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Sample records for water moderated organic cooled reactors

  1. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  2. Concept of safe tank-type water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle fuel compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'tsev, A.O.; Kukharkin, N.E.; Mosevitskij, I.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Popov, S.V.; Udyanskij, Yu.N.; Tsibul'skij, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    Concept of safe tank-type water-cooled and moderated reactor on the basis of HTGR fuel microparticles which enable to avoid environment contamination with radioactive products under severe accidents, is proposed. Results of neutron-physical and thermal-physical studies of water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle compacts are presented. Characteristics of two reactors with thermal power of 500 and 1500 MW are indicated within the concept frames. The reactor behaviour under severe accident connected with complete loss of water coolant is considered. It is shown that under such an accident the fission products release from fuel microparticles does not occur

  3. Calculations on heavy-water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo V, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    One of the codes that the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) has for the nuclear reactors design calculations is the LEOPARD code. This work studies the reliability of this code in reactors design calculations which component materials are the same of the heavy water moderated and cooled, natural uranium fuelled power reactors. (author)

  4. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  5. Water cooled reactor technology: Safety research abstracts no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD publish these Nuclear Safety Research Abstracts within the framework of their efforts to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants and to promote the exchange of research information. The abstracts are of nuclear safety related research projects for: pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactors (PWRs); boiling light water cooled and moderated reactors (BWRs); light water cooled and graphite moderated reactors (LWGRs); pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactors (PHWRs); gas cooled graphite moderated reactors (GCRs). Abstracts of nuclear safety research projects for fast breeder reactors are published independently by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and are not included in this joint publication. The intention of the collaborating international organizations is to publish such a document biannually. Work has been undertaken to develop a common computerized system with on-line access to the stored information

  6. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  7. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  8. Startup of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Tin Tin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The startup schemes of high-temperature reactors cooled and moderated by supercritical pressure light water (SCLWR-H) with square lattice and descending flow type water rods are studied by thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study, two kinds of startup systems are investigated. In the constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A flash tank and pressure reducing valves are necessary. The flash tank is designed so that the moisture content in the steam is less than 0.1%. In sliding pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a subcritical pressure. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for two-phase flow at startup. The separator is designed by referring to the water separator used in supercritical fossil-fired power plants. The maximum cladding surface temperature during the power-raising phase of startup is restricted not to exceed the rated value of 620degC. The minimum feedwater flow rate is 25% for constant pressure startup and 35% for sliding pressure startup system. It is found that both constant pressure startup system and sliding pressure startup system are feasible in SCLWR-H from the thermal hydraulic point of view. The core outlet temperature as high as 500degC can be achieved in the present design of SCLWR-H. Since the feedwater flow rate of SCLWR-H (1190 kg/s) is lower than that of the previous SCR designs the weight of the component required for startup is reduced. The sliding pressure startup system is better than constant pressure startup system in order to reduce the required component weight (and hence material expenditure) and to simplify the startup plant system. (author)

  9. A Conceptual Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor Design Using a Cruciform Solid Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Bae, Kang Mok; Yoo, Jae Woon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man; Bae, Yoon Yong

    2006-01-15

    A Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor(SCWR) concept proposed by Gen-IV has an advantage of a high thermal efficiency. However, there are some difficulties in neutronic core design for a SCWR due to lower moderator density resulting from the high operating temperature over the pseudo-critical temperature. In this report, the design concepts for the fuel assembly and the core for a SCWR were described as a feasibility study on the SCWR core design. HELIOS lattice code which will be used for group constants generation was verified for the application to the low coolant density condition of a SCWR. The TAF module for a thermal hydraulic feedback in MASTER was modified to consider high pressure and temperature of the supercritical coolant with single-phase fluid. A cruciform ZrH{sub 2} solid moderator was proposed for the SCWR fuel assembly design to compensate the lower coolant density. The axial zoning concept with three different enrichments for a fuel rod was used for the axial power shape control. Gadolinia burnable poison rods were used to reduce excess reactivity. Control rod system was grouped into 6 banks to control the excess reactivity of the core during normal operation. An orifice concept for each assembly was applied to control a coolant flow rate individually. As a result of the neutronic analysis for the equilibrium SCWR core, the maximum linear heat generation rete limit was satisfied and the maximum coolant temperature of the core outlet was {approx}590 .deg. C which is lower than 620 .deg. C of the maximum clad temperature limit.

  10. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors; Filiere eau lourde - gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailly du Bois, B; Bernard, J L; Naudet, R; Roche, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [French] La France, qui a base son effort principal pour la production d'energie nucleaire sur la filiere des reacteurs a uranium naturel et graphite refroidis par gaz, et qui a un programme a plus

  11. Safety analysis of high temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes 'Safety' of a high temperature supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor (SCRLWR-H) with descending flow water rods. The safety system of the SCLWR-H is similar to that of a BWR. It consists of reactor scram, high pressure auxiliary feedwater system (AFS), low pressure core injection system (LPCI), safety relief valves (SRV), automatic depressurization system (ADS), and main steam isolation valves (MSIV). Ten types of transients and five types of accidents are analyzed using a plant transient analysis code SPRAT-DOWN. The sequences are determined referring to LWRs. At the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' transient, the coolant density and the core power are increased by the over-pressurization, and at the same time the core flow rate is decreased by the closure of the turbine control valves. The peak cladding temperature increases to 727degC. The high temperature at this type of transient is one of the characteristics of the SCLWR-H. Conversely at 'feedwater-loss' events, the core power decrease to some extend by density feedback before the reactor scram. The peak cladding temperatures at the 'Partial loss of feedwater' transient and the 'Total loss of feedwater' accident are only 702degC and 833degC, respectively. The cladding temperature does not increase so much at the transients 'Loss of feedwater heating' and 'CR withdrawal' because of the operation of the plant control system. All the transients and accidents satisfy the satisfy criteria with good margins. The highest cladding temperatures of the transients and the accidents are 727degC and 833degC at the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' and 'Total loss of feedwater', respectively. The duration of the high cladding temperature is very short at the transients. According to the parametric survey, the peak cladding temperature are sensitive to the parameters such as the pump coast-down time, delay of pump trip, AFS capacity, AFS delay, CR worth, and SRV setpoint

  12. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  13. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Mikhaj, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  14. Study on neutronics performance of flower shape advanced supercritical water cooled fast reactor with different solid moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Li Zhifeng; Xie Jinsen; Peng Honghua

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical water cooled fast reactors worked at such harsh condition with high temperature and high pressure, huge hydrogen balance pressure and thermal shock can result in a great loss of hydrogen. The released hydrogen would be out of control under accident situations. K_e_f_f, conversion ratio, moderator temperature effect, Doppler effect and void effect of different material such as ZrH_1_._7, Bp, BeO, C and SiC are discussed. BeO and SiC hold better integrated performance among these materials. Besides, moderators have less effect on the Doppler effect of fuel. (authors)

  15. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  16. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-01-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  17. Problems of two-phase flows in water cooled and moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Heat exchange in two-phase flows of coolant in loss of coolant accidents in PWR and BWR reactors has been investigated. Three main stages of accident history are considered: blowdown, reflooding using emergency core cooling system and rewetting. Factors, determining the rate of coolant leakage and the rate of temperature increase in fuel cladding during blowdown, processes of vapour during reflooding and liquid priming by vapour during rewetting, are discussed

  18. Decommissioning the Romanian Water-Cooled Water-Moderated Research Reactor: New Environmental Perspective on the Management of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, G.; Giumanca, R.

    2006-01-01

    Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies were performed for decommissioning of the water-cooled water-moderated research reactor (WWER) located in Bucharest - Magurele, Romania. Using these studies as a starting point, the preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as for the rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and for the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and ecological reconstruction of the grounds need to be provided for, in accordance with national and international regulations. In accordance with IAEA recommendations at the time, the pre-feasibility study proposed three stages of decommissioning. However, since then new ideas have surfaced with regard to decommissioning. Thus, taking into account the current IAEA ideology, the feasibility study proposes that decommissioning of the WWER be done in one stage to an unrestricted clearance level of the reactor building in an Immediate Dismantling option. Different options and the corresponding derived preferred option for waste management are discussed taking into account safety measures, but also considering technical, logistical and economic factors. For this purpose, possible types of waste created during each decommissioning stage are reviewed. An approximate inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the recommended international basic safety standards identified in the previous phase of the project. The existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (RWTP) from the Horia Hulubei Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering (IFIN-HH), which has been in service with no significant upgrade since 1974, will need refurbishing due to deterioration, as well as upgrading in order to ensure the

  19. Aiming at super long term application of nuclear energy. Scope and subjects on the water cooled breeder reactor, the 'reduced moderation water reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2001-01-01

    In order to make possible on nuclear energy application for super long term, development of sodium cooling type fast breeder reactor (FBR) has been carried out before today. However, as it was found that its commercialization was technically and economically difficult beyond expectation, a number of nations withdrew from its development. And, as Japan has continued its development, scope of its actual application is not found yet. Now, a research and development on a water cooling type breeder reactor, the reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR)' using LWR technology has now been progressed under a center of JAERI. This RMWR is a reactor intending a jumping upgrade of conversion ratio by densely arranging fuel bars to shift neutron spectrum to faster region. The RMWR has a potential realizable on full-dress plutonium application at earlier timing through its high conversion ratio, high combustion degree, plutonium multi-recycling, and so on. And, it has also feasibility to solve uranium resource problem by realization of conversion ratio with more than 1.0, to contribute to super long term application of nuclear energy. Here was investigated on an effect of reactor core on RMWR, especially of its conversion ratio and plutonium loading on introduction effect as well as on how RMWR could be contributed to reduction of uranium resource consumption, by drawing some scenario on development of power generation reactor and fuel cycle in Japan under scope of super long term with more than 100 years in future. And, trial calculation on power generation cost of the RMWR was carried out to investigate some subjects at a viewpoint of upgrading on economy. (G.K.)

  20. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  2. High conversion heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1989-01-01

    In the present invention, fuel rods using uranium-plutonium oxide mixture fuels are arranged in a square lattice at the same pitch as that in light water cooled reactor and heavy water moderators are used. Accordingly, the volume ratio (Vm/Vf) between the moderator and the fuel can be, for example, of about 2. When heavy water is used for the moderator (coolant), since the moderating effect of heavy water is lower than that of light water, a high conversion ratio of not less than 0.8 can be obtained even if the fuel rod arrangement is equal to that of PWR (Vm/Vf about 2). Accordingly, it is possible to avoid problems caused by dense arrangement of fuel rods as in high conversion rate light water cooled reactors. That is, there are no more troubles in view of thermal hydrodynamic characteristics, re-flooding upon loss of coolant accident, etc., as well as the fuel production cost is not increased. (K.M.)

  3. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER [Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor] reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Development of an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, N.S.

    1981-06-01

    The results of work carried out under IAEA Contract No. 2336/RB are described (subject: an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER) reactors). The basic principles of an accounting system for this type of nuclear power plant are outlined. The general structure and individual units of the information computer program used to achieve automated accounting are described and instructions are given on the use of the program. A detailed example of its application (on a simulated nuclear power plant) is examined

  5. Outline of design, manufacturing and installation experience of pressure vessel structure for the prototype heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor 'FUGEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibato, Eizo; Oguchi, Isao; Kishi, Toshikazu; Kitagawa, Yuji

    1977-01-01

    After component installation completed in June 1977 and various functional tests to be conducted later, the prototype heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled reactor ''FUGEN'' is scheduled to reach first criticality in March 1978. Since the pressure vessel of ''FUGEN'' is completely different from that of a light water reactor in structure and materials, through research and development work was carried out prior to fabrication and construction. Based on these studies, installation of the actual pressure vessel was completed. Functional tests are now under way. This article describes examples in which our research and development results are reflected on design, manufacture, and installation of the pressure vessel. Also it introduces noteworthy achievements relevant to production techniques in manufacture and installation. (auth.)

  6. Emergency cooling of presurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1981-01-01

    The method described of emergency core cooling in the pressurized water reactor is characterized by the fact that water is transported to the disturbed primary circuit or direct to the reactor by the action of the energy and mass of the steam and/or liquid phase of the secondary circuit coolant, which during emergency core cooling becomes an emergency cooling medium. (B.S.)

  7. STUDY OF WATER HAMMERS IN THE FILLING OF THE SYSTEM OF PRESSURE COMPENSATION IN THE WATER-COOLED AND WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Korolyev

    2017-01-01

    list of initial events of severe accidents at NPPs with a water-cooled and water-moderated power reactor can be expanded.

  8. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  9. Thermal calculations for water cooled research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrega, S.

    1979-01-01

    The formulae and the more important numerical data necessary for thermic calculations on the core of a research reactor, cooled with low pressure water, are presented. Most of the problems met by the designer and the operator are dealt with (calculations margins, cooling after shut-down). Particular cases are considered (gas release, rough walls, asymmetric cooling slabs etc.), which are not generally envisaged in works on general thermics

  10. Development of the heavy-water organic-cooled reactor. Status report from the United States of America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trilling, C A [Atomics International, Division of North American Aviation, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1967-01-01

    loops required. A second benefit of the pressure tube concept is that it is easily adaptable to the use of on-power refuelling, with the consequent potential of achieving high plant availability and optimizing the fuel management programme for maximum neutron economy. Many studies have been carried out in an attempt to optimize the selection of the coolant for a heavy-water-moderated reactor. The choice of an organic coolant for the US heavy-water reactor development programme offers several advantages. By limiting the heavy water to its function as moderator, its containment is required only at low temperatures and pressures, thus minimizing both inventory and losses of this expensive material. The compatibility of the organic coolant with uranium, plutonium, and thorium metals, and with their oxides and carbides provides for maximum flexibility in the selection of fuel material for this reactor. The HWOCR can therefore take full advantage of whichever fuel cycle in the long run demonstrates the most favourable economics. The low vapour pressure of the organic coolant and its compatibility with standard materials of construction provide for the design of low pressure primary coolant loops using carbon and low alloy steels while obtaining the thermodynamic efficiency of a superheat steam cycle. The low level of induced radioactivity normally present in the organic coolant permits normal contact maintenance of the primary coolant loops while the plant is in operation.

  11. Reactor core of light water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor core of a light water cooled reactor, the center of the fuel rods or moderating rods situated at the outermost circumference among control rods or moderating rods are connected to divide a lattice region into an inner fuel region and an outer moderator region. In this case, the area ratio of the moderating region to the fuel region is determined to greater than 0.81 for every cross section of the fuel region. The moderating region at the outer side is increased relative to the fuel rod region at the inner side while keeping the lattice pitch of the fuel assembly constant, thereby suppressing the increase of an absolute value of a void reactivity coefficient which tends to be caused when using MOX fuels as a fuel material, by utilizing neutron moderation due to a large quantity of coolants at the outer side of the fuel region. The void reactivity coefficient can be made substantially equal with that of uranium fuel assembly without greatly reducing a plutonium loading amount or without greatly increasing linear power density. (N.H.)

  12. Method of operating heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stabilized reactor control, and improve the working rate and the safety of the reactor by removing liquid poison in heavy water while maintaining the power level constant to thereby render the void coefficient of the coolants negative in the low power operation. Method: The operation device for a heavy water moderated reactor comprises a power detector for the reactor, a void coefficient calculator for coolants, control rods inserted into the reactor, a poison regulator for dissolving poisons into or removing them out of heavy water and a device for removing the poisons by the poison regulator device while maintaining the predetermined power level or inserting the control rods by the signals from the power detector and the void coefficient calculator in the high temperature stand-by conditions of the reactor. Then, the heavy water moderated reactor is operated so that liquid poisons in the heavy water are eliminated in the high temperature stand-by condition prior to the start for the power up while maintaining the power level constant and the plurality of control rods are inserted into the reactor core and the void coefficient of the coolants is rendered negative in the low power operation. (Seki, T.)

  13. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  14. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  15. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Study of the consequences of the rupture of a pressure tube in the tank of a gas-cooled, heavy-water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareux, F.; Roche, R.; Vrillon, B.

    1964-01-01

    Bursting of a pressure tube in the tank of a heavy water moderated-gas cooled reactor is an accident which has been studied experimentally about EL-4. A first test (scale 1) having shown that the burst of a tube does not cause the rupture of adjacent tubes, tests on the tank resistance have been undertaken with a very reduced scale model (1 to 10). It has been found that the tank can endure many bursts of tube without any important deformation. Transient pressure in the tank is an oscillatory weakened wave, the maximum of which (pressure peak) has been the object of a particular experimental study. It appears that the most important parameters which affect the pressure peak are; the pressure of the gas included in the bursting pressure tube, the volume of this gas, the mass of air included in the tank and the nature of the gas. A general method to calculate the pressure peak value in reactor tanks has been elaborated by direct application of experimental data. (authors) [fr

  17. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  18. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy; Amit Jain Han Sang Kim; Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

    2006-01-01

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  19. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  20. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  1. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Technological readiness of evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has evolved to a mature industry that supplies over 16% of the world's electricity, and it represents an important option for meeting the global energy demands of the coming century in an environmentally acceptable manner. New, evolutionary water cooled reactor designs that build on successful performance of predecessors have been developed; these designs have generally been guided by wishes to reduce cost, to improve availability and reliability, and to meet increasingly stringent safety objectives. These three aspects are important factors in what has been called technological readiness for an expanded deployment of nuclear power; a major increase in utilization of nuclear power will only occur if it is economically competitive, and meets safety expectations. To this end, the industry will also have to maintain or improve the public perception of nuclear power as a benign, economical and reliable energy source. (author)

  6. Advanced water-cooled reactor technologies. Rationale, state of progress and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty per cent of the world's power reactors are water cooled and moderated. Many improvements in their design and operation have been implemented since the first such reactor started commercial operation in 1957. This report addresses the safety, environmental and economic rationales for further improvements, as well as their relevance to currently operating water reactors

  7. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Olmstead, R.A.; Yu, A.M.; Dastur, A.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  8. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  9. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Vaporization Rate Analysis of Primary Cooling Water from Reactor PUSPATI TRIGA (RTP) Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonny Anak Lanyau; Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Yahya Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Primary cooling system consists of pumps, heat exchangers, probes, a nitrogen-16 diffuser and associated valves is connected to the reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) tank by aluminium pipes. Both the primary cooling system and the reactor tank is filled with demineralized light water (H 2 O), which serves as a coolant, moderator as well as shielding. During reactor operation, vaporization in the reactor tank will reduce the primary water and contribute to the formation of vapor in the reactor hall. The vaporization may influence the function of the water subsequently may affect the safety of the reactor operation. It is essential to know the vaporization rate of the primary water to ensure its functionality. This paper will present the vaporization rate of the primary cooling water from the reactor tank and the influence of temperature of the water in the reactor tank to the vaporization rate. (author)

  12. Thermophysical properties of materials for water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) to establish a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials was organized within the framework of the IAEA`s International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The work within the CRP started in 1990. The objective of the CRP was to collect and systemaize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. These properties as well as the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys, the thermophysical characteristics of high temperature concrete-core melt interaction and the mechanical properties of construction materials are presented in this report. It is hoped that this report will serve as a useful source of thermophysical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data are maintained on the THERSYST system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany and are internationally available. Refs, figs, tabs.

  13. Thermophysical properties of materials for water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) to establish a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials was organized within the framework of the IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The work within the CRP started in 1990. The objective of the CRP was to collect and systemaize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. These properties as well as the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys, the thermophysical characteristics of high temperature concrete-core melt interaction and the mechanical properties of construction materials are presented in this report. It is hoped that this report will serve as a useful source of thermophysical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data are maintained on the THERSYST system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany and are internationally available. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Sea water take-up facility for cooling reactor auxiliary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Noriko; Mizutani, Akira; Hirako, Shizuka; Uchiyama, Yuichi; Oda, Atsushi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides an improvement of a cooling sea water take-up facility for cooling auxiliary equipments of nuclear power plant. Namely, an existent sea water take-up facility for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments has at least two circulation water systems and three independent sea water systems for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments. In this case, a communication water channel is disposed, which connects the three independent sea water systems for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments mutually by an opening/closing operation of a flow channel partitioning device. With such a constitution, even when any combination of two systems among the three circulation water systems is in inspection at the same time, one system for cooling the reactor auxiliary equipments can be kept operated, and one system is kept in a stand-by state by the communication water channel upon periodical inspection of water take-up facility for cooling the auxiliary equipments. As a result, the sea water take-up facility for cooling auxiliary equipments of the present invention have operation efficiency higher than that of a conventional case while keeping the function and safety at the same level as in the conventional case. (I.S.)

  15. Evaluation of filters in RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) in OPAL research reactor at ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization) using Gamma Spectrometry System and Liquid Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jim In; Foy, Robin; Jung, Seong Moon; Park, Hyeon Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization(ANSTO) has a research reactor, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor) which is a state-of-art 20 MW reactor for various purposes. In OPAL reactor, there are many kinds of radionuclides produced from various reactions in pool water and those should be identified and quantified for the safe use of OPAL. To do that, it is essential to check the efficiency of filters which are able to remove the radioactive substance from the reactor pool water. There are two main water circuits in OPAL which are RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) water circuits. The reactor service pool is connected to the reactor pool via a transfer canal and provides a working area and storage space for the spent and other materials. Also, HWL is the upper part of the reactor pool water and it minimize radiation dose rates at the pool surface. We collected water samples from these circuits and measured the radioactivity by using Gamma Spectrometry System (GSS) and Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) to evaluate the filters. We could evaluate the efficiency of filters in RSPCS and HWL in OPAL research reactor. Through the measurements of radioactivity using GSS and LSC, we could conclude that there is likely to be no alpha emitter in water samples, and for beta and gamma activity, there are very big differences between inlet and outlet results, so every filter is working efficiently to remove the radioactive substance.

  16. Uranium utilization of light water cooled reactors and fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, Timm

    1991-08-01

    The better uranium utilization of fast breeder reactors as compared with water cooled reactors is one argument in favour of the breeder introduction. This report tries to quantify this difference. It gives a generally valid formalism for the uranium utilization as a function of the fuel burnup, the conversion rate, fuel cycle losses and the fuel enrichment. On the basis of realistic assumptions, the ratio between the utilizations of breeder reactors to that of light water cooled reactors (LWR) amounts to 180 for the open LWR cycle and 100 in case of plutonium recycling in LWRs

  17. Assessment of competing reaction effect on results of activation analysis with use of water-cooled and water-moderated reactor neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avsaragov, Kh.B.; Toichkin, A.N.; Lobov, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of competing threshold reactions on results of neutron activation analysis (NAA) using WWER-440 reactor is investigated. (n,p) and (n,α) fast neutron and 232 Th (n,f), 235 U(n,f), 238 U(n,f) fast and thermal neutron processes are considered as competing ones. Contribution of competing reactions when determining Na, Mn, Sc, Fe, Cu, Y for the core channels of in-core monitoring and ionization chamber ring water protection is experimentally evaluated using a spectrometer with Ge(Li) detector in a set with AI-4096 analyser. Under rigid neutron fields interfering activity increases at the expense of thorium and uranium atom fission. It is stressed that when determining Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Nd contribution of fission reaction products can appear to be sufficient

  18. Summary report of the 7th reduced-moderation water reactor workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Uchikawa, Sadao

    2005-08-01

    As a research on the future innovative water reactor, the development of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The workshop on RMWRs is aiming at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors, and has been held every year since 1998. The 7th workshop was held on March 5, 2004 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The program of the workshop was composed of 5 lectures and an overall discussion time. The workshop started with the lecture by JAERI on the status and future program of PMWR research and development, followed by the two presentations by JAERI and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, respectively, on the investigation and evaluation of water cooled reactor in Feasibility Study Program on Commercialized Fast Reactor Systems. The lectures were also made on the Japan's nuclear fuel cycle and scenarios for RMWRs deployment by JAERI, and on the next generation reactor development activity by Hitachi, Ltd. The main subjects of the overall discussion time were Na cooled fast reactor, deployment effects of RMWRs and the future plan of the RMWR research and development. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as of the discussion time. In addition in the Appendices, there are included presentation handouts of each lecture, program of the workshop and the participants list. (author)

  19. Analytical evaluation on dynamical response characteristics of reduced-moderation water reactor with tight-lattice core under natural circulation core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    The time-domain analyses with TRAC-BF1 code were performed for clarifying the dynamical response characteristics of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with tight-lattice core configuration. The response characteristics were evaluated based on the step response basically utilized for dynamical system evaluation. As for the most fundamental dynamical characteristics, the channel flow response characteristics of single fuel assembly were evaluated. In the evaluation, the appropriate single-phase pressure drop setting at the inlet orifice was determined in terms of response stability from the design viewpoint. In addition, from the investigation on the relation of the response and transit time of coolant, it is confirmed that the channel flow response of RMWR is dominated by the transit time of vapor phase resulting from a high void fraction operation condition. As for a natural circulation flow response, it is clarified that the response is strongly influenced by the effect of two-phase pressure loss owing to a high void fraction condition. The reactor power response with reactivity feedback shows quite stable response characteristics on account of the small absolute value of void reactivity coefficient.

  20. LOFA analyses for the water and helium cooled SEAFP reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponton, L.; Sjoeberg, A.; Nordlinder, S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed in the frame of the European long-term fusion safety programme 1999 (SEAFP99). Loss of flow accidents (LOFA) have been studied for two cases, first for a helium cooled reactor with advanced dual-coolant (DUAL) blanket at 100% nominal power. The second case applies to a water-cooled reactor at 20% nominal power. Both transients were simulated with the code MELCOR 1.8.4. The results for the helium cooled reactor show that with a natural circulation flow of helium after the pump stops, the first wall temperature will stay below the temperature for excepted failure of the construction material. For the water cooled reactor, the results show that the pressurizer set point for its liquid volumetric inventory is reached before the plasma facing components attain a critical temperature. The pressurizer set point will induce a plasma shutdown

  1. European supercritical water cooled reactor (HPLWR Phase 2 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg; Marsault, Philippe; Bittermann, Dietmar; Maraczy, Czaba; Laurien, Eckart; Lycklama, Jan Aiso; Anglart, Henryk; Andreani, Michele; Ruzickova, Mariana; Heikinheimo, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 deg C maximum core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 13 partners from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small, housed fuel assemblies with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The innovative core design with upward and downward flow through its assemblies has been studied with neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and stress analyses and has been reviewed carefully in a mid-term assessment. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. An overview of results achieved up to now, given in this paper, is illustrating the latest scientific and technological advances. (author)

  2. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  3. Conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactor with heavy water coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibi, Kohki; Shimada, Shoichiro; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi; Wada, Shigeyuki

    2001-12-01

    The conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactors, i.e. advanced water-cooled reactors using plutonium mixed-oxide fuel with high conversion ratios more than 1.0 and negative void reactivity coefficients, has been carried out. The core is designed on the concept of a pressurized water reactor with a heavy water coolant and a triangular tight lattice fuel pin arrangement. The seed fuel assembly has an internal blanket region inside the seed fuel region as well as upper and lower blanket regions (i.e. an axial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket fuel assemblies are introduced in a checkerboard pattern among the seed fuel assemblies (i.e. a radial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket region is shorter than the seed fuel region. This study shows that the heavy water moderated core can achieve negative void reactivity coefficients and conversion ratios of 1.06-1.11.

  4. Device for preventing cooling water from flowing out of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinen, Masanori; Kotani, Koichi; Murase, Michio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide emergency cooling system, which can prevent cooling water bearing radioactivity from flowing to the outside of the reactor at the time of breakage of feedwater pipe, thus eliminating the possibility of exposure of the fuel rod to provide high reliability and also reducing the possibility of causing radioactive pollution. Structure: The device for preventing cooling water from flowing out from the reactor features a jet nozzle inserted in a feedwater pipe adjacent to the inlet or outlet thereof immediately before the reactor container. The nozzle outlet is provided in the vicinity of the reactor wall and in a direction opposite to the direction of out-flow, and water supplied from a high pressure pump is jetted from it. (Nakamura, S.)

  5. Progress in design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takeda, Renzo [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tsugio [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Hibi, Koki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Wada, Shigeyuki [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) in 1998, under technical cooperation with three Japanese reactor vendors. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight-lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR type core with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR type core using void tube assembly, a high conversion BWR type core without blankets, a high conversion PWR type core using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR type core for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. Detailed feasibility studies for the RMWR have been continued on core design study. The present report summarizes the recent progress in the design study for the RMWR. (author)

  6. Auxiliary equipment for cooling water in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Yasuhiro; Sakairi, Toshiaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effectively make use of pressure energy of reactor water, which has heretofore been discarded, to enable supply of emergency power supply of high reliability and to prevent spreading of environmental contamination. Structure: Sea water pumped by a sea water supply pump is fed to a heat exchanger. Reactor water carried through piping on the side to be cooled is removed in heat by the heat exchanger to be cooled and returned, and then again returned to the reactor. On the other hand, sea water heated by the heat exchanger is fed to a water wheel to drive the water wheel, after which it is discharged into a discharging path. A generator may be directly connected to the water wheel to use the electricity generated by the generator as the emergency power source. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Analysis of passive moderator cooling system of Candu-6A reactor at emergency condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Subki, M. Hadid; Vecchiarelli, Jack

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of passive moderator cooling system subject to in-core LOCA with no emergency core cooling injection has been done. In this study, the new model of passive moderator system has been tested for emergency conditions and CATHENA code Mod-3.5b/Rev1 is used to calculate some parameters of this passive moderator cooling system. This result of simulation show that the proposed moderator cooling system have given satisfactory result, especially for the case with 0.7 m riser diameter and the number of heat exchanger tubes 8100. For PEWS tank containing 3000 m3 of light water initially at 30 0C and a 3641 m2 moderator heat exchanger, the average long-term heat removed rate balances the moderator heat load and the flow through the passive moderator loop remains stable for over 72 hours with no saturated boiling in the calandria and flow instabilities do not develop during long-term period

  8. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su’ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  9. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulianti, Yanti [Department of Physics, University of Lampung Jl. Sumantri Brojonegoro No.1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia Email: y-yanti@unila.ac.id (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia Email: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id (Indonesia); Takaki, Naoyuki [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy (Graduate School) 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi,Setagayaku, Tokyo158-8557, Japan Email: ntakaki@tcu.ac.jp (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  10. CFD simulations of moderator flow inside Calandria of the Passive Moderator Cooling System of an advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Eshita [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 India (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CFD simulations in the Calandria of an advanced reactor under natural circulation. • Under natural convection, majority of the flow recirculates within the Calandria. • Maximum temperature is located at the top and center of the fuel channel matrix. • During SBO, temperature inside Calandria is stratified. - Abstract: Passive systems are being examined for the future Advanced Nuclear Reactor designs. One of such concepts is the Passive Moderator Cooling System (PMCS), which is designed to remove heat from the moderator in the Calandria vessel passively in case of an extended Station Black Out condition. The heated heavy-water moderator (due to heat transferred from the Main Heat Transport System (MHTS) and thermalization of neutrons and gamma from radioactive decay of fuel) rises upward due to buoyancy, gets cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator temperature and pressure beyond safe limits. In an earlier study, a full-scale 1D transient simulation was performed for the reactor including the MHTS and the PMCS, in the event of a station blackout scenario (Kumar et al., 2013). The results indicate that the systems remain within the safe limits for 7 days. However, the flow inside a geometry like Calandria is quite complex due to its large size and inner complexities of dense fuel channel matrix, which was simplified as a 1D pipe flow in the aforesaid analysis. In the current work, CFD simulations are performed to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution of moderator inside the Calandria vessel using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. First, a set of steady state simulation was carried out for a band of inlet mass flow rates, which gives the minimum mass flow rate required for removing the maximum heat load, by virtue of prediction of hot spots inside the Calandria

  11. Procedure for operating a heavy water cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.; Kumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactors cooled by heavy water usually have equipment for fuel element exchange during operation, with the primary circuit remaining contained. This fuel element exchange equipment is expensive and complicated in many respects. According to the invention, the heavy water is therefore replaced by light water after a certain time of operation in such way that light water is led in and heavy water is led off. After the replacement, at least a quarter of the fuel elements of the reactor core is exchanged with the reactor pressure vessel being open. Then the light water serving as a shielding is replaced by heavy water, with the reactor pressure vessel being closed. The invention is of interest particularly for high-conversion reactors. (orig.) [de

  12. Whole body cooling by immersion in water at moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, F; Booth, J

    1998-06-01

    This study investigated the potential use of whole body cooling by water immersion for lowering body temperatures prior to endurance exercise. Rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Tsk), oxygen consumption (VO2), and ventilation (VE) were measured in 7 male and 3 female subjects who were immersed in a water bath for up to 60 min. Initial water temperature was 28.8+/-1.5 degrees C and decreased to 23.8+/-1.1 degrees C by the end of immersion. Pre-immersion Tre of 37.34+/-0.36 degrees C was not altered by 60 min water immersion but decreased to 36.64+/-0.34 degrees C at 3 min post immersion (p immersion. Reductions in Tre and Tsk resulted in reduced body heat content (Hc) of approximately 545 kJ (p immersion. VO2 and VE increased from pre-immersion values of 0.34+/-0.08 L x min(-1) and 6.2+/-1.4 L x min(-1) to 0.54+/-0.09 L x min(-) and 11.5+/-5.4 L x min(-1) at the end of immersion, respectively. Heart rate remained unchanged throughout immersion. These results indicate that whole body immersion in moderately cold water temperatures is an effective cooling maneuver for lowering body temperatures and body Hc in the absence of severe physiological responses generally associated with sudden cold stress.

  13. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Status of research and development on reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-01-01

    To improve uranium utilization, a design study of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been carried out intensively since 1998 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this reactor, the nuclear fission reaction is designed to be realized mainly by high energy neutrons. To achieve this, the volume of water used to cool the fuel rods is decreased by reducing the gap width between the fuel rods. Conversion ratio greater than 1.0 is expected whether the core i-s cooled by boiling water or pressurized water and whether the core size is small or large. Status of the RMWR design is reviewed and planning of R and D for future deployment of this reactor after 20-20 is presented. To improve economics of this reactor, development of fuel cans for high burnup and low-cost reprocessing technology of mixed oxide spect fuels are highly needed. R and D has been conducted under the cooperation with utilities, industry, research organization and academia. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Status of research and development on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    To improve uranium utilization, a design study of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been carried out intensively since 1998 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this reactor, the nuclear fission reaction is designed to be realized mainly by high energy neutrons. To achieve this, the volume of water used to cool the fuel rods is decreased by reducing the gap width between the fuel rods. Conversion ratio greater than 1.0 is expected whether the core i-s cooled by boiling water or pressurized water and whether the core size is small or large. Status of the RMWR design is reviewed and planning of R and D for future deployment of this reactor after 20-20 is presented. To improve economics of this reactor, development of fuel cans for high burnup and low-cost reprocessing technology of mixed oxide spect fuels are highly needed. R and D has been conducted under the cooperation with utilities, industry, research organization and academia. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from 238 U to 239 Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  17. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  18. A passive emergency heat sink for water-cooled reactors with particular application to CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Water in an overhead pool can serve as a general-purpose passive emergency heat sink for water-cooled reactors. It can be used for containment cooling, for emergency depressurization of the heat transport-system, or to receive any other emergency heat, such as that from the CANDU moderator. The passive emergency water system provides in-containment depressurization of steam generators and no other provision is needed for supply of low-pressure emergency water to the steam generators. For containment cooling, the pool supplies water to the tube side of elevated tube banks inside containment. The elevation with respect to the reactor heat source maximizes heat transport, by natural convection, of hot containment gases. This effective heat transport combines with the large heat-transfer coefficients of tube banks, to reduce containment overpressure during accidents. Cooled air from the tube banks is directed past the break in the heat-transport system, to facilitate removal of hydrogen using passive catalytic recombiners. (author)

  19. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  20. Passive safety features in current and future water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    Better understanding of the passive safety systems and components in current and future water-cooled reactors may enhance the safety of present reactors, to the extend passive features are backfitted. This better understanding should also improve the safety of future reactors, which can incorporate more of these features. Passive safety systems and components may help to prevent accidents, core damage, or release radionuclides to the environment. The Technical Committee Meeting which was hosted by the USSR State Committee for Utilization of Nuclear Energy was attended by about 80 experts from 16 IAEA Member States and the NEA-OECD. A total of 21 papers were presented during the meeting. The objective of the meeting was to review and discuss passive safety systems and features of current and future water cooled reactor designs and to exchange information in this area of activity. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 21 papers published in this proceedings. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Method of operating a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysell, G.

    1975-01-01

    When operating a water-cooled nuclear reactor, in which the fuel rods consist of zirconium alloy tubes containing an oxidic nuclear fuel, stress corrosion in the tubes can be reduced or avoided if the power of the reactor is temporarily increased so much that the thermal expansion of the nuclear fuel produces a flow of the material in the tube. After that temporary power increase the power output is reduced to the normal power

  2. Method of injecting cooling water in emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Adachi, Michihiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a cooling water injection method in an ECCS, which can perform effective cooling of the reactor core. Method: In a method of injecting cooling water in an ECCS as a countermeasure against a rupture accident of a pwr type reactor, cooling water in the first pressure storage injection system is injected into the upper plenum of the reactor pressure vessel at a set pressure of from 50 to 90 atg. and a set temperature of from 80 to 200 0 C, cooling water in the second pressure storage injection system is injected into the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel at a pressure of from 25 to 60 atg. which is lower than the set pressure and a temperature less than 60 0 C, and further in combination with these procedures, cooling water of less than 60 0 C is injected into a high-temperature side piping, in the high-pressure injection system of upstroke of 100 atg. by means of a pump and the low-pressure injection system of upstroke of 20 atg. also by means of a pump, thereby cooling the reactor core. (Aizawa, K.)

  3. Balancing passive and active systems for evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil, N.S.; Allen, P.J.; Kirmse, R.E.; Kurihara, M.; Oh, S.J.; Sinha, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced concepts of the water-cooled reactors are intended to improve safety, economics and public perception of nuclear power. The potential inclusion of new passive means in addition or instead of traditional active systems is being considered by nuclear plant designers to reach these goals. With respect to plant safety, application of the passive means is mainly intended to simplify the safety systems and to improve their reliability, to mitigate the effect of human errors and equipment malfunction. However, some clear drawbacks and the limited experience and testing of passive systems may raise additional questions that have to be addressed in the design process for each advanced reactor. Therefore the plant designer should find a reasonable balance of active and passive means to effectively use their advantages and compensate their drawbacks. Some considerations that have to be taken into account when balancing active/passive means in advanced water-cooled reactors are discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. UK methods for studying fuel management in water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayers, F.J.

    1970-10-01

    Current UK methods for studying fuel management and for predicting the reactor physics performance for both light and heavy water moderated power reactors are reviewed. Brief descriptions are given of the less costly computer codes used for initial assessment studies, and also the more elaborate programs associated with detailed evaluation are discussed. Some of the considerations influencing the accuracy of predictions are included with examples of various types of experimental confirmation. (author)

  5. Gamma spectroscopy in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persault, M.

    1977-10-01

    Gamma spectroscopy analysis of spent fuels in power reactors; study of two typical cases: determination of the power distribution by the mean of the activity of a low periodic element (Lanthanum 140) and determination of the burnup absolute rate by examining the ratio of Cesium 134 and Cesium 137 activities. Measures were realized on fuel solutions and on fuel assemblies. Development of a power distribution map of the assemblies and comparison with the results of a three dimensional calculation of core evolution [fr

  6. The role of the IAEA in advanced technologies for water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    The role of the IAEA in advanced technologies for water-cooled reactors is described, including the following issues: international collaboration ways through international working group activities; IAEA coordinated research programmes; cooperative research in advanced water-cooled reactor technology

  7. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  8. Analysis on small long life reactor using thorium fuel for water cooled and metal cooled reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik

    2009-01-01

    Long-life reactor operation can be adopted for some special purposes which have been proposed by IAEA as the small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Thermal reactor and fast reactor types can be used for SMR and in addition to that program the utilization of thorium fuel as one of the candidate as a 'partner' fuel with uranium fuel which can be considered for optimizing the nuclear fuel utilization as well as recycling spent fuel. Fissile U-233 as the main fissile material for thorium fuel shows higher eta-value for wider energy range compared with other fissile materials of U-235 and Pu-239. However, it less than Pu-239 for fast energy region, but it still shows high eta-value. This eta-value gives the reactor has higher capability for obtaining breeding condition or high conversion capability. In the present study, the comparative analysis on small long life reactor fueled by thorium for different reactor types (water cooled and metal cooled reactor types). Light water and heavy water have been used as representative of water-cooled reactor types, and for liquid metal-cooled reactor types, sodium-cooled and lead-bismuth-cooled have been adopted. Core blanket arrangement as general design configuration, has been adopted which consist of inner blanket region fueled by thorium oxide, and two core regions (inner and out regions) fueled by fissile U-233 and thorium oxide with different percentages of fissile content. SRAC-CITATION and JENDL-33 have been used as core optimization analysis and nuclear data library for this analysis. Reactor operation time can reaches more than 10 years operation without refueling and shuffling for different reactor types and several power outputs. As can be expected, liquid metal cooled reactor types can be used more effective for obtaining long life reactor with higher burnup, higher power density, higher breeding capability and lower excess reactivity compared with water-cooled reactors. Water cooled obtains long life core operation

  9. Nuclear calculation methods for light water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1961-02-01

    This report is intended as an introductory review. After a brief discussion of problems encountered in the nuclear design of water moderated reactors a comprehensive scheme of calculations is described. This scheme is based largely on theoretical methods and computer codes developed in the U.S.A. but some previously unreported developments made in this country are also described. It is shown that the effective reproduction factor of simple water moderated lattices may be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1%. Methods for treating water gap flux peaking and control absorbers are presented in some detail, together with a brief discussion of temperature coefficients, void coefficients and burn-up problems. (author)

  10. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  11. Economic competitiveness requirements for evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R.; Bertel, E.; Paik, K.H.; Roh, J.H.; Tort, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyses the necessary economic conditions for evolutionary water cooled reactors to be competitive. Utilising recent national cost data for fossil-fired base load plants expected to be commissioned by 2005 -2010, target costs for nuclear power plants are discussed. Factors that could contribute to the achievement of those targets by evolutionary water cooled reactors are addressed. The feed-back from experience acquired in implementing nuclear programmes is illustrated by some examples from France and the Republic of Korea. The paper discusses the impacts on nuclear power competitiveness of globalisation and deregulation of the electricity market and privatisation of the electricity sector. In addition, issues related to external cost internalisation are considered. (author)

  12. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The meeting was attended by 20 participants from 12 countries who reviewed and discussed the status and progress of national programmes on advanced water-cooled reactors and recommended to the Scientific Secretary a comprehensive programme for 1991/1992 which would support technology development programmes in IWGATWR Member States. This summary report outlines the activities of IWGATWR since its Second Meeting in June 1988 and main results of the Third Meeting

  13. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Steam generators in indirect-cycle water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajeau, M.

    1976-01-01

    In the indirect cycle water-cooled nuclear reactors, the steam generators are placed between the primary circuit and the turbine. They act both as an energy transmitter and as a leaktigh barrier against fission or corrosion products. Their study is thus very important from a performance and reliability point of view. Two main types are presented here: the U-tube and the once-through steam generators [fr

  15. Materials challenges for the supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the materials requirements of the Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) which arise from its severe expected operating conditions: (i) Outlet Temperature (to 650 C); (ii) Pressure of 25 MPa for the coolant containment, (iii) Thermochemical stress in the presence of supercritical water, and (iv) Radiative damage (up to 150 dpa for the fast spectrum variant). These operating conditions are reviewed; the phenomenology of materials in the supercritical water environment that create the materials challenges is discussed; knowledge gaps are identified, and efforts to understand material behaviour under the operating conditions expected in the SCWR are described. (author)

  16. Progress in development and design aspects of advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was to provide an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss technology developments and design work for advanced water cooled reactors, safety approaches and features of current water cooled reactors and to identify, understand and describe advanced features for safety and operational improvements. The TCM was attended by 92 participants representing 18 countries and two international organizations and included 40 presentations by authors of 14 countries and one international organization. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these presentations. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. The rate of diffusion into advanced gas cooled reactor moderator bricks: an equivalent cylinder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyte, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    The graphite moderator bricks which make up the moderator of an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor (AGR) are of many different and complex shapes. Many physico-chemical processes that occur within these porous bricks include a diffusional step and thus to model these processes it is necessary to solve the diffusion equation (with chemical reaction) in a porous medium of complex shape. A finite element technique is applied to calculating the rate at which nitrogen diffuses into and out of the porous moderator graphite during operation of a shutdown procedure for an AGR. However, the finite element method suffers from several disadvantages that undermine its general usefulness for calculating rates of diffusion in AGR moderator cores. A model which overcomes some of these disadvantages is presented (the equivalent cylinder model) and it is shown that this gives good results for a variety of different boundary and initial conditions

  18. Power control device for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hidesuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve self controllability of a nuclear power plant, as well as enable continuous power level control by a controlled flow of moderators in void pipes provided in a reactor core. Constitution: Hollow void pipes are provided in a reactor core to which a heavy water recycle loop for power control, a heavy water recycle pump for power control, a heavy water temperature regulator and a heavy water flow rate control valve for power control are connected in series to constitute a heavy water recycle loop for flowing heavy water moderators. The void ratio in each of the void pipes are calculated by a process computer to determine the flow rate and the temperature for the recycled heavy water. Based on the above calculation result, the heavy water temperature regulator is actuated by way of a temperature setter at the heavy water inlet and the heavy water flow rate is controlled by the actuation of the heavy water flow rate control valve. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Reactivity margins in heavy water moderated production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, F.D.

    1981-11-01

    The design of the reactor core and components of the heavy water moderated reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SFP) can be varied to produce a number of isotopes. For the past decade, the predominant reactor core design has been the enriched-depleted lattice. In this lattice, fuel assemblies of highly enriched uranium and target assemblies of depleted uranium, which produce plutonium, occupy alternate lattice positions. This heterogeneous lattice arrangement and a nonuniform control rod distribution result in a reactor core that requires sophisticated calculational methods for accurate reactivity margin and power distribution predictions. For maximum accuracy, techniques must exist to provide a base of observed data for the calculations. Frequent enriched-depleted lattice design changes are required as product demands vary. These changes provided incentive for the development of techniques to combine the results of calculations and observed reactivity data to accurately and conveniently monitor reactivity margins during operation

  20. Method of operating water cooled reactor with blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the production amount of fissionable plutonium by increasing the burnup degree of blanket fuels in a water cooled reactor with blanket. Method: Incore insertion assemblies comprising water elimination rods, fertile material rods or burnable poison rods are inserted to those fuel assemblies at the central portion of the reactor core that are situated at the positions not inserted with control rods in the earlier half of the operation cycle, while the incore reactor insertion assemblies are withdrawn at the latter half of the operation cycle of a nuclear reactor. As a result, it is possible to increase the power share of the blanket fuels and increase the fuel burnup degree to thereby increase the production amount of fissionable plutonium. Furthermore, at the initial stage of the cycle, the excess reactivity of the reactor can be suppressed to decrease the reactivity control share on the control rod. At the final stage of the cycle, the excess reactivity of the reactor core can be increased to improve the cycle life. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Feasibility study of self sustaining capability on water cooled thorium reactors for different power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, S.; Takaki, N.; Sekimoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    Thorium fuel cycle can maintain the sustainable system of the reactor for self sustaining system for future sustainable development in the world. Some characteristics of thorium cycle show some advantages in relation to higher breeding capability, higher performance of burn-up and more proliferation resistant. Several investigations was performed to improve the breeding capability which is essential for maintaining the fissile sustainability during reactor operation in thermal reactor such as Shippingport reactor and molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project. The preliminary study of breeding capability on water cooled thorium reactor has been investigated for various power output. The iterative calculation system is employed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000. In this calculation, 1238 fission products and 129 heavy nuclides are employed. In the cell calculation, 26 heavy metals and 66 fission products and 1 pseudo FP are employed. The employed nuclear data library was JENDL 3.2. The reactor is fueled by 2 33U-Th Oxide and it has used the light water coolant as moderator. Some characteristics such as conversion ratio and void reactivity coefficient performances are evaluated for the systems. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) values and average burnups are studied for survey parameter. The parametric survey for different power outputs are employed from 10 MWt to 3000 MWt for evaluating the some characteristics of core size and leakage effects to the spectra profile, required enrichment, breeding capability, fissile inventory condition, and void reactivity coefficient. Different power outputs are employed in order to evaluate its effect to the required enrichment for criticality, breeding capability, void reactivity and fissile inventory accumulation. The obtained value of the conversion ratios is evaluated by using the equilibrium atom composition. The conversion ratio is employed based on the

  2. Fine distributed moderating material to the enhance feedback effects in LBE cooled rast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, Bruno [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactor Safety Div.

    2013-07-01

    In this work it is demonstrated, that the concept of enhanced feedback coefficients is transferable to LBE cooled fast reactors. The demonstration is based on the fuel assembly design of the CDT project. The effect of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, on the k{sub inf}, and on the fuel temperature feedback and the coolant feedback is shown, discussed and compared to SFRs. The calculations are performed with the 2D lattice transport code HELIOS and based on the fully detailed fuel assembly geometry representation. (orig.)

  3. Effect of horizontal flow on the cooling of the moderator brick in the advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, P.; He, S.; Hamad, F.; Gotts, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports an investigation of the effect of the horizontal cross flow on the temperature of the moderator brick in UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a conjugate heat transfer model for the solid and fluid. The commercial software package of ANSYS Fluent is used for this purpose. The CFD model comprises the full axial length of one-half of a typical fuel channel (assuming symmetry) and part of neighbouring channels on either side. Two sets of simulations have been carried out, namely, one with cross flow and one without cross flow. The effect of cross flow has subsequently been derived by comparing the results from the two groups of simulations. The study shows that a small cross flow can have a significant effect on the cooling of the graphite brick, causing the peak temperature of the brick to reduce significantly. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for this. Firstly, the small cross flow causes a significant redistribution of the main axial downward flow and this leads to an enhancement of heat transfer in some of the small clearances, and an impairment in others although overall, the enhancement is dominant leading to a better cooling. Secondly, the cross flow makes effective use of the small clearances between the key/keyway connections which increases the effective heat transfer area, hence increasing the cooling. Under the conditions of no cross flow, these areas remain largely inactive in heat transfer. The study shows that the cooling of the moderator is significantly enhanced by the cross flow perpendicular to the main cooling flow. (author)

  4. Methods and technologies for cost reduction in the design of water cooled reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Specialists Meeting was organized in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors. Its purpose was to provide an international forum for review and discussion on recent results in research and development on different methods and technologies of current and advanced water-cooled reactor power plants, which can lead to reduced investment and operation, maintenance and fuel-cycle costs of the plants. 27 specialists representing 10 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting. 10 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Advanced concept of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) for plutonium multiple recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, T.; Iwamura, T.; Takeda, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Okada, H.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced water-cooled reactor concept named the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been proposed to attain a high conversion ratio more than 1.0 and to achieve the negative void reactivity coefficient. At present, several types of design concepts satisfying both the design targets have been proposed based on the evaluation for the fuel without fission products and minor actinides. In this paper, the feasibility of the RMWR core is investigated for the plutonium multiple recycling under advanced reprocessing schemes with low decontamination factors as proposed for the FBR fuel cycle. (author)

  6. Fuel enrichment reduction for heavy water moderated research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve heavy-water-moderated research reactors of significant power level (5 MW to 125 MW) currently operate in a number of countries, and use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. Most of these reactors could in principle be converted to use uranium of lower enrichment, subject in some cases to the successful development and demonstration of new fuel materials and/or fuel element designs. It is, however, generally accepted as desirable that existing fuel element geometry be retained unaltered to minimise the capital costs and licensing difficulties associated with enrichment conversion. The high flux Australian reactor, HIFAR, at Lucas Heights, Sydney is one of 5 Dido-class reactors in the above group. It operates at 10 MW using 80% 235 U HEU fuel. Theoretical studies of neutronic, thermohydraulic and operational aspects of converting HIFAR to use fuels of reduced enrichment have been made over a period. It is concluded that with no change of fuel element geometry and no penalty in the present HEU fuel cycle burn-up performance, conversion to MEU (nominally 45% 235 U) would be feasible within the limits of current fully qualified U-Al fuel materials technology. There would be no significant, adverse effects on safety-related parameters (e.g. reactivity coefficients) and only small penalties in reactor flux. Conversion to LEU (nominally 20% 235 U) a similar basis would require that fuel materials of about 2.3 g U cm -3 be fully qualified, and would depress the in-core thermal neutron flux by about 15 per cent relative to HEU fuelling. In qualitative terms, similar conclusions would be expected to hold for a majority of the above heavy water moderated reactors. (author)

  7. State of the art of nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brede, O.

    1984-01-01

    USA, Canadian, and USSR activities aimed at developing nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors are summarized. The facilities OMRE, PNPF, WR-1, and ARBUS are described, discussing in particular the problems of the chemistry of organic coolants. Finally, problems of further development and prospects of the application of organic cooled reactors are briefly outlined. (author)

  8. Calculational experimental examination and ensuring of equipment and pipelines seismic resistance at starting and operating water-cooled and moderated reactor WWER-type NPPs. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The results of testing of equipment at Bohunice NPP and pipeline systems at Unit 3 of Kozloduy NPP (WWER-440 type reactors) are presented in this Final Report. These results side by side with experimental values of natural frequencies and decrements also include experimental data about vibration modes of tested equipment and pipelines. For the first time the results of new calculational-experimental examination of equipment seismic resistance at Unit 2 of Armenian NPP are presented. At Kozloduy NPP direction's request the planed additional tests of some selected items were put off on 1997. Instead of postponed tests we carried out detailed analysis of our past inspections of numerous equipment seismic resistance at the Unit 5 of Kozloduy NPP. Experimental data with results of additional analysis are presented

  9. Long-term scenarios of power reactors and fuel cycle development and the role of reduced moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2000-01-01

    Reduced moderation spectrum reactor is one of water cooled type reactors in future, which is based on the advanced technology of conventional nuclear power plants. The reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR) has various advantages, such as effective utilization of uranium resources, high conversion ratio, high burn-up, long-term cycle operation, and multiple recycle of plutonium. The RMWR is expected to be a substitute of fast breeder reactor (FBR) of which the development encounters with some technical and financial difficulties, and discontinues in many countries. The role of the RMWR on long-term scenarios of power reactor and fuel cycle development in Japan is investigated from the point of view of uranium resource needed. The consumption of natural uranium needed up to the year 2200 is calculated on various assumptions for the following three cases: (1) no breeder reactor; plutonium-thermal cycle in conventional light water reactor, (2) introduction of the FBR, and (3) introduction of the RMWR. The amounts of natural uranium consumption depends largely on the conversion ratio and plutonium quantity needed of a reactor type. The RMWR has a possibility as a substitute technology of the FBR with the improvement of conversion ratio and high burn-up. (Suetake, M.)

  10. Long-term scenarios of power reactors and fuel cycle development and the role of reduced moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    Reduced moderation spectrum reactor is one of water cooled type reactors in future, which is based on the advanced technology of conventional nuclear power plants. The reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR) has various advantages, such as effective utilization of uranium resources, high conversion ratio, high burn-up, long-term cycle operation, and multiple recycle of plutonium. The RMWR is expected to be a substitute of fast breeder reactor (FBR) of which the development encounters with some technical and financial difficulties, and discontinues in many countries. The role of the RMWR on long-term scenarios of power reactor and fuel cycle development in Japan is investigated from the point of view of uranium resource needed. The consumption of natural uranium needed up to the year 2200 is calculated on various assumptions for the following three cases: (1) no breeder reactor; plutonium-thermal cycle in conventional light water reactor, (2) introduction of the FBR, and (3) introduction of the RMWR. The amounts of natural uranium consumption depends largely on the conversion ratio and plutonium quantity needed of a reactor type. The RMWR has a possibility as a substitute technology of the FBR with the improvement of conversion ratio and high burn-up. (Suetake, M.)

  11. Chemistry control challenges in a supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, David; Tremaine, Peter; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The long-term viability of a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will depend on the ability of designers to predict and control water chemistry to minimize corrosion and the transport of corrosion products and radionuclides. Meeting this goal requires an enhanced understanding of water chemistry as the temperature and pressure are raised beyond the critical point. A key aspect of SCWR water chemistry control will be mitigation of the effects of water radiolysis; preliminary studies suggest markedly different behavior than that predicted from simple extrapolations from conventional water-cooled reactor behavior. The commonly used strategy of adding excess hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to suppress the net radiolytic production of primary oxidizing species may not be effective in an SCWR. The behavior of low concentrations of impurities such as transition metal corrosion products, chemistry control agents, anions introduced via make-up water or from ion-exchange resins, and radionuclides (e.g., 60 Co) needs to be understood. The formation of neutral complexes increases with temperature, and can become important under near-critical and supercritical conditions; the most important region is from 300-450 C, where the properties of water change dramatically, and solvent compressibility effects exert a huge influence on solvation. The potential for increased transport and deposition of corrosion products (active and inactive), leading to (a) increased deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, and (b) increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose, must be assessed. There are also significant challenges associated with chemistry sampling and monitoring in an SCWR. The typical methods used in current reactor designs (grab samples, on-line monitors at the end of a cooled, depressurized sample line) will be inadequate, and in-situ measurements of key parameters will be required. This paper describes current Canadian activities in SCWR chemistry and chemistry

  12. The thorium fuel cycle in water-moderated reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1977-01-01

    Current interest in the thorium cycle, as an alternative to the uranium cycle, for water-moderated reactors is based on two attractive aspects of its use - the extension of uranium resources, and the related lower sensitivity of energy costs to uranium price. While most of the scientific basis required is already available, some engineering demonstrations are needed to provide better economic data for rational decisions. Thorium and uranium cycles are compared with regard to reactor characteristics and technology, fuel-cycle technology, economic parameters, fuel-cycle costs, and system characteristics. There appear to be no major feasibility problems associated with the use of thorium, although development is required in the areas of fuel testing and fuel management. The use of thorium cycles implies recycling the fuel, and the major uncertainties are in the associated costs. Experience in the design and operation of fuel reprocessing and active-fabrication facilities is required to estimate costs to the accuracy needed for adequately defining the range of conditions economically favourable to thorium cycles. In heavy-water reactors (HWRs) thorium cycles having uranium requirements at equilibrium ranging from zero to a quarter of those for the natural-uranium once-through cycle appear feasible. An ''inventory'' of uranium of between 1 and 2Mg/MW(e) is required for the transition to equilibrium. The cycles with the lowest uranium requirements compete with the others only at high uranium prices. Using thorium in light-water reactors, uranium requirements can be reduced by a factor of between two and three from the once-through uranium cycle. The light-water breeder reactor, promising zero uranium requirements at equilibrium, is being developed. Larger uranium inventories are required than for the HWRs. The lead time, from a decision to use thorium to significant impact on uranium utilization (compared to uranium cycle, recycling plutonium), is some two decades

  13. Emergency reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Ken.

    1993-01-01

    An emergency nuclear reactor cooling device comprises a water reservoir, emergency core cooling water pipelines having one end connected to a water feeding sparger, fire extinguishing facility pipelines, cooling water pressurizing pumps, a diesel driving machine for driving the pumps and a battery. In a water reservoir, cooling water is stored by an amount required for cooling the reactor upon emergency and for fire extinguishing, and fire extinguishing facility pipelines connecting the water reservoir and the fire extinguishing facility are in communication with the emergency core cooling water pipelines connected to the water feeding sparger by system connection pipelines. Pumps are operated by a diesel power generator to introduce cooling water from the reservoir to the emergency core cooling water pipelines. Then, even in a case where AC electric power source is entirely lost and the emergency core cooling system can not be used, the diesel driving machine is operated using an exclusive battery, thereby enabling to inject cooling water from the water reservoir to a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container by the diesel drive pump. (N.H.)

  14. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  15. Implementation of new core cooling monitoring system for light water reactors - BCCM (Becker Core Cooling Monitor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coville, Patrick; Eliasson, Bengt; Stromqvist, Erik; Ward, Olav; Fox, Georges; Ashjian, D. T.

    1998-01-01

    Core cooling monitors are key instruments to protect reactors from large accidents due to loss of coolant. Sensors presented here are based on resistance thermometry. Temperature dependent resistance is powered by relatively high and constant current. Value of this resistance depends on thermal exchange with coolant and when water is no more surrounding the sensors a large increase of temperature is immediately generated. The same instrument can be operated with low current and will measure the local temperature up to 1260 o C in case of loss of coolant accident. Sensors are manufactured with very few components and materials already qualified for long term exposure to boiling or pressurized water reactors environment. Prototypes have been evaluated in a test loop up to 160 bars and in the Barsebaeck-1 reactor. Industrial sensors are now in operation in reactor Oskarshamn 2. (author)

  16. Development Project of Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Oka, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    A Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor (SCPR) development project (Feb. 2001- Mar. 2005) is being performed by a joint team consisting of Japanese universities and nuclear venders with a national fund. The main objective of this project is to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through concentrating three sub-themes: 'plant conceptual design', 'thermohydraulics', and 'material and water chemistry'. The target of the 'plant conceptual design sub-theme' is simplify the whole plant systems compared with the conventional LWRs while achieving high thermal efficiency of more than 40 % without sacrificing the level of safety. Under the 'thermohydraulics sub-theme', heat transfer characteristics of supercritical-water as a coolant of the SCPR are examined experimentally and analytically focusing on 'heat transfer deterioration'. The experiments are being performed using fron-22 for water at a fossil boiler test facility. The experimental results are being incorporated in LWR analytical tools together with an extended steam/R22 table. Under the 'material and water chemistry sub-theme', material candidates for fuel claddings and internals of the SCPR are being screened mainly through mechanical tests, corrosion tests, and simulated irradiation tests under the SCPR condition considering water chemistry. In particular, stress corrosion cracking sensitivity is being investigated as well as uniform corrosion and swelling characteristics. Influences of water chemistry on the corrosion product characteristics are also being examined to find preferable water condition as well as to develop rational water chemistry controlling methods. (authors)

  17. Improving economics and safety of water cooled reactors. Proven means and new approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    would facilitate development of standardized designs which can be built in several countries without major re-design efforts. This publication has been prepared to address a recommendation of the IAEA Symposium on Evolutionary Water Cooled Reactors: Strategic Issues, Technologies and Economic Viability (Seoul, Republic of Korea, December 1998): namely that increased emphasis should be placed on achieving simplified water cooled reactor designs with improved economics. The task was carried out during 1999-2001 jointly by the Nuclear Power Technology Development Section, Division of Nuclear Power, and the Planning and Economic Studies Section of the Department of Nuclear Energy, in co-operation with the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety of the Department of Nuclear Safety. This report has been developed with participation of representatives from eleven industrial organizations and four government agencies as well as the OECD-NEA and the European Commission

  18. Improving economics and safety of water cooled reactors. Proven means and new approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    would facilitate development of standardized designs which can be built in several countries without major re-design efforts. This publication has been prepared to address a recommendation of the IAEA Symposium on Evolutionary Water Cooled Reactors: Strategic Issues, Technologies and Economic Viability (Seoul, Republic of Korea, December 1998): namely that increased emphasis should be placed on achieving simplified water cooled reactor designs with improved economics. The task was carried out during 1999-2001 jointly by the Nuclear Power Technology Development Section, Division of Nuclear Power, and the Planning and Economic Studies Section of the Department of Nuclear Energy, in co-operation with the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety of the Department of Nuclear Safety. This report has been developed with participation of representatives from eleven industrial organizations and four government agencies as well as the OECD-NEA and the European Commission.

  19. Core Design and Deployment Strategy of Heavy Water Cooled Sustainable Thorium Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies on water cooled thorium breeder reactor based on matured pressurized water reactor (PWR plant technology concluded that reduced moderated core by arranging fuel pins in a triangular tight lattice array and using heavy water as coolant is appropriate for achieving better breeding performance and higher burn-up simultaneously [1–6]. One optimum core that produces 3.5 GW thermal energy using Th-233U oxide fuel shows a breeding ratio of 1.07 and averaged burn-up of about 80 GWd/t with long cycle length of 1300 days. The moderator to fuel volume ratio is 0.6 and required enrichment of 233U for the fresh fuel is about 7%. The coolant reactivity coefficient is negative during all cycles despite it being a large scale breeder reactor. In order to introduce this sustainable thorium reactor, three-step deployment scenario, with intermediate transition phase between current light water reactor (LWR phase and future sustainer phase, is proposed. Both in transition phase and sustainer phase, almost the same core design can be applicable only by changing fissile materials mixed with thorium from plutonium to 233U with slight modification in the fuel assembly design. Assuming total capacity of 60 GWe in current LWR phase and reprocessing capacity of 800 ton/y with further extensions to 1600 ton/y, all LWRs will be replaced by heavy water cooled thorium reactors within about one century then thorium reactors will be kept operational owing to its potential to sustain fissile fuels while reprocessing all spent fuels until exhaustion of massive thorium resource.

  20. Effects of moderation level on core reactivity and. neutron fluxes in natural uranium fueled and heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.J.; Aslam; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, R.; Ahmad, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron moderation level in a nuclear reactor has a strong influence on core multiplication, reactivity control, fuel burnup, neutron fluxes etc. In the study presented in this article, the effects of neutron moderation level on core reactivity and neutron fluxes in a typical heavy water moderated nuclear research reactor is explored and the results are discussed. (author)

  1. Meltdown reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The meltdown reactor core cooling facility comprises a meltdown reactor core cooling tank, a cooling water storage tank situates at a position higher than the meltdown reactor core cooling tank, an upper pipeline connecting the upper portions of the both of the tanks and a lower pipeline connecting the lower portions of them. Upon occurrence of reactor core meltdown, a high temperature meltdown reactor core is dropped on the cooling tank to partially melt the tank and form a hole, from which cooling water is flown out. Since the water source of the cooling water is the cooling water storage tank, a great amount of cooling water is further dropped and supplied and the reactor core is submerged and cooled by natural convection for a long period of time. Further, when the lump of the meltdown reactor core is small and the perforated hole of the meltdown reactor cooling tank is small, cooling water is boiled by the high temperature lump intruding into the meltdown reactor core cooling tank and blown out from the upper pipeline to the cooling water storage tank to supply cooling water from the lower pipeline to the meltdown reactor core cooling tank. Since it is constituted only with simple static facilities, the facility can be simplified to attain improvement of reliability. (N.H.)

  2. Evolutionary water cooled reactors: Strategic issues, technologies and economic viability. Proceedings of a symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-01

    Symposium on evolutionary water cooled reactors: Strategic issues, technologies and economic viability was intended for managers in utilities, reactor design organizations and hardware manufacturing companies and for government decision makers who need to understand technological advances and the potential of evolutionary water cooled reactors to contribute to near and medium term energy demands. The topics addressed include: strategic issues (global energy outlook, the role of nuclear power in sustainable energy strategies, power generation costs, financing of nuclear plant projects, socio-political factors and nuclear safety requirements); technological advances (instrumentation and control, means od improving prevention and mitigation of severe accidents, development of passive safety systems); keys to economic viability (simplification, standardization, advances in construction and project management, feedback of experience from utilities into new designs, and effective management of plant operation)

  3. A passive emergency heat sink for water cooled reactors with particular application to CANDU reg-sign reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Water in an overhead pool can serve as a general-purpose passive emergency heat sink for water-cooled reactors. It can be used for containment cooling, for emergency depressurization of the heat transport-system, or to receive any other emergency heat, such as that from the CANDU reg-sign moderator. The passive emergency water system provides in-containment depressurization of steam generators and no other provision is needed for supply of low-pressure emergency water to the steam generators. For containment cooling, the pool supplies water to the tube side of elevated tube banks inside containment. The elevation with respect to the reactor heat source maximizes heat transport, by natural convection, of hot containment gases. This effective heat transport combines with the large heat-transfer coefficients of tube banks, to reduce containment overpressure during accidents. Cooled air from the tube banks is directed past the break in the heat-transport system, to facilitate removal of hydrogen using passive catalytic recombiners

  4. Core design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi, Akie; Yoshihiro, Nakano; Toshihisa, Shirakawa; Tsutomu, Okubo; Takamichi, Iwamura

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual core design study of reduced-moderation water reactors (RMWRs) with tight-pitched MOX-fuelled lattice has been carried out at JAERI. Several different RMWR core concepts based on both BWR and PWR have been proposed. All the core concepts meet with the aim to achieve both a conversion ratio of 1.0 or larger and negative void reactivity coefficient. As one of these RMWR concepts, the ABWR compatible core is also proposed. Although the conversion ratio of this core is 1.0 and the void coefficient is negative, the discharge burn-up of the fuel was about 25 GWd/t. By adopting a triangular fuel pin lattice for the reduction of moderator volume fraction and modifying axial Pu enrichment distribution, it was aimed to extend the discharge burn-up of ABWR compatible type RMWR. By using a triangular fuel lattice of smaller moderator volume fraction, discharge burn-up of 40 GWd/t seems achievable, keeping the high conversion ratio and the negative void coefficient. (authors)

  5. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  6. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  7. Performance of water cooled nuclear power reactor fuels in India – Defects, failures and their mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Chaitanyamoy

    2015-01-01

    Water cooled and moderated nuclear power reactors account for more than 95% of the operating reactors in the world today. Light water reactors (LWRs) consisting of pressurized water reactor (PWR), their Russian counterpart namely VVER and boiling water reactor (BWR) will continue to dominate the nuclear power market. Pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), also known as CANDU, is the backbone of the nuclear power program in India. Updates on LWR and PHWR fuel performance are being periodically published by IAEA, OECD-NEA and the World Nuclear Association (WNA), highlighting fuel failure rate and the mitigation of fuel defects and failures. These reports clearly indicate that there has been significant improvement in in – pile fuel performance over the years and the present focus is to achieve zero fuel failure in high burn up and high performance fuels. The present paper summarizes the status of PHWR and LWR fuel performance in India, highlighting the manufacturing and the related quality control and inspection steps that are being followed at the PHWR fuel fabrication plant in order to achieve zero manufacturing defect which could contribute to achieving zero in – pile failure rate in operating and upcoming PHWR units in India. (author)

  8. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  9. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L.; Espinosa P, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  10. Behavior of radioactive organic iodide in an atmosphere of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Masakatsu; Nakashima, Mikio; Sagawa, Chiaki; Masaki, Nobuyuki; Hirabayashi, Takakuni; Aratono, Yasuyuki

    1990-06-01

    Formation and decomposition behavior of radioactive organic iodide have been studied in an atmosphere of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR). Na 125 I was chosen for radioactive iodine source instead of CsI diffusing from coated fuel particles. Na 125 I adsorbed on graphite was heated in pure He and He containing O 2 or H 2 O atmosphere. The results obtained are as follows. It was proved that organic iodide was formed with organic radicals released from graphite even in He atmosphere. Thus, the interchange rate of inorganic iodide with organic iodide was remarkably decreased with prolonged preheat-treatment period at 1000degC. Organic iodide formed was easily decomposed by its recirculation into hot reaction tube kept at 900degC. When organic iodide was passed through powdered graphite bed, more than 70% was decomposed at 90degC. Oxygen and water vapour intermixed in He suppressed the interchange rate of inorganic iodide with organic iodide. These results suggest that organic iodide rarely exists in the pressure vessel under normal operating condition of HTTR, and, under hypothetical accident condition of HTTR, organic iodide fraction never exceeds the value used for a safety assessment of light water reactor. (author)

  11. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Bays, Samuel E.; Pope, Michael A.; Youinou, Gilles J.

    2010-01-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  12. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  13. Design Feasible Area on Water Cooled Thorium Breeder Reactor in Equilibrium States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidik Permana; Naoyuki Takaki; Hiroshi Sekimoto

    2006-01-01

    Thorium as supplied fuel has good candidate for fuel material if it is converted into fissile material 233 U which shows superior characteristics in the thermal region. The Shippingport reactor used 233 U-Th fuel system, and the molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project showed that breeding is possible in a thermal spectrum. In the present study, feasibility of water cooled thorium breeder reactor is investigated. The key properties such as flux, η value, criticality and breeding performances are evaluated for different moderator to fuel ratios (MFR) and burn-ups. The results show the feasibility of breeding for different MFR and burn-ups. The required 233 U enrichment is about 2% - 9% as charge fuel. The lower MFR and the higher enrichment of 233 U are preferable to improve the average burn-up; however the design feasible window is shrunk. This core shows the design feasible window especially in relation to MFR with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  14. Reactor physics measurements with 19-element ThOsub(2)-sup(235)UOsub(2) cluster fuel in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, P.M.

    1985-02-01

    Low power lattice physics measurements have been performed with a single rod of 19-element thorium oxide fuel enriched with 1.45 wt. percent sub(235)UOsub(2) (93 percent enriched) in a simulated heavy water moderated and cooled power reactor core. The experiments were designed to provide data relevant to a power reactor irradiation and to obtain some basic information on the physics of uranium-thorium fuel material. Some theoretical flux calculations are summarized and show reasonable agreement with experiment

  15. Moderator clean-up system in a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasada, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the fluctuation of the poison concentration in heavy water moderator due to a heavy water clean-up system. Constitution: To a calandria tank filled with heavy water as poison-containing moderators, are connected both end of a pipeway through which heavy water flows and to which a clean-up device is provided. Strongly basic resin is filled within the clean-up device and a cooler is disposed to a pipeway at the upstream of the clean-up device. In this structure, the temperature of heavy water at the inlet of the clean-up device at a constant level between the temperature at the exit of the cooler and the lowest temperature for the moderator to thereby decrease the fluctuation in the poison concentration in the heavy water moderator due to the heavy water clean-up device. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Kinetics of Pressurized Water Reactors with Hot or Cold Moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norinder, O

    1960-11-15

    The set of neutron kinetic equations developed in this report permits the use of long integration steps during stepwise integration. Thermal relations which describe the transfer of heat from fuel to coolant are derived. The influence upon the kinetic behavior of the reactor of a number of parameters is studied. A comparison of the kinetic properties of the hot and cold moderators is given.

  17. Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Community (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided in 1989 to update the state of the art concerning hydrogen in water cooled nuclear power reactors by commissioning a report which would review, all the available information to-date and make recommendations for the future. This joint report was prepared by committees formed by the IAEA and by the CEC. The aim of this report is to review the current understanding on the areas in which the research on hydrogen in LWR is conventionally presented, taking into account the results of the latest reported research developments. The main reactions through which hydrogen is produced are assessed together with their timings. An estimation of the amount of hydrogen produced by each reaction is given, in order to reckon their relative contribution to the hazard. An overview is then given of the state of knowledge of the most important phenomena taking place during its transport from the place of production and the phenomena which control the hydrogen combustion and the consequences of combustion under various conditions. Specific research work is recommended in each sector of the presented phenomena. The last topics reviewed in this report are the hydrogen detection and the prevent/mitigation of pressure and temperature loads on containment structures and structures and safety related equipment caused by hydrogen combustion

  18. A flashing driven moderator cooling system for CANDU reactors: Experimental and computational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khartabil, H.F.

    2000-01-01

    A flashing-driven passive moderator cooling system is being developed at AECL for CANDU reactors. Preliminary simulations and experiments showed that the concept was feasible at normal operating power. However, flow instabilities were observed at low powers under conditions of variable and constant calandria inlet temperatures. This finding contradicted code predictions that suggested the loop should be stable at all powers if the calandria inlet temperature was constant. This paper discusses a series of separate-effects tests that were used to identify the sources of low-power instabilities in the experiments, and it explores methods to avoid them. It concludes that low-power instabilities can be avoided, thereby eliminating the discrepancy between the experimental and code results. Two factors were found to be important for loop stability: (1) oscillations in the calandria outlet temperature, and (2) flashing superheat requirements, and the presence of nucleation sites. By addressing these factors, we could make the loop operate in a stable manner over the whole power range and we could obtain good agreement between the experimental and code results. (author)

  19. Steam water cycle chemistry of liquid metal cooled innovative nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, Victor; Lemekhov, Vadim; Smykov, Vladimir

    2012-09-01

    selection of chemistry controls is vital for NPPs with liquid metal cooled reactors. This paper highlights principles and approaches to chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors. The recommendations on how to arrange chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors are based taking into account: - the experience with operation of fossil power industry; - secondary side water chemistry of lead-bismuth eutectics cooled nuclear reactors at submarines; - steam/water cycles of NPPs with sodium cooled fast breeders BN-350 and BN-600; - secondary water chemistry at conventional NPPs with WER, RBMK and some other reactors. (authors)

  20. A plan of reactor physics experiments for reduced-moderation water reactors with MOX fuel in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Akie, Hiroshi; Suzaki, Takenori; Okubo, Tutomu; Usui, Shuji; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamiti; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors which aim at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. Critical Experiments performed so far in Eualope and Japan were reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of the equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX fuel rods used in the experiments are obtained by calculations and the modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. (author)

  1. 78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... comments were received. A companion guide, DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0129] Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling... (RG), 1.79, ``Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors...

  2. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  3. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors and the role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Groeneveld, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1998. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote International Information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water-cooled reactors. (authors)

  4. Design measures in evolutionary water cooled reactors to optimize for economic viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.J.; Yu, S.K.W.; Appell, B.

    1999-01-01

    Since the mid 1980s, there have been various efforts to develop evolutionary water cooled reactors based on the current operating plant experience. To sustain and improve the economic viability, particular attention has been paid to the following aspects in developing evolutionary water cooled reactors: design simplification and increased operating margins, standardization in design as well as construction and operation, integration of operating plant insights, and consideration of safety, operability and constructability during the design stage. This paper reviews each item and discusses several examples from some of the evolutionary water cooled reactors being developed. (author)

  5. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunsuke Uchida; Eishi Ibe; Katsumi Ohsumi

    1994-01-01

    Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve structural integrities of major components and structures in the primary cooling system of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are usually accompanied by several disadvantages. After evaluating merits and demerits of HWC application, it is concluded that optimal amounts of hydrogen injected into the feed water can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. (authors). 1 fig., 4 refs

  6. Analysis of water cooled reactors stability; Analiza stabilnosti reaktorskih sistema hladjenih vodom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, P; Pesic, M [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1980-07-01

    A model for stability analysis of non-boiling water cooled nuclear system is developed. The model is based on linear reactor kinetics and space averaged heat transfer in reactor and heat-exchanger. The transfer functions are defined and the analysis was applied to nuclear reactor RA at 'Boris Kidric' Institute - Vinca. (author)

  7. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  8. Material Issues of Blanket Systems for Fusion Reactors - Compatibility with Cooling Water -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    Environmental assisted cracking (EAC) is one of the material issues for the reactor core components of light water power reactors(LWRs). Much experience and knowledge have been obtained about the EAC in the LWR field. They will be useful to prevent the EAC of water-cooled blanket systems of fusion reactors. For the austenitic stainless steels and the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, they clarifies that the EAC in a water-cooled blanket does not seem to be acritical issue. However, some uncertainties about influences on water temperatures, water chemistries and stress conditions may affect on the EAC. Considerations and further investigations elucidating the uncertainties are discussed.

  9. Breeding capability and void reactivity analysis of heavy-water-cooled thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The fuel breeding and void reactivity coefficient of thorium reactors have been investigated using heavy water as coolant for several parametric surveys on moderator-to-fuel ratio (MFR) and burnup. The equilibrium fuel cycle burnup calculation has been performed, which is coupled with the cell calculation for this evaluation. The η of 233 U shows its superiority over other fissile nuclides in the surveyed MFR ranges and always stays higher than 2.1, which indicates that the reactor has a breeding condition for a wide range of MFR. A breeding condition with a burnup comparable to that of a standard PWR or higher can be achieved by adopting a larger pin gap (1-6 mm), and a pin gap of about 2 mm can be used to achieve a breeding ratio (BR) of 1.1. A feasible design region of the reactors, which fulfills the breeding condition and negative void reactivity coefficient, has been found. A heavy-water-cooled PWR-type Th- 233 U fuel reactor can be designed as a breeder reactor with negative void coefficient. (author)

  10. Indian experience with radionuclide transport, deposition and decontamination in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Lawrence, D.A.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The present generation of water-cooled nuclear reactors uses construction materials chosen with utmost care so that minimum corrosion occurs during the life of the reactor. As interaction between the primary coolant and the construction materials is unavoidable, the coolant is chemically treated to achieve maximum compatibility. First measurements of the chemical and radiochemical composition of the crud present on the in-core and out-of-core primary heat transport system surfaces of a pressurized heavy-water-moderated and cooled reactor (PHWR) are given; then experience in India in the development of a low temperature, one-stage decontaminating formulation for chemical decontamination of the radioactive deposits formed on stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions is discussed. The effect of the magnitude of the transients in parameters such as reactor power, system temperature, dissolved oxygen content in the coolant, etc. on the nature and migration behaviour of primary heat transport system crud in a PHWR is described. Contributions to radioactive sources and insoluble crud from different primary heat transport system materials are identified and correlated with reactor operations in a PHWR. Man-rem problems faced by nuclear reactors, especially during off-line maintenance, stress the need for reducing the deposited radioactive sources from system surfaces which would otherwise be accessible. Laboratory and on-site experimentation was carried out to effect chemical decontamination on the radioactive deposits formed on the stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions. Both the reducing and oxidizing formulations were subsequently used in a small-scale, in-plant trial in the clean-up system of a BWR. More than 85% of the deposited 60 Co activity was found to have been removed by the oxidizing formulation. Efforts to develop a decontaminating mixture containing a reducing agent with the help of a circulating loop are in progress in the laboratory. (author)

  11. The thorium fuel cycle in water-moderated reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1977-05-01

    Thorium and uranium cycles are compared with regard to reactor characteristics and technology, fuel-cycle technology, economic parameters, fuel-cycle costs, and system characteristics. In heavy-water reactors (HWRs) thorium cycles having uranium requirements at equilibrium ranging from zero to a quarter of those for the natural-uranium once-through cycle appear feasible. An 'inventory' of uranium of between 1 and 2 Mg/MW(e) is required for the transition to equilibrium. The cycles with the lowest uranium requirements compete with the others only at high uranium prices. Using thorium in light-water reactors, uranium requirements can be reduced by a factor of between two and three from the once-through uranium cycle. The light-water breeder reactor, promising zero uranium requirements at equilibrium, is being developed. Larger uranium inventories are required than for the HWRs. The lead time, from a decision to use thorium to significant impact on uranium utilization (compared to uranium cycle, recycling plutonium) is some two decades

  12. Design and analysis on super-critical water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    The Super-Critical Water Cooled Power Reactors (SCPR) is cooled by 25 MPa supercritical water of 280degC at reactor inlet and greater than 500degC at reactor outlet and directly connected with turbine/generators with high energy conversion efficiency. This corresponds to the deletion of recirculation system and steam-water separation system of BWR type reactors or of pressurizer and steam generator of PWR type reactors. In addition to the design study of the university of Tokyo, technology development of the SCPR for practical use has started under the collaboration of industry and academia since 2000. Mockup single tube and bundle tests for heat transfer/fluid flow characteristics of the design have been conducted with 3D heat transfer analysis. Materials compatible with coolant conditions for fuel cans and reactor internals are also assessed. Overall evaluation of the reactor concept is under way. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Loose parts monitoring in light water reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Alma, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work related to loose monitoring system for light water reactor, developed at GRS - Munique, are described. The basic problems due to the exact localization and detection of the loose part as well the research activities and development necessary aiming to obtain the best techniques in this field. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  15. IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Aksan, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

  16. Minimization of radioactive material deposition in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Blaies, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method for inhibiting the deposition of radioactive cobalt in a water-bearing vessel of a water-cooled nuclear reactor which comprises adding zinc ion to water entering the water-bearing vessel. The improvement contains a substantially lower proportion of the /sup 64/Zn isotope than naturally occurring zinc

  17. Changes in water chemistry and primary productivity of a reactor cooling reservoir (Par Pond)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, L.J.

    1975-01-01

    Water chemistry and primary productivity of a reactor cooling reservoir have been studied for 8 years. Initially the primary productivity increased sixfold, and the dissolved solids doubled. The dissolved-solids increase appears to have been caused by additions of makeup water from the Savannah River and by evaporative concentration during the cooling process. As the dissolved-solids concentrations and the conductivity of makeup water leveled off, the primary productivity stabilized. Major cation and anion concentrations generally followed total dissolved solids through the increase and plateau; however, silica concentrations declined steadily during the initial period of increased plankton productivity. Standing crops of net seston and centrifuge seston did not increase during this initial period. The collective data show the effects of thermal input to a cooling reservoir, illustrate the need for limnological studies before reactor siting, and suggest the possibility of using makeup-water additions to power reactor cooling basins as a reservoir management tool

  18. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0134] Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core..., entitled, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors,'' is...

  19. Characteristic behaviour of Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors during water ingress events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoza, Samukelisiwe N.; Serfontein, Dawid E.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water on the tube-side of the steam generators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with indirect cycle layouts presents a possibility for a penetration of neutron moderating steam into the core, which may cause a power excursion. This article presents results on the effect of water ingress into the core of the two South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor design concepts, i.e. the PBMR-200 MW th and the PBMR-400 MW th developed by PBMR SOC Ltd. The VSOP 99/05 suite of codes was used for the simulation of this event. Partial steam vapour pressures were added in stages into the primary circuit in order to investigate the effect of water ingress on reactivity, power profiles and thermal neutron flux profiles. The effects of water ingress into the core are explained by increased neutron moderation, due to the addition of 1 H, which leads to a decrease in resonance capture by 238 U and therefore an increase in the multiplication factor. The more effective moderation of neutrons by definition reduces the fast neutron flux and increases the thermal flux in the core, i.e. leads to a softer spectrum. The more effective moderation also increases the average increase in lethargy between collisions of a neutron with successive fuel kernels, which reduces the probability for neutron capture in the radiative capture resonances of 238 U. The resulting higher resonance escape probability also increases the thermal flux in the core. The softening of the neutron spectrum leads to an increased effective microscopic fission cross section in the fissile isotopes and thus to increased neutron absorption for fission, which reduces the remaining number of neutrons that can diffuse into the reflectors. Therefore water ingress into the core leads to a reduced thermal neutron flux in the reflectors. The power density spatial distribution behaved similarly to the thermal neutron flux in the core. Analysis of possible mechanisms was conducted. The results show that

  20. Determining the void fraction in draught sections of a boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Barolomej, G.G.; Solodkij, V.A.; Shmelev, V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the problem of improving methods for calculation of the void fraction in large channels of cooling system of the boiling water cooled reactor during two-phase unsteady flow. Investigation of the structure of two-phase flow was conducted in draught section of the VK-50 reactor (diameter D=2 m, height H=3). The method for calculation of the void fraction in channels with H/D ratio close to 1 is suggested

  1. Improvements in gas supply systems for heavy-water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, G.; Hassig, J.M.; Laurent, N.; Thomas, B.

    1964-01-01

    In a heavy-water moderated reactor cooled by pressurized gas, an important problem from the point of view, of the reactor block and its economics is the choice of the gas supply system. In the pressure tube solution, the whole of the reactor block structure is at a relatively low temperature, whereas the gas supply equipment is at that of the gas, which is much higher. These parts, through which passes the heat carrying fluid have to present as low a resistance as possible to it so as to avoid costly extra blowing power. Finally, they may only be placed in the reactor block after it has been built; the time required for putting them in position should therefore not be too long. The work reported here concerns the various problems arising in the case of each channel being supplied individually by a tube at the entry and the exit which is connected to a main circuit made up of large size collectors. This individual tubing is sufficiently flexible to absorb the differential expansion and the movement of its ends without stresses or prohibitive reactions being produced; the tubing is also of relatively short length so as to reduce the pressure head of the pressurized gas outside the channels; the small amount of space taken up by the tubing makes it possible to assemble it in a manner which is satisfactory from the point of view both of the time required and of the technical quality. (authors) [fr

  2. Power spectral density measurements with 252Cf for a light water moderated research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of determining the reactivity of far subcritical systems from neutron noise power spectral density measurements with 252 Cf has previously been tested in fast reactor critical assemblies: a mockup of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor and a uranium metal sphere. Calculations indicated that this measurement was feasible for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to evaluate the ability to perform these measurements with moderated reactors which have long prompt neutron lifetimes, measurements were performed with a small plate-type research reactor whose neutron lifetime (57 microseconds) was about a factor of three longer than that of a PWR and approx. 50% longer than that of a boiling water reactor. The results of the first measurements of power spectral densities with 252 Cf for a water moderated reactor are presented

  3. A moderation layer to improve the safety behavior of sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, B.; Weiß, F.P., E-mail: b.merk@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut für Sicherheitsforschung, Dresden (germany)

    2011-07-01

    The nature of the sodium void effect in an infinite lattice is discussed and for a reduction of the effect the insertion of moderating material is proposed. The effect of three different moderating layers on the sodium void defect and the feedback effects is investigated. Especially the uranium zirconium hydride UzrH layer causes a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally, this layer improves the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system significantly. All changes caused by the insertion of the UZrH layer lead to a significant increase in stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides. (author)

  4. A moderation layer to improve the safety behavior of sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Weiß, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the sodium void effect in an infinite lattice is discussed and for a reduction of the effect the insertion of moderating material is proposed. The effect of three different moderating layers on the sodium void defect and the feedback effects is investigated. Especially the uranium zirconium hydride UzrH layer causes a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally, this layer improves the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system significantly. All changes caused by the insertion of the UZrH layer lead to a significant increase in stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides. (author)

  5. Method of avoiding hazards resulting from accidents in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.; Schumacher, G.

    1984-01-01

    In water-cooled reactors, e.g. BWRs and PWRs, elemental hydrogen is released by hydrolysis (in-leakage). In case of an accident in these reactors or at emergency cooling of e.g., a gas-cooled reactor with water additional hydrogen is produced by chemical reactions of the water with the cladding material. In order to prevent hydrogen pressurizing and the formation of a detonating gas mixture, dry powder containers are provided for in the endangered compartments of the reactor. In case of danger powdered CuO, MnO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , or CdO, the oxygen content of which recombines with the hydrogen, is ejected from them. In addition, an extinguishing substance with an anticatalytic resp. inhibition effect and/or an inert gas of the group N 2 , He, Ar, CO 2 may be admixed to the powder resp. powder mixture. (orig./PW)

  6. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji.

    1996-01-01

    Upon assembling a static container cooling system to an emergency reactor core cooling system using dynamic pumps in a power plant, the present invention provides a cooling device of lowered center of gravity and having a good cooling effect by lowering the position of a cooling water pool of the static container cooling system. Namely, the emergency reactor core cooling system injects water to the inside of a pressure vessel using emergency cooling water stored in a suppression pool as at least one water source upon loss of reactor coolant accident. In addition, a cooling water pool incorporating a heat exchanger is disposed at the circumference of the suppression pool at the outside of the container. A dry well and the heat exchanger are connected by way of steam supply pipes, and the heat exchanger is connected with the suppression pool by way of a gas exhaustion pipe and a condensate returning pipeline. With such a constitution, the position of the heat exchanger is made higher than an ordinary water level of the suppression pool. As a result, the emergency cooling water of the suppression pool water is injected to the pressure vessel by the operation of the reactor cooling pumps upon loss of coolant accident to cool the reactor core. (I.S.)

  7. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  8. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  9. Heat diffusion in cylindrical fuel elements of water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randles, J [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1961-09-15

    This report contains a theoretical study of heat diffusion in the cylindrical fuel elements of water reactors. After setting up appropriate boundary conditions on the temperature, the steady state Fourier equation is solved both for a flat and a tilted fission power source. It is shown that source tilting does not have an appreciable effect on the peak fuel temperature while the heat flux to the coolant suffers a circumferential variation of less than a half of that of the fission power. In the last section, the theory is extended to include the effect of a flat, time dependent fission power. The time dependent Fourier equation is solved by means of a Dini series of Bessel functions which is shown to be rapidly convergent. From this series is derived expressions for the fuel element transfer functions required in reactor servo-analysis. These have the form of a rapidly convergent series of time-lag terms. (author)

  10. 78 FR 63516 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0134] Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling....79.1, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors.'' This... emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling- water reactors (BWRs) whose licenses are issued after...

  11. Performance of materials in the component cooling water systems of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The component cooling water (CCW) system provides cooling water to several important loads throughout the plant under all operating conditions. An aging assessment CCW systems in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was conducted as part of Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program (NPAR) instituted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents some of the results on the performances of materials in respect of their application in CCW Systems. All the CCW system failures reported to the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) from January 1988 to June 1990 were reviewed; it is concluded that three of the main contributors to CCW system failures are valves, pumps, and heat exchangers. This study identified the modes and causes of failure for these components; most of the causes for the aging-related failures could be related to the performance of materials. Also, in this paper the materials used for these components are reviewed, and there aging mechanisms under CCW system conditions are discussed

  12. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  13. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  14. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  15. Study of the consequences of the rupture of a pressure tube in the tank of a gas-cooled, heavy-water moderated reactor; Etude des consequences de la rupture d'un tube de force dans la cuve d'un reacteur modere a l'eau lourde et refroidi au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareux, F; Roche, R; Vrillon, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Bursting of a pressure tube in the tank of a heavy water moderated-gas cooled reactor is an accident which has been studied experimentally about EL-4. A first test (scale 1) having shown that the burst of a tube does not cause the rupture of adjacent tubes, tests on the tank resistance have been undertaken with a very reduced scale model (1 to 10). It has been found that the tank can endure many bursts of tube without any important deformation. Transient pressure in the tank is an oscillatory weakened wave, the maximum of which (pressure peak) has been the object of a particular experimental study. It appears that the most important parameters which affect the pressure peak are; the pressure of the gas included in the bursting pressure tube, the volume of this gas, the mass of air included in the tank and the nature of the gas. A general method to calculate the pressure peak value in reactor tanks has been elaborated by direct application of experimental data. (authors) [French] L'eclatement d'un tube de force dans la cuve d'un reacteur de puissance modere a l'eau lourde et refroidi par un gaz sous pression est un accident qui a ete etudie experimentalement a propos d'EL-4. Un premier essai a l'echelle 1 ayant montre que l'eclatement d'un tube ne provoque pas celui des tubes voisins, des essais relatifs a la tenue de la cuve ont ete effectues sur maquettes a echelle tres reduite (l/lO). Il a ete trouve que la cuve peut supporter plusieurs eclatements de tubes sans deformations notables. La pression transitoire dans la cuve a une allure oscillatoire amortie dont le maximum (pression de pic) a fait l'objet d'une etude experimentale detaillee. Il apparait que les parametres essentiels influant sur cette pression sont: la pression du gaz contenu dans le tube de force, le volume du gaz qui participe a l'eclatement, la flexibilite de la cuve, la masse d'air empoisonnee dans la cuve, la nature du gaz explosant. Une methode generale d'estimation des pics de pression dans

  16. On the use of a moderation layer to improve the safety behavior in sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, Bruno, E-mail: b.merk@fzd.de [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Fridman, Emil; Weiss, Frank-Peter [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Using a moderation layer can reduce the sodium void effect in a SFR. > Inserting the moderation layer improves the Doppler effect significantly. > The uniform layer distribution avoids effects on power and burnup distribution. > Hydride containing material like uranium-zirconium hydride is most efficient. - Abstract: This work shows the effect of the use of moderating layers on the sodium void effect in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. The moderating layers consisting of either boron carbide B{sub 4}C or uranium-zirconium hydride UZrH cause a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally these layers improve the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system. The use of the UZrH is significantly more effective for the reduction of the sodium void effect as well as for the improvement of the fuel temperature and the coolant effect. All changes cause by the insertion of the UZrH layer cause a significantly increased stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides.

  17. Study on the LLFPs transmutation in a super-critical water-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Haoliang; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Transmutation of LLFPs with a super-criticial water cooled fast reactor. → Transmutation of iodine and cesium without the isotopic separation. → The transmuted isotope was mixed with UO 2 to reduce the effect of self-shielding. → A weak neutron moderator Al 2 O 3 was used to suppress the creation of 135 Cs from 133 Cs. - Abstract: The performance of the super-critical water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) for the transmutation treatment of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) was evaluated. Two regions with the soft neutron spectrum, which is of great benefit to the LLFPs transmutation, can be utilized in the Super FR. First region is in the blanket assembly due to the ZrH 1.7 layer which was utilized to slow down the fast neutrons to achieve a negative void reactivity. Second region is in the reflector region of core like other metal-cooled fast reactors. The LLFPs selected in the transmutation analysis include 99 Tc, 129 I and 135 Cs discharged from LWR or fast reactor. Their isotopes, such as 127 I, 133 Cs, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were also considered to avoid the separation. By loading the isotopes ( 99 Tc or 127 I and 129 I) in the blanket assembly and the reflector region simultaneously, the transmutation rates of 5.36%/GWe year and 2.79%/GWe year can be obtained for 99 Tc and 129 I, respectively. The transmuted amounts of 99 Tc and 129 I are equal to the yields from 11.8 and 6.2 1000 MWe-class PWRs. Because of the very low capture cross section of 135 Cs and the effect of other cesium isotopes, 135 Cs was loaded with three rings of assemblies in the reflector region to make the transmuted amount be larger than the yields of two 1000 MWe-class PWRs. Based on these results, 99 Tc and 129 I can be transmuted conveniently and higher transmutation performance can be obtained in the Super FR. However, the transmutation of 135 Cs is very difficult and the transmuted amount is less than that produced by the Super FR. It turns out that the

  18. Design and development of rolled joint for moderator sparger channel of an Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joemon, V.; Sinha, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors are natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated and cooled reactors. As per the conventional scheme, the moderator enters through one or more inlet nozzles penetrating the calandria shell and flows out through outlet nozzles. Baffles are fixed at the inlet nozzles for proper distribution of moderator in the calandria and to avoid the impact of the jet on the neighbouring calandria tubes. An alternate scheme for moderator inlet has been conceived and engineered in which three lower peripheral lattice locations of the reactor are converted into moderator inlets. This is achieved by moderator sparger channels each containing a 5 m long perforated zircaloy-2 sparger tube rolled to the calandria tube sheets and extended by stainless steel tubular components (inserts) at both ends of a sparger channel. Moderator enters the sparger channel at both ends and flows into the calandria. In the absence of standard codes for design of rolled joints, it was requires to develop these joints based on trials followed by various tests. this paper discusses the details of the rolled joint developed for this purpose, the details of the trials with test results and optimization of rolling parameters for these joints

  19. Feasible region of design parameters for water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The performances of a light water cooled thorium breeder reactor have been investigated. A feasible region of fresh fuel enrichment and moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is found to satisfy the constrains of criticality, breeding, and negative void coefficient for several burnups of discharged fuel. The equilibrium fuel cycle burnup calculation has been performed which is coupled with the cell calculation. The MFR is changed to investigate its effect to the breeding capability and void reactivity coefficient profile for different average discharged burnups. For moderated cases, the conversion ratio (CR) decreases with increasing burnup and MFR. The ratio of fissile inventory in equilibrium core to the initial fissile loading (FIR) has the maximum value at certain burnups depending on the MFR and its value increases with the decreasing MFR. Considering to the breeding capability of the reactor, for burnups of equal to 30 GWd/t or higher, the MFR≤0.3 is needed. For the larger MFR and lower burnups, the void reactivity coefficient becomes more negative with an increasing void fraction. The most negative value of the void reactivity coefficient is obtained at MFR=0.3. (author)

  20. Breeding and plutonium characterization analysis on actinides closed water-cooled thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Higher difficulties (barrier) or more complex design of nuclear weapon, material fabrication and handling and isotopic enrichment can be achieved by a higher isotopic barrier. The isotopic material barrier includes critical mass, heat-generation rate, spontaneous neutron generation and radiation. Those isotopic barriers in case of plutonium isotope is strongly depend on the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as 238 Pu, 240 Pu and 242 Pu and for 233 U of thorium cycle depends on 232 U. In this present study, fuel sustainability as fuel breeding capability and plutonium characterization as main focus of proliferation resistance analysis have been analyzed. Minor actinide (MA) is used as doping material to be loaded into the reactors with thorium fuel. Basic design parameters are based on actinide closed-cycle reactor cooled by heavy water. The evaluation use equilibrium burnup analysis coupled with cell calculation of SRAC and nuclear data library is JENDL.32. Parametrical survey has been done to analyze the effect of MA doping rate, different moderation ratio for several equilibrium burnup cases. Plutonium characterization which based on plutonium isotope composition is strongly depending on MA doping concentration and different moderation conditions. Breeding condition can be achieved and high proliferation resistance level can be obtained by the present reactor systems. Higher isotopic plutonium composition of Pu-238 (more than 40%) can be obtained compared with other plutonium isotopes. In addition, higher moderation ratio gives the isotope composition of 238 Pu increases, however, it obtains lower composition when MA doping is increased and it slightly lower composition for higher burnup. Meanwhile, higher 240 Pu composition can be achieved by higher MA doping rate as well as for obtaining higher breeding capability. (author)

  1. Prospects for development of an innovative water-cooled nuclear reactor for supercritical parameters of coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyakin, S. G.; Kirillov, P. L.; Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Nikitenko, M. P.; Makhin, V. M.; Churkin, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The state of nuclear power engineering as of February 1, 2014 and the accomplished elaborations of a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor are briefly reviewed, and the prospects of this new project are discussed based on this review. The new project rests on the experience gained from the development and operation of stationary water-cooled reactor plants, including VVERs, PWRs, BWRs, and RBMKs (their combined service life totals more than 15 000 reactor-years), and long-term experience gained around the world with operation of thermal power plants the turbines of which are driven by steam with supercritical and ultrasupercritical parameters. The advantages of such reactor are pointed out together with the scientific-technical problems that need to be solved during further development of such installations. The knowledge gained for the last decade makes it possible to refine the concept and to commence the work on designing an experimental small-capacity reactor.

  2. Steam-generator tube failures: world experience in water-cooled nuclear power reactors in 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Steam-generator tube failures were reported at 25 of 59 water-cooled nuclear power reactors surveyed in 1974, compared to 11 of 49 in 1973. A summary is presented of these failures, most of which, where the cause is known, were the result of corrosion. Water chemistry control, inspection and repair procedures, and failure rates are discussed

  3. Emergency reactor cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Hidefumi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling water in a gravitationally dropping water reservoir is injected into a reactor pressure vessel passing through a pipeline upon occurrence of emergency. The pipeline is inclined downwardly having one end thereof being in communication with the pressure vessel. During normal operation, the cooling water in the upper portion of the inclined pipeline is heated by convection heat transfer from the communication portion with the pressure vessel. On the other hand, cooling water present at a position lower than the communication portion forms cooling water lumps. Accordingly, temperature stratification layers are formed in the inclined pipeline. Therefore, temperature rise of water in a vertical pipeline connected to the inclined pipeline is small. With such a constitution, the amount of heat lost from the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline is reduced. Further, there is no worry that cooling water to be injected upon occurrence of emergency is boiled under reduced pressure in the injection pipeline to delay the depressurization of the pressure vessel. (I.N.)

  4. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  5. Supercritical-pressure, once-through cycle light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop new reactor concepts for the innovation of light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors. Concept of the once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor was developed. Major aspects of reactor design and safety were analysed by the computer codes which were developed by ourselves. It includes core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant system, safety criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start up and stability. High enthalpy rise as supercritical boiler was achieved by evaluating the cladding temperature directly during transients. Fundamental safety principle of the reactor is monitoring coolant flow rate instead of water level of LWR. The reactor system is compact and simple because of high specific enthalpy of supercritical water and the once-through cycle. The major components are similar to those of LWR and supercritical thermal plant. Their temperature are within the experiences in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The reactor is compatible with tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of the high head pumps and low coolant flow rate. The power rating of the fast reactor is higher than the that of thermal reactor because of the high power density. (author)

  6. Neutron absorption profile in a reactor moderated by different mixtures of light and heavy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Mohamed E.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Gaber, Fatma A.; Dorrah, Mahmoud E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied neutron absorption spectra in a mixed water moderated reactor. • Changing D 2 O% in moderator induced neutron energy spectral shift. • Most of the neutrons absorbed in control rods were epithermal. • Control rods worth changes were not proportional to changes of D 2 O% in moderator. • Control rod arrangement influenced the neutronic behavior of the reactor. - Abstract: A Monte-Carlo parametric study was carried out to investigate the neutron absorption profile in a model of LR-0 reactor when it is moderated by different mixtures of heavy/light waters at molecular ratios ranging from 0% up to 100% D 2 O at increments of 10% in D 2 O. The tallies included; neutron absorption profiles in control rods and moderator, and neutron capture profile in 238 U. The work focused on neutron absorption in control rods entailing; total mass of control rods needed to attain criticality, neutron absorption density and total neutron absorption in control rods at each of the studied mixed water moderators. The aim was to explore whether thermal neutron poisons are the most suitable poisons to be used in control rods of nuclear reactors moderated by mixed heavy/light water moderators

  7. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide turbomachinery design for water-cooled Small Modular Reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jekyoung; Lee, Jeong Ik; Yoon, Ho Joon; Cha, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We described the concept of coupling the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle to the water-cooled SMRs. • We describe a turbomachinery design code called KAISD T MD that can use real gases too. • We suggest changes to the S-CO 2 cycle layout with multiple-independent shafts. • KAIST T MD was used to design the turbomachinery of suggested layout. - Abstract: The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO 2 ) Brayton cycle has been gaining attention due to its compactness and high efficiency at moderate turbine inlet temperature. Previous S-CO 2 cycle research works in the field of nuclear engineering were focused on its application to the next generation reactor with higher turbine inlet temperature than the existing conventional water-cooled nuclear power plants. However, it was shown in authors’ previous paper that the advantages of the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle can be also further applied to the water-cooled Small Modular Reactor (SMR) with a success, since SMR requires minimal overall footprint while retaining high performance. One of the major issues in the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle is the selection and design of appropriate turbomachinery for the designed cycle. Because most of the nuclear industry uses incompressible working fluids or ideal gases in the turbomachinery, a more detailed examination of the design of the turbomachinery is required for a power system that uses S-CO 2 as working fluid. This is because the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle high efficiency is the result of the non-ideal variation of properties near the CO 2 critical point. Thus, the major focus of this paper is to suggest the design of the turbomachinery necessary for the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle coupled to water cooled SMRs. For this reason, a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle turbomachinery design methodology was suggested and the suggested design methodology was first tested with the existing experimental data to verify its capability. After then, it was applied to the proposed reference system to demonstrate its

  8. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide turbomachinery design for water-cooled Small Modular Reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jekyoung, E-mail: leejaeky85@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon, E-mail: hojoon.yoon@kustar.ac.ae [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cha, Jae Eun, E-mail: jecha@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We described the concept of coupling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle to the water-cooled SMRs. • We describe a turbomachinery design code called KAISD{sub T}MD that can use real gases too. • We suggest changes to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle layout with multiple-independent shafts. • KAIST{sub T}MD was used to design the turbomachinery of suggested layout. - Abstract: The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been gaining attention due to its compactness and high efficiency at moderate turbine inlet temperature. Previous S-CO{sub 2} cycle research works in the field of nuclear engineering were focused on its application to the next generation reactor with higher turbine inlet temperature than the existing conventional water-cooled nuclear power plants. However, it was shown in authors’ previous paper that the advantages of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can be also further applied to the water-cooled Small Modular Reactor (SMR) with a success, since SMR requires minimal overall footprint while retaining high performance. One of the major issues in the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is the selection and design of appropriate turbomachinery for the designed cycle. Because most of the nuclear industry uses incompressible working fluids or ideal gases in the turbomachinery, a more detailed examination of the design of the turbomachinery is required for a power system that uses S-CO{sub 2} as working fluid. This is because the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle high efficiency is the result of the non-ideal variation of properties near the CO{sub 2} critical point. Thus, the major focus of this paper is to suggest the design of the turbomachinery necessary for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to water cooled SMRs. For this reason, a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle turbomachinery design methodology was suggested and the suggested design methodology was first tested with the existing experimental data to verify its capability. After then, it was

  9. Mitigation of hydrogen hazards in water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    Past considerations of hydrogen generated in containment buildings have tended to focus attention on design basis accidents (DBAs) where the extent of the in-core metal-water reaction is limited at low values by the operation of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). The radiolysis of water in the core and in the containment sump, together with the possible corrosion of metals and paints in the containment, are all relatively slow processes. Therefore, in DBAs the time scale involved for the generation of hydrogen allows sufficient time for initiation of measures to control the amount of hydrogen in the containment atmosphere and to prevent any burning. Provisions have been made in most plants to keep the local hydrogen concentration below its flammability limit (4% of volume) by means of mixing devices and thermal recombiners. Severe accidents, involving large scale core degradation and possibly even core concrete interactions, raise the possibility of hydrogen release rates greatly exceeding the capacity of conventional DBA hydrogen control measures. The accident at Three Mile Island illustrated the potential of unmitigated hydrogen accumulation to escalate the potential consequences of a severe accident. In a severe accident scenario, local high hydrogen concentrations can be reached in a short time, leading to flammable gas mixtures in containment. Another possibility is that local high steam concentrations will initially create an inert atmosphere and prevent burning for a limited time. While such temporary inerting provides additional time for mixing (dilution) of the hydrogen with containment air, depending on the quantity of hydrogen released, it prevents early intervention by deliberate ignition and sets up conditions for more severe combustion hazards after steam condensation eventually occurs, e.g., by spray initiation or the long term cooling down of the containment atmosphere. As the foregoing example indicates, analysis of the hydrogen threat in

  10. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. In-service inspections of the reactor cooling system of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerste, W.; Hohnerlein, G.; Werden, B.

    1982-01-01

    In order to guarantee constant safety of the components of the reactor cooling system, regular in-service inspections are carried out after commissioning of the nuclear power plant. This contribution is concerned with the components of the reactor cooling system, referring to the legal requirements, safety-related purposes and scope of the in-service inspections during the entire period of operation of a nuclear power plant. Reports are made with respect to type, examination intervals, examination technique, results and future development. The functional tests which are carried out within the scope of the in-service inspections are not part of this contribution. (orig.) [de

  12. Emergency cooling system with hot-water jet pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.O.W.

    1977-01-01

    The ECCS for a PWR or BWR uses hot-water jet pumps to remove the thermal energy generated in the reactor vessel and stored in the water. The hot water expands in the nozzle part (Laval nozzle) of the jet pump and sucks in coolant (borated water) coming from a storage tank containing subcooled water. This water is mixing with the hot water/steam mixture from the Laval nozzle. The steam is condensed. The kinetic energy of the water is converted into a pressure increase which is sufficient to feed the water into the reactor vessel. The emergency cooling may further be helped by a jet condenser also operating according to the principle of a jet pump and condensing the steam generated in the reactor vessel. (DG) [de

  13. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  14. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors, NERI Proposal No.99-0010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimblott, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors, NERI Proposal No.99-0010. The aim of this project is to develop an experiment-and-theory based model for the radiolysis of nonstandard aqueous systems like those that will be encountered in the Advance Light Water reactor. Three aspects of the radiation chemistry of aqueous systems at elevated temperatures are considered in the project: the radiation-induced reaction within the primary track and with additives, the homogeneous production of H 2 O 2 at high radiation doses, and the heterogeneous reaction of the radiation-induced species escaping the track. The goals outlined for Phase 1 of the program were: the compilation of information on the radiation chemistry of water at elevated temperatures, the simulation of existing experimental data on the escape yields of e aq - , OH, H 2 and H 2 O 2 in γ radiolysis at elevated temperatures, the measurement of low LET and high LET production of H 2 O 2 at room temperature, the compilation of information on the radiation chemistry of water-(metal) oxide interfaces, and the synthesis and characterization the heterogeneous water-oxide systems of interest

  15. Outline of examination guides of water-cooled research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, F.; Kimura, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan published two examination guides of water-cooled research reactors on July 18, 1991; one is for safety design, and another is for safety evaluation. In these guides, careful consideration is taken into account on the basic safety characteristic features of research reactors in order to be reasonable regulative requirements. This paper describes the fundamental philosophy and outline of the guides. (author)

  16. Steam-generator tube performance: world experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of steam-generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978 is reviewed. Tube failures occurred at 31 of the 86 reactors surveyed. The causes of these failures and the procedures designed to deal with them are described. The number of tubes plugged has decreased dramatically in 1978 compared to the previous year. This is attributed to the diligent application of techniques developed through in-plant experience and research and development programs over the past several years

  17. A method and programme (BREACH) for predicting the flow distribution in water cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randles, J.; Roberts, H.A.

    1961-03-01

    The method presented here of evaluating the flow rate in individual reactor channels may be applied to any type of water cooled reactor in which boiling occurs The flow distribution is calculated with the aid of a MERCURY autocode programme, BREACH, which is described in detail. This programme computes the steady state longitudinal void distribution and pressure drop in a single channel on the basis of the homogeneous model of two phase flow. (author)

  18. A method and programme (BREACH) for predicting the flow distribution in water cooled reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randles, J; Roberts, H A [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1961-03-15

    The method presented here of evaluating the flow rate in individual reactor channels may be applied to any type of water cooled reactor in which boiling occurs The flow distribution is calculated with the aid of a MERCURY autocode programme, BREACH, which is described in detail. This programme computes the steady state longitudinal void distribution and pressure drop in a single channel on the basis of the homogeneous model of two phase flow. (author)

  19. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathania, R.S.; Tatone, O.S.

    1979-02-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1977. Failures were reported in 34 of the 79 reactors surveyed. Causes of these failures and inspection and repair procedures designed to deal with them are presented. Although corrosion remained the leading cause of tube failures, specific mechanisms have been identified and methods of dealing with them developed. These methods are being applied and should lead to a reduction of corrosion failures in future. (author)

  20. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  1. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K. [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Journeau, C., E-mail: christophe.journeau@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Piluso, P. [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V. [IAE, National Nuclear Centre, Material Structure Investigation Dept., Krasnoarmeiskaya, 10, Kurchatov City (Kazakhstan); Poirier, J. [CEMHTI, 1D, av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U{sub x}, Zr{sub y})O{sub 2-z} water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO{sub 2}, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} below 2000 deg. C but does not resist to a UO{sub 2}-Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture.

  2. Scientific-technical cooperation with Russia. Transient analyses for alternative types of water-cooled reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, Ulrich; Pivovarov, Valeri; Matveev, Yurij

    2010-12-01

    The recently developed multi-group version DYN3D-MG of the reactor dynamics code DYN3D has been qualified for applications to water-cooled reactor concepts different from industrial PWR and BWR. An extended DYN3D version was applied to the graphite-moderated pressure tube reactor EGP-6 (NPP Bilibino) and conceptual design studies of an advanced Boiling Water Reactor with reduced moderation (RMWR) as well as the RUTA-70 reactor for low temperature heat supply. Concerning the RUTA reactor, safe heat removal by natural circulation of the coolant at low pressure has to be shown. For the corresponding validation of thermo-hydraulic system codes like ATHLET and RELAP5, experiments on flashing-induced natural circulation instabilities performed at the CIRCUS test facility at the TU Delft were simulated using the RELAP5 code. For the application to alternative water-cooled reactors, DYN3D model extensions and modifications were implemented, in particular adaptations of heat conduction and heat transfer models. Performing code-to-code comparisons with the Russian fine-mesh neutron diffusion code ACADEM contributed to the verification of DYN3D-MG. Validation has been performed by calculating reactor dynamics experiments at the NPP Bilibino. For the reactors EGP-6, RMWR and RUTA, analyses of various protected and unprotected control rod withdrawal and ejection transients were performed. The beyond design basis accident (BDBA) scenario ''Coast-down of all main coolant pumps at nominal power without scram'' for the RUTA reactor was analyzed using the code complexes DYN3D/ATHLET and DYN3D/RELAP5. It was shown, that the reactor passes over to a save asymptotic state at reduced power with coolant natural circulation. Analyzing the BDBA ''Unprotected withdrawal of a control rod group'' for the RMWR, the safety against Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) could not be shown with the necessary confidence. Finally, conclusions have been drawn

  3. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP

  4. Design guide for heat transfer equipment in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    Information pertaining to design methods, material selection, fabrication, quality assurance, and performance tests for heat transfer equipment in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems is given in this design guide. This information is intended to assist those concerned with the design, specification, and evaluation of heat transfer equipment for nuclear service and the systems in which this equipment is required. (U.S.)

  5. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  6. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  7. Investigation in justification of innovation supercritical water-cooled reactor - WWER-SCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, P.L.; Baranaev, Yu.D.; Bogoslovskaya, G.P.; Glebov, A.P.; Grabezhnaya, V.A.; Kartashov, K.V.; Klushin, A.V.; Popov, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art, gathered experience and development prospects of water-cooled reactors of next generation are considered. It is pointed out that development of SCWR is more attractive from the viewpoint of the basis principle of infrastructure - NPP adaptation without excessive investments. The results of experimental and calculational study of reactor installations on supercritical parameters (SCP) of water and freon are given. Consideration is given to the data on heat transfer at SCP of coolant, optimization of thermodynamic cycle, codes for thermohydraulic calculations, processes of heat and mass transfer at SCP, mass transfer and corrosion in SCP water, fuel elements and martials [ru

  8. Caramel, uranium oxide fuel plates for water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, Pierre; Delafosse, Jacques; Lestiboudois, Guy; Cerles, J.-M.; Schwartz, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel is composed of thin plates assembled parallel to each other to form bundles or assemblies. Each plate is composed of a pavement of uranium oxide pellets, insulated from each other by a zircaloy cladding. The 235 U enrichment does not exceed 8%. The range of uses for this fuel extends from electric power generating reactors to irradiation reactors for research work. A parametric study in test loops has made it possible to determine the operating limits of this thick fuel, without bursting. The resulting diagram gives the permissible power densities, with and without cycling for specific burn-ups beyond 50,000 MWd/t. The thinnest plates were also irradiated in total in the form of advance assemblies irradiated in the core of the OSIRIS pile prior to its transformation. This transformation and the operation of this reactor with a core of 'Caramel' elements is the main trial experiment of this fuel [fr

  9. An evolutionary approach to advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, A.R.; Subki, I.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the result of the Feasibility Study undertaken since 1991, Indonesia may enter in the new nuclear era by introduction of several Nuclear Power Plants in our energy supply system. Requirements for the future NPP's are developed in two step approach. First step is for the immediate future that is the next 50 years where the system will be dominated by A-LWR's/A-PHWR's and the second step is for the time period beyond 50 years in which new reactor systems may start to dominate. The integral reactor concept provides a revolutionary improvements in terms of conceptual and safety. However, it creates a new set of complex machinery and operational problems of its own. The paper concerns with a brief description of nuclear technology status in Indonesia and a qualitative assessment of integral reactor concept. (author)

  10. Power oscillation and stability in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Kis, G.

    1998-01-01

    Periodic oscillation in measured temperature fluctuation was observed near to surface of a heated rod in certain heat transfer range. The frequency of the peak found in power spectral density of temperature fluctuation and period estimated from the cross correlation function for two axially placed thermocouples change linearly with linear energy (or surface heat) production. It was concluded that a resonance of such surface (inlet) temperature oscillation with the pole of the reactor transfer function can be responsible for power oscillation in BWR and PWR, thus instability is not solely due to reactor transfer function. (author)

  11. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic assessment of fast reactor cooling by water of super critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Ukraintsev, V. F.; Kolesov, V. V.

    2007-01-01

    Necessity of essential improvement of competitiveness for reactors on light water determines development of new generation power reactors on water of super critical parameters. The main objective of these projects is reaching of high efficiency coefficients while decreasing of investment to NPP and simplification of thermal scheme and high safety level. International programme of IV generation in which super critical reactors present is already started. In the frame of this concept specific Super Critical Fast Reactor with tight lattice of pitch is developing by collaboration of the FEI and IATE. In present article neutronic and thermal hydraulic assessment of fast reactor with plutonium MOX fuel and a core with a double-path of super critical water cooling is presented (SCFR-2X). The scheme of double path of coolant via the core in which the core is divided by radius on central and periphery parts with approximately equal number of fuel assemblies is suggested. Periferia part is cooling while down coming coolant movement. At the down part of core into the mix chamber flows from the periphery assemblies joining and come to the inlet of the central part which is cooling by upcoming flow. Eight zone of different content of MOX fuel are used (4 in down coming and 4 in upcoming) sub zones. Calculation of fuel burn-up and approximate scheme of refueling is evaluated. Calculation results are presented and discussed

  12. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  13. Steam generator tube performance. Experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Tapping, R.L.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes at water-cooled reactors during 1985 has been reviewed. Seventy-three of 168 reactors in the survey experienced tube degradation sufficient for the tubes to be plugged. The number of tubes plugged was 6837 or 0.28% of those in service. The leading cause of tube failure was stress corrosion cracking from the primary side. Stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack from the secondary side and pitting were also major causes of tube failure. Unlike most previous years, fretting was a substantial problem at some reactors. Overall, corrosion continued to account for more than 80% of the defects. 20 refs

  14. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1983 and 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Meindl, P.; Taylor, G.F.

    1986-06-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 47 (35.6%) of the reactors in 1983 and at 63 (42.6%) of the reactors during 1984. In 1983 and 1984 3291 and 3335 tubes, respectively, were removed from service, about the same as in 1982. The leading causes assigned to tube failure were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side and stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack from the secondary side. In addition 5668 tubes were repaired for further service by installation of internal sleeves. Most of these were believed to have deteriorated by one of the above mechanisms or by pitting. There is a continuing trend towards high-integrity condenser tube materials at sites cooled by brackish or sea water. 31 refs

  15. Steam generator tube failures: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1978-02-01

    A survey was conducted of experience with steam generator tubes at nuclear power stations during 1976. Failures were reported at 25 out of 68 water-cooled reactors. The causes of these failures and the repair and inspection procedures designed to cope with them are summarized. Examination of the data indicates that corrosion was the major cause of steam generator tube failures. Improvements are needed in steam generator design, condenser integrity and secondary water chemistry control. (author)

  16. SPLOSH II: A dynamics programme for nuclear - thermal - hydrodynamic behaviour of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moxon, D.

    1966-01-01

    A dynamics code is described that solves the two-group neutron diffusion equations simultaneously with the thermal and the hydraulic equations for an average channel of a water-cooled reactor. Other reactor channels can be represented as 'slaves', which have no feedback to the average channel. The fission power at any axial station in a slave channel is related to that in the average by prescribed time-dependent factors, and the hydraulic flow is determined from pressure-drop requirements dictated by the performance of the average channel. A finite difference model of the fuel element and can represents the behaviour of the fuel temperatures and surface heat flux. The representation of the hydraulic circuit has been made sufficiently general that the code is applicable to B.W.R., P.W.R. and pressure tube reactor designs. The code can be used to study transients resulting from imposed time variations in coolant flow, inlet enthalpy, system pressure, electrical torque supplied to the circulating pumps, (or alternatively, the angular velocity of the pump rotors,) moderator height, frictional resistances simulating blockages and control rod and fuel element insertions. The harmonic response can be obtained by injecting sinusoidal time variations until the starting transient has been damped out. Output includes axial distributions of the neutron fluxes, heat flux, coolant density and temperature, burn-but margin, and the fuel and can temperatures in both the average and the slave channels. The code was originally written in FORTRAN II for use on the IBM 7090. Computing times vary greatly with the problem and the desired accuracy but experience has shown that a computing time which is slower than real time by a factor thirty is adequate for a wide range of cases. The code has recently been converted to S2 and EGTRAN for use on the IBM 7030 and the English Electric Leo Marconi KDF 9 computers. (author)

  17. Recolonization of reactor cooling water system by the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Recolonization rates for the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea ranged from 3.0 to 5.6 metric tons per year in cooling water basins for a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant. However, a 10-month cleaning cycle for each basin (flow area, 6100 m 2 ) keeps the depth of the silt/clam layer low. With this cleaning frequency, Corbicula are not reaching heat exchangers at sufficient size or in sufficient numbers to restrict flow. Data are presented on the size/age distribution for clams recolonizing cooling water basins between cleanings

  18. Method and plant to remote tritium from the cooling water of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method is proposed for the extraction of tritium from the cooling water of a nuclear reactor, based on the principle of concentrating the tritium by a multi-stage transfer process. The cooling water is brought into contact in each stage with basic, labile, hydrogen-containing material with high pH value, whereby the tritium is transfered into an intermediate solid product and can be separated off. The technical details of the plant are described. Cellulose materials, such as cotton and wood as well as protein-containing material, such as muscle tissue are mentioned as examples of materials with a high affinity to tritium, greater than the affinity of water to tritium. They extract tritium from the cooling water. (HK) [de

  19. Moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal methods for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed for incorporating moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal codes used for pressurized water reactor (PWR) neutronic analysis. Equations for the assembly average quality and density are developed in terms of the assembly power calculated in two dimensions. The method is validated with a Westinghouse PWR using the Electric Power Research Institute code SIMULATE-E. Results show a several percent improvement is achieved in the two-dimensional power distribution prediction compared to methods without moderator feedback

  20. French study and research program on water cooled reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zammite, R.

    1985-05-01

    Electricite de France and the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), joined to obtain, in several fields, the knowledge and qualified calculation tools, they need to develop new means to face the potential consequences of accidents. The bringing on of an important number of PWR units in France in the eightys involves a focusing on these studies. The main fields concerned are the following ones: core cooling accidents and severe accident prevention; fuel behavior in case of accident; containment behavior in accidental situation; emission, transfer and release of fission products in case of accident; probabilistic risk analysis, human factor and earthquakes [fr

  1. Research and development on reduced-moderation light water reactor with passive safety features (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Akie, Hiroshi; Kugo, Teruhiko; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Araya, Fumimasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Okumura, Keisuke; Suzuki, Motoe; Mineo, Hideaki; Nakatsuka, Toru

    2004-06-01

    The present report contains the achievement of 'Research and Development on Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features', which was performed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Hitachi Ltd., Japan Atomic Power Company and Tokyo Institute of Technology in FY2000-2002 as the innovative and viable nuclear energy technology (IVNET) development project operated by the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE). In the present project, the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) has been developed to ensure sustainable energy supply and to solve the recent problems of nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle, such as economical competitiveness, effective use of plutonium and reduction of spent fuel storage. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burnup, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium (Pu) and effective utilization of uranium resources based on accumulated LWR technologies. Our development target is 'Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features' with innovative technologies to achieve above mentioned requirement. Electric power is selected as 300 MWe considering anticipated size required for future deployment. The reactor core consists of MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement to increase the conversion ratio. Design targets of the core specification are conversion ratio more than unity, negative void reactivity feedback coefficient to assure safety, discharged burnup more than 60 GWd/t and operation cycle more than 2 years. As for the reactor system, a small size natural circulation BWR with passive safety systems is adopted to increase safety and reduce construction cost. The results obtained are as follows: As regards core design study, core design was performed to meet the goal. Sequence of startup operation was constructed for the RMWR. As the plant design, plant system was designed to achieve enhanced economy using passive safety system effectively. In

  2. RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

    2003-04-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

  3. Status of advanced light water cooled reactor designs 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The present report, which is significantly more comprehensive than the previously one, addresses the rationale and basic motivations that lead to a continuing development of nuclear technology, provides an overview of the world status of current LWRs, describes the present market situations, and identifies desired characteristics for future plants. The report also provides a detailed description of utility requirements that largely govern today's nuclear development efforts, the situation with regard to enhanced safety objectives, a country wise description of the development activities, and a technical description of the various reactor designs in a consistent format. The reactor designs are presented in two categories: (1) evolutionary concepts that are expected to be commercially available soon; and (2) innovative designs. The report addresses the main technical characteristics of each concept without assessing or evaluating them from a particular point of view (e.g. safety or economics). Additionally, the report identifies basic reference documents that can provide further information for detailed evaluations. The report closes with an outlook on future energy policy developments

  4. Status of advanced light water cooled reactor designs 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The present report, which is significantly more comprehensive than the previously one, addresses the rationale and basic motivations that lead to a continuing development of nuclear technology, provides an overview of the world status of current LWRs, describes the present market situations, and identifies desired characteristics for future plants. The report also provides a detailed description of utility requirements that largely govern today`s nuclear development efforts, the situation with regard to enhanced safety objectives, a country wise description of the development activities, and a technical description of the various reactor designs in a consistent format. The reactor designs are presented in two categories: (1) evolutionary concepts that are expected to be commercially available soon; and (2) innovative designs. The report addresses the main technical characteristics of each concept without assessing or evaluating them from a particular point of view (e.g. safety or economics). Additionally, the report identifies basic reference documents that can provide further information for detailed evaluations. The report closes with an outlook on future energy policy developments.

  5. Natural circulation cooling in US pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.; Wilson, G.E.; Boyack, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The research into the modes of, and heat removed by, natural circulation in PWR systems is reviewed for the purpose of determining the status of this method for off-nominal recovery procedures. The referenced information comes from all facets of the nuclear industry, both domestic and international. The information focuses on recent research (1986--1988); however, pre-1986 research is summarized and referenced. Particular attention is paid to the role of scaling in the experimental facilities and analytical tools. Three modes of natural-circulation cooling are covered: condensation. The conclusion of the review is that the new research reconfirms the pre-1986 conclusion that natural circulation is a viable means of decay heat removal. In addition, the new research sufficiently completes the acquisition of an appropriate experimental data base and the development of system codes to permit the design of valid plant recovery procedures incorporating all three modes of natural circulation. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2001-07-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  7. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2001-01-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  8. Chooz A: a model for the dismantling of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2017-01-01

    The specificity of Chooz-A, the first French pressurized water reactor (PWR), is that the reactor and its major components (pumps, exchangers and cooling circuits) are installed in 2 caves dug out in a hill slope. Chooz-A was operating from 1967 to 1991, in 1993 the fuel was removed and in 2007 EDF received the authorization to dismantle the reactor. In 2012, EDF completed the dismantling of the cave containing the elements of the cooling circuit, a cornerstone was the removing of the four 14 m high steam generators. The dismantling of the pressure vessel began in march 2017, it is the same tools and the same processes that were used for the dismantling of the pressure vessel of the Zorita plant (Spain) in 2016. The end of the Chooz-A dismantling is expected in 2022. The feedback experience will help to standardize practices for the French fleet of PWRs. (A.C.)

  9. Physical aspects of the Canadian generation IV supercritical water-cooled pressure tube reactor plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudet, M.; Yetisir, M.; Haque, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The form of the containment building is a function of the requirements imposed by various systems. In order to provide sufficient driving force for naturally-circulated emergency cooling systems, as well as providing a gravity-driven core flooding pool function, the Canadian SCWR reactor design relies on elevation differences between the reactor and the safety systems. These elevation differences, the required cooling pool volumes and the optimum layout of safety-related piping are major factors influencing the plant design. As a defence-in-depth, the containment building and safety systems also provide successive barriers to the unplanned release of radioactive materials, while providing a path for heat flow to the ultimate heat sink, the atmosphere. Access to the reactor for refuelling is from the top of the reactor, with water used as shielding during the refuelling operations. The accessibility to the reactor and protection of the environment are additional factors influencing the plant design. This paper describes the physical implementation of the major systems of the Canadian SCWR within the reactor building, and the position of major plant services relative to the reactor building. (author)

  10. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  11. Operation and Licensing of Mixed Cores in Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear fuel is a highly complex material that is subject to continuous development and is produced by a range of manufacturers. During operation of a nuclear power plant, the nuclear fuel is subject to extreme conditions of temperature, corroding environment and irradiation, and many different designs of fuel have been manufactured with differing fuel materials, cladding materials and assembly structure to ensure these conditions. The core of an operating power plant can contain hundreds of fuel assemblies, and where there is more than a single design of a fuel assembly in the core, whether through a change of fuel vendor, introduction of an improved design or for some other reason, the core is described as a mixed core. The task of ensuring that the different assembly types do not interact in a harmful manner, causing, for example, differing flow resistance resulting in under cooling, is an important part of ensuring nuclear safety. This report has compiled the latest information on the operational experience of mixed cores and the tools and techniques that are used to analyse the core operation and demonstrate that there are no safety related problems with its operation. This publication is a result of a technical meeting in 2011 and a series of consultants meetings

  12. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  13. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  14. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. The Effect of Topaz Irradiation to the Quality of Cooling Water Reactor GA Siwabessy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elisabeth Ratnawati; Kawkab Mustofa; Arif Hidayat

    2012-01-01

    Topaz irradiation which applied both inside and outside the reactor core is one utilization of the reactor GA Siwabessy. Topaz consists of silicon clusters containing a combination of aluminum, fluorine and hydroxyl, and impurities. The results of the qualitative analysis of the topaz before irradiation detected europium (Eu-152), potassium (K-40) and sodium (Na-24). While the post-irradiation of topaz detected europium (Eu), cobalt (Co), cesium (Cs), tantalum (Ta), scandium (Sc), iron (Fe), Selenium (Se) and potassium (K). These elements might affect the quality of the cooling water. But the results of the qualitative analysis that were carried out to the primary cooling water did not reveal any elements similar to the elements contained in topaz impurities. Most likely this is because most impurities have been caught by the resin trap in purification systems, because of the results of the analysis of the dirt on the resin trap contained elements similar to the impurities Fe and Co topaz. The purification system makes quality primary cooling water is maintained. From the result shows that chemically the quality of primary cooling water is not affected by the topaz irradiation. (author)

  16. Hydrogen behaviour and mitigation in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Loggia, E.

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), within the framework of their safety research activities, initiated and arranged a series of specialist meetings and research contracts on hydrogen behaviour and control. The result of this work is summarized in a report jointly prepared by the two international organizations entitled 'Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors'. Independently, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute organized a workshop on the hydrogen issue in Sukhumi, USSR, with CEC and IAEA cooperation. Commonly expressed views have emerged and recommendations were formulated to organize the subsequent seminar/workshop concentrating mainly on the most recent research and analytical projects and findings related to the hydrogen behaviour, and-most importantly-on the practical approaches and engineering solutions to the hydrogen control and mitigation. The seminar/workshop, therefore, addressed the 'theory and practice' aspects of the hydrogen issue. The workshop was structured in the following sessions: combustible gas production; hydrogen distribution; combustion phenomena; combustion effects and threats; and detection and migration

  17. Power distribution monitoring system in the boiling water cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskij, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the system of physical power distribution monitoring, used during several years in the VK-50 tank type boiling water cooled reactor. Experiments were conducted to measure the ratios of detector prompt and activation currents, coefficients of detector relative sensitivity with respect to neutrons and effective cross sections of 103 Rh interaction with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Mobile self-powered detectors (SPD) with rhodium emitters are used as the power distribution detectors in the considered system. All detectors move simultaneously with constant rate in channels, located in fuel assembly central tubes, when conducting the measurements. It is concluded on the basis of analyzing the obtained data, that investigated system with calibrated SPD enables to monitor the absolute power distribution in fuel assemblies under conditions of boiling water cooled reactor and is independent of thermal engineering measurements conducted by in core instruments

  18. Development status and application prospect of supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Manchang; Wang Mingli

    2006-01-01

    The Supercritical-pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as one of the six Generation IV nuclear systems that will be developed in the future, and it is an innovative design based on the existing technologies used in LWR and supercritical coal-fired plants. Technically, SCWR may be based on the design, construction and operation experiences in existing PWR and supercritical coal-fired plants, which means that there is no insolvable technology difficulties. Since PWR technology will be adopted in the near term and medium term projects in China, and considering the sustainable development of the technology, it is an inevitable choice to research and develop the nuclear system of supercritical light water cooled reactor. (authors)

  19. Cooling water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  20. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  1. Optimization of the fuel assembly for the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C.; Bonin, H.; Chan, P., E-mail: Corey.French@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A parametric optimization of the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) lattice geometry and fresh fuel content is performed in this work. With the potential to improve core physics and performance, significant gains to operating and safety margins could be achieved through slight progressions. The fuel performance codes WIMS-AECL and SERPENT are used to calculate performance factors, and use them as inputs to an optimization algorithm. (author)

  2. Supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel management and economic comparison and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming; Ruan Liangcheng; Liu Xuechun

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is expected to have an excellent fuel economical efficiency because of its high thermal efficiency. This article compares CSR1OOO with the current mainstream PWR and ABWR on the aspect of the economical efficiency of fuel management, and finally makes an unexpected conclusion that the SCWR has worse fuel economy than others. And it remains to be deliberated whether the SCWR will be the fourth generation of nuclear system. (authors)

  3. HAZOP-study on heavy water research reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi-Tilehnoee, M.; Pazirandeh, A.; Tashakor, S.

    2010-01-01

    By knowledge-based Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) technique, equipment malfunction and deficiencies in the primary cooling system of the generic heavy water research reactor are studied. This technique is used to identify the representative accident scenarios. The related Process Flow Drawing (PFD) is prepared as our study database for this plant. Since this facility is in the design stage, applying the results of HAZOP-study to PFD improves the safety of the plant.

  4. Ecological impact of chloro-organics produced by chlorination of cooling tower waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Cumming, R.B.; Pitt, W.W.; Taylor, F.G.; Thompson, J.E.; Hartmann, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results of the initial assessment of chlorine-containing compounds in the blowdown from cooling towers and the possible mutagenic activity of these compounds are reported. High-resolution liquid chromatographic separations were made on concentrates of the blowdown from the cooling tower at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and from the recirculating water system for the cooling towers at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The chromatograms of chlorinated cooling waters contained numerous uv-absorbing and cerate-oxidizable constituents that are now being processed through a multicomponent identification procedure. Concentrates of the chlorinated waters are also being examined for mutagenic activity

  5. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1980-02-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1978. Tube failures occurred at 31 of the 86 reactors surveyed. Causes of these failures and procedures designed to deal with them are described. A dramatic decrease in the number of tubes plugged was evident in 1978 compared to the previous year. This is attributed to diligent application of techniques developed from in-plant experience and research and development programs over the past several years. (auth)

  6. The effects of aging on Boiling Water Reactor core isolation cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bom Soon.

    1994-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system in commercial Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The failure data, from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the RCIC system. This analysis identified important components that should receive the highest priority in terms of aging management. The aging characterization provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes

  7. Some methods of failed fuel element detection in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strindehag, O.M.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are surveyed using fission products released in the coolant for the detection of failed fuel elements in water cooled reactors. The classification of the detection methods is made with respect to fission product detection in the coolant and to gaseous fission product detection. The detection systems are listed used for the AGESTA power reactor and for the experimental loops of the RA research reactor based on the detection of either gaseous fission products or gaseous daughter products. The AGESTA reactor detection systems using electrostatic precipitators consist of five precipitator channels of which three are intended for detection and two for localization. A special detection unit was developed for the failed fuel element detection in the R-2 reactor experimental steam loop. Its description is listed. In the reactor pressurized-water loop a Cherenkov counter was used in the detection of fission products. An ion exchange monitor whose application is described was used in the total measurement of the main coolant flow in the AGESTA reactor. (J.P.)

  8. Stability monitoring of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for monitoring the stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are discussed. Surveillance of BWR stability is of importance as problems were encountered in several large reactors. Moreover, surveying stability allows plant owners to operate at high power with acceptable stability margins. The results of experiments performed on the Dodewaard BWR (the Netherlands) are reported. This type reactor is cooled by natural circulation, a cooling principle that is also being considered for new reactor designs. The stability of this reactor was studied both with deterministic methods and by noise analysis. Three types of stability are distinguished and were investigated separately: reactor-kinetic stability, thermal-hydraulic stability and total-plant stability. It is shown that the Dodewaard reactor has very large stability margins. A simple yet reliable stability criterion is introduced. It can be derived on-line from thhe noise signal of ex-vessel neutron detectors during normal operation. The sensitivity of neutron detectors to in-core flux perturbations - reflected in the field-of-view of the detector - was calculated in order to insure proper stability surveillance. A novel technique is presented which enables the determination of variations of the in-core coolant velocity by noise correlation. The velocity measured was interpreted on the basis of experiments performed on the air/water flow in a model of a BWR coolant channel. It appeared from this analysis that the velocity measured was much higher than the volume-averaged water and air velocities and the volumetric flux. The applicability of the above-mentioned technique to monitoring of local channel-flow stability was tested. It was observed that stability effects on the coolant velocity are masked by other effects originating from the local flow pattern. Experimental and theoretical studies show a shorter effective fuel time constant in a BWR than was assumed. (author). 118 refs.; 73 figs.; 21 tabs

  9. FLUID MODERATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-10-22

    A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

  10. Research on water hammer forces caused by rapid growth of bubbles at severe accidents of water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Adachi, Masaki; Aya, Izuo

    2004-01-01

    At severe accidents of Water Cooled Reactors a great deal of gas is expected to be produced in a short time within the water of lower part of nuclear pressure vessel and containment vessel caused by hydrogen production with a metal water reaction and steam explosions with direct contact of melting core and water. Water hammer forces caused by rapid growth of bubbles shall work on the wall of containment vessel and affect its integrity. Coherency of water block movement is not clear, whether simultaneous or in the same direction. Water block behavior and water hammer forces caused by rapid growth of bubbles have been tested using a modified scale model and analyzed to obtain experimental correlated equation to estimate water block's rising distance and velocity from water hammer data. Numerical analysis using RELAP5-3D (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program) has been conducted to evaluate water hammer forces and makes clear its modifications needed. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Onsite nondestructive examination techniques for irradiated water-cooled power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, in response to the recommendations from several Member States, has prepared this Guidebook on Onsite Non-Destructive Techniques for Irradiated Water-Cooled Power Reactor Fuel with the assistance of a number of experts and organizations in this field. During the preparation of this report it became evident that a comparison between different techniques is a most difficult task and depends on a number of factors related to fuel design, plant characteristics and operating conditions. Consequently the emphasis of the report is on the survey of different techniques presently available. It is also to be noted that because the degree of development for any given technique varies significantly among organizations, it is understood that the report should not be used as consensus standard of the minimum capabilities for each class of techniques, nor does it give recommendations in the regulatory sense. Furthermore, the inclusion of some commercial pieces of equipment, services and other products are for illustrative purposes only and neither implies any preference by the Agency nor can the Agency be liable for any material presented in the report

  12. Research and development of the supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The concept of high temperature reactor cooled by light water (SCR) has been developed at the University of Tokyo since 1989. Major elements of reactor conceptual design and safety were studied. It includes fuel rod design, core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant heat balance, safety design, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start-up and stability. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical FPP in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil Fired Power Plants (FPP) will be fully utilized for SCR. Although the concept was developed at the University of Tokyo mostly with our own funds and resources, four funding was/is provided for the research in Japan so far. Those are TEPCO studies with Japanese vendors in 1994 and 1995. JSPS (Monbusho) funding of pulse radiolysis of supercritical water to the University of Tokyo, Japanese-NERI program of METI to Toshiba team on thermal hydraulics, corrosion and plant system and Japanese-NERI program of MEXT on water chemistry to the University of Tokyo. The concept was taken as the reference of HPLWR study in Europe with funding of EU in 2000 and 2001. The concept was evaluated in the Generation 4 reactor program in USA. It was selected as only one water-cooled Generation 4 reactor. This paper describes the overview of the conceptual design at the University of Tokyo and R and D in the world

  13. Proceedings (slides) of the OECD/NEA Workshop on Innovations in Water-cooled Reactor Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiler, Joze; Kim, Sang-Baik; ); Feron, Fabien; Jaervinen, Marja-Leena; Husse, Julien; ); Ferraro, Giovanni; Bertels, Frank; Denk, Wolfgang; Tuomisto, Harri; Golay, Michael; Buongiorno, J.; Todreas, N.; Adams, E.; Briccetti, A.; Jurewicz, J.; Kindfuller, V.; Srinivasan, G.; Strother, M.; Minelli, P.; Fasil, E.; Zhang, J.; Genzman, G.; Epinois, Bertrand de l'; Kim, Shin Whan; Laaksonen, Jukka; Maltsev, Mikhail; Yu, CHongxing; Powell, David; Gorgemans, Julie; Hopwood, Jerry; Bylov, Igor; Bakhmetyev, Alexander M.; Lepekhin, Andrey N.; Fadeev, Yuriy P.; Bruna, Giovanni; Gulliford, Jim; ); Ham-Su, Rosaura; Thevenot, Caroline; GAUTIER, Guy-Marie; MARSAULT, Philippe; PIGNATEL, Jean-Francois; White, Andrew; )

    2015-02-01

    New technologies and solutions have been developed over more than thirty years to improve the safety, performance and economics of nuclear power plants. Particular efforts were made in designing systems to prevent or mitigate nuclear accidents and, greatly limit or even avoid any offsite release of radioactivity. Reactor designs developed in the 1980's and later are often referred to as Generation III (Gen III) reactors. They offer enhanced safety compared to earlier Generation II (Gen II) designs, as well as improved performance and economics. Examples of Gen III safety design features include solutions for corium localisation, advanced containment structures, improved emergency core-cooling systems, filtered venting systems, hydrogen risk management solutions, etc. Some of these solutions have also been back-fitted or partially adapted to existing reactors, based on recommendations from regulators or modernisation efforts by the utilities operating these reactors, to bring their level of safety to levels approaching those of the more modern designs. Other innovations found in the latest water-cooled reactor designs include the use of passive safety systems, and often associated with those, a simplification in the design of the reactor. Gen III reactors also feature better economics, for example increased design lifetime up to 60 years, ability to use 100% MOX fuel and operate with higher flexibility, higher thermal efficiencies and reduced staff requirements. Modularity is often quoted as a feature of some Gen III designs as a way of reducing the construction times and simplifying the decommissioning of the plant. The scope of the Workshop includes, inter alia: - Evolution of regulatory and design requirements for commercial water-cooled reactors; - Innovations in water-cooled reactor technologies that allowed significant improvement in the level of safety, with a discussion on advantages and challenges of active vs. passive safety systems; - Innovations under

  14. Survey of natural-circulation cooling in U.S. pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    Literature describing natural circulation analyses, experiments, and plant operation have been obtained from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reactor vendors, utility-sponsored research groups, utilities, national laboratories, and foreign sources. These have been reviewed and significant results and conclusions identified. Three modes of natural-circulation cooling are covered: single phase, two-phase, and reflux condensation. Single-phase natural circulation is amply verified by plant operational data, test data from scaled experimental facilities, and analysis with assessed computer codes. Ample evidence also exists that two-phase natural circulation can successfully cool pressurized water reactors. This mode occurs during certain events such as small-break loss-of-coolant accidents. The data base for reflux condensation is primarily from tests in scaled experimental facilities. There are no plant operational data and only limited assessment of thermal-hydraulic systems codes has been performed. Further work is needed before this mode of natural circulation can be confidently used

  15. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  16. Multi-physical developments for safety related investigations of low moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-12-19

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  17. Multi-physical Developments for Safety Related Investigations of Low Moderated Boiling Water Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  18. Numerical simulation of severe water ingress accidents in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, W.

    1996-01-01

    This report analyzes reverse water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200 MW Modular Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-MODULE) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margins of the current HTR-MODULE design and to realize a catastrophe-free nuclear technology. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The DSNP system is then used to simulate the primary and secondary circuit of a HTR-MODULE power plant. Comparisons of the model with experiments and with TINTE calculations serve as validation of the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit tries to answer the question how fast the water enters the reactor core. It was found that the maximum H 2 O concentration increase in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m 3 s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H 2 O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduce the ingress velocity of the H 2 O into the reactor core. In order to answer the question how much water enters the primary circuit, the full cavitation of the feed water pumps is analyzed. It is found that if the secondary circuit is depressurized enough, the feed water pumps will be inherently stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water to be pumped from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the MODUL-HTR power plant then shows that the H 2 O inventory in the primary circuit can be limited to about 3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600 C was not reached in any case. (orig.) [de

  19. Severe water ingress accident analysis for a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, Winfried

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyzes the severe water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200MW Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-Module) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margin of the current HTR-Module design. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is originally developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The developed DSNP system is used to simulate the primary circuit of HTR-Module power plant. The comparisons of the models with the TINTE calculations validate the current simulation. After analyzing the effects of blower separation on water droplets, the wall heat storage, etc., it is found that the maximum H 2 O density increase rate in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m 3 s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H 2 O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduces the impulse of the H 2 O in the reactor core. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600degC was not reached in any case. (author)

  20. Core design of a high breeding fast reactor cooled by supercritical pressure light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Takayuki, E-mail: russell@ruri.waseda.jp; Yamaji, Akifumi

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Core design concept of supercritical light water cooled fast breeding reactor is developed. • Compound system doubling time (CSDT) is applied for considering an appropriate target of breeding performance. • Breeding performance is improved by reducing fuel rod diameter of the seed assembly. • Core pressure loss is reduced by enlarging the coolant channel area of the seed assembly. - Abstract: A high breeding fast reactor core concept, cooled by supercritical pressure light water has been developed with fully-coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations, which takes into account the influence of core pressure loss to the core neutronics characteristics. Design target of the breeding performance has been determined to be compound system doubling time (CSDT) of less than 50 years, by referring to the relationship of energy consumption and economic growth rate of advanced countries such as the G7 member countries. Based on the past design study of supercritical water cooled fast breeder reactor (Super FBR) with the concept of tightly packed fuel assembly (TPFA), further improvement of breeding performance and reduction of core pressure loss are investigated by considering different fuel rod diameters and coolant channel geometries. The sensitivities of CSDT and the core pressure loss with respect to major core design parameters have been clarified. The developed Super FBR design concept achieves fissile plutonium surviving ratio (FPSR) of 1.028, compound system doubling time (CSDT) of 38 years and pressure loss of 1.02 MPa with positive density reactivity (negative void reactivity). The short CSDT indicates high breeding performance, which may enable installation of the reactors at a rate comparable to energy growth rate of developed countries such as G7 member countries.

  1. Cooling system upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Oda, Shingo; Miura, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    A water level indicator for detecting the upper limit value for a range of using a suppression pool and a thermometer for detecting the temperature of water at the cooling water inlet of an auxiliary device are disposed. When a detection signal is intaken and the water level in the suppression pool reach the upper limit value for the range of use, a secondary flow rate control value is opened and a primary flow rate control valve is closed. When the temperature of the water at the cooling water inlet of the auxiliary device reaches the upper limit value, the primary and the secondary flow rate control valves are opened. During a stand-by state, the first flow rate control valve is set open and the secondary flow rate control valve is set closed respectively. After reactor isolation, if a reactor water low level signal is received, an RCIC pump is actuated and cooling water is sent automatically under pressure from a condensate storage tank to the reactor and the auxiliary device requiring coolants by way of the primary flow rate control valve. Rated flow rate is ensured in the reactor and cooling water of an appropriate temperature can be supplied to the auxiliary device. (N.H.)

  2. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  3. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  4. Emergency reactor container cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns an emergency cooling facility for a nuclear reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber, in which water in the suppression chamber is effectively used for cooling the reactor container. That is, the lower portion of a water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline. The lower end of the pipeline and a pressurized incombustible gas tank disposed to the outside of the reactor container are connected by a pipeline by way of valves. Then, when the temperature of the lower end of the pressure vessel exceeds a predetermined value, the valves are opened. If the valves are opened, the incombustible gas flows into the lower end of the pipeline connecting the lower portion of the water pool in the pressure suppression chamber and the inside of the reactor container. Since the inside of the pipeline is a two phase flow comprising a mixture of a gas phase and a liquid phase, the average density is decreased. Therefore, the water level of the two phase flow is risen by the level difference between the inside and the outside of the pipeline and, finally, the two phase mixture is released into the reactor container. As a result, the reactor container can be cooled by water in the suppression chamber by a static means without requiring pumps. (I.S.)

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment facility (OMRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) facility performed from October 1977 through September 1979. This D and D project included removal of all the facilities and as much contaminated soil and rock as practical. Removal of the reactor pressure vessel was an unusually difficult problem, and an extraordinary, unexpected amount of activated rock and soil was removed. After removal of all significantly contaminated material, the site consisted of a 20-ft deep excavation surrounded by backfill material. Before this excavation was backfilled, it and the backfill material were radiologically surveyed and detailed records made of these surveys. After the excavation was backfilled and graded, the site surface was surveyed again and found to be essentially uncontaminated

  6. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  7. A Management Strategy for the Heavy Water Reflector Cooling System of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. S.; Park, Y. C.; Lim, S. P. (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Heavy water is used as the reflector and the moderator of the HANARO research reactor. After over 10 years operation since first criticality in 1995 there arose some operational issues related with the tritium. A task force team(TFT) has been operated for 1 year since September 2006 to study and deduce resolutions of the issues concerning the tritium and the degradation of heavy water in the HANARO reflector system. The TFT drew many recommendations on the hardware upgrade, tritium containing air control, heavy water quality management, waste management, and tritium measurement system upgrade.

  8. Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Dong Yujie; Scherer, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was 3 s). The water vaporization in the steam generator and characteristics of water transport from the steam generator to the reactor core would reduce the rate of water ingress into the reactor core. The analysis of a full cavitation of the feedwater pump showed that if the secondary circuit could be depressurized, the feedwater pump would be stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water transported from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to ∼3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged

  9. Natural-circulation flow pattern during the gamma-heating phase of an LBLOCA in a heavy-water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, S.B.; Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Motley, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    In a postulated large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA), the core of the reactor is uncovered quickly as the liquid that drains out of the tank is replaced by air. During the LBLOCA, the reactor is scrammed. the moderator tank is drained, and fuel and control rod tubes are cooled internally by forced convection via the emergency cooling system (ECS) water. However, the safety rods, reflector assemblies, tank wall, and instrument rods continue to heat up as a result of gamma deposition. These components are primarily cooled by natural/mixed convection and radiation heat transfer. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a reactor moderator tank exposed to air during an LBLOCA is discussed. The analysis was performed using a special version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). TRAC input and code modifications considered the appropriate modeling of ECS cooling, thermal radiation heat transfer, and natural convection. The major objective of the model was to calculate the limiting component temperature (that establishes the maximum operating power) as a result of gamma heating. In addition, the nature of the moderator tank air-circulation pattern and its effects on the limiting temperature under various conditions were analyzed. None of the components were found to exceed their structural limits when the pre-scram power level was 50% of historical power

  10. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachansky, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders

  11. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachansky, S [Building Research Institute (NISI), Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-07-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders.

  12. Sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkyo, N; Inoue, K; Maeda, H

    1968-11-21

    In a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor, an ultrasonic generator is installed at a fuel assembly hold-down mechanism positioned above a blanket or fission gas reservoir located above the core. During operation of the reactor an ultrsonic wave of frequency 10/sup 3/ - 10/sup 4/ Hz is constantly transmitted to the core to resonantly inject the primary bubble with ultrasonic energy to thereby facilitate its growth. Hence, small bubbles grow gradually to prevent the sudden boiling of sodium if an accident occurs in the cooling system during operation of the reactor.

  13. Fuel element replacement and cooling water activity at the musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tetsuya; Honda, Teruyuki; Horiuchi, Norikazu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Sato, Tadashi

    1989-01-01

    The Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (TRIGA 11, 100 kW) has been operated without serious problems since 1963. However, because there is no more spare fuel element, it was necessary to decide how to solve the problem. In the end, it was decided to obtain many stainless steel-clad fuel elements and operate with those fuel elements only, under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The bulk shielding experimental pool was remodeled as the storage for spent fuel elements, where the neutrons from the thermalizing column were shielded with cadmium and boron polyethylene plates. The equipment for transferring spent fuel elements was built and temporarily set up between the core tank and the new storage. These works were started in 1983, and finished in 1985. After the reactor was restarted, the count rate of the conventional cooling water monitor which was set in the cooling system using a GM counter drastically decreased. The spent fuel storage, the equipment and the works for fuel transfer, and the radioactivity of cooling water are reported. (K.I.)

  14. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chending; Zhao, Fuqiang; Zhang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH 4 ) and CO 2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ∼9.66 × 10 4 t/y and ∼26.6 × 10 4 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration

  15. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  16. XHM-1 alloy as a promising structural material for water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Alekseev, A.B.; Kazennov, Yu.I.; Khramtsov, V.F.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Rechitsky, V.N.; Stepankov, V.N.; Votinov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experience gained in utilizing austenitic stainless steel components in water-cooled power reactors indicates that the main cause of their failure is the steel's propensity for corrosion cracking. In search of a material immune to this type of corrosion, different types of austenitic steels and chromium-nickel alloys were investigated and tested at VNIINM. This paper presents the results of studying physical and mechanical properties, irradiation and corrosion resistance in a water coolant at <350 C of the alloy XHM-1 as compared with austenitic stainless steels 00Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, 00Cr20Ni25Nb and alloy 00Cr20Ni40Mo5Nb. Analysis of the results shows that, as distinct from the stainless steels studied, the XHM-1 alloy is completely immune to corrosion cracking (CC). Not a single induced damage was encountered within 50 to 350 C in water containing different amounts of chlorides and oxygen under tensile stresses up to the yield strength of the material. One more distinctive feature of the alloy compared to steels is that no change in the strength or total elongation is encountered in the alloy specimens irradiated to 32 dpa at 350 C. The XHM-1 alloy has adequate fabricability and high weldability characteristics. As far as its properties are concerned, the XHM-1 alloy is very promising as a material for water-cooled fusion reactor components. (orig.)

  17. Estimation of the amount of surface contamination of a water cooled nuclear reactor by cooling water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)]. E-mail: nagyg@sunserv.kfki.hu; Somogyi, A. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Patek, G. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant, P.O. Box 71, Paks H-7031 (Hungary); Pinter, T. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant, P.O. Box 71, Paks H-7031 (Hungary); Schiller, R. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)

    2007-06-15

    Calculations, based upon on-the-spot measurements, were performed to estimate the contamination of NPP primary circuit and spent fuel storage pool solid surfaces via the composition of the cooling water in connection with a non-nuclear incident in the Paks NPP. Thirty partially burnt-up fuel element bundles were damaged during a cleaning process, an incident which resulted in the presence of fission products in the cooling water of the cleaning tank (CT) situated in a separate pool (P1). Since this medium was in contact for an extended period of time with undamaged fuel elements to be used later and also with other structural materials of the spent fuel storage pool (SP), it was imperative to assess the surface contamination of these latter ones with a particular view to the amount of fission material. In want of direct methods, one was restricted to indirect information which rested mainly on the chemical and radiochemical data of the cooling water. It was found that (i) the most important contaminants were uranium, plutonium, cesium and cerium; (ii) after the isolation of P1 and SP and an extended period of filtering the only important contaminants were uranium and plutonium; (iii) the surface contamination of the primary circuit (PC) was much lower than that of either SP or P1; (iv) some 99% of the contamination was removed from the water by the end of the filtering process.

  18. All heavy metals closed-cycle analysis on water-cooled reactors of uranium and thorium fuel cycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Waris, Abdul; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Uranium and Thorium fuels as the basis fuel of nuclear energy utilization has been used for several reactor types which produce trans-uranium or trans-thorium as 'by product' nuclear reaction with higher mass number and the remaining uranium and thorium fuels. The utilization of recycled spent fuel as world wide concerns are spent fuel of uranium and plutonium and in some cases using recycled minor actinide (MA). Those fuel schemes are used for improving an optimum nuclear fuel utilization as well to reduce the radioactive waste from spent fuels. A closed-cycle analysis of all heavy metals on water-cooled cases for both uranium and thorium fuel cycles has been investigated to evaluate the criticality condition, breeding performances, uranium or thorium utilization capability and void reactivity condition. Water-cooled reactor is used for the basic design study including light water and heavy water-cooled as an established technology as well as commercialized nuclear technologies. A developed coupling code of equilibrium fuel cycle burnup code and cell calculation of SRAC code are used for optimization analysis with JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. An equilibrium burnup calculation is adopted for estimating an equilibrium state condition of nuclide composition and cell calculation is performed for calculating microscopic neutron cross-sections and fluxes in relation to the effect of different fuel compositions, different fuel pin types and moderation ratios. The sensitivity analysis such as criticality, breeding performance, and void reactivity are strongly depends on moderation ratio and each fuel case has its trend as a function of moderation ratio. Heavy water coolant shows better breeding performance compared with light water coolant, however, it obtains less negative or more positive void reactivity. Equilibrium nuclide compositions are also evaluated to show the production of main nuclides and also to analyze the isotopic composition pattern especially

  19. Power density effect on feasibility of water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidik, Permana; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Breeding is made possible by the high value of neutron regeneration ratio η for 233 U in thermal energy region. The reactor is fueled by 233 U-Th oxide and it has used the light water as moderator. Some characteristics such as spectrum, η value, criticality, breeding performance and number density are evaluated. Several power densities are evaluated in order to analyze its effect to the breeding performance. The η value of fissile 233 U obtains higher value than 2 which may satisfy the breeding capability especially for thermal reactor for all investigated MFR. The increasing enrichment and decreasing conversion ratio are more significant for MFR 233 U enrichment. Number density of 233 Pa decreases significantly with decreasing power density which leads the reactor has better breeding performance because lower capture rate of 233 Pa. (author)

  20. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing

  1. Water chemical control of the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, Lucia M.L.A; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Damazio, Ilza; Fagundes, Oliene dos R.; Cintra, Maria Olivia C.; Andrade, Geraldo V. de; Amaral, Angela M.; Franco, Milton B.; Fortes, Flavio; Gomes, Nilton Carlos; Vidal, Andrea; Maretti Junior, Fausto; Knupp, Eliana A.N.; Souza, Wagner de; Guedes, Joao B.; Furtado, Renato C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor located at CDTN/CNEN has been in operation and contributed to research and with services to society since 1960. Is has been used in several activities such as nuclear power plant operation, graduate and post-graduate training courses, isotope production, and as an analytical irradiation tool of different types of samples. Among the several structural and operational safety requirements is the chemical quality control of the primary circuit cooling water. The aim of this work was to check the cooling water quality from the pool reactor. A water sampling plan was proposed (May, 2011 - June, 2012) and presents the results obtained in this period. The natural radioactivity level as gross alpha and gross beta activity and other chemical parameters (pH and electric conductivity) of the samples were analyzed. Some instrumental techniques were used: potentiometric methods (pH), conductometric methods (electrical conductivity, EC) and gross α and gross β proportional counting system). (author)

  2. Design measures for prevention and mitigation of severe accidents at advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with the current nuclear energy systems. New generations of nuclear power plants are being developed, building upon this background of experience. During the last decade, requirements for equipment specifically intended to minimize releases of radioactive material to the environment in the event of a core melt accident have been introduced, and designs for new plants include measures for preventing and mitigating a range of severe accident scenarios. The IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Impact of Severe Accidents on Plant Design and Layout of Advanced Water Cooled Reactors was jointly organized by the Department of Nuclear Energy and the Department of Nuclear Safety to review measures which are being incorporated into advanced water cooled reactor designs for preventing and mitigating severe accidents, the status of experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena and challenges which support design decisions and accident management procedures, and to understand the impact of explicitly addressing severe accidents on the cost of nuclear power plants. This publication is intended to provide an objective source of information on this topic. It includes 14 papers presented at the Technical Committee meeting held in Vienna between 21-25 October 1996. It also includes a Summary and Findings of the Working Groups. The papers were grouped in three sections. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  3. Cooling system for auxiliary reactor component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihira, Tomoko.

    1991-01-01

    A cooling system for auxiliary reactor components comprises three systems, that is, two systems of reactor component cooling water systems (RCCW systems) and a high pressure component cooling water system (HPCCW system). Connecting pipelines having partition valves are intervened each in a cooling water supply pipeline to an emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water return pipeline from the emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water supply pipeline to each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system and a cooling water return pipeline from each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system. With such constitution, cooling water can be supplied also to the emmergency components in the stand-by system upon periodical inspection or ISI, thereby enabling to improve the backup performance of the emmergency cooling system. (I.N.)

  4. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  5. Recent IAEA activities to support advanced water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-H.; Bilbao y Leon, S.; Rao, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the world's center of cooperation in the nuclear field. The IAEA works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. To catalyse innovation in nuclear power technology in Member States, the IAEA coordinates cooperative research, promotes information exchange, and analyses technical data and results, with a focus on reducing capital costs and construction periods while further improving performance, safety and proliferation resistance. This paper summarizes the recent major IAEA activities to support technology development for water cooled reactors, which is the most common type of reactor design at present and will probably still be in the near future. (author)

  6. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  7. Passive containment cooling system performance in the simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Gamble, R.E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) incorporates a passive system for decay heat removal from the containment in the event of a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). Decay heat is removed by condensation of the steam discharged from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in three condensers which comprise the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). These condensers are designed to carry the heat load while transporting a mixture of steam and noncondensible gas (primarily nitrogen) from the drywell to the suppression chamber. This paper describes the expected LOCA response of the SBWR with respect to the PCCS performance, based on analysis and test results. The results confirm that the PCCS has excess capacity for decay heat removal and that overall system performance is very robust. 12 refs., 8 figs

  8. Steam generator tube performance: world experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors is reviewed for 1979. Tube failures occurred at 38 of the 93 reactors surveyed. The causes of these failures and the procedures designed to deal with them are described. The defect rate, although higher than that in 1978, was still lower than the rates of the two previous years. Methods being employed to detect defects include the increased use of multifrequency eddy-current testing and a trend to full-length inspection of all tubes. To reduce the incidence of tube failure by corrosion, plant operators are turning to full-flow condensate demineralization and more leak-resistant condenser tubes. 10 tables

  9. Nuclear and thermal analyses of supercritical-water-cooled solid breeder blanket for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshihiko; Sato, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Kikuchi, Shigeto; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kosaku, Yasuo; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    Within a design study of a fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating technologies of fusion power plant, supercritical water is applied as a coolant of solid breeder blanket to attain high thermal efficiency. The blanket has multi-layer composed of solid breeder pebbles (Li{sub 2}O) and neutron multiplier pebbles (Be) which are radially separated by cooling panels. The first wall and the breeding region are cooled by supercritical water below and above the pseudo-critical temperature, respectively. Temperature distribution and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) have been estimated by one-dimensional nuclear and thermal calculations. The local TBR as high as 1.47 has been obtained after optimization of temperature distribution in the breeder region under the following conditions: neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m{sup 2}, {sup 6}Li enrichment of 30% and coolant temperature at inlet of breeder region of 380degC. In the case of the higher coolant temperature 430degC of the breeder region the local TBR was reduced to be 1.40. This means that the net TBR higher than 1.0 could be expected with the supercritical-water-cooled blanket, whose temperature distribution in the breeder region would be optimized by following the coolant temperature, and where a coverage of the breeder region is assumed to be 70%. (author)

  10. Method of collecting helium cover gas for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji; Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the systematic facility cost in a heavy water moderated reactor by contriving the simplification of a helium cover gas collecting intake system. Method: A detachable low pressure metal tank and a neoprene balloon are prepared for a vacuum pump in a permanent vacuum drying facility. When all of the helium cover gas is collected from a heavy water moderated reactor, a large capacity of neoprene balloon capable of temporarily storing it under low pressure is connected to the exhaust of the vacuum pump. On the other hand, while the reactor is operating, a suitable amount of the low pressure tank or neoprene balloon is connected to the exhaust side of the pump, thereby regulating the pressure of the helium cover gas. When refeeding the cover gas, the balloon, with a large capacity for collecting and storing the cover gas is connected to the intake side of the pump. Thus, the pressure regulation, collection of all of the cover gas and refeeding of the cover gas can be conducted without using a high discharge pump and high pressure tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  12. International conference on opportunities and challenges for water cooled reactors in the 21. century. PowerPoint presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    , engineers, researchers, educators, managers, government officials and regulators. The objectives of the International Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21st Century are to: - Provide a forum for the exchange of information among those interested in the introduction or expansion of nuclear power programmes in the 21st century, taking into account the desire to build capacity in terms of human resources, energy planning, regulatory capabilities and other infrastructure. -- Explore the status and trends in the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs, both for electrical and non-electrical applications. - Discuss the trends in nuclear power plant design and safety and their anticipated impact on the required capabilities of operating, regulatory and technical support organizations, as well as the advanced technology impacts in safety, reliability and performance improvements. - Discuss the role of operation and maintenance optimization programmes in assuring safe and reliable nuclear power plant operations. - Explore the future role of water cooled reactors, by themselves and as a bridge towards the use of innovative nuclear reactors designs and fuel cycles

  13. Experimental tests and qualification of analytical methods to address thermohydraulic phenomena in advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    Worldwide there is considerable experience in nuclear power technology, especially in water cooled reactor technology. Of the operating plants, in September 1998, 346 were light water reactors (LWRs) totalling 306 GW(e) and 29 were heavy water reactors (HWRs) totalling 15 GW(e). The accumulated experience and lessons learned from these plants are being incorporated into new advanced reactor designs. Utility requirements documents have been formulated to guide these design activities by incorporating this experience, and results from research and development programmes, with the aim of reducing costs and licensing uncertainties by establishing the technical bases for the new designs. Common goals for advanced designs are high availability, user-friendly features, competitive economics and compliance with internationally recognized safety objectives. Large water cooled reactors with power outputs of 1300 MW(e) and above, which possess inherent safety characteristics (e.g. negative Doppler moderator temperature coefficients, and negative moderator void coefficient) and incorporate proven, active engineered systems to accomplish safety functions are being developed. Other designs with power outputs from, for example, 220 MW(e) up to about 1300 MW(e) which also possess inherent safety characteristics and which place more emphasis on utilization of passive safety systems are being developed. Passive systems are based on natural forces and phenomena such as natural convection and gravity, making safety functions less dependent on active systems and components like pumps and diesel generators. In some cases, further experimental tests for the thermohydraulic conditions of interest in advanced designs can provide improved understanding of the phenomena. Further, analytical methods to predict reactor thermohydraulic behaviour can be qualified for use by comparison with the experimental results. These activities should ultimately result in more economical designs. The

  14. Development of a silicon calorimeter for dosimetry applications in a water-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; King, Donald Bryan; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael; Keltner, Ned R.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Griffin, Patrick Joseph

    2005-01-01

    High fidelity active dosimetry in the mixed neutron/gamma field of a research reactor is a very complex issue. For passive dosimetry applications, the use of activation foils addresses the neutron environment while the use of low neutron response CaF 2 :Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) addresses the gamma environment. While radiation-hardened diamond photoconducting detectors (PCD) have been developed that provide a very precise fast response (picosecond) dosimeter and can provide a time-dependent profile for the radiation environment, the mixed field response of the PCD is still uncertain and this interferes with the calibration of the PCD response. In order to address the research reactor experimenter's need for a dosimeter that reports silicon dose and dose rate at a test location during a pulsed reactor operation, a silicon calorimeter has been developed. This dosimeter can be used by itself to provide a dose in rad(Si) up to a point in a reactor pulsed operation, or, in conjunction with the diamond PCD, to provide a dose rate. This paper reports on the development, testing, and validation of this silicon calorimeter for applications in water-moderated research reactors.

  15. Safety design of Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Uchida, Shoji; Yamada, Yumi; Koyama, Kazuya

    2008-01-01

    In Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR), steam is generated by direct contact of feedwater with primary Pb-Bi coolant above the core, and Pb-Bi coolant is circulated by steam lift pump in chimneys. Safety design has been developed to show safety features of PBWFR. Negative void reactivity is inserted even if whole of the core and upper plenum are voided hypothetically by steam intrusion from above. The control rod ejection due to coolant pressure is prevented using in-vessel type control rod driving mechanism. At coolant leak from reactor vessel and feedwater pipes, Pb-Bi coolant level in the reactor vessel required for decay heat removal is kept using closed guard vessel. Dual pipes for feedwater are employed to avoid leak of water. Although there is no concern of loss of flow accident due to primary pump trip, feedwater pump trip initiates loss of coolant flow (LOF). Injection of high pressure water slows down the flow coast down of feedwater at the LOF event. The unprotected loss of flow and heat sink (ATWS) has been evaluated, which shows that the fuel temperatures are kept lower than the safety limits. (author)

  16. Improving the understanding of thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer for super critical water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, S.; Aksan, N.

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring the exchange of information and fostering the collaboration among Member States on the development of technology advances for future nuclear power plants are among the key roles of the IAEA. There is high interest internationally in both developing and industrialized countries in the design of innovative super-critical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs). This interest arises from the high thermal efficiencies (44-45%) and improved economic competitiveness promised by for this concept, utilizing and building on the recent developments of highly efficient fossil power plants. The SCWR is one of the six concepts included in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). Following the advice of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Dept.'s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), with the feedback from the Gen-IV SCWR Steering Committee, and in coordination with the OECD-NEA, IAEA is working on a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) in the areas of heat transfer behaviour and testing of thermo-hydraulic computer methods for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors. The second Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP was held at the IAEA Headquarters, in Vienna (Austria)) in August 2009. This paper summarizes the current status of the CRP, as well as the major achievements to date. (authors)

  17. Bruce unit 1 moderator to end shield cooling leak repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, P; Ashton, A [Ontario Hydro, Tiverton, ON (Canada). Bruce Nuclear Generating Station-A

    1996-12-31

    In October 1994, a leak developed between the heavy water Moderator System and the light water End Shield Cooling System at Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A Generating Station Unit 1. The interface between these two systems consists of numerous reactor components all within the reactor vessel. This paper describes the initial discovery and determination of the leak source. The techniques used to pinpoint the leak location are described. The repair strategies and details are outlined. Flushing and refilling of the Moderator system are discussed. The current status of the Unit 1 End Shield Cooling System is given with possible remedial measures for clean-up. Recommendations and observations are provided for future references. (author). 7 figs.

  18. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas, J.; Jeanjacques, M.; Peulve, J.

    1994-01-01

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  19. MIF-SCD computer code for thermal hydraulic calculation of supercritical water cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galina P Bogoslovskaia; Alexander A Karpenko; Pavel L Kirillov; Alexander P Sorokin

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Supercritical pressure power plants constitute the basis of heat power engineering in many countries to day. Starting from a long-standing experience of their operation, it is proposed to develop a new type of fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical water, which enables the economical indices of NPP to be substantially improved. In the Thermophysical Department of SSC RF-IPPE, an attempt is made to provide thermal-hydraulic validation of the reactor under discussion. The paper presents the results of analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of fuel subassemblies cooled by supercritical water based on subchannel analysis. Modification of subchannel code MIF - MIF-SCD Code - developed in the SSC RF IPPE is designed as block code and permits one to calculate the coolant temperature and velocity distributions in fuel subassembly channels, the temperature of fuel pin claddings and fuel subassembly wrapper under conditions of irregular geometry and non-uniform axial and radial power generation. The thermal hydraulics under supercritical pressure of water exhibits such peculiarities as abrupt variation of the thermal physical properties in the range of pseudo-critical temperature, the absence of such phenomenon as the critical heat flux which can lead to fuel element burnout in WWERs. As compared with subchannel code for light water, in order to take account of the variation of the coolant properties versus temperature in more detail, a block for evaluating the thermal physical properties of supercritical water versus the local coolant temperature in the fuel subassembly channels was added. The peculiarities of the geometry and power generation in the fuel subassembly of the supercritical reactor are considered as well in special blocks. The results of calculations have shown that considerable preheating of supercritical coolant (several hundreds degrees) can occur in the fuel subassembly. The test calculations according to

  20. Safety system consideration of a supercritical-water cooled fast reactor with simplified PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1999-01-01

    The probabilistic safety of the supercritical-water cooled fast reactor (SCFR) is evaluated with the simplified probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology. SCFR has a once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure. There are no recirculation loops in the once-through direct cycle system, which is the most important difference from the current light water reactor (LWR). The main objective of the present study is to assess the effect of this difference on the safety in the stage of conceptual design study. A safety system configuration similar to the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is employed. At loss of flow events, no natural recirculation occurs. Thus, emergency core flow should be quickly supplied before the completion of the feedwater pump coastdown at a loss of flow accident. The motor-driven high pressure coolant injection (MD-HPCI) system cannot be used for the quick core cooling due to the delay of the emergency diesel generator (D/G) start-up. Accordingly, an MD-HPCI system in an ABWR is substituted by a turbine-driven (TD-) HPCI system for the SCFR. The calculated core damage frequency (CDF) is a little higher than that of the Japanese ABWR and a little lower than that of the Japanese BWR when Japanese data are employed for initiating event frequencies. Four alternatives to the safety system configurations are also examined as a sensitivity analysis. This shows that the balance of the safety systems designed here is adequate. Consequently, though the SCFR has a once-through coolant system, the CDF is not high due to the diversity of feedwater systems as the direct cycle characteristics

  1. Fuel element replacement and cooling water radioactivity at the Musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, T.; Honda, T.; Horiuchi, N.; Aizawa, O.; Sato, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Musashi reactor (TRIGA-II, 100kW) has been operated without any serious troubles since 1963. In 1985 the old Al-cladded fuel elements were replaced with new stainless cladded ones in order to insure a long and safe operation. By using a semi-automatic equipment the old fuel elements have been transferred into the bulk-shielding experimental pool, which was remodelled for the spent-fuel storage. In order to reduce the exposure during the transfer work, the old fuel elements were cooled in the core tank for 3 months. After the replacement, the radioactivities in the cooling water have been drastically changed. The activity of Na-24 decreased about one decade, and the activities of Cr-51, Mn-54, Mn-56, Co-58 and Co-60 increased about two decades. At this conference we will report on the following points: (1) semi-automatic equipment for the transportation of the Al-cladded spent fuel, (2) structure of spent-fuel storage pool, and (3) radioactivity change in the cooling water. (author)

  2. Secondary Cooling Water Quality Management for Multi Purpose Reactor 30 MW GA Siwabessy Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaryo, Geni Rina, E-mail: genirina@batan.go.i [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety (PTRKN-BATAN), Bldg. 80, Puspiptek Area, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2011-07-01

    Indonesia Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MPR) G.A. Siwabessy 30 MW will be 25 years old in 2011. Series of Non Destructive Test (NDT) were done to understand the current condition such as Eddy Current test for Heat Exchangers, water immersed camera for understanding the tank liner condition, ultrasonic for secondary piping etc. Some deteorization was observed because of ageing and some changing was done. One of them is changing some part of secondary pipe lines because of leaking, with the local ones. For having another 25 years operation life, a proper water quality for secondary cooling water is needed towards corrosion prevention. The main objectives of this experiment is to understand the current water quality of secondary cooling water of RSG-GAS from the aspect of corrosion induced by chemicals and bacteria, and establish procedure for managing the secondary cooling water quality. Methodologies applied are surveillance corrosion by immersing coupon into water observed and followed by visual analyses, corrosion rate determination by electrochemical method with various chemical conditions and total bacteria determination by using test kit. The results show visually that the crevice, galvanic and homogeny corrosion with the current water quality easily be observed for carbon steel represented secondary pipelines at the condition of none oxy bio agent addition. This corrosion is being suppressed by adding the oxy bio agent. The orientation of coupon, vertically and horizontally, gives slightly different effect. The closely corrosion rate was obtained by separately experiment, electrochemical, at the concentration of inhibitor 100ppm is 0.13 {+-} 0.02, which is lower than in the raw water of 0.20 {+-} 0.01 mpy. The total bacteria detected is around 10{sup 7} cfu/ml at none reactor operation and without any anti bacteria added. The oxi bio agent chemical addition suppresses the numbers becomes 10{sup 3} cfu/ml. The SRB bacteria is detected as >10{sup 6} cfu/ml at

  3. Control of Canadian once-through direct cycle supercritical water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Peiwei; Wang, Baosheng; Zhang, Jianmin; Su, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic characteristics of Canadian SCWR are analyzed. • Hybrid feedforward and feedback control is adopted to deal with cross-coupling. • Gain scheduling control with smooth weight is applied to deal with nonlinearity. • It demonstrates through simulation that the control requirements are satisfied. - Abstract: Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) can be modelled as a Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) system. It has a high power-to-flow ratio, strong cross-coupling and high degree of nonlinearity in its dynamic characteristics. Among the outputs, the steam temperature is strongly affected by the reactor power and the most challenging to control. It is difficult to adopt a traditional control system design methodology to obtain a control system with satisfactory performance. In this paper, feedforward control is applied to reduce the effect on steam temperature from the reactor power. Single-input Single-output (SISO) feedback controllers are synthesized in the frequency domain. Using the feedforward controller, the steam temperature variation due to disturbances at the reactor power has been significantly suppressed. The control system can effectively maintain the overall system stability and regulate the plant around a specified operating condition. To deal with the nonlinearities, gain scheduling control strategy is adopted. Different sets of controllers combined by smooth weight functions are used for the plant at different load conditions. The proposed control strategies have been evaluated under various operating scenarios. Simulation results show that satisfactory performance can successfully achieved by the designed control system

  4. Multidimensional space-time kinetics of a heavy water moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.; Baumann, N.P.; Jewell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion theory analysis of a series of multidimensional space-time experiments is appraised in terms of the final experiment of the series. In particular, TRIMHX diffusion calculations were examined for an experiment involving free-fall insertion of a 235 U-bearing rod into a heavy water moderated reactor with a large reflector. The experimental transient flux-tilts were accurately reproduced after cross section adjustments forced agreement between static diffusion calculations and static reactor measurements. The time-dependent features were particularly well modeled, and the bulk of the small discrepancies in space-dependent features should be removable by more refined cross-section adjustments. This experiment concludes a series of space-time experiments that span a wide range of delayed neutron holdback effects. TRIMHX calculations of these experiments demonstrate the accuracy of the modeling employed in the code

  5. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. M. Pimblott

    2000-10-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  6. Thermal aspects of mixed oxide fuel in application to supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.; Peiman, W.; Rodriguez-Prado, A.; Villamere, B.; Mikhael, S.; Allison, L.; Pioro, I., E-mail: lisa.grande@mycampus.uoit.ca, E-mail: igor.pioro@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs) are a renewed technology being developed as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts. This reactor type uses a light water coolant at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. These elevated operating conditions will improve Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermal efficiencies by 10 - 15% compared to those of current NPPs. Also, SCWRs will have the ability to utilize a direct cycle, thus decreasing NPP capital and operational costs. The SCWR core has 2 configurations: 1) Pressure Vessel (PV) -type enclosing a fuel assembly and 2) Pressure Tube (PT) -type consisting of individual pressurized channels containing fuel bundles. Canada and Russia are developing PT-type SCWRs. In particular, the Canadian SCWR reactor has an output of 1200 MW{sub el} and will operate at a pressure of 25 MPa with inlet and outlet fuel-channel temperatures of 350 and 625°C, respectively. These extreme operating conditions require alternative fuels and materials to be investigated. Current CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor fuel-channel design is based on the use of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) fuel; zirconium alloy sheath (clad) bundle, pressure and calandria tubes. Alternative fuels should be considered to supplement depleting world uranium reserves. This paper studies general thermal aspects of using Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel in an Inconel-600 sheath in a generic PT-type SCWR. The bulk fluid, sheath and fuel centerline temperatures along with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were calculated at uniform and non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs). (author)

  7. Numerical investigation of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor in horizontal rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang Zhi, E-mail: shangzhi@tsinghua.org.c [Faculty of Engineering, Kingston University, London SW15 3DW (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.co [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round rods and rod bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal rods and rod bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. In the rod bundle simulations, it is found that the geometry and orientation of the rod bundle have strong effects on the wall temperature distributions and heat transfers. In one orientation the square bundle has a higher wall temperature difference than other bundles. However, when the bundles are rotated by 90 deg. the highest wall temperature difference is found in the hexagon bundle. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  8. Improving activity transport models for water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, K.A

    2001-08-01

    Eight current models for describing radioactivity transport and radiation field growth around water-cooled nuclear power reactors have been reviewed and assessed. A frequent failing of the models is the arbitrary nature of the determination of the important processes. Nearly all modelers agree that the kinetics of deposition and release of both dissolved and particulate material must be described. Plant data must be used to guide the selection and development of suitable improved models, with a minimum of empirically-based rate constraints being used. Limiting case modelling based on experimental data is suggested as a way to simplify current models and remove their subjectivity. Improved models must consider the recent change to 'coordinated water chemistry' that appears to produce normal solubility behaviour for dissolved iron throughout the fuel cycle in PWRs, but retrograde solubility remains for dissolved nickel. Profiles are suggested for dissolved iron and nickel concentrations around the heat transport system in CANDU reactors, which operate nominally at constant chemistry, i.e., pH{sub T} constant with time, and which use carbon steel isothermal piping. These diagrams are modified for a CANDU reactor with stainless steel piping, in order to show the changes expected. The significance of these profiles for transport in PWRs is discussed for further model improvement. (author)

  9. Experimental study on the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear reactor containment wall cooled by gravitationally falling water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Ari D.; Umar, Efrison; Suwono, Aryadi; Manalu, Reinhard E. E.

    2012-06-01

    Gravitationally falling water cooling is one of mechanism utilized by a modern nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) for its Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). Since the cooling is closely related to the safety, water film cooling characteristics of the PCCS should be studied. This paper deals with the experimental study of laminar water film cooling on the containment model wall. The influences of water mass flow rate and wall heat rate on the heat transfer characteristic were studied. This research was started with design and assembly of a containment model equipped with the water cooling system, and calibration of all measurement devices. The containment model is a scaled down model of AP 1000 reactor. Below the containment steam is generated using electrical heaters. The steam heated the containment wall, and then the temperatures of the wall in several positions were measure transiently using thermocouples and data acquisition. The containment was then cooled by falling water sprayed from the top of the containment. The experiments were done for various wall heat rate and cooling water flow rate. The objective of the research is to find the temperature profile along the wall before and after the water cooling applied, prediction of the water film characteristic such as means velocity, thickness and their influence to the heat transfer coefficient. The result of the experiments shows that the wall temperatures significantly drop after being sprayed with water. The thickness of water film increases with increasing water flow rate and remained constant with increasing wall heat rate. The heat transfer coefficient decreases as film mass flow rate increase due to the increases of the film thickness which causes the increasing of the thermal resistance. The heat transfer coefficient increases slightly as the wall heat rate increases. The experimental results were then compared with previous theoretical studied.

  10. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  11. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  12. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  13. CIRCUS and DESIRE: Experimental facilities for research on natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Haden, T.H.J.J. van der; Zboray, R.; Manera, A.; Mudde, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology two thermohydraulic test facilities are being used to study the characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with natural circulation core cooling. The focus of the research is on the stability characteristics of the system. DESIRE is a test facility with freon-12 as scaling fluid in which one fuel bundle of a natural-circulation BWR is simulated. The neutronic feedback can be simulated artificially. DESIRE is used to study the stability of the system at nominal and beyond nominal conditions. CIRCUS is a full-height facility with water, consisting of four parallel fuel channels and four parallel bypass channels with a common riser or with parallel riser sections. It is used to study the start-up characteristics of a natural-circulation BWR at low pressures and low power. In this paper a description of both facilities is given and the research items are presented. (author)

  14. Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Design for Water Cooled Reactors. Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increased fuel burnup and longer fuel cycles, i.e. increasing the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Efficient consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means that less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. Better utilization of fissile nuclear materials, as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all, on fuel and cladding materials. It entails increased attention to measures ensuring desired in-pile fuel performance parameters that require adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. These are the main reasons that motivated the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) to recommend the organization of a Technical Committee Meeting on Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Designs for Power Reactors. The proposal was supported by the IAEA TWGs on Advanced Technologies for Light and Heavy Water-Cooled Reactors (TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), and the meeting was held at the invitation of the Government of Switzerland at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, from 23 to 26 November 2009. This was the third IAEA meeting on these subjects (the first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan, and the second in 2003 in Brussels, Belgium), which reflects the continuous interest in the above issues among Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status in the development of fuel pellet materials and to explore recent improvements in fuel rod designs for light and heavy water cooled power reactors. The meeting was attended by 45 specialists representing fuel vendors, nuclear utilities, research and development

  15. Subchannel analysis of 37-rod tight-lattice bundle experiments for reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Tamai, Hidesada; Akimoto, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance of tight-lattice fuel bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with utilities, reactor vendors and universities from 2002. The RMWR realizes a high conversion ratio larger than 0.1 for sustainable energy supply through plutonium multiple recycling based on the well-experienced LWR technologies. The reactor core comprises tight-lattice fuel assemblies with gap clearance of around 1.0 mm to reduce the water volume ratio to achieve the high conversion ratio. A problem of utmost importance from a thermal-hydraulic point of view is the coolability of the tight-lattice assembly with such a small gap width. JAERI has been carrying out experimental study to investigate the system parameter effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance and to confirm the feasibility of the core. In the present study, the subchannel analysis code NASCA was applied to 37-rod tight-lattice bundle experiments. The NASCA can give good predictions of critical power for the gap width of 1.3 mm while the prediction accuracy decreases for the gap width of 1.0 mm. To improve the prediction accuracy, the code will be modified to take the effect of film thickness distribution around fuel rods on boiling transition. (author)

  16. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  17. Design guide for category II reactors light and heavy water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in the ERDA Manual, requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification operation, maintainance, and decommissioning of DOW-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guide and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of Category II reactor structure, components, and systems

  18. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  19. Emergency cooling device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hisamichi; Naito, Masanori; Sato, Chikara; Chino, Koichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To pour high pressure cooling water into a core, when coolant is lost in a boiling water reactor, thereby restraining the rise of fuel cladding. Structure: A control rod guiding pipe, which is moved up and down by a control rod, is mounted on the bottom of a pressure vessel, the control rod guiding pipe being communicated with a high pressure cooling water tank positioned externally of the pressure vessel, and a differential in pressure between the pressure vessel and the aforesaid tank is detected when trouble of coolant loss occurs, and the high pressure cooling water within the tank is poured into the core through the control rod guiding pipe to restrain the rise of fuel cladding. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Updated heat transfer correlations for supercritical water-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokry, S.J.; Pioro, I.L.; Farah, A.; King, K.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the development of SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs), research is currently being conducted for heat-transfer at supercritical conditions. Currently, there are no experimental datasets for heat transfer from power reactor fuel bundles to the fuel coolant (Water) available in open literature. Therefore, for preliminary calculations, heat-transfer correlations obtained with bare tube data can be used as a conservative approach. A large set of experimental data, for supercritical water was analyzed and an updated heat-transfer correlation for forced-convective heat-transfer, in the normal heat transfer regime, was developed. This experimental dataset was obtained within conditions similar to those for proposed SCWR concepts. Thus, this new correlation can be used for preliminary heat-transfer calculations in SCWR fuel channels. It has demonstrated a good fit for the analyzed dataset. Experiments with SuperCritical Water (SCW) are very expensive. Therefore, a number of experiments are performed in modeling fluids, such as carbon dioxide and refrigerants. However, there is no common opinion if SC modeling fluids' correlations can be applied to SCW and vice versa. Therefore, a correlation for supercritical carbon dioxide heat transfer was developed as a less expensive alternative to using supercritical water. The conducted analysis also meets the objective of improving our fundamental knowledge of the transport processes and handling of supercritical fluids. These correlations can be used for supercritical water heat exchangers linked to indirect-cycle concepts and the cogeneration of hydrogen, for future comparisons with other independent datasets, with bundle data, for the verification of computer codes for SCWR core thermalhydraulics and for the verification of scaling parameters between water and modeling fluids. (author)

  1. Occupational radiation exposure at light water cooled power reactors. Annual report, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, L.J.

    1979-04-01

    This report presents an updated compilation of occupational radiation exposures at commercial light water cooled nuclear power reactors (LWRs) for the years 1969 through 1977. The information contained in this document was derived from reports submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in accordance with requirements of individual plant Technical Specifications, and in accordance with Part 20.407 of Title 10, Chapter 1, Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20.407). An additional 4 LWRs completed a full calendar year of commercial operation for the first time in 1977. This report now encompasses data from 57 commercially operating U.S. nuclear power plants. The number of personnel monitored at LWRs increased approximately 10% in 1977, and the average collective dose to personnel (man-rems per reactor-year) increased 14% over the 1976 average. The average number of personnel receiving measurable exposure per reactor increased 11%, and the average exposure per individual in 1977 was 0.8 rem per person

  2. Thermal-hydraulic limitations on water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.; Misra, B.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of the cooling requirements for fusion reactor components, such as the first wall and limiter/divertor, was carried out using pressurized water as the coolant. In order to establish the coolant operating conditions, a survey of the literature on departure from nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, asymmetrical heating and heat transfer augmentation techniques was carried out. The experimental data and the empirical correlations indicate that thermal protection for the fusion reactor components based on conventional design concepts can be provided with an adequate margin of safety without resorting to either high coolant velocities, excessive coolant pressures, or heat transfer augmentation techniques. If, however, the future designs require unconventional shapes or heat transfer enhancement techniques, experimental verification would be necessary since no data on heat transfer augmentation techniques exist for complex geometries, especially under asymmetrically heated conditions. Since the data presented herein are concerned primarily with thermal protection of the reactor components, the final design should consider other factors such as thermal stresses, temperature limits, and fatigue

  3. Theoretical Calculations of the Effect on Lattice Parameters of Emptying the Coolant Channels in a D{sub 2}O- Moderated and Cooled Natural Uranium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissglas, P [The Swedish State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1960-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate theoretically the effect of coolant boiling and subsequent void formation in a pressurized D{sub 2}O moderated and cooled reactor. The fuel rods were arranged in a cluster geometry and clad in Zr-2. The coolant was separated from the moderator by a Zr-2 shroud. In this geometry the following problems have been given special attention: l) calculation of the effective resonance integral, 2) thermal disadvantage factors, 3) fast fission effects, 4) leakage effects, 5) changes in epithermal absorption. No account has up to now been taken of the variation of these effects with position in the reactor and burnup. Some comparisons of the theoretical methods and measurements have been attempted. It is concluded that at the present time it is not possible to calculate the void coefficient with any accuracy but it may be possible to give an upper limit from theoretical consideration.

  4. Reactor cooling water expansion joint bellows: The role of the seam weld in fatigue crack development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The secondary cooling water system pressure boundary of Savannah River Site reactors includes expansion joints utilizing a thin-wall bellows. While successfully used for over thirty years, an occasional replacement has been required because of the development of small, circumferential fatigue cracks in a bellows convolute. One such crack was recently shown to have initiated from a weld heat-affected zone liquation microcrack. The crack, initially open to the outer surface of the rolled and seam welded cylindrical bellows section, was closed when cold forming of the convolutes placed the outer surface in residual compression. However, the bellows was placed in tension when installed, and the tensile stresses reopened the microcrack. This five to eight grain diameter microcrack was extended by ductile fatigue processes. Initial extension was by relatively rapid propagation through the large-grained weld metal, followed by slower extension through the fine-grained base metal. A significant through-wall crack was not developed until the crack extended into the base metal on both sides of the weld. Leakage of cooling water was subsequently detected and the bellows removed and a replacement installed

  5. Device for monitoring radioactivity of cooling water in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Yasuo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide means for monitoring the peak channel of γ-ray spectrum in cooling water and the time-wise attenuation value of the counts of the peak channels and capable of early detecting abnormal phenomenon with a constant reference. Structure: It is provided with a γ-ray detector, a multi-channel γ-ray spectrometer, peak determining means for determining the peak position of the spectrum from the count value of each channel of the γ-ray spectrum, a peak channel memory for memorizing the channel number of the peak channels, attenuation measurement means for measuring the attenuation value by repeatedly measuring the count value of the peak channel, an attenuation memory for memorizing the attenuation value and a variation detector for detecting the variation in radioactivity of the reactor cooling water from the count value of the peak channel and peak channel attenuation value. When a difference is detected by the variation detector, the measurement value is provided as defective value. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Optimization of the fuel assembly for the Canadian SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C., E-mail: Corey.French@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bonin, H.; Chan, P.K. [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    An approach to develop a parametric optimization tool to support the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) fuel design is presented in this work. The 2D benchmark lattices for 78-pin and 64-pin fuel assemblies are used as the initial models from which fuel performance and subsequent optimization stem from. A tandem optimization procedure is integrated which employs the steepest descent method. The physics codes WIMS-AECL, MCNP6 and SERPENT are used to calculate and verify select performance factors. The results are used as inputs to an optimization algorithm that yield optimal fresh fuel isotopic composition and lattice geometry. Preliminary results on verifications of infinite lattice reactivity are demonstrated in this paper. (author)

  7. Surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong-Sun; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Park, Dae-Gyu; Jung, Yang-Hong; Yoo, Byung-Ok; Oh, Wan-Ho; Baik, Seung-Je; Koo, Dae-Seo; Lee, Key-Soon

    1999-01-01

    The surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels were established to monitor the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in the beltline according to US NRC 10 CFR 50 App. G, US NRC RG1.99-rev.2, ASTM E185-82 and E185-94 in Irradiated Materials Examination Facility(IMEF). The surveillance capsule was transported from NPPs pool sites to KAERI IMEF by using a shipping cask. The capsule was cut and dismantled by capsule cutting machine and milling machine in M2 hot cell. Charpy tests and tension tests were performed in M5a and M5b hot cells respectively. Especially the EPMA located at hot lab was used to analyze the Ni and Cu wt% composition of base metal and weld for predicting the adjusted reference temperature(ART). The established process and test results were summarized in this paper. (author)

  8. Modelling of Transport of Radioactive Substances in the Primary Circuit of Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    Since the beginning of the development of water cooled nuclear power reactors, it has been known that the materials in contact with the water release some of their corrosion products into the water. As a consequence, some of the corrosion products are neutron-activated while in the reactor core and then create a gamma radiation field when deposited outside the core. These radiation fields are hazardous to the inspection, maintenance and operating staff in the power plant and therefore must be minimized. Many methods have been developed to control these radiation fields, such as the proper selection of materials and surface finishing technologies at the design stage, operating and shutdown water chemistry optimization, and the application of different decontamination methods. The need to understand the causes of this radioactivity transport has resulted in many mathematical models to describe the transport, irradiation and deposition of the radioactive corrosion products out of the core. Early models were empirical descriptions of the transport, irradiation and deposition steps, and these models allowed analytical solution of the resulting differential equations. As the mechanisms responsible for radioactivity transport gradually became better understood, more precise models of the mechanisms were made. Computer codes to solve the equations describing these models are necessary. Accurate codes are invaluable design tools for carrying out cost-benefit analysis during materials selection, for estimating shielding thicknesses and for evaluating water chemistry specifications, for example. Such codes are also useful in operating plants to predict radiation fields at specific locations where shielding may be required during a maintenance shutdown, for example, when control of radiation dose to staff is essential. To complement the previous work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to improve the mechanistic understanding of radioactivity transport, a

  9. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.; Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  10. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, 28401 North Carolina (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  11. A study of the tritium behavior in coolant and moderator system of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. P.; Song, S. S.; Chae, K. S. and others [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to present a regulatory policy on the environmental impact and personnel exposure by understanding the generation, accumulation, environmental release and management of tritium in heavy water reactors. By estimating the tritium concentration at Wolsong nuclear plant site by estimating and forecasting the generation and accumulation of tritium in coolant and moderator systems at Wolsong unit 1, we will study the management and release of tritium at Wolsong units 3 and 4 which are ready for construction. The major activities of this study are as follows : tritium generation and accumulation in heavy water reactor, a quantitative assessment of the accumulation and release of tritium at Wolsong nuclear plant site, heavy water management at Wolsong nuclear plants. The tritium concentration and accumulation trends in the systems at Wolsong unit 1 was estimated. A quantitative assessment of the tritium accumulation and release for Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 based on data from Wolsong 1 was performed. The tritium removal schemes and its long-term management plan were made.

  12. The research of materials and water chemistry for supercritical water-cooled reactors in Research Centre Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zychova, Marketa; Fukac, Rostislav; Vsolak, Rudolf; Vojacek, Ales; Ruzickova, Mariana; Vonkova, Katerina

    2012-09-01

    Research Centre Rez (CVR) is R and D company based in the Czech Republic. It was established as the subsidiary of the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. One of the main activities of CVR is the research of materials and chemistry for the generation IV reactor systems - especially the supercritical water-cooled one. For these experiments is CVR equipped by a supercritical water loop (SCWL) and a supercritical water autoclave (SCWA) serving for research of material and Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) environment compatibility experiments. SCWL is a research facility designed to material, water chemistry, radiolysis and other testing in SCWR environment, SCWA serves for complementary and supporting experiments. SCWL consists of auxiliary circuits (ensuring the required parameters as temperature, pressure and chemical conditions in the irradiation channel, purification and measurements) and irradiation channel (where specimens are exposed to the SCWR environment). The design of the loop is based on many years of experience with loop design for various types of corrosion/water chemistry experiments. Designed conditions in the test area of SCWL are 600 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL was designed in 2008 within the High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 project and built during 2008 and 2009. The trial operations were performed in 2010 and 2011 and were divided into three phases - the first phase to verify the functionality of auxiliary circuits of the loop, the second phase to verify the complete facility (auxiliary circuits and functional irradiation channel internals) and the third phase to verify the feasibility of corrosion tests with the complete equipment and specimens. All three trial operations were very successful - designed conditions and parameters were reached. (authors)

  13. Proceedings of the GCNEP-IAEA course on natural circulation phenomena and passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The current status and prospect, economics, advanced designs and applications of reactors in operation and construction, safety of advanced water cooled reactors is discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  14. Proceedings of the GCNEP-IAEA course on natural circulation phenomena and passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The current status and prospect, economics, advanced designs and applications of reactors in operation and construction, safety of advanced water cooled reactors is discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. CFD investigation of vertical rod bundles of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhi

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as the numerical simulation tool for the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The numerical simulation is based on the real full 3D rod bundles' geometry of the nuclear reactors. For satisfying the near-wall resolution of y + ≤ 1, the structure mesh with the stretched fine mesh near wall is employed. The validation of the numerical simulation for mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model for the heat transfer of supercritical water is carried out to compare with 3D tube experiments. After the validation, the same mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model are employed to study three types of the geometry frame of the real rod bundles. Through the numerical investigations, it is found that the different arrangement of the rod bundles will induce the different temperature distribution at the rods' walls. The wall temperature distributions are non-uniform along the wall and the values depend on the geometry frame. At the same flow conditions, downward flow gets higher wall temperature than upward flow. The hexagon geometry frame has the smallest wall temperature difference comparing with the others. The heat transfer is controlled by P/D ratio of the bundles.

  16. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Shang, E-mail: zhi.shang@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.com [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In a vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in a horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-{epsilon} turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculation region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  17. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Zhi; Lo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-ε turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculating region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR. (author)

  18. Thermal-hydraulic evaluation study of the effectiveness of emergency core cooling system for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto

    1985-08-01

    In order to evaluate the core cooling capability of the emergeny core cooling system, which is a safety guard system of light water reactors for a loss-of-coolant accident, a variety of large scale test were performed. Through the results, many phenomena were investigated and the predictabity of analytical codes were examined. The tests conducted were a single-vessel blowdown test, emergency core cooling test in a PWR simulation facility, spray cooling test for a BWR, large scale reflood test and a separate effect test on countercurrent flow. These test results were examined to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena and the effect of various test parameters and were utilized to improve predictability of the analytical codes. Some models for flow behavior in the upper core were also developed. By evaluating the effectiveness of various emergency core cooling system configurations, more effective cooling system than the current one was proposed and demonstrated. (author)

  19. Energetics of semi-catalyzed-deuterium, light-water-moderated, fusion-fission toroidal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.; Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.

    1978-07-01

    The semi-catalyzed-deuterium Light-Water Hybrid Reactor (LWHR) comprises a lithium-free light-water-moderated blanket with U 3 Si fuel driven by a deuterium-based fusion-neutron source, with complete burn-up of the tritium but almost no burn-up of the helium-3 reaction product. A one-dimensional model for a neutral-beam-driven tokamak plasma is used to determine the operating modes under which the fusion energy multiplication Q/sub p/ can be equal to or greater than 0.5. Thermonuclear, beam-target, and energetic-ion reactions are taken into account. The most feasible operating conditions for Q/sub p/ approximately 0.5 are tau/sub E/ = 2 to 4 x 10 14 cm -3 s, = 10 to 20 keV, and E/sub beam/ = 500 to 1000 keV, with approximately 40% of the fusion energy produced by beam-target reactions. Illustrative parameters of LWHRs are compared with those of an ignited D-T reactor

  20. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    1978-06-01

    The first part of the study consists of a thorough investigation of the properties of subcritical thermal lattices for hybrid reactor applications. Light water is found to be the best moderator for (fuel-self-sufficient) FSS hybrid reactors for power generation. Several lattice geometries and compositions of particular promise for LWHRs are identified. Using one of these lattices, fueled with natural uranium, the performance of several concepts of LWHR blankets is investigated, and optimal blanket designs are identified. The effect of blanket coverage efficiency and the feasibility of separating the functions of tritium breeding and of power generation to different blankets are investigated. Optimal iron-water shields for LWHRs are also determined. The performance of generic types of LWHRs is evaluated. The evolution of the blanket properties with burnup is evaluated and fuel management schemes are briefly examined. The feasibility of using the lithium system of the blanket to control the blanket power amplitude and shape is also investigated. A parametric study of the energy balance of LWHR power plants is carried out, and performance parameters expected from LWHRs are estimated. Discussions are given of special features of LWHRs and their fuel cycle

  1. Scientific-technical cooperation with Russia. Transient analyses for alternative types of water-cooled reactors. Final report; WTZ mit Russland. Transientenanalysen fuer wassergekuehlte Kernreaktoren. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Ulrich [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung; Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Pivovarov, Valeri; Matveev, Yurij [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    The recently developed multi-group version DYN3D-MG of the reactor dynamics code DYN3D has been qualified for applications to water-cooled reactor concepts different from industrial PWR and BWR. An extended DYN3D version was applied to the graphite-moderated pressure tube reactor EGP-6 (NPP Bilibino) and conceptual design studies of an advanced Boiling Water Reactor with reduced moderation (RMWR) as well as the RUTA-70 reactor for low temperature heat supply. Concerning the RUTA reactor, safe heat removal by natural circulation of the coolant at low pressure has to be shown. For the corresponding validation of thermo-hydraulic system codes like ATHLET and RELAP5, experiments on flashing-induced natural circulation instabilities performed at the CIRCUS test facility at the TU Delft were simulated using the RELAP5 code. For the application to alternative water-cooled reactors, DYN3D model extensions and modifications were implemented, in particular adaptations of heat conduction and heat transfer models. Performing code-to-code comparisons with the Russian fine-mesh neutron diffusion code ACADEM contributed to the verification of DYN3D-MG. Validation has been performed by calculating reactor dynamics experiments at the NPP Bilibino. For the reactors EGP-6, RMWR and RUTA, analyses of various protected and unprotected control rod withdrawal and ejection transients were performed. The beyond design basis accident (BDBA) scenario ''Coast-down of all main coolant pumps at nominal power without scram'' for the RUTA reactor was analyzed using the code complexes DYN3D/ATHLET and DYN3D/RELAP5. It was shown, that the reactor passes over to a save asymptotic state at reduced power with coolant natural circulation. Analyzing the BDBA ''Unprotected withdrawal of a control rod group'' for the RMWR, the safety against Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) could not be shown with the necessary confidence. Finally, conclusions have been drawn

  2. Pressure drop characteristics in tight-lattice bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    The reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) consists of several distinctive structures; a triangular tight-lattice configuration and a double-flat core. In order to design the RMWR core from the point of view of thermal-hydraulics, an evaluation method on pressure drop characteristics in the rod bundles at the tight-lattice configuration is required. In this study, calculated results by the Martinelli-Nelson's and Hancox's correlations were compared with experimental results in 4 x 5 rod bundles and seven-rod bundles. Consequently, the friction loss in two-phase flows becomes smaller at the tight-lattice configuration with the hydraulic diameter less than about 3 mm. This reason is due to the difference of the configuration between the multi-rod bundle and the circular tube and due to the effect of the small hydraulic diameter on the two-phase multiplier. (author)

  3. Experiment of IEA-R1 reactor core cooling by air convection after pool water loss accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a Emergency Core Cooling to be applied to the IEA-R1 reactor. This system must have the characteristics of passive action, with water spraying over the core, and feeding by gravity from elevated reservoirs. In the evaluation, this system must demonstrate that when the reservoirs are emptied, the core cooling must assure to be fulfilled by air natural convection. This work presents the results of temperature distribution in a test section with plates electrically heated simulation the heat generation conditions on the most heated reactor element

  4. Method of 16N generation for test of radiation controlled channels at nuclear power stations with water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khryachkov, V.A.; Bondarenko, I.P.; Dvornikov, P.A.; Zhuravlev, B.V.; Kovtun, S.N.; Khromyleva, T.A.; Pavlov, A.V.; Roshchin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    The preferences of nuclear reaction use for radiation control channels test in water-cooled power reactors have been analyzed in the paper. The new measurements for more accurate determination of reaction cross section energy dependence have been carried out. A set of new methods for background reducing and improvement of events determination reliability has also been developed [ru

  5. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  6. Chlorination of cooling water: a source of chlorine-containing organic compounds with possible environmental significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Gehrs, C.W.; Pitt, W.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorination of cooling waters may be a source of environmentally significant pollutants. Many water-soluble chlorine-containing organic compounds of low volatility were found in a sample of cooling water chlorinated to a 2-mg/l chlorine concentration in the laboratory. The compounds were separated and detected using a coupled 36 Cl-tracer--high-resolution liquid chromatographic technique developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for determination of chlorinated organics in process effluents. For a chlorination contact time of 75 min at 25 0 C, the yield of chlorine in the form of chloro-organics amounted to 0.78% of the chlorine dosage. It is estimated that the yield is about 0.5% under typical reaction conditions in the electric power plant cooling system chosen for study. Because chlorine is commonly used to remove slime films from the cooling systems of electric power plants, as a means of maintaining high operational efficiency, it is estimated that several hundred tons of chlorinated organics are produced annually in the nation by this antifoulant process. The chromatographic elution positions of some of the separated constituents correspond to those of compounds separated and partially identified from chlorinated sewage treatment plant effluents. The results of this study indicate the formation of chloro-organics during the chlorination of cooling waters should be thoroughly examined, particularly with respect to their identification and determination of possible toxicological properties

  7. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  8. Program of chemical research organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R

    1961-07-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  9. Program of chemical research on organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  10. Requirements on cast steel for the primary coolant circuit of water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important requirements placed on the structural components of water cooled nuclear reactors include corrosion resistance and mechanical materials properties. Intercrystalline corrosion resistance was tested using the Strauss Test in compliance with the DIN 50914 Standard. Following sensitization between 600 to 700 degC with a dwell time between 15 minutes and 100 hours, a specimen homogeneously annealed with the casting and rapidly water cooled showed no intercrystalline corrosion. Specimens cooled from 1050 degC at a rate of 100 degC per hour showed no unambiguous tendency for intercrystalline corrosion after sensitization; in some cases, however, an initial attack of intercrystalline corrosion was found. It was found that austenitic Cr-Ni cast steel containing 2.5% Mo and about 15% ferrite showed the sensitive intercrystalline corrosion range at higher temperatures and longer dwell times than rolled Cr-Ni steels. In plating the ferritic cast steel with a corrosion resistant plating material, annealing temperature after welding must not exceed 600 to 620 degC otherwise the resistance of the plated layer against intercrystalline corrosion would not be safeguarded, and following annealing for stress removal at a temperature of 600 to 620 degC all requirements must be satisfied by the weld metal and weld transition placed on the initial material. Martensite materials are used for the manufacture of components which are not used under pressure, such as alloys with 13% Cr and 1% to 6% Ni and alloys with 17% Cr and 4% Ni. Carbon content is maintained below 0.10% to guarantee good weldability and the highest corrosion resistance. Cast steels with 13% Cr and 4% Ni after a dwell of 2500 hours in fully desalinated water without oxygen and with 3600 ppm of boron at a test temperature of 95 to 300 degC showed a surface reduction of 0.005 mm annually. In identical conditions except for the water containing oxygen the reduction in surface was 0.05 mm per year. (J.B.)

  11. Experience in the development of metal uranium-base nuclear fuel for heavy-water gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikhmin, V.P.; Vorob'ev, M.A.; Gusarov, M.S.; Davidenko, A.S.; Zelenskij, V.F.; Ivanov, V.E.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Stukalov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to solve the problem of making the development of radiation-resistant uranium fuel for power reactors including the heavy-water gas-cooled KS-150 reactor. Factors are considered that limit the lifetime of uranium fuel elements, and the ways of suppressing them are discussed. Possible reasons of the insufficient radiation resistance of uranium rod fuel element and the progress attained are analyzed. Some general problems on the fuel manufacture processes are discussed. The main results are presented on the operation of the developed fuel in research reactor loops and the commercial heavy-water KS-150 reactor. The results confirm an exceptionally high radiation resistance of fuel to burn-ups of 1.5-2%. The successful solution of a large number of problems associated with the development of metal uranium fuel provides for new possibilities of using metal uranium in power reactors

  12. Optimization of seed-blanket type fuel assembly for reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelley, Afroza; Shimada, Shoichiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-10-01

    Parametric studies have been performed for a PWR-type reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with the seed-blanket type fuel assembles to achieve a high conversion ratio, negative void reactivity coefficient and a high burnup by using MOX fuel. From the viewpoint of reactor safety analysis, the fuel temperature coefficients were also studied. From the result of the burnup calculation, it has been seen that ratio of 40-50% of outer blanket in a seed-blanket assembly gives higher conversion ratio compared to the other combination of seed-blanket assembly. And the recommended number of (seed+blanket) layers is 20, in which the number of seed (S) layers is 15 (S15) and blanket (B) layers is 5 (B5). It was found that the conversion ratio of seed-blanket assembly decreases, when they are arranged looks like a flower shape (Hanagara). By the optimization of different parameters, S15B5 fuel assembly with the height of seed of 1000 mmx2, internal blanket of 150 mm and axial blanket of 400 mmx2 is recommended for a reactor of high conversion ratio. In this assembly, the gap of seed fuel rod is 1.0 mm and blanket fuel rod is 0.4 mm. In S15B5 assembly, the conversion ratio is 1.0 and the burnup is 38.18 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region. However, the burnup is 57.45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket) region. The cycle length of the core is 16.46 effective full power in month (EFPM) by six batches and the enrichment of fissile Pu is 14.64 wt.%. The void coefficient is +21.82 pcm/%void, however, it is expected that the void coefficient will be negative if the radial neutron leakage is taken into account in the calculation. It is also possible to use S15B5 fuel assembly as a high burnup reactor 45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region, however, it is necessary to decrease the height of seed to 500 mmx2 to improve the void coefficient. In this reactor, the conversion ratio is 0.97 and void coefficient is +20.81 pcm/%void. The fuel temperature

  13. Moderator behaviour and reactor internals integrity at Atucha I NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berra, S.; Guala, M.; Herzovich, P.; Chocron, M.; Lorenzo, A.; Raffo Calderon, Ma. C. del; Urrutia, G.

    1996-01-01

    Atucha I is a Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Cooled Heavy Water Moderator Reactor. In this kind of reactor the moderator tank is physically connected to the primary coolant. Since neutron economy requires the moderator to be as cold as possible, it is necessary that even when physically connected, it should have a separated cooling system, which in this case is also used as a feed-water preheater, and also heat mass transfer with primary coolant should be minimized. This condition requires that some reactor internals are designed in principle to last the whole life of the plant. However, in 1988 the failure of one internal produced a 16 month shut down. This incident could have been prevented but the idea that reactor internals would not have failures due to aging was dominant at that time avoiding the early detection of the failure. However, the analysis of the records after the incident showed that some process variables had changed previously to the incident, i.e., power exchanged at the moderator heat exchanger had increased. Since the station restart up some changes in the moderator process variables and a flow rate reduction of about 10% through the primary side of one moderator cooler were observed. In order to understand the flow reduction and the overall behaviour of moderators parameters, two models were developed that predict moderator and moderator cooler behavior under the new conditions. The present paper refers to these models, which together with the improvement of process variables measurements mentioned in another paper presented at this meeting permits to understand current moderator behaviour and helps to early diagnostic of an eventual reactor internal failure. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Moderator behaviour and reactor internals integrity at Atucha I NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berra, S; Guala, M; Herzovich, P [Central Nuclear Atucha I, Nucleoelectrica Argentina, Lima, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chocron, M; Lorenzo, A; Raffo Calderon, Ma. C. del; Urrutia, G [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1997-12-31

    Atucha I is a Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Cooled Heavy Water Moderator Reactor. In this kind of reactor the moderator tank is physically connected to the primary coolant. Since neutron economy requires the moderator to be as cold as possible, it is necessary that even when physically connected, it should have a separated cooling system, which in this case is also used as a feed-water preheater, and also heat mass transfer with primary coolant should be minimized. This condition requires that some reactor internals are designed in principle to last the whole life of the plant. However, in 1988 the failure of one internal produced a 16 month shut down. This incident could have been prevented but the idea that reactor internals would not have failures due to aging was dominant at that time avoiding the early detection of the failure. However, the analysis of the records after the incident showed that some process variables had changed previously to the incident, i.e., power exchanged at the moderator heat exchanger had increased. Since the station restart up some changes in the moderator process variables and a flow rate reduction of about 10% through the primary side of one moderator cooler were observed. In order to understand the flow reduction and the overall behaviour of moderators parameters, two models were developed that predict moderator and moderator cooler behavior under the new conditions. The present paper refers to these models, which together with the improvement of process variables measurements mentioned in another paper presented at this meeting permits to understand current moderator behaviour and helps to early diagnostic of an eventual reactor internal failure. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Assessment of the accident response of a light-water-moderated breeder-reactor system: AWBA development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High, H.M.

    1983-05-01

    The predicted accident response for a light water moderated, thorium/U-233 fueled, seed-blanket reactor concept was assessed. The first part of the assessment compared breeder accident response with that of a current commercial pressurized water reactor design for several different types of transients. Based on these comparisons and a review of the various parameter differences between the breeder and a U-235 fueled plant, the second part of the assessment studied the breeder accident behavior in more detail, particularly in areas of potential concern. Based on the two parts of the assessment, it was concluded that the breeder accident response would be very similar to that of present commercial pressurized water reactor plants. The large Doppler and moderator reactivity coefficients of the breeder would significantly reduce the severity of many of the accidents that must be considered. It is expected that the accident response of the breeder can be shown to meet regulatory criteria

  16. Solid radioactive waste processing system for light water cooled reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Design, construction and performance requirements are given for the operation of the solid radioactive waste processing system for light water-cooled reactor plants. All radioactive or contaminated materials, including spent air and liquid filter elements, spent bead resins, filter sludge, spent powdered resins, evaporator and reverse osmosis concentrates, and dry radioactive wastes are to be processed in appropriate portions of the system. Sections of the standard cover: overall system requirements; equipment requirement; controls and instrumentation; physical arrangement; system capacity and redundancy; operation and maintenance; and system construction and testing. Provisions contained in this standard are to take precedence over ANS-51.1-1973(N18.2-1973) and its revision, ANS-51.8-1975(N18.2a-1975), Sections 2.2 and 2.3. The product resulting from the solid radioactive waste processing system must meet criteria imposed by standards and regulations for transportation and burial (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 100 to 199). As a special feature, all statements in this standard which are related to nuclear safety are set off in boxes

  17. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  18. Effect of TOC [total organic carbon] on a PWR secondary cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gau, J.Y.; Oung, J.C.; Wang, T.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the amount of total organic carbon (TOC) during the wet layup of the steam generator was a problem in PWR nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The results of surveys of TOC in PWR secondary cooling water systems had shown that the impurity of hydrazine and the bacteria were the main reasons that increase TOC. These do not have a corrosion effect on Inconel 600 and carbon steel when the secondary cooling water containing the TOC is below 200 ppb. But the anaerobic bacteria from the steam generator in wet layup will increase corrosion rate of carbon steel and crevice corrosion of Inconel 600. (author)

  19. Current status of nuclear power generation in Japan and directions in water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, T.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand aspects and current status of nuclear power generation in Japan are outlined. Although the future plan for nuclear power generation has not been determined yet the Japanese nuclear research centers and institutes are investigating and developing some projects on the next generation of light water reactors and other types of reactors. The paper describes these main activities

  20. MEANS FOR SHIELDING AND COOLING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-10

    Reactors of the water-cooled type and a means for shielding such a rcactor to protect operating personnel from harmful radiation are discussed. In this reactor coolant tubes which contain the fissionable material extend vertically through a mass of moderator. Liquid coolant enters through the bottom of the coolant tubes and passes upwardly over the fissionable material. A shield tank is disposed over the top of the reactor and communicates through its bottom with the upper end of the coolant tubes. A hydrocarbon shielding fluid floats on the coolant within the shield tank. With this arrangements the upper face of the reactor can be opened to the atmosphere through the two superimposed liquid layers. A principal feature of the invention is that in the event radioactive fission products enter thc coolant stream. imposed layer of hydrocarbon reduces the intense radioactivity introduced into the layer over the reactors and permits removal of the offending fuel material by personnel shielded by the uncontaminated hydrocarbon layer.

  1. Feasibility analysis of modified AL-6XN steel for structure component application in supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinggang LI; Qingzhi YAN; Rong MA; Haoqiang WANG; Changchun GE

    2009-01-01

    Modified AL-6XN austenite steel was patterned after AL-6XN superaustenitic stainless steel by introducing microalloy elements such as zirconium and titanium in order to adapt to recrystallizing thermo-mechanical treatment and further improve crevice corrosion resistance. Modified AL-6XN exhibited comparable tensile strength, and superior plasticity and impact toughness to commercial AL-6XN steel. The effects of aging behavior on corrosion resistance and impact toughness were measured to evaluate the qualification of modified AL-6XN steel as an in-core component and cladding material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Attention should be paid to degradation in corrosion resistance and impact toughness after aging for 50 hours when modified AL-6XN steel is considered as one of the candidate materials for in-core components and cladding tubes in supercritical water-cooled reactors.

  2. Investigation on spent fuel characteristics of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Okubo, T.; Uchikawa, S.

    2008-01-01

    The spent fuel characteristics of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been investigated using the SWAT and ORIGEN codes. RMWR is an advanced LWR concept for plutonium recycling by using the MOX fuel. In the code calculation, the ORIGEN libraries such as one-group cross-section data prepared for RMWR were necessary. Since there were no open libraries for RMWR, they were produced in this study by using the SWAT code. New libraries based on the heterogeneous core modeling in the axial direction and with the variable actinide cross-section (VXSEC) option were produced and selected as the representative ORIGEN libraries for RMWR. In order to investigate the characteristics of the RMWR spent fuel, the decay heat, the radioactivity and the content of each nuclide were evaluated with ORIGEN using these libraries. In this study, the spent fuel characteristics of other types of reactors, such as PWR, BWR, high burn-up PWR, full-MOX-PWR, full-MOX-BWR and FBR, were also evaluated with ORIGEN. It has been found that about a half of the decay heat of the RMWR spent fuel comes from the actinides nuclides. It is the same with the radioactivity. The decay heat and the radioactivity of the RMWR spent fuel are lower than those of full-MOX-LWRs and FBR, and are the same level as those of the high burn-up PWR. The decay heat and the radioactivity from the fission products (FPs) in the spent fuel mainly depend on the burn-up and the burn-up time rather than the reactor type. Therefore, the decay heat and the radioactivity from FPs in the RMWR spent fuel are smaller, reflecting its relatively long burn-up time resulted from its core characteristics with the high conversion ratio. The radioactivity from the actinides in the spent fuel mainly depends on the 241 Pu content in the initial fuel, and the decay heat mainly depends on 238 Pu and 244 Cm. The contribution of 244 Cm is much smaller in RMWR than in MOX-LWRs because of the difference in the spectrum. In addition, from

  3. Investigation on spent fuel characteristics of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukaya, Y. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)], E-mail: fukaya.yuji@jaea.go.jp; Okubo, T.; Uchikawa, S. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    The spent fuel characteristics of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been investigated using the SWAT and ORIGEN codes. RMWR is an advanced LWR concept for plutonium recycling by using the MOX fuel. In the code calculation, the ORIGEN libraries such as one-group cross-section data prepared for RMWR were necessary. Since there were no open libraries for RMWR, they were produced in this study by using the SWAT code. New libraries based on the heterogeneous core modeling in the axial direction and with the variable actinide cross-section (VXSEC) option were produced and selected as the representative ORIGEN libraries for RMWR. In order to investigate the characteristics of the RMWR spent fuel, the decay heat, the radioactivity and the content of each nuclide were evaluated with ORIGEN using these libraries. In this study, the spent fuel characteristics of other types of reactors, such as PWR, BWR, high burn-up PWR, full-MOX-PWR, full-MOX-BWR and FBR, were also evaluated with ORIGEN. It has been found that about a half of the decay heat of the RMWR spent fuel comes from the actinides nuclides. It is the same with the radioactivity. The decay heat and the radioactivity of the RMWR spent fuel are lower than those of full-MOX-LWRs and FBR, and are the same level as those of the high burn-up PWR. The decay heat and the radioactivity from the fission products (FPs) in the spent fuel mainly depend on the burn-up and the burn-up time rather than the reactor type. Therefore, the decay heat and the radioactivity from FPs in the RMWR spent fuel are smaller, reflecting its relatively long burn-up time resulted from its core characteristics with the high conversion ratio. The radioactivity from the actinides in the spent fuel mainly depends on the {sup 241}Pu content in the initial fuel, and the decay heat mainly depends on {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm. The contribution of {sup 244}Cm is much smaller in RMWR than in MOX-LWRs because of the difference in the spectrum

  4. The ISIS operation: Robotics repair work on the CHINON A3 natural uranium, carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmoine, R.M.E.

    1989-01-01

    After describing the upper internal support structures of the CHINON A3 reactor, the problems resulting from their degradation due to corrosion and to the difficulties of the ISIS operation are presented here. The repair method is as follows: all tools and repair parts reach the working area by the feeding-pipes drilled through the 7 m thick concrete vessel surrounding the reactor core; the robots handle into the reactor, the tool heads and the repair parts which are automatically positioned and welded around the corroded structure, thus restoring the support of measurement devices. The parts are either linked together or to the existing structure by means of 2 studs of 12 mm in diameter. The different phases to sort out a problem are: in-core topography, reconforming of the full-scale mock-up with the repair area, learning on this mock-up and in-core repair. The technical specificities of the robots used are the following: they have an 11 meter long, 0.22 meter across telescopic mast with jointed arms reaching a radius of 2.7 m. Then the useful load is 70 daN and the repeatability 0.1 mm. Different tool heads can be handled by the robot: telemeter and laser reconstruction: it allows to locate the in core points and to materialize them on the mock-up by a laser crossed-beams locating technique; scouring: it cleans the corroded parts of the structures before welding; welding: it allows the parts handling and the carried studs welding; screwing; tensile test: carried out when the stud welds are defective. A high level computerized control system is organized around a central unit which calculates the displacements of robots and synchronises the actions of different tools by communicating with several local units. A 100,000 hour designing, a 200,000 hour building and assembling and a 450,000 hour operating on working area were necessary to repair 15 out of the 102 corroded structures by fitting and welding 205 repair parts. 10 figs

  5. Indian programme on molten salt cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuIera, I.V.; Vijayan, P.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is developing a 600 MWth pebble bed high temperature reactor, cooled by natural circulation of molten fluoride salts and is capable of supplying process heat at 1000 ℃ to facilitate hydrogen production by splitting water. BARC has also initiated studies for a reactor concept in which salts of molten fluoride fuel and coolant in fluid form, flows through the reactor core of graphite moderator, resulting in nuclear fission within the molten salt. For thorium fuel cycle, this concept is very attractive, since the fuel can be re-processed on-line, enabling it to be an efficient neutron breeder. (author)

  6. Determination of mixture coefficients in tests simulating channels of a fuel assembly in a water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.R.

    1983-09-01

    Here, the mixture coefficients are determined in tests which simulate two symmetric and two assymetric coolant channels of a water cooled reactor. It was studies the effects of coolant flow and of the distance among the coolant channels on these coefficients. The technique used to determine the mixture coefficients was to introduce a tracer (methylene blue) into the flow. The determination of the tracer concentration at the end of the channels was made by means of spectrophotometric analysis. (author)

  7. High temperature on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion control in water cooled power reactors. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the results of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on High Temperature On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion in Water Cooled Power Reactors (1995-1999). This report attempts to provide both an overview of the state of the art with regard to on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion in operating reactors, and technical details of the important contributions made by programme participants to the development and qualification of new monitoring techniques. The WACOL CRP is a follow-up to the WACOLIN (Investigations on Water Chemistry Control and Coolant Interaction with Fuel and Primary Circuit Materials in Water Cooled Power Reactors) CRP conducted by the IAEA from 1986 to 1991. The WACOLIN CRP, which described chemistry, corrosion and activity-transport aspects, clearly showed the influence of water chemistry on corrosion of both fuel and reactor primary-circuit components, as well as on radiation fields. It was concluded that there was a fundamental need to monitor water-chemistry parameters in real time, reliably and accurately. The objectives of the WACOL CRP were to establish recommendations for the development, qualification and plant implementation of methods and equipment for on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion. Chief investigators from 18 organizations representing 15 countries provided a variety of contributions aimed at introducing proven monitoring techniques into plants on a regular basis and filling the gaps between plant operator needs and available monitoring techniques. The CRP firmly demonstrated that in situ monitoring is able to provide additional and valuable information to plant operators, e.g. ECP, high temperature pH and conductivity. Such data can be obtained promptly, i.e. in real time and with a high degree of accuracy. Reliable techniques and sensor devices are available which enable plant operators to obtain additional information on the response of structural materials in

  8. Detection and location of can rupture in reactors cooled by a flow of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, R.

    1968-01-01

    This report brings together the principal methods of fission-product detection used for water reactors. The position, type and method of adjustment is given for each detector. The methods for localizing the defective elements are explained, in particular those using water sampling or decreases in the flux. A few installations are briefly described. They correspond to particular types of reactors using boiling, pressurized or cold water. Amongst the many methods used, it can be noted that when the fuel is resistant, the installations are fairly compact. In nuclear super-heated reactors on the other hand, the study of fuel behaviour calls for larger installations. An identification of defective elements exists when the reactor structure allows it. If this is not possible, a localization in a group of elements is obtained by a flux depression. (author) [fr

  9. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  10. International symposium on evolutionary water cooled reactors: strategic issues, technologies and economic viability. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Within the frame of growing energy demand caused by global economic growth and taking into account the Kyoto protocol on carbon dioxide emissions nuclear power plants attaining a new role. The presented papers deal mostly with improvements in NPP design, construction and safety. Some new concepts are proposed, especially in the field of inherent or passive reactor safety as well as computerised control systems. Water cooled reactors achieved already the necessary cost reduction but require some radical thinking in fuel design, construction rate, built-in safety. The key factor will be mass production in order to attain capital cost of half today's level

  11. Calculation of steam content in a draught section of a tank-type boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panajotov, D.P.; Gorburov, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    Structural and hydrodynamic features of a two-phase flow in a draught section of a tank-type boiling water cooled reactor are considered. A calculated model of the steady flow and methods for determining steam content and phase rate profiles under the maximum steam content at the section axis and at some distance from it are proposed. Steam content distribution by height quantitatively agrees with experimental data for the VK-50 reactor. Calculation technique allows one to obtain steam content and phase rate profiles at the section outlet

  12. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  13. Analysis on blow-down transient in water ingress accident of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Yanhua; Li, Fu; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction with the increase of steam density in reactor core to enhance neutron slowing-down, also the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and the damage of reflector structure material. The increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The research on water ingress transient is significant for the verification of inherent safety characteristics of high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), designed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, is exampled to be analyzed in this paper. The design basis accident (DBA) scenarios of double-ended guillotine break of single heat-exchange tube (steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture) are simulated by the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, and some key concerns which are relative to the amount of water into the reactor core during the blow-down transient are analyzed in detail. The results show that both of water mass and steam ratio of the fluid spouting from the broken heat-exchange tube are affected by break location, which will increase obviously with the broken location closing to the outlet of the heat-exchange tube. The double-ended guillotine rupture at the outlet of the heat-exchange will result more steam penetrates into the reactor core in the design basis accident of water ingress. The mass of water ingress will also be affected by the draining system. It is concluded that, with reasonable optimization on design to balance safety and economy, the total mass of water ingress into the primary circuit of reactor could be limited effectively to meet the safety requirements, and the pollution of

  14. Performance of highly rated UO2 fuel in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schankula, M. H.; Hastings, I. J.

    1977-07-15

    Information on oxide fuel behaviour in organic coolant was required as part of the organic-cooled power reactor (OCR) study. Of major interest were data on the release of fission gases from fuel operating at high fuel surface temperatures and low external restraint; features which are peculiar to the OCR. To provide these and other data, UO2 fuel with cold-worked Zr-2.5wt%Nb sheathing was irradiated in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor to burnups of 135-154 MWh/kgU at a time-averaged linear power of 60-63 kW/m. Elements with 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing showed maximum diametral increases averaging 3.7 and 1.7% respectively at pellet mid-planes. Reduced fuel/sheath heat transfer resulting from a difference between internal gas pressure and coolant pressure produced high operating temperatures, and there was evidence of central melting in some elements. Fission gas releases were 30-60%. In the heat affected zone adjacent to brazed appendages, the diametral increases were lower, averaging 0.9 and 0.5% for 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing respectively. Heat treatment during the brazing process produced a local improvement in sheath creep strength. Highly rated oxide fuel irradiated in organic coolant will require sheathing with improved high temperature creep properties; heat-treated Zr-2.5 wt% Nb may provide this improvement.

  15. The effect of water vapor in the reactor cavity in a MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor] on the radiation heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses have been completed to determine the effect of the presence of water vapor in the reactor cavity in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor on the predicted radiation heat transfer from the vessel wall to the reactor cavity cooling system. The analysis involves the radiation heat transfer between two parallel plates with an absorbing and emitting medium present. Because the absorption in the water vapor is spectrally dependent, the solution is difficult even for simple geometries. A computer code was written to solve the problem using the Monte Carlo method. The code was validated against closed form solutions, and shows excellent agreement. In the analysis of the reactor problem, the results show that the reduction in heat transfer, and the consequent increase in the vessel wall temperature, can be significant. This effect can be cast in terms of a reduction in the wall surface emissivities from 0.8 to 0.59. Because of the insulating effect of the water vapor, increasing the gap distance between the vessel wall and the cooling system will cause the vessel wall temperature to increase further. Care should be taken in the design of the facility to minimize the gap distance and keep temperature increase within allowable limits. 3 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Water-ingress analysis for the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Wang Yan

    2010-01-01

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor adopting steam-turbine cycle, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction, as well as the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and reflector structure material. Besides, increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The analysis of such a kind of important and particular accident is significant to verify the inherent safety characteristics of the modular HTR plants. Based on the preliminary design of the 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM), the design basis accident of a double-ended guillotine break of one heating tube and the beyond design basis accident of a large break of the main steam collection plate have been analyzed by using TINTE code, which is a special transient analysis program for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Some safety relevant concerns, such as the fuel temperature, the primary loop pressure, the graphite corrosion, the water gas releasing amount, as well as the natural convection influence on the condition of failing to close the blower flaps, have been studied in detail. The calculation results indicate that even under some severe hypothetical postulates, the HTR-PM is able to keep the inherent safeties of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor and has a relatively good natural plant response, which will not result in environmental radiation hazard.

  17. Thermal and stability considerations for a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor during power-raising phase of plant startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes thermal analyses and linear stability analyses of the Supercritical Water-cooled Fast Reactor with 'two-path' flow scheme during the power-raising phase of plant startup. For thermal consideration, the same criterion of the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) as applied to the normal operating condition is used. For thermal-hydraulic stability consideration, the decay ratio of 0.5 is applied, which is taken from BWRs. Firstly, we calculated the flow rate distribution among the parallel flow paths from the reactor vessel inlet nozzles to the mixing plenum below the core using a system analysis code. The parallel flow paths consist of the seed fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow, the blanket fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow and the downcomer. Then, the MCSTs are estimated for various reactor powers and feedwater flow rates with system analyses. The decay ratios are estimated with linear stability analyses. The available range of the reactor power and feedwater flow rate to satisfy the thermal and stability criteria is obtained. (author)

  18. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  19. Model validation using CFD-grade experimental database for NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems with water and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Petrov, Victor [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tompkins, Casey [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Nunez, Daniel [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-02-13

    This project has been focused on the experimental and numerical investigations of the water-cooled and air-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) designs. At this aim, we have leveraged an existing experimental facility at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), and we have designed and built a separate effect test facility at the University of Michigan. The experimental facility at UW has underwent several upgrades, including the installation of advanced instrumentation (i.e. wire-mesh sensors) built at the University of Michigan. These provides highresolution time-resolved measurements of the void-fraction distribution in the risers of the water-cooled RCCS facility. A phenomenological model has been developed to assess the water cooled RCCS system stability and determine the root cause behind the oscillatory behavior that occurs under normal two-phase operation. Testing under various perturbations to the water-cooled RCCS facility have resulted in changes in the stability of the integral system. In particular, the effects on stability of inlet orifices, water tank volume have and system pressure been investigated. MELCOR was used as a predictive tool when performing inlet orificing tests and was able to capture the Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) that occurred upon reaching saturation in the risers. The experimental and numerical results have then been used to provide RCCS design recommendations. The experimental facility built at the University of Michigan was aimed at the investigation of mixing in the upper plenum of the air-cooled RCCS design. The facility has been equipped with state-of-theart high-resolution instrumentation to achieve so-called CFD grade experiments, that can be used for the validation of Computational Fluid Dynanmics (CFD) models, both RANS (Reynold-Averaged) and LES (Large Eddy Simulations). The effect of risers penetration in the upper plenum has been investigated as well.

  20. Renewal of reactor cooling system of JMTR. Reactor building site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, Ryuji; Kawamata, Takanori; Otsuka, Kaoru; Sekine, Katsunori; Koike, Sumio; Gorai, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Fukasaku, Akitomi

    2012-03-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) is a light water moderated and cooled tank-type reactor, and its thermal power is 50 MW. The JMTR is categorized as high flux testing reactors in the world. The JMTR has been utilized for irradiation experiments of nuclear fuels and materials, as well as for radioisotope productions since the first criticality in March 1968 until August 2006. JAEA is decided to refurbish the JMTR as an important fundamental infrastructure to promote the nuclear research and development. And The JMTR refurbishment work is carried out for 4 years from 2007. Before refurbishment work, from August 2006 to March 2007, all concerned renewal facilities were selected from evaluation on their damage and wear in terms of aging. Facilities which replacement parts are no longer manufactured or not likely to be manufactured continuously in near future, are selected as renewal ones. Replace priority was decided with special attention to safety concerns. A monitoring of aging condition by the regular maintenance activity is an important factor in selection of continuous using after the restart. In this report, renewal of the cooling system within refurbishment facilities in the JMTR is summarized. (author)

  1. Critical Design Issues of Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seokho H.; Berry, Jan

    2011-01-01

    U.S. ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). The TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak to cooling water during nominal pulsed operation 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. This water contains radionuclides because impurities (e.g., tritium) diffuse from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200 240 C at up to 4.4MPa, and corrosion products become activated by neutron bombardment. The system is designated as safety important class (SIC) and will be fabricated to comply with the French Order concerning nuclear pressure equipment (December 2005) and the EU Pressure Equipment Directive using ASME Section VIII, Div 2 design codes. The complexity of the TCWS design and fabrication presents unique challenges. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed with several issues that need to be resolved to move to next stage of the design. Those issues include flow balancing between over hundreds of branch pipelines in parallel to supply cooling water to blankets, determination of optimum flow velocity while minimizing the potential for cavitation damage, design for freezing protection for cooling water flowing through cryostat (freezing) environment, requirements for high-energy piping design, and electromagnetic impact to piping and components. Although the TCWS consists of standard commercial components such as piping with valves and fittings, heat exchangers, and pumps, complex requirements present interesting design challenges. This paper presents a brief description of TCWS conceptual design and critical design issues that need to be resolved.

  2. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The first meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. Part I of the Summary Report contains the minutes of the meeting

  5. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The First Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. The Summary Report (Pt. 2) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs

  6. Static seals and their application in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Information relative to six types of static seals commonly used in the primary cooling systems of nuclear reactors is compiled. This information includes a description of each type of seal, its material of construction, design features, operating experience, and advantages and disadvantages. The types covered include spiral-wound asbestos-filled gaskets, hollow metallic O-rings, Belleville spring type of gasketed joints, integrated elastomer and metal retainer gaskets, and solid metal gaskets with heavy cross sections. Omega, canopy, and lip seals are discussed briefly, and information on flange design for gasketing is also presented

  7. Impact of moderator history on physics parameters in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The magnitude of differential reactivity effects that result from spectral differences in different portions of a pressurized water (PWR) core is studied, and it is shown that these effects can be correlated very well with the local moderator history. The impact of these differences on physics parameters such as axial offset, isothermal moderator temperature coefficient, and differential control rod worth is shown to be significant for two PWRs of considerably different design

  8. CFD Application and OpenFOAM on the 2-D Model for the Moderator System of Heavy-Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Se Myong; Park, A. Y.; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2011-01-01

    The flow in the complex pipeline system in a calandria tank of CANDU reactor is transported through the distribution of heat sources, which also exerts the pressure drop to the coolant flow. So the phenomena should be considered as multi-physics both in the viewpoints of heat transfer and fluid dynamics. In this study, we have modeled the calandria tank system as two-dimensional simplified one preliminarily that is yet far from the real objects, but to see the essential physics and to test the possibility of the present CFD(computational fluid dynamics) methods for the thermo-hydraulic problem in the moderator system of heavy-water reactors

  9. Integral design concepts of advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Under the sub-programme on non-electrical applications of advanced reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing a worldwide forum for exchange of information on integral reactor concepts. Two Technical Committee meetings were held in 1994 and 1995 on the subject where state-of-the-art developments were presented. Efforts are continuing for the development of advanced nuclear reactors of both evolutionary and innovative design, for electricity, co-generation and heat applications. While single purpose reactors for electricity generation may require small and medium sizes under certain conditions, reactors for heat applications and co-generation would be necessary in the small and medium range and need to be located closer to the load centres. The integral design approach to the development of advanced light water reactors has received special attention over the past few years. Several designs are in the detailed design stage, some are under construction, one prototype is in operation. A need has been felt for guidance on a number of issues, ranging from design objectives to the assessment methodology needed to show how integral designs can meet these objectives, and also to identify their advantages and problem areas. The technical document addresses the current status of the design, safety and operational issues of integral reactors and recommends areas for future development

  10. Steam generator tube failures: world experience in water-cooled nuclear power reactors in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.G.

    1976-11-01

    Steam generator tube failures were reported in 22 out of 62 water-cooled nuclear power plants surveyed in 1975. This was less than in 1974, and the number of the tubes affected was noticeably less. This report summarizes these failures, most of which were due to corrosion. Secondary-water chemistry control, procedures for inspection and repair, tube materials, and failure rates are discussed. (author)

  11. High temperature and high performance light water cooled reactors operating at supercritical pressure, research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Yamada, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of supercritical-pressure, once-through coolant cycle nuclear power plant (SCR) was developed at the University of Tokyo. The research and development (R and D) started worldwide. This paper summarized the conceptual design and R and D in Japan. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants (FPP) in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants will be fully utilized for SCR. The high temperature, supercritical-pressure light water reactor is the logical evolution of LWR. Boiling evolved from circular boilers, water tube boilers and once-through boilers. It is the reactor version of the once-through boiler. The development from LWR to SCR follows the history of boilers. The goal of the R and D should be the capital cost reduction that cannot be achieved by the improvement of LWR. The reactor can be used for hydrogen production either by catalysis and chemical decomposition of low quality hydrocarbons in supercritical water. The reactor is compatible with tight lattice fast core for breeders due to low outlet coolant density, small coolant flow rate and high head coolant pumps

  12. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  13. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of decommissioning of water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, a large amount of rad-waste in the form of graphite stack fragments is generated (on average 1500-2000 tons per reactor). That is why it is essentially important, although complex from the technical point of view, to develop advanced technologies based on up-to-date remotely-controlled systems for unmanned dismantling of the graphite stack containing highly-active long-lived radionuclides and for conditioning of irradiated graphite (IG) for the purposes of transportation and subsequent long term and ecologically safe storage either on NPP sites or in special-purpose geological repositories. The main characteristics critical for radiation and nuclear hazards of the graphite stack are as follows: the graphite stack is contaminated with nuclear fuel that has gotten there as a result of the accidents; the graphite mass is 992 tons, total activity -6?104 Ci (at the time of unit shutdown); the fuel mass in the reactor stack amounts to 100-140 kg, as estimated by IPPE and RDIPE, respectively; γ-radiation dose rate in the stack cells varies from 4 to 4300 R/h, with the prevailing values being in the range from 50 to 100 R/h. In this paper the traditional methods of rad-waste handling as bituminization technology, cementing technology are discussed. In terms of IG handling technology two lines were identified: long-term storage of conditioned IG and IG disposal by means of incineration. The specific cost of graphite immobilization in a radiation-resistant polymeric matrix amounts to -2600 USD per 1 t of graphite, whereas the specific cost of immobilization in slag-stone containers with an inorganic binder (cement) is -1400 USD per 1 t of graphite. On the other hand, volume of conditioned IG rad-waste subject for disposal, if obtained by means of the first technology, is 2-2.5 times less than the volume of rad-waste generated by means of the second technology. It can be concluded from the above that

  14. Thermal-hydraulic R and D infrastructure for water cooled reactors of the Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Jain, V.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    R and D has been the critical ingredient of Indian Nuclear Power Program from the very inception. Approach to R and D infrastructure has been closely associated with the three-stage nuclear power program that was crafted on the basis of available resources and technology in the short-term and energy security in the long-term. Early R and D efforts were directed at technologies relevant to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) which are currently the mainstay of Indian nuclear power program. Lately, the R and D program has been steered towards the design and development of advanced and innovative reactors with the twin objective of utilization of abundant thorium and to meet the future challenges to nuclear power such as enhanced safety and reliability, better economy, proliferation resistance etc. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is an Indian innovative reactor currently being developed to realize the above objectives. Extensive R and D infrastructure has been created to validate the system design and various passive concepts being incorporated in the AHWR. This paper provides a brief review of R and D infrastructure that has been developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for thermal-hydraulic investigations for water-cooled reactors of Indian nuclear power program. (author)

  15. Process for changing fuel elements of a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.; Rau, P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to change fuel elements, a water-filled duct can be installed between the rector pressure vessel and a space for accommodating the fuel elements. The fuel elements are transported there under water by a fuelling machine. The duct is installed as watertight connection closed on all sides between the reactor pressure vessel and a fuel element transport container brought close to it. The fuelling machine works in this duct. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Cooled Water Production System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invention refers to the field of air conditioning and regards an apparatus for obtaining cooled water . The purpose of the invention is to develop...such a system for obtaining cooled water which would permit the maximum use of the cooling effect of the water -cooling tower.

  17. Present status of study on super-critical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ookawa, Masahiro; Shiga, Shigenori; Moriya, Kumiaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Suguru; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    Reactor structure design, the core design and coolant flow in sub-channel of fuel assembly are evaluated in the subtitle of plant concepts of the 2002 fiscal year. High temperature parts and high pressure parts are separated on the reactor structure design. Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is designed under the condition of low temperature and high pressure, while, apparatuses and instruments in the reactor core are designed under the condition of high temperature and low pressure. Design of control rods for cold shut down of the reactor are estimated by using monte carlo computation code (MCNP). It reveals that the number of 16 control rods (0.7 cm in dia) per a fuel assembly is needed for getting control rod worth of conventional light water reactor. Radial power peaking factor reduces to 1.27 by using a load pattern of fuel assembly, number and load position of fuel elements with burnable poison and control rod pattern. Distributions of coolant flow rate in the fuel assembly are studied by sub-channel analysis code, SILFEED, for BWR. The fuel assembly with 1.0 mm gaps between fuel rod and water keeps an uniform flow distribution in which no sub-channel below 90% of flow rate appears in the fuel assembly. Heat transfer experiments for a single test fuel are carried out in the subtitle of heat transfer. The heat transfer data obtained by the experiments are fitted well to Watts' formula. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) for SUS 304 and SUS 316L steels in the subtitle of materials are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the materials under the super-critical pressure water environment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) takes place in SUS 304, but doesn't take place in SUS 316L. (M. Suetake)

  18. Neutronic performance of high-density LEU fuels in water-moderated and water-reflected research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    At the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) meeting in September 1994, Durand reported that the maximum uranium loading attainable with U 3 Si 2 fuel is about 6.0 g U/cm 3 . The French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) plan to perform irradiation tests with 5 plates at this loading. Compagnie pour L'Etude et La Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques (CERCA) has also fabricated a few uranium nitride (UN) plates with a uranium density in the fuel meat of 7.0 g/cm 3 and found that UN is compatible with the aluminum matrix at temperatures below 500 C. High density dispersion fuels proposed for development include U-Zr(4 wt%)-Nb(2 wt%), U-Mo(5 wt%), and U-Mo(9 wt%). The purpose of this note is to examine the relative neutronic behavior of these high density fuels in a typical light water-reflected and water-moderated MTR-type research reactor. The results show that a dispersion of the U-Zr-Nb alloy has the most favorable neutronic properties and offers the potential for uranium densities greater than 8.0 g/cm 3 . On the other hand, UN is the least reactive fuel because of the relatively large 14 N(n,p) cross section. For a fixed value of k eff , the required 235 U loading per fuel element is least for the U-Zr-Nb fuel and steadily increases for the U-Mo(5%), U-Mo(9%), and UN fuels. Because of volume fraction limitations, the UO 2 dispersions are only useful for uranium densities below 5.0 g/cm 3 . In this density range, however, UO 2 is more reactive than U 3 Si 2

  19. Device for detecting the water leak within a feedwater nozzle in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Tsunekazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable exact recognition and detection for the state of water leak. Constitution: The detection device comprises a thermocouple disposed to the outer surface of a feedwater nozzle, a distortion meter for detecting the change in the outer diameter of a nozzle and an acoustic emission generator disposed to the inside of the nozzle for generating a signal upon temperature change. These sensors previously monitor the states during normal operation, and thus detect the change in each of the states upon occurrence of water leakage to issue an alarm. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Neutronics study on hybrid reactor cooled by helium, water and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zaixin; Feng Kaiming; Zhang Guoshu; Zheng Guoyao; Zhao Fengchao

    2009-01-01

    There is no serious magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem when helium,water or molten salt of Flibe flows in high magnetic field. Thus helium, water and Flibe were proposed as candidate of coolant for fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on magnetic confinement. The effect on neutronics of hybrid reactor due to coolant was investigated. The analyses of neutron spectra and fuel breeding of blanket with different coolants were performed. Variations of tritium breeding ratio (TBR), blanket energy multiplication (M) and keff with operating time were also studied. MCNP code was used for neutron transport simulation. It is shown that spectra change greatly with different coolants. The blanket with helium exhibits very hard spectrum and good tritium breeding ability. And fission reactions are mainly from fast neutron. The blanket with water has soft spectrum and high energy multiplication factor. However, it needs to improve TBR. The blanket with Flibe has hard spectrum and less energy release. (authors)

  1. Opening Remarks by Mr. Yury A. Sokolov [International Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21. Century, Vienna (Austria), 27-30 October 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, I would like to welcome you to this important international Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21st Century. First, I would like to express our sincere appreciation to the European Commission, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the World Nuclear Association and the International Electrotechnical Commission for their cooperation and the assistance provided in the organization of this conference. Challenges and opportunities, like the poles of a magnet, do not exist separately. Furthermore, what some perceive as an opportunity may be a challenge for others, and a challenge today will probably become an opportunity tomorrow. All these complexities are fully applicable to the nuclear industry and its future. Water Cooled Reactors have been the keystone of the nuclear industry in the 20th Century. As we move into the 21st Century and face new challenges such as the growth in world energy demand or the threat of global climate change, nuclear energy has been identified as one of the sources that could substantially and sustainably contribute to power the world. Many projections forecast significant growth in the use of nuclear energy both in countries currently taking advantage of it and in countries considering its use for the first time. As we look into the future with the development of advanced and innovative reactor designs and fuel cycles, it seems clear that Water Cooled Reactors will play an important role in the future too. In recent times, there has been a two prong approach on the expansion of nuclear power. - On one hand, countries with existing nuclear power programmes have made a large effort towards making the most of their current nuclear assets by capitalizing in many years of operational excellence, as well as by extending and optimizing their operational life. - On the other hand, and despite these life management efforts, there is a clear need to eventually

  2. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, (2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or (3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and (2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code

  3. Studies on the behaviour of a passive containment cooling system for the Indian advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, N.K.; Saha, D.; Chandraker, D.K.; Kakodkar, A.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2001-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system has been proposed for the advanced heavy water reactor being designed in India. This is to provide long term cooling for the reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident. The system removes energy released into the containment through immersed condensers kept in a pool of water. An important aspect of immersed condenser's working is the potential degradation of immersed condenser's performance due to the presence of noncondensable gases. An experimental programme to investigate the passive containment cooling system behaviour and performance has been undertaken in a phased manner. In the first phase, system response tests were conducted on a small scale model to understand the phenomena involved. Tests were conducted with constant energy input rate and with varying energy input rate simulating decay heat. With constant energy input rate, pressures in volume V 1 and V 2 reached almost steady value. With varying energy input rate V 1 pressure dropped below the pressure in V 2 . The system could efficiently purge air from V 1 to V 2 . The paper deals with the details of the tests conducted and the results obtained. (orig.) [de

  4. Chinese development of water-cooled reactors for non-electric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuliang; Duo Dong

    1997-01-01

    China is very densely inhabited land where approximately 75% of the primary energy consumption is contributed by coal. The strong dependence on coal results in two significant problems, the burden on transportation and the emission of environmental pollutants. Distances between coal production and consumption result in a burden on China's railway, road and water transport systems of approximately 40%, 25%, and 20% of their respective capacities. Environmentally, although the per capita annual CO2 emission is well under the world average, China ranks third after the USA and Russia in CO2 emission. Both of these problems can be alleviated through the increase use of nuclear energy. A dominant consumer of China's primary energy is in the form of heat application, of which district heating is a significant portion. The State is supporting the development of nuclear heating reactors for district heating purposes. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), with the support of the State, completed the construction of a 5MW test nuclear heating reactor in 1989. Since then, this reactor has been successfully operated for heating purposes, safety demonstration experiments and for tests on other applications. Subsequently, a 200MW commercial nuclear heating demonstration plant was approved by the State Council and design and licensing work on this plant is currently in progress at INET. This paper provides a review of the design parameters for these two nuclear heating plants. Other applications of the nuclear heating reactor, including seawater desalination, air conditioning and as an industrial process steam supply are currently under consideration. INET has considered two designs of a nuclear desalination plant (steam only and co-generation) coupled with the 200MW nuclear heating reactor. Also, INET is investigating use of this reactor for air conditioning and process chilled water production. The current status of these efforts are described in this paper. (author

  5. Validation of Reactor Physics-Thermal hydraulics Calculations for Research Reactors Cooled by the Laminar Flow of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K. A.; Schubring, D. [Univ. of Florida, Florida (United States); Girardin, G.; Pautz, A. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    A collaboration between the University of Florida and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL) has been formed to develop and validate detailed coupled multiphysics models of the zero-power (100 W) CROCUS reactor at EPFL and the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor, for the comprehensive analysis of the reactor behavior under transient (neutronic or thermal-hydraulic induced) conditions. These two reactors differ significantly in the core design and thermal power output, but share unique heat transfer and flow characteristics. They are characterized by single-phase laminar water flow at near-atmospheric pressures in complex geometries with the possibility of mechanically entrained air bubbles. Validation experiments will be designed to expand the validation domain of these existing models, computational codes and techniques. In this process, emphasis will be placed on validation of the coupled models developed to gain confidence in their applicability for safety analysis. EPFL is responsible for the design and implementation of transient experiments to generate a database of reactor parameters (flow distribution, power profile, and power evolution) to be used to validate against code predictions. The transient experiments performed at EPFL will be simulated on the basis of developed models for these tasks. Comparative analysis will be performed with SERPENT and MCNPX reference core models. UF focuses on the generation of the coupled neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic models, including implementation of a TRACE/PARCS reactor simulator model, a PARET model, and development of full-field computational fluid dynamics models (using OpenFOAM) for refined thermal-hydraulics physics treatments. In this subtask of the project, the aim is to verify by means of CFD the validity of TRACE predictions for near-atmospheric pressure water flow in the presence of mechanically entrained air bubbles. The scientific understanding of these multiphysics

  6. Validation of Reactor Physics-Thermal hydraulics Calculations for Research Reactors Cooled by the Laminar Flow of Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K. A.; Schubring, D.; Girardin, G.; Pautz, A.

    2013-01-01

    A collaboration between the University of Florida and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL) has been formed to develop and validate detailed coupled multiphysics models of the zero-power (100 W) CROCUS reactor at EPFL and the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor, for the comprehensive analysis of the reactor behavior under transient (neutronic or thermal-hydraulic induced) conditions. These two reactors differ significantly in the core design and thermal power output, but share unique heat transfer and flow characteristics. They are characterized by single-phase laminar water flow at near-atmospheric pressures in complex geometries with the possibility of mechanically entrained air bubbles. Validation experiments will be designed to expand the validation domain of these existing models, computational codes and techniques. In this process, emphasis will be placed on validation of the coupled models developed to gain confidence in their applicability for safety analysis. EPFL is responsible for the design and implementation of transient experiments to generate a database of reactor parameters (flow distribution, power profile, and power evolution) to be used to validate against code predictions. The transient experiments performed at EPFL will be simulated on the basis of developed models for these tasks. Comparative analysis will be performed with SERPENT and MCNPX reference core models. UF focuses on the generation of the coupled neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic models, including implementation of a TRACE/PARCS reactor simulator model, a PARET model, and development of full-field computational fluid dynamics models (using OpenFOAM) for refined thermal-hydraulics physics treatments. In this subtask of the project, the aim is to verify by means of CFD the validity of TRACE predictions for near-atmospheric pressure water flow in the presence of mechanically entrained air bubbles. The scientific understanding of these multiphysics

  7. Thermo-fluid analysis of water cooled research reactors in natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini

    2004-01-01

    The STHIRP-1 computer program, which fundamentals are described in this work, uses the principles of the subchannels analysis and has the capacity to simulate, under steady state and transient conditions, the thermal and hydraulic phenomena which occur inside the core of a water-refrigerated research reactor under a natural convection regime. The models and empirical correlations necessary to describe the flow phenomena which can not be described by theoretical relations were selected according to the characteristics of the reactor operation. Although the primary objective is the calculation of research reactors, the formulation used to describe the fluid flow and the thermal conduction in the heater elements is sufficiently generalized to extend the use of the program for applications in power reactors and other thermal systems with the same features represented by the program formulations. To demonstrate the analytical capacity of STHIRP-l, there were made comparisons between the results calculated and measured in the research reactor TRIGA IPR-R1 of CDTN/CNEN. The comparisons indicate that the program reproduces the experimental data with good precision. Nevertheless, in the future there must be used more consistent experimental data to corroborate the validation of the program. (author)

  8. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing

  9. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  10. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  11. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  12. An organic profile of a pressurised water reactor secondary plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeden, Nestor van; Stwayi, Mandisibuntu; Gericke, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Make-up water addition to the steam/water cycle at Koeberg Nuclear Power Station usually results in a corresponding increase of the chloride concentration in the steam generator blowdown system. During plant transients, when higher than normal make-up is required to the secondary plant, the concentration of chloride occasionally exceeds the limiting value for the station chemistry performance indicator. Irrespective of this, the demineralised water make-up supply tanks, which are routinely analysed for chloride, are within all recognised acceptable standards for secondary water make-up and therefore these tanks do not initially appear to be the source of chloride contamination. Water treatment at the plant relies essentially on ion exchange, which has been proven to be very effective in removing inorganic ionic species such as chloride. Organic compounds are less effectively removed by ion exchange and may pass through the treatment system, and these organics can reside undetected in the make-up water tanks. Historically, the elevated chloride concentration following high system make-up has been attributed to chlorinated organic compounds known as trihalomethanes being present in the make-up water tanks, but no rigorous study had been undertaken. As it has been assumed that the majority of chloride in the secondary system originates from the make-up water organic impurities, it was considered important to confirm this by compiling an organic profile of the secondary plant. The use of organic additives was also taken into account in the profile. This work has confirmed the contribution from trihalomethanes and has also found that other organochlorides contribute even more significantly to the overall chloride inventory of the secondary plant. (orig.)

  13. Solar energy as an alternate energy source to mixed oxide fuels in light-water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    Supplemental information pertaining to the generic environmental impact statement on the Pu recycling process for mixed oxide light-water cooled reactors (GESMO) was requested from several sources. In particular, the role of alternate sources of energy was to be explored and the implications of these alternate sources to the question of Pu recycle in LWRs were to be investigated. In this vein, solar energy as an alternate source is the main subject of this report, along with other information related to solar energy. The general conclusion is that solar energy should have little effect on the decisions concerning GESMO

  14. Fissile fuel assembly for a sub-moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Dejeux, Pol.; Alibran, Patrice.

    1983-01-01

    Each of the core assemblies is composed of a prismatic case made of a neutron absorbing material, inside which very long rods containing the fissile material are arranged parallel to the height of the case and according to a regular network in the straight sections of the case. At least one piece in a fertile material exposed to the neutrons emitted by the fissile material of the assembly is arranged on each one of the side faces of the case. The invention applies in particular to sub-moderated reactors, cooled and moderated by pressurized water [fr

  15. On Stability of Natural-circulation-cooled Boiling Water Reactors during Start-up (Experimental Results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, A.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of flashing-induced instabilities, which are of importance during the start-up phase of natural-circulation Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), are studied. Experiments at typical start-up conditions (low power and low pressure) are carried out on a steam/water natural circulation loop. The mechanism of flashing-induced instability is analyzed in detail and it is found that non-equilibrium between phases and enthalpy transport plays an important role in the instability process. Pressure and steam volume in the steam dome are found to have a stabilizing effect. The main characteristics of the instabilities have been analyzed. (authors)

  16. Review on conformance of JMTR reactor facility to safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Naka, Michihiro; Sakuta, Yoshiyuki; Hori, Naohiko; Matsui, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Masataka

    2009-03-01

    The safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research are formulated as fundamental judgements on the basic design validity for licensing from a viewpoint of the safety. Taking the refurbishment opportunity of the JMTR, the conformance of the JMTR reactor facility to current safety design examination guides was reviewed with licensing documents, annexes and related documents. As a result, it was found that licensing documents fully satisfied the requirements of the current guides. Moreover, it was found that the JMTR reactor facility itself also satisfied the guides requirements as well as the safety performance, since the facility with safety function such as structure, systems, devices had been installed based on the licensing documents under the permission by the regulation authority. Important devices for safety have been produced under authorization of regulating authority. Therefore, it was confirmed that the licensing was conformed to guides, and that the JMTR has enough performance. (author)

  17. Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

  18. Processes influencing cooling of reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magoulas, V.E.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge of heated reactor cooling water from SRP reactors to the Savannah River is through sections of stream channels into the Savannah River Swamp and from the swamp into the river. Significant cooling of the reactor effluents takes place in both the streams and swamp. The majority of the cooling is through processes taking place at the surface of the water. The major means of heat dissipation are convective transfer of heat to the air, latent heat transfer through evaporation and radiative transfer of infrared radiation. A model was developed which incorporates the effects of these processes on stream and swamp cooling of reactor effluents. The model was used to simulate the effect of modifications in the stream environment on the temperature of water flowing into the river. Environmental effects simulated were the effect of changing radiant heat load, the effect of changes in tree canopy density in the swamp, the effect of total removal of trees from the swamp, and the effect of diverting the heated water from L reactor from Steel Creek to Pen Branch. 6 references, 7 figures

  19. Application of the dose limitation system to the control of carbon-14 releases from heavy-water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.; Gonzalez, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Heavy-water-moderated reactors produce substantially more carbon-14 than light-water reactors. Applying the principles of the systems of dose limitation, the paper presents the rationale used for establishing the release limit for effluents containing this nuclide and for the decisions made regarding the effluent treatment in the third nuclear power station in Argentina. Production of carbon-14 in PHWR and the release routes are analysed in the light of the different effluent treatment possibilities. An optimization assessment is presented, taking into account effluent treatment and waste management costs, and the collective effective dose commitment due to the releases. The contribution of present carbon-14 releases to future individual doses is also analysed in the light of an upper bound for the contribution, representing a fraction of the individual dose limits. The paper presents the resulting requirements for the effluent treatment regarding carbon-14 and the corresponding regulatory aspects used in Argentina. (author)

  20. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammers, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a sodium-cooled nuclear reactor, whose reactor tank contains the primary circuit, shielding surrounding the reactor core and a primary/secondary heat exchanger, particularly a fast breeder reactor on the module principle. In order to achieve this module principle it is proposed to have electromagnetic circulating pumps outside the reactor tank, where the heat exchanger is accomodated in an annular case above the pumps. This case has several openings at the top end to the space above the reactor core, some smaller openings in the middle to the same space and is connected at the bottom to an annular space between the tank wall and the reactor core. As a favoured variant, it is proposed that the annular electromagnetic pumps should be arranged concentrically to the reactor tank, where there is an annual duct on the inside of the reactor tank. In this way the sodium-cooled nuclear reactor is made suitable as a module with a large number of such elements. (orig.) [de

  1. Evolution of design of steam generator for sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetal, S.C.; Vaidyanathan

    1997-01-01

    The first sodium cooled reactor was the experimental breeder reactor (EBR-I) in usa which was commissioned in 1951 and was incidentally the first nuclear reactor to generate electrical energy. This was followed by fast breeder reactors in USSR, UK, france, USA, japan, germany and India. The use of sodium as a coolant is due to its low moderation which helps in breeding fissile fuel from fertile materials and also its high heat transfer coefficient at comparatively low velocities. The good heat transfer properties introduce thermal stresses when there are rapid changes in the sodium temperatures. Also sodium has a chemical affinity with air and water. The steam generators for sodium cooled reactors have to allow for these novel conditions and in addition, unlike other components. Choices have to be made whether it is a recirculation type as in most fossil plants or an once through unit, the power rating, shape of the tube (straight, helical, U-tube), materials (Ferritic or austenitic), with free level of sodium or not, sodium on tube side or shell side and so on. With higher pressures and steam temperatures reheating steam after partial expansion in the turbine becomes essential as in conventional turbines. For this purpose the choice of reheating fluid viz sodium or live main steam has to be made. This paper traces the evolution of steam generator designs in the different sodium cooled reactors (chronologically) and the operation experience. 16 figs., 1 tab

  2. Passive device for emergency core cooling of pressurized water reactors. Pasivno ustrojstvo za bezopasnost na vodo-voden atomen reaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, D

    1984-02-28

    The device proposed ensures additional margin of reactor subcriticality in case of post-accident emergency core cooling (ECC), using concentrated solution of chemical absorber and hot water from the secondary circuit. It consists of: a) a differential cylinder with a differential piston in it, with a lid and a seal, connected to a pipeline for secondary coolant; b) a pipeline for the secondary coolant; c) a volume between the lid and the piston for the secondary coolant from the steam generator; d) a discharge pipeline with a check valve of seal type connecting the inner volume of the differential cylinder to the discharge line; and e) a pipeline from the high-pressure volume of the differential cylinder filled with concentrated chemical absorber solution, to one of the main circulation loops. The device permits ECC innovation of the operating non-standard nuclear power plants with PWR type reactors.

  3. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  4. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturana, Roberto Hernan

    2008-01-01

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design. [es

  5. Feasibility study on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, A.; Kureta, M.; Liu, W.; Tamai, H.; Akimoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development project for investigating thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 2002. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured light-water reactor technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important issues for the RMWR because of the tight-lattice configuration. The project has mainly consisted of a large-scale thermal-hydraulic test and development of analytical methods named modeling engineering. In the large-scale test, 37-rod bundle experiments can be performed. Steady-state critical power experiments have been achieved in the test facility and the experimental data reveal the feasibility of RMWR

  6. Emergency cooling apparatus for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, S.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described which has the core surrounded by coolant and an inert cover gas all sealed within a container, an emergency cooling apparatus employing a detector that will detect cover gas or coolant, particularly liquid sodium, leaking from the container of the reactor, to release a heat exchange material that is inert to the coolant, which heat exchange material is cooled during operation of the reactor. The heat exchange material may be liquid niitrogen or a combination of spheres and liquid nitrogen, for example, and is introduced so as to contact the coolant that has leaked from the container quickly so as to rapidly cool the coolant to prevent or extinguish combustion. (Official Gazette)

  7. IAEA coordinated research programme on heat transfer behavior and thermo-hydraulics code testing for super critical water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, Sama; Aksan, Nusret

    2009-01-01

    One of the key roles of the IAEA is to foster the collaboration among Member States on the development of advances in technology for advanced nuclear power plants. There is high international interest, both in developing and industrialized countries, in innovative supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs), primarily because such concepts will achieve high thermal efficiencies (44-45%) and promise improved economic competitiveness utilizing and building upon the recent developments for highly efficient fossil power plants. The SCWR has been selected as one of the promising concepts for development by the Generation-IV International Forum. Following the advice of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), with the feedback from the Gen-IV SCWR Steering Committee, and in coordination with the OECD-NEA, IAEA has recently started a Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) in the areas of heat transfer behaviour and testing of thermo-hydraulic computer methods for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors. The first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP was held at the IAEA Headquarters, in Vienna, Austria in July 2008. This paper summarizes the current status of the CRP, including the Integrated Research Plan and the general schedule for the CRP. (author)

  8. Advanced fuel pellet materials and designs for water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This meeting was the second IAEA meeting on this subject. The first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan. They are all part of a cooperative effort through the Technical Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) of IAEA, with a series of three further meetings organized by CEA, France and co-sponsored by the IAEA and OECD/NEA. In the seven years since the first meeting took place, the demands on fuel duties have increased, with higher burnup, longer fuel cycles and higher temperatures. This places additional demands on fuel performance to comply with safety requirements. Criteria relative to fuel components, i.e. pellets and fuel rod column, require limiting of fission gas release and pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). This means that fuel components should maintain the composite of rather contradictory properties from the beginning until the end of its in-pile operation. Fabrication and design tools are available to influence, and to some extent, to ensure desirable in-pile fuel properties. Discussion of these tools was one of the objectives of the meeting. The second objective was the analysis of fuel characteristics at high burnup and the third and last objective was the discussion of specific feature of MOX and urania gadolinia fuels. Sixty specialists in the field of fuel fabrication technology attended the meeting from 18 countries. Twenty-five papers were presented in five sessions covering all relevant topics from the practices and modelling of fuel fabrication technology to its optimization. Eight papers were presented in session 'Optimization of fuel fabrication technology' which all were devoted to fuel fabrication technology. They mostly treated methods for optimizing fuel manufacturing processes, but gave also a good overview on nuclear fabrication needs and capabilities in different countries. During Session 'UO 2 , MOX and UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 pellets with additives', six papers were presented in this session, which dealt mainly

  9. Conceptual design of a high temperature water-cooled divertor for a fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Bonal, J.P.; Puma, A. Li; Michel, B.; Sardain, P.; Salavy, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a water-cooled divertor target using EUROFER as structural material, water coolant pressure and outlet temperature, respectively, of 15.5 MPa and 325 o C, and W-alloy monoblocks as armour. Assuming an advanced interface, formed by a thermal barrier in the pipe front part and a compliance layer between W and steel, this concept is able to withstand an incident surface heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 . Both thermal barrier and compliance layer are made of carbon-based materials. The main issues are the manufacturing process of the steel/W interface, and the behaviour under irradiation of graphite materials

  10. Conceptual design of a high temperature water-cooled divertor for a fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancarli, L. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]. E-mail: luciano.giancarli@cea.fr; Bonal, J.P. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Puma, A. Li [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Michel, B. [CEA Cadarache, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-13108 St. Paul-les-Durances (France); Sardain, P. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Salavy, J.F. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-11-15

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a water-cooled divertor target using EUROFER as structural material, water coolant pressure and outlet temperature, respectively, of 15.5 MPa and 325 {sup o}C, and W-alloy monoblocks as armour. Assuming an advanced interface, formed by a thermal barrier in the pipe front part and a compliance layer between W and steel, this concept is able to withstand an incident surface heat flux of 15 MW/m{sup 2}. Both thermal barrier and compliance layer are made of carbon-based materials. The main issues are the manufacturing process of the steel/W interface, and the behaviour under irradiation of graphite materials.

  11. Calculational-experimental examination and ensuring of equipment and pipelines seismic resistance at starting and operating water-cooled and moderated reactor WWER-type NPPs shake table investigation at Paks NPP. Final report from 15 June 1993 - 15 June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaznovsky, S.

    1995-01-01

    This final report involves the calculation and experimental examination and ensuring the seismic resistance of the reactor equipment and pipelines at start up and operation of WWER type nuclear power plants. Shake table experiments performed at the Paks NPP are included. Namely the following devices of the emergency cooling system were tested: pump of low pressure; valve of low pressure; intermediate heat exchanger. The following values were determined: natural frequencies and vibration decrements and the main modes of normal vibrations for the heat exchanger

  12. Specific features of phase distribution in a draught part of the tank type boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Bartolomej, G.G.; Solodkij, V.A.; Shmelev, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of the two-phase flow structure in a draught part of the VK-50 boiling water cooled reactor are presented. A qualitative physical model of steam-water mixture flow in the large diameter draught part is suggested. It is shown that for hydrodynamically unstable two-phase flows a considerable nonuniformity in steam content distribution over the draught part volume which determines the possibility of the recirculating coolant flow formation in the peripheral zone is observed. At the draught part inlet the radial distribution of steam content is determined by the complex effects of power distribution and coolant flow rate change over the core radius. The flow structure in the lower section of the draught part adjoining to the core is determined to a considerable degree by a coolant jet outflow from fuel assembly (FA) nozzels Jet height depends on the velocity of outgoing two-phase flow, working pressure and hydrodynamics of the draught part. The jet height does not exceed 0.4 m for the K-50 reactor. Due to the increased steam outflow from the central FAs and the existence of radial pressure gradient the water-steam mixture is turned from the draught part periphery to its central part, where accelerated water steam flow with an increased steam content is formed. When a certain height is achieved a graduel expansion of the water-steam flow begins leading to equalizing the steam content over the draught part cross section

  13. Application of reliability-centered maintenance to boiling water reactor emergency core cooling systems fault-tree analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.A.; Feltus, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) methods are applied to boiling water reactor plant-specific emergency core cooling system probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault trees. The RCM is a technique that is system function-based, for improving a preventive maintenance (PM) program, which is applied on a component basis. Many PM programs are based on time-directed maintenance tasks, while RCM methods focus on component condition-directed maintenance tasks. Stroke time test data for motor-operated valves (MOVs) are used to address three aspects concerning RCM: (a) to determine if MOV stroke time testing was useful as a condition-directed PM task; (b) to determine and compare the plant-specific MOV failure data from a broad RCM philosophy time period compared with a PM period and, also, compared with generic industry MOV failure data; and (c) to determine the effects and impact of the plant-specific MOV failure data on core damage frequency (CDF) and system unavailabilities for these emergency systems. The MOV stroke time test data from four emergency core cooling systems [i.e., high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI), reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC), low-pressure core spray (LPCS), and residual heat removal/low-pressure coolant injection (RHR/LPCI)] were gathered from Philadelphia Electric Company's Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3 between 1980 and 1992. The analyses showed that MOV stroke time testing was not a predictor for eminent failure and should be considered as a go/no-go test. The failure data from the broad RCM philosophy showed an improvement compared with the PM-period failure rates in the emergency core cooling system MOVs. Also, the plant-specific MOV failure rates for both maintenance philosophies were shown to be lower than the generic industry estimates

  14. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which the...

  15. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Jayasree; Vijayan, K.; Kain, Vivekanad; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  16. Replacement of the cooling system of the TRIGA Mainz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inspection of the reactor facility resulted in a recommendation to install a new heat exchanger and at the same time to separate the primary cooling circuit and the water purification system. Due to possible the deposition of lime and organic matter on the tubes, the heat transfer rate has decreased. In the meantime a rule has been introduced, according to which the pressure in the secondary cooling circuit must be permanently higher than in the primary cooling circuit which prompted the design of a new cooling system. The detail planning was completed in December 1987. In response to the regulatory requirements a motion for a replacement of the cooling system was submitted to the authorities. The start of the procedure is possible a year after the obtaining of the licenses. In the planning of the changes an upgrading of the steady state power to 300 kW is envisioned

  17. Operating experience of natural circulation core cooling in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullberg, C.; Jones, K.; Heath, C.

    1993-01-01

    General Electric (GE) has proposed an advanced boiling water reactor, the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), which will utilize passive, gravity-driven safety systems for emergency core coolant injection. The SBWR design includes no recirculation loops or recirculation pumps. Therefore the SBWR will operate in a natural circulation (NC) mode at full power conditions. This design poses some concerns relative to stability during startup, shutdown, and at power conditions. As a consequence, the NRC has directed personnel at several national labs to help investigate SBWR stability issues. This paper will focus on some of the preliminary findings made at the INEL. Because of the broad range of stability issues this paper will mainly focus on potential geysering instabilities during startup. The two NC designs examined in detail are the US Humboldt Bay Unit 3 BWR-1 plant and Dodewaard plant in the Netherlands. The objective of this paper will be to review operating experience of these two plants and evaluate their relevance to planned SBWR operational procedures. For completeness, experimental work with early natural circulation GE test facilities will also be briefly discussed

  18. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  19. Advances of study on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira Ohnuki; Kazuyuki Takase; Masatoshi Kureta; Hiroyuki Yoshida; Hidesada Tamai; Wei Liu; Toru Nakatsuka; Hajime Akimoto

    2005-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in collaboration with power company, reactor vendors, universities since 2002. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important R and D items for the RMWR because of the tight-lattice configuration. In this paper, we will show the R and D plan and describe some advances on experimental and analytical studies. The experimental study is performed mainly using large-scale (37-rod bundle) test facility and the analytical one aims to develop a predictable technology for geometry effects such as gap between rods, grid spacer configuration etc. using advanced 3-D two-phase flow simulation methods. Steady-state and transient critical power experiments are conducted with the test facility (Gap width between rods: 1.0 mm) and the experimental data reveal the feasibility of RMWR. (authors)

  20. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting points of Na and NaOH, phase transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of sodium monoxide (Na 2 O) generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na 2 O generation at the secondary overall reaction should be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  1. Proceedings of 'workshop on Pb-alloy cooled fast reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Yong Hee; Hong, Ser Gi

    2003-06-01

    The objective of 'Workshop on Pb-Alloy Cooled Fast Reactor', held in Taejeon, Korea on May 6, 2003, is to enhance the basic knowledge in this area by facilitating the exchange of information and discussions about problematic area of design aspects. There were five presentations from three different countries and about 25 participants gathered during the workshop. The topics covered in the workshop include benefits and drawbacks of Pb-alloy and Sodium coolant, two Pb-alloy cooled 900 MWt reactor designs using both B4C rods and NSTs, BREST-300 breakeven reactor and transmutation effectiveness of LLFPs in the typical thermal/fast neutron systems. The generic conclusion for the Pb-alloy cooled fast reactor from this workshop is as follows: 1) It has a potential to satisfy the goals established for the Generation-IV reactor concepts, so it has a bright future. 2) As a fast neutron system with a moderate breeding or a conversion, it is flexible in its roles and has superior safety characteristics over sodium coolant because of Pb-alloy's chemical inertness with water/air and high boiling temperature

  2. Improvements in gas supply systems for heavy-water moderated reactors; Etudes de perfectionnements aux systemes d'alimentation en gaz d'un reacteur modere a l'eau lourde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, G; Hassig, J M; Laurent, N; Thomas, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In a heavy-water moderated reactor cooled by pressurized gas, an important problem from the point of view, of the reactor block and its economics is the choice of the gas supply system. In the pressure tube solution, the whole of the reactor block structure is at a relatively low temperature, whereas the gas supply equipment is at that of the gas, which is much higher. These parts, through which passes the heat carrying fluid have to present as low a resistance as possible to it so as to avoid costly extra blowing power. Finally, they may only be placed in the reactor block after it has been built; the time required for putting them in position should therefore not be too long. The work reported here concerns the various problems arising in the case of each channel being supplied individually by a tube at the entry and the exit which is connected to a main circuit made up of large size collectors. This individual tubing is sufficiently flexible to absorb the differential expansion and the movement of its ends without stresses or prohibitive reactions being produced; the tubing is also of relatively short length so as to reduce the pressure head of the pressurized gas outside the channels; the small amount of space taken up by the tubing makes it possible to assemble it in a manner which is satisfactory from the point of view both of the time required and of the technical quality. (authors) [French] Dans un reacteur modere a l'eau lourde et refroidi au gaz sous pression, un probleme important du point de vue du trace du bloc pile et de son economie est le choix du systeme d'alimentation en gaz. Pour une solution a tubes de force, l'ensemble des structures du bloc reacteur est a temperature relativement faible, alors que les organes d'alimentation en gaz sont a celle, notablement plus elevee, du gaz. Ces organes, traverses par le debit du caloporteur, doivent lui opposer le minimum de resistance afin de ne pas necessiter un supplement onereux de puissance de

  3. Technologies for tritium control in fission reactors moderated with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramilo, L.B.; Gomez de Soler, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to analyze the possible strategies and technologies, to be applied to HWR at Argentine nuclear power plants, for tritium control. The high contribution of tritium to the total dose has given rise to the need by the operators and/or designers to carry out developments and improvements to try to optimize tritium control technologies. Within a tritium control program, only that one which includes the heavy water detritiation will allow to reduce the tritium concentrations at optimum levels for safety and cost-effective power plant operation. The technology chosen to be applied should depend not only on the technical feasibility but also on the analysis of economic and juncture factors such as, among others, the quantity of heavy water to be treated. It is the authors' belief that AECL tendency concerning heavy water treatment in its future reactors would be to employ the CECE technology complemented with immobilization on titanium beds, with the 'on-line' detritiation in each nuclear power plant. This would not be of immediate application since our analysis suggests that AECL would assume that the process is under development and needs to be tested. (author). 21 refs

  4. Reactor cooling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To increase natural convection flowrate in the reactor core upon interruption of a recycling pump by remarkably decreasing the flow resistance. Constitution: By-pass lines are disposed to a recycling pump in a primary coolant system and a second recycling pump in a secondary coolant system respectively, and a check valve and an isolation valve are attached to each of them. Each of the isolation valves is closed during normal operation and automatically opened when the number of rotation for each of the recycling pumps goes lower than a predetermined value. This can significantly decrease the flow resistance in the primary and secondary coolant systems upon interruption of the recycling pumps due to the entire loss of AC power source or the like to thereby increase the natural convection flowrate in the reactor core. (Sekiya, K.)

  5. Modelling aerosol behavior in reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of some of the areas of concern in using computer codes to model fission-product aerosol behavior in the reactor cooling system (RCS) of a water-cooled nuclear reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident. The basic physical processes that require modelling include: fission product release and aerosol formation in the reactor core, aerosol transport and deposition in the reactor core and throughout the rest of the RCS, and the interaction between aerosol transport processes and the thermalhydraulics. In addition to these basic physical processes, chemical reactions can have a large influence on the nature of the aerosol and its behavior in the RCS. The focus is on the physics and the implications of numerical methods used in the computer codes to model aerosol behavior in the RCS

  6. Device for regulating light water nuclear reactors by changing the boric acid concentration in the cooling water circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.W.; Van der Schoot, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Small changes in boric acid concentration can be carried out quickly by a combination of an ion exchanger with temperature-dependent capacity and an evaporator. No boric acid need be extracted from the circuit or added to it. However, if large changes of concentration are required, boric acid has to be added. The evaporator is then used to separate distilled water and concentrated boric acid when the cooling water is diluted. (DG) [de

  7. Cooling water injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, ECCS system is constituted as a so-called stand-by system which is not used during usual operation and there is a significant discontinuity in relation with the usual system. It is extremely important that ECCS operates upon occurrence of accidents just as specified. In view of the above in the present invention, the stand-by system is disposed along the same line with the usual system. That is, a driving water supply pump for supplying driving water to a jet pump is driven by a driving mechanism. The driving mechanism drives continuously the driving water supply pump in a case if an expected accident such as loss of the function of the water supply pump, as well as during normal operation. That is, all of the water supply pump, jet pump, driving water supply pump and driving mechanism therefor are caused to operate also during normal operation. The operation of them are not initiated upon accident. Thus, the cooling water injection system can perform at high reliability to remarkably improve the plant safety. (K.M.)

  8. Exergy analysis of a system using a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, M.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M. A.; Pioro, I

    2007-01-01

    The power generation efficiency of nuclear plants is mainly determined by the permissible temperatures and pressures of the nuclear reactor fuel and coolants. These parameters are limited by materials properties and corrosion rates and their effect on nuclear reactor safety. The advanced materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ steam as a coolant and heat carrier, permit the increased steam parameters (outlet temperature up to 625 degree C and pressure of about 25 MPa). Supercritical water-cooled (SCW) nuclear power plants are expected to increase the power generation efficiency from 35 to 45%. Supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors can be linked to thermochemical water splitting cycles for hydrogen production. An increased steam temperature from the nuclear reactor makes it also possible to utilize its energy in thermochemical water splitting cycles. These cycles are considered by many as one of the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require a heat supply at the temperatures over 550-600 degree C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump which increases the temperature the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. A high temperature chemical heat pump which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with a SCW nuclear plant on one side and thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature level of the 'nuclear' heat and, thus, the intensity of

  9. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described, wherein coolant is arranged to be flowed upwardly through a fuel assembly and having one or more baffles located above the coolant exit of the fuel assembly, the baffles being arranged so as to convert the upwardly directed motion of liquid metal coolant leaving the fuel assembly into a substantially horizontal motion. (author)

  10. Passive cooling of condensate chambers as retrofitting measure in boiling water reactors; Passive Kuehlung der Kondensationskammern in Siedewasserreaktoren als Nachruestmassnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freis, Daniel; Nachtrodt, Frederik; Sporn, Michael; Tietsch, Wolfgang; Sassen, Felix [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH has developed a concept for passive cooling of condensate chambers of BWR-type reactors. Due to its compactness the system is feasible as retrofitting measure. The passive condensate chamber cooling system is based on a cooling module with ascending and down pipe that are connected with the evaporation condenser to form a cooling circuit. Based on the consequent use of high-effective heat transport mechanisms, as boiling, condensation without non-condensable gases and mass transport a high cooling performance and compact construction is possible. The system is completely passive and completely diverse to existing active cooling systems. In the frame of a true-scale experiment the significant cooling performance was demonstrated. RELAP5 calculations confirmed the functionality of the cooling module.

  11. Design and Analysis of Thorium-fueled Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Phillip Michael

    The Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactors (RBWRs) are a set of light water reactors (LWRs) proposed by Hitachi which use a triangular lattice and high void fraction to incinerate fuel with an epithermal spectrum, which is highly atypical of LWRs. The RBWRs operate on a closed fuel cycle, which is impossible with a typical thermal spectrum reactor, in order to accomplish missions normally reserved for sodium fast reactors (SFRs)--either fuel self-sufficiency or waste incineration. The RBWRs also axially segregate the fuel into alternating fissile "seed" regions and fertile "blanket" regions in order to enhance breeding and leakage probability upon coolant voiding. This dissertation focuses on thorium design variants of the RBWR: the self-sufficient RBWR-SS and the RBWR-TR, which consumes reprocessed transuranic (TRU) waste from PWR used nuclear fuel. These designs were based off of the Hitachi-designed RBWR-AC and the RBWR-TB2, respectively, which use depleted uranium (DU) as the primary fertile fuel. The DU-fueled RBWRs use a pair of axially segregated seed sections in order to achieve a negative void coefficient; however, several concerns were raised with this multi-seed approach, including difficulty with controlling the reactor and unacceptably high axial power peaking. Since thorium-uranium fuel tends to have much more negative void feedback than uranium-plutonium fuels, the thorium RBWRs were designed to use a single elongated seed to avoid these issues. A series of parametric studies were performed in order to find the design space for the thorium RBWRs, and optimize the designs while meeting the required safety constraints. The RBWR-SS was optimized to maximize the discharge burnup, while the RBWR-TR was optimized to maximize the TRU transmutation rate. These parametric studies were performed on an assembly level model using the MocDown simulator, which calculates an equilibrium fuel composition with a specified reprocessing scheme. A full core model was

  12. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  13. Neutronics analysis of water-cooled energy production blanket for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jieqiong; Wang Minghuang; Chen Zhong; Qiu Yuefeng; Liu Jinchao; Bai Yunqing; Chen Hongli; Hu Yanglin

    2010-01-01

    Neutronics calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of blanket energy multiplication factor (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for energy production named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-EM (Energy Multiplier) blanket. The most significant and main goal of the FDS-EM blanket is to achieve the energy gain of about 1 GWe with self-sustaining tritium, i.e. the M factor is expected to be ∼90. Four different fission materials were taken into account to evaluate M in subcritical blanket: (i) depleted uranium, (ii) natural uranium, (iii) enriched uranium, and (iv) Nuclear Waste (transuranic from 33 000 MWD/MTU PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and depleted uranium) oxide. These calculations and analyses were performed using nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) and a home-developed code VisualBUS. The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with Nuclear Waste was most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency and a high-energy multiplication.

  14. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, S; Shabalin, E

    2012-01-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams nos. 7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams nos. 2-3 and for beams nos. 1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (∼3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  15. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.

    2012-03-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams #7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams #2-3 and for beams #1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (~3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  16. Technical and institutional preparedness for introduction of evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.; Machiels, A.J.; Vine, G.V.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1982, US utilities have been leading an industry-wide effort to establish a technical foundation for the design of the next generation of light water reactors in the United States: the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Program. This program provided a foundation for a comprehensive initiative for revitalizing Nuclear Power in the US, as set forth in the Nuclear Energy Industry's 'Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants'. The Strategic Plan contains fourteen building blocks, each of which is considered essential to building new nuclear plants. At its inception, the ALWR Program envisioned new plant orders in the US shortly after the turn of the century, and geared its milestones and deliverables to enabling ALWRs as an option for utilities by about 2000. However, in the US, new orders for nuclear plants are not imminent. There are three primary reasons for this - the lack of demand today for major new construction of baseload capacity, the economic and structural uncertainty associated with deregulation, and the lack of an assured resolution to public concerns over long term management of nuclear waste. Deregulation will likely drive further consolidation of the electricity business, as evidenced in recent nuclear utility mergers, acquisitions, and plant purchases by the larger utilities intent on remaining in the generation business. Deregulation has focused attention on some of the inefficiencies in the current regulatory regime for nuclear energy, and is likely to drive the US government to find more efficient and less expensive ways of providing adequate protection of public health and safety. Deregulation has also focused the industry on the significant variations in production costs among plants, fueling the belief that the industry as a whole can make further improvements in this area to match the stable, low cost performance of the top ten plants. Finally, deregulation has focused the nuclear industry on the imperative for ensuring that

  17. Rectification of leak from upper aluminium thermal shield cooling water inlet line of Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Anil; Joshi, N.S.; Kharpate, A.V.; Marik, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    During 1994, a small water leak was observed from the upper aluminium thermal shield of Cirus reactor. Detailed investigations revealed that the leakage was from the weld joint of one of the 1 1/4 inch NB Sch. 80 coolant inlet pipes connected to the upper aluminium thermal shield. The location of the leak was identified by monitoring the stabilised water level in the vertical inlet pipe under stagnant condition. The exact location was identified by installing an inflatable seal arrangement inside the leaky pipe and inflating the seal at different elevations to isolate the leaky location and ensuring that the leak was completely stopped. This location was about 15 feet below the operating floor of the reactor. The pipe was visually inspected with the help of a fibre-scope to assess the condition of the inner surface. Eddy current testing was also carried out for volumetric examination. This revealed one more localised flaw on the outer surface little above the leaky joint. A hollow plug, with expandable rings, having C-shaped cross section at both the ends and a straight portion in the middle to cover the defective region, was developed and qualified in a mock-up station after extensive trials. In view of the site constraints, a flexible hollow link assembly was engineered, for installing the plug remotely. The inner surface of the pipe was cleaned using an emery brush and a deburring tool. The plug was then installed covering the leak area and the rings were expanded by remote tightening. The shield was hydro-tested satisfactorily. (author)

  18. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Santos, Rubens S. dos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  19. Potential advantages of coupling supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle to water cooled small and medium size reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho Joon; Ahn, Yoonhan; Lee, Jeong Ik; Addad, Yacine

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► S-CO 2 cycle as candidate for SMS. ► MATLAB code used for S-CO 2 cycle analysis. ► Pressure ratio and split ratio comparison analyzed. - Abstract: The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) Brayton cycle is being considered as a favorable candidate for the next generation nuclear reactors power conversion systems. Major benefits of the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle compared to other Brayton cycles are: (1) high thermal efficiency in relatively low turbine inlet temperature, (2) compactness of the turbomachineries and heat exchangers and (3) simpler cycle layout at an equivalent or superior thermal efficiency. However, these benefits can be still utilized even in the water-cooled reactor technologies under special circumstances. A small and medium size water-cooled nuclear reactor (SMR) has been gaining interest due to its wide range of application such as electricity generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. Another key advantage of a SMR is that it can be transported from one place to another mostly by maritime transport due to its small size, and sometimes even through a railway system. Therefore, the combination of a S-CO 2 Brayton cycle with a SMR can reinforce any advantages coming from its small size if the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle has much smaller size components, and simpler cycle layout compared to the currently considered steam Rankine cycle. In this paper, SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), a 330 MW th integral reactor developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Institute) for multipurpose utilization, is considered as a potential candidate for applying the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle and advantages and disadvantages of the proposed system will be discussed in detail. In consideration of SMART condition, the turbine inlet pressure and size of heat exchangers are analyzed by using in-house code developed by KAIST–Khalifa University joint research team. According to the cycle evaluation, the maximum cycle efficiency

  20. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program. Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimblott, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  1. Purification of cooling water for nuclear reactors using ion exchangers; Preciscavanje vode za hladjenje nuklearnih reaktora pomocu neorganskih jonoizmenjivaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    Zirconiumphosphate, zirconiumoxide and natural magnetite as inorganic substances with favourable adsorption properties were the subject of investigations dealing with problems of water purification for nuclear rector cooling. Study on adsorption of impurities form reactor water to 300 deg C and 100 Atm was done by specially constructed autoclaves. On the other hand, a pre-project covering a laboratory plant for investigation of inorganic ion exchangers under real dynamic conditions is given. In order to obtain necessary data on the basis of which techno-economical analyses regarding utilization of zirconiumphosphate, zirconiumoxide and magnetite for water purification is cooling the reactors types BWR and PWR, could be performed, systematic investigations of physical and chemical properties of these substances were commenced. Equilibrium constants have been determined for adsorption processes at different pH values, as well as under various temperatures. Obtained equilibrium constants were used for calculation of thermodynamic quantities {delta}H, {delta}G and {delta}S (author) [Serbo-Croat] Cirkonijumfosfat, cirkonijumoksid i prirodni magnet, kao neorganski materijali sa pogodnim adsorpcionim osobinama, bili su predmet istrazivanja vezanih za probleme preciscavanja vode za hladjenje nuklearnih reaktora. Izucavanje adsorpcije necistoca iz reaktorske vode do 300 deg C i 100 Atm vrseno je pomocu specijalno konstruisanog autoklava, a za ispitivanje neorganskih jonoizmenjivaca pri realnim dinamickim uslovima dat je idejni projekt jednog laboratorijskog postrojenja. Za dobijanje potrebnih podataka, na osnovu kojih se mogu napraviti tehno-ekonomske analize o koriscenju cirkonijumfosfata, cirkoijumoksida i magnetita za preciscavanje vode za hladjenje reaktora tipa BWR i PWR, zapoceto je sa sistematskim proucavanjima fizickih i hemijskih osobina pomenutih materijala, odredjivane su konstante ravnoteze za procese adsorpcije pri razlicitim pH vrednostima, kao i na razlicitim

  2. Emergency cooling system for a liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Ryoichi; Fujiwara, Toshikatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suitably cool liquid metal as coolant in emergency in a liquid metal cooled reactor by providing a detector for the pressure loss of the liquid metal passing through a cooling device in a loop in which the liquid metal is flowed and communicating the detector with a coolant flow regulator. Constitution: A nuclear reactor is stopped in nuclear reaction by control element or the like in emergency. If decay heat is continuously generated for a while and secondary coolant is insufficiently cooled with water or steam flowed through a steam and water loop, a cooler is started. That is, low temperature air is supplied by a blower through an inlet damper to the cooler to cool the secondary coolant flowed into the cooler through a bypass pipe so as to finally safely stop an entire plant. Since the liquid metal is altered in its physical properties by the temperature at this time, it is detected to regulate the opening of the valve of the damper according to the detected value. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. Nuclear reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaya; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transfer performance, as well as reducing and simplifying the structure while preventing the intrusion of primary coolants to utilization systems. Constitution: Heat transfer from the primary coolant circuit to the utilization circuits is conducted by means of heat pipe type heat exchangers. The heat exchanger comprises a tightly closed vessel divided by a partition wall, through which a plurality of heat pipes are passed. The primary coolants receiving the heat from the nuclear reactor enter the first chamber of the heat exchanger to heat the evaporating portion of the heat pipes. The heated flow of steams in the heat pipes transfer to the condensating portion in the second chamber to conduct heat exchange with the utilization system. In this way, since secondary coolant circuits are saved, the heat transfer performance can be improved significantly and the risk of failure can be reduced. (Kamimura, M,)

  4. A neutron poison tritium breeding controller applied to a water cooled fusion reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, L.W.G.; Packer, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    the water coolant of a stratified blanket model, depending on the difference between the required tritium excess inventory and the measured tritium excess inventory. The compounds effectively reduce the amount of low energy neutrons available to react with lithium compounds, thus reducing the tritium breeding ratio. This controller reduces the amount of tritium being produced at the start of the reactor's lifetime and increases the rate of tritium production towards the end of its lifetime. Thus, a relatively stable tritium production level may be maintained, allowing the control system to minimize the stored tritium with obvious safety benefits. The FATI code (Fusion Activation and Transport Interface) will be used to perform the tritium breeding and controller calculations

  5. A neutron poison tritium breeding controller applied to a water cooled fusion reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, L.W.G., E-mail: Lee.Morgan@CCFE.ac.uk; Packer, L.W.

    2014-10-15

    the water coolant of a stratified blanket model, depending on the difference between the required tritium excess inventory and the measured tritium excess inventory. The compounds effectively reduce the amount of low energy neutrons available to react with lithium compounds, thus reducing the tritium breeding ratio. This controller reduces the amount of tritium being produced at the start of the reactor's lifetime and increases the rate of tritium production towards the end of its lifetime. Thus, a relatively stable tritium production level may be maintained, allowing the control system to minimize the stored tritium with obvious safety benefits. The FATI code (Fusion Activation and Transport Interface) will be used to perform the tritium breeding and controller calculations.

  6. Cooling device for reactor suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasaki, Susumu; Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a cooling device of a reactor suppression pool, when a temperature of pool water is abnormally increased and a heat absorbing portion is heated by, for example, occurrence of an accident, coolants are sent to the outside of the reactor container to actuates a thermally operating portion by the heat energy of coolants and drive heat exchanging fluids of a secondary cooling system. If the heat exchanging fluids are sent to a cooling portion, the coolants are cooled and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. If the heat absorbing portion is heat pipes, the coolants are evaporated by heat absorbed from the suppression pool water, steams are sent to the thermally operating portion, then coolants are liquefied and caused to return to the heat absorbing portion. If the thermal operation portion is a gas turbine, the gas turbine is operated by the coolants, and it is converted to a rotational force to drive heat exchanging fluids by pumps. By constituting the cooling portion with a condensator, the coolants are condensed and liquefied and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. (N.H.)

  7. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Miyuki.

    1996-01-01

    In a cooling device for a reactor container, a low pressure vessel is connected to an incondensible gas vent tube by way of an opening/closing valve. Upon occurrence of a loss of coolant accident, among steams and incondensible gases contained in the reactor container, steams are cooled and condensed in a heat exchanger. The incondensible gases are at first discharged from the heat exchanger to a suppression pool by way of the incondensible gas vent tube, but subsequently, they are stagnated in the incondensible gas vent tube to hinder heat exchanging and steam cooling and condensing effects in the heat exchanger thereby raising temperature and pressure in the reactor. However, if the opening/closing valve is opened when the incondensible gases are stagnated in the incondensible gas vent tube, since the incondensible gases stagnated in the heat exchanger are sucked and discharged to the low pressure vessel, the performance of the heat exchanger is maintained satisfactorily thereby enabling to suppress elevation of temperature and pressure in the reactor container. (N.H.)

  8. Determination of trace level anions in reactor cooling water by ion chromatography using a resin of low capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In the field of nuclear technology, IC has been found to be one of the most versatile and efficient analytical technique because of its ability to provide a fast and sensitive analysis of anions. In this work, a separater column packed with a resin of very low capacity was used with a concentration column for the determination of low level of anions present as traces in reactor cooling water. The results of retention times and detection limits were determined using 2.4 mM Na2CO3 / 3mM NaHCO3 mixture as eluent. The interferences of cations and anions such as (Ca)2+, (UO2)2+, (SO4)2+, have been investigated

  9. Neutronic analysis of the European reference design of the water cooled lithium lead blanket for a DEMOnstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrizzi, L.

    1994-01-01

    Water cooled lithium lead blankets, using liquid Pb-17Li eutectic both as breeder and neutron multiplier material, and martensitic steel as structural material, represent one of the four families under development in the European DEMO blanket programme. Two concepts were proposed, both reaching tritium breeding self-sufficiency: the 'box-shaped' and the 'cylindrical modules'. Also to this scope a new concept has been defined: 'the single box'. A neutronic analysis of the 'single box' is presented. A full 3-D model including the whole assembly and many of the reactor details (divertors, holes, gaps) has been defined, together with a 3-D neutron source. A tritium breeding ration (TBR) value of 1.19 confirms the tritium breeding self-sufficiency of the design. Selected power densities, calculated for the different materials and zones, are here presented. Some shielding capability considerations with respect to the toroidal field coil system are presented too. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. Study on characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Several characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states have been investigated. Performances of PWR and CANDU reactors are compared. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000 code. In the present study, we have compared the characteristics for different moderator to fuel ratio (MFR, 0.1 to 30), different burn-up for CANDU type and four fuels cycle schemes. Nuclide density of 235 U at MFR=1.9 decreases with increasing number of confined HM, while 235 U at higher MFR has the opposite trend. However, the nuclide density of fissile material at higher MFR is lower except 238 U. CANDU type requires lower uranium enrichment and obtains higher conversion ratio than PWR type. Lowest burn-up requires the lowest uranium enrichment and obtains the highest conversion ratio. The breeding condition can be obtained for plutonium recycle cases at MFR=2.1 of Case 4 and MFR=1.4 of Case 3. The natural uranium can be achieved at MFR=14 of plutonium recycle cases, and it can be used easier by increasing number of confined HM. (author)

  11. Reactivity and reaction rate ratio changes with moderator voidage in a light water high converter reactor lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, R.; Gmuer, K.; Hager, H.; Seiler, R.

    1986-01-01

    Integral reaction rate ratios and other k ∞ related parameters have been measured in the first three cores of the experimental program on light water high converter reactor (LWHCR) test lattices in the PROTEUS reactor. The reference tight-pitch lattice consisted of two rod types, with an average fissile-plutonium enrichment of 6% and a fuel/moderator ratio of 2.0. The moderators were H 2 O, Dowtherm (simulating an H 2 O voidage of 42.5%), and air (100% void). Comparisons of the measured parameters have been made with calculational results based mainly on the use of two separate codes and their associated data libraries, namely, WIMS-D and EPRI-CPM. A reconstruction of individual components of the k-infinity void coefficient has been carried out on the basis of the measured changes with voidage of the various reaction rate ratios, as well as of k-infinity itself. The subsequent more detailed comparisons between experiment and calculation should provide a useful basis for resolving the conflicting calculational results that have been reported in the past for the void coefficient characteristics of LWHCRs. (author)

  12. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Forest Hull, S.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Data analysis for high-performance simulations of reactors will be a problem that we address with a new management system. • We describe new input-output libraries for nuclear reactor simulations. • We describe a new user interface for visualizing and analyzing simulation results. • We show the utility of these systems with a 17 × 17 fuel assembly example simulation. • The availability of the code and avenues for collaboration are presented. - Abstract: Building a new generation of fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. One important challenge is the need to share and present results from new high-fidelity, high-performance simulations in an easily usable way. Since modern multiscale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, they will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest (e.g., pin powers, temperatures) with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately available in the community and need to be developed. This paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It describes requirements to build such a system and the technical challenges faced in its development at all levels (simulation, user interface, etc.). An example comparing results from two different simulation suites for a single assembly in a light-water reactor is presented, along with a detailed discussion of the system’s requirements and design

  13. Investigation of primary cooling water chemistry following the partial meltdown of Pu-Be neutron source in Tehran Research Reactor Core (TRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghoyeh, Reza Gholizadeh [School of Research and Development of Nuclear Reactors and Accelerators, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), P.O. Box: 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein, E-mail: hkhalafi@aeoi.org.i [School of Research and Development of Nuclear Reactors and Accelerators, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), P.O. Box: 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Effect of Pu-Be neutron source meltdown in core on reactor water chemistry. Water chemistry of primary cooling before, during and after of above incident was compared. Training importance. Management of nuclear incident and accident. - Abstract: Effect of Pu-Be neutron source meltdown in core on reactor water chemistry was main aim of this study. Leaving the neutron source in the core after reactor power exceeds a few hundred Watts was the main reason for its partial meltdown. Water chemistry of primary cooling before, during and after of above incident was compared. Activity of some radio-nuclides such as Ba-140, La-140, I-131, I-132, Te-132 and Xe-135 increased. Other radio-nuclides such as Nd-147, Xe-133, Sr-91, I-133 and I-135 are also detected which were not existed before this incident.

  14. The study on water ingress mass in the steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture accident of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Shi Lei; Li Fu; Zheng Yanhua

    2012-01-01

    The steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture (SGTR) accident is an important and particular accident which will result in water ingress to the primary loop of reactor. Water ingress will result in chemical reaction of graphite fuel and structure with water, which may cause overpressure due to generation of explosive gaseous in large quantity. The study on the water ingress accident is significant for the verification of the inherent characteristics of high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The previous research shows that the amount of water ingress mass is the dominant key factor on the severity of the accident consequence. The 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), which is the first modular pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor in China designed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, is selected to be analyzed in this paper. The different DBA accident scenarios of double-ended break of single heat-exchange tube are simulated respectively by the thermal-hydraulic analysis code RETRAN-02. The results show the water ingress mass through the broken heat-exchange tube is related to the break location. The amount of