WorldWideScience

Sample records for water mass mixing

  1. Gateways and Water Mass Mixing in the Late Cretaceous North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharian Rostami, M.; Martin, E. E.; MacLeod, K. G.; Poulsen, C. J.; Vande Guchte, A.; Haynes, S.

    2017-12-01

    Regions of intermediate/deep water formation and water-mass mixing in the North Atlantic are poorly defined for the Late Cretaceous, a time of gateway evolution and cooler conditions following the Mid Cretaceous greenhouse. Improved proxy data combined with modeling efforts are required to effectively evaluate the relationship between CO2, paleogeography, and circulation during this cooler interval. We analyzed and compiled latest Cretaceous (79 - 66 Ma) ɛNd and δ13C records from seven bathyal (paleodepths 0.2 - 2 km) and eight abyssal (paleodepths > 2 km) sites in the North Atlantic. Data suggest local downwelling of Northern Component Water (NCW; ɛNd -9.5 and δ13C 1.7 ‰) is the primary source of intermediate/deep water masses in the basin. As this water flows southward and ages, δ13C values decrease and ɛNd values increase; however, additional chemical changes at several sites require mixing with contributions from several additional water masses. Lower ɛNd ( -10) and higher δ13C ( 1.9 ‰) values in the deep NW part of the basin indicate proximal contributions from a region draining old continental crust, potentially representing deep convection following opening of the Labrador Sea. In the deep NE Iberian Basin, higher ɛNd ( -7) and lower δ13C ( 0.8 ‰) during the Campanian suggest mixing with a Tethyan source (ɛNd -7 and δ13C 0.1 ‰) whose importance decreased with restriction of that gateway in the Maastrichtian. Data from bathyal sites suggest additional mixing. In the SE Cape Verde region, observed ɛNd variations from -10 in the Campanian to -13 and -12 in the early and late Maastrichtian, respectively, may record variations in output rates of Tethyan and/or NCW sources and Demerara Bottom Water (ɛNd -16), a proposed warm saline intermediate water mass formed in shallow, equatorial seas. Pacific inflow through the Caribbean gateway impacts intermediate sites at Blake Nose (ɛNd values -8), particularly the shallowest site during the late

  2. Effect of the Discharge Water which Mixed Sewage Disposal Water with Seawater Desalting Treated Sewage for Bottom Sediment and Hypoxic Water Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryoichi; Yamasaki, Koreyoshi; Minagawa, Tomoko; Iyooka, Hiroki; Kitano, Yoshinori

    For every time in summer season, hypoxic water mass has formed at the inner part of Hakata Bay. Field observation study has carried out at the inner part of Hakata Bay since 2004 with the particular aim of tracking the movement of hypoxic water mass. Hypoxic water masses form the end of June to September on this area because the consumption of oxygen in bottom water layers exceeds the re-supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. Under such hypoxic conditions, the seawater desalination plant has begun to use in 2005. After seawater desalination plant operation starting, hypoxic water mass tends to improve. In this research, the authors show the following result. After seawater desalination plant has begun to operate, the hypoxia around the mixed discharge water outlet tends to be improved.

  3. Neutrino masses and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogli, G.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the solar neutrino problem in terms of both Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) and vacuum neutrino oscillations, with the inclusion of the data collected by the SuperKamiokande experiment during 306.3 days of operation. In particular, the observed energy spectrum of the recoil electrons from 8 B neutrino scattering is discussed in detail and used to constrain the mass-mixing parameter space. Going to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, the paper performs both a two- and three-flavor analysis of the most recent SuperKamiokande atmospheric neutrino data. The variations of the zenith distributions of ν events in the presence of flavor oscillations are investigated. It is seen that fits to the SK data, with and without the addition of the CHOOZ constrains, strongly limit the parameter space. Detailed bounds in triangle graphs are reported

  4. Neutrino masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical prejudices, cosmology, and neutrino oscillation experiments all suggest neutrino mass are far below present direct experimental limits. Four interesting scenarios and their implications are discussed: (1) a 17 keV ν τ , (2) a 30 ev ν τ making up the dark matter, (3) a 10 -3 ev ν μ to solve the solar neutrino problem, and (4) a three-neutrino MSW solution

  5. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartadikaria, Aditya; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  6. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ < 26.0. These types of water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  7. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red

  8. Understanding neutrino masses and mixings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    various possible oscillation solutions to the solar neutrino puzzle. It seems .... A first hint of this new ingredient came from the observation of Weinberg that if ..... Using the discussion of the above paragraph, the Dirac mass of the neutrino as .... that contributes to charged fermion masses, one can write the quark and lepton.

  9. Axial vector mass spectrum and mixing angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarelli, R.V.; Kang, K.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral sum rules of the axial-vector current and axial-vector current-pseudoscalar field are used to study the axial-vector mass spectrum and mixing angles, as well as the decay constants and mixing angles of the pseudoscalar mesons. In general, the result is quite persuasive for the existence of the Jsup(PC) = 1 ++ multiplet in which one has a canonical D-E mixing. (Auth.)

  10. Measurement of low-ppm mixing ratios of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Thornberry

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor (H2O at low mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. A low-pressure flow of sample air passes through an ionization volume containing an α-particle radiation source, resulting in a cascade of ion-molecule reactions that produce hydronium ions (H3O+ from ambient H2O. The production of H3O+ ions from ambient H2O depends on pressure and flow through the ion source, which were tightly controlled in order to maintain the measurement sensitivity independent of changes in the airborne sampling environment. The instrument was calibrated every 45 min in flight by introducing a series of H2O mixing ratios between 0.5 and 153 parts per million (ppm, 10−6 mol mol−1 generated by Pt-catalyzed oxidation of H2 standards while overflowing the inlet with dry synthetic air. The CIMS H2O instrument was deployed in an unpressurized payload area aboard the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX mission in March and April 2011. The instrument performed successfully during seven flights, measuring H2O mixing ratios below 5 ppm in the lower stratosphere at altitudes up to 17.7 km, and as low as 3.5 ppm near the tropopause. Data were acquired at 10 Hz and reported as 1 s averages. In-flight calibrations demonstrated a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz ppm−1 at 3 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ, 1 s greater than 32. The total measurement uncertainty was 9 to 11%, derived from the uncertainty in the in situ calibrations.

  11. Masses, flavor mix and CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussard, L.

    2004-06-01

    The author describes the relationships between masses, mixing of flavors and CP violation. This document is divided into 4 chapters: 1) fermions' masses, 2) mixing of flavors and CP violation, 3) beauty physics and 4) neutrino physics. In chapter 1 an attempt is made to explain what is behind the concepts of lepton mass and quark mass. As for neutrinos, the only neutral fermion, Dirac's and Majorana's views are exposed as well as their consequences. Fermion flavors are mixed in the process of mass generation and this mix is responsible for the breaking of CP and T symmetries. In chapter 2 the author shows how the analysis of particle oscillations from neutral mesons (K 0 , D 0 , B d 0 and B s 0 ) and from neutrinos can shed light on CP violation. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the contribution of beauty physics to the determination of the unitary triangle, through the oscillations of beauty mesons. In chapter 4 the author reviews the experimental results obtained recently concerning neutrino mass and neutrino oscillations and draws some perspectives on future neutrino experiments. (A.C.)

  12. Neutrino Masses and Mixings and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, George M.

    1998-10-01

    Here we discuss the implications of light neutrino masses and neutrino flavor/type mixing for dark matter, big bang nucleosynthesis, and models of heavy element nucleosynthesis in super novae. We will also argue the other way and discuss possible constraints on neutrino physics from these astrophysical considerations.

  13. Neutrino mass and mixing with discrete symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F; Luhn, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This is a review paper about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally, we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A 4 , S 4 and Δ(96). (review article)

  14. Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the Mascarene Plateau during the Northeast Monsoon season. ... Mixing occurs in the central gap between intermediate water masses (Red Sea Water [RSW] and Antarctic Intermediate Water [AAIW]) as well as in the upper waters (Subtropical Surface Water ...

  15. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan; Khosa, Charanjit K.; Mummidi, V.S.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A t , relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models (DOI: 10.1007/JHEP05(2013)055; 10.1007/JHEP08(2013)093 ) so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ∼1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  16. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science,2A & 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Khosa, Charanjit K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mummidi, V.S. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Vempati, Sudhir K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-03-06

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A{sub t}, relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models (DOI: 10.1007/JHEP05(2013)055; 10.1007/JHEP08(2013)093 ) so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ∼1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  17. Mixing and Mass Transfer in Industrial Bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    Design of a real reactor for a real process in industrial scale requires much more than the design of the "ideal" reactors. This insight is formulated in empirical relations between key process parameters, such as mass and heat transfer coefficients, and the power input to the process. Mixing...... formulas are not in any way quantitatively correct, but based on dimensional analysis one is able to extrapolate from small-to large-scale operation. It is shown that linear scale-up may not give the smallest power input for a given mixing objective. The introduction presented is the basis...... for the visionary scale-up/scale-down design principles....

  18. Theory of Neutrino Masses and Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    2003-01-01

    In this talk I will review our present knowledge on neutrino masses and mixing trying to emphasize what has been definitively proved and what is in the process of being probed. I will also discuss the most important theoretical implications of these results: the existence of new physics, the estimate of the scale of this new physics as well as some other possible consequences such as leptogenesis origin of the baryon asymmetry.

  19. Mixing of water masses caused by a drifting iceberg affects bacterial activity, community composition and substrate utilization capability in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinasquet, Julie; Richert, Inga; Logares, Ramiro; Yager, Patricia; Bertilsson, Stefan; Riemann, Lasse

    2017-06-01

    The number of icebergs produced from ice-shelf disintegration has increased over the past decade in Antarctica. These drifting icebergs mix the water column, influence stratification and nutrient condition, and can affect local productivity and food web composition. Data on whether icebergs affect bacterioplankton function and composition are scarce, however. We assessed the influence of iceberg drift on bacterial community composition and on their ability to exploit carbon substrates during summer in the coastal Southern Ocean. An elevated bacterial production and a different community composition were observed in iceberg-influenced waters relative to the undisturbed water column nearby. These major differences were confirmed in short-term incubations with bromodeoxyuridine followed by CARD-FISH. Furthermore, one-week bottle incubations amended with inorganic nutrients and carbon substrates (a mix of substrates, glutamine, N-acetylglucosamine, or pyruvate) revealed contrasting capacity of bacterioplankton to utilize specific carbon substrates in the iceberg-influenced waters compared with the undisturbed site. Our study demonstrates that the hydrographical perturbations introduced by a drifting iceberg can affect activity, composition, and substrate utilization capability of marine bacterioplankton. Consequently, in a context of global warming, increased frequency of drifting icebergs in polar regions holds the potential to affect carbon and nutrient biogeochemistry at local and possibly regional scales. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Models of neutrino mass and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    There are two basic theoretical approaches to obtaining neutrino mass and mixing. In the minimalist approach, one adds just enough new stuff to the Minimal Standard Model to get m ν ≠0 and U αi ≠1. In the holistic approach, one uses a general framework or principle to enlarge the Minimal Standard Model such that, among other things, m ν ≠0 and U αi ≠1. In both cases, there are important side effects besides neutrino oscillations. I discuss a number of examples, including the possibility of leptogenesis from R parity nonconservation in supersymmetry

  1. Neutrino masses and mixing: evidence and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Nir, Yosef

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric and solar neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. The authors review the phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter. They present the existing evidence from solar and atmospheric neutrinos as well as the results from laboratory searches, including the final status of the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment. The theoretical inputs that are used to interpret the experimental results are described in terms of neutrino oscillations. The allowed ranges for the mass and mixing parameters are derived in two frameworks: First, each set of observations is analyzed separately in a two-neutrino framework; Second, the data from solar and atmospheric neutrinos are analyzed in a three-active-neutrino framework. The theoretical implications of these results are then discussed, including the existence of new physics, the estimate of the scale of this new physics, and the lessons for grand unified theories, for models of extra dimensions and singlet fermions in the bulk, and for flavor models

  2. Introduction to models of neutrino masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshipura, Anjan S.

    2004-01-01

    This review contains an introduction to models of neutrino masses for non-experts. Topics discussed are i) different types of neutrino masses ii) structure of neutrino masses and mixing needed to understand neutrino oscillation results iii) mechanism to generate neutrino masses in gauge theories and iv) discussion of generic scenarios proposed to realize the required neutrino mass structures. (author)

  3. Seismic Characterization of Oceanic Water Masses, Water Mass Boundaries, and Mesoscale Eddies SE of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Andrew R.; Smillie, Matthew W.; Cooper, Joanna K.; Bowman, M. Hamish; Vennell, Ross; Holbrook, W. Steven; Frew, Russell

    2018-02-01

    The Subtropical and Subantarctic Fronts, which separate Subtropical, Subantarctic, and Antarctic Intermediate Waters, are diverted to the south of New Zealand by the submerged continental landmass of Zealandia. In the upper ocean of this region, large volumes of dissolved or suspended material are intermittently transported across the Subtropical Front; however, the mechanisms of such transport processes are enigmatic. Understanding these oceanic boundaries in three dimensions generally depends on measurements collected from stationary vessels and moorings. The details of these data sets, which are critical for understanding how water masses interact and mix at the fine-scale (seismic reflection images of oceanic water masses have been produced using petroleum industry data. These seismic sections clearly show three main water masses, the boundary zones (fronts) between them, and associated thermohaline fine structure that may be related to the mixing of water masses in this region. Interpretations of the data suggest that the Subtropical Front in this region is a landward-dipping zone, with a width that can vary between 20 and 40 km. The boundary zone between Subantarctic Waters and the underlying Antarctic Intermediate Waters is also observed to dip landward. Several isolated lenses have been identified on the three data sets, ranging in size from 9 to 30 km in diameter. These lenses are interpreted to be mesoscale eddies that form at relatively shallow depths along the south side of the Subtropical Front.

  4. Relating masses and mixing angles. A model-independent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Saldana-Salazar, Ulises Jesus [CINVESTAV (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    In general, mixing angles and fermion masses are seen to be independent parameters of the Standard Model. However, exploiting the observed hierarchy in the masses, it is viable to construct the mixing matrices for both quarks and leptons in terms of the corresponding mass ratios only. A closer view on the symmetry properties leads to potential realizations of that approach in extensions of the Standard Model. We discuss the application in the context of flavored multi-Higgs models.

  5. Neutrino mass and mixing – status

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    be specific, a Majorana mass term for neutrinos, together with the mass term for charged leptons: LM = −. 1 .... hierarchy, respectively (see refs [5,6] for details and references). Parameter ... In figure 3 we show the region in the sin2 θ13–δ plane indicated by T2K ..... and 40 m and the precise rate measurement from Bugey4.

  6. Natural fermion mass hierarchy and mixings in family unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, James B.; Feger, Robert; Kephart, Thomas W.; Nandi, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present an SU(9) model of family unification with three light chiral families, and a natural hierarchy of charged fermion masses and mixings. The existence of singlet right handed neutrinos with masses about two orders of magnitude smaller than the GUT scale, as needed to understand the light neutrinos masses via the see-saw mechanism, is compelling in our model.

  7. Hierarchical Neutrino Masses and Mixing in Flipped-SU(5)

    CERN Document Server

    Rizos, J

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of flipped SU(5). The right-handed neutrino mass, generated through the operation of a seesaw mechanism by a sector of gauge singlets, leads naturally, at a subsequent level, to the standard seesaw mechanism resulting into three light neutrino states with masses of the desired phenomenological order of magnitude. In this framework we study simple Ansatze for the singlet couplings for which hierarchical neutrino masses emerge naturally, parametrized in terms of the Cabbibo parameter. The resulting neutrino mixing matrices are characterized by a hierarchical structure, in which theta-(13) is always predicted to be the smallest. Finally, we discuss a possible factorized parametrization of the neutrino mass that, in addition to Cabbibo mixing, encodes also mixing due to the singlet sector.

  8. Hierarchical neutrino masses and mixing in flipped-SU(5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizos, J. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Tamvakis, K., E-mail: tamvakis@uoi.g [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-02-22

    We consider the problem of neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of flipped SU(5). The right-handed neutrino mass, generated through the operation of a seesaw mechanism by a sector of gauge singlets, leads naturally, at a subsequent level, to the standard seesaw mechanism resulting into three light neutrino states with masses of the desired phenomenological order of magnitude. In this framework we study simple Ansaetze for the singlet couplings for which hierarchical neutrino masses emerge naturally as lambda{sup n}:lambda:1 or lambda{sup n}:lambda{sup 2}:1, parametrized in terms of the Cabbibo parameter. The resulting neutrino mixing matrices are characterized by a hierarchical structure, in which theta{sub 13} is always predicted to be the smallest. Finally, we discuss a possible factorized parametrization of the neutrino mass that, in addition to Cabbibo mixing, encodes also mixing due to the singlet sector.

  9. Thermobaricity, cabbeling, and water-mass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Trevor J.

    1987-05-01

    The efficient mixing of heat and salt along neutral surfaces (by mesoscale eddies) is shown to lead to vertical advection through these neutral surfaces. This is due to the nonlinearities of the equation of state of seawater through terms like ∂2ρ/∂θ∂p (thermobaric effect) and ∂2ρ/∂ θ2 (cabbeling). Cabbeling always causes a sinking or downwelling of fluid through neutral surfaces, whereas thermobaricity can lead to a vertical velocity (relative to neutral surfaces) of either sign. In this paper it is shown that for reasonable values of the lateral scalar diffusivity (especially below a depth of 1000 m), these two processes cause vertical velocities of the order of 10-7 m s-1 through neutral surfaces (usually downward!) and cause water-mass conversion of a magnitude equal to that caused by a vertical diffusivity of 10-4 m2 s-1 (often equivalent to a negative diffusivity). Both thermobaricity and cabbeling can occur in the presence of any nonzero amount of small-scale turbulence and so will not be detected by microstructure measurements. The conservation equations for tracers are considered in a nonorthogonal coordinate frame that moves with neutral surfaces in the ocean. Since only mixing processes cause advection across neutral surfaces, it is useful to regard this vertical advection as a symptom of various mixing processes rather than as a separate physical process. It is possible to derive conservative equations for scalars that do not contain the vertical advective term explicity. In these conservation equations, the terms that represent mixing processes are substantially altered. It is argued that this form of the conservation equations is the most appropriate when considering water-mass transformation, and some examples are given of its application in the North Atlantic. It is shown that the variation of the vertical diffusivity with height does not cause water-mass transformation. Also, salt fingering is often 3-4 times more effective at

  10. Origins of tiny neutrino mass and large flavor mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haba, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Active neutrino masses are extremely smaller than those of other quarks and leptons, and there are large flavor mixings in the lepton sector, contrary to the quark sector. They are great mysteries in the standard model, but also excellent hints of new physics beyond the standard model. Thus, questions 'What is an origin of tiny neutrino mass?' and 'What is an origin of large lepton flavor mixings?' are very important. In this paper, we overview various attempts to solve these big questions. (author)

  11. Supernova constraints on neutrino mass and mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Chandrasekhar limiting mass the pressure of the relativistic electron gas alone can ... and facilitates electron capture by nuclei and free protons leading to .... the neutrino luminosity in units of 10 ¾ ergs/sec, Т and Ф are the neutron and proton ... would be changed to М . One can make a rough estimate of the increase in ...

  12. Marketing mix of chosen Slovak mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhanová Silvia

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering its small area, Slovakia abounds in many sources of mineral waters and a considerable amount of them can be used for the commercial utilization. STN 86 8000 divides mineral waters in the natural mineral waters, natural mineral table waters and the natural mineral healing waters. Natural mineral water is, after the present norm, in effect water, which rises from natural trapped sources. This type of water contains more than 1 gram of dissolved substances or 1 gram of dissolved CO 2 in 1 litter. Natural mineral table water is water that, with its chemical composition as well as its physical and sensorial attributes is suitable as a refresher. It contains at least 1 gram of melted CO2 and up to 6 grams of dissolved illiquid substances in 1 litter. The mentioned substances are not characterised by any marked pharmacological effect. Natural mineral healing water is water, which with an eye to its chemical composition and physical properties, have a scientifically demonstrable effects to the human health and it is generally used for healing purposes. In the present contribution, an attention is orientated to the occurrence of listed types of waters in Slovakia, in connection with geological conditions of their circulation and accumulation and especially with possibilities of their use on the Slovak buyer’s market.The marketing mix is a complex of information, which can be regulated. Firms accumulate this information to satisfy a customer. Marketing mix of mineral waters includes information about four variables: product (characteristics of product, quality, packing, design..., prices, advertisement, distribution (the way how to get product to customer. Data listed in the contribution come from the sectional market research, which was performed between December 1st and December 22nd 2000 in twenty groceries in

  13. Tidal mixing in Dahej creek waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Sarma, R.V.

    Mixing characteristics of a tidal inlet near Dahej at the mouth of Narmada River, Gujarat, India are examined in terms of tides, currents and bathymetry. The dilution potential of the Dahej Creek waters during a tidal march for a given rate...

  14. Hierarchy plus anarchy in quark masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a parametrization of the effect of unknown corrections from new physics on quark and lepton mass matrices. This parametrization is used in order to study how the hierarchies of quark masses and mixing angles are modified by random perturbations of the Yukawa matrices. We discuss several examples of flavor relations predicted by different textures, analyzing how these relations are influenced by the random perturbations. We also comment on the unlikely possibility that unknown corrections contribute significantly to the hierarchy of masses and mixings

  15. Mixing Hot and Cold Water Streams at a T-Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, David; Zhang, Mingqian; Xu, Zhenghe; Ryan, Jim; Wanke, Sieghard; Afacan, Artin

    2008-01-01

    A simple mixing of a hot- and cold-water stream at a T-junction was investigated. The main objective was to use mass and energy balance equations to predict mass low rates and the temperature of the mixed stream after the T-junction, and then compare these with the measured values. Furthermore, the thermocouple location after the T-junction and…

  16. Neutrino mass and mixing in the seesaw playground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss neutrino mass and mixing in the framework of the classic seesaw mechanism, involving right-handed neutrinos with large Majorana masses, which provides an appealing way to understand the smallness of neutrino masses. However, with many input parameters, the seesaw mechanism is in general not predictive. We focus on natural implementations of the seesaw mechanism, in which large cancellations do not occur, where one of the right-handed neutrinos is dominantly responsible for the atmospheric neutrino mass, while a second right-handed neutrino accounts for the solar neutrino mass, leading to an effective two right-handed neutrino model. We discuss recent attempts to predict lepton mixing and CP violation within such natural frameworks, focusing on the Littlest Seesaw and its distinctive predictions.

  17. Seesaw neutrino masses with large mixings from dimensional deconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, K.R.S.; Lindner, Manfred; Seidl, Gerhart

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a dynamical origin for the dimension-five seesaw operator in dimensional deconstruction models. Light neutrino masses arise from the seesaw scale which corresponds to the inverse lattice spacing. It is shown that the deconstructing limit naturally prefers maximal leptonic mixing. Higher-order corrections which are allowed by gauge invariance can transform the bimaximal into a bilarge mixing. These terms may appear to be nonrenormalizable at scales smaller than the deconstruction scale

  18. Fermion mass hierarchies and flavor mixing from T' symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Guijun

    2008-01-01

    We construct a supersymmetric model based on T ' x Z 3 x Z 9 flavor symmetry. At the leading order, the charged lepton mass matrix is not diagonal, T ' is broken completely, and the hierarchy in the charged lepton masses is generated naturally. Nearly tribimaximal mixing is predicted, and subleading effects induce corrections of order λ 2 , where λ is the Cabibbo angle. Both the up quark and down quark mass matrices' textures of the well-known U(2) flavor theory are produced at the leading order; realistic hierarchies in quark masses and Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements are obtained. The vacuum alignment and subleading corrections are discussed in detail.

  19. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  20. Implications of neutrino masses and mixing for weak processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrock, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A general theory is presented of weak processes involving neutrinos which consistently incorporates the possibility of nonzero neutrino masses and associated lepton mixing. The theory leads to new tests for and bounds on such masses and mixing. These tests make use of (π,K)/sub l2/ decay, nuclear β decay, and μ and tau decays, among others. New experiments at SIN and KEK to apply the tests are mentioned. Further, some implications are discussed for (1) the analysis of the spectral parameters in leptonic decays to determine the Lorentz structure of the weak leptonic couplings; (2) fundamental weak interaction constants such as G/sub μ/, G/sub V/', f/sub π/, f/sub K/, V/sub uq/, q = d or s, m/sub W/, and m/sub Z/; and (3) neutrino propagation

  1. GUT and flavor models for neutrino masses and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Davide

    2017-10-01

    In the recent years experiments have established the existence of neutrino oscillations and most of the oscillation parameters have been measured with a good accuracy. However, in spite of many interesting ideas, no real illumination was sparked on the problem of flavor in the lepton sector. In this review, we discuss the state of the art of models for neutrino masses and mixings formulated in the context of flavor symmetries, with particular emphasis on the role played by grand unified gauge groups.

  2. Water masses in the Gulf of Aden

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Al Saafani, M.A.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    Hydrographic data collected from Gulf of Aden since 1920 have been compiled to identify and refine the definitions of water masses in the Gulf of Aden (GA) and to describe their spatio-temporal variability. Four water masses have been identified...

  3. Remarks on ''Neutrino masses and mixing angles in a predictive theory of fermion masses''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoura, L.; Silva, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the extension of the Dimopoulos-Hall-Raby model of the fermion mass matrices to the neutrino sector, there is an entry in the up-quark and neutrino Dirac mass matrices which can be assumed to arise from the Yukawa coupling of a 120, instead of a 10 or a 126, of SO(10). Although this assumption leads to an extra undetermined complex parameter in the model, the resulting lepton mixing matrix exhibits the remarkable feature that the ν τ does not mix with the other two neutrinos. Making a reasonable assumption about the extra parameter, we are able to fit the large-mixing-angle MSW solution of the solar-neutrino problem, and we obtain m ντ ∼10 eV, the right mass range to close the Universe. Other possibilities for explaining the solar-neutrino deficit are also discussed

  4. Neutrino Mixing and Masses from a Minimum Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R; Isidori, G; Maiani, L

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $\\left[SU(3)\\right]^5\\otimes \\mathcal O(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one mixing angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and one maximal relative Majorana phase. Adding small perturbations the predicted structure for the neutrino mass matrix is in excellent agreement with present observations and could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay and cosmological measurements. The generalization of these results to arbitrary sew-saw models is also discussed.

  5. Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drechsel, P.; Gröber, R.; Heinemeyer, S.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM based on an on-shell (OS) renormalization of the gauge-boson and Higgs-boson masses and the parameters of the top/scalar top sector. We compare the implementation of the OS calculations in the codes NMSSMCALC and NMSSM-FeynHiggs up...... to O(αtαs). We identify the sources of discrepancies at the one- and at the two-loop level. Finally we compare the OS and DR ¯ evaluation as implemented in NMSSMCALC. The results are important ingredients for an estimate of the theoretical precision of Higgs-boson mass calculations in the NMSSM....

  6. Water mass modification at the Agulhas retroflection: chlorofluoromethane studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Rana A.; Warner, Mark J.; Weiss, Ray F.

    1988-03-01

    Chlorofluoromethane (CFM) and hydrographic data from the 1983 Agulhas Retroflection cruise are used to show the importance of the region in ventilating thermocline and Intermediate Waters of the southwest Indian ocean gyre. Generally South Atlantic waters are more recently ventilated by at least two years than those of the South Indian Ocean, probably because the latter are farther downstream from the source regions near the South Atlantic subantarctic sector. A two-component mixing model shows that the outflow from the Agulhas Retroflection (14-4°C) was composed of South Indian water and at least 23% South Atlantic water. However, at the density of Indian sector Subantarctic Mode Water the inflow into the Agulhas Retroflection was well preserved in the outflow, and the South Atlantic and Indian waters appear to be ventilated by different water masses. In addition, strong interleaving was found throughout the survey area (between 14 and 4°C), characterized by correlations of negative salinity anomalies with high CFM concentrations. At the density of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) there was interleaving of both low salinity water and higher salinity Red Sea Water. Using estimates of past atmospheric ratios of two CFMs, we calculate that AAIW within the retroflection was 50-75% diluted by mixing with CFM-free water since leaving the source region. Results from the two-component mixing model, which show substantial contributions of South Atlantic water in the outflow, suggest that the return flow for the 10 Sv leakage of Indian Ocean water via the Agulhas Current into the South Atlantic [ GORDON (1985) Science, 227, 1030-1033; GORDONet al. (1987) Deep-Sea Research, 34, 565-600] is occurring at thermocline and intermediate depths. A combination of active mixing in this region and similarity in the ventilation processes may be the reason that the South Atlantic and Indian thermoclines are coincident in temperature and salinity space (between 15 and 7°C) as noted

  7. Water masses of Visakhapatnam shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, V.S.

    The T-S relationships of shelf waters off Visakhapatnam in the Bay of Bengal are studied for the different seasons with the data collected during February 1979 to January 1981. The T-S relationships indicate distinct characteristics of the water...

  8. Neutrino mass and mixing: from theory to experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F; Merle, Alexander; Morisi, Stefano; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2014-01-01

    The origin of fermion mass hierarchies and mixings is one of the unresolved and most difficult problems in high-energy physics. One possibility to address the flavour problems is by extending the standard model to include a family symmetry. In the recent years it has become very popular to use non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetries because of their power in the prediction of the large leptonic mixing angles relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. Here we give an introduction to the flavour problem and to discrete groups that have been used to attempt a solution for it. We review the current status of models in light of the recent measurement of the reactor angle, and we consider different model-building directions taken. The use of the flavons or multi-Higgs scalars in model building is discussed as well as the direct versus indirect approaches. We also focus on the possibility of experimentally distinguishing flavour symmetry models by means of mixing sum rules and mass sum rules. In fact, we illustrate in this review the complete path from mathematics, via model building, to experiments, so that any reader interested in starting work in the field could use this text as a starting point in order to obtain a broad overview of the different subject areas

  9. CP violation and neutrino masses and mixings from quark mass hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Covi, L.; Emmanuel-Costa, D.; Wiesenfeldt, S.

    2007-10-01

    We study the connection between quark and lepton mass matrices in a supersymmetric SO(10) GUT model in six dimensions, compactified on an orbifold. The physical quarks and leptons are mixtures of brane and bulk states. This leads to a characteristic pattern of mass matrices and high-energy CP violating phases. The hierarchy of up and down quark masses determines the CKM matrix and most charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixings. The small hierarchy of neutrino masses is a consequence of the mismatch of the up and down quark mass hierarchies. The effective CP violating phases in the quark sector, neutrino oscillations and leptogenesis are unrelated. In the neutrino sector we can accomodate naturally sin θ 23 ∝1, sin θ 13 1 2 ∝√(Δm 2 sol ) 3 ∝√(Δm 2 atm ). (orig.)

  10. CP violation and neutrino masses and mixings from quark mass hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Covi, Laura; Emmanuel-Costa, David; Wiesenfeldt, Soeren

    2007-01-01

    We study the connection between quark and lepton mass matrices in a supersymmetric SO(10) GUT model in six dimensions, compactified on an orbifold. The physical quarks and leptons are mixtures of brane and bulk states. This leads to a characteristic pattern of mass matrices and high-energy CP violating phases. The hierarchy of up and down quark masses determines the CKM matrix and most charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixings. The small hierarchy of neutrino masses is a consequence of the mismatch of the up and down quark mass hierarchies. The effective CP violating phases in the quark sector, neutrino oscillations and leptogenesis are unrelated. In the neutrino sector we can accomodate naturally sin θ 23 ∼ 1, sin θ 13 ∼ 1 ∼ 2 ∼ (Δm 2 sol ) 1/2 3 ∼ (Δm 2 atm ) 1/2

  11. Hierarchical fermion masses and mixing angles from the flipped string

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1990-07-02

    We present a general method to obtain specific predictions for the fermion masses and mixings in the low-energy theory of the flipped SU(5) x U(1) superstring model. The condition of unbroken N=1 supergravity of M{sub Pl} in the presence of an anomalous U{sub A}(1) symmetry gives strong constraints on the parameters of the model. We obtain: (i) a top quark mass between 60 and 100 GeV, with values close to 100 GeV strongly favored; (ii) up- and down-type quark and lepton mass ratios and Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixings, which could be found consistent with their accepted values simultaneously in parameter space; (iii) a direct connection between the hierarchical fermion mass spectrum and baryon decay modes, we find p{yields}{mu}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0},anti {nu}{sub {mu}}{pi}{sup +}; n{yields}{mu}{sup +}{pi}{sup -},anti {nu}{sub {mu}}{pi}{sup 0}, with {tau}{sub p}{proportional to}{tau}{sub n}{proportional to}10{sup 35{plus minus}2} y; and (iv) a vanishing bare u quark mass that solves the strong CP problem in this model and is not in conflict with previous expectations. We stress that a full dynamical calculation would unambiguously determine these observables and hence constitute a definite test of the model. However, the whole framework is so constrained that crucial information can already be extracted from the model at this stage. (orig.).

  12. A flavor symmetry model for bilarge leptonic mixing and the lepton masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Seidl, Gerhart

    2002-11-01

    We present a model for leptonic mixing and the lepton masses based on flavor symmetries and higher-dimensional mass operators. The model predicts bilarge leptonic mixing (i.e., the mixing angles θ12 and θ23 are large and the mixing angle θ13 is small) and an inverted hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum. Furthermore, it approximately yields the experimental hierarchical mass spectrum of the charged leptons. The obtained values for the leptonic mixing parameters and the neutrino mass squared differences are all in agreement with atmospheric neutrino data, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein large mixing angle solution of the solar neutrino problem, and consistent with the upper bound on the reactor mixing angle. Thus, we have a large, but not close to maximal, solar mixing angle θ12, a nearly maximal atmospheric mixing angle θ23, and a small reactor mixing angle θ13. In addition, the model predicts θ 12≃ {π}/{4}-θ 13.

  13. Mixed-mode chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James S O

    2010-03-15

    Liquid chromatography coupled to molecular mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been a standard technique since the early 1970s but liquid chromatography coupled to high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) has only been available commercially since 2004. This development has, for the first time, enabled natural abundance and low enrichment delta(13)C measurements to be applied to individual analytes in aqueous mixtures creating new opportunities for IRMS applications, particularly for the isotopic study of biological molecules. A growing number of applications have been published in a range of areas including amino acid metabolism, carbohydrates studies, quantification of cellular and plasma metabolites, dietary tracer and nucleic acid studies. There is strong potential to extend these to new compounds and complex matrices but several challenges face the development of LC/IRMS methods. To achieve accurate isotopic measurements, HPLC separations must provide baseline-resolution between analyte peaks; however, the design of current liquid interfaces places severe restrictions on compatible flow rates and in particular mobile phase compositions. These create a significant challenge on which reports associated with LC/IRMS have not previously focused. Accordingly, this paper will address aspects of chromatography in the context of LC/IRMS, in particular focusing on mixed-mode separations and their benefits in light of these restrictions. It aims to provide an overview of mixed-mode stationary phases and of ways to improve high aqueous separations through manipulation of parameters such as column length, temperature and mobile phase pH. The results of several practical experiments are given using proteogenic amino acids and nucleosides both of which are of noted importance in the LC/IRMS literature. This communication aims to demonstrate that mixed-mode stationary phases provide a flexible approach given the constraints of LC/IRMS interface design and acts as a

  14. Seasonal spreading of the Persian Gulf water mass in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Ikeda, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    The characteristics of the subsurface salinity maximum associated with the Persian Gulf Water mass (PGW) are used to quantify the spreading and mixing of PGW in the thermocline of the Arabian Sea based on a bimonthly climatology of temperature...

  15. Applying rotary jet heads for mixing and mass transfer in a forced recirculation tank reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hummer, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    or an external loop.In this study, we determine mixing times in water and CMC solutions and oxygen mass transfer coefficients in water for a tank reactor system where a small fraction of the total liquid volume is rapidly circulated through an external loop and injected through the nozzles of rotary jet heads....... The system has a very simple design with no internal baffles or heat exchange area, and between batches the rotary jet heads are used for cleaning in place.Mixing time decreases and mass transfer increases with increasing circulation flow rate. For nozzle diameters between 5.5 and 10 mm and with one or two...... rotary jet heads, it is shown that a remarkable saving in power input for a fixed mixing time or mass transfer coefficient can be obtained by using a large nozzle diameter and two rather than one rotary jet heads.At the experimental conditions of the study the system is scaleable by simple formulas...

  16. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without

  17. Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems. ... method has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 ... is of no consequential effect because in its normal state, the [OH-] of the lake water is ...

  18. Water masses in the Humboldt Current System: Properties, distribution, and the nitrate deficit as a chemical water mass tracer for Equatorial Subsurface Water off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson; Rojas, Nora; Fedele, Aldo

    2009-07-01

    Three sections are used to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of the water masses in the eastern South Pacific and their distributions. Oceanographic data were taken from the SCORPIO (May-June 1967), PIQUERO (May-June 1969), and KRILL (June 1974) cruises. Vertical sections of temperature, salinity, σ θ, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and silicate were used to analyze the water column structure. Five water masses were identified in the zone through T- S diagrams: Subantarctic Water, Subtropical Water, Equatorial Subsurface Water, Antarctic Intermediate Water, and Pacific Deep Water. Their proportions in the sea water mixture are calculated using the mixing triangle method. Vertical sections were used to describe the geographical distributions of the water mass cores in the upper 1500 m. Several characteristic oceanographic features in the study area were analyzed: the shallow salinity minimum displacement towards the equator, the equatorial subsurface salinity maximum associated with a dissolved oxygen minimum zone and a high nutrient content displacement towards the south, and the equatorward intermediate Antarctic salinity minimum associated with a dissolved oxygen maximum. The nitrate deficit generated in the denitrification area off Peru and northern Chile is proposed as a conservative chemical tracer for the Equatorial Subsurface Waters off the coast of Chile, south of 25°S.

  19. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H; Yu, Y; Glimm, J; Li, X-L; Sharp, D H

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  20. Performance of Portland cement mixes containing silica fume and mixed with lime-water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwally A.A. Abd Elaty

    2014-12-01

    Test results show that using lime-water in mixing enhances consistency degree compared to the corresponding control mixes. Furthermore, it delays both initial and final setting times compared with traditional water due to the common ion effect principles. Moreover, combined use of lime-water and silica fume enhances the pozzolanic reaction that was identified by the strength development at both early and later ages. The existence of CH crystals for higher percentages of silica fume (up to 30% for further reaction at later ages was observed by XRD results. Moreover, combined use of silica fume and lime-water ensures a high alkaline media around steel bars from the moment of ingredients mixing as long as later ages despite of pozzolanic reaction that was identified from results of chloride attack.

  1. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  2. Five adjustable parameter fit of quark and lepton masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Takanishi, Y.

    2002-05-01

    We develop a model of ours fitting the quark and lepton masses and mixing angles by removing from the model a Higgs field previously introduced to organise a large atmospheric mixing angle for neutrino oscillations. Due to the off-diagonal elements dominating in the see-saw neutrino mass matrix the large atmospheric mixing angle comes essentially by itself. It turns out that we have now only five adjustable Higgs field vacuum expectation values needed to fit all the masses and mixings order of magnitudewise taking into account the renormalisation group runnings in all sectors. The CHOOZ angle comes out close to the experimental bound. (orig.)

  3. Mass transfer in water-saturated concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Claisse, P.A.; Harris, A.W.; Nickerson, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cements and concretes are often considered as components of barriers for the containment of radioactive waste. The performance of such materials as mainly physical barriers to the transport of dissolved radionuclides depends on the mass transfer characteristics of the material. In particular the diffusion and sorption behavior of the radionuclides and the water permeability are important. These parameters also influence how the chemistry of the concrete is imposed on the repository. In addition, the transport of gas through concrete controls the way in which gases escape from the repository. Diffusion and gas transport have been measured in a variety of cementitious materials, covering both structural concretes and cementitious backfills; all possible repository construction materials. Measurements have been made using aqueous iodide, strontium and caesium ions and tritiated water as diffusants. The results show that the diffusion of tritiated water is more rapid than that of other species, whilst the transport of strontium and caesium is hindered by sorption; particularly in materials containing blast furnace slag. The transport of gas in these materials has been found to be very sensitive to the degree of water saturation and is extremely low in fully saturated structural concretes. Cementitious backfills have, nevertheless, been identified that have appreciable gas transport even when almost water saturated. The consequences of the results for the performance of cementitious barriers are discussed

  4. Hydrography and water masses in the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The surface hydrography during March –April was dominated by the intrusion of low-salinity waters from the south;during May –June,the low-salinity waters were beginning to be replaced by the high- salinity waters from the north.There was considerable mixing at the bottom of the surface mixed layer,leading to interleaving ...

  5. Nonzero θ13 and neutrino masses from the modified tri-bi-maximal neutrino mixing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damanik, A.

    2014-01-01

    There are 3 types of neutrino mixing matrices: tri-bi-maximal, bi-maximal and democratic. These 3 types of neutrino mixing matrices predict that the mixing angle θ 13 should be null. Motivated by the recent experimental evidence of nonzero and relatively large θ 13 , we modified the tribimaximal mixing matrix by introducing a simple perturbation matrix into tribimaximal neutrino mixing matrix. In this scenario, we obtained nonzero mixing angle θ 13 =7.9 degrees which is in agreement with the present experimental results. By imposing 2 zeros texture into the obtained neutrino mass matrix from modified tribimaximal mixing matrix, we then have the neutrino mass spectrum in normal hierarchy. Some phenomenological implications are also discussed. It appears that if we use the solar neutrino squared-mass difference to determine the values of neutrino masses, then we cannot have the correct value for the atmospheric squared-mass difference. Conversely, if we use the experimental value of the squared-mass difference to determine the neutrino masses, then we cannot have the correct value for the solar neutrino squared-mass difference

  6. The mixing of particle clouds plunging into water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, S.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This work addresses certain fundamental aspects of the premixing phase of steam explosions, At issue are the multifield interaction aspects under highly transient, multidimensional conditions, and in presence of strong phase changes. They are addressed in an experiment (the MAGICO-2000) involving well-characterized particle clouds mixing with water, and detailed measurements on both external and internal characteristics of the mixing zone. Both cold and hot (up to 1500{degrees}C) particle clouds are considered in conjunction with saturated and subcooled water pools. The PMALPHA code is used as an aid in interpreting the experimental results, and the exercise reveals good predictive capabilities for it.

  7. Thermodynamics of saline and fresh water mixing in estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2018-03-01

    The mixing of saline and fresh water is a process of energy dissipation. The freshwater flow that enters an estuary from the river contains potential energy with respect to the saline ocean water. This potential energy is able to perform work. Looking from the ocean to the river, there is a gradual transition from saline to fresh water and an associated rise in the water level in accordance with the increase in potential energy. Alluvial estuaries are systems that are free to adjust dissipation processes to the energy sources that drive them, primarily the kinetic energy of the tide and the potential energy of the river flow and to a minor extent the energy in wind and waves. Mixing is the process that dissipates the potential energy of the fresh water. The maximum power (MP) concept assumes that this dissipation takes place at maximum power, whereby the different mixing mechanisms of the estuary jointly perform the work. In this paper, the power is maximized with respect to the dispersion coefficient that reflects the combined mixing processes. The resulting equation is an additional differential equation that can be solved in combination with the advection-dispersion equation, requiring only two boundary conditions for the salinity and the dispersion. The new equation has been confronted with 52 salinity distributions observed in 23 estuaries in different parts of the world and performs very well.

  8. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gregory M.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic and mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Between one day and 90 days after initial contact, specific conductance in the sample mixtures had a median increase of 306 percent. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of the lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden (a coal, a sandstone, and a shale) probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the over-burden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water.

  9. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.M.; Williams, R.S. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water

  10. Mass transfer resistance in ASFF reactors for waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettouney, H M; Al-Haddad, A A; Abu-Irhayem, T M

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of mass transfer resistances was performed for an aerated submerged fixed-film reactor (ASFF) for the treatment of waste water containing a mixture of sucrose and ammonia. Both external and internal mass transfer resistances were considered in the analysis, and characterized as a function of feed flow-rate and concentration. Results show that, over a certain operating regime, external mass transfer resistance in the system was greater for sucrose removal than ammonia. This is because the reaction rates for carbon removal were much larger than those of nitrogen. As a result, existence of any form of mass transfer resistance caused by inadequate mixing or diffusion limitations, strongly affects the overall removal rates of carbon more than nitrogen. Effects of the internal måss transfer resistance were virtually non-existent for ammonia removal. This behaviour was found over two orders of magnitude range for the effective diffusivity for ammonia, and one order of magnitude for the film specific surface area. However, over the same parameters' range, it is found that sucrose removal was strongly affected upon lowering its effective diffusivity and increasing the film specific surface area.

  11. Mixed meson masses with domain-wall valence and staggered sea fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Mixed action lattice calculations allow for an additive lattice-spacing-dependent mass renormalization of mesons composed of one sea and one valence quark, regardless of the type of fermion discretization methods used in the valence and sea sectors. The value of the mass renormalization depends upon the lattice actions used. This mixed meson mass shift is an important lattice artifact to determine for mixed action calculations; because it modifies the pion mass, it plays a central role in the low-energy dynamics of all hadronic correlation functions. We determine the leading order, O(a 2 ), and next-to-leading order, O(a 2 m π 2 ), additive mass shift of valence-sea mesons for a mixed lattice action with domain-wall valence fermions and rooted staggered sea fermions, relevant to the majority of current large scale mixed action lattice efforts. We find that, on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC lattices, this additive mass shift is well parametrized in lattice units by Δ(am) 2 =0.034(2)-0.06(2)(am π ) 2 , which in physical units, using a=0.125 fm, corresponds to Δ(m) 2 =(291±8 MeV) 2 -0.06(2)m π 2 . In terms of the mixed action effective field theory parameters, the corresponding mass shift is given by a 2 Δ Mix =(316±4 MeV) 2 at leading order plus next-to-leading order corrections including the necessary chiral logarithms for this mixed action calculation, determined in this work. Within the precision of our calculation, one cannot distinguish between the full next-to-leading order effective field theory analysis of this additive mixed meson mass shift and the parametrization given above.

  12. Water masses and property distribution in the EEZ of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSousa, S.N.; Singbal, S.Y.S.; George, M.D.

    Water masses and their properties have been studied in the Mauritian during September-October, 1987. Surface water is characterizEd. by two water masses: 1) a warm (temp. 27 degrees C) and relatively saline water (salinity 35.3 x 10 sup(-3)) which...

  13. A neutrino mass-mixing sum rule from SO(10) and neutrinoless double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccella, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Chianese, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Ettore Pancini, Università di Napoli Federico II,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Mangano, G. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Miele, G.; Morisi, S.; Santorelli, P. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Ettore Pancini, Università di Napoli Federico II,Complesso University Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2017-04-03

    Minimal SO(10) grand unified models provide phenomenological predictions for neutrino mass patterns and mixing. These are the outcome of the interplay of several features, namely: i) the seesaw mechanism; ii) the presence of an intermediate scale where B-L gauge symmetry is broken and the right-handed neutrinos acquire a Majorana mass; iii) a symmetric Dirac neutrino mass matrix whose pattern is close to the up-type quark one. In this framework two natural characteristics emerge. Normal neutrino mass hierarchy is the only allowed, and there is an approximate relation involving both light-neutrino masses and mixing parameters. This differs from what occurring when horizontal flavour symmetries are invoked. In this case, in fact, neutrino mixing or mass relations have been separately obtained in literature. In this paper we discuss an example of such comprehensive mixing-mass relation in a specific realization of SO(10) and, in particular, analyse its impact on the expected neutrinoless double beta decay effective mass parameter 〈m{sub ee}〉, and on the neutrino mass scale. Remarkably a lower limit for the lightest neutrino mass is obtained (m{sub lightest}≳7.5×10{sup −4} eV, at 3 σ level).

  14. Flow structure of steam-water mixed spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki; Mitsuhashi, Yuki; Mizutani, Hiroya; Saito, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the flow structure of a steam-water mixed spray is studied both numerically and experimentally. The velocity and pressure profiles of single-phase flow are calculated using numerical methods. On the basis of the calculated flow fields, the droplet behavior is predicted by a one-way interaction model. This numerical analysis reveals that the droplets are accelerated even after they are sprayed from the nozzle. Experimentally, the mixed spray is observed using an ultra-high-speed video camera, and the velocity field is measured by using the oarticle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Along with this PIV velocity field measurement, the velocities and diameters of droplets are measured by phase Doppler anemometry. Furthermore, the mixing process of steam and water and the atomization process of a liquid film are observed using a transparent nozzle. High-speed photography observations reveal that the flow inside the nozzle is annular flow and that most of the liquid film is atomized at the nozzle throat and nozzle outlet. Finally, the optimum mixing method for steam and water is determined.

  15. Flow structure of steam-water mixed spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki, E-mail: ttsanad@ipc.shizuoka.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Yuki; Mizutani, Hiroya; Saito, Takayuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, the flow structure of a steam-water mixed spray is studied both numerically and experimentally. The velocity and pressure profiles of single-phase flow are calculated using numerical methods. On the basis of the calculated flow fields, the droplet behavior is predicted by a one-way interaction model. This numerical analysis reveals that the droplets are accelerated even after they are sprayed from the nozzle. Experimentally, the mixed spray is observed using an ultra-high-speed video camera, and the velocity field is measured by using the oarticle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Along with this PIV velocity field measurement, the velocities and diameters of droplets are measured by phase Doppler anemometry. Furthermore, the mixing process of steam and water and the atomization process of a liquid film are observed using a transparent nozzle. High-speed photography observations reveal that the flow inside the nozzle is annular flow and that most of the liquid film is atomized at the nozzle throat and nozzle outlet. Finally, the optimum mixing method for steam and water is determined.

  16. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Single particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been estimated using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulphate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal/optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and ten discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. Potassium content was used to identify particles associated with biomass combustion. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorization, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulphate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA/EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidized OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of primary and

  17. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC, organic aerosol (OA, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, a thermal–optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC. ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67–0.78, and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the

  18. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal-optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the temporal

  19. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    the effects of viscous dissipation and variable viscosity on the flow of heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the ..... been solved by Gauss-. Seidel iteration method and numerical values are carried out after executing the computer program for it. In order to prove.

  20. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the viscous dissipation and variable viscosity effects on the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the presence of chemical reaction. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity ...

  1. Fermion flavor mixing in models with dynamical mass generation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 6 (2010), 065029/1-065029/13 ISSN 1550-7998 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : weak interactions * particle physics * neutrino masses Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 4.964, year: 2010

  2. Neutrino mass and mixing, and non-accelerator experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental knowledge about neutrinos derived from kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at reactors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indication that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  3. The experimental status of neutrino masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental knowledge about neutrinos derived from kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at reactors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  4. Experimental investigation of mixing of non-isothermal water streams at BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergagio, Mattia, E-mail: bergagio@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Anglart, Henryk, E-mail: henryk@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 21/25 Nowowiejska Street, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Temperatures are measured in the presence of mixing at BWR operating conditions. • The thermocouple support is moved along a pattern to extend the measurement region. • Uncertainty of 1.58 K for temperatures acquired at 1000 Hz. • Momenta of the hot streams and thermal stratification affect the data examined. • Unconventional spectral analysis is required to further study the data collected. - Abstract: In this experimental investigation, wall surface temperatures have been measured during mixing of three water streams in the annular gap between two coaxial stainless-steel tubes. The inner tube, with an outer diameter of 35 mm and a thickness of 5 mm, holds six K-type, ungrounded thermocouples with a diameter of 0.5 mm, which measured surface temperatures with a sampling rate of either 100 Hz or 1000 Hz. The tube was rotated from 0 to 360° and moved in a range of 387 mm in the axial direction to allow measurements of surface temperatures in the whole mixing region. The outer tube has an inner diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 10 mm to withstand a water pressure of 9 MPa. A water stream at a temperature of either 333 K or 423 K and a Reynolds number between 1657 and 8410 rose vertically in the annular gap and mixed with two water streams at a temperature of 549 K and a Reynolds number between 3.56 × 10{sup 5} and 7.11 × 10{sup 5}. These two water streams entered the annulus radially on the same axial level, 180° apart. Water pressure was kept at 7.2 MPa. Temperature recordings were performed at five axial and eight azimuthal locations, for each set of boundary conditions. Each recording lasted 120 s to provide reliable data on the variance, intermittency and frequency of the surface temperature time series at hand. Thorough calculations indicate that the uncertainty in the measured temperature is of 1.58 K. The mixing region extends up to 0.2 m downward of the hot inlets. In most cases, measurements indicate non-uniform mixing in the

  5. The double mass hierarchy pattern: Simultaneously understanding quark and lepton mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor; Saldaña Salazar, Ulises Jesús

    2015-03-01

    The charged fermion masses of the three generations exhibit the two strong hierarchies m3 ≫m2 ≫m1. We assume that also neutrino masses satisfy mν3 >mν2 >mν1 and derive the consequences of the hierarchical spectra on the fermionic mixing patterns. The quark and lepton mixing matrices are built in a general framework with their matrix elements expressed in terms of the four fermion mass ratios, mu /mc, mc /mt, md /ms and ms /mb, and me /mμ, mμ /mτ, mν1 /mν2 and mν2 /mν3, for the quark and lepton sector, respectively. In this framework, we show that the resulting mixing matrices are consistent with data for both quarks and leptons, despite the large leptonic mixing angles. The minimal assumption we take is the one of hierarchical masses and minimal flavor symmetry breaking that strongly follows from phenomenology. No special structure of the mass matrices has to be assumed that cannot be motivated by this minimal assumption. This analysis allows us to predict the neutrino mass spectrum and set the mass of the lightest neutrino well below 0.01 eV. The method also gives the 1σ allowed ranges for the leptonic mixing matrix elements. Contrary to the common expectation, leptonic mixing angles are found to be determined solely by the four leptonic mass ratios without any relation to symmetry considerations as commonly used in flavor model building. Still, our formulae can be used to build up a flavor model that predicts the observed hierarchies in the masses - the mixing follows then from the procedure which is developed in this work.

  6. Mixing and remineralization in waters detrained from the surface into Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water in the southeastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. R.; Talley, L. D.; Dickson, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    A hydrographic data set collected in the region and season of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water (SAMW and AAIW) formation in the southeastern Pacific allows us to estimate the preformed properties of surface water detrained into these water masses from deep mixed layers north of the Subantarctic Front and Antarctic Surface Water south of the front. Using 10 measured seawater properties, we estimate: the fractions of SAMW/AAIW that originate as surface source waters, as well as fractions that mix into these water masses from subtropical thermocline water above and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water below the subducted SAMW/AAIW; ages associated with the detrained surface water; and remineralization and dissolution rates and ratios. The mixing patterns imply that cabbeling can account for ˜0.005-0.03 kg m-3 of additional density in AAIW, and ˜0-0.02 kg m-3 in SAMW. We estimate a shallow depth (˜300-700 m, above the aragonite saturation horizon) calcium carbonate dissolution rate of 0.4 ± 0.2 µmol CaCO3 kg-1 yr-1, a phosphate remineralization rate of 0.031 ± 0.009 µmol P kg-1 yr-1, and remineralization ratios of P:N:-O2:Corg of 1:(15.5 ± 0.6):(143 ± 10):(104 ± 22) for SAMW/AAIW. Our shallow depth calcium carbonate dissolution rate is comparable to previous estimates for our region. Our -O2:P ratio is smaller than many global averages. Our model suggests neglecting diapycnal mixing of preformed phosphate has likely biased previous estimates of -O2:P and Corg:P high, but that the Corg:P ratio bias may have been counteracted by a second bias in previous studies from neglecting anthropogenic carbon gradients.

  7. Masses and mixing angles in SU(5) gauge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.; Tanaka, K.

    1979-01-01

    Georgi and Jarlskog mass relations m/sub μ/m/sub e/ = 9m/sub s//m/sub d/, m/sub b/ = m/sub tau/ are obtained above the grand unification mass M = 10 15 GeV with two approx. 5's and one approx. 45 Higgs representations of SU(5) and a discrete symmetry. In the lowest order, the Kobayashi-Maskawa angles are found to be s 2 = -(m/sub c//m/sub t/) /sup 1/2/ and s 3 = -(m/sub u//m/sub t/) /sup 1/2//s 1 , where s 1 is the sine of the Cabibbo angle. The CP violation is considered, and the b quark decays predominantly into c quarks with lifetime of tau/sub b/ approx. equal to 10 -13 s for m/sub t/ = 25 GeV

  8. Normal and Special Models of Neutrino Masses and Mixings

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    2005-01-01

    One can make a distinction between "normal" and "special" models. For normal models $\\theta_{23}$ is not too close to maximal and $\\theta_{13}$ is not too small, typically a small power of the self-suggesting order parameter $\\sqrt{r}$, with $r=\\Delta m_{sol}^2/\\Delta m_{atm}^2 \\sim 1/35$. Special models are those where some symmetry or dynamical feature assures in a natural way the near vanishing of $\\theta_{13}$ and/or of $\\theta_{23}- \\pi/4$. Normal models are conceptually more economical and much simpler to construct. Here we focus on special models, in particular a recent one based on A4 discrete symmetry and extra dimensions that leads in a natural way to a Harrison-Perkins-Scott mixing matrix.

  9. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : Mass Spectrometric Studies of Acetonitrile-Water and Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixtures (Part 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2002-01-01

    The microscopic structures of acetonitrile-water and DMSO-water binary mixed solvents and their influence on the solvation for solutes (some alcohols and phenol) have been studied on the basis of the cluster structures observed through a specially designed mass spectrometer. In acetonitrile-water

  10. Mixing and mass transfer in a pilot scale U-loop bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Leander Adrian Haaning; Villadsen, John; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2017-01-01

    A system capable of handling a large volumetric gas fraction while providing a high gas to liquid mass transfer is a necessity if the metanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus is to be used in single cell protein (SCP) production. In this study mixing time and mass transfer coefficients we...

  11. Nonabelian family symmetry and the origin of fermion masses and mixing angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldate, M.; Reno, M.H.; Hill, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of fermion masses and mixing angles is studied in a class of gauged family-symmetry models broken by elementary Higgs scalars at ≅10 3 TeV. It is found that large hierarchies among fermion masses can be produced more naturally in a model with four generations rather than three. (orig.)

  12. Fourth SM family, breaking of mass democracy, and the CKM mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atag, S.; Celikel, A.; Ciftci, A.K.; Sultansoy, S.; Yilmaz, U.O.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the violation of the democratic mass matrix in the framework of the four-family standard model. Predictions of fourth-family fermion masses as well as quark and lepton CKM mixings are presented. Production and decay modes of new fermions are discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Evaluation of mixing and mass transfer in a stirred pilot scale bioreactor utilizing CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Yang, Jifeng; Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge and prediction of mixing and mass transfer in agitated bioreactors is fundamental for process development and scale up. In particular key process parameters such as mixing time and volumetric mass transfer coefficient are essential for bioprocess development. In this work the mixing...... and mass transfer performance of a high power agitated pilot scale bioreactor has been characterized using a novel combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental investigations. The effect of turbulence inside the vessel was predicted using a standard RANS k-ε model. Mixing time...... transfer coefficients were in accordance with the experimental data. This work illustrates the possibility of predicting the two phase fluid dynamic performance of an agitated pilot scale bioreactor using validated CFD models. These models can be applied to illustrate the effect of changing the physical...

  14. Overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea. A case study for mixed action lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Herdoiza, Gregorio; UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid

    2012-11-01

    We discuss a Lattice QCD mixed action investigation employing Wilson maximally twisted mass sea and overlap valence fermions. Using four values of the lattice spacing, we demonstrate that the overlap Dirac operator assumes a point-like locality in the continuum limit. We also show that by adopting suitable matching conditions for the sea and valence theories a consistent continuum limit for the pion decay constant and light baryon masses can be obtained. Finally, we confront results for sea-valence mixed meson masses and the valence scalar correlator with corresponding expressions of chiral perturbation theory. This allows us to extract low energy constants of mixed action chiral perturbation which characterize the strength of unitarity violations in our mixed action setup.

  15. Overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea. A case study for mixed action lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Garcia-Ramos, Elena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Herdoiza, Gregorio [UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2012-11-15

    We discuss a Lattice QCD mixed action investigation employing Wilson maximally twisted mass sea and overlap valence fermions. Using four values of the lattice spacing, we demonstrate that the overlap Dirac operator assumes a point-like locality in the continuum limit. We also show that by adopting suitable matching conditions for the sea and valence theories a consistent continuum limit for the pion decay constant and light baryon masses can be obtained. Finally, we confront results for sea-valence mixed meson masses and the valence scalar correlator with corresponding expressions of chiral perturbation theory. This allows us to extract low energy constants of mixed action chiral perturbation which characterize the strength of unitarity violations in our mixed action setup.

  16. Knitting neutrino mass textures with or without Tri-Bi maximal mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontaris, G.K., E-mail: leonta@uoi.gr [Theoretical Physics Division, Ioannina University, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vlachos, N.D. [Theoretical Physics Division, Aristotle University, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-08-03

    The solar and baseline neutrino oscillation data suggest bimaximal neutrino mixing among the first two generations, and trimaximal mixing between all three neutrino flavors. It has been conjectured that this indicates the existence of an underlying symmetry for the leptonic fermion mass textures. The experimentally measured quantities, however, are associated to the latter indirectly and in a rather complicated way through the mixing matrices of the charged leptons and neutrinos. Motivated by these facts, we derive exact analytical expressions which directly link the charged lepton and neutrino mass and mixing parameters to measured quantities and obtain constraints on the parameter space. We discuss deviations from Tri-Bi mixing matrices and present minimal extensions of the Harrison, Perkins and Scott matrices capable of interpreting all neutrino data.

  17. Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family: Upper and Lower Limits on CKM Mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental limits on the Higgs boson mass restrict CKM mixing of a possible fourth family beyond the constraints previously obtained from precision electroweak data alone. Existing experimental and theoretical bounds on m H already significantly restrict the allowed parameter space. Zero CKM mixing is excluded and mixing of order θ Cabbibo is allowed. Upper and lower limits on 3-4 CKM mixing are exhibited as a function of m H . We use the default inputs of the Electroweak Working Group and also explore the sensitivity of both the three and four family fits to alternative inputs.

  18. Radiative seesaw-type mechanism of fermion masses and non-trivial quark mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelaez, Carolina; Hernandez, A.E.C.; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso-CCTVal, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a predictive inert two-Higgs doublet model, where the standard model (SM) symmetry is extended by S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 12} and the field content is enlarged by extra scalar fields, charged exotic fermions and two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos. The charged exotic fermions generate a non-trivial quark mixing and provide one-loop-level masses for the first- and second-generation charged fermions. The masses of the light active neutrinos are generated from a one-loop-level radiative seesaw mechanism. Our model successfully explains the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. (orig.)

  19. Fermion masses and flavor mixings in a model with S4 flavor symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Guijun

    2010-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric model of quark and lepton based on S 4 xZ 3 xZ 4 flavor symmetry. The S 4 symmetry is broken down to Klein four and Z 3 subgroups in the neutrino and the charged lepton sectors, respectively. Tri-Bimaximal mixing and the charged lepton mass hierarchies are reproduced simultaneously at leading order. Moreover, a realistic pattern of quark masses and mixing angles is generated with the exception of the mixing angle between the first two generations, which requires a small accidental enhancement. It is remarkable that the mass hierarchies are controlled by the spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry in our model. The next to leading order contributions are studied, all the fermion masses and mixing angles receive corrections of relative order λ c 2 with respect to the leading order results. The phenomenological consequences of the model are analyzed, the neutrino mass spectrum can be normal hierarchy or inverted hierarchy, and the combined measurement of the 0ν2β decay effective mass m ββ and the lightest neutrino mass can distinguish the normal hierarchy from the inverted hierarchy.

  20. Water masses as a unifying framework for understanding the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Iudicone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific motivation for this study is to understand the processes in the ocean interior controlling carbon transfer across 30° S. To address this, we have developed a unified framework for understanding the interplay between physical drivers such as buoyancy fluxes and ocean mixing, and carbon-specific processes such as biology, gas exchange and carbon mixing. Given the importance of density in determining the ocean interior structure and circulation, the framework is one that is organized by density and water masses, and it makes combined use of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics. This is achieved through application to a global ice-ocean circulation model and an ocean biogeochemistry model, with both components being part of the widely-used IPSL coupled ocean/atmosphere/carbon cycle model.

    Our main new result is the dominance of the overturning circulation (identified by water masses in setting the vertical distribution of carbon transport from the Southern Ocean towards the global ocean. A net contrast emerges between the role of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW, associated with large northward transport and ingassing, and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, associated with a much smaller export and outgassing. The differences in their export rate reflects differences in their water mass formation processes. For SAMW, two-thirds of the surface waters are provided as a result of the densification of thermocline water (TW, and upon densification this water carries with it a substantial diapycnal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. For AAIW, principal formatin processes include buoyancy forcing and mixing, with these serving to lighten CDW. An additional important formation pathway of AAIW is through the effect of interior processing (mixing, including cabelling that serve to densify SAMW.

    A quantitative evaluation of the contribution of mixing, biology and gas exchange to the DIC evolution per water mass reveals that

  1. Mode Water Formation via Cabbeling and Submesoscale Lateral Mixing at a Strained Thermohaline Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. N.; Shakespeare, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mode waters play an important role in interannual climate variability through the temporary storage of heat and carbon in the ocean. The mechanisms explaining their formation are not well understood but appear to be shaped by the dynamics of the ocean fronts that mark their poleward extent. We explore a mode water formation mechanism that has a clear connection to fronts and involves cabbeling. Cabbeling refers to the process by which two water masses of equal density but different temperature and salinity are combined to create a new, denser water mass, as a result of nonlinearities in the equation of state for seawater. The work is motivated in part by recent observations of an extremely sharp, density-compensated front at the north wall of the Gulf Stream, the boundary between the subtropical and subpolar gyres. Here, the inter-gyre salinity/temperature difference is compressed into a span of a few kilometers, making the flow susceptible to cabbeling. The sharpness of the front is caused by frontogenetic strain, which is presumably balanced by submesoscale lateral mixing processes. We study this balance with a simple analytical model of a thermohaline front forced by uniform strain and derive a scaling for the amount of water mass transformation resulting from the ensuing cabbeling. The theory suggests that this mechanism could be responsible for persistent, hence significant, mode water formation. As such, it represents a submesoscale process that impacts the ocean on basin scales that should be resolved or parameterized in realistic numerical simulations.

  2. Algebraic structures of the fermion mass spectrum and the phenomenon of the quark mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plankl, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the present thesis algebraic structures of the fermion mass spectrum are considered, whereby especially a possible connection with the phenomenon of the flavor mixing is looked for. After a presentation of the relevant theoretical and experimental foundations arguments are given, which call for the hypothesis of a relation of the mass and mixing parameters. We discuss the populary approaches of the mass matrices of the quarks. A main topic of this thesis form studies on the 'democratic' mass matrix. For this approximation, which corresponds to a matrix of the rank one, specific corrections are proposed, which have a breaking of chiral permutation symmetries as consequence, from which the masses of the first two generations result. The generation of possible small neutrino masses follows by the see-saw mechanism, which in generalized form serves also for the foundation of the smallness of the masses of the first two families. The mass hierarchy becomes understandable, if the corrections to the rank-1-matrix are of radiative nature. In this connection we especially enter the model of the 'see-saw democracy' more closely. The second main topic represents another access to the present theme, whic is given by the mixing matrix of the quarks. We diagonalize the mixing matrix for two and three families. Furthermore we define eigenstates of the weak interaction and give for the real 3x3 matrix a geometrical interpretation of the flavor mixing. Beyond we obtain in the current eigen base in the case of a decoupled third generation for the first two families mass matrices with democratic structure. (orig.) [de

  3. A novel and economical explanation for SM fermion masses and mixings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A.E.C. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2016-09-15

    I propose the first multiscalar singlet extension of the standard model (SM), which generates tree level top quark and exotic fermion masses as well as one and three loop level masses for charged fermions lighter than the top quark and for light active neutrinos, respectively, without invoking electrically charged scalar fields. That model, which is based on the S{sub 3} x Z{sub 8} discrete symmetry, successfully explains the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. The charged exotic fermions induce one loop level masses for charged fermions lighter than the top quark. The Z{sub 8} charged scalar singlet χ generates the observed charged fermion mass and quark mixing pattern. (orig.)

  4. Remote sensing in the mixing zone. [water pollution in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemonte, J. R.; Hoopes, J. A.; Wu, D. S.; Lillesand, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    Characteristics of dispersion and diffusion as the mechanisms by which pollutants are transported in natural river courses were studied with the view of providing additional data for the establishment of water quality guidelines and effluent outfall design protocols. Work has been divided into four basic categories which are directed at the basic goal of developing relationships which will permit the estimation of the nature and extent of the mixing zone as a function of those variables which characterize the outfall structure, the effluent, and the river, as well as climatological conditions. The four basic categories of effort are: (1) the development of mathematical models; (2) laboratory studies of physical models; (3) field surveys involving ground and aerial sensing; and (4) correlation between aerial photographic imagery and mixing zone characteristics.

  5. Multi-Tracer Approach for Shelf Water Mixing Studies in Brazilian Regions under Different Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, L. D.; Marins, R. V.; Dias, F. J.S. [Instituto de Ciencias do Mar, Universidate Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Godoy, M. L.D.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Godoy, J. M.; Souza, T. A. [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rezende, C. E. [Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Fresh water and sediment supply at estuary and plume regions has dramatically changed due to land use changes, mostly damming, in river basins. The resulting impact, however, may vary significantly depending on climate and hydrology. The seasonal differences in shelf, plume, estuarine and river waters of two watersheds located under contrasting climates in the Brazilian coast are reported using a multi-tracer approach (salinity, barium, silica, uranium, deuterium and {sup 18}O) to characterize the mixing processes. At the Paraiba do Sul River, SE Brazil, in a wet tropical coast, all results showed similarity between dry and wet seasons; at the Jaguaribe river under semi arid climate in NE Brazil, the results showed a moving freshwater plume depending on season, with freshwater at the estuary in the rainy season and shelf water intrusion upstream in the estuary in the dry season. Most tracers used were able to consistently characterize water masses even in the wide range of latitudes studied, confirming their importance as a tool for modelling mixing processes at the continent-ocean boundary. Barium, however, still needs better studies on its seashore chemistry, since in the semi arid site, Ba distribution could not be directly related to conservative mixing behaviour, at least during the rainy season. (author)

  6. Water isotope composition as a tracer for study of mixing processes in rivers. Part II. Determination of mixing degrees in the tributary-main river systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarczyk, A.; Wierzchnicki, R.; Zimnicki, R.; Ptaszek, S.; Palige, J.; Dobrowolski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Two river-tributary systems have been chosen for the investigation of mixing processes: the Narew River-the Bug River-Zegrzynski Reservoir and the Bugo-Narew River-the Vistula River. In both river systems, several profiles for the water sampling have been selected down to the tributary confluent line. Each sample position has been precisely determined by means of GPS. Then, the δDi have been measured in IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectroscopy). The δD distributions in selected profiles have been presented for both investigated river systems. Presented results will be applied for the verification of the mathematical model for transport and mixing in river systems

  7. Formation rate of water masses in the Japan Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hideyuki; Ito, Toshimichi; Yoon, Jong-Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Water masses in the subsurface and the intermediate layer are actively formed due to strong winter convection in the Japan Sea. It is probable that some fraction of pollution is carried into the layer below the sea surface together with these water masses, so it is important to estimate the formation rate and turnover time of water masses to study the fate of pollutants. The present study estimates the annual formation rate and the turnover time of water masses using a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and a particle chasing method. The total annual formation rate of water masses below the sea surface amounted to about 3.53±0.55 Sv in the Japan Sea. Regarding representative intermediate water masses, the annual formation rate of the Upper portion of the Japan Sea Proper Water (UJSPW) and the Japan Sea Intermediate Water (JSIW) were estimated to be about 0.38±0.11 and 1.43±0.16 Sv, respectively, although there was little evidence of the formation of deeper water masses below a depth of about 1500 m in a numerical experiment. An estimate of turnover time shows that the UJSPW and the JSIW circulate in the intermediate layer of the Japan Sea with timescales of about 22.1 and 2.2 years, respectively. (author)

  8. Flavor Mixing, CP-Violation and the Masses of the Light Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1998-01-01

    The observed hierarchy of the quark masses is interpreted as a signal for an underlying ``subnuclear democracy'' as the relevant symmetry of the quark mass terms. A simple breaking of the symmetry leads to a mixing between the second and the third family, in agreement with observation. Introducing the mixing between the first and the second family, one finds an interesting pattern of maximal CP--violation as well as a complete determination of the elements of the CKM matrix and of the unitarity triangle.

  9. Flavor mixing, CP-violation and the masses of the light quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, H.

    1998-01-01

    The observed hierarchy of the quark masses is interpreted as a signal for an underlying ''subnuclear democracy'' as the relevant symmetry of the quark mass terms. A simple breaking of the symmetry leads to a mixing between the second and the third family, in agreement with observation. Introducing the mixing between the first and the second family, one finds an interesting pattern of maximal CP-violation as well as a complete determination of the elements of the CKM matrix and of the unitarity triangle. (orig.)

  10. A model of radiative neutrino masses. Mixing and a possible fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, K.S.; Ma, E.; Pantaleone, J.

    1989-01-01

    We consider the phenomenological consequences of a recently proposed model with four lepton generations such that the three known neutrinos have radiatively induced Majorana masses. Mixing among generations in the presence of a heavy fourth neutrino necessitates a reevaluation of the usual experimental tests of the standard model. One interesting possibility is to have a τ lifetime longer than predicted by the standard three-generation model. Another is to have neutrino masses and mixing angles in the range needed for a natural explanation of the solar-neutrino puzzle in terms of the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. (orig.)

  11. LSND versus MiniBooNE: Sterile neutrinos with energy dependent masses and mixing?

    CERN Document Server

    Schwetz, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Standard active-sterile neutrino oscillations do not provide a satisfactory description of the LSND evidence for neutrino oscillations together with the constraints from MiniBooNE and other null-result short-baseline oscillation experiments. However, if the mass or the mixing of the sterile neutrino depends in an exotic way on its energy all data become consistent. I explore the phenomenological consequences of the assumption that either the mass or the mixing scales with the neutrino energy as $1/E_\

  12. Homologous Type of Malignant Mixed Mullerian Tumor of the Uterus Presenting as a Cervical Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umur Kuyumcuoğlu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mixed Mullerian tumors are composed of a mixture of sarcoma and carcinoma. The carcinomatous element is usually glandular, whereas the sarcomatous element may resemble normal endometrial stroma (homologous or so-called carcinosarcoma. Here, we present a homologous type of malignant mixed Mullerian tumor of the uterus that presented as a cervical mass. We describe a 55-year-old patient who had a cervical mass arising from the uterus. We performed total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and surgical staging (including (peritoneal washings, suspicious areas or peritoneal surfaces sampled, infracolic omental sampling, pelvic and paraaortic lymph node sampling, and appendectomy. Carcinosarcomas of the uterine cervix are extremely rare, and when a post-menopausal woman with a cervical mass is admitted to the gynecology clinic, the physician should keep in mind that the mass might be a carcinosarcoma. [J Chin Med Assoc 2009;72(10:533–535

  13. New narrow boson resonances and SU(4) symmetry: Selection rules, SU(4) mixing, and mass formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, E.; Oneda, S.

    1975-01-01

    General SU(4) sum rules are obtained for bosons in the theoretical framework of asymptotic SU(4), chiral SU(4) direct-product SU(4) charge algebra, and a simple mechanism of SU(4) and chiral SU(4) direct-product SU(4) breaking. The sum rules exhibit a remarkable interplay of the masses, SU(4) mixing angles, and axial-vector matrix elements of 16-plet boson multiplets. Under a particular circumstance (i.e., in the ''ideal'' limit) this interplay produces selection rules which may explain the remarkable stability of the newly found narrow boson resonances. General SU(4) mass formulas and inter-SU(4) -multiplet mass relations are derived and SU(4) mixing parameters are completely determined. Ground state 1 -- and 0 -+ 16-plets are especially discussed and the masses of charmed and uncharmed new members of these multiplets are predicted

  14. Radiative generation of quark masses and mixing angles in the two Higgs doublet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Solaguren-Beascoa, Ana

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework to generate the quark mass hierarchies and mixing angles by extending the Standard Model with one extra Higgs doublet. The charm and strange quark masses are generated by small quantum effects, thus explaining the hierarchy between the second and third generation quark masses. All the mixing angles are also generated by small quantum effects: the Cabibbo angle is generated at zeroth order in perturbation theory, while the remaining off-diagonal entries of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa matrix are generated at first order, hence explaining the observed hierarchy |V ub |,|V cb |≪|V us |. The values of the radiatively generated parameters depend only logarithmically on the heavy Higgs mass, therefore this framework can be reconciled with the stringent limits on flavor violation by postulating a sufficiently large new physics scale

  15. A Water Model Study on Mixing Behavior of the Two-Layered Bath in Bottom Blown Copper Smelting Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lang; Cui, Zhixiang; Ma, Xiaodong; Jiang, Xu; Chen, Mao; Xiang, Yong; Zhao, Baojun

    2018-05-01

    The bottom-blown copper smelting furnace is a novel copper smelter developed in recent years. Many advantages of this furnace have been found, related to bath mixing behavior under its specific gas injection scheme. This study aims to use an oil-water double-phased laboratory-scale model to investigate the impact of industry-adjustable variables on bath mixing time, including lower layer thickness, gas flow rate, upper layer thickness and upper layer viscosity. Based on experimental results, an overall empirical relationship of mixing time in terms of these variables has been correlated, which provides the methodology for industry to optimize mass transfer in the furnace.

  16. Dimethylamine biodegradation by mixed culture enriched from drinking water biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jingxu; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylamine (DMA) is one of the important precursors of drinking water disinfection by-product N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Reduction of DMA to minimize the formation of carcinogenic NDMA in drinking water is of practical importance. Biodegradation plays a major role in elimination of DMA pollution in the environment, yet information on DMA removal by drinking water biofilter is still lacking. In this study, microcosms with different treatments were constructed to investigate the potential of DMA removal by a mixed culture enriched from a drinking water biofilter and the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources. DMA could be quickly mineralized by the enrichment culture. Amendment of a carbon source, instead of a nitrogen source, had a profound impact on DMA removal. A shift in bacterial community structure was observed with DMA biodegradation, affected by carbon and nitrogen sources. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum group in DMA-degrading microcosms. Microorganisms from a variety of bacterial genera might be responsible for the rapid DMA mineralization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Water Storage, Mixing and Transit Times During a Multiyear Drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Velde, Y.; Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Safeeq, M.

    2017-12-01

    From 2012 to 2016, a five year intensive drought occurred in the Californian Sierra Nevada. We use this drought period as an opportunity to investigate how catchment water storage, mixing and transit times changes from wet to dry conditions using long term datasets of river discharge, evapotranspiration, water quality, and multiple cosmogenic radioactive isotopes. Characteristic features of the test catchment (4.6 km2 , altitude 1660-2117 m) include a thick (>5m) unsaturated zone in deeply weathered granite mountain soils, snow melt and events of high intensity rainfall, dry summers and numerous wetland meadows along the stream. Our data and model analysis suggest that under drought conditions, river flow predominantly consist of deep groundwater tapped by deeply incised sections of the stream, while the wetlands hold on to their water just below the root system of its shallow rooting vegetation. In contrast, during wet periods, most runoff is generated on the flat riparian wetland meadows, while the regional groundwater system slowly refills itself as water makes its way through the thick unsaturated zones. Antecedent wet or dry years play an crucial role as antecedent wet years cause a substantial regional groundwater flow towards the riparian wetlands, filling up the riparian wetlands and yielding a much stronger discharge response of the wetlands to rainfall events than under antecedent dry years This interaction between the regional groundwater system and the local wetland systems weakens as the drought progresses and regional groundwater flow to the wetlands lessens. Although, due to the wet events in 2016-2017, the catchment fills up rapidly to pre-drought conditions, we show that water transit times and therefore likely the water quality will contain drought signs for several years to come. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS- XXXXXX

  18. Mass imbalances in EPANET water-quality simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas N.

    2018-04-01

    EPANET is widely employed to simulate water quality in water distribution systems. However, in general, the time-driven simulation approach used to determine concentrations of water-quality constituents provides accurate results only for short water-quality time steps. Overly long time steps can yield errors in concentration estimates and can result in situations in which constituent mass is not conserved. The use of a time step that is sufficiently short to avoid these problems may not always be feasible. The absence of EPANET errors or warnings does not ensure conservation of mass. This paper provides examples illustrating mass imbalances and explains how such imbalances can occur because of fundamental limitations in the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET. In general, these limitations cannot be overcome by the use of improved water-quality modeling practices. This paper also presents a preliminary event-driven approach that conserves mass with a water-quality time step that is as long as the hydraulic time step. Results obtained using the current approach converge, or tend to converge, toward those obtained using the preliminary event-driven approach as the water-quality time step decreases. Improving the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET could eliminate mass imbalances and related errors in estimated concentrations. The results presented in this paper should be of value to those who perform water-quality simulations using EPANET or use the results of such simulations, including utility managers and engineers.

  19. Theory of quark mixing matrix and invariant functions of mass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, C.

    1987-10-01

    The outline of this talk is as follows: The origin of the quark mixing matrix. Super elementary theory of flavour projection operators. Equivalences and invariances. The commutator formalism and CP violation. CP conditions for any number of families. The 'angle' between the quark mass matrices. Application to Fritzsch and Stech matrices. References. (author)

  20. Origin of fermion masses and quark mixing without of fundamental scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyatlov, I.T.

    1991-01-01

    Hierarchy of masses of fermion generation and the properties of the weak mixing matrix give evidence for the mechanism in which the fourth generation condensate and new vector boson are necessary elements. Rather large value of neutral transitions between heavy flavours could serve as a main experimental manifestation of the suggested mechanism

  1. Plasma mass density, species mix and fluctuation diagnostics using fast Alfven wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezi, H.; deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    The authors propose to employ a fast Alfven wave interferometer and reflectometer as a tokamak diagnostic to measure the plasma mass density, D-T species mix profile, and density fluctuations. Utilize the property that the phase velocity of the fast wave propagating across the magnetic field is the Alfven speed with thermal correction, this fast wave interferometer on the DIII-D tokamak was successfully used to obtain the line integrated density. Since the position of the ion-ion hybrid cut-off in tokamaks is uniquely determined by the species mix ratio and the wave frequency, the reflectometer arrangement finds the species mix profile. The inversion method of reflectometry is discussed. The multiple chord interferometer also measures the mass density fluctuation profile.

  2. Plasma mass density, species mix and fluctuation diagnostics using fast Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    The authors propose to employ a fast Alfven wave interferometer and reflectometer as a tokamak diagnostic to measure the plasma mass density, D-T species mix profile, and density fluctuations. Utilize the property that the phase velocity of the fast wave propagating across the magnetic field is the Alfven speed with thermal correction, this fast wave interferometer on the DIII-D tokamak was successfully used to obtain the line integrated density. Since the position of the ion-ion hybrid cut-off in tokamaks is uniquely determined by the species mix ratio and the wave frequency, the reflectometer arrangement finds the species mix profile. The inversion method of reflectometry is discussed. The multiple chord interferometer also measures the mass density fluctuation profile

  3. Neutrino masses and mixings: Big Bang and Supernova nucleosynthesis and neutrino dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, George M.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of small mixings between light active and sterile neutrino species could have implications for Big Bang and Supernova Heavy Element Nucleosynthesis. As well, such mixing would force us to abandon cherished constraints on light neutrino Dark Matter. Two proposed 4-neutrino mass and mixing schemes, for example, can both accomodate existing experimental results and lead to elegant solutions to the neutron-deficit problem for r-Process nucleosynthesis from neutrino-heated supernova ejecta. Each of these solutions is based on matter-enhanced (MSW) active-sterile neutrino transformation. In plausible extensions of these schemes to the early universe, Shi and Fuller have shown that relatively light mass (∼200 eV to ∼10 keV) sterile neutrinos produced via active-sterile MSW conversion can have a ''cold'' energy spectrum. Neutrinos produced in this way circumvent the principal problem of light neutrino dark matter and would be, essentially, Cold Dark Matter

  4. Mass mixing, CP violation and left-right symmetry for heavy neutral mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.; Grimus, W.

    1985-01-01

    We investigate M 0 - M-bar 0 mixing and CP violation in the minimal left-right symmetric gauge model with spontaneous P and CP violation. The dominant contributions to the mixing amplitude including QCD corrections are calculated explicitly for B 0 - B-bar 0 . While the amount of mixing is not much changed with respect to the standard model left-right symmetry can give rise to significantly larger CP violation in the B 0 sub(s) - B-bar 0 sub(s) system (up to two orders of magnitude for the dilepton charge asymmetry). Sizable CP violating effects require that the left-right contribution to the KsubLKsubS mass difference has the same sign as the standard model contribution. We also comment on D 0 - D-bar 0 mixing including a careful discussion of the standard model prediction. (Author)

  5. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.; Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  6. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, 28401 North Carolina (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  7. Heat Transfer to Supercritical Water in Gaseous State or Affected by Mixed Convection in Vertical Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pis'menny, E.N.; Razumovskiy, V.G.; Maevskiy, E.M.; Koloskov, A.E.; Pioro, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    The results on heat transfer to supercritical water heated above the pseudo-critical temperature or affected by mixed convection flowing upward and downward in vertical tubes of 6.28-mm and 9.50-mm inside diameter are presented. Supercritical water heat-transfer data were obtained at a pressure of 23.5 MPa, mass flux within the range from 250 to 2200 kg/(m 2 s), inlet temperature from 100 to 415 deg. C and heat flux up to 3.2 MW/m 2 . Temperature regimes of the tubes cooled with supercritical water in a gaseous state (i.e., supercritical water at temperatures beyond the pseudo-critical temperature) were stable and easily reproducible within a wide range of mass and heat fluxes. An analysis of the heat-transfer data for upward and downward flows enabled to determine a range of Gr/Re 2 values corresponding to the maximum effect of free convection on the heat transfer. It was shown that: 1) the heat transfer coefficient at the downward flow of water can be higher by about 50% compared to that of the upward flow; and 2) the deteriorated heat-transfer regime is affected with the flow direction, i.e., at the same operating conditions, the deteriorated heat transfer may be delayed at the downward flow compared to that at the upward flow. These heat-transfer data are applicable as the reference dataset for future comparison with bundle data. (authors)

  8. Neutrino mixing and masses in SO(10) GUTs with hidden sector and flavor symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Xiaoyong [International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34100 Trieste (Italy); Smirnov, Alexei Yu. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics,Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34100 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    We consider the neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of SO(10) GUTs with hidden sector consisting of fermionic and bosonic SO(10) singlets and flavor symmetries. The framework allows to disentangle the CKM physics responsible for the CKM mixing and different mass hierarchies of quarks and leptons and the neutrino new physics which produces smallness of neutrino masses and large lepton mixing. The framework leads naturally to the relation U{sub PMNS}∼V{sub CKM}{sup †}U{sub 0}, where structure of U{sub 0} is determined by the flavor symmetry. The key feature of the framework is that apart from the Dirac mass matrices m{sub D}, the portal mass matrix M{sub D} and the mass matrix of singlets M{sub S} are also involved in generation of the lepton mixing. This opens up new possibilities to realize the flavor symmetries and explain the data. Using A{sub 4}×Z{sub 4} as the flavor group, we systematically explore the flavor structures which can be obtained in this framework depending on field content and symmetry assignments. We formulate additional conditions which lead to U{sub 0}∼U{sub TBM} or U{sub BM}. They include (i) equality (in general, proportionality) of the singlet flavons couplings, (ii) equality of their VEVs; (iii) correlation between VEVs of singlets and triplet, (iv) certain VEV alignment of flavon triplet(s). These features can follow from additional symmetries or be remnants of further unification. Phenomenologically viable schemes with minimal flavon content and minimal number of couplings are constructed.

  9. Critical mass variation of 239Pu with water dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1996-01-01

    The critical mass of an unreflected solid sphere of 239 Pu is ∼ 10 kg. The increase in critical mass observed for small water dilutions of unreflected 239 Pu spheres is paradoxical. Introducing small amounts of water uniformly throughout the sphere increases the spherical volume containing the same amount of 239 Pu as the critical solid sphere. The increase in radius decreases the surface-to-volume ratio of the sphere, which has the effect to first order of decreasing the neutron leakage, which is proportional to the surface, relative to the fissions, which are proportional to the volume. The reduction in neutron leakage is expected to reduce the critical mass, but instead, the critical mass is observed to increase. It is discussed how changes in the fast neutron spectrum with corresponding changes in the nuclear parameters result in an increase in critical mass for small water dilutions

  10. Mixed garnet laser crystals for water vapour DIAL transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treichel, Rainer; Czeranowsky, Christoph; Ileri, Bilge; Petermann, Klaus; Huber, Günter

    2017-11-01

    There are more or less well established technologies such as the optical-parametric-oscillator (OPO), the Raman-laser, and the Ti-Sapphire laser, which are able to emit laser light in the region of the water vapour absorption lines. For WALES the regions of about 935 nm, 942 nm, and 944 nm have been identified as the most suitable wavelength ranges. However, each of these laser designs is highly sophisticated. Current baseline for WALES is the Ti-Sapphire laser. A fourth possibility to achieve these wavelength ranges is to shift the groundstate laser lines (938 nm and 946 nm) of the Nd:YAG laser by replacing Aluminium and Yttrium by other rare earth elements. Changes of the host lattice characteristics lead to a shift of the upper and lower laser levels. These modified crystals are summarized under the name of "Mixed Garnet" crystals. Only the Mixed Garnet lasers can be pumped directly with diode laser and use a direct approach to generate the required laser pulses without frequency conversion. Therefore no additional non-linear crystals are needed and a higher electric to optical efficiency is expected as well as single frequency operation using spectral tuning elements like etalons. Such lasers have the great potential to fulfil the requirements and to become the preferred transmitter concept for WALES as well as for follow up missions. Within a ESA study several crystal compositions have been grown, spectrally characterised and analysed. Absorbed space radiation energy in the crystal lattice causes colour centres, which can reabsorb the pump and laser wavelength and consequently reduce the laser gain considerably. Co-dopants such as Chromium and Cerium are able to suppress the colour centres and are candidates for effective radiation hardening. The results of the crystal tuning, the co-doping with different radiation hardeners and the radiation tests will be presented. There applicability for a space based water vapour DIAL transmitter will be discussed.

  11. Seasonal to Mesoscale Variability of Water Masses in Barrow Canyon,Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, C.; Pickart, R. S.; Moore, K.; Ashjian, C. J.; Arrigo, K. R.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Vagle, S.; Itoh, M.; Berchok, C.; Stabeno, P. J.; Kikuchi, T.; Cooper, L. W.; Hartwell, I.; He, J.

    2016-02-01

    Barrow Canyon is one of the primary conduits by which Pacific-origin water exits the Chukchi Sea into the Canada Basin. As such, it is an ideal location to monitor the different water masses through the year. At the same time, the canyon is an energetic environment where mixing and entrainment can occur, modifying the pacific-origin waters. As part of the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) program, a transect across the canyon was occupied 24 times between 2010-2013 by international ships of opportunity passing through the region during summer and early-fall. Here we present results from an analysis of these sections to determine the seasonal evolution of the water masses and to investigate the nature of the mesoscale variability. The mean state shows the clear presence of six water masses present at various times through the summer. The seasonal evolution of these summer water masses is characterized both in depth space and in temperature-salinity (T-S) space. Clear patterns emerge, including the arrival of Alaskan coastal water and its modification in early-fall. The primary mesoscale variability is associated with wind-driven upwelling events which occur predominantly in September. The atmospheric forcing of these events is investigated as is the oceanic response.

  12. Solar neutrino masses and mixing from bilinear R-parity broken supersymmetry: Analytical versus numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, M.; Hirsch, M.; Porod, W.; Romão, J.; Valle, J.

    2003-07-01

    We give an analytical calculation of solar neutrino masses and mixing at one-loop order within bilinear R-parity breaking supersymmetry, and compare our results to the exact numerical calculation. Our method is based on a systematic perturbative expansion of R-parity violating vertices to leading order. We find in general quite good agreement between the approximate and full numerical calculations, but the approximate expressions are much simpler to implement. Our formalism works especially well for the case of the large mixing angle Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution, now strongly favored by the recent KamLAND reactor neutrino data.

  13. Identifying water mass depletion in northern Iraq observed by GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, G.; Olsthoorn, T.N.; Al-manmi, D.A.M.A.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Smidt, E.H.

    2015-01-01

    Observations acquired by Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission indicate a mass loss of 146 ± 6 mm equivalent water height (EWH) in northern Iraq between 2007 and 2009. These data are used as an independent validation of lake mass variations and a rainfall-runoff model, which is

  14. Discrete conservation properties for shallow water flows using mixed mimetic spectral elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Palha, A.; Gerritsma, M.

    2018-03-01

    A mixed mimetic spectral element method is applied to solve the rotating shallow water equations. The mixed method uses the recently developed spectral element histopolation functions, which exactly satisfy the fundamental theorem of calculus with respect to the standard Lagrange basis functions in one dimension. These are used to construct tensor product solution spaces which satisfy the generalized Stokes theorem, as well as the annihilation of the gradient operator by the curl and the curl by the divergence. This allows for the exact conservation of first order moments (mass, vorticity), as well as higher moments (energy, potential enstrophy), subject to the truncation error of the time stepping scheme. The continuity equation is solved in the strong form, such that mass conservation holds point wise, while the momentum equation is solved in the weak form such that vorticity is globally conserved. While mass, vorticity and energy conservation hold for any quadrature rule, potential enstrophy conservation is dependent on exact spatial integration. The method possesses a weak form statement of geostrophic balance due to the compatible nature of the solution spaces and arbitrarily high order spatial error convergence.

  15. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  16. Pollen, water, and wind: Chaotic mixing in a puddle of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    and nutrient distribution in puddles and small ponds.The flow patterns are generated by wind blowing across the puddle surface. This causes a shear stress at the atmospheric interface, which drives a flow in the liquid below. Chaotic mixing can occur if the wind direction changes over time. A fluid patch......This paper talks about how pine pollen grains dispersedin an approximately 1 m wide and 1 cm deep water puddle. The pollen has mixed due to wind blowing across the liquid surface, revealing a strikingly complex flow pattern. The flows revealed by nature’s tracer particles may influence circulation...

  17. Hydrochemical evidence for mixing of river water and groundwater during high-flow conditions, lower Suwannee River basin, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C.A.; Katz, B.G.; Hirten, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Karstic aquifers are highly susceptible to rapid infiltration of river water, particularly during periods of high flow. Following a period of sustained rainfall in the Suwannee River basin, Florida, USA, the stage of the Suwannee River rose from 3.0 to 5.88 m above mean sea level in April 1996 and discharge peaked at 360 m3/s. During these high-flow conditions, water from the Suwannee River migrated directly into the karstic Upper Floridan aquifer, the main source of water supply for the area. Changes in the chemical composition of groundwater were quantified using naturally occurring geochemical tracers and mass-balance modeling techniques. Mixing of river water with groundwater was indicated by a decrease in the concentrations of calcium, silica, and 222Rn; and by an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), tannic acid, and chloride, compared to low-flow conditions in water from a nearby monitoring well, Wingate Sink, and Little River Springs. The proportion (fraction) of river water in groundwater ranged from 0.13 to 0.65 at Wingate Sink and from 0.5 to 0.99 at well W-17258, based on binary mixing models using various tracers. The effectiveness of a natural tracer in quantifying mixing of river water and groundwater was related to differences in tracer concentration of the two end members and how conservatively the tracer reacted in the mixed water. Solutes with similar concentrations in the two end-member waters (Na, Mg, K, Cl, SO4, SiO2) were not as effective tracers for quantifying mixing of river water and groundwater as those with larger differences in end-member concentrations (Ca, tannic acid, DOC, 222Rn, HCO3). ?? Springer-Verlag.

  18. Lepton masses and mixings in orbifold models with three Higgs families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, N.; Munoz, C.; Teixeira, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the phenomenological viability of heterotic Z 3 orbifolds with two Wilson lines, which naturally predict three supersymmetric families of matter and Higgs fields. Given that these models can accommodate realistic scenarios for the quark sector avoiding potentially dangerous flavour-changing neutral currents, we now address the leptonic sector, finding that viable orbifold configurations can in principle be obtained. In particular, it is possible to accomodate present data on charged lepton masses, while avoiding conflict with lepton flavour-violating decays. Concerning the generation of neutrino masses and mixings, we find that Z 3 orbifolds offer several interesting possibilities

  19. Seasonal water mass distribution in the Indonesian throughflow entering the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatanoan, C.; Metzl, N.; Fieux, M.; Coste, B.

    1999-09-01

    A multiparametric approach is used to analyze the seasonal properties of water masses in the eastern Indian Ocean. The data were measured during two cruises of the Java Australia Dynamic Experiment (JADE) program carried out during two opposite seasons: August 1989 (SE monsoon) and February-March 1992 (NW monsoon). These cruises took place at the end of a La Niña event and during an El Niño episode, respectively. Seven sources have been identified in the studied region for the 200-800 m layer: the Subtropical Indian Water, the Indian Central Water, the modified Antarctic Intermediate Water, the Indonesian Subsurface Water, the Indonesian Intermediate Water, the Arabian Sea-Persian Gulf Water (AS-PGW), and the Arabian Sea-Red Sea Water (AS-RSW). The selected tracers are potential temperature, salinity and oxygen with mass conservation and positive mixing coefficients as constraints. The analysis indicates the proportion of each water source along the Australia-Bali section and into the Indonesian channels. Although no large changes are observed for Indonesian waters, significant seasonal variations are found for the southern and northern Indian Ocean water. During the NW monsoon, the contribution of the AS-RSW increases at the entrance of the Indonesian archipelago whereas the contribution of the south Indian waters decreases in the northwest Australia basin. In a complementary study, nutrients are introduced into the multiparametric analysis in order to more clearly separate the signature of the north Indian waters (AS-PGW, AS-RSW) and to provide supplementary information on the biological history of the water masses, which is compared to large-scale primary production estimates.

  20. Fritzsch-type mass matrices and the Wolfenstein parametrization of quark mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.; Hadjitheodoridis, S.; Brown Univ., Providence, RI

    1987-01-01

    We give approximate and analytic expressions of polynomial type in small parameters defined in terms of quark mass ratios for the elements of the flavor-mixing matrix predicted from the Fritzsch-type mass matrices of quarks. The results are successfully tested against experiments as represented by the Wolfenstein parametrization of quark mixing. From the reality of the CP phases we get an allowed range for m s , which in turn implies that m t can be as large as 80.8 GeV. In addition we find that the two CP phases α and β are very close, i.e., vertical strokeα-βvertical stroke ≅ O(λ). (orig.)

  1. Prospects for experiments on neutrino masses and mixing via neutrino oscillations at future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanou, R.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A study is made of the requirements necessary for improvement in our knowledge of limits in mass and mixing parameters for neutrinos via oscillation phenomena at accelerators. It is concluded that increased neutrino event rate (flux x energy) at modest energy machines (e.g., AGS and LAMPF) is the single most important requirement. This will permit smaller E/L ratios and refinement of systematics

  2. Hysteresis Behaviour of Mass Concrete Mixed with Plastic Fibre under Compression

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Okeola; T. I. Sijuade

    2016-01-01

    Unreinforced concrete is a comparatively brittle substance when exposed to tensile stresses, the required tensile strength is provided by the introduction of steel which is used as reinforcement. The strength of concrete may be improved tremendously by the addition of fibre. This study focused on investigating the compressive strength of mass concrete mixed with different percentage of plastic fibre. Twelve samples of concrete cubes with varied percentage of plastic fibre at 7, 14 and 28 days...

  3. ON THE NEED FOR DEEP-MIXING IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS OF LOW MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Cristallo, S.; Abia, C.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Cognata, M. La

    2010-01-01

    The photospheres of low-mass red giants show CNO isotopic abundances that are not satisfactorily accounted for by canonical stellar models. The same is true for the measurements of these isotopes and of the 26 Al/ 27 Al ratio in presolar grains of circumstellar origin. Non-convective mixing, occurring during both red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stages, is the explanation commonly invoked to account for the above evidence. Recently, the need for such mixing phenomena on the AGB was questioned, and chemical anomalies usually attributed to them were suggested to be formed in earlier phases. We have therefore re-calculated extra-mixing effects in low-mass stars for both the RGB and AGB stages, in order to verify the above claims. Our results contradict them; we actually confirm that slow transport below the convective envelope occurs also on the AGB. This is required primarily by the oxygen isotopic mix and the 26 Al content of presolar oxide grains. Other pieces of evidence exist, in particular from the isotopic ratios of carbon stars of type N, or C(N), in the Galaxy and in the LMC, as well as of SiC grains of AGB origin. We further show that, when extra-mixing occurs in the RGB phases of Population I stars above about 1.2 M sun , this consumes 3 He in the envelope, probably preventing the occurrence of thermohaline diffusion on the AGB. Therefore, we argue that other extra-mixing mechanisms should be active in those final evolutionary phases.

  4. Experimental and analytical studies of iodine mass transfer from xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to liquid sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, S.; Sagawa, N.; Shimoyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the fuel pin failure accident of a liquid metal fast reactor, volatile fission products play an important role in the assessment of radiological consequences. Especially the radioisotopes of elemental iodine are important because of their high volatility and of the low permissible dose to human thyroid. The released iodines are known to be retained in the coolant sodium as sodium iodide due to the chemical affinity between alkali metals and halogens. However, the xenon and krypton released with iodines into the sodium pool as bubbles may influence the reaction rate of iodine with sodium during the bubble rising. So far, the only few experimental results have been available concerning the decontamination factor (DF: the ratio of the initial iodine mass in the mixed gas bubble to the released mass into the cover gas) of iodine in this phenomenon. Therefore, experimental and analytical studies were carried out to study the mass transfer of iodine from a xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to the liquid sodium pool. In the experiments, the bubble was generated in the sodium pool by cracking a quartz ball which contains the xenon-iodine mixed gas and then, the mixed gas released into the argon cover gas was collected to determine the transferred iodine mass into the pool. A rising velocity of the bubble was measured by Chen-type void sensors arranged vertically in the pool. From the measured rising velocity and another observation of bubble behavior in simulated water experiments, it is found that the generated bubble breaks up into several smaller bubbles of spherical cap type during the rising period. Transferred iodine mass per unit initial bubble volume from the bubble to the sodium pool shows increases with increasing time and the initial iodine concentration. A mass transfer rate obtained by differentiating the transferred iodine mass with respect to the time indicates a rapid decrease just after the bubble generation and a slow decrease for the successive period

  5. Mass imbalances in EPANET water-quality simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas N.

    2018-04-06

    EPANET is widely employed to simulate water quality in water distribution systems. However, the time-driven simulation approach used to determine concentrations of water-quality constituents provides accurate results, in general, only for small water-quality time steps; use of an adequately short time step may not be feasible. Overly long time steps can yield errors in concentrations and result in situations in which constituent mass is not conserved. Mass may not be conserved even when EPANET gives no errors or warnings. This paper explains how such imbalances can occur and provides examples of such cases; it also presents a preliminary event-driven approach that conserves mass with a water-quality time step that is as long as the hydraulic time step. Results obtained using the current approach converge, or tend to converge, to those obtained using the new approach as the water-quality time step decreases. Improving the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET could eliminate mass imbalances and related errors in estimated concentrations.

  6. Mixed filling for the successive isotopic exchange in the phase sequence water - water vapors - hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.; Peculea, M.; Hirean, I.; Croitoru, C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of the isotopic exchange implied in heavy water production. Details concerning the structural arrangement of the process contact elements inside the exchange columns are presented. A hydrophilic filling, based on phosphorous bronze, and the platinum catalyst structure , resulted from this work, are to be implemented in the column equipment of the heavy water distillation pilot operating in connection with the CANDU type reactors. The performances of the mixed catalyst components were derived from experimental data by means of the three fluids model equations

  7. Does deep ocean mixing drive upwelling or downwelling of abyssal waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, R. M.; McDougall, T. J.; Mashayek, A.; Nikurashin, M.; Campin, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    It is generally understood that small-scale mixing, such as is caused by breaking internal waves, drives upwelling of the densest ocean waters that sink to the ocean bottom at high latitudes. However the observational evidence that the turbulent fluxes generated by small-scale mixing in the stratified ocean interior are more vigorous close to the ocean bottom than above implies that small-scale mixing converts light waters into denser ones, thus driving a net sinking of abyssal water. Using a combination of numerical models and observations, it will be shown that abyssal waters return to the surface along weakly stratified boundary layers, where the small-scale mixing of density decays to zero. The net ocean meridional overturning circulation is thus the small residual of a large sinking of waters, driven by small-scale mixing in the stratified interior, and a comparably large upwelling, driven by the reduced small-scale mixing along the ocean boundaries.

  8. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Feijó Delgado

    Full Text Available We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein, we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  9. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Vivian C.; Son, Sungmin; Li, Yingzhong; Knudsen, Scott M.; Olcum, Selim; Higgins, John M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Grover, William H.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell’s water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell’s dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density – the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein), we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell. PMID:23844039

  10. Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM. Analysis of on-shell calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drechsel, Peter; Weiglein, Georg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Groeber, Ramona [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre (Italy); Heinemeyer, Sven [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (UAM/CSIC) (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); UAM + CSIC Campus of International Excellence, Madrid (Spain); Muehlleitner, Milada [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Rzehak, H. [Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark). CP3-Origins

    2016-12-22

    We analyze the Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM based on an on-shell (OS) renormalization of the gauge-boson and Higgs-boson masses and the parameters of the top/scalar top sector. We compare the implementation of the OS calculations in the codes NMSSMCALC and NMSSM-FeynHiggs up to O(α{sub t}α{sub s}). We identify the sources of discrepancies at the one- and at the two-loop level. Finally we compare the OS and DR evaluation as implemented in NMSSMCALC. The results are important ingredients for an estimate of the theoretical precision of Higgs-boson mass calculations in the NMSSM.

  11. Neutrino masses and flavor mixing in the extended double Seesaw model with two texture zeros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Li-Jun; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Ablat, Abduleziz

    2011-01-01

    We study the light neutrino mass matrix in the extended double Seesaw model (EDSM), and as a result we get its general form. Also we demonstrate that conventional type-I and double seesaw mechanisms can be regarded as two special cases. We analyze the structure of the 9 x 9 neutrino mass matrix in this scenario, and surprisingly we find that EDSM will degenerate to a conventional type-I seesaw mechanism when M R = M S M μ -1 M S T holds exactly. Considering two simple ansaetze in two texture zeros for its 3 x 3 submatrices, we calculate the neutrino masses and flavor mixing angles, in which the θ 13 is a nonzero large angle. (orig.)

  12. Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM: analysis of on-shell calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drechsel, P.; Weiglein, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Groeber, R. [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Heinemeyer, S. [Campus of International Excellence UAM+CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, (UAM/CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Muehlleitner, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Rzehak, H. [University of Southern Denmark, CP3-Origins, Odense M (Denmark)

    2017-06-15

    We analyze the Higgs-boson masses and mixing matrices in the NMSSM based on an on-shell (OS) renormalization of the gauge-boson and Higgs-boson masses and the parameters of the top/scalar top sector. We compare the implementation of the OS calculations in the codes NMSSMCALC and NMSSM-FeynHiggs up to O(α{sub t}α{sub s}). We identify the sources of discrepancies at the one- and at the two-loop level. Finally we compare the OS and DR evaluation as implemented in NMSSMCALC. The results are important ingredients for an estimate of the theoretical precision of Higgs-boson mass calculations in the NMSSM. (orig.)

  13. Spectroscopic and physical parameters of Galactic O-type stars. III. Mass discrepancy and rotational mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, N.; Puls, J.; Langer, N.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Massive stars play a key role in the evolution of galaxies and our Universe. Aims: Our goal is to compare observed and predicted properties of single Galactic O stars to identify and constrain uncertain physical parameters and processes in stellar evolution and atmosphere models. Methods: We used a sample of 53 objects of all luminosity classes and with spectral types from O3 to O9.7. For 30 of these, we determined the main photospheric and wind parameters, including projected rotational rates accounting for macroturbulence, and He and N surface abundances, using optical spectroscopy and applying the model atmosphere code FASTWIND. For the remaining objects, similar data from the literature, based on analyses by means of the CMFGEN code, were used instead. The properties of our sample were then compared to published predictions based on two grids of single massive star evolution models that include rotationally induced mixing. Results: Any of the considered model grids face problem in simultaneously reproducing the stellar masses, equatorial gravities, surface abundances, and rotation rates of our sample stars. The spectroscopic masses derived for objects below 30 M⊙ tend to be smaller than the evolutionary ones, no matter which of the two grids have been used as a reference. While this result may indicate the need to improve the model atmosphere calculations (e.g. regarding the treatment of turbulent pressure), our analysis shows that the established mass problem cannot be fully explained in terms of inaccurate parameters obtained by quantitative spectroscopy or inadequate model values of Vrot on the zero age main sequence. Within each luminosity class, we find a close correlation of N surface abundance and luminosity, and a stronger N enrichment in more massive and evolved O stars. Additionally, we also find a correlation of the surface nitrogen and helium abundances. The large number of nitrogen-enriched stars above 30 M⊙ argues for rotationally

  14. Mass and charge transfer within a floating water bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Agostinho, Luewton L. F.; Eisenhut, Mathias; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2010-11-01

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge 1-8. This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the charge and mass transfer through the water bridge are investigated with schlieren visualization and laser interferometry. It can be shown that the addition of a pH dye increases the H+ and OH- production with subsequent electrolysis, whereas schlieren and interferometric methods reveal another mechanism where charge and mass transfer appear to be coupled. Whereas this mechanism seems to be responsible for the electrolysis-less charge and mass transfer in the water bridge, it is increasingly superseded by the electrochemical mechanism with rising conductivity. Thus it can be shown that a pH dye does only indirectly visualize the charge transfer in the water bridge since it is dragged along with the water flow like any other dye, and additionally promotes conventional electrochemical conduction mechanisms, thereby enhancing electrolysis and reducing the masscoupled charge transport and thus destabilizing the bridge.

  15. Mixed Inert scalar triplet dark matter, radiative neutrino masses and leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neutral component of an inert scalar multiplet with hypercharge can provide a stable dark matter particle when its real and imaginary parts have a splitting mass spectrum. Otherwise, a tree-level dark-matter-nucleon scattering mediated by the Z boson will be much above the experimental limit. In this paper we focus on a mixed inert scalar triplet dark matter scenario where a complex scalar triplet with hypercharge can mix with another real scalar triplet without hypercharge through their renormalizable coupling to the standard model Higgs doublet. We consider three specified cases that carry most of the relevant features of the full parameter space: (i the neutral component of the real triplet dominates the dark matter particle, (ii the neutral component of the complex triplet dominates the dark matter particle; and (iii the neutral components of the real and complex triplets equally constitute the dark matter particle. Subject to the dark matter relic abundance and direct detection constraint, we perform a systematic study on the allowed parameter space with particular emphasis on the interplay among triplet-doublet terms and gauge interactions. In the presence of these mixed inert scalar triplets, some heavy Dirac fermions composed of inert fermion doublets can be utilized to generate a tiny Majorana neutrino mass term at one-loop level and realize a successful leptogenesis for explaining the cosmic baryon asymmetry.

  16. Some considerations about mixing, oscillation phenomena and CP violation of different mass eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malace, Simona; Lucaci-Timoce, Angela; Lazanu, I.

    2003-01-01

    In the last twenty years there have been made many experimental and theoretical efforts to measure and verify the prediction of the Standard Model, as well as to put in evidence small deviation from these values. In the present paper, we discuss some aspects of possible regularities of the formalism of mixing and oscillation phenomena of the mass eigenstates in particle physics and possible consequences of hidden proprieties of the systems. In the literature representations of lepton flavour mixing with different parametrisation are used for three generations of leptons and quarks. Although these are mathematically equivalent, only one of them are likely to describe the underlying physics in a more transparent way, and particularly convenient in the analysis of experimental data or is able to establish a concordance with these ones. Flavour permutational symmetry of the mixing matrix, 'maximal democracy' and maximal CP violation give a simple and efficient way to understand the essential characteristics of the phenomena, with a minimum number of parameters. The deviations of the experimental data of these predicted values represent a simple clue to study phenomenologically the breaking of symmetries. The interplay of gravitation and linear superposition of different mass eigenstates, and their consequences on the oscillation clocks, phases and the physical observability are also briefly discussed. (authors)

  17. Internal hydraulic control in the Little Belt, Denmark - observations of flow configurations and water mass formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtegaard Nielsen, Morten; Vang, Torben; Chresten Lund-Hansen, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Internal hydraulic control, which occurs when stratified water masses are forced through an abrupt constriction, plays an enormous role in nature on both large and regional scales with respect to dynamics, circulation, and water mass formation. Despite a growing literature on this subject surprisingly few direct observations have been made that conclusively show the existence of and the circumstances related to internal hydraulic control in nature. In this study we present observations from the Little Belt, Denmark, one of three narrow straits connecting the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. The observations (comprised primarily of along-strait, detailed transects of salinity and temperature; continuous observations of flow velocity, salinity, and temperature at a permanent station; and numerous vertical profiles of salinity, temperature, fluorescence, and flow velocity in various locations) show that internal hydraulic control is a frequently occurring phenomenon in the Little Belt. The observations, which are limited to south-going flows of approximately two-layered water masses, show that internal hydraulic control may take either of two configurations, i.e. the lower or the upper layer being the active, accelerating one. This is connected to the depth of the pycnocline on the upstream side and the topography, which is both deepening and contracting toward the narrow part of the Little Belt. The existence of two possible flow configurations is known from theoretical and laboratory studies, but we believe that this has never been observed in nature and reported before. The water masses formed by the intense mixing, which is tightly connected with the presence of control, may be found far downstream of the point of control. The observations show that these particular water masses are associated with chlorophyll concentrations that are considerably higher than in adjacent water masses, showing that control has a considerable influence on the primary production and

  18. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    -PJM tests and modeling being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and small-scale agitation tests and evaluations of effects waste and AFA ingredients have on gas retention and mass transfer being conducted at SRNL. Only work conducted at SRNL is reported here. Key results are: (1) The unexpected gas holdup behavior reported in 2006 for a small-scale agitation system is confirmed. The gas holdup data from small-scale and bench-scale impeller-type mixing systems reported herein show very different trends than the behavior exhibited by the prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system tested in the PNNL APEL facility. Results obtained from testing this 1/4-scale prototypic mixing system will be reported by PNNL. The reason for this difference in holdup behavior between the two different mixing systems is not known at this time. Consequently, data from the small mechanical agitation systems should not be extrapolated to prototypic plant conditions. (2) Bench-scale and small-scale tests conducted with Dow Corning 1520-US AFA show it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA will, however, require significantly higher dosage (concentration) to perform the same antifoam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA. The Gas holdup is similar whether or not noble metals are present in the AZ-101 simulant. (4) Mass transfer tests were performed in a large (0.76 m diameter) bubble column filled to 1.3, 3.4, and 7.4 m elevations with water and the AZ-101 waste simulant. Mass transfer coefficients for air bubbles emanating from a prototypic 0.051 m diameter sparger were obtained from the transient decay of dissolved oxygen concentration in the initially saturated fluids. Adding AFA to water reduces the mass transfer coefficient slightly. AFA addition reduces the mass transfer coefficient for AZ-101 simulant more than it does for water because the

  19. Thermodynamics of mixing of sodium naproxen and procaine hydrochloride in ethanol + water cosolvent mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Guerrero, Carolina Del Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamic functions Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of mixing of sodium naproxen and procaine hydrochloride were evaluated. Mixing quantities were calculated based on fusion calorimetric values obtained from differential scanning calorimetry measurements and equilibrium solubility values reported in the literature for both drugs in ethanol + water mixtures. By means of enthalpy-entropy compensation analysis, non-linear ΔH°mix vs. ΔG°mix plots were obtained which indicates different me...

  20. Asymptotic behavior of the mixed mass in Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability induced flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Cabot, William H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Thornber, Ben [The University of Sydney, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, New South Wales 2006, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Rayleigh–Taylor instability (RTI) and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) are serious practical issues in inertial confinement fusion research, and also have relevance to many cases of astrophysical fluid dynamics. So far, much of the attention has been paid to the late-time scaling of the mixed width, which is used as a surrogate to how well the fluids have been mixed. Yet, the actual amount of mixed mass could be viewed as a more direct indicator on the evolution of the mixing layers due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Despite its importance, there is no systematic study as yet on the scaling of the mixed mass for either the RTI or the RMI induced flow. In this article, the normalized mixed mass (Ψ) is introduced for measuring the efficiency of the mixed mass. Six large numerical simulation databases have been employed: the RTI cases with heavy-to-light fluid density ratios of 1.5, 3, and 9; the single shock RMI cases with density ratios of 3 and 20; and a reshock RMI case with density ratio of 3. Using simulated flow fields, the normalized mixed mass Ψ is shown to be more sensitive in discriminating the variation with Atwood number for the RTI flows. Moreover, Ψ is demonstrated to provide more consistent results for both the RTI and RMI flows when compared with the traditional mixedness parameters, Ξ and Θ.

  1. Evidence for a mixed mass composition at the ‘ankle’ in the cosmic-ray spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a first measurement for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays of the correlation between the depth of shower maximum and the signal in the water Cherenkov stations of air-showers registered simultaneously by the fluorescence and the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Such a correlation measurement is a unique feature of a hybrid air-shower observatory with sensitivity to both the electromagnetic and muonic components. It allows an accurate determination of the spread of primary masses in the cosmic-ray flux. Up till now, constraints on the spread of primary masses have been dominated by systematic uncertainties. The present correlation measurement is not affected by systematics in the measurement of the depth of shower maximum or the signal in the water Cherenkov stations. The analysis relies on general characteristics of air showers and is thus robust also with respect to uncertainties in hadronic event generators. The observed correlation in the energy range around the ‘ankle’ at lg⁡(E/eV=18.5–19.0 differs significantly from expectations for pure primary cosmic-ray compositions. A light composition made up of proton and helium only is equally inconsistent with observations. The data are explained well by a mixed composition including nuclei with mass A>4. Scenarios such as the proton dip model, with almost pure compositions, are thus disfavored as the sole explanation of the ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray flux at Earth. Keywords: Pierre Auger Observatory, Cosmic rays, Mass composition, Ankle

  2. Nanoscale study on water damage for different warm mix asphalt binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefei Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the water damage to different warm mix asphalt binders from the micro scale, five kinds of asphalt binders, 70#A base asphalt, sasobit warm mix asphalt, energy champion 120 °C (EC120 warm mix asphalt, aspha-min warm mix asphalt, sulfur-extended asphalt modifier (SEAM warm mix asphalt, under different conditions (dry/wet, original/aging are prepared for laboratory tests. The atomic force microscope (AFM is used to observe the surface properties and measure the adhesion force between the asphalt and the mineral aggregate. The obtained results show that under the dry condition aspha-min warm mix asphalt and SEAM warm mix asphalt show stronger adhesive ability with the mineral aggregate compared with other asphalt binders, but also have relatively large dispersion and fluctuation in the tested results; under the wet condition, aspha-min warm mix asphalt and SEAM warm mix asphalt show stronger water damage resistance ability. The EC120 warm mix asphalt and aspha-min warm mix asphalt are less sensitive to moist, and their corresponding adhesion force is less susceptible to the change of external moisture conditions, leading to a better ability to resist water erosion. The aging process significantly lowers the moisture erosion resistance ability, which further impairs the water damage resistance ability. The base asphalt is more sensitive to moisture and more vulnerable to water damage, no matter whether it is under original or aging conditions. The aging aspha-min warm mix asphalt has the least loss of adhesion force, the smallest dispersion of the tested adhesion force, the strongest water damage resistance ability, no matter it is dry or wet. Keywords: Road engineering, Warm mix asphalt, Moisture damage, Atomic force microscope, Microcosmic

  3. Fluidic oscillator-mediated microbubble generation to provide cost effective mass transfer and mixing efficiency to the wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Fahad; Medley, Gareth J D; Bandulasena, Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B J

    2015-02-01

    Aeration is one of the most energy intensive processes in the waste water treatment plants and any improvement in it is likely to enhance the overall efficiency of the overall process. In the current study, a fluidic oscillator has been used to produce microbubbles in the order of 100 μm in diameter by oscillating the inlet gas stream to a pair of membrane diffusers. Volumetric mass transfer coefficient was measured for steady state flow and oscillatory flow in the range of 40-100l/min. The highest improvement of 55% was observed at the flow rates of 60, 90 and 100l/min respectively. Standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were also calculated. Both standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were found to be considerably higher under oscillatory air flow conditions compared to steady state airflow. The bubble size distributions and bubble densities were measured using an acoustic bubble spectrometer and confirmed production of monodisperse bubbles with approximately 100 μm diameters with fluidic oscillation. The higher number density of microbubbles under oscillatory flow indicated the effect of the fluidic oscillation in microbubble production. Visual observations and dissolved oxygen measurements suggested that the bubble cloud generated by the fluidic oscillator was sufficient enough to provide good mixing and to maintain uniform aerobic conditions. Overall, improved mass transfer coefficients, mixing efficiency and energy efficiency of the novel microbubble generation method could offer significant savings to the water treatment plants as well as reduction in the carbon footprint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Large νμ-ντ mixing and the structure of right-handed Majorana mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masahisa

    1993-01-01

    Recent solar neutrino and atmospheric neutrino experiment suggest the existence of the large lepton mixing among 2nd and 3rd generation neutrino. This fact gives the important information on the structure of right-handed Majorana neutrino. It is shown that, if we assume that the neutrino Dirac mass matrix is similar to the mass matrix of the up-quark sector, the large lepton mixing among the 2nd and the 3rd generation requires the hierarchical structure of the Majorana mass matrix. This model-independent analyses serve the model-building of the mass matrices based on the quark-lepton unified theory. (author)

  5. Vector-like quarks at the origin of light quark masses and mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, Francisco J. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Burjassot (Spain); Branco, G.C.; Nebot, Miguel; Rebelo, M.N.; Silva-Marcos, J.I. [Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisbon (Portugal)

    2017-06-15

    We show how a novel fine-tuning problem present in the Standard Model can be solved through the introduction of a Z{sub 6} flavour symmetry, together with three Q = -1/3 quarks, three Q = 2/3 quarks, as well as a complex singlet scalar. The Z{sub 6} symmetry is extended to the additional fields and it is an exact symmetry of the Lagrangian, only softly broken in the scalar potential, in order to avoid the domain-wall problem. Specific examples are given and a phenomenological analysis of the main features of the model is presented. It is shown that even for vector-like quarks with masses accessible at the LHC, one can have realistic quark masses and mixing, while respecting the strict constraints on processes arising from flavour changing neutral currents. The vector-like quark decay channels are also described. (orig.)

  6. A Lagrangian parcel based mixing plane method for calculating water based mixed phase particle flows in turbo-machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2015-05-01

    A method for calculating particle transport through turbo-machinery using the mixing plane analogy was developed and used to analyze the energy efficient engine . This method allows the prediction of temperature and phase change of water based particles along their path and the impingement efficiency and particle impact property data on various components in the engine. This methodology was incorporated into the LEWICE3D V3.5 software. The method was used to predict particle transport in the low pressure compressor of the . The was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbo-machinery flow solver. Computations were performed for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20 and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of . The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.18. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22.6 %).

  7. Climatology and evolution of the mixing height over water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempreviva, A.M. [Istituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera, CNR, Rome (Italy); Grynig, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present results from an experimental investigation on the height of the mixed layer h, using a meteorological station located on the Danish island of Anholt. The station was operational for two years from September 1990 to October 1992. We present the analysis of two years of radio-sounding showing the average daily evolution of h. Furthermore observations of the mixed layer growth under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions during six consecutive days has been modelled using a simple zero-order mixed-layer height model. Finally we have compared the evolution of the mixing height from the model with the evolution of the correlation coefficient between temperature and humidity to study the influence of the deepness of the convective layer on the mechanism of the correlation between temperature and humidity in the surface layer. (au)

  8. Estimation of The Contribution of the Water Sources in The Mixed Waters; Karisim Sularinda Koekensel Katkilarin Belirlenmesi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurttas, T [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2002-07-01

    In many cases simple hydrogeochemical evaluations are sufficient to distinguish different source of the waters in the hydrogeological studies. In this study how hydrochemical data can be used to understand mixing mechanism is explained. Mixing ratios determined by using physically or chemically nonreactive component in hydrogeological studies. For mixing quantity calculations, quantity of the end members that cause to mixing, need to be known. Electrical conductivity is another parameter may be used when lack of hydrochemical data is present or more practical and fast solution is required. Isotope techniques are widely used to describe the hydrogeological conditions, where the conventional methods is not sufficient to understand. Since {sup 18}O ve D are conservative isotopes and do not effected by the hydrochemical processes in the aquifer, they are used to explain recharge quantities of the aquifer, determination of the recharge areas, groundwater-surface water relations, determination of mixing quantities and understanding of recharge-discharge relations in the fractured aquifers. By using stable isotope data, sources of the mixing portions, dissolution of salts, evaporation and isotopic enrichment or fresh water-salt water/fresh water- sea water mixing can be identified easily.

  9. Renormalization-group equations of neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2018-05-01

    We borrow the general idea of renormalization-group equations (RGEs) to understand how neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters evolve when neutrinos propagate in a medium, highlighting a meaningful possibility that the genuine flavor quantities in vacuum can be extrapolated from their matter-corrected counterparts to be measured in some realistic neutrino oscillation experiments. Taking the matter parameter a≡ 2√{2}{G}F{N}_eE to be an arbitrary scale-like variable with N e being the net electron number density and E being the neutrino beam energy, we derive a complete set of differential equations for the effective neutrino mixing matrix V and the effective neutrino masses {\\tilde{m}}_i (for i = 1 , 2 , 3). Given the standard parametrization of V , the RGEs for {{\\tilde{θ}}_{12}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{13}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{23}, \\tilde{δ}} in matter are formulated for the first time. We demonstrate some useful differential invariants which retain the same form from vacuum to matter, including the well-known Naumov and Toshev relations. The RGEs of the partial μ- τ asymmetries, the off-diagonal asymmetries and the sides of unitarity triangles of V are also obtained as a by-product.

  10. Neutrino masses and large mixings as a indirect signature of grand unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Grand unified theory (GUT) unifies not only three forces (electromagnetic force, strong force and weak force) but also quarks and leptons. As an experimental support for the unification of forces, it is well-known that three gauge couplings meet at a scale (the GUT scale). However, it is not so well-known that there is an experimental support even for the unification of matters (quarks and leptons). We explain the indirect support in this document and show that the important key is what the neutrino experiments have revealed for 20 years. Concretely, for the unification of matters in SU(5) GUT, various observed hierarchies of quark and lepton masses and mixings can be understood only from one assumption that '10 dimensional fields of SU(5) induce stronger hierarchy for the Yukawa couplings than 5-bar fields'. For this explanation, the knowledges on neutrino masses and mixings are critical. In the end, we comment E 6 unification in which the above assumption in the SU(5) GUT can be induced. (author)

  11. Discovery of Three Pulsating, Mixed-atmosphere, Extremely Low-mass White Dwarf Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianninas, A.; Curd, Brandon; Fontaine, G.; Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in three mixed-atmosphere, extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD, M ≤slant 0.3 M ⊙) precursors. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in both ELM and pre-ELM WDs, we targeted pre-ELM WDs with mixed H/He atmospheres with high-speed photometry. We find significant optical variability in all three observed targets with periods in the range 320-590 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical predictions of p-mode pulsations in mixed-atmosphere ≈0.18 M ⊙ He-core pre-ELM WDs. This represents the first empirical evidence that pulsations in pre-ELM WDs can only occur if a significant amount of He is present in the atmosphere. Future, more extensive, timeseries photometry of the brightest of the three new pulsators offers an excellent opportunity to constrain the thickness of the surface H layer, which regulates the cooling timescales for ELM WDs. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  12. CFD analysis of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in single channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Xie Hongyan; Yu Tao

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wane in supercritical water reactor is investigated with CFX. The mixing vane elevation influenced on temperature distribution and flow field are simulated in the model. The results showed the mixing vane cause fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improve the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45, 50, 60 and 70 angle, the 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  13. A laboratory investigation of mixing dynamics between biofuels and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiang; Cotel, Aline

    2017-11-01

    Recently, production and usage of ethanol-blend fuels or biofuels have increased dramatically along with increasing risk of spilling into surface waters. Lack of understanding of the environmental impacts and absence of standard clean-up procedures make it crucial to study the mixing behavior between biofuels and water. Biofuels are represented by a solution of ethanol and glycol. A Plexiglas tank in conjunction with a wave generator is used to simulate the mixing of surface waters and biofuels under different natural conditions. In our previous experiments, two distinct mixing regimes were observed. One regime was driven by turbulence and the other by interfacial instabilities. However, under more realistic situations, without wind driven waves, only the first mixing regime was found. After one minute of rapid turbulent mixing, biofuels and water were fully mixed and no interface was formed. During the mixing process, chemical reactions happened simultaneously and influenced mixing dynamics. Current experiments are investigating the effect of waves on the mixing dynamics. Support from NSF CBET 1335878.

  14. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  15. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sioud, Salim

    2012-05-04

    RATIONALE To enhance the ionization efficiencies in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry a dopant with favorable ionization energy such as chlorobenzene is typically used. These dopants are typically toxic and difficult to mix with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. METHODS A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was developed and optimized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Various single and multicomponent mixed dopants consisting of ethanol, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, anisole and toluene were evaluated. RESULTS Fourteen out of eighteen PAHs were successfully separated and detected at low pg/μL levels within 5 min with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. The optimal mixed multicomponent dopant consisted of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v %) and it improved the limit of detection (LOD) by 2- to 10-fold for the tested PAHs compared to those obtained with pure chlorobenzene. CONCLUSIONS A novel multicomponent dopant that contains 99% ethanol and 1% mixture of chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and anisole was found to be an effective dopant mixture to ionize PAHs. The developed UPLC multicomponent dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry offered a rapid non targeted screening method for detecting the PAHs at low pg/;μL levels within a 5 min run time with high mass accuracy a;circ4 ppm. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Characterization of Athabasca lean oil sands and mixed surficial materials: Comparison of capillary electrophoresis/low-resolution mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Matthew S; Peru, Kerry M; Swyngedouw, Chris; Fleming, Ian; Chen, David D Y; Headley, John V

    2018-05-15

    Oil sands mining in Alberta, Canada, requires removal and stockpiling of considerable volumes of near-surface overburden material. This overburden includes lean oil sands (LOS) which cannot be processed economically but contain sparingly soluble petroleum hydrocarbons and naphthenic acids, which can leach into environmental waters. In order to measure and track the leaching of dissolved constituents and distinguish industrially derived organics from naturally occurring organics in local waters, practical methods were developed for characterizing multiple sources of contaminated water leakage. Capillary electrophoresis/positive-ion electrospray ionization low-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE/LRMS), high-resolution negative-ion electrospray ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS) and conventional gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) were used to characterize porewater samples collected from within Athabasca LOS and mixed surficial materials. GC/FID was used to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon and HRMS was used to measure total naphthenic acid fraction components (NAFCs). HRMS and CE/LRMS were used to characterize samples according to source. The amounts of total petroleum hydrocarbon in each sample as measured by GC/FID ranged from 0.1 to 15.1 mg/L while the amounts of NAFCs as measured by HRMS ranged from 5.3 to 82.3 mg/L. Factors analysis (FA) on HRMS data visually demonstrated clustering according to sample source and was correlated to molecular formula. LRMS coupled to capillary electrophoresis separation (CE/LRMS) provides important information on NAFC isomers by adding analyte migration time data to m/z and peak intensity. Differences in measured amounts of total petroleum hydrocarbons by GC/FID and NAFCs by HRMS indicate that the two methods provide complementary information about the nature of dissolved organic species in a soil or water leachate samples. NAFC molecule class O x S y is a possible tracer for LOS

  17. Robust automated mass spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation using mixed integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Richard; Northen, Trent R

    2013-10-15

    Untargeted metabolite profiling using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled via electrospray ionization is a powerful tool for the discovery of novel natural products, metabolic capabilities, and biomarkers. However, the elucidation of the identities of uncharacterized metabolites from spectral features remains challenging. A critical step in the metabolite identification workflow is the assignment of redundant spectral features (adducts, fragments, multimers) and calculation of the underlying chemical formula. Inspection of the data by experts using computational tools solving partial problems (e.g., chemical formula calculation for individual ions) can be performed to disambiguate alternative solutions and provide reliable results. However, manual curation is tedious and not readily scalable or standardized. Here we describe an automated procedure for the robust automated mass spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation using mixed integer linear programming optimization (RAMSI). Chemical rules among related ions are expressed as linear constraints and both the spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation are performed in a single optimization step. This approach is unbiased in that it does not require predefined sets of neutral losses and positive and negative polarity spectra can be combined in a single optimization. The procedure was evaluated with 30 experimental mass spectra and was found to effectively identify the protonated or deprotonated molecule ([M + H](+) or [M - H](-)) while being robust to the presence of background ions. RAMSI provides a much-needed standardized tool for interpreting ions for subsequent identification in untargeted metabolomics workflows.

  18. Validation of effective momentum and heat flux models for stratification and mixing in a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    The pressure suppression pool is the most important feature of the pressure suppression system in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) that acts primarily as a passive heat sink during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or when the reactor is isolated from the main heat sink. The steam injection into the pool through the blowdown pipes can lead to short term dynamic phenomena and long term thermal transient in the pool. The development of thermal stratification or mixing in the pool is a transient phenomenon that can influence the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Different condensation regimes depending on the pool's bulk temperature and steam flow rates determine the onset of thermal stratification or erosion of stratified layers. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (i) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (ii) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale

  19. Water treatment technologies for a mixed waste remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, C; Freeman, G [Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., St. Charles, MO (United States); Ballew, B [Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Dames and Moore, St. Charles, MO (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Water treatment is an important element of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), which is cleaning up a former uranium processing plant near St. Louis, Missouri. This project, under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), includes treatment and release of contaminated surface water and possibly groundwater at the plant site and a nearby quarry, which was once used for waste disposal. The contaminants include uranium, thorium, radium, nitroaromatics, nitrates, and metals. Three water treatment plants will be used to treat contaminated water prior to its release to the Missouri River. The first, construction of which is nearly complete, will treat contaminated surface water and interstitial water in and around the quarry. A stepwise process of sedimentation, clarification, filtration, adsorption, and ion exchange will be used to remove the contaminants. A similar sequence will be used for the first train of the water treatment plant at the plant site, although process details have been adjusted to address the different contaminant concentrations. The site water treatment plant will also have a second train consisting of a vapor compression/ distillation (VCD) system. Train 2 is necessary to treat waters primarily from four raffinate pits containing high concentrations of inorganics (e.g., nitrates, sulfates, and chlorides) in addition to radionuclides, nitroaromatics, and metals contamination that are common in most of the waters at the site. Construction is under way on the First train of this facility. After it is treated, all water will be impounded and batch tested for compliance with the project's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits prior to release to the Missouri River. The third water treatment plant is a mobile system that will be used to treat waters in some of the building sumps. (author)

  20. Water treatment technologies for a mixed waste remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, C.; Freeman, G.; Ballew, B.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment is an important element of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), which is cleaning up a former uranium processing plant near St. Louis, Missouri. This project, under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), includes treatment and release of contaminated surface water and possibly groundwater at the plant site and a nearby quarry, which was once used for waste disposal. The contaminants include uranium, thorium, radium, nitroaromatics, nitrates, and metals. Three water treatment plants will be used to treat contaminated water prior to its release to the Missouri River. The first, construction of which is nearly complete, will treat contaminated surface water and interstitial water in and around the quarry. A stepwise process of sedimentation, clarification, filtration, adsorption, and ion exchange will be used to remove the contaminants. A similar sequence will be used for the first train of the water treatment plant at the plant site, although process details have been adjusted to address the different contaminant concentrations. The site water treatment plant will also have a second train consisting of a vapor compression/ distillation (VCD) system. Train 2 is necessary to treat waters primarily from four raffinate pits containing high concentrations of inorganics (e.g., nitrates, sulfates, and chlorides) in addition to radionuclides, nitroaromatics, and metals contamination that are common in most of the waters at the site. Construction is under way on the First train of this facility. After it is treated, all water will be impounded and batch tested for compliance with the project's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits prior to release to the Missouri River. The third water treatment plant is a mobile system that will be used to treat waters in some of the building sumps. (author)

  1. Lepton mixing matrix element U13 and new assignments of universal texture for quark and lepton mass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    We reanalyze the mass matrix model of quarks and leptons that gives a unified description of quark and lepton mass matrices with the same texture form. By investigating possible types of assignment for the texture components of the lepton mass matrix, we find that a different assignment for neutrinos than for charged leptons can also lead to consistent values of the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata-Pontecorv (MNSP) lepton mixing matrix. We also find that the predicted value for the lepton mixing matrix element U 13 of the model depends on the assignment. A proper assignment will be discriminated by future experimental data for U 13

  2. Disappearance of a detached vapor mass in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Shigeaki; Miyasaka, Yoshiki; Izumi, Ryotaro.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on pool transition boiling of water under atmospheric pressure on a heated surface 10 mm in diameter were conducted for subcooling 15 - 50 K. The mass flux of condensation of a detached coalescent vapor bubble was experimentally estimated by a mathematical model based on the mass transfer mechanism of condensation. As a result, it is clarified that the mass flux of condensation of the detached bubble was influenced by the initial growing velocity of a vapor bubble immediately following the detached bubble. The disappearance velocity of the detached bubble defined as a ratio of the bubble diameter at the departure to the time required until the disappearance, is in the range 0.2 to 2.0 m/sec. The disappearance velocity is proportional to the initial growing velocity of the bubble, to the square of the heat flux of the heated surface and to the cube of the wall superheat, separately. (author)

  3. Nuclear equipment to determine soil and water mass attenuation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchi, O.L.A.D.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of substituting the monochannel gamma spectrometer, traditionally used in the gamma ray attenuation technique, for a less sophisticated and less expensive system of integral counting is studied. The proposed system can be operated by a non-specialized person. Three detection systems were used in the determination of the mass attenuation coefficients for different types of soil and for water. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  5. Discrete conservation properties for shallow water flows using mixed mimetic spectral elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, D.; Palha, A.; Gerritsma, M.

    2018-01-01

    A mixed mimetic spectral element method is applied to solve the rotating shallow water equations. The mixed method uses the recently developed spectral element histopolation functions, which exactly satisfy the fundamental theorem of calculus with respect to the standard Lagrange basis functions in

  6. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  7. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Pt. 1. Feasibility of closed analytical solutions and simulation of the mixing with CFX-4. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Rohde, U.

    2001-10-01

    The project was aimed at the analytical and numerical simulation of coolant mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWRs. Generally, the coolant mixing is of relevance for two classes of accident scenarios - boron dilution and cold water transients. For the investigation of the relevant mixing phenomena, the Rossendorf test facility ROCOM has been designed. ROCOM is a 1:5 scaled Plexiglas trademark model of the PWR Konvoi allowing velocity measurements by the LDA technique. Design and construction of the ROCOM facility including the measurement equipment were performed in a second part of the project. For the design of the facility, CFD calculations were performed to analyze the scaling of the model. It was found, that the scaling of 1:5 to the prototype meets both: physical and economical demands. A theoretical 2D-model of the downcomer flow was developed based on the potential theory. The coolant inlet is represented by mass sources. Potential vortices were superposed to describe large scale recirculations. However, the method requires an a-priory knowledge of the location and intensity of the vorticity sources. Therefore, the main goal of the project was the numerical simulation of the coolant mixing of different PWRs. The temperature and boron concentration fields established by the coolant mixing during nominal and transient flow conditions in the pressure vessel of the PWR Konvoi and the Russian type WWER-440 were investigated. The calculations were carried out with the CFD-code CFX 4. The results of the CFD calculation are found in the final report. The report is based on the Ph.D. work of T. Hoehne. (orig.) [de

  8. Crystal Nucleation and Crystal Growth and Mass Transfer in Internally Mixed Sucrose/NaNO3 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhi-Ru; Zhang, Yun; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2017-10-19

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can exist in a glassy or semisolid state under low relative humidity (RH) conditions, in which the particles show nonequilibrium kinetic characteristics with changing ambient RH. Here, we selected internally mixed sucrose/NaNO 3 droplets with organic to inorganic molar ratios (OIRs) of 1:8, 1:4, 1:2, and 1:1 as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosols to study crystal nucleation and growth processes and water transport under a highly viscous state with the combination of an RH-controlling system and a vacuum Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The initial efflorescence RH (ERH) of NaNO 3 decreased from ∼45% for pure NaNO 3 droplets to ∼38.6 and ∼37.9% for the 1:8 and 1:4 sucrose/NaNO 3 droplets, respectively, while no crystallization of NaNO 3 occurred for the 1:2 and 1:1 droplets in the whole RH range. Thus, the addition of sucrose delayed the ERH and even completely inhibited nucleation of NaNO 3 in the mixed droplets. In addition, the crystal growth of NaNO 3 was suppressed in the 1:4 and 1:8 droplets most likely due to the slow diffusion of Na + and NO 3 - ions at low RH. Water uptake/release of sucrose/NaNO 3 particles quickly arrived at equilibrium at high RH, while the hygroscopic process was kinetically controlled under low RH. The half-time ratio between the liquid water content and the RH was used to describe the mass transfer behavior. For the 1:1 droplets, no mass limitation was observed with the ratio approaching to 1 when the RH was higher than 53%. The ratio increased 1 order of magnitude under an ultraviscous state with RH ranging from 53 to 15% and increased a further 1 order of magnitude at RH < 15% under a glassy state.

  9. Sneutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Y.

    1997-10-01

    In supersymmetric models with nonvanishing Majorana neutrino masses, the sneutrino and antisneutrino mix. The conditions under which this mixing is experimentally observable are studied, and mass-splitting of the sneutrino mass eigenstates and sneutrino oscillation phenomena are analyzed

  10. Mixing height and mass balance of SO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere above Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, J.A.; Branson, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the SO/sub 2/ concentration at heights ranging from 150 to 1200 m were made at Cardington, Bedfordshire, using lightweight samplers carried on the cable of the tethered balloon. A value of 1200 m for the mean mixing height for SO/sub 2/ was deduced from the measurements. This value indicates that dry deposition limits the mean lifetime of SO/sub 2/ to about 2 days. The results of the national survey of air pollution were used to derive an area-mean concentration of 36 micrograms/m3 for SO/sub 2/ over Great Britain (excluding the north of Scotland, West Wales and the South West Peninsula) and this result is used in a discussion of the mass balance of atmospheric sulphur over this area.

  11. A tale of two timescales: Mixing, mass generation, and phase transitions in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kost, Jeff; Thomas, Brooks

    2016-02-01

    Light scalar fields such as axions and string moduli can play an important role in early-universe cosmology. However, many factors can significantly impact their late-time cosmological abundances. For example, in cases where the potentials for these fields are generated dynamically—such as during cosmological mass-generating phase transitions—the duration of the time interval required for these potentials to fully develop can have significant repercussions. Likewise, in scenarios with multiple scalars, mixing amongst the fields can also give rise to an effective timescale that modifies the resulting late-time abundances. Previous studies have focused on the effects of either the first or the second timescale in isolation. In this paper, by contrast, we examine the new features that arise from the interplay between these two timescales when both mixing and time-dependent phase transitions are introduced together. First, we find that the effects of these timescales can conspire to alter not only the total late-time abundance of the system—often by many orders of magnitude—but also its distribution across the different fields. Second, we find that these effects can produce large parametric resonances which render the energy densities of the fields highly sensitive to the degree of mixing as well as the duration of the time interval over which the phase transition unfolds. Finally, we find that these effects can even give rise to a "reoverdamping" phenomenon which causes the total energy density of the system to behave in novel ways that differ from those exhibited by pure dark matter or vacuum energy. All of these features therefore give rise to new possibilities for early-universe phenomenology and cosmological evolution. They also highlight the importance of taking into account the time dependence associated with phase transitions in cosmological settings.

  12. Study of polluted water mixing on sediment of Lahore canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asim, M.

    2016-01-01

    People living in societies along the canals which pass through the urban areas, are adding domestic and industrial waste water and wastes into them like Lahore canal. This untreated industrial and municipal waste and contaminated water may become a risk to irrigation water quality and sediment moving in it in the form of suspended load. The results disclose that as suspended sediment concentration increases the pH value drops. Consequently it can be established from results that they are inversely related to each other but this behaviour is generally due to effect of rain water runoff. The suspended sediment content was at its highest during monsoon season. Similarly pH values varied considerably from limit of 6.5-8.4. Other water quality chemical parameters did not stray from their recommended limits. The dumping of waste water from pipes did not have any major effect on the water quality of the canal due to its less percentage to the total canal discharge. (author)

  13. Water masses transform at mid-depths over the Antarctic Continental Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead Silvester, Jess; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Polton, Jeffrey; Phillips, Helen E.; Morales Maqueda, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) controls the oceans' latitudinal heat distribution, helping to regulate the Earth's climate. The Southern Ocean is the primary place where cool, deep waters return to the surface to complete this global circulation. While water mass transformations intrinsic to this process predominantly take place at the surface following upwelling, recent studies implicate vertical mixing in allowing transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. We deployed an EM-Apex float near Elephant Island, north of the Antarctic Peninsula's tip, to profile along the slope and use potential vorticity to diagnose observed instabilities. The float captures direct heat exchange between a lens of Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and surrounding Lower Circumpolar Deep Waters (LCDW) at mid-depths and over the course of several days. Heat fluxes peak across the top and bottom boundaries of the UCDW lens and peak diffusivities across the bottom boundary are associated with shear instability. Estimates of diffusivity from shear-strain finestructure parameterisation and heat fluxes are found to be in reasonable agreement. The two-dimensional Ertel potential vorticity is elevated both inside the UCDW lens and along its bottom boundary, with a strong contribution from the shear term in these regions and instabilities are associated with gravitational and symmetric forcing. Thus, shear instabilities are driving turbulent mixing across the lower boundary between these two water masses, leading to the observed heat exchange and transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. This has implications for our understanding of the rates of upwelling and ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and carbon at this critical location.

  14. Surface water management at a mixed waste remediation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlotzhauer, D.S.; Warbritton, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) deals with chemical and radiological contaminants. MK-Ferguson Company is managing the project under contract with the US Department of Energy. Remedial activities include demolishing buildings, constructing material storage and staging areas, excavating and consolidating waste materials, and treating and disposing of the materials in a land disposal facility. Due to the excavation and construction required during remediation, a well-planned surface water management system is essential. Planning involves characterization of source areas and surface water transport mechanisms and identification of applicable regulations. System components include: erosion control sediment control, flow attenuation, and management of contaminated water. Combinations of these components may be utilized during actual construction and remediation to obtain optimum control. Monitoring is performed during implementation in order to assess the effectiveness of control measures. This management scheme provides for comprehensive management of surface water at this site by providing control and/or treatment to appropriate standards. Although some treatment methodologies for contaminated water are specific to site contaminants, this comprehensive program provides a management approach which is applicable to many remedial projects in order to minimize contaminant release and meet Clean Water Act requirements

  15. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S.; Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding

  16. Mixed reverse micelles facilitated downstream processing of lipase involving water-oil-water liquid emulsion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowal, Saibal; Priyanka, B S; Rastogi, Navin K

    2014-01-01

    Our earlier work for the first time demonstrated that liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) containing reverse micelles could be successfully used for the downstream processing of lipase from Aspergillus niger. In the present work, we have attempted to increase the extraction and purification fold of lipase by using mixed reverse micelles (MRM) consisting of cationic and nonionic surfactants in LEM. It was basically prepared by addition of the internal aqueous phase solution to the organic phase followed by the redispersion of the emulsion in the feed phase containing enzyme, which resulted in globules of water-oil-water (WOW) emulsion for the extraction of lipase. The optimum conditions for maximum lipase recovery (100%) and purification fold (17.0-fold) were CTAB concentration 0.075 M, Tween 80 concentration 0.012 M, at stirring speed of 500 rpm, contact time 15 min, internal aqueous phase pH 7, feed pH 9, KCl concentration 1 M, NaCl concentration 0.1 M, and ratio of membrane emulsion to feed volume 1:1. Incorporation of the nonionic surfactant (e.g., Tween 80) resulted in remarkable improvement in the purification fold (3.1-17.0) of the lipase. LEM containing a mixture of nonionic and cationic surfactants can be successfully used for the enhancement in the activity recovery and purification fold during downstream processing of enzymes/proteins. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Three-Dimensional Effects of Artificial Mixing in a Shallow Drinking-Water Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengyang; Little, John C.; Carey, Cayelan C.; McClure, Ryan P.; Lofton, Mary E.; Lei, Chengwang

    2018-01-01

    Studies that examine the effects of artificial mixing for water-quality mitigation in lakes and reservoirs often view a water column with a one-dimensional (1-D) perspective (e.g., homogenized epilimnetic and hypolimnetic layers). Artificial mixing in natural water bodies, however, is inherently three dimensional (3-D). Using a 3-D approach experimentally and numerically, the present study visualizes thermal structure and analyzes constituent transport under the influence of artificial mixing in a shallow drinking-water reservoir. The purpose is to improve the understanding of artificial mixing, which may help to better design and operate mixing systems. In this reservoir, a side-stream supersaturation (SSS) hypolimnetic oxygenation system and an epilimnetic bubble-plume mixing (EM) system were concurrently deployed in the deep region. The present study found that, while the mixing induced by the SSS system does not have a distinct 3-D effect on the thermal structure, epilimnetic mixing by the EM system causes 3-D heterogeneity. In the experiments, epilimnetic mixing deepened the lower metalimnetic boundary near the diffuser by about 1 m, with 55% reduction of the deepening rate at 120 m upstream of the diffuser. In a tracer study using a 3-D hydrodynamic model, the operational flow rate of the EM system is found to be an important short-term driver of constituent transport in the reservoir, whereas the duration of the EM system operation is the dominant long-term driver. The results suggest that artificial mixing substantially alters both 3-D thermal structure and constituent transport, and thus needs to be taken into account for reservoir management.

  18. Operation and Licensing of Mixed Cores in Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear fuel is a highly complex material that is subject to continuous development and is produced by a range of manufacturers. During operation of a nuclear power plant, the nuclear fuel is subject to extreme conditions of temperature, corroding environment and irradiation, and many different designs of fuel have been manufactured with differing fuel materials, cladding materials and assembly structure to ensure these conditions. The core of an operating power plant can contain hundreds of fuel assemblies, and where there is more than a single design of a fuel assembly in the core, whether through a change of fuel vendor, introduction of an improved design or for some other reason, the core is described as a mixed core. The task of ensuring that the different assembly types do not interact in a harmful manner, causing, for example, differing flow resistance resulting in under cooling, is an important part of ensuring nuclear safety. This report has compiled the latest information on the operational experience of mixed cores and the tools and techniques that are used to analyse the core operation and demonstrate that there are no safety related problems with its operation. This publication is a result of a technical meeting in 2011 and a series of consultants meetings

  19. Mechanisms of flow and water mass variability in Denmark Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Martin; Jochumsen, Kerstin; Quadfasel, Detlef; Mashayekh Poul, Hossein; Käse, Rolf H.

    2017-04-01

    The dense water export through Denmark Strait contributes significantly to the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Overflow water is transported southwestward not only in the deep channel of the Strait, but also within a thin bottom layer on the Greenland shelf. The flow on the shelf is mainly weak and barotropic, exhibiting many recirculations, but may eventually contribute to the overflow layer in the Irminger Basin by spilling events in the northern Irminger Basin. Especially the circulation around Dohrn Bank and the Kangerdlussuaq Trough contribute to the shelf-basin exchange. Moored observations show the overflow in Denmark Strait to be stable during the last 20 years (1996-2016). Nevertheless, flow variability was noticed on time scales of eddies and beyond, i.e. on weekly and interannual scales. Here, we use a combination of mooring data and shipboard hydrographic and current data to address the dominant modes of variability in the overflow, which are (i) eddies, (ii) barotropic pulsations of the plume, (iii) lateral shifts of the plume core position, and (iv) variations in vertical extension, i.e. varying overflow thickness. A principle component analysis is carried out and related to variations in sea surface height and wind stress, derived from satellite measurements. Furthermore, a test for topographic waves is performed. Shelf contributions to the overflow core in the Irminger Basin are identified from measurements of temperature and salinity, as well as velocity, which were obtained during recent cruises in the region. The flow and water mass pattern obtained from the observational data is compared to simulations in a high resolution regional model (ROMS), where tracer release experiments and float deployments were carried out. The modelling results allow a separation between different atmospheric forcing modes (NAO+ vs NAO- situations), which impact the water mass distribution and alter the dense water pathways on the

  20. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  1. Fingerprinting North Atlantic water masses near Iceland using Nd-isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Norbert [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, INF229, Heidelberg (Germany); Waldner, Astrid [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Montagna, Paolo [CNR - ISMAR, Bologna (Italy); Colin, Christophe [IDES, Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Wu, Qiong [State Key Laboratory, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-01

    The radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio of seawater is a valuable tracer of north Atlantic circulation pathways, driven by continental runoff (freshwater and Aeolian dust), boundary exchange and advection and thus mixing patterns. A region of particular interest in the North Atlantic is the overflow across the Iceland-Scotland Ridge injecting water from the Arctic Ocean into the Iceland basin (Iceland Scotland Overflow Water). However, Iceland itself constitutes a local source for Nd due to possible leaching of young volcanic basalts adding radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd to seawater. We have conducted an intense survey of physical properties and Nd-isotope composition between Iceland and the Azores that allows to fingerprint different water masses of the North Atlantic through the {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio and that demonstrates the very local influence of volcanic material to the seawater Nd cycle. A first local transect is achieved from the open ocean to the outflow of the Vatnajoekull glacier. Runoff influences seawater Nd in close vicinity (< 40 km near the outflow). A along shelf transect provide a similar observation. From Iceland to the Azores, however, water masses of the sub-tropical and sub-polar gyre are clearly distinguishable.

  2. Experimentally obtainable energy from mixing river water, seawater or brines with reverse electrodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniilidis, Alexander; Vermaas, David; Herber, Rien; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    2014-01-01

    Energy is released when feed waters with different salinity mix. This energy can be captured in reverse electrodialysis (RED). This paper examines experimentally the effect of varying feed water concentrations on a RED system in terms of permselectivity of the membrane, energy efficiency, power

  3. Experimentally obtainable energy from mixing river water, seawater or brines with reverse electrodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniilidis, Alexandros; Vermaas, David A.; Herber, Rien; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    Energy is released when feed waters with different salinity mix. This energy can be captured in reverse electrodialysis (RED). This paper examines experimentally the effect of varying feed water concentrations on a RED system in terms of permselectivity of the membrane, energy efficiency, power

  4. 1.3. Chemical and mineral additives of concretes and water used for concrete mix preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that chemical and mineral additives increase physicochemical properties of concretes, thus, chemical and mineral additives, including super plasticizer and organo mineral additives are examined in this work. It was noted that along with salt water fresh water can also be used for concrete mix preparation.

  5. Bilarge neutrino mixing and mass of the lightest neutrino from third generation dominance in a democratic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermisek, Radovan

    2004-01-01

    We show that both small mixing in the quark sector and large mixing in the lepton sector can be obtained from a simple assumption of universality of Yukawa couplings and the right-handed neutrino Majorana mass matrix in leading order. We discuss conditions under which bilarge mixing in the lepton sector is achieved with a minimal amount of fine-tuning requirements for possible models. From knowledge of the solar and atmospheric mixing angles we determine the allowed values of sin θ 13 . If embedded into grand unified theories, the third generation Yukawa coupling unification is a generic feature while masses of the first two generations of charged fermions depend on small perturbations. In the neutrino sector, the heavier two neutrinos are model dependent, while the mass of the lightest neutrino in this approach does not depend on perturbations in the leading order. The right-handed neutrino mass scale can be identified with the GUT scale in which case the mass of the lightest neutrino is given as (m top 2 /M GUT )sin 2 θ 23 sin 2 θ 12 in the limit sin θ 13 ≅0. Discussing symmetries we make a connection with hierarchical models and show that the basis independent characteristic of this scenario is a strong dominance of the third generation right-handed neutrino, M 1 ,M 2 -4 M 3 , M 3 =M GUT

  6. Mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Masabumi; Kamimae, Kozo

    2005-01-01

    It is anticipated that a certain amount of tritiated water exists in the atmosphere of tritium handling facilities, and it is recognized that the hazardous potential of tritiated water is rather high. Then, it is important to grasp the behavior of tritiated water for preserving of the radiation safety. The mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface was discussed in this study. The evaporation rate of water and the condensation rate of water were experimentally examined from measurement of change of the weight of distilled water. The tritium transfer rate from the tritiated water in air to the distilled water was also experimentally examined by using a liquid scintillation counter. Experimental results about change of tritium level in a small beaker placed in the atmosphere with tritiated water showed that diffusion of tritium in water and gas flow in the atmosphere gives considerable effect on tritium transfer. The estimation method of the tritium transfer made in this study was applied to explain the data at The Japan Atomic Power Company second power station at Tsuruga and good agreement was obtained. (author)

  7. Forage mass and the nutritive value of pastures mixed with forage peanut and red clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Lima de Azevedo Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to estimate three pasture-based systems mixed with elephantgrass + spontaneous growth species, annual ryegrass, for pasture-based system 1; elephantgrass + spontaneous growth species + forage peanut, for pasture-based system 2; and elephantgrass + spontaneous growth species + annual ryegrass + red clover, for pasture-based system 3. Elephantgrass was planted in rows 4 m apart from each other. During the cool-season, annual ryegrass was sown in the alleys between the rows of elephantgrass; forage peanut and red clover were sown in the alleys between the elephantgrass according to the respective treatment. The experimental design was totally randomized in the three treatments (pasture-based systems, two replicates (paddocks in completely split-plot time (grazing cycles. Holstein cows receiving 5.5 kg-daily complementary concentrate feed were used in the evaluation. Pre-grazing forage mass, botanical composition and stocking rate were evaluated. Samples of simulated grazing were collected to analyze organic matter (OM, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, crude protein (CP and organic matter in situ digestibility (OMISD. Nine grazing cycles were performed during the experimental period (341 days. The average dry matter values for pre-grazing and stocking rate were 3.34; 3.46; 3.79 t/ha, and 3.28; 3.34; 3.60 AU/ha for each respective pasture-based system. Similar results were observed between the pasture-based systems for OM, NDF, CP and OMISD. Considering forage mass, stocking rate and nutritive value, the pasture-based system intercropped with forage legumes presented better performance.

  8. Assessment of Southern Ocean water mass circulation and characteristics in CMIP5 models: Historical bias and forcing response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallée, J.-B.; Shuckburgh, E.; Bruneau, N.; Meijers, A. J. S.; Bracegirdle, T. J.; Wang, Z.; Roy, T.

    2013-04-01

    The ability of the models contributing to the fifth Coupled Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to represent the Southern Ocean hydrological properties and its overturning is investigated in a water mass framework. Models have a consistent warm and light bias spread over the entire water column. The greatest bias occurs in the ventilated layers, which are volumetrically dominated by mode and intermediate layers. The ventilated layers have been observed to have a strong fingerprint of climate change and to impact climate by sequestrating a significant amount of heat and carbon dioxide. The mode water layer is poorly represented in the models and both mode and intermediate water have a significant fresh bias. Under increased radiative forcing, models simulate a warming and lightening of the entire water column, which is again greatest in the ventilated layers, highlighting the importance of these layers for propagating the climate signal into the deep ocean. While the intensity of the water mass overturning is relatively consistent between models, when compared to observation-based reconstructions, they exhibit a slightly larger rate of overturning at shallow to intermediate depths, and a slower rate of overturning deeper in the water column. Under increased radiative forcing, atmospheric fluxes increase the rate of simulated upper cell overturning, but this increase is counterbalanced by diapycnal fluxes, including mixed-layer horizontal mixing, and mostly vanishes.

  9. Variation of the solvation number of Eu(III) in mixed system of methanol and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganuma, H.; Arisaka, M.; Omori, T.; Satoh, I.; Choppin, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants (β 1 ) of the monofluoride complex of Eu(III) have been determined in mixed solvents of methanol and water at a 0.10 M ionic strength using a solvent extraction technique. The values of ln β 1 increase as the mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent system increases. The variation in the stability constants can be correlated with both the large effect due to the solvation of F and the small effect due to both (1) the solvation of cations in connection with complexation and (2) the electrostatic attraction between Eu 3+ and F - . Based on the variation in the sum of (1) and (2) in water and the mixed solvent solutions, it was determined that the coordination number (CN) of Eu(III) varied from a mixture of CN = 9 and 8 to CN = 8 at about a 0.03 mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent. (orig.)

  10. Tracers confirm downward mixing of Tyrrhenian Sea upper waters associated with the Eastern Mediterranean Transient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Roether

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of tritium and 3He in the Tyrrhenian Sea, 1987–2009, confirm the enhanced vertical mixing of intermediate waters into the deep waters that has been noted and associated with the Eastern Mediterranean Transient in previous studies. Our evidence for the mixing rests on increasing tracer concentrations in the Tyrrhenian deep waters, accompanied by decreases in the upper waters, which are supplied from the Eastern Mediterranean. The downward transfer is particularly evident between 1987 and 1997. Later on, information partly rests on increasing tritium-3He ages; here we correct the observed 3He for contributions released from the ocean floor. The Tyrrhenian tracer distributions are fully compatible with data upstream of the Sicily Strait and in the Western Mediterranean. The tracer data show that mixing reached to the bottom and confirm a cyclonic nature of the deep water circulation in the Tyrrhenian. They furthermore indicate that horizontal homogenization of the deep waters occurs on a time scale of roughly 5 years. Various features point to a reduced impact of Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW in the Tyrrhenian during the enhanced-mixing period. This is an important finding because it implies less upward mixing of WMDW, which has been named a major process to enable the WMDW to leave the Mediterranean via the Gibraltar Strait. On the other hand, the TDW outflow for several years represented a major influx of enhanced salinity and density waters into the deep-water range of the Western Mediterranean.

  11. Speciation of cadmium mixed ligand complexes in salt water lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Kituyi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam voltammetry has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 at 23 oC at concentration levels of genuine lake water. The hanging drop amalgam electrode was prepared in situ before exchanging the medium for the sample solution. Half-wave potentials at two metal ion concentrations were measured, one at the actual concentration in the lake while the other at a much lower one. The experimentally determined shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute several formation constants. At the natural [CO32-] of 0.5 M in the lake, the main contributor to the speciation of cadmium is [Cd(CO3Cl2]2-. At high [Cd2+], the DPASV detects the presence of free Cd2+ ions, hence, potential polluting effect, while the amalgam reports [Cd(CO32Cl] 3- to be dominant above [CO32-] = 0.8 M. There is a variation in the number of complexes detected, their stabilities and percentage distribution in the two methods. Cd2+ ion concentration also affects the number of complexes formed and their stabilities.

  12. Consequences of a unified, anarchical model of fermion masses and mixings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibbi, L.; Ferretti, L.; Romanino, A.; Ziegler, R.

    2009-01-01

    We show that most features of the mass and mixing pattern of the second and third SM fermion families can be accounted for without making use of flavour symmetries or other types of flavour dynamics. We discuss the implications for flavour phenomenology, in particular for the τ → μγ decay rate, and comment on LFV effects at colliders. We show that the model can be embedded in a full SO(10) supersymmetric GUT in 5 dimensions that preserves the successful MSSM gauge coupling unification prediction for α s . Interesting features of this embedding are i) the connection of one of the hierarchy parameters with the strong coupling assumption, ii) the absence of KK threshold effects on the α s prediction at one loop, and iii) the shift of the GUT scale up to about 10 17 GeV. Proton decay is under control, also due to the larger GUT scale. A large atmospheric angle for normal hierarchical neutrinos is obtained in an unusual way.

  13. Fermion Masses and Mixing in SUSY Grand Unified Gauge Models with Extended Gut Gauge Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chih-Lung

    2005-04-05

    The authors discuss a class of supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified gauge (GUT) models based on the GUT symmetry G x G or G x G x G, where G denotes the GUT group that has the Standard Model symmetry (SU(3){sub c} x SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}) embedded as a subgroup. As motivated from string theory, these models are constructed without introducing any Higgs field of rani two or higher. Thus all the Higgs fields are in the fundamental representations of the extended GUT symmetry or, when G = SO(10), in the spinorial representation. These Higgs fields, when acquiring their vacuum expectation values, would break the extended GUT symmetry down to the Standard Model symmetry. In this dissertation, they argue that the features required of unified models, such as the Higgs doublet-triplet splitting, proton stability, and the hierarchy of fermion masses and mixing angles, could have natural explanations in the framework of the extended SUSY GUTs. Furthermore, they argue that the frameworks used previously to construct SO(10) GUT models using adjoint Higgs fields can naturally arise from the SO(10) x SO(10) and SO(10) x SO(10) x SO(10) models by integrating out heavy fermions. This observation thus suggests that the traditional SUSY GUT SO(10) theories can be viewed as the low energy effective theories generated by breaking the extended GUT symmetry down to the SO(10) symmetry.

  14. Effect of Water-Air Clearing on Thermal Mixing in IRWST Using Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jeong Hee; Lee, Doo Yong; Hong, Soon Joon; Jeong, Jae Sik; Park, Man Heung; Moon, Young Tae

    2013-01-01

    study of steam condensation. Actually, when the POSRV is opened, the water and the air in the pipes of the SDVS are discharged firstly into the IRWST (Water/Air Clearing), which forms the fluid velocity prior to steam discharge. However, it has been observed that sole CFD analysis could not simulate the thermal mixing phenomena with those clearing. In this study, the framework for numerical analysis of CFD has been proposed to properly simulate the thermal mixing phenomena with the water and air clearing. The boundary conditions such as the mass and energy release from the POSRV have been obtained from the one-dimensional system code, RELAP5. The boundary conditions are divided into three phases which are the water clearing, the air clearing and the steam condensation. The thermal mixing in the IRWST has been simulated using the three-dimensional CFD with three different phases of boundary condition. The computational results with the proposed approach are compared to the case without the water and air clearing

  15. Study on Mixed Solvency Concept in Formulation Development of Aqueous Injection of Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Singh Solanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, mixed-solvency approach has been applied for the enhancement of aqueous solubility of a poorly water- soluble drug, zaltoprofen (selected as a model drug, by making blends (keeping total concentrations 40% w/v, constant of selected water-soluble substances from among the hydrotropes (urea, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, nicotinamide; water-soluble solids (PEG-4000, PEG-6000; and co-solvents (propylene glycol, glycerine, PEG-200, PEG-400, PEG-600. Aqueous solubility of drug in case of selected blends (12 blends ranged from 9.091 ± 0.011 mg/ml–43.055 ± 0.14 mg/ml (as compared to the solubility in distilled water 0.072 ± 0.012 mg/ml. The enhancement in the solubility of drug in a mixed solvent containing 10% sodium citrate, 5% sodium benzoate and 25 % S cosolvent (25% S cosolvent contains PEG200, PEG 400, PEG600, Glycerine and Propylene glycol was more than 600 fold. This proved a synergistic enhancement in solubility of a poorly water-soluble drug due to mixed cosolvent effect. Each solubilized product was characterized by ultraviolet and infrared techniques. Various properties of solution such as pH, viscosity, specific gravity and surface tension were studied. The developed formulation was studied for physical and chemical stability. This mixed solvency shall prove definitely a boon for pharmaceutical industries for the development of dosage form of poorly water soluble drugs.

  16. Quantification of submarine groundwater discharge and its short-term dynamics by linking time-variant end-member mixing analysis and isotope mass balancing (222-Rn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Eric; Knöller, Kay; Stollberg, Reiner; Scholten, Jan; Rocha, Carlos; Weiß, Holger; Schubert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) plays a crucial role for the water quality of coastal waters due to associated fluxes of nutrients, organic compounds and/or heavy-metals. Thus, the quantification of SGD is essential for evaluating the vulnerability of coastal water bodies with regard to groundwater pollution as well as for understanding the matter cycles of the connected water bodies. Here, we present a scientific approach for quantifying discharge of fresh groundwater (GWf) and recirculated seawater (SWrec), including its short-term temporal dynamics, into the tide-affected Knysna estuary, South Africa. For a time-variant end-member mixing analysis we conducted time-series observations of radon (222Rn) and salinity within the estuary over two tidal cycles in combination with estimates of the related end-members for seawater, river water, GWf and SWrec. The mixing analysis was treated as constrained optimization problem for finding an end-member mixing ratio that simultaneously fits the observed data for radon and salinity best for every time-step. Uncertainty of each mixing ratio was quantified by Monte Carlo simulations of the optimization procedure considering uncertainty in end-member characterization. Results reveal the highest GWf and SWrec fraction in the estuary during peak low tide with averages of 0.8 % and 1.4 %, respectively. Further, we calculated a radon mass balance that revealed a daily radon flux of 4.8 * 108 Bq into the estuary equivalent to a GWf discharge of 29.000 m3/d (9.000-59.000 m3/d for 25th-75th percentile range) and a SWrec discharge of 80.000 m3/d (45.000-130.000 m3/d for 25th-75th percentile range). The uncertainty of SGD reflects the end-member uncertainty, i.e. the spatial heterogeneity of groundwater composition. The presented approach allows the calculation of mixing ratios of multiple uncertain end-members for time-series measurements of multiple parameters. Linking these results with a tracer mass balance allows conversion

  17. Extraction of Lithium from Lepidolite Using Mixed Grinding with Sodium Sulfide Followed by Water Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeryeong Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mixed grinding with Na2S followed by water leaching was performed to extract Li from lepidolite. The leachability of Li increases dramatically in the ground mixture, regardless of the mixing ratio over the range of 1:1 to 3:1, while only 4.53% of Li was extracted in lepidolite ground without Na2S. The leachability increased with an increase of the grinding time, and ultimately, 93% of the Li was leached by water from the ground mixture with a weight ratio of 3:1 (Na2S:Lepidolite. In the process of the mixed grinding, the Li-contained lepidolite was destructured crystallographically, and it might have changed to different compounds. This process enables us to extract Li from lepidolite via a water leaching treatment.

  18. Phase transition of LB films of mixed diblock copolymer at the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Y. S.; Kim, K. S.; Samuilov, V.; Rafailovich, M. H.; Sokolov, J.; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Vancso, G. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have studied the morphology of Langmuir blodgett films at the air/water interface of mixed diblock copolymer films. Solutions of poly(styrene-b-ferrocenyldimethylsilane) and PS-b-P2VP mixed in a ratio of 20/80 in chloroform were spread at the air/water interface. The morphology of the films was studied with AFM as a function of the surface pressure and the diblock copolymer molecular weight. The results show that the two diblock copolymers can be induced to mix at the air/water interface with increasing surface pressure. A reversible transition from spherical to cylindrical morphologies is induced in the mixture which can not be observed in films formed of the two components separately. The effective surface phase diagram as a function of block copolymer composition and pressure will be presented.

  19. Assessment of condensation of water vapor in the mixing chamber by CFD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojkůvková Petra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analyzed topic belongs to the field of design and operation of HVAC systems, focusing mainly on mixing chambers. The paper deals with problems of condensation and freezing of water vapour on walls of mixing chambers in a special case, when the partial pressure of the final resulting state of the mixture of warm moist air and colder air is located above the saturation limit. Experimental in situ methods and computer computational fluid dynamics (CFD modelling method were used for processing. The main contribution of this work is the finding that partial condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur in local parts of the mixing chamber. It causes problems in terms of hygienic safety and service life of these devices. In particular it has been found that condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur even if relative humidity of the resulting mixture is about 70 %.

  20. Integration of water footprint accounting and costs for optimal pulp supply mix in paper industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Alessandro; Ren, Jingzheng; Piantella, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    studies have focused on these aspects, but there have been no previous reports on the integrated application of raw material water footprint accounting and costs in the definition of the optimal supply mix of chemical pulps from different countries. The current models that have been applied specifically...... that minimizes the water footprint accounting results and costs of chemical pulp, thereby facilitating the assessment of the water footprint by accounting for different chemical pulps purchased from various suppliers, with a focus on the efficiency of the production process. Water footprint accounting...... was adapted to better represent the efficiency of pulp and paper production. A multi-objective model for supply mix optimization was also developed using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). Water footprint accounting confirmed the importance of the production efficiency of chemical pulp, which affected...

  1. Hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel (2013) and their impact on the salinity of the Meteoric Water Mass, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutino, Aaron; Stastna, Marek; Kovacs, Shawn; Reinhardt, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    We report on measurements of the salinity and temperature in the Yax Chen cave system on the Yuacatan peninsula. This paper is submitted together with Kovacs et al. (2017). Kovacs et al. focuses on the salinity levels of the meteoric lens, while this paper uses the observed results to elucidate the hydrodynamics. The cave passages have water depths on the order of 10 m, with flow on the order of ten centimeters a second, and as such is a hydrodynamic, as opposed to a porous, system. The measurements reveal that episodes of significant mixing between the fresh meteoric lens and the underlying salty water are driven by meteorological events (e.g., Hurricane Rina in 2011, and the twin Hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel in 2013). We find evidence that after the hurricanes in 2013, the water column remains unstable for several months. Through wavelet analysis, we find that the marine Water Mass (WM) exhibits much less low period activity compared to the meteoric WM. We hypothesize that the open cenotes are locations of high mixing intensity, with turbulent fronts propagating away from the sites of direct mixing into the cave network. We perform laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore this phenomenon, and find that mixing preferentially occurs on the flanks of regions of strong, stable density stratification (i.e., on the periphery of pycnoclines), and leads to entrainment of fluid into the turbulent region. Using high resolution direct numerical simulation, we explore the detailed manner in which turbulent entrainment can drive flow toward the mixing region, and lead to mixing of passive tracers. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for the mixing of passive tracers, such as suspended chemicals.

  2. Separation and extraction device for mixed radioactive waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamachi, Kimio; Takebe, Tsukasa.

    1989-01-01

    The separation device for radioactive sludges comprises cyclone separators each made of conical vessel and arranged in a plurality of stages in series, in which only oils of low density are extracted at the initial stage and heavy sludges are separated from a mixture of water and sludges in the succeeding stage. When sludges are injected at high velocity to the conical vessel in the tangential direction at the edge thereof. The heavy components in the sewage sludges move from the central portion to the outer circumference of the voltex flow and impinge against the inner wall of the vessel. If the vessel is a cylindrical shape or such a shape having a small slope spproximate to that of a cylinder and has short length, the entire portion is swirled and the heavy components are deposited to the inner circumference of the cylinder of the centrifugal force making it difficult for discharge. However, in a vessel of conical shape, since the inner wall of the vessel is inclined, the stream is directed downward by the vertical component thereof and only the heavy components move selectively downward. Thus the size of the device is reduced as a whole and the consumption of filter is reduced. (N.H.)

  3. Water Mass Classification on a Highly Variable Arctic Shelf Region: Origin of Laptev Sea Water Masses and Implications for the Nutrient Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, D.; Cherniavskaia, E.

    2018-03-01

    Large gradients and inter annual variations on the Laptev Sea shelf prevent the use of uniform property ranges for a classification of major water masses. The central Laptev Sea is dominated by predominantly marine waters, locally formed polynya waters and riverine summer surface waters. Marine waters enter the central Laptev Sea from the northwestern Laptev Sea shelf and originate from the Kara Sea or the Arctic Ocean halocline. Local polynya waters are formed in the Laptev Sea coastal polynyas. Riverine summer surface waters are formed from Lena river discharge and local melt. We use a principal component analysis (PCA) in order to assess the distribution and importance of water masses within the Laptev Sea. This mathematical method is applied to hydro-chemical summer data sets from the Laptev Sea from five years and allows to define water types based on objective and statistically significant criteria. We argue that the PCA-derived water types are consistent with the Laptev Sea hydrography and indeed represent the major water masses on the central Laptev Sea shelf. Budgets estimated for the thus defined major Laptev Sea water masses indicate that freshwater inflow from the western Laptev Sea is about half or in the same order of magnitude as freshwater stored in locally formed polynya waters. Imported water dominates the nutrient budget in the central Laptev Sea; and only in years with enhanced local polynya activity is the nutrient budget of the locally formed water in the same order as imported nutrients.

  4. Nitrogen patterns in subsurface waters of the Yzeron stream: effect of combined sewer overflows and subsurface-surface water mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucour, A M; Bariac, T; Breil, P; Namour, P; Schmitt, L; Gnouma, R; Zuddas, P

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization subjects streams to increased nitrogen loads. Therefore studying nitrogen forms at the interface between urban stream and groundwater is important for water resource management. In this study we report results on water δ(18)O and nitrogen forms in subsurface waters of a stream (Yzeron, France). The sites studied were located upstream and downstream of combined sewer overflows (CSO) in a rural area and a periurban area, respectively. Water δ(18)O allowed us to follow the mixing of subsurface water with surface water. Dissolved organic nitrogen and organic carbon of fine sediment increased by 20-30% between rural and periurban subsurface waters in the cold season, under high flow. The highest nitrate levels were observed in rural subsurface waters in the cold season. The lowest nitrate levels were found in periurban subsurface waters in the warm season, under low flow. They corresponded to slow exchange of subsurface waters with channel water. Thus reduced exchange between surface and subsurface waters and organic-matter-rich input seemed to favor nitrate reduction in the downstream, periurban, subsurface waters impacted by CSO.

  5. Investigation of coolant mixture in pressurized water reactors at the Rossendorf mixing test facility ROCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Richter, K.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    During the so-called boron dilution or cold water transients at pressurized water reactors too weakly borated water or too cold water, respectively, might enter the reactor core. This results in the insertion of positive reactivity and possibly leads to a power excursion. If the source of unborated or subcooled water is not located in all coolant loops but in selected ones only, the amount of reactivity insertion depends on the coolant mixing in the downcomer and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such asymmetric disturbances of the coolant temperature or boron concentration might e.g. be the result of a failure of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) or of a main steam line break (MSLB) that does only affect selected steam generators (SG). For the analysis of boron dilution or MSLB accidents coupled neutron kinetics/thermo-hydraulic system codes have been used. To take into account coolant mixing phenomena in these codes in a realistic manner, analytical mixing models might be included. These models must be simple and fast running on the one hand, but must well describe the real mixing conditions on the other hand. (orig.)

  6. The influence of future electricity mix alternatives on southwestern US water resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, D; Meldrum, J; Averyt, K

    2013-01-01

    A climate driven, water resource systems model of the southwestern US was used to explore the implications of growth, extended drought, and climate warming on the allocation of water among competing uses. The analysis focused on the water benefits from alternative thermoelectric generation mixes, but included other uses, namely irrigated agriculture, municipal indoor and outdoor use, and environmental and inter-state compact requirements. The model, referred to as WEAP-SW, was developed on the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) platform, and is scenario-based and forward projecting from 2008 to 2050. The scenario includes a southwest population that grows from about 55 million to more than 100 million, a prolonged dry period, and a long-term warming trend of 2 ° C by mid-century. In addition, the scenario assumes that water allocation under shortage conditions would prioritize thermoelectric, environmental, and inter-state compacts by shorting first irrigated agriculture, then municipal demands. We show that while thermoelectric cooling water consumption is relatively small compared with other uses, the physical realities and the legal and institutional structures of water use in the region mean that relatively small differences in regional water use across different electricity mix scenarios correspond with more substantial impacts on individual basins and water use sectors. At a region-wide level, these choices influence the buffer against further water stress afforded the region through its generous storage capacity in reservoirs. (letter)

  7. The influence of future electricity mix alternatives on southwestern US water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, D.; Meldrum, J.; Averyt, K.

    2013-12-01

    A climate driven, water resource systems model of the southwestern US was used to explore the implications of growth, extended drought, and climate warming on the allocation of water among competing uses. The analysis focused on the water benefits from alternative thermoelectric generation mixes, but included other uses, namely irrigated agriculture, municipal indoor and outdoor use, and environmental and inter-state compact requirements. The model, referred to as WEAP-SW, was developed on the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) platform, and is scenario-based and forward projecting from 2008 to 2050. The scenario includes a southwest population that grows from about 55 million to more than 100 million, a prolonged dry period, and a long-term warming trend of 2 ° C by mid-century. In addition, the scenario assumes that water allocation under shortage conditions would prioritize thermoelectric, environmental, and inter-state compacts by shorting first irrigated agriculture, then municipal demands. We show that while thermoelectric cooling water consumption is relatively small compared with other uses, the physical realities and the legal and institutional structures of water use in the region mean that relatively small differences in regional water use across different electricity mix scenarios correspond with more substantial impacts on individual basins and water use sectors. At a region-wide level, these choices influence the buffer against further water stress afforded the region through its generous storage capacity in reservoirs.

  8. Source zone remediation by ZVI-clay soil-mixing: Reduction of tetrachloroethene mass and mass discharge at a Danish DNAPL site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Binning, Philip John

    2012-01-01

    The presence of chlorinated solvent source zones in the subsurface pose a continuous threat to groundwater quality. The remediation of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) sites is especially challenging and the development of innovative remediation technologies is needed. Zero-valent iron (ZVI......) technologies have proven effective for remediation of chlorinated compounds. ZVI-Clay soil-mixing is a new remediation technology, which combines abiotic degradation (via ZVI addition) and immobilization (via soil-mixing and clay addition), whereby a great potential for reduction of both contaminant mass....... The concentrations of chlorinated ethenes were monitored via soil sampling at the source zone and groundwater sampling at a control plane with multilevel samplers covering the entire contaminated plume down-gradient (3 m) of the source zone. The results showed a significant mass depletion of PCE (2-3 orders...

  9. The nepheloid bottom layer and water masses at the shelf break of the western Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, Marco; Budillon, Giorgio; Cutroneo, Laura; Tucci, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In the austral summers of 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 the Italian CLIMA Project carried out two oceanographic cruises along the northwestern margin of the Ross Sea, where the Antarctic Bottom Water forms. Here there is an interaction between the water masses on the sea floor of the outer shelf and slope with a consequent evolution of benthic nepheloid layers and an increase in total particulate matter. We observed three different situations: (a) the presence of triads (bottom structures characterized by a concomitant jump in turbidity, temperature, and salinity data) and high re-suspension phenomena related to the presence of the Circumpolar Deep Water and its mixing with cold, salty shelf waters associated with gravity currents; (b) the absence of triads with high re-suspension, implying that when the gravity currents are no longer active the benthic nepheloid layer may persist until the suspended particles settle to the sea floor, suggesting that the turbidity data can be used to study recent gravity current events; and (c) the absence of turbidity and sediment re-suspension phenomena supports the theory that a steady situation had been re-established and the current interaction no longer occurred or had finished sometime before.

  10. Air-water mixing experiments for direct vessel injection of KNGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun

    2000-02-01

    Two air-water mixing experiments are conducted to understand the flow behavior in the downcomer for Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In the first experiment which is an air-water experiment in the rectangular channel with the gap size of 1cm, the width of water film is proportional to the water and air velocities and the inclined angle is proportional to the water velocity only, regardless of the water velocity injected in the rectangular channel. It is observed that the amount of entrained water is negligible. In the second experiment which is a full-scaled water jetting experiment without air flow, the width of water film is proportional to the flow rate injected from the pipe exit and the film thickness of water varies from 1.0mm to 5.0mm, and the maximum thickness does not exceed 5.0mm. The amount of water separated from the liquid film after striking of water jetting on the wall is measured. The amount of separation water is proportional to the flow rate, but the separation ratio in the full-scaled water jetting is not over 15%. A simplified physical model, which is designed to predict the trajectories of the width of water film, is validated through the comparison with experiment results. The 13 .deg. upward water droplet of the water injected from the pipe constitutes the outermost boundary at 1.7m below from pipe level, after the water impinges against the wall. In the model, the parameter, η which represents the relationship between the jetting velocity and the initial spreading velocity, is inversely proportional to the water velocity when it impinges against the wall. The error of the predictions by the model is decreased within 14% to the experimental data through use of exponential fitting of η for the jetting water velocity

  11. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sioud, Salim; Amad, Maan H.; Al-Talla, Zeyad

    2012-01-01

    with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. METHODS A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

  12. Experiments and CFD Modelling of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager Osenbroch, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2006-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k-ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean......Experiments are carried out for passive mixing in order to obtain local mean and turbulent velocities and concentrations. The mixing takes place in a square channel with two inlets separated by a block. A combined PIV/PLIF technique is used to obtain instantaneous velocity and concentration fields...... and fluctuating concentrations. The multi-peak presumed PDF mixing model is tested....

  13. Influence of cellulose ether particle size on water retention of freshly-mixed mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Patural , Laetitia; Govin , Alexandre; Grosseau , Philippe; Ruot , Bertrand; Deves , Olivier

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Cellulose ethers are polymers frequently introduced into mortar formulations in order to improve water retention capacity and workability of the freshly-mixed materials. Physico-chemical parameters of these admixtures (molecular weight, granulometry, substitution degrees, etc) seem to have a strong influence on mortar water retention capacity. In this paper, the influence of cellulose ether particle size was studied. Two behaviors were highlighted regarding the particl...

  14. Evaluating the electricity intensity of evolving water supply mixes: the case of California’s water network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes-Draut, Jennifer; Taptich, Michael; Kavvada, Olga; Horvath, Arpad

    2017-11-01

    Climate change is making water supply less predictable, even unreliable, in parts of the world. Urban water providers, especially in already arid areas, will need to diversify their water resources by switching to alternative sources and negotiating trading agreements to create more resilient and interdependent networks. The increasing complexity of these networks will likely require more operational electricity. The ability to document, visualize, and analyze water-energy relationships will be critical to future water planning, especially as data needed to conduct the analyses become increasingly available. We have developed a network model and decision-support tool, WESTNet, to perform these tasks. Herein, WESTNet was used to analyze a model of California’s 2010 urban water network as well as the projected system for 2020 and 2030. Results for California’s ten hydrologic regions show that the average number of water sources per utility and total electricity consumption for supplying water will increase in spite of decreasing per-capita water consumption. Electricity intensity (kWh m-3) will increase in arid regions of the state due to shifts to alternative water sources such as indirect potable water reuse, desalination, and water transfers. In wetter, typically less populated, regions, reduced water demand for electricity-intensive supplies will decrease the electricity intensity of the water supply mix, though total electricity consumption will increase due to urban population growth. The results of this study provide a baseline for comparing current and potential innovations to California’s water system. The WESTNet tool can be applied to diverse water systems in any geographic region at a variety of scales to evaluate an array of network-dependent water-energy parameters.

  15. Influence of air mass source sector on variations in CO2 mixing ratio at a boreal site in northern Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, T.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.

    2003-01-01

    CO 2 mixing ratio in air masses coming from different source sectors was studied at Pallas measurement station in Lapland. Source sectors were defined using back trajectories and wind direction measurements. Air masses from the North and West sectors showed an annual variation of 17 ppm, possibly affected by a long range transported marine air. A larger variation of 20 ppm was observed in air masses from the more continental South and East sectors. During late autumn mixing ratios in air masses from the South sector were high in comparison with the other sectors. Different methods for a source sector definition were considered for the site, located in a contoured terrain. 52%-73% of wind direction-based source sector definitions agreed with trajectory- based definitions. However, the number of cases with reliable sector definitions may remain low when considering all observations. Different definition methods can cause differences of the order of 1 ppm in sectorially selected monthly mean CO 2 mixing ratios. (orig.)

  16. Processes that generate and deplete liquid water and snow in thin midlevel mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam J.; Larson, Vincent E.; Niu, Jianguo; Kankiewicz, J. Adam; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2009-06-01

    This paper uses a numerical model to investigate microphysical, radiative, and dynamical processes in mixed-phase altostratocumulus clouds. Three cloud cases are chosen for study, each of which was observed by aircraft during the fifth or ninth Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX). These three clouds are numerically modeled using large-eddy simulation (LES). The observed and modeled clouds consist of a mixed-phase layer with a quasi-adiabatic profile of liquid, and a virga layer below that consists of snow. A budget of cloud (liquid) water mixing ratio is constructed from the simulations. It shows that large-scale ascent/descent, radiative cooling/heating, turbulent transport, and microphysical processes are all significant. Liquid is depleted indirectly via depositional growth of snow (the Bergeron-Findeisen process). This process is more influential than depletion of liquid via accretional growth of snow. Also constructed is a budget of snow mixing ratio, which turns out to be somewhat simpler. It shows that snow grows by deposition in and below the liquid (mixed-phase) layer, and sublimates in the remainder of the virga region below. The deposition and sublimation are balanced primarily by sedimentation, which transports the snow from the growth region to the sublimation region below. In our three clouds, the vertical extent of the virga layer is influenced more by the profile of saturation ratio below the liquid (mixed-phase) layer than by the mixing ratio of snow at the top of the virga layer.

  17. Role of synergism effect of mixed metal oxides on molecular hydrogen formation from photocatalitic water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmudov, H.M.; Ismayilova, M.K.; Jafarova, N.A.; Azizova, K.V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen production using photocatalysis. In particular, we focus on the role of synergism on the reaction rate. For hydrogen production presented photocatalyst is composed of nanoAl_2O_3 and dispers TiO_2. Yet, the presence of the two mixed metal oxides together results in considerable enhancement of the reaction rate. The main reason for this is the increase of the charge carriers lifetime allowing for electron transfer to hydrogen ions and hole transfer to oxygen ions. It was investigated the mechanism of water splitting in presence of mixed nanocatalysed. It has been shown that the effect occurs during irradiation as a result of photooxidation of water with mixed metal oxides catalyst.

  18. Factors affecting alcohol-water pervaporation performance of hydrophobic zeolite-silicone rubber mixed matrix membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) consisting of ZSM-5 zeolite particles dispersed in silicone rubber exhibited ethanol-water pervaporation permselectivities up to 5 times that of silicone rubber alone and 3 times higher than simple vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). A number of conditi...

  19. Numerical evaluation of fluid mixing phenomena in boiling water reactor using advanced interface tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low. (author)

  20. Detailed simulations of liquid and solid-liquid mixing : Turbulent agitated flow and mass transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis aims at a contribution to reliable and accurate predictions of complex, multi-phase processes. The reader is presented detailed simulations on liquid and solid-liquid mixing using large eddy simulations (LES) including scalar mixing and particle transport in a Rushton turbine stirred

  1. Flavour mixing and fermion mass generation as a result of symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that a simple breaking of the subnuclear democracy leads to a successful description of the mixing between the second and third family. In the lepton channel the ν μ - ν τ oscillations are expected to be described by a mixing angle of 2.65 deg which might be observed soon in neutrino experiments. (author). 11 refs

  2. PDF uncertainties in the determination of the W boson mass and of the effective lepton mixing angle at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rojo, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The precision measurement of the W boson mass allows to perform stringent consistency tests of the Standard Model by means of global electroweak fits. The accurate determination of the W boson mass is one of the legacy results of the Tevatron, where the experimental accuracy is such that $M_W$ is now limited by theoretical uncertainties related to the parton distributions of the proton. In this contribution, we show how to quantify the impact of PDF uncertainties in the measurement of $M_W$ at the Tevatron and the LHC by means of a template method, and study both the use of the W transverse mass and the lepton pT kinematical distributions to generate these templates. We also present preliminary results on the quantification of the PDF uncertainties in the determination of the effective lepton mixing angle at the LHC, based on the same template method as for the W mass determination

  3. Experimental study on vapor explosion induced by pressure pulse in coarse mixing of hot molten metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A.; Tobita, Y.; Aritomi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was done to investigate characteristics of metal-water interaction, when a mount of hot liquid metal is injected into the water. The test section is a vertical shock tube of 60mm in inner diameter and 1200mm in length. A special injector which is designed to inject hot metal of controlled volume and flow rate is attached at the top of the tube. When the hot metal is injected in the water and comes down at a position of the test vessel, a trigger pressure pulse is generated at the bottom of the test tube. Local transient pressures along the tube are measured by piezo pressure transducers. The following items were investigated in the experiment; 1) The criteria to cause a vapor explosion, 2) Transient behaviors and propagation characteristics of pressure wave in the mixing region. 3) Effects of triggering pulse, injection temperature and mass of hot molten metal on the peak pressure. The probability of the vapor explosion jumped when the interface temperature at the molten metal-water direct contact is higher than the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water and the triggering pulse becomes larger than 0.9MPa. Two types of the pressure propagation modes are observed, one is the detonative mode with a sharp rise and other is usual pressure mode with a mild rise. (author)

  4. Myths and methodologies: Making sense of exercise mass and water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? There is a need to revisit the basic principles of exercise mass and water balance, the use of common equations and the practice of interpreting outcomes. What advances does it highlight? We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying exercise mass and water balance calculations in conditions where food is not consumed and waste is not excreted: ∆body mass - 0.20 g/kcal -1  = ∆body water. The relative efficacy of exercise drinking behaviours can be judged using the following equation: percentage dehydration = [(∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal -1 )/starting body mass] × 100. Changes in body mass occur because of flux in liquids, solids and gases. This knowledge is crucial for understanding metabolism, health and human water needs. In exercise science, corrections to observed changes in body mass to estimate water balance are inconsistently applied and often misinterpreted, particularly after prolonged exercise. Although acute body mass losses in response to exercise can represent a close surrogate for body water losses, the discordance between mass and water balance equivalence becomes increasingly inaccurate as more and more energy is expended. The purpose of this paper is briefly to clarify the roles that respiratory water loss, gas exchange and metabolic water production play in the correction of body mass changes for fluid balance determinations during prolonged exercise. Computations do not include waters of association with glycogen because any movement of water among body water compartments contributes nothing to water or mass flux from the body. Estimates of sweat loss from changes in body mass should adjust for non-sweat losses when possible. We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying the study of exercise mass and water balance: ∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal -1  = ∆body water. This equation directly controls for the influence of energy expenditure on body mass

  5. Determination of the external mass transfer coefficient and influence of mixing intensity in moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Bruno L; Pérez, Julio; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Secchi, Argimiro R; Dezotti, Márcia; Biscaia, Evaristo C

    2015-09-01

    In moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR), the removal of pollutants from wastewater is due to the substrate consumption by bacteria attached on suspended carriers. As a biofilm process, the substrates are transported from the bulk phase to the biofilm passing through a mass transfer resistance layer. This study proposes a methodology to determine the external mass transfer coefficient and identify the influence of the mixing intensity on the conversion process in-situ in MBBR systems. The method allows the determination of the external mass transfer coefficient in the reactor, which is a major advantage when compared to the previous methods that require mimicking hydrodynamics of the reactor in a flow chamber or in a separate vessel. The proposed methodology was evaluated in an aerobic lab-scale system operating with COD removal and nitrification. The impact of the mixing intensity on the conversion rates for ammonium and COD was tested individually. When comparing the effect of mixing intensity on the removal rates of COD and ammonium, a higher apparent external mass transfer resistance was found for ammonium. For the used aeration intensities, the external mass transfer coefficient for ammonium oxidation was ranging from 0.68 to 13.50 m d(-1) and for COD removal 2.9 to 22.4 m d(-1). The lower coefficient range for ammonium oxidation is likely related to the location of nitrifiers deeper in the biofilm. The measurement of external mass transfer rates in MBBR will help in better design and evaluation of MBBR system-based technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-03-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season. Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea), in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  7. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Carton

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter.

    The Persian Gulf Water (PGW is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N, again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18–19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season.

    Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea, in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  8. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P.

    2012-06-01

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this work. We

  9. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this

  10. Predictions of the Higgs mass and the weak mixing angle in the 6D gauge-Higgs unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kouhei; Lim, Chong-Sa; Maru, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    In the gauge-Higgs unification with multiple extra spaces, the Higgs self-coupling is on the order of g 2 and the Higgs boson is predicted to be light, being consistent with the LHC results. When the gauge group is simple, the weak mixing angle is also predictable. We address a question on whether there exists a model of gauge-Higgs unification in six-dimensional space-time, which successfully predicts the mass ratios of the Higgs boson and weak gauge bosons. First, using a useful formula, we give a general argument on the condition for obtaining a realistic prediction of the weak mixing angle sin 2 θ W = 1/4, and find that triplet and sextet representations of the minimal SU(3) gauge group lead to the realistic prediction. Concerning the Higgs mass, we notice that, in the models with one Higgs doublet, the predicted Higgs mass is always the same: M H = 2M W . However, by extending our discussion to the models with two Higgs doublets, the situation changes: we obtain an interesting prediction M H ≤ 2M W at the leading order of the perturbation. Thus, it is possible to recover the observed Higgs mass, 125 GeV, for a suitable choice of the parameter. The situation is in clear contrast to the case of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where M H ≤ M Z at the classical level and the predicted Higgs mass cannot recover the observed value. (author)

  11. Circulation, retention, and mixing of waters within the Weddell-Scotia Confluence, Southern Ocean: The role of stratified Taylor columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Meijers, Andrew S.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Brown, Peter J.; Venables, Hugh J.; Abrahamsen, E. Povl; Jullion, Loïc.; Messias, Marie-José

    2015-01-01

    The waters of the Weddell-Scotia Confluence (WSC) lie above the rugged topography of the South Scotia Ridge in the Southern Ocean. Meridional exchanges across the WSC transfer water and tracers between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) to the north and the subpolar Weddell Gyre to the south. Here, we examine the role of topographic interactions in mediating these exchanges, and in modifying the waters transferred. A case study is presented using data from a free-drifting, intermediate-depth float, which circulated anticyclonically over Discovery Bank on the South Scotia Ridge for close to 4 years. Dimensional analysis indicates that the local conditions are conducive to the formation of Taylor columns. Contemporaneous ship-derived transient tracer data enable estimation of the rate of isopycnal mixing associated with this column, with values of O(1000 m2/s) obtained. Although necessarily coarse, this is of the same order as the rate of isopycnal mixing induced by transient mesoscale eddies within the ACC. A picture emerges of the Taylor column acting as a slow, steady blender, retaining the waters in the vicinity of the WSC for lengthy periods during which they can be subject to significant modification. A full regional float data set, bathymetric data, and a Southern Ocean state estimate are used to identify other potential sites for Taylor column formation. We find that they are likely to be sufficiently widespread to exert a significant influence on water mass modification and meridional fluxes across the southern edge of the ACC in this sector of the Southern Ocean.

  12. A Mixed-Oxide Assembly Design for Rapid Disposition of Weapons Plutonium in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo; Adams, Marvin L.

    2002-01-01

    We have created a new mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assembly design for standard pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Design goals were to maximize the plutonium throughput while introducing the lowest perturbation possible to the control and safety systems of the reactor. Our assembly design, which we call MIX-33, offers some advantages for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium; it increases the disposition rate by 8% while increasing the worth of control material, compared to a previous Westinghouse design. The MIX-33 design is based upon two ideas: the use of both uranium and plutonium fuel pins in the same assembly, and the addition of water holes in the assembly. The main result of this paper is that both of these ideas are effective at increasing Pu throughput and increasing the worth of control material. With this new design, according to our analyses, we can transition smoothly from a full low-enriched-uranium (LEU) core to a full MIX-33 core while meeting the operational and safety requirements of a standard PWR. Given an interruption of the MOX supply, we can transition smoothly back to full LEU while meeting safety margins and using standard LEU assemblies with uniform pinwise enrichment distribution. If the MOX supply is interrupted for only one cycle, the transition back to a full MIX-33 core is not as smooth; high peaking could cause power to be derated by a few percent for a few weeks at the beginning of one transition cycle

  13. Water isotope partitioning and ecohydrologic separation in mixed conifer forest explored with a centrifugation water extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, W.; Mercer, J.; Pleasants, M.; Williams, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Isotopic partitioning of water within soil into tightly and loosely bound fractions has been proposed to explain differences between isotopic water sources used by plants and those that contribute to streams and ground water, the basis for the "two water worlds" hypothesis. We examined the isotope ratio values of water in trees, bulk soil, mobile water collected from soil lysimeters, stream water, and GW at three different hillslopes in a mixed conifer forest in southeastern Wyoming, USA. Hillslopes differed in aspect and topographic position with corresponding differences in surface energy balance, snowmelt timing, and duration of soil moisture during the dry summer. The isotopic results support the partitioning of water within the soil; trees apparently used a different pool of water for transpiration than that recovered from soil lysimeters and the source was not resolved with the isotopic signature of the water that was extracted from bulk soil via cryogenic vacuum distillation. Separating and measuring the isotope ratios values in these pools would test the assumption that the tightly bound water within the soil has the same isotopic signature as the water transpired by the trees. We employed a centrifugation approach to separate water within the soil held at different tensions by applying stepwise increases in rotational velocity and pressures to the bulk soil samples. Effluent and the remaining water (cryogenically extracted) at each step were compared. We first applied the centrifugation method in a simple lab experiment using sandy loam soil and separate introductions of two isotopically distinct waters. We then applied the method to soil collected from the montane hillslopes. For the lab experiment, we predicted that effluents would have distinct isotopic signatures, with the last effluent and extracted water more closely representing the isotopic signature of the first water applied. For our field samples, we predicted that the isotopic signature of the

  14. Mass matrices of weak interaction, quark flavour mixing and exponential form of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1995-01-01

    The quark mixing matrix is diagonalized. The use of the exponential parametrization leads to straightforward results, obtained in exact form, without simplifying assumptions. In this study, it is defined weak interaction eigenstates in the sense of Fritzch and Planckl. The relevant mass matrices are derived and are shown to belong to Barnhill canonical forms. It is proven that, at lowest order, these matrices exhibit a democratic structure. The mechanism of democracy breaking is finally discussed

  15. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  16. Estimates of water source contributions in a dynamic urban water supply system inferred via a Bayesian stable isotope mixing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameel, M. Y.; Brewer, S.; Fiorella, R.; Tipple, B. J.; Bowen, G. J.; Terry, S.

    2017-12-01

    Public water supply systems (PWSS) are complex distribution systems and critical infrastructure, making them vulnerable to physical disruption and contamination. Exploring the susceptibility of PWSS to such perturbations requires detailed knowledge of the supply system structure and operation. Although the physical structure of supply systems (i.e., pipeline connection) is usually well documented for developed cities, the actual flow patterns of water in these systems are typically unknown or estimated based on hydrodynamic models with limited observational validation. Here, we present a novel method for mapping the flow structure of water in a large, complex PWSS, building upon recent work highlighting the potential of stable isotopes of water (SIW) to document water management practices within complex PWSS. We sampled a major water distribution system of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, measuring SIW of water sources, treatment facilities, and numerous sites within in the supply system. We then developed a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) isotope mixing model to quantify the proportion of water supplied by different sources at sites within the supply system. Known production volumes and spatial distance effects were used to define the prior probabilities for each source; however, we did not include other physical information about the supply system. Our results were in general agreement with those obtained by hydrodynamic models and provide quantitative estimates of contributions of different water sources to a given site along with robust estimates of uncertainty. Secondary properties of the supply system, such as regions of "static" and "dynamic" source (e.g., regions supplied dominantly by one source vs. those experiencing active mixing between multiple sources), can be inferred from the results. The isotope-based HB isotope mixing model offers a new investigative technique for analyzing PWSS and documenting aspects of supply system structure and operation that are

  17. Optics of Water Cloud Droplets Mixed with Black-Carbon Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Cairns, Brian; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to calculate scattering and absorption properties of micrometer-sized water droplets contaminated by black carbon. Our numerically exact results reveal that, depending on the mode of soot-water mixing, the soot specific absorption can vary by a factor exceeding 6.5. The specific absorption is maximized when the soot material is quasi-uniformly distributed throughout the droplet interior in the form of numerous small monomers. The range of mixing scenarios captured by our computations implies a wide range of remote sensing and radiation budget implications of the presence of black carbon in liquid-water clouds. We show that the popular Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation can be used to calculate the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter for the quasi-uniform mixing scenario, but is likely to fail in application to other mixing scenarios and in computations of the elements of the scattering matrix.

  18. Chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade mixed oxides [(U,Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Mixed oxide, a mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides, is used as a nuclear-reactor fuel in the form of pellets. The plutonium content may be up to 10 wt %, and the diluent uranium may be of any U-235 enrichment. In order to be suitable for use as a nuclear fuel, the material must meet certain criteria for combined uranium and plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. Analytical procedures used to determine if mixed oxides comply with specifications are: uranium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron (II); nitrogen by distillation spectrophotometry using Nessler reagent; carbon (total) by direct combustion-thermal-conductivity; total chlorine and fluorine by pyrohydrolysis; sulfur by distillation-spectrophotometry; moisture by the coulometric, electrolytic moisture analyzer; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; rare earths by copper spark spectroscopy; trace impurities by carrier distillation spectroscopy; impurities by spark-source mass spectrography; total gas in reactor-grade mixed dioxide pellets; tungsten by dithiol-spectrophotometry; rare earth elements by spectroscopy; plutonium-238 isotopic abundance by alpha spectrometry; uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry; oxygen-to-metal atom ratio by gravimetry

  19. Modeling of condensation, stratification, and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. As a passive safety system, the function of steam pressure suppression pools is paramount to the containment performance. In the present work, the focus is on apparently-benign but intricate and potentially risk-significant scenarios in which thermal stratification could significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, the steam condenses rapidly in the pool and the hot condensate rises in a narrow plume above the steam injection plane and spreads into a thin layer at the pool's free surface. When the steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and shrink of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can cause breakdown of the stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. Accurate prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in such scenarios presents a computational challenge. Lumped-parameter models have no capability to predict temperature distribution of water pool during thermal stratification development. While high-order-accurate CFD (RANS, LES) methods are not practical due to excessive computing power needed to calculate 3D high-Rayleighnumber natural circulation flow in long transients. In the present work, a middleground approach is used, namely CFD-like model of the general purpose thermalhydraulic code GOTHIC. Each cell of 3D GOTHIC grid uses lumped parameter volume type closures for modeling of various heat and mass transfer processes at subgrid scale. We use GOTHIC to simulate POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment, in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, and (b

  20. A Fast GPU-accelerated Mixed-precision Strategy for Fully NonlinearWater Wave Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Madsen, Morten G.

    2011-01-01

    We present performance results of a mixed-precision strategy developed to improve a recently developed massively parallel GPU-accelerated tool for fast and scalable simulation of unsteady fully nonlinear free surface water waves over uneven depths (Engsig-Karup et.al. 2011). The underlying wave......-preconditioned defect correction method. The improved strategy improves the performance by exploiting architectural features of modern GPUs for mixed precision computations and is tested in a recently developed generic library for fast prototyping of PDE solvers. The new wave tool is applicable to solve and analyze...

  1. Effect of water volume based on water absorption and mixing time on physical properties of tapioca starch – wheat composite bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prameswari, I. K.; Manuhara, G. J.; Amanto, B. S.; Atmaka, W.

    2018-05-01

    Tapioca starch application in bread processing change water absorption level by the dough, while sufficient mixing time makes the optimal water absorption. This research aims to determine the effect of variations in water volume and mixing time on physical properties of tapioca starch – wheat composite bread and the best method for the composite bread processing. This research used Complete Randomized Factorial Design (CRFD) with two factors: variations of water volume (111,8 ml, 117,4 ml, 123 ml) and mixing time (16 minutes, 17 minutes 36 seconds, 19 minutes 12 seconds). The result showed that water volume significantly affected on dough volume, bread volume and specific volume, baking expansion, and crust thickness. Mixing time significantly affected on dough volume and specific volume, bread volume and specific volume, baking expansion, bread height, and crust thickness. While the combination of water volume and mixing time significantly affected for all physical properties parameters except crust thickness.

  2. The hydromedusae and water masses of the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Navas-Pereira

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis of distribution and abundance of species of Hydromedusae completes a report (Vannucci & Navas, 1973b on the ecology of Indian Ocean Hydromedusae based on the zooplankton collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE. Distribution and abundance are taken here to be the ecological expression of variability of species in space and time. The aim was to identify the biological signature of below surface water masses that cannot be identified by remote sensing techniques. Selected species were taken as biological units, the oceanic water masses as defined by their T-S and T-O2 diagrammes were taken as the non biological units. Taken together they define different ecosystems of the Indian Ocean. About 45,000 specimens of hydromedusae taken at 480 stations were sorted from 900 plankton samples and all specimens were determined and counted. Several hauls, mostly stratified, were taken with closing nets, but not all contained hydromedusae. The distribution of each species was studied in relation to water salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen; the limits of ecological tolerance and preference were defined by the environmental characteristics of the layers sampled by the nets and are given for each species. These can be grouped as follows: 1. Deep water species, cold tolerant, often eurytopic; 2. Antarctic species, cold loving, usually stenothermal with preference for low salinity; 3. Indian Ocean Central Water species, with preference for temperature lower than 19ºC and salinity not much higher than 35%o, usually found at sub-surface or intermediate depths, they may spread into the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal in surface layers; 4. Indian Ocean Equatorial System species, warm tolerant, usually prefer comparatively low salinity, high temperature and high oxygen content; 5. Bay of Bengal Surface Water species, found in surface layers of the Bay, with preference for low salinity, high temperature and high oxygen content

  3. Thermodynamic and Interfacial Properties of DTABr/CTABr Mixed Surfactant Systems in Ethanolamine/Water Mixtures: A Conductometry Study

    OpenAIRE

    Esan, Olaseni Segun; Osundiya, Medinat Olubunmi; Aboluwoye, Christopher Olumuyiwa; Olanrewaju, Owoyomi; Ige, Jide

    2013-01-01

    Mixed-micelle formation in the binary mixtures of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTABr) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) surfactants in water-ethanolamine mixed solvent systems has been studied by conductometric method in the temperature range of 298.1 to 313.1 K at 5 K intervals. It was observed that the presence of ethanolamine forced the formation of mixed micelle to lower total surfactant concentration than in water only. The synergistic interaction was quantitatively investi...

  4. Black sea annual and inter-annual water mass variations from space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Simav, M.

    2011-01-01

    influenced by the leakage of hydrological signals from the surrounding land. After applying the corresponding correction, we found a good agreement with water mass variations derived from steric-corrected satellite altimetry observations. Both GRACE and altimetry show significant annual water mass variations......This study evaluates the performance of two widely used GRACE solutions (CNES/GRGS RL02 and CSR RL04) in deriving annual and inter-annual water mass variations in the Black Sea for the period 2003–2007. It is demonstrated that the GRACE derived water mass variations in the Black Sea are heavily...

  5. Coliform bacteria as in indicator of sewerage water mixing with drinking water sources in Rawalpindi city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashiatullah, A.; Qureshi, R.M.; Bibi, S.; Javed, T.; Shah, Z.; Sajjad, M.I.

    1993-12-01

    The coliform group of bacteria are consider to be one of the prominent indicators of surface/groundwater pollution as their presence in drinking water sources shows that water has been in contact with soil, plants, septic tanks or sewerage lines/drains. As a part of surface/groundwater pollution studies in various areas of Rawalpindi city coliform bacteria have been determined in the available drinking sources to evaluate their possible connection with the nearby septic tanks and sewerage lines/drains. Selective water samples were tapped from 72 domestic dug wells, and 98 municipal corporation tube-wells and associated water supply lines in some poorly drained areas of Rawalpindi. These samples were analyzed using membrane filter technique. In general, the sampled areas have indicated poor water quality w.r.t. coliform activity. 52% samples of the collected samples have indicated presence of Ecoli. Of these, 73% samples mostly collected from the poorly drained areas have shown significant counts of Ecoli. These water are rendered unfit for drinking purposes. Thirteen water samples collected indicated toxic levels of Ecoli in the municipal water supply caused due to a known leakage in the main domestic water supply line. The presence of coliform in the tube-well water supply taps are thus attributed to ruptures in the underground water supply lines. Present study reveals that general sanitary condition and water quality in the city are poor and that there is an urgent need of improvement in the water treatment and distribution systems by the concern quaters. (Orig./A.B.)

  6. Neutrino masses, mixings, and FCNC’s in an S3 flavor symmetric extension of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragón, A.; Mondragón, M.; Peinado, E.

    2011-01-01

    By introducing threeHiggs fields that are SU(2) doublets and a flavor permutational symmetry, S 3 , in the theory, we extend the concepts of flavor and generations to the Higgs sector and formulate a Minimal S 3 -Invariant Extension of the Standard Model. The mass matrices of the neutrinos and charged leptons are re-parameterized in terms of their eigenvalues, then the neutrino mixing matrix, V PMNS , is computed and exact, explicit analytical expressions for the neutrino mixing angles as functions of the masses of neutrinos and charged leptons are obtained in excellent agreement with the latest experimental data. We also compute the branching ratios of some selected flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) processes, as well as the contribution of the exchange of neutral flavor-changing scalars to the anomaly of the magnetic moment of the muon, as functions of the masses of charged leptons and the neutral Higgs bosons. We find that the S 3 × Z 2 flavor symmetry and the strong mass hierarchy of the charged leptons strongly suppress the FCNC processes in the leptonic sector, well below the present experimental bounds by many orders of magnitude. The contribution of FCNC’s to the anomaly of the muon’s magnetic moment is small, but not negligible.

  7. Lake Mixing Regime Influences Arsenic Transfer from Sediments into the Water Column and Uptake in Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, J.; Barrett, P. M.; Hull, E.; Burkart, K.; McLean, J.; Hargrave, O.; Neumann, R.

    2017-12-01

    The former ASARCO copper smelter in Ruston, WA, now a Superfund site, contaminated a large area of the south-central Puget Sound region with arsenic over its almost 100-year history. Arsenic, a priority Superfund contaminant and carcinogen, is a legacy pollutant impacting aquatic ecosystems in urban lakes downwind of the ASARCO emissions stack. We investigated the impact of lake mixing regime on arsenic transfer from sediments into lake water and aquatic biota. We regularly collected water column and plankton samples from four study lakes for two years, and deployed sediment porewater peepers and sediment traps to estimate arsenic flux rates to and from the sediments. In lakes with strong seasonal stratification, high aqueous arsenic concentrations were limited to anoxic hypolimnetic waters while low arsenic concentrations were observed in oxic surface waters. However, in polymictic, shallow lakes, we observed elevated arsenic concentrations throughout the entire oxic water column. Sediment flux estimates support higher rates of arsenic release from sediments and vertical transport. Because high arsenic in oxic waters results in spatial overlap between arsenate, a phosphate analog, and lake biota, we observed enhanced trophic transfer of arsenic in polymictic, shallow study lakes, with higher arsenic accumulation (up to an order of magnitude) in both phytoplankton and zooplankton compared to stratified lakes. Chemical and physical mechanisms for higher steady-state arsenic concentrations will be explored. Our work demonstrates that physical mixing processes coupled with sediment/water redox status exert significant control over bioaccumulation, making shallow, periodically-mixed urban lakes uniquely vulnerable to environmental and human health risks from legacy arsenic contamination.

  8. The effect of design and scale on the mixing and mass transfer in U-loop bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Leander Adrian Haaning; Villadsen, John; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    is altered? In this study we have investigated the mixing time and mass transfer capabilities of U-loop reactors of different geometries (high vs. diameter ratio) in pilot (0.15m3) and semi-industrial scales (2.2m3). A new expression for the mechanical power input into the system is also proposed, which......A system capable of handling a large volumetric gas fraction while providing a high gas to liquid mass transfer is a necessity if the metanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus is to be used in single cell protein (SCP) production. Previous studies have proven that a U-loop fermenter, a novel...... indicates that an even more favorable relationship between power input and mass transfer rate (compared to previous literature) applies to U-loop fermenters....

  9. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3??MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16??m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1??mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the

  10. A mass conservative numerical solution of vertical water flow and mass transport equations in unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.; Lee, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the problem of one-dimensional, vertical flow of water and mass transport of conservative-nonconservative solutes in unsaturated porous media. Numerical approximations based on different forms of the governing equation, although they are equivalent in continuous forms, can result in remarkably different solutions in an unsaturated flow problem. Solutions given by a simple Galerkin method based on the h-based Richards equation yield a large mass balance error and an underestimation of the infiltration depth. With the employment of the ROMV (restoration of main variable) concept in the discretization step, the mass conservative numerical solution algorithm for water flow has been derived. The resulting computational schemes for water flow and mass transport are applied to sandy soil. The ROMV method shows good mass conservation in water flow analysis, whereas it seems to have a minor effect on mass transport. However, it may relax the time-step size restriction and so ensure an improved calculation output. (author)

  11. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Wei [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Doster, J. Michael [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)], E-mail: doster@eos.ncsu.edu; Mayo, Charles W. [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators.

  12. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wei; Doster, J. Michael; Mayo, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators

  13. Properties of experimental titanium cast investment mixing with water reducing agent solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zutai; Ding, Ning; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Han-Cheol, Cho; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental investment for titanium casting. ZrO(2) and Al(2)O(3) were selected as refractory materials to prepare three investments (Codes: A-C) according to the quantity of Zr. Al(2)O(3) cement was used as a binder at a ratio of 15%, they were mixed with special mixing liquid. B1 was used as a control mixed with water. Fundamental examinations were statistically evaluated. A casting test was performed with investment B. Fluidities, setting times, and green strengths showed no remarkable differences; however, they were significantly different from those of B1. Expansion values for A, B, C, and B1 at 850°C were 1.03%±0.08%, 1.96%±0.17%, 4.35%±0.23%, and 1.50%±0.28%, respectively. Castings were covered by only small amounts of mold materials. The hardness test showed no significant differences between castings from B and the ones from commercial investments. The experimental special mixing liquid effectively reduced the water/powder ratio and improved the strength and thermal expansion.

  14. Monitoring water masses properties by Glider in Sardinia Channel during summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Slim; Iudicone, Daniele; Ghenim, Leila; Mortier, Laurent; Testor, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquin; Olita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    : Leg#1 (16 to 23 August 2014), Leg#2 (23 to 28 August 2014), Leg#3 (28 Aug. to 03 Sept. 2014) Leg#4 (03 to 08 Sept. 2014), Leg#5 (08 to 13 Sept. 2014), Leg#6 (13 to 19 Sept. 2014). As mentioned above, the first aim of this work is to analyze the hydrological properties of the surface and intermediate water masses and their variability, focusing first on T/S properties. The comparison of the successive T/S diagrams and T/S hydrological sections allows us to quantify the intensity of temporal variability and to assess mixing processes occurring within and between water masses. The core of LIW is clearly observed with S>38.7 psu (T~13.75 °C, S~38.75 psu) at depths between 250m and 450m and the spreading of this water mass appears clearly from one leg to the other. According Astraldi et al. (2002), this water mass is coming from the strait of Sicily and outflows into the Algero-Provencal Basin. This water mass should not be confounded with the so-called 'old' LIW, that recirculates to reenter the lower intermediate layer of the area from west to east. Near the surface, lenses of fresh water are observed at about 50m depth, all along the section, with a typical radius of 20 km. These lenses are generated by the meandering of the Algerian Current, which is advecting MAW first eastward along the Algerian slope, and then, at the vicinity of the Channel of Sardinia, a few lenses (AEs according Puillat et al., 2002) detach from the Algerian slope and propagate along the Sardinian one. We will show that the signature of these lenses are also detected by satellite, both in the altimetric signal and in the sea color radiometric data. 4. References • Astraldi, M., Conversano, F., Civitarese, G., Gasparini, G. P., Ribera d'Alcalà, M., and Vetrano, A.,: Water mass properties and chemical signatures in the central Mediterranean region, J. Mar. Syst., 33-34, 155-177, 2002 • Bouffard, J., A. Pascual, S. Ruiz, Y. Faugère, and J. Tintoré (2010), Coastal and mesoscale dynamics

  15. Polybenzimidazole-based mixed membranes with exceptional high water vapor permeability and selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Akhtar, Faheem Hassan

    2017-09-13

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI), a thermal and chemically stable polymer, is commonly used to fabricate membranes for applications like hydrogen recovery at temperatures of more than 300 °C, fuel cells working in a highly acidic environment, and nanofiltration in aggressive solvents. This report shows for the first time use of PBI dense membranes for water vapor/gas separation applications. They showed an excellent selectivity and high water vapor permeability. Incorporation of inorganic hydrophilic titanium-based nano-fillers into the PBI matrix further increased the water vapor permeability and water vapor/N2 selectivity. The most selective mixed matrix membrane with 0.5 wt% loading of TiO2 nanotubes yielded a water vapor permeability of 6.8×104 Barrer and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.9×106. The most permeable membrane with 1 wt% loading of carboxylated TiO2 nanoparticles had a 7.1×104 Barrer water vapor permeability and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.1×106. The performance of these membranes in terms of water vapor transport and selectivity is among the highest reported ones. The remarkable ability of PBI to efficiently permeate water versus other gases opens the possibility to fabricate membranes for dehumidification of streams in harsh environments. This includes the removal of water from high temperature reaction mixtures to shift the equilibrium towards products.

  16. Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Katie P; Stanley, Jane W; Meinzer, Frederick C; McCulloh, Katherine A; Woodruff, David R; Chen, Weile; Adams, Thomas S; Lin, Henry; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-04-01

    We investigated depth of water uptake of trees on shale-derived soils in order to assess the importance of roots over a meter deep as a driver of water use in a central Pennsylvania catchment. This information is not only needed to improve basic understanding of water use in these forests but also to improve descriptions of root function at depth in hydrologic process models. The study took place at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania. We asked two main questions: (i) Do trees in a mixed-hardwood, humid temperate forest in a central Pennsylvania catchment rely on deep roots for water during dry portions of the growing season? (ii) What is the role of tree genus, size, soil depth and hillslope position on the depth of water extraction by trees? Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment. While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected. Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Polybenzimidazole-based mixed membranes with exceptional high water vapor permeability and selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Akhtar, Faheem Hassan; Kumar, Mahendra; Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Shevate, Rahul; Vovusha, Hakkim; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI), a thermal and chemically stable polymer, is commonly used to fabricate membranes for applications like hydrogen recovery at temperatures of more than 300 °C, fuel cells working in a highly acidic environment, and nanofiltration in aggressive solvents. This report shows for the first time use of PBI dense membranes for water vapor/gas separation applications. They showed an excellent selectivity and high water vapor permeability. Incorporation of inorganic hydrophilic titanium-based nano-fillers into the PBI matrix further increased the water vapor permeability and water vapor/N2 selectivity. The most selective mixed matrix membrane with 0.5 wt% loading of TiO2 nanotubes yielded a water vapor permeability of 6.8×104 Barrer and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.9×106. The most permeable membrane with 1 wt% loading of carboxylated TiO2 nanoparticles had a 7.1×104 Barrer water vapor permeability and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.1×106. The performance of these membranes in terms of water vapor transport and selectivity is among the highest reported ones. The remarkable ability of PBI to efficiently permeate water versus other gases opens the possibility to fabricate membranes for dehumidification of streams in harsh environments. This includes the removal of water from high temperature reaction mixtures to shift the equilibrium towards products.

  18. Solubility of daidzin in different organic solvents and (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Jie-Ping; Yang, Dan; Xu, Xiao-Kang; Guo, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubilities of daidzin were measured in various solvents. • The solubility data were correlated by three models. • The thermodynamic properties of the dissolution process were also determined. - Abstract: The solubility of daidzin in different organic solvents and (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis method from T = (283.2 to 323.2) K at atmosphere pressure. The results show that at higher temperature more daidzin dissolves, and moreover, the solubility increases with the ethyl alcohol mole fraction increase in the (ethyl alcohol + water) mixed solvents. The experimental solubility values were correlated by a simplified thermodynamic equation, λh equation and modified Apelblat equation. Based on the solubility of daidzin, the enthalpy and entropy of solution were also evaluated by van’t Hoff equation. The results illustrated that the dissolution process of daidzin is endothermic and entropy driven

  19. Effect of water-methanol mixed solvents on the ultrasonic relaxation of cadmium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sree Rama Murthy, J.; Ramachandra Rao, B.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic absorption have been made by pulse technique in 1 M solutions of cadmium acetate with water-methanol mixed solvents. Results are analysed by assuming a single relaxation mechanism. The characteristic frequency of relaxation is found to decrease with increasing composition of methanol in the solvent. It is proposed that the mechanism of relaxation may be perturbation of chemical equilibrium between complex CdAc + ions and Cd ++ , Ac - species by soundwaves. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic mixing effects of liquid ternary Au–Fe–Pd alloys by computer-aided Knudsen cell mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiska, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermodynamic mixing behavior of liquid Au–Fe–Pd alloys over the whole range of composition. ► Experimental investigations by means of the computer-aided Knudsen cell mass spectrometry. ► Algebraic representation of the molar excess properties by TAP series concept. ► The corresponding TAP parameters are presented. ► The values of all molar excess functions, and thermodynamic activities at 1850 K are given. - Abstract: Thermodynamic investigations on liquid ternary Au–Fe–Pd alloys have been performed by means of the computer-aided Knudsen cell mass spectrometry. The “Digital Intensity-Ratio” (DIR) – method has been applied for the determination of the thermodynamic mixing behaviour. The ternary thermodynamically adapted power (TAP) series concept is used for the algebraic representation of the molar excess properties. The corresponding TAP parameters, and the values of the molar excess quantities Z E (Z = Gibbs energy G, heat of mixing H, and entropy S) as well as the thermodynamic activities of all three constituents at 1850 K are presented.

  1. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  2. Trace metals behaviour during salt and fresh water mixing in the Venice Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghermandi, G.; Campolieti, D.; Cecchi, R.; Costa, F.; Zaggia, L.; Zonta, R.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation on trace metals behaviour in the estuarine system of the Dese River (Venice Lagoon) are described. Hydrodynamical and water chemical-physical measurements and PIXE concentrations analysis on size-fractionated samples emphasize the complexity of the processes occurring in the area of salt and fresh water mixing. Suspended load variations in the bottom layer of the water column, which may be mostly ascribed to resuspension, regulate the trace metal concentrations and seem to play a fundamental role in the transport of pollutants in shallow water areas of the estuary. The behaviour of dissolved metals is masked by the presence of suspended matter, but some relationships with chemical-physical variables are distinguishable, furnishing information on the processes affecting their concentration in the system. (orig.)

  3. Use of multitracers for the study of water mixing in the Paraiba do Sul River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Thaisa Abreu, E-mail: abreu.thaisa@gmail.co [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Godoy, Jose Marcus [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Godoy, Maria Luiza D.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moreira, Isabel [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Zenildo L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salomao, Marcos Sarmet M.B.; Rezende, Carlos E. [Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, 28013-600 Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Multitracers were used to study water mixing in the Paraiba do Sul River estuary region in August 2007 (dry season) and March 2008 (rainy season) and to evaluate the reach of the river plume in the direction of the open ocean. Two sampling campaigns were carried out, each in a different season. Based on these results, it was possible to conclude that the multitracers used in this study (salinity, Si, Ba and U, as well as the radium isotopes {sup 223}Ra, {sup 224}Ra, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) presented satisfactory results toward defining the plume reach and determining the residence time and water-mixing processes in the estuary. A strong correlation was observed between tracers and the distance to the coast. During the low river water discharge period, the riverine water took about 10 days to reach open ocean waters (salinity {approx} 35). During the rainy period this value decreased to 6 days. Based on the radium results, it was possible to calculate diffusion coefficients (K{sub h}) of 23 km{sup 2} d{sup -1} and 38 km{sup 2} d{sup -1} for {sup 224}Ra and {sup 223}Ra, respectively, during the dry season (winter). Values of 65 km{sup 2} d{sup -1} and 68 km{sup 2} d{sup -1} for {sup 223}Ra and {sup 224}Ra, respectively, were found for the rainy period (summer).

  4. Use of multitracers for the study of water mixing in the Paraiba do Sul River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Thaisa Abreu; Godoy, Jose Marcus; Godoy, Maria Luiza D.P.; Moreira, Isabel; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Salomao, Marcos Sarmet M.B.; Rezende, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    Multitracers were used to study water mixing in the Paraiba do Sul River estuary region in August 2007 (dry season) and March 2008 (rainy season) and to evaluate the reach of the river plume in the direction of the open ocean. Two sampling campaigns were carried out, each in a different season. Based on these results, it was possible to conclude that the multitracers used in this study (salinity, Si, Ba and U, as well as the radium isotopes 223 Ra, 224 Ra, 226 Ra and 228 Ra) presented satisfactory results toward defining the plume reach and determining the residence time and water-mixing processes in the estuary. A strong correlation was observed between tracers and the distance to the coast. During the low river water discharge period, the riverine water took about 10 days to reach open ocean waters (salinity ∼ 35). During the rainy period this value decreased to 6 days. Based on the radium results, it was possible to calculate diffusion coefficients (K h ) of 23 km 2 d -1 and 38 km 2 d -1 for 224 Ra and 223 Ra, respectively, during the dry season (winter). Values of 65 km 2 d -1 and 68 km 2 d -1 for 223 Ra and 224 Ra, respectively, were found for the rainy period (summer).

  5. Experimental and Computational Studies of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2008-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k- ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean...

  6. Radium-226 and barium as tracers of water masses in the North Atlantic (GA01-GEOTRACES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Emilie; Sanial, Virginie; Charette, Matthew; Henderson, Paul; Jacquet, Stéphanie; García-Ibáñez, Maribel; Pérez, Fiz; Lherminer, Pascale; Souhaut, Marc; Jeandel, Catherine; Lacan, François; van Beek, Pieter

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we report concentrations of radium-226 (226Ra, t1/2=1602 y) and barium determined along the GEOVIDE section conducted in the North Atlantic (May-July 2014; Portugal-Greenland-Canda) in the framework of the international GEOTRACES program. A high vertical resolution (up to 22 depths per station) was achieved by analyzing small volumes (˜10 L) of seawater for 226Ra using a radon emanation technique. We will present the distribution of 226Ra activities and barium concentrations in contrasting biogeochemical regions of the North Atlantic (Iberian margin, West European Basin, Reykjanes Ridge, Irminger Sea, Greenland margin and Labrador Sea). These regions strongly differ in terms of boundary inputs, biogeochemistry and deep water formation. We observe a linear correlation between 226Ra and barium along the GEOVIDE section, which results from the dominantly conservative behavior of the two tracers. However, deviations from the linear correlation between 226Ra and Ba are found in several places. The potential causes for such deviations are investigated. Optimum multi-parameter (OMP) analysis was thus used to distinguish the relative importance of physical transport (i.e., water mass mixing) from non-conservative processes (sedimentary, river or hydrothermal inputs; uptake by particles) on the 226Ra and Ba distribution in the North Atlantic.

  7. Constraints on neutralino masses and mixings from cosmology and collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenfeld, U.

    2007-07-01

    Bounds on cross section measurements of chargino pair production at LEP yield a bound on the chargino mass. If the GUT relation is assumed, the lightest neutralino must be heavier than ∼45-50 GeV. If no GUT relation is assumed, no lower bound on the neutralino mass exists. I derive mass bounds on the lightest neutralino from relic density measurements for relativistic and non-relativistic neutralinos and I derive bounds on the selectron mass from the observed limits on the cross section of the neutralino pair production process e + e - → χ 0 1 χ 0 2 at LEP, if the lightest neutralino is massless. I further discuss radiative neutralino production and its background at the future ILC. Finally, I present a method to determine the neutralino couplings to right and left handed selectrons and Z bosons from cross section measurements of radiative neutralino pair production at the ILC. (orig.)

  8. Linking diverse nutrient patterns to different water masses within anticyclonic eddies in the upwelling system off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranga José, Yonss; Dietze, Heiner; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Ocean eddies can both trigger mixing (during their formation and decay) and effectively shield water encompassed from being exchanged with ambient water (throughout their lifetimes). These antagonistic effects of eddies complicate the interpretation of synoptic snapshots typically obtained by ship-based oceanographic measurement campaigns. Here we use a coupled physical-biogeochemical model to explore biogeochemical dynamics within anticyclonic eddies in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean. The goal is to understand the diverse biogeochemical patterns that have been observed at the subsurface layers of the anticyclonic eddies in this region. Our model results suggest that the diverse subsurface nutrient patterns within eddies are associated with the presence of water masses of different origins at different depths.

  9. The initial study on supercritical water flow and heat transfer in square rod bundle channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Cao Can; Yu Tao

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wine in supercritical water reactor was studied in the paper using the FLUENT software. The mixing wing elevation influence on temperature distribution and flow field were studied in the model. The results showed the mixing wing caused fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improved the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the four cases of mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45 and 50 angle, 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  10. On line determination of deuterium in hydrogen water exchange reaction by mass spectrometry. IRP-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.D.; Alphonse, K.P.; Mishra, Sushama; Prabhu, S.A.; Mohan, Sadhana; Tangri, V.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Deuterium (D)/Hydrogen (H) analysis at low Concentration is generally carried out by Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometer is specially designed for the measurement of Mass 2 and 3 ratio. The Deuterium analysis of water and hydrogen in concentration range of a few ppm to about 1% plays an important role in the Heavy Water Production Plants. For the enrichment of the Deuterium concentration in H 2 O by H 2 - H 2 O exchange a catalyst is essential as reaction is relatively slow. Heavy Water Division has developed in house Platinum based catalyst for the isotopic exchange of Hydrogen and Water

  11. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Shetye, S.; Maya, M.V.; Mangala, K.R.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    . (Position of Fig 1.) 3. Results and Discussion 3.1. Water masses in the area of observation You and Tomczak (1993) has reviewed the water masses in the Indian Ocean identified by the earlier workers ( Sverdrup et al. 1942; Mamalev, 1975; and Shcherbinin... at 200 m at 5° S in the meridional region of our observations and flows down to 800 m to the north and termed as Indian central water (ICW) (You and Tomczak, 1993). (position of Fig.2) 3.2. Seasonal variability of water masses The seasonal...

  12. E2,M1 Multipole mixing ratios in odd-mass nuclei, 59< or =A< or =149

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, K.S.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is presented of the E2,M1 mxing ratios of gamma-ray transitions in odd-mass nuclei with 59< or =A< or =149. Angular distribution and correlation data from the literature are analyzed in terms of a consistent choice of the phase relationship between the E2 and M1 matrix elements. A set of recommended values of the mixing ratios is included, based on averages of results from various studies. The survey includes data available in the literature up to September 1976

  13. Mixing Time, Inversion and Multiple Emulsion Formation in a Limonene and Water Pickering Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sawiak

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It has previously been demonstrated that particle-stabilized emulsions comprised of limonene, water and fumed silica particles exhibit complex emulsification behavior as a function of composition and the duration of the emulsification step. Most notably the system can invert from being oil-continuous to being water-continuous under prolonged mixing. Here we investigate this phenomenon experimentally for the regime where water is the majority liquid. We prepare samples using a range of different emulsification times and we examine the final properties in bulk and via confocal microscopy. We use the images to quantitatively track the sizes of droplets and clusters of particles. We find that a dense emulsion of water droplets forms initially which is transformed, in time, into a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion with concomitant changes in droplet and cluster sizes. In parallel we carry out rheological studies of water-in-limonene emulsions using different concentrations of fumed silica particles. We unite our observations to propose a mechanism for inversion based on the changes in flow properties and the availability of particles during emulsification.

  14. On watermass mixing ratios and regenerated silicon in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.P.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, V.S.; Sudhakar, U.; Gupta, G.V.M.

    Regeneration of silicon on mixing in the Bay of Bengal have been computed from six water masses [Bay of Bengal low saline water (BBLS), Bay of Bengal subsurface water (BBSS), northern southeast high salinity water (NSEHS), north Indian intermediate...

  15. Application of the Regional Water Mass Variations from GRACE Satellite Gravimetry to Large-Scale Water Management in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ramillien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time series of regional 2° × 2° Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE solutions of surface water mass change have been computed over Africa from 2003 to 2012 with a 10-day resolution by using a new regional approach. These regional maps are used to describe and quantify water mass change. The contribution of African hydrology to actual sea level rise is negative and small in magnitude (i.e., −0.1 mm/y of equivalent sea level (ESL mainly explained by the water retained in the Zambezi River basin. Analysis of the regional water mass maps is used to distinguish different zones of important water mass variations, with the exception of the dominant seasonal cycle of the African monsoon in the Sahel and Central Africa. The analysis of the regional solutions reveals the accumulation in the Okavango swamp and South Niger. It confirms the continuous depletion of water in the North Sahara aquifer at the rate of −2.3 km3/y, with a decrease in early 2008. Synergistic use of altimetry-based lake water volume with total water storage (TWS from GRACE permits a continuous monitoring of sub-surface water storage for large lake drainage areas. These different applications demonstrate the potential of the GRACE mission for the management of water resources at the regional scale.

  16. Vector-like fields, messenger mixing and the Higgs mass in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischler, Willy; Tangarife, Walter [Department of Physics and Texas Cosmology Center,The University of Texas at Austin,TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-05-30

    In order to generate, in the context of gauge mediation, a Higgs mass around 126 GeV that avoids the little hierarchy problem, we explore a set of models where the messengers are directly coupled to new vector-like fields at the TeV scale in addition to the usual low energy degrees of freedom. We find that in this context, stop masses lighter than 2 TeV and large A-terms are generated, thereby improving issues of fine tuning.

  17. MiRTE: Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game for Mass Casualty information systems design, testing and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xunyi; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a Mixed Reality Triage and Evacuation game, MiRTE, that is used in the development, testing and training of Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) information systems for first responders. Using the Source game engine from Valve software, MiRTE creates immersive virtual environments to simulate various incident scenarios, and enables interactions between multiple players/first responders. What distinguishes it from a pure computer simulation game is that it can interface with external mass casualty incident management systems, such as DIORAMA. The game will enable system developers to specify technical requirements of underlying technology, and test different alternatives of design. After the information system hardware and software are completed, the game can simulate various algorithms such as localization technologies, and interface with an actual user interface on PCs and Smartphones. We implemented and tested the game with the DIORAMA system.

  18. The valuation of water quality: Effects of mixing different drinking water qualities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, Martin; Arvin, Erik; Binning, Philip John

    2009-01-01

    impacts are cardiovascular diseases, dental caries, atopic eczema, lifetime of dish and clothes washing machines, heat exchangers, distribution systems, bottled water consumption and soap usage. The method includes an uncertainty assessment that ranks the imacts having the hi hest influence on the result...

  19. Rational designing of the internal water supply system in reconstructed residential buildings of mass standard series

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov Evgeny

    2018-01-01

    The issues of water supply system reconstruction in mass series buildings are reviewed with consideration of water- and resource saving. Principal points for location of plumbing cells in apartments, arrangement of water devices and wastewater receivers, selection of pipelines for reconstructed water line are described. Comparative analysis of design variants of inner water line before and following reconstruction are given. It was found that applying the developed system design approaches th...

  20. A Novel Ion Exchange System to Purify Mixed ISS Waste Water Brines for Chemical Production and Enhanced Water Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Griffin; Spencer, LaShelle; Ruby, Anna-Maria; McCaskill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Current International Space Station water recovery regimes produce a sizable portion of waste water brine. This brine is highly toxic and water recovery is poor: a highly wasteful proposition. With new biological techniques that do not require waste water chemical pretreatment, the resulting brine would be chromium-free and nitrate rich which can allow possible fertilizer recovery for future plant systems. Using a system of ion exchange resins we can remove hardness, sulfate, phosphate and nitrate from these brines to leave only sodium and potassium chloride. At this point modern chlor-alkali cells can be utilized to produce a low salt stream as well as an acid and base stream. The first stream can be used to gain higher water recovery through recycle to the water separation stage while the last two streams can be used to regenerate the ion exchange beds used here, as well as other ion exchange beds in the ISS. Conveniently these waste products from ion exchange regeneration would be suitable as plant fertilizer. In this report we go over the performance of state of the art resins designed for high selectivity of target ions under brine conditions. Using ersatz ISS waste water we can evaluate the performance of specific resins and calculate mass balances to determine resin effectiveness and process viability. If this system is feasible then we will be one step closer to closed loop environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for current or future applications.

  1. Constraints on neutralino masses and mixings from cosmology and collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.

    2007-07-15

    Bounds on cross section measurements of chargino pair production at LEP yield a bound on the chargino mass. If the GUT relation is assumed, the lightest neutralino must be heavier than {approx}45-50 GeV. If no GUT relation is assumed, no lower bound on the neutralino mass exists. I derive mass bounds on the lightest neutralino from relic density measurements for relativistic and non-relativistic neutralinos and I derive bounds on the selectron mass from the observed limits on the cross section of the neutralino pair production process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields} {chi}{sup 0}{sub 1} {chi}{sup 0}{sub 2} at LEP, if the lightest neutralino is massless. I further discuss radiative neutralino production and its background at the future ILC. Finally, I present a method to determine the neutralino couplings to right and left handed selectrons and Z bosons from cross section measurements of radiative neutralino pair production at the ILC. (orig.)

  2. Determination of seven pyrethroids and six pyrethrins in water by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ccanccapa, alexander; Masia, Ana; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Pyrethroids are the synthetic analogues of pyrethrins which were developed as pesticides from the extracts of dried and powdered flower heads of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium. They are increasingly used in agriculture due to their broad biological activity and slow development of pest resistance. Contamination of fresh-water ecosystems appears either because of the direct discharge of industrial and agricultural effluents or as a result of effluents from sewage treatment works; residues can thus accumulate in the surrounding biosphere [1, 2]. These substances, mostly determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) can be difficult to analyse due to their volatility and degradability. The purpose of this study is, as an alternative, to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue method for the target analysis of 7 pyrethroids and the 6 natural pyrethrins currently used in water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The compounds included in the study were acrinathrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and flumethrin as pyrethroids and a commercial mix of pyrethrins containing Cinerin I, Jasmolin I, pyrethrin I, cinerin II, jasmolin II, pyrethrins II in different percentages. As a preliminary step, the ionization and fragmentation of the compounds were optimized injecting individual solutions of each analyte at 10 ppm in the system, using a gradient elution profile of water-methanol both with 10 mM ammonium formate. The ESI conditions were: capillary voltage 4000 V, nebulizer15 psi, source temperature 300◦C and gas flow 10 L min-1. [M+H]+, [M+Na]+ ,[M+NH3]+ ,[M+NH4+]+ were tested as precursor ions. The most intense signal was for ammonium adduct for all compounds. The optimal fragmentor range for product ions were between 20 to 80 ev and the collision energy ranged between 5 to 86 ev. The efficiency of the method was tested in water samples from Turia River without any known exposure to

  3. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  4. An ion-neutral model to investigate chemical ionization mass spectrometry analysis of atmospheric molecules - application to a mixed reagent ion system for hydroperoxides and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikes, Brian G.; Treadaway, Victoria; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    An ion-neutral chemical kinetic model is described and used to simulate the negative ion chemistry occurring within a mixed-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The model objective was the establishment of a theoretical basis to understand ambient pressure (variable sample flow and reagent ion carrier gas flow rates), water vapor, ozone and oxides of nitrogen effects on ion cluster sensitivities for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc). The model development started with established atmospheric ion chemistry mechanisms, thermodynamic data and reaction rate coefficients. The chemical mechanism was augmented with additional reactions and their reaction rate coefficients specific to the analytes. Some existing reaction rate coefficients were modified to enable the model to match laboratory and field campaign determinations of ion cluster sensitivities as functions of CIMS sample flow rate and ambient humidity. Relative trends in predicted and observed sensitivities are compared as instrument specific factors preclude a direct calculation of instrument sensitivity as a function of sample pressure and humidity. Predicted sensitivity trends and experimental sensitivity trends suggested the model captured the reagent ion and cluster chemistry and reproduced trends in ion cluster sensitivity with sample flow and humidity observed with a CIMS instrument developed for atmospheric peroxide measurements (PCIMSs). The model was further used to investigate the potential for isobaric compounds as interferences in the measurement of the above species. For ambient O3 mixing ratios more than 50 times those of H2O2, O3-(H2O) was predicted to be a significant isobaric interference to the measurement of H2O2 using O2-(H2O2) at m/z 66. O3 and NO give rise to species and cluster ions, CO3-(H2O) and NO3-(H2O), respectively, which interfere in the measurement of CH3OOH using O2-(CH3OOH) at m/z 80. The CO3-(H2O

  5. Mixing regime of the residual water basins of the Aral Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhitskiy, Alexander; Zavialov, Peter; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2017-04-01

    The Aral Sea, a terminal salt lake in western Central Asia situated at the border between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, was ranked as the fourth largest inland water body in the mid-20th century. However, in the early 1960s, the lake's volume started to decrease rapidly due to severe changes in the Aral's water balance. Thus, the present-day Aral Sea can be considered as a system of separate water bodies with a common origin but very different physical, chemical and biological features. Our previous studies showed that the Large Aral Sea and Lake Tshchebas transformed into hyperhaline water bodies, while the Small Aral Sea was a brackish basin with rather similar to the pre-desiccation environment. On the other hand, the Small Aral Sea and Lake Tshchebas exhibited a mixed vertical structure, whereas the Western Large Aral Sea (especially the Chernyshev Bay) was strongly stratified. The presented study is focused on the seasonal mixing regimes of the residual basins. Isolation of deep waters from the atmosphere together with low rates of photosynthesis produce deep anoxia observed in the Chernyshev Bay and in the Large Aral. The high amount of organic matter provides a rich source of nutrients for anoxic microorganisms favoring methanogenesis in the bottom layer of the basins. In the Small Aral, the water column remains well-oxygenated down to the bottom throughout most of the year and development of anoxia is unlikely. The mixing regimes of the recently formed residual lakes of the former Aral Sea will provide manifold effect on the ongoing development of the aquatic system in the following decades. The study is based on a field data collected during two surveys of Shirshov Institute of Oceanology to the Aral Sea, which took place in October, 2015 and June, 2016. In situ measurements including CTD profiling and water sampling were carried out in the northern extremity of the western Large Aral (the Chernyshev Bay), in Lake Tshchebas, and in the Small Aral Sea

  6. Evaluation of a mass-balance approach to determine consumptive water use in northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patrick C.; Duncker, James J.; Over, Thomas M.; Marian Domanski,; ,; Engel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A principal component of evaluating and managing water use is consumptive use. This is the portion of water withdrawn for a particular use, such as residential, which is evaporated, transpired, incorporated into products or crops, consumed by humans or livestock, or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment. The amount of consumptive use may be estimated by a water (mass)-balance approach; however, because of the difficulty of obtaining necessary data, its application typically is restricted to the facility scale. The general governing mass-balance equation is: Consumptive use = Water supplied - Return flows.

  7. Neutrino masses and mixings as an evidence of GUT, and the impact to (flavor changing) nucleon decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Yu

    2017-11-01

    First, we see that the observed data of quark and lepton masses and mixings, which has been completed by adding neutrino data, can be a qualitative signature of S U(5) grand unified theory (GUT). Actually, an assumption, 10 fields induce stronger hierarchy in Yukawa couplings than 5 ¯ fields, can explain all hierarchical structures of quark and lepton masses and mixings. Second, we see the attractiveness of E6 GUT, in which the above assumption in S U(5) GUT can be derived and as the result various Yukawa hierarchies of quarks and leptons can be obtained from only one basic hierarchy. Third, we compare the predictions for nucleon decay among several GUTs with S U(5), S O(10), and E6 unification group which satisfy the above important assumption for Yukawa hierarchy, since this understanding about Yukawa structures reduces the ambiguities in prediction of nucleon decay via superheavy gauge boson exchange. We stress the importance of observations for several decay modes. One of them is flavor changing nucleon decay, for example, P → π0 µ+, which is the decay mode that SuperKamiokande has reported two events in the signal region. This article is based on our works in Ref.[1, 2

  8. Structure of mixed β-lactoglobulin/pectin adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces; a spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Fokkink, R.; Vliet, T. van; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2008-01-01

    Based on earlier reported surface rheological behaviour two factors appeared to be important for the functional behaviour of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces: (1) protein/polysaccharide mixing ratio and (2) formation history of the layers. In this study complexes

  9. Structure of mixed Beta-lactoglobulin/pectin adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces; a spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Fokkink, R.G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on earlier reported surface rheological behaviour two factors appeared to be important for the functional behaviour of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces: (1) protein/polysaccharide mixing ratio and (2) formation history of the layers. In this study complexes

  10. Bovine insulin-phosphatidylcholine mixed Langmuir monolayers: behavior at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, S; Blanco-Vila, N M; Vila-Romeu, N

    2011-08-04

    The behavior of the binary mixed Langmuir monolayers of bovine insulin (INS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) spread at the air-water interface was investigated under various subphase conditions. Pure and mixed monolayers were spread on water, on NaOH and phosphate-buffered solutions of pH 7.4, and on Zn(2+)-containing solutions. Miscibility and interactions between the components were studied on the basis of the analysis of the surface pressure (π)-mean molecular area (A) isotherms, surface compression modulus (C(s)(-1))-π curves, and plots of A versus mole fraction of INS (X(INS)). Our results indicate that intermolecular interactions between INS and PC depend on both the monolayer state and the structural characteristics of INS at the interface, which are strongly influenced by the subphase pH and salt content. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) was applied to investigate the peptide aggregation pattern at the air-water interface in the presence of the studied lipid under any experimental condition investigated. The influence of the lipid on the INS behavior at the interface strongly depends on the subphase conditions.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of nickel hydroxide nanostructures in mixed solvents of water and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixia; Zhu Yingjie; Tong Hua; Liang Zhenhua; Li Liang; Zhang Ling

    2007-01-01

    Nickel hydroxide nanosheets and flowers have been hydrothermally synthesized using Ni(CH 3 COO) 2 .4H 2 O in mixed solvents of ethylene glycol (EG) or ethanol and deionized water at 200 deg. C for different time. The phase and morphology of the obtained products can be controlled by adjusting the experimental parameters, including the hydrothermal time and the volume ratio of water to EG or ethanol. The possible reaction mechanism and growth of the nanosheets and nanoflowers are discussed based on the experimental results. Porous nickel oxide nanosheets are obtained by heating nickel hydroxide nanosheets in air at 400 deg. C. The products were characterized by using various methods including X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The electrochemical property of β-Ni(OH) 2 nanosheets was investigated through the cyclic voltammogram (CV) measurement. - Graphical abstract: Nickel hydroxide nanosheets and flowers have been hydrothermally synthesized using Ni(CH 3 COO) 2 .4H 2 O in mixed solvents of ethylene glycol (EG) or ethanol and deionized water at 200 deg. C for different reaction time. Porous nickel oxide nanosheets are obtained by heating nickel hydroxide nanosheets in air at 400 deg. C

  12. Mesopelagic Prokaryotes Alter Surface Phytoplankton Production during Simulated Deep Mixing Experiments in Eastern Mediterranean Sea Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Hazan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesopelagic prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria, which are transported together with nutrient-rich intermediate-water to the surface layer by deep convection in the oceans (e.g., winter mixing, upwelling systems, can interact with surface microbial populations. This interaction can potentially affect production rates and biomass of surface microbial populations, and thus play an important role in the marine carbon cycle and oceanic carbon sequestration. The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS is one of the most oligotrophic and warm systems in the world's oceans, with usually very shallow winter mixing (<200 m and lack of large-size spring algal blooms. In this study, we collected seawater (0–1,500 m in 9 different cruises at the open EMS during both the stratified and the mixed seasons. We show that the EMS is a highly oligotrophic regime, resulting in low autotrophic biomass and primary productivity and relatively high heterotrophic prokaryotic biomass and production. Further, we simulated deep water mixing in on-board microcosms using Levantine surface (LSW, ~0.5 m and intermediate (LIW, ~400 m waters at a 9:1 ratio, respectively and examined the responses of the microbial populations to such a scenario. We hypothesized that the LIW, being nutrient-rich (e.g., N, P and a “hot-spot” for microbial activity (due to the warm conditions that prevail in these depths, may supply the LSW with not only key-limiting nutrients but also with viable and active heterotrophic prokaryotes that can interact with the ambient surface microbial population. Indeed, we show that LIW heterotrophic prokaryotes negatively affected the surface phytoplankton populations, resulting in lower chlorophyll-a levels and primary production rates. This may be due to out-competition of phytoplankton by LIW populations for resources and/or by a phytoplankton cell lysis via viral infection. Our results suggest that phytoplankton in the EMS may not likely form blooms, even after

  13. Effect of rotational mixing and metallicity on the hot star wind mass-loss rates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 567, July (2014), A63/1-A63/7 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10589S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : stars: winds * outflows * stars: mass-loss Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  14. Retrieval of water vapor mixing ratios from a laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, George F.

    1995-01-01

    Langley Research Center has developed a novel external path sensor which monitors water vapor along an optical path between an airplane window and reflective material on the plane's engine. An infrared tunable diode laser is wavelength modulated across a water vapor absorption line at a frequency f. The 2f and DC signals are measured by a detector mounted adjacent to the laser. The 2f/DC ratio depends on the amount of wavelength modulation, the water vapor absorption line being observed, and the temperature, pressure, and water vapor content of the atmosphere. The present work concerns efforts to quantify the contributions of these factors and to derive a method for extracting the water vapor mixing ratio from the measurements. A 3 m cell was fabricated in order to perform laboratory tests of the sensor. Measurements of 2f/DC were made for a series of pressures and modulation amplitudes. During my 1994 faculty fellowship, a computer program was created which allowed 2f/DC to be calculated for any combination of the variables which effect it. This code was used to generate 2f/DC values for the conditions measured in the laboratory. The experimental and theoretical values agreed to within a few percent. As a result, the laser modulation amplitude can now be set in the field by comparing the response of the instrument to the calculated response as a function of modulation amplitude. Once the validity of the computer code was established, it was used to investigate possible candidate absorption lines. 2f/DC values were calculated for pressures, temperatures, and water vapor mixing ratios expected to be encountered in future missions. The results have been incorporated into a database which will be used to select the best line for a particular mission. The database will also be used to select a retrieval technique. For examples under some circumstances there is little temperature dependence in 2f/DC so temperature can be neglected. In other cases, there is a dependence

  15. Graft copolymerization of water soluble mixed monomers onto polyethylene by the pre-irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Fu; Tang Liming; Zhao Jin; Gao Zhenyong

    1993-01-01

    Grafting of water soluble mixed monomers of acrylic acid (AA)/acrylamide (Am) and acrylic acid/methacrylic acid (MA) onto polyethylene film by the pre-irradiation grafting method was investigated. The results showed that the grafting proceeded successfully with the adding of ferric salt in the solution. In the case of AA/Am system, a synergistic effect was noticed. In the case of AA/MA system, the graft percent increased with the increase in the concentration of MA in the feed ratio. Furthermore, the effects of monomer concentration, radiation dose and temperature on the grafting were also studied

  16. Combined uses of water-table fluctuation (WTF), chloride mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agadaga

    isotopes methods to investigate groundwater recharge ... and isotopic characterization of groundwater, rainfall and the unsaturated zone were also carried out using a ..... Chloride concentrations in soil water extracted by lixiviation from.

  17. Heavy water stratification in a low-mass protostar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Cazaux, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Demyk, K.; Taquet, V.; Wakelam, V.

    Context. Despite the low elemental deuterium abundance in the Galaxy, enhanced molecular deuterium fractionation has been found in the environments of low-mass star-forming regions and, in particular, the Class 0 protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Aims. The key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star

  18. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pérez, Fiz F.; Lherminier, Pascale; Zunino, Patricia; Mercier, Herlé; Tréguer, Paul

    2018-04-01

    We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP) analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW) dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section) by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002-2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58-59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) across the OVIDE line, we conclude that the larger AMOC intensity in

  19. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. García-Ibáñez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland–Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002–2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58–59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC across the OVIDE line, we conclude

  20. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  1. Ikaite precipitation by mixing of shoreline springs and lake water, Mono Lake, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, James L.; Stine, Scott; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.

    1993-08-01

    Metastable ikaite (CaCO 3·6H 2O) forms abundantly during winter months along the south shoreline of Mono Lake where shoreline springs mix with lake water. Ikaite precipitates because of its decreased solubility at low temperature and because of orthophosphate-ion inhibition of calcite and aragonite. During the spring some of the ikaite is transformed to anhydrous CaCO 3 and is incorporated into tufa, but most is dispersed by wave action into the lake where it reacts to form gaylussite (Na 2Ca(CO 3) 2· 5H 2O). Spring waters have low pH values, are dominantly Ca-Na-HCO 3, have low radiocarbon activities, and are mixtures of deep-seated geothermal and cold groundwaters. Chemical modeling reveals that precipitation of CaCO 3 can occur over a broad range of mixtures of spring and lake water with a maximum production occurring at 96% spring water and 4% lake water. Under these conditions all the Ca and a significant fraction of the CO 3 of the precipitate is spring supplied. A radiocarbon age of 19,580 years obtained on a natural ikaite sample supports this conclusion. With the springs supplying a large and probably variable portion of the carbonate, and with apparent 14C age of the carbonate varying from spring to spring, tufa of similar actual antiquity may yield significantly different 14C dates, making tufa at this location unsuitable for absolute age dating by the radiocarbon method.

  2. Using a biological aerated filter to treat mixed water-borne volatile organic compounds and assessing its emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    A biological aerated filter (BAF) was evaluated as a fixed-biofilm processes to remove water-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a multiple layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing plant in southern Taiwan.The components of VOC were identified to be toluene,1,2,4-trimethylbenzene,1,3,5-trimethylbenzene,bromodichloromethane and isopropanol (IPA).The full-scale BAF was constructed of two separate reactors in series,respectively using 10-cm and 15-cm diameter polypropylene balls as the packing materials and a successful preliminary bench-scale experiment was performed to feasibility.Performance results show that the BAF removed over 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the influent with (1188 ± 605) mg/L of COD.A total organic loading of 2.76 kg biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/(m~3 packing·d) was determined for the packed bed,in which the flow pattern approached that of a mixed flow.A limited VOC concentration of (0.97 ± 0.29) ppmv (as methane) was emitted from the BAF system.Moreover,the emission rate of VOC was calculated using the proposed formula,based on an air-water mass equilibrium relationship,and compared to the simulated results obtained using the Water 9 model.Both estimation approaches of calculation and model simulation using Water 9 evaluating VOC emissions reveal that 0.1% IPA (0.0031-0.0037 kg/d) was aerated into a gaseous phase,and 30% to 40% (0.006-0.008 kg/d) of the toluene was aerated.

  3. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A CFD model for determining mixing and mass transfer in a high power agitated bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Albæk, Mads O.; Stocks, Stuart M.

    performance of a high power agitated pilot scale bioreactor has been characterized using a novel combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental investigations. The effect of turbulence inside the vessel was found to be most efficiently described by using the k-ε model with regards...... simulations, and the overall mass transfer coefficient was found to be in accordance with experimental data. This work illustrates the possibility of predicting the hydrodynamic performance of an agitated bioreactor using validated CFD models. These models can be applied in the testing of new bioreactor...

  5. Mass and Energy Balances of Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion Treating Swine Manure Mixed with Rice Straw

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Jining; Zou, Guoyan; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of swine manure treatment by a proposed Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (DT-AD) system, we evaluated the methane yield of swine manure treated using a DT-AD method with rice straw under different C/N ratios and solid retention time (SRT) and calculated the mass and energy balances when the DT-AD system is used for swine manure treatment from a model farm with 1000 pigs and the digested residue is used for forage rice production. A traditional swine manure trea...

  6. The coordination number of Lu(III) in a mixed system of methanol and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisaka, M.; Takuwa, N.; Suganuma, H.

    2000-01-01

    The stability constants (β 1(F) ) of the monofluoro complex of Lu(III) and those (β 1(Cl) ) of the monochloride solvent-shared ion-pair of Lu(III) have been determined in mixed solvents of methanol and water at 0.10 and 1.00 mol x dm -3 ionic strengths, respectively. The variation in lnβ 1(F) with an increase in the mole fraction of methanol (X s ) in the mixed solvent system showed an acute-angled convex inflection point at X s ∼ 0.12, an acute-angled concave inflection point at X s ∼ 0.22, and another acute-angled convex inflection point at X s ∼ 0.27. It was concluded that the first and the second convex inflection points denoted the CN of Lu 3+ from CN = 8 to a mixture of CN = 8 and 7 and from CN = 8 and 7 to a mixture containing CN = 6, respectively. The concave point is the starting point of a change in the CN of Lu(III) in LuF 2+ from CN = 8 to a mixture of CN = 8 and 7. The values at two inflection points of the CN around Lu 3+ are consistent with the inflection points of the variation in the values of lnβ 1(Cl ) versus the dielectric constant of the mixed solvent. (author)

  7. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  8. Transient mixed convection in a cavity. Comparison between water and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The basic problem studied is the interaction between a vortex and a thermal stratification. The experiments are done in a parallelepipedic cavity which bottom communicates with a rectangular channel. A forced flow in this channel induces a recirculating flow in the cavity. The transient condition is a decrease (step wise or slope) of the inlet temperature at a constant flowrate. This problem is studied with two different approaches: experiments in water or in sodium. In the sodium experiments, the dimension of the cavity ensures large values of the Peclet number (about 10 4 ) and a wide range of values for the Richardson number (from 0.1 to 3). With these experiment, all the regimes of mixed convection, from forced convection to complete stratification can be covered. These results are compared with the other approach using a water model. This comparison is very helpful for studies on the thermalhydraulic behavior of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors. (author)

  9. Water-Exit Process Modeling and Added-Mass Calculation of the Submarine-Launched Missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the process that the submarine-launched missile exits the water, there is the complex fluid solid coupling phenomenon. Therefore, it is difficult to establish the accurate water-exit dynamic model. In the paper, according to the characteristics of the water-exit motion, based on the traditional method of added mass, considering the added mass changing rate, the water-exit dynamic model is established. And with help of the CFX fluid simulation software, a new calculation method of the added mass that is suit for submarine-launched missile is proposed, which can effectively solve the problem of fluid solid coupling in modeling process. Then by the new calculation method, the change law of the added mass in water-exit process of the missile is obtained. In simulated analysis, for the water-exit process of the missile, by comparing the results of the numerical simulation and the calculation of theoretical model, the effectiveness of the new added mass calculation method and the accuracy of the water-exit dynamic model that considers the added mass changing rate are verified.

  10. Indoor and outdoor urban atmospheric CO2: Stable carbon isotope constraints on mixing and mass balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanes, Yurena; Yapp, Crayton J.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → 13 C of indoor CO 2 indicates proportion of C 4 -derived carbon in occupants' diet. → Flux balance model for ventilated rooms shows rapid approach to CO 2 steady-state. → From extant indoor CO 2 data more dietary C 4 carbon in American than European diets. → Local outdoor urban CO 2 increase of 17 ppm in ten years, no change in average 13 C. - Abstract: From July to November 2009, concentrations of CO 2 in 78 samples of ambient air collected in 18 different interior spaces on a university campus in Dallas, Texas (USA) ranged from 386 to 1980 ppm. Corresponding δ 13 C values varied from -8.9 per mille to -19.4 per mille. The CO 2 from 22 samples of outdoor air (also collected on campus) had a more limited range of concentrations from 385 to 447 ppm (avg. = 408 ppm), while δ 13 C values varied from -10.1 per mille to -8.4 per mille (avg.=-9.0 per mille). In contrast to ambient indoor and outdoor air, the concentrations of CO 2 exhaled by 38 different individuals ranged from 38,300 to 76,200 ppm (avg. = 55,100 ppm), while δ 13 C values ranged from -24.8 per mille to -17.7 per mille (avg. = -21.8 per mille). The residence times of the total air in the interior spaces of this study appear to have been on the order of 10 min with relatively rapid approaches (∼30 min) to steady-state concentrations of ambient CO 2 gas. Collectively, the δ 13 C values of the indoor CO 2 samples were linearly correlated with the reciprocal of CO 2 concentration, exhibiting an intercept of -21.8 per mille, with r 2 = 0.99 and p 2 data representing 18 interior spaces (with varying numbers of occupants), and the coincidence of the intercept (-21.8 per mille) with the average δ 13 C value for human-exhaled CO 2 demonstrates simple mixing between two inputs: (1) outdoor CO 2 introduced to the interior spaces by ventilation systems, and (2) CO 2 exhaled by human occupants of those spaces. If such simple binary mixing is a common feature of interior spaces, it

  11. Multiple scattering of light by water cloud droplets with external and internal mixing of black carbon aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Hua; Sun Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The mixture of water cloud droplets with black carbon impurities is modeled by external and internal mixing models. The internal mixing model is modeled with a two-layered sphere (water cloud droplets containing black carbon (BC) inclusions), and the single scattering and absorption characteristics are calculated at the visible wavelength of 0.55 μm by using the Lorenz—Mie theory. The external mixing model is developed assuming that the same amount of BC particles are mixed with the water droplets externally. The multiple scattering characteristics are computed by using the Monte Carlo method. The results show that when the size of the BC aerosol is small, the reflection intensity of the internal mixing model is bigger than that of the external mixing model. However, if the size of the BC aerosol is big, the absorption of the internal mixing model will be larger than that of the external mixing model. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. The use of the average plutonium-content for criticality evaluation of boiling water reactor mixed oxide-fuel transport and storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattera, C.

    2003-01-01

    Currently in France, criticality studies in transport configurations for Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide fuel assemblies are based on conservative hypothesis assuming that all rods (Mixed Oxide (Uranium and Plutonium), Uranium Oxide, Uranium and (Gadolinium Oxide rods) are Mixed Oxide rods with the same Plutonium-content, corresponding to the maximum value. In that way, the real heterogeneous mapping of the assembly is masked and covered by an homogenous Plutonium-content assembly, enriched at the maximum value. As this calculation hypothesis is extremely conservative, Cogema Logistics (formerly Transnucleaire) has studied a new calculation method based on the use of the average Plutonium-content in the criticality studies. The use of the average Plutonium-content instead of the real Plutonium-content profiles provides a highest reactivity value that makes it globally conservative. This method can be applied for all Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide complete fuel assemblies of type 8 x 8, 9 x 9 and 10 x 10 which Plutonium-content in mass weight does not exceed 15%; it provides advantages which are discussed in the paper. (author)

  13. Recycling of fresh concrete exceeding and wash water in concrete mixing plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Férriz Papí, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The exceeding concrete and washing equipment water are a matter to solve in concrete production. This paper explains several possibilities for recycling and analyses the products obtained with one recycling equipment. The objective of this work is to study the possibility to increase the percentage of recycling in new mixes. The developed study relates wash water density and fine particles content. Besides, mortar and concrete samples were tested introducing different quantities of these fine particles, substituting cement, sand or only as an addition. Consistency, compressive strength, setting time, absorption, and capillarity were tested. The results indicated an improvement of the studied properties in some percentages when substituting sand. It confirms the possibility to introduce larger quantities of wash water in new concrete mixes, with corrections in sand quantity depending on water density.Los hormigones frescos sobrantes y aguas procedentes de la limpieza de equipos son un inconveniente a resolver en las plantas de hormigón. Este artículo explica varias posibilidades de reciclado y analiza los productos obtenidos en un equipo reciclador concreto, con el objetivo de estudiar el incremento del porcentaje de reciclaje en nuevas amasadas. El estudio realizado relaciona la densidad del agua de lavado y el contenido de partículas finas. Además, ensaya muestras de mortero y hormigón realizando sustituciones de estas partículas finas por cemento, arena o simplemente como adición. Determina consistencia, resistencia a compresión, principio y fin de fraguado, absorción y capilaridad. Los resultados indicaron un incremento general de las propiedades estudiadas en algunos porcentajes de sustitución por arena. Ello confirma la posibilidad de introducir mayores cantidades de agua de lavado en nuevas amasadas de hormigón, mediante correcciones en la dosificación de arena en función de la densidad del agua.

  14. Mixing of alcohol and water molecules studied by neutron probe. Structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Koji

    2001-01-01

    Structure of water/alcohol mixing solution was studied by three methods such as an isotope-exchanged neutron scattering method, RISM (Reference Interaction Site Model) integral equation and a neutron spin echo method. The principle of methods, experiments and results were reported. The results of experiments of water/tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) solution by the isotope-exchange neutron scattering method showed TBA molecule associated with each other through end methyl group. Especially this effect was the largest at x TBA = 0.06 and decreased with increasing the concentration of TBA. However, hydrogen bonding of TBA was very rare at x TBA = 0.06. By the partial radial distribution function obtained from RISM integral equation, it indicated that the structure of pure TBA became chain structure by hydrogen bond but changed to the structure contacted directly each hydrophobic group with increasing the concentration of water. Water/2-butoxyethanol (BE) mixing solution was measured by a neutron spin echo method. The activation energy of the diffusion coefficients obtained agreed to the energy of hydrogen bonding. The temperature response of diffusion coefficients showed the inverse of the experimental results obtained by the dynamic light scattering method. The difference between two measurement methods was different time scale and space scale. Namely, the object of the neutron scattering method is nano meter and nano second, but one of light scattering method many times over. It was proved from the above results that there was the cluster consisted of the same kind of molecule in the homogeneous two components solution, but the cluster was not stable and constantly exchanged with molecule, where the production and decay of the cluster is repeated at about nano sec. (S.Y.)

  15. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary

  16. Recharge Estimation Using Water, Chloride and Isotope Mass Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, S.; Firmani, G.; Hedley, P.; Skrzypek, G.; Grierson, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    Discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may elevate groundwater levels and alter the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers but it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid subtropical Hamersley Basin that has received continuous mine discharge for more than five years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 74 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.24‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ~ 65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ~35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the creek has not extended beyond 27 km from the discharge point. Our approach using a combination of hydrochemical and isotope methods coupled with classical surface flow hydraulic modelling allowed evaluation of components of water budget otherwise not possible in a highly dynamic system that is mainly driven by infrequent but large episodic

  17. Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Treated Waste Water for Mixing and Curing of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Kanwal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of the available resources is imperative approach to achieve the apex of productivity. The modern world is focusing on the conditioning, sustainability and recycling of the assets by imparting innovative techniques and methodologies. Keeping this in view, an experimental study was conducted to evaluate the strength of concrete made with treated waste water for structural use. In this study ninetysix cylinders of four mixes with coarse aggregates in combination with FW (Fresh Water, WW (Wastewater, TWW (Treated Wastewater and TS (Treated Sewagewere prepared. The workability of fresh concrete was checked before pouring of cylinders. The test cylinders were left for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for curing. After curing, the compressive strength was measured on hardened concrete cylinders accordingly. Test results showed that workability of all the four mixes were between 25-50mm but ultimate compressive strength of concrete with WW was decreased and with TWW, TS at the age of 28 days do not change significantly. This research will open a new wicket in the horizon of recycling of construction materials. The conditioning and cyclic utilization will reduce the cost of the construction and building materials as well as minimize the use of natural resources. This novelty and calculating approach will save our natural assets and resources.

  18. Characterization of Bacteria in Ballast Water Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Emami, K.; Askari, V.; Ullrich, M.; Mohinudeen, K.; Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Burgess, J.G.; Mesbahi, E.

    To evaluate a rapid and cost-effective method for monitoring bacteria in ballast water, several marine bacterial isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Since...

  19. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains data presented in the figures of the paper "On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass"...

  20. Biomarker Pigment Divinyl Chlorophyll a as a Tracer of Water Masses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdandzic, Maja; Mihanovic, Hrvoje; Silovic, Tina; Henderiks, Jorijntje; Supraha, Luka; Polovic, Dorotea; Bosak, Suncica; Bosnjak, Ivana; Cetinic, Ivona; Olujic, Goran; hide

    2015-01-01

    The ecological preferences of different Phytoplankton types drive their temporal and spatial distributions, reflecting their dependence on certain temperature ranges, light levels, nutrient availability and other environmental gradients. Hence, some phytoplankton taxa can be used as water mass tracers (biotracers).

  1. Land cover and water yield: inference problems when comparing catchments with mixed land cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. J. M. van Dijk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled experiments provide strong evidence that changing land cover (e.g. deforestation or afforestation can affect mean catchment streamflow (Q. By contrast, a similarly strong influence has not been found in studies that interpret Q from multiple catchments with mixed land cover. One possible reason is that there are methodological issues with the way in which the Budyko framework was used in the latter type studies. We examined this using Q data observed in 278 Australian catchments and by making inferences from synthetic Q data simulated by a hydrological process model (the Australian Water Resources Assessment system Landscape model. The previous contrasting findings could be reproduced. In the synthetic experiment, the land cover influence was still present but not accurately detected with the Budyko- framework. Likely sources of interpretation bias demonstrated include: (i noise in land cover, precipitation and Q data; (ii additional catchment climate characteristics more important than land cover; and (iii covariance between Q and catchment attributes. These methodological issues caution against the use of a Budyko framework to quantify a land cover influence in Q data from mixed land-cover catchments. Importantly, however, our findings do not rule out that there may also be physical processes that modify the influence of land cover in mixed land-cover catchments. Process model simulations suggested that lateral water redistribution between vegetation types and recirculation of intercepted rainfall may be important.

  2. Circulation and water masses of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    1500-3500 m). It is further speculated that the flow in this layer consists of a poleward western boundary current and a weak equatorward flow in the interior. It is not known if there is an annual cycle associated with the deep and the bottom water...

  3. Thermohaline structure and water masses in the north of Antarctic Peninsula from data collected in situ by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana E. K. C. Wainer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Western Antarctic Peninsula is rapidly warming and exhibits high indices of biodiversity concentrated mostly along its continental shelf. This region has great importance due to the the mixing caused by the interaction of waters from Weddell Sea (MW, Bransfield Strait (EB and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (CCA transmits thermohaline characteristics and nutrients of different sites and finally connects with all the world’s oceans. However, studies focusing on the temporal variability of the region’s oceanographic conditions that finally determine the water mass formation are sparse due to the logistical difficulties of conducting oceanographic surveys and traditional monitoring during the winter. For this study, variations of the thermohaline structure and water masses in the vicinity and below the sea ice in the North of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Scotia Sea (SS were recorded between February and November 2008 by two female southern elephant seals (SES, Mirounga leonina tagged with Conductivity–Temperature–Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD–SRDL. One thousand three hundred and thirty vertical profiles of temperature and salinity were collected by seals which were tagged by the MEOP-BR Project team at the Elephant Island, South Shetlands. These profiles, together with spread state diagrams allowed the identification of water masses and their variances in the ocean’s vertical structure. Among the set of identified water masses we cite: Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, Winter Water (WW, Warm Deep Water (WDW, Modified Warm Deep Water (MWDW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW, Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW and Ice Shelf Water (ISW. Our results show that the oceanic vertical structure undergoes changes that cannot be traditionally monitored, particularly during the Austral winter and that SES are important and modern oceanographic data collection platforms allowing for the improvement of our

  4. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol, small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds.

  5. Radium variability produced by shelf-water transport and mixing in the western Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    226 Ra and 228 Ra exhibit significant temporal and spatial variability in the near-surface western Gulf of Mexico. Concentrations of both isotopes during March 1976 were approx. 22 to 26% greater than those observed during February 1973. It is shown that analytical differences cannot account for this increase. Consideration of radium levels in the western Caribbean Sea indicates that there must be an internal source of radium that has a significant but temporally variable influence on near-surface radium concentrations in the western Gulf. Comparisons of radium, salinity, and temperature data from 1973 and 1976 provide evidence that advective transport and mixing of radium-rich shelf water with the interior water column of the western basin is responsible for the variability. By plotting 228 Ra vs 226 Ra from this region, estimates of the apparent shelf-water component in the upper water column can be made. The results indicate 36% over the northern slope, 10 to 18% in the central western Gulf, and 3 to 7% over Campeche Bank. In addition to explaining observed short-term variations of radium in this region, this information should be useful for environmental impact assessments concerned with industrial discharges on the northern shelf. (author)

  6. Residence times and mixing of water in river banks: implications for recharge and groundwater-surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Cendón, D. I.; Chisari, R.

    2014-12-01

    Bank exchange processes within 50 m of the Tambo River, southeast Australia, have been investigated through the combined use of 3H and 14C. Groundwater residence times increase towards the Tambo River, which suggests the absence of significant bank storage. Major ion concentrations and δ2H and δ18O values of bank water also indicate that bank infiltration does not significantly impact groundwater chemistry under baseflow and post-flood conditions, suggesting that the gaining nature of the river may be driving the return of bank storage water back into the Tambo River within days of peak flood conditions. The covariance between 3H and 14C indicates the leakage and mixing between old (~17 200 years) groundwater from a semi-confined aquifer and younger groundwater (bank infiltration. Furthermore, the more saline deeper groundwater likely controls the geochemistry of water in the river bank, minimising the chemical impact that bank infiltration has in this setting. These processes, coupled with the strongly gaining nature of the Tambo River are likely to be the factors reducing the chemical impact of bank storage in this setting. This study illustrates the complex nature of river groundwater interactions and the potential downfall in assuming simple or idealised conditions when conducting hydrogeological studies.

  7. Water vapor mass balance method for determining air infiltration rates in houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; Gordon M. Heisler

    1980-01-01

    A water vapor mass balance technique that includes the use of common humidity-control equipment can be used to determine average air infiltration rates in buildings. Only measurements of the humidity inside and outside the home, the mass of vapor exchanged by a humidifier/dehumidifier, and the volume of interior air space are needed. This method gives results that...

  8. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer of water- Vapor in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor into a cylindrical zeolite adsorber has been numerically simulated The twodimensional heat and mass transfer equations are numerically solved using gPROMS program - a general Process Modeling System {lJ program, inserting the proper initial and ...

  9. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jn this paper, the combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor into a cylindrical zeolite adsorber has been numerically simulated The twodimensional heat and mass transfer equations are numerically solved using gPROMS program - a general Process Modeling System [J] program, inserting the proper initial and ...

  10. Model description of dibenzothiophene mass transfer in oil/water dispersions with respect to biodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.; Leeuwen, van M.; Polderman, H.G.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed in order to describe the mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene within the oil droplet to the oil/water interface of droplets created in a stirred tank reactor. The mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene was calculated for various complex hydrocarbon distillates

  11. Physicochemical investigation of mixed surfactant microemulsions: water solubilization, thermodynamic properties, microstructure, and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Soumik; Kundu, Kaushik; Saha, Swapan K; Paul, Bidyut K

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution, we report on a systematic investigation of phase behavior and solubilization of water in water-in-heptane or decane aggregates stabilized by mixtures of polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl ether (Brij-58) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactants with varying compositions in conjugation with 1-pentanol (Pn) at fixed surfactant(s)/Pn ratio and temperature. Synergism in water solubilization was evidenced by the addition of CTAB to Brij-58 stabilized system in close proximity of equimolar composition in both oils. An attempt has been made to correlate composition dependent water solubilization and volume induced conductivity studies to provide insight into the solubilization mechanism of these mixed systems. Conductivity studies reveal the ascending curve in water solubilization capacity-(Brij-58:CTAB, w/w) profile as the interdroplet interaction branch indicating percolation of conductance and the descending curve is a curvature branch due to the rigidity of the interface in these systems. The microstructure of these systems as a function of surfactant composition has been determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. FTIR study reveals increase and decrease in relative population of bound and bulk-like water, respectively, with increase in Brij-58:CTAB (w/w). DLS measurements showed that the droplet hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) decreases significantly with the increase in Brij-58:CTAB (w/w). Further, the interfacial composition and energetic parameters for the transfer of Pn from bulk oil to the interface were evaluated by the dilution method. Formation of temperature-insensitive microemulsions and temperature invariant droplet sizes are evidenced in the vicinity of the equimolar composition. The results are interpreted in terms of a proposed mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Water reactivity with mixed oxide (U,Pu)O2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of water with actinides oxide surfaces remains poorly understood. The adsorption of water on PuO 2 surface and (U,Pu)O 2 surface leads to hydrogen generation through radiolysis but also surface evolution. The study of water interaction with mixed oxide (U,Pu)O 2 and PuO 2 surfaces requires the implementation of non intrusive techniques. The study of the hydration of CeO 2 surface is used to study the effectiveness of different techniques. The results show that the water adsorption leads to the surface evolution through the formation of a hydroxide superficial layer. The reactivity of water on the surface depends on the calcination temperature of the oxide precursor. The thermal treatment of hydrated surfaces can regenerate the surface. The study on CeO 2 hydration emphasizes the relevancies of these techniques in studying the hydration of surfaces. The hydrogen generation through water radiolysis is studied with an experimental methodology based on constant relative humidity in the radiolysis cell. The hydrogen accumulation is linear for the first hours and then tends to a steady state content. A mechanism of hydrogen consumption is proposed to explain the existence of the steady state of hydrogen content. This mechanism enables to explain also the evolution of the oxide surface during hydrogen generation experiments as shown by the evolution of hydrogen accumulation kinetics. The accumulation kinetics depends on the dose rate, specific surface area and the relative humidity but also on the oxide aging. The plutonium percentage appears to be a crucial parameter in hydrogen accumulation kinetics. (author) [fr

  13. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  14. Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tsz-Tsun; So, Pui-Kin; Zheng, Bo [Food Safety and Technology Research Centre, State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences and Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Food Biological Safety Control and State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology (Incubation), Shenzhen Research Institute of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen (China); Yao, Zhong-Ping, E-mail: zhongping.yao@polyu.edu.hk [Food Safety and Technology Research Centre, State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences and Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Food Biological Safety Control and State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology (Incubation), Shenzhen Research Institute of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • Simplified sample preparation method for direct analysis of edible oils by MALDI-MS. • Establishment of a preliminary MALDI-MS spectral database of edible oils. • Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils. - Abstract: Authentication of edible oils is a long-term issue in food safety, and becomes particularly important with the emergence and wide spread of gutter oils in recent years. Due to the very high analytical demand and diversity of gutter oils, a high throughput analytical method and a versatile strategy for authentication of mixed edible oils and gutter oils are highly desirable. In this study, an improved matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method has been developed for direct analysis of edible oils. This method involved on-target sample loading, automatic data acquisition and simple data processing. MALDI-MS spectra with high quality and high reproducibility have been obtained using this method, and a preliminary spectral database of edible oils has been set up. The authenticity of an edible oil sample can be determined by comparing its MALDI-MS spectrum and principal component analysis (PCA) results with those of its labeled oil in the database. This method is simple and the whole process only takes several minutes for analysis of one oil sample. We demonstrated that the method was sensitive to change in oil compositions and can be used for measuring compositions of mixed oils. The capability of the method for determining mislabeling enables it for rapid screening of gutter oils since fraudulent mislabeling is a common feature of gutter oils.

  15. Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Tsz-Tsun; So, Pui-Kin; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simplified sample preparation method for direct analysis of edible oils by MALDI-MS. • Establishment of a preliminary MALDI-MS spectral database of edible oils. • Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils. - Abstract: Authentication of edible oils is a long-term issue in food safety, and becomes particularly important with the emergence and wide spread of gutter oils in recent years. Due to the very high analytical demand and diversity of gutter oils, a high throughput analytical method and a versatile strategy for authentication of mixed edible oils and gutter oils are highly desirable. In this study, an improved matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method has been developed for direct analysis of edible oils. This method involved on-target sample loading, automatic data acquisition and simple data processing. MALDI-MS spectra with high quality and high reproducibility have been obtained using this method, and a preliminary spectral database of edible oils has been set up. The authenticity of an edible oil sample can be determined by comparing its MALDI-MS spectrum and principal component analysis (PCA) results with those of its labeled oil in the database. This method is simple and the whole process only takes several minutes for analysis of one oil sample. We demonstrated that the method was sensitive to change in oil compositions and can be used for measuring compositions of mixed oils. The capability of the method for determining mislabeling enables it for rapid screening of gutter oils since fraudulent mislabeling is a common feature of gutter oils

  16. Influence of multivalent ions on power production from mixing salt and fresh water with a reverse electrodialysis system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.W.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse electrodialysis is a membrane-based technique for production of sustainable electricity from controlled mixing of a diluted electrolyte solution (e.g., river water) and a concentrated electrolyte solution (e.g., sea water). Reverse electrodialysis has been investigated with pure sodium

  17. Evaluation of Aerosol Mixing State Classes in the GISS Modele-matrix Climate Model Using Single-particle Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Ault, Andrew; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state, which describes how chemical species are mixed at the single-particle level, provides critical information on microphysical characteristics that determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system. The evaluation of mixing state has become the next challenge. This study uses aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) data and compares the results to those of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies modelE-MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state) model, a global climate model that includes a detailed aerosol microphysical scheme. We use data from field campaigns that examine a variety of air mass regimens (urban, rural, and maritime). At all locations, polluted areas in California (Riverside, La Jolla, and Long Beach), a remote location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sugar Pine) and observations from Jeju (South Korea), the majority of aerosol species are internally mixed. Coarse aerosol particles, those above 1 micron, are typically aged, such as coated dust or reacted sea-salt particles. Particles below 1 micron contain large fractions of organic material, internally-mixed with sulfate and black carbon, and few external mixtures. We conclude that observations taken over multiple weeks characterize typical air mass types at a given location well; however, due to the instrumentation, we could not evaluate mass budgets. These results represent the first detailed comparison of single-particle mixing states in a global climate model with real-time single-particle mass spectrometry data, an important step in improving the representation of mixing state in global climate models.

  18. Mass and Energy Balances of Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion Treating Swine Manure Mixed with Rice Straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Jining; Zou, Guoyan; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of swine manure treatment by a proposed Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (DT-AD) system, we evaluated the methane yield of swine manure treated using a DT-AD method with rice straw under different C/N ratios and solid retention time (SRT) and calculated the mass and energy balances when the DT-AD system is used for swine manure treatment from a model farm with 1000 pigs and the digested residue is used for forage rice production. A traditional swine manure treatment Oxidation Ditch system was used as the study control. The results suggest that methane yield using the proposed DT-AD system increased with a higher C/N ratio and shorter SRT. Correspondently, for the DT-AD system running with SRT of 80 days, the net energy yields for all treatments were negative, due to low biogas production and high heat loss of digestion tank. However, the biogas yield increased when the SRT was shortened to 40 days, and the generated energy was greater than consumed energy when C/N ratio was 20 : 1 and 30 : 1. The results suggest that with the correct optimization of C/N ratio and SRT, the proposed DT-AD system, followed by using digestate for forage rice production, can attain energy self-sufficiency.

  19. Mass transfer of H2O between petroleum and water: implications for oil field water sample quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCartney, R.A.; Ostvold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Water mass transfer can occur between water and petroleum during changes in pressure and temperature. This process can result in the dilution or concentration of dissolved ions in the water phase of oil field petroleum-water samples. In this study, PVT simulations were undertaken for 4 petroleum-water systems covering a range of reservoir conditions (80-185 o C; 300-1000 bar) and a range of water-petroleum mixtures (volume ratios of 1:1000-300:1000) to quantify the extent of H 2 O mass transfer as a result of pressure and temperature changes. Conditions were selected to be relevant to different types of oil field water sample (i.e. surface, downhole and core samples). The main variables determining the extent of dilution and concentration were found to be: (a) reservoir pressure and temperature, (b) pressure and temperature of separation of water and petroleum, (c) petroleum composition, and (d) petroleum:water ratio (PWR). The results showed that significant dilution and concentration of water samples could occur, particularly at high PWR. It was not possible to establish simple guidelines for identifying good and poor quality samples due to the interplay of the above variables. Sample quality is best investigated using PVT software of the type used in this study. (author)

  20. Lithium isotope effects in cation exchange chromatography of lithium lactate in water-dimethyl sulfoxide and water-acetone mixed solvent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Takao; Kondoh, Akiko; Ohno, Etsuko; Hosoe, Morikazu

    1993-01-01

    Lithium isotope separation by ion exchange displacement chromatography of lithium lactate in water-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water-acetone mixed solvent media at 25 C was explored. In both the water-DMSO and water-acetone system, the single stage isotope separation factor (S) was a convex function of the mixing ratio of the solvents in the external solution phase; S had its maximum value of 1.00254 at water: DMSO=25:75 v/v and 1.00182 at water: acetone=75:25 v/v. Strong correlations of S with solvent partitions between the solution and the exchanger phases were found in both systems, which was qualitatively explainable by considering the lithium isotope distributions between the two phases based on the fundamental lithium isotope effects and the relative affinities of water, DMSO and acetone towards the lithium ion. (orig.)

  1. [Mass maritime casualty incidents in German waters: structures and resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castan, J; Paschen, H-R; Wirtz, S; Dörges, V; Wenderoth, S; Peters, J; Blunk, Y; Bielstein, A; Kerner, T

    2012-07-01

    The Central Command for Maritime Emergencies was founded in Germany in 2003 triggered by the fire on board of the cargo ship "Pallas" in 1998. Its mission is to coordinate and direct measures at or above state level in maritime emergency situations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. A special task in this case is to provide firefighting and medical care. To face these challenges at sea emergency doctors and firemen have been specially trained. This form of organization provides a concept to counter mass casualty incidents and peril situations at sea. Since the foundation of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies there have been 5 operations for firefighting units and 4 for medical response teams. Assignments and structure of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies are unique in Europe.

  2. Spreading of water masses and regeneration of silica and sup(226)Ra in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Yuan-Hui, Li

    The magnitudes of silica and sup(226) RA inputs to water (through particle regeneration, in situ, and from sediments) and the validity of observed Si and sup(226) Ra as tracers of water masses and advective processes were examined in the Indian...

  3. Water masses and general hydrography along the west coast of India during early March

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Varkey, M.J.; Das, V.K.; Gouveia, A.D.

    Structure of water masses along the west coast of India from Bombay to Trivandrum has been studied through vertical sections of temperature, salinity and density during 3-17 March 1977. The Arabian Sea high salinity water spreads south as a core...

  4. The physiological response to cold-water immersion following a mixed martial arts training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Angus; Carr, Sam; Cross, Sean; Petersen, Carl; Lewis, John G; Gieseg, Steven P

    2017-05-01

    Combative sport is one of the most physically intense forms of exercise, yet the effect of recovery interventions has been largely unexplored. We investigated the effect of cold-water immersion on structural, inflammatory, and physiological stress biomarkers following a mixed martial arts (MMA) contest preparation training session in comparison with passive recovery. Semiprofessional MMA competitors (n = 15) were randomly assigned to a cold-water immersion (15 min at 10 °C) or passive recovery protocol (ambient air) completed immediately following a contest preparation training session. Markers of muscle damage (urinary myoglobin), inflammation/oxidative stress (urinary neopterin + total neopterin (neopterin + 7,8-dihydroneopterin)), and hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) activation (saliva cortisol) were determined before, immediately after, and 1, 2, and 24 h postsession. Ratings of perceived soreness and fatigue, counter movement jump, and gastrointestinal temperature were also measured. Concentrations of all biomarkers increased significantly (p < 0.05) postsession. Cold water immersion attenuated increases in urinary neopterin (p < 0.05, d = 0.58), total neopterin (p < 0.05, d = 0.89), and saliva cortisol after 2 h (p < 0.05, d = 0.68) and urinary neopterin again at 24 h (p < 0.01, d = 0.57) in comparison with passive recovery. Perceived soreness, fatigue, and gastrointestinal temperatures were also lower for the cold-water immersion group at several time points postsession whilst counter movement jump did not differ. Combative sport athletes who are subjected to impact-induced stress may benefit from immediate cold-water immersion as a simple recovery intervention that reduces delayed onset muscle soreness as well as macrophage and HPA activation whilst not impairing functional performance.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Controlling Thermal Cracks in Mass Concrete Foundation by Circulating Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes an engineering experience of solving the problem of thermal cracking in mass concrete by using a large project, Zhongguancun No.1 (Beijing, China, as an example. A new method is presented for controlling temperature cracks in the mass concrete of a foundation. The method involves controlled cycles of water circulating between the surface of mass concrete foundation and the atmospheric environment. The temperature gradient between the surface and the core of the mass concrete is controlled at a relatively stable state. Water collected from the well-points used for dewatering and from rainfall is used as the source for circulating water. Mass concrete of a foundation slab is experimentally investigated through field temperature monitoring. Numerical analyses are performed by developing a finite element model of the foundation with and without water circulation. The calculation parameters are proposed based on the experiment, and finite element analysis software MIDAS/CIVIL is used to calculate the 3D temperature field of the mass concrete during the entire process of heat of hydration. The numerical results are in good agreement with the measured results. The proposed method provides an alternative practical basis for preventing thermal cracks in mass concrete.

  6. PES-Kaolin Mixed Matrix Membranes for Arsenic Removal from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tiziana; Russo, Francesca; Rezzouk, Lina; Bouzid, Abderrazak; Figoli, Alberto

    2017-09-30

    The aim of this work was the fabrication and the characterization of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for arsenic (As) removal from water. Membrane separation was combined with an adsorption process by incorporating the kaolin (KT2) Algerian natural clay in polymeric membranes. The effects of casting solution composition was explored using different amounts of polyethersufone (PES) as a polymer, polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP K17) and polyethylene glycol (PEG 200) as pore former agents, N -methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent, and kaolin. Membranes were prepared by coupling Non-solvent Induced Phase Separation and Vapour Induced Phase Separation (NIPS and VIPS, respectively). The influence of the exposure time to controlled humid air and temperature was also investigated. The MMMs obtained were characterized in terms of morphology, pore size, porosity, thickness, contact angle and pure water permeability. Adsorption membrane-based tests were carried out in order to assess the applicability of the membranes produced for As removal from contaminated water. Among the investigated kaolin concentrations (ranging from 0 wt % to 5 wt %), a content of 1.25 wt % led to the MMM with the most promising performance.

  7. Livestock and feed water productivity in the mixed crop-livestock system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, M; Mengistu, A; Tamir, B

    2017-10-01

    Recently with limited information from intensified grain-based farming systems in developed countries, livestock production is challenged as being huge consumer of freshwater. The smallholder mixed crop-livestock (MCL) system which is predominant in developing countries like Ethiopia, is maintained with considerable contributions of crop residues (CR) to livestock feeding. Inclusion of CR is expected to reduce the water requirement for feed production resulting improvement in livestock water productivity (LWP). This study was conducted to determine feed water productivity (FWP) and LWP in the MCL system. A multistage sampling procedure was followed to select farmers from different wealth status. Wealth status dictated by ownership of key farm resources such as size of cropland and livestock influenced the magnitude of livestock outputs, FWP and LWP. Significant difference in feed collected, freshwater evapotranspired, livestock outputs and water productivity (WP) were observed between wealth groups, where wealthier are relatively more advantaged. Water productivity of CR and grazing land (GL) analyzed separately showed contrasting differences where better-off gained more on CR, whereas vice versa on GL. These counterbalancing of variations may justify the non-significant difference in total FWP between wealth groups. Despite observed differences, low WP on GL indicates the need of interventions at all levels. The variation in WP of CR is attributed to availability of production factors which restrained the capacity of poor farmers most. A linear relationship between the proportion of CR in livestock feed and FWP was evident, but the relationship with LWP was not likely linear. As CR are inherently low in digestibility and nutritive values which have an effect on feed conversion into valuable livestock products and services, increasing share of CR beyond an optimum level is not a viable option to bring improvements in livestock productivity as expressed in terms of

  8. Effects of Thinning Intensities on Soil Infiltration and Water Storage Capacity in a Chinese Pine-Oak Mixed Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lili; Yuan, Zhiyou; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Dexiang; Mu, Xingmin

    2014-01-01

    Thinning is a crucial practice in the forest ecosystem management. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity of pine-oak mixed forest under three different thinning intensity treatments (15%, 30%, and 60%) were studied in Qinling Mountains of China. The thinning operations had a significant influence on soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity in different thinning treatments followed the order of control (nonthinning):

  9. Mixing regime as a key factor to determine DON formation in drinking water biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changqing; Li, Shuai; Gong, Song; Yuan, Shoujun; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as precursor of nitrogenous disinfection by-products formed during chlorination disinfection. The performances of biological fluidized bed (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and bio-ceramic filters (plug flow reactor, PFR) were compared in this study to investigate the influence of mixing regime on DON formation in drinking water treatment. In the shared influent, DON ranged from 0.71mgL(-1) to 1.20mgL(-1). The two biological fluidized bed reactors, named BFB1 (mechanical stirring) and BFB2 (air agitation), contained 0.12 and 0.19mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Meanwhile, the bio-ceramic reactors, labeled as BCF1 (no aeration) and BCF2 (with aeration), had 1.02 and 0.81mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Comparative results showed that the CSTR mixing regime significantly reduced DON formation. This particular reduction was further investigated in this study. The viable/total microbial biomass was determined with propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) and qPCR, respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that the microbes in BFB2 had higher viability than those in BCF2. The viable bacteria decreased more sharply than the total bacteria along the media depth in BCF2, and DON in BCF2 accumulated in the deeper media. These phenomena suggested that mixing regime determined DON formation by influencing the distribution of viable, total biomass, and ratio of viable biomass to total biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of tubular reactor designs for supercritical water oxidation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for industrial waste treatment and is being developed for treatment of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes. In the SCWO process, wastes containing organic material are oxidized in the presence of water at conditions of temperature and pressure above the critical point of water, 374 C and 22.1 MPa. DOE mixed wastes consist of a broad spectrum of liquids, sludges, and solids containing a wide variety of organic components plus inorganic components including radionuclides. This report is a review and evaluation of tubular reactor designs for supercritical water oxidation of US Department of Energy mixed waste. Tubular reactors are evaluated against requirements for treatment of US Department of Energy mixed waste. Requirements that play major roles in the evaluation include achieving acceptable corrosion, deposition, and heat removal rates. A general evaluation is made of tubular reactors and specific reactors are discussed. Based on the evaluations, recommendations are made regarding continued development of supercritical water oxidation reactors for US Department of Energy mixed waste

  11. Mathematical modeling of water mass balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari; Nik Suhaimi Mat Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Water plays a critical role in PEMFC. The proton conductivity is increase with the water content. In order to achieve enough hydration, water is normally introduced into the cell externally by a variety of methods such as liquid injection, steam introduction, and humidification of reactants by passing them through humidifiers before entering the cell. In this paper, mathematical modeling of water mass balance for PEMFC at anode and cathode side are proposed by using external humidification and assume that steady state, constant pressure, constant temperature and gases distribution are uniform

  12. Residence times and mixing of water in river banks: implications for recharge and groundwater - surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Cendón, D. I.; Chisari, R.

    2014-02-01

    The residence time of groundwater within 50 m of the Tambo River, South East Australia, has been estimated through the combined use of 3H and 14C. Groundwater residence times increase towards the Tambo River which implies a gaining river system and not increasing bank storage with proximity to the Tambo River. Major ion concentrations and δ2H and δ18O values of bank water also indicate that bank infiltration does not significantly impact groundwater chemistry under baseflow and post-flood conditions, suggesting that the gaining nature of the river may be driving the return of bank storage water back into the Tambo River within days of peak flood conditions. The covariance between 3H and 14C indicates the leakage and mixing between old (~17 200 yr) groundwater from a semi-confined aquifer and younger groundwater (bank storage, as rapid pressure propagation into the semi-confined aquifer during flooding will minimise bank infiltration. This study illustrates the complex nature of river groundwater interactions and the potential downfall in assuming simple or idealised conditions when conducting hydrogeological studies.

  13. Cm3+-F- interaction in a mixed system of methanol and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, I.; Watanabe, T.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suganuma, H.

    2003-01-01

    The stability constants (β 1 ) of the monofluoro complex of Cm(III) have been determined in mixed solvents of methanol and water using the solvent extraction technique. The values of Inβ 1 increase as the molar fraction of methanol (X s ) in the mixed solvent increases. The variation in the stability constants mainly depends on the solvation of F - and slightly depends on both (1) the solvation of cations in connection with the complexation of CmF 2+ and (2) the electrostatic attraction of Cm 3+ -F - . The variation in Inβ 1 for Cm(III) due to the effect of both (1) and (2) is similar to that for Sm(III). By variation of Inβ 1 the coordination number in the primary hydration sphere (CN) of Cm(III) decreased from a value between CN = 9 and CN = 8 to CN = 8, at about X s = 0.02. The X s value of the inflection point of the CN for Cm is slightly lower than X s = 0.06 for Sm(III) and X s = 0.03 for Eu(III), previously obtained. (author)

  14. Electronic structures and water reactivity of mixed metal sulfide cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structures and chemical reactivity of the mixed metal sulfide cluster anion (MoWS{sub 4}{sup −}) have been investigated with density functional theory. Our study reveals the presence of two almost isoenergetic structural isomers, both containing two bridging sulfur atoms in a quartet state. However, the arrangement of the terminal sulfur atoms is different in the two isomers. In one isomer, the two metals are in the same oxidation state (each attached to one terminal S). In the second isomer, the two metals are in different oxidation states (with W in the higher oxidation state attached to both terminal S). The reactivity of water with the two lowest energy isomers has also been studied, with an emphasis on pathways leading to H{sub 2} release. The reactive behavior of the two isomers is different though the overall barriers in both systems are small. The origin of the differences are analyzed and discussed. The reaction pathways and barriers are compared with the corresponding behavior of monometallic sulfides (Mo{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup −} and W{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup −}) as well as mixed metal oxides (MoWO{sub 4}{sup −})

  15. Managing mixed fisheries in the European western waters: application of Fcube methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iriondo, Ane; García, Dorleta; Santurtún, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Fisheries management is moving towards ecosystem based management instead of traditional single species based advice. To progress towards an ecosystem approach, a new methodology called “Fleet and Fisheries Forecast” (Fcube) has been proposed. In the application of the method, a precise initial f...... the lowest. In this analysis, Western Waters fleet management results show consistency between stocks and their respective TACs. The study highlights that it is possible to deliver advice within the context of mixed fisheries using the Fcube method......Fisheries management is moving towards ecosystem based management instead of traditional single species based advice. To progress towards an ecosystem approach, a new methodology called “Fleet and Fisheries Forecast” (Fcube) has been proposed. In the application of the method, a precise initial...

  16. A High-Resolution Model of Water Mass Transformation and Transport in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, J.; Stewart, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean circulation around the Antarctic margins has a pronounced impact on the global ocean and climate system. One of these impacts includes closing the global meridional overturning circulation (MOC) via formation of dense Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), which ventilates a large fraction of the subsurface ocean. AABW is also partially composed of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), a warm, mid-depth water mass whose transport towards the continent has the potential to induce rapid retreat of marine-terminating glaciers. Previous studies suggest that these water mass exchanges may be strongly influenced by high-frequency processes such as downslope gravity currents, tidal flows, and mesoscale/submesoscale eddy transport. However, evaluating the relative contributions of these processes to near-Antarctic water mass transports is hindered by the region's relatively small scales of motion and the logistical difficulties in taking measurements beneath sea ice.In this study we develop a regional model of the Weddell Sea, the largest established source of AABW. The model is forced by an annually-repeating atmospheric state constructed from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System data and by annually-repeating lateral boundary conditions constructed from the Southern Ocean State Estimate. The model incorporates the full Filchner-Ronne cavity and simulates the thermodynamics and dynamics of sea ice. To analyze the role of high-frequency processes in the transport and transformation of water masses, we compute the model's overturning circulation, water mass transformations, and ice sheet basal melt at model horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 1/2 degree to 1/24 degree. We temporally decompose the high-resolution (1/24 degree) model circulation into components due to mean, eddy and tidal flows and discuss the geographical dependence of these processes and their impact on water mass transformation and transport.

  17. Charaterising water-rock interaction in a mixed carbonate-evaporite karstified aquifer system, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirathititham, R.; Whitaker, F.

    2017-12-01

    Qatar is an arid country, most of the rainfall (80 mm/yr) occurring during intense storms. Surface runoff is endorheic and recharge is facilitated by karst features developed over an extended (c.30 Ma) period of exposure of the carbonate bedrock. In December 2016, we sampled a rare intense rainfall event (41 mm over 3 days), after which waters ponded within low-relief terminal depressions prior to infiltration. We compare the chemistry of these recharge waters with that of ground waters from 76 wells distributed across Qatar to understand the nature and spatial distribution of water-rock interaction. Using Cl- as a conservative tracer for seawater mixing, we calculate concentrations of rock-derived Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42-. During surface detention, rain chemistry is modified by evaporation and interaction with clays and the surface bedrock over days to weeks. However, groundwater chemistry is dominated by subsurface interaction between recharge waters and the karstified Tertiary aquifers. These include the largely dolomitic Paleocene to Lower Eocene Umm er Radhuma (UER) and overlying Lower Eocene Rus, with the Middle Eocene Abarug limestone forming a locally important aquifer in the south west. Away from coastal areas which show clear evidence of salinisation, TDS of groundwaters in the interior of the peninsula increases from north to south. All groundwaters are significantly enriched in SO42-, but this enrichment is marked greater in the south. This likely reflects the presence of a unit of middle Rus gypsum that in the south of the country confines the Lower Rus and UER aquifers, whilst in the north either gypsum was not deposited or has been dissolved. Waters in the Abarug limestone show limited sulfate enrichment and a 1:1 molar ratio of rock-derived SO42-: Ca2+, but across much of the country both SO42- enrichment and SO42-: Ca2+ molar ratio are significantly higher, the latter reaching 2:1 and suggesting an additional sink for Ca2+. The dolomite aquifer waters

  18. Flow reversal in combined laminar mixed convection heat and mass transfer with phase change in a vertical channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulaid, Othmane; Benhamou, Brahim; Galanis, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    This paper, deals with a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy forces on an upward, steady state, laminar flow of humid air in a vertical parallel-plate channel. The plates are wetted by a thin liquid water film and maintained at a constant temperature which is lower than that of the air entering the channel. A 2D fully elliptical model, associated with the Boussinesq assumption, is used to take into account axial diffusion. The solution of this mathematical model is based on the finite volume method and the velocity-pressure coupling is handled by the SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results show that buoyancy forces have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic, thermal and mass fraction fields. Additionally, these forces induce flow reversal for high air temperatures and mass fractions at the channel entrance. It is established that heat transfer associated with phase change is, sometimes, more significant than sensible heat transfer. Furthermore, this importance depends on the mass fraction gradient. The conditions for the existence of flow reversal are presented in charts and analytical expressions specifying the critical thermal Grashof number as a function of the Reynolds number for different values of the solutal Grashof number and different aspect ratios of the channel.

  19. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in Distinct Arctic Water Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Müller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most abundant archaeal groups on Earth is the Thaumarchaeota. They are recognized as major contributors to marine ammonia oxidation, a crucial step in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. Their universal success is attributed to a high genomic flexibility and niche adaptability. Based on differences in the gene coding for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA, two different ecotypes with distinct distribution patterns in the water column have been identified. We used high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes combined with archaeal amoA functional gene clone libraries to investigate which environmental factors are driving the distribution of Thaumarchaeota ecotypes in the Atlantic gateway to the Arctic Ocean through an annual cycle in 2014. We observed the characteristic vertical pattern of Thaumarchaeota abundance with high values in the mesopelagic (>200 m water throughout the entire year, but also in the epipelagic (<200 m water during the dark winter months (January, March and November. The Thaumarchaeota community was dominated by three OTUs which on average comprised 76% ± 11 and varied in relative abundance according to water mass characteristics and not to depth or ammonium concentration, as suggested in previous studies. The ratios of the abundance of the different OTU types were similar to that of the functional amoA water cluster types. Together, this suggests a strong selection of ecotypes within different water masses, supporting the general idea of water mass characteristics as an important factor in defining microbial community structure. If indeed, as suggested in this study, Thaumarchaeota population dynamics are controlled by a set of factors, described here as water mass characteristics and not just depth alone, then changes in water mass flow will inevitably affect the distribution of the different ecotypes.

  20. Derivation of an empirical formula for determining water content of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Duck Kee; Choi, Byung Il; Ro, Seung Gy; Eom, Tae Yoon; Kim, Zong Goo

    1986-01-01

    Densities of a large number of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions were measured with pycnometer. By the least squares analysis of the experimental result, an empirical formula for determining water content of mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions as functions of uranium concentration, thorium concentration and nitric acid normality is derived; W=1.0-0.3580 C u -0.4538 C Th -0.0307H + where W, C u , C Th , and H + stand for water content(g/cc), uranium concentration (g/cc), thorium concentration(g/cc), and nitric acid normality, respectively. Water contents of the mixed uranyl nitrate-thorium nitrate solutions are calculated by using the empirical formular, and compared with the values calculated by Bouly's equation in which an additional data, solution density, is required. The two results show good agreements within 2.7%. (Author)

  1. An experimental investigation of the thermal mixing in a water pool using a simplified I-sparger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Jun, H. G.; Youn, Y. J.; Park, C. K.; Song, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    The SDVS (Safety Depressurization and Vent System) in the APR1400 is designed to cope with some DBEs (Design Bases Events) and beyond-DBEs related to overpressurization of the RCS (Reactor Coolant System). When the POSRV (Power Operated Safety Relief Valve) is actuated, steam from the pressurizer is discharged to the IRWST(In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank) through I-spargers. When injected steam is condensed in the pool, it induces water motions and temperature variations in the pool, which effects on the steam jet condensation, vice versa. The B and C(Blowdown and Condensation) loop is a test facility for the thermal mixing through a steam sparger in a water pool. Thermal mixing tests provide basic understanding of the physics and some insights related to efficient pool mixing, dynamic load, and the IRWST design improvement etc

  2. Numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer for water recovery in an evaporative cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsub; Son, Gihun

    2017-11-01

    Numerical analysis is performed for water recovery in an evaporative cooling tower using a condensing heat exchanger, which consists of a humid air channel and an ambient dry air channel. The humid air including water vapor produced in an evaporative cooling tower is cooled by the ambient dry air so that the water vapor is condensed and recovered to the liquid water. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and vapor concentration in each fluid region and the energy equation in a solid region are simultaneously solved with the heat and mass transfer boundary conditions coupled to the effect of condensation on the channel surface of humid air. The present computation demonstrates the condensed water film distribution on the humid air channel, which is caused by the vapor mass transfer between the humid air and the colder water film surface, which is coupled to the indirect heat exchange with the ambient air. Computations are carried out to predict water recovery rate in parallel, counter and cross-flow type heat exchangers. The effects of air flow rate and channel interval on the water recovery rate are quantified.

  3. Water and Electricity Do Mix: Studying Plates, Petroleum, and Permafrost using Marine Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, S.

    2015-12-01

    Marine magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) sounding methods were developed in the early 1980's as deep-water academic tools to study the oceanic lithosphere and mantle. Electrical conductivity is a strong function of porosity, temperature, melting, and volatile content, and so marine MT and CSEM data can be used to address a variety of geological questions related to plate tectonics. These include the distribution of melt at mid-ocean ridges, the fate of fluids in subduction zones, and the nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. With the advent of deepwater oil and gas drilling in the late 1990's, marine EM methods were embraced by the exploration community, and are now routinely used to assist in exploration and make drilling decisions for wells costing $100M or more. For countries without conventional hydrocarbon resources, gas hydrate offers the potential for energy production, and marine CSEM methods may be the only effective way to explore for and characterize this resource. The use of EM methods to map geothermal, groundwater, and mineral resources also has application in the marine environment. Water and electricity has proved to be a very successful mix!

  4. Solubility of mixed monomers of tetrafluoroethylene and propylene in water and latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromasa; Okamoto, Jiro

    1978-03-01

    For kinetical analysis of the emulsion copolymerization of tetrafluoroethylene with propylene and selection of the optimum reaction conditions, the monomer concentrations and composition of the polymer particle were measured and the relations with reaction conditions were determined. Solubilities of tetrafluoroethylene and propylene in water increase with pressure. solubility of propylene is larger than that of tetrafluoroethylene. Solubility of the mixed monomers in water and latex increases with pressure and propylene concentration and decreases with temperature. Propylene concentration in the dissolved monomers is dependent on its concentration in the gas phase and independent of pressure and temperature. The monomer concentrations and the composition were estimated from measurements. Under propylene concentration in the gas phase of 0 to 40 wt % at 30 Kg/cm 2 G and 40 0 C, the monomer concentration and propylene fraction of the polymer particle are 17 -- 27% and 0 -- 62% respectively. The amount of propylene in the particle increases with its fraction in the gas phase, but the amount of tetrafluoroethylene is independent of its fraction in the gas phase. Monomer composition of the polymer particle is dependent on monomer composition of the gas phase and independent of temperature and pressure. The concentration in the polymer particle is 17% at propylene concentration 10 mole % in the gas phase. (auth.)

  5. Advanced light water reactors: an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to safety and reliability, a common mission for the international nuclear industry in the 21. century will be ensure affordable electricity. At the Westinghouse Electric Corporation believe our advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design gives us the opportunity to provide the safest, most reliable, lowest cost, most competitive generation method possible for use by nations and utilities worldwide. While the safety and reliability aspects of the ALWR can be proven tangibly and are well-documented, questions have been raised about the technology's ability to work within the world's selling price range for electricity generation. For our industry's financial stability, and especially for the stability of the world's future power needs, Westinghouse has done extensive work on this issue and we are convinced we can meet the competitive challenge. We believe the ALWR can be an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix. This paper will define the competitive challenge that is being addressed by the industry and then analyze three specific areas: capital costs, operating costs, and financing costs. The hidden advantage of nuclear power in responding to these challenges will be explored, and a strong case will be made asserting that the advanced light water reactor will be able to compete in international markets with viable production costs. (authors)

  6. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    , hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on available primary data from the extended data freeze L2.3 at Laxemar (November 30 2007). The data interpretation was carried out during November 2007 to September 2008. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. The original works by the ChemNet modellers are presented in four level III reports containing complementary information for the bedrock hydrogeochemistry Laxemar Site Descriptive Model (SDM-Site Laxemar, R-08-93) level II report. There is also a fifth level III report: Fracture mineralogy of the Laxemar area (R-08-99). This report presents the modelling work performed by the UZ (Univ. of Zaragoza) group as part of the work plan for Laxemar-Simpevarp 2.2 and 2.3. The main processes determining the global geochemical evolution of the Laxemar-Simpevarp groundwaters system are mixing and reaction processes. Mixing has taken place between different types of waters (end members) over time, making the discrimination of the main influences not always straightforward. Several lines of evidence suggest the input of dilute waters (cold or warm), at different stages, into a bedrock with pre-existing very saline groundwaters. Subsequently, marine water entered the system over the Littorina period (when the topography and the distance to the coast allowed it) and mixed with pre-existent groundwaters of variable salinity. In the Laxemar subarea mainland, the Littorina input occurred only locally and it has mostly been flushed out by the subsequent input of warm meteoric waters with a distinctive modern isotopic signature. In addition to mixing processes and superimposed to their effects, different

  7. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain))

    2009-01-15

    , hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on available primary data from the extended data freeze L2.3 at Laxemar (November 30 2007). The data interpretation was carried out during November 2007 to September 2008. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. The original works by the ChemNet modellers are presented in four level III reports containing complementary information for the bedrock hydrogeochemistry Laxemar Site Descriptive Model (SDM-Site Laxemar, R-08-93) level II report. There is also a fifth level III report: Fracture mineralogy of the Laxemar area (R-08-99). This report presents the modelling work performed by the UZ (Univ. of Zaragoza) group as part of the work plan for Laxemar-Simpevarp 2.2 and 2.3. The main processes determining the global geochemical evolution of the Laxemar-Simpevarp groundwaters system are mixing and reaction processes. Mixing has taken place between different types of waters (end members) over time, making the discrimination of the main influences not always straightforward. Several lines of evidence suggest the input of dilute waters (cold or warm), at different stages, into a bedrock with pre-existing very saline groundwaters. Subsequently, marine water entered the system over the Littorina period (when the topography and the distance to the coast allowed it) and mixed with pre-existent groundwaters of variable salinity. In the Laxemar subarea mainland, the Littorina input occurred only locally and it has mostly been flushed out by the subsequent input of warm meteoric waters with a distinctive modern isotopic signature. In addition to mixing processes and superimposed to their

  8. An argon–nitrogen–hydrogen mixed-gas plasma as a robust ionization source for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane, E-mail: diane.beauchemin@chem.queensu.ca

    2014-09-01

    Multivariate optimization of an argon–nitrogen–hydrogen mixed-gas plasma for minimum matrix effects, while maintaining analyte sensitivity as much as possible, was carried out in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In the presence of 0.1 M Na, the 33.9 ± 3.9% (n = 13 elements) analyte signal suppression on average observed in an all-argon plasma was alleviated with the optimized mixed-gas plasma, the average being − 4.0 ± 8.8%, with enhancement in several cases. An addition of 2.3% v/v N{sub 2} in the outer plasma gas, and 0.50% v/v H{sub 2} to the central channel, as a sheath around the nebulizer gas flow, was sufficient for this drastic increase in robustness. It also reduced the background from ArO{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +} as well as oxide levels by over an order of magnitude. On the other hand, the background from NO{sup +} and ArN{sup +} increased by up to an order of magnitude while the levels of doubly-charged ions increased to 7% (versus 2.7% in an argon plasma optimized for sensitivity). Furthermore, detection limits were generally degraded by 5 to 15 fold when using the mixed-gas plasma versus the argon plasma for matrix-free solution (although they were better for several elements in 0.1 M Na). Nonetheless, the drastically increased robustness allowed the direct quantitative multielement analysis of certified ore reference materials, as well as the determination of Mo and Cd in seawater, without using any matrix-matching or internal standardization. - Highlights: • Addition of N{sub 2} to the plasma gas and H{sub 2} as a sheath gas results in a very robust ICP. • ArO{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +} background and oxide levels are reduced by over an order of magnitude. • Multielement analysis of rock digests is possible with a simple external calibration. • No internal standardization or matrix-matching is required for accurate analysis. • Cd and Mo were accurately determined in undiluted seawater.

  9. Water temperature, body mass and fasting heat production of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Fredy A A; Cruz, Thaline M P DA; Mourão, Gerson B; Cyrino, José Eurico P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on fasting heat production (HEf) of fish is key to develop bioenergetics models thus improving feeding management of farmed species. The core of knowledge on HEf of farmed, neotropical fish is scarce. This study assessed the effect of body mass and water temperature on standard metabolism and fasting heat production of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, an omnivore, Neotropical fresh water characin important for farming and fisheries industries all through South American continent. An automated, intermittent flow respirometry system was used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) of pacu (17 - 1,050 g) at five water temperatures: 19, 23, 26, 29 and 33 °C. Mass specific SMR increased with increasing water temperature but decreased as function of body mass. The allometric exponent for scaling HEf was 0.788, and lied in the range recorded for all studied warm-water fish. The recorded van't Hoff factor (Q10) for pacu (2.06) shows the species low response to temperature increases. The model HEf = 0.04643×W0.7882×T1.837 allows to predict HEf (kJ d-1) from body mass (W, kg) and water temperature (T, °C), and can be used in bioenergetical models for the species.

  10. Water temperature, body mass and fasting heat production of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREDY A.A. AGUILAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knowledge on fasting heat production (HEf of fish is key to develop bioenergetics models thus improving feeding management of farmed species. The core of knowledge on HEf of farmed, neotropical fish is scarce. This study assessed the effect of body mass and water temperature on standard metabolism and fasting heat production of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, an omnivore, Neotropical fresh water characin important for farming and fisheries industries all through South American continent. An automated, intermittent flow respirometry system was used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR of pacu (17 - 1,050 g at five water temperatures: 19, 23, 26, 29 and 33 °C. Mass specific SMR increased with increasing water temperature but decreased as function of body mass. The allometric exponent for scaling HEf was 0.788, and lied in the range recorded for all studied warm-water fish. The recorded van't Hoff factor (Q10 for pacu (2.06 shows the species low response to temperature increases. The model HEf = 0.04643×W0.7882×T1.837 allows to predict HEf (kJ d-1 from body mass (W, kg and water temperature (T, °C, and can be used in bioenergetical models for the species.

  11. Application of tritium content isotopic measurements to the investigation of underground water circulations and mixing in different porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguy, C.

    1979-06-01

    This research thesis aims at investigating actual and potential mixing of underground waters in different soil types, and more particularly different porous media. Tritium content measurements of these waters have been performed by liquid scintillation after enrichment. The first part of this report addresses the physical aspect of these measurements. The second one deals with the interpretation of the acquired data, of circulation or mixing schemes which can be deduced with respect to the concerned soils. It highlights the importance of geo-morphological factors for the studied flows

  12. Water masses in Kangerlussuaq, a large fjord in West Greenland: the processes of formation and the associated foraminiferal fauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Erbs-Hansen, Dorthe Reng; Knudsen, Karen Luise

    2010-01-01

    –temperature–density measurements were carried out in connection with sediment surface sampling along a transect through the 180 km long fjord. The exchange between the inner part of Kangerlussuaq (275 m deep) and the ocean is restricted by an almost 100 km long outer, shallow part. Our study shows that the water mass...... in this inner part is almost decoupled from the open ocean, and that in winter the inner part of the fjord is ice covered and convection occurs as a result of brine release. These processes are reflected in the foraminiferal assemblage, which consists of a sparse agglutinated fauna, indicative of carbonate...... dissolution. A monospecific, calcareous assemblage (Elphidium excavatum forma clavata) occurs in the innermost, shallow part, which is strongly influenced by sediment-loaded meltwater during the summer. The outer, shallow part of the fjord is dominated by strong tidal mixing, and in summer the density...

  13. Tracing the source and fate of nitrate in contemporary mixed land-use surface water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. D.; Young, M. B.; Horton, T. W.; Harding, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogenous fertilizers increase agricultural productivity, ultimately feeding the planet. Yet, it is possible to have too much of a good thing, and nitrogen is no exception. When in excess nitrogen has been shown to accelerate eutrophication of water bodies, and act as a chronic toxin (e.g. methemoglobinemia). As land-use intensity continues to rise in response to increases in agricultural productivity, the risk of adverse effects of nitrogen loading on surface water bodies will also increase. Stable isotope proxies are potential tracers of nitrate, the most common nitrogenous phase in surface waters. Applying stable isotope proxies therefore presents an opportunity to identify and manage sources of excess nitrogen before aquatic systems are severely degraded. However, the heterogeneous nature of potential pollution sources themselves, and their distribution with a modified catchment network, make understanding this issue highly complex. The Banks Peninsula, an eroded late tertiary volcanic complex located on the east coast of the South Island New Zealand, presents a unique opportunity to study and understand the sources and fates of nitrate within streams in a contemporary mixed land-use setting. Within this small geographic area there a variety of agricultural activities are practiced, including: heavily fertilized golf courses; stands of regenerating native forest; and areas of fallow gorse (Ulex europaeus; a invasive N-fixing shrub). Each of these landuse classes has its own unique nitrogen budget. Multivariate analysis was used on stream nitrate concentrations to reveal that stream reaches dominated by gorse had significantly higher nitrate concentrations than other land-use classes. Nitrate δ15N & δ18O data from these sites show strong covariance, plotting along a distinct fractionation line (r2 = 0.96). This finding facilitates interpretation of what processes are controlling nitrate concentration within these systems. Further, complementary aquatic

  14. EFFECTS OF ROTATIONALLY INDUCED MIXING IN COMPACT BINARY SYSTEMS WITH LOW-MASS SECONDARIES AND IN SINGLE SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Robinson, Edward L.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Many population synthesis and stellar evolution studies have addressed the evolution of close binary systems in which the primary is a compact remnant and the secondary is filling its Roche lobe, thus triggering mass transfer. Although tidal locking is expected in such systems, most studies have neglected the rotationally induced mixing that may occur. Here we study the possible effects of mixing in mass-losing stars for a range of secondary star masses and metallicities. We find that tidal locking can induce rotational mixing prior to contact and thus affect the evolution of the secondary star if the effects of the Spruit-Tayler dynamo are included both for angular momentum and chemical transport. Once contact is made, the effect of mass transfer tends to be more rapid than the evolutionary timescale, so the effects of mixing are no longer directly important, but the mass-transfer strips matter to inner layers that may have been affected by the mixing. These effects are enhanced for secondaries of 1-1.2 M ☉ and for lower metallicities. We discuss the possible implications for the paucity of carbon in the secondaries of the cataclysmic variable SS Cyg and the black hole candidate XTE J1118+480 and for the progenitor evolution of Type Ia supernovae. We also address the issue of the origin of blue straggler stars in globular and open clusters. We find that for models that include rotation consistent with that observed for some blue straggler stars, evolution is chemically homogeneous. This leads to tracks in the H-R diagram that are brighter and bluer than the non-rotating main-sequence turn-off point. Rotational mixing could thus be one of the factors that contribute to the formation of blue stragglers.

  15. Competition for water vapour results in suppression of ice formation in mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Simpson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of ice in clouds can initiate precipitation and influence a cloud's reflectivity and lifetime, affecting climate to a highly uncertain degree. Nucleation of ice at elevated temperatures requires an ice nucleating particle (INP, which results in so-called heterogeneous freezing. Previously reported measurements for the ability of a particle to nucleate ice have been made in the absence of other aerosol which will act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Here we show that CCN can outcompete INPs for available water vapour thus suppressing ice formation, which has the potential to significantly affect the Earth's radiation budget. The magnitude of this suppression is shown to be dependent on the mass of condensed water required for freezing. Here we show that ice formation in a state-of-the-art cloud parcel model is strongly dependent on the criteria for heterogeneous freezing selected from those previously hypothesised. We have developed an alternative criteria which agrees well with observations from cloud chamber experiments. This study demonstrates the dominant role that competition for water vapour can play in ice formation, highlighting both a need for clarity in the requirements for heterogeneous freezing and for measurements under atmospherically appropriate conditions.

  16. Competition for water vapour results in suppression of ice formation in mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Emma L.; Connolly, Paul J.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2018-05-01

    The formation of ice in clouds can initiate precipitation and influence a cloud's reflectivity and lifetime, affecting climate to a highly uncertain degree. Nucleation of ice at elevated temperatures requires an ice nucleating particle (INP), which results in so-called heterogeneous freezing. Previously reported measurements for the ability of a particle to nucleate ice have been made in the absence of other aerosol which will act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Here we show that CCN can outcompete INPs for available water vapour thus suppressing ice formation, which has the potential to significantly affect the Earth's radiation budget. The magnitude of this suppression is shown to be dependent on the mass of condensed water required for freezing. Here we show that ice formation in a state-of-the-art cloud parcel model is strongly dependent on the criteria for heterogeneous freezing selected from those previously hypothesised. We have developed an alternative criteria which agrees well with observations from cloud chamber experiments. This study demonstrates the dominant role that competition for water vapour can play in ice formation, highlighting both a need for clarity in the requirements for heterogeneous freezing and for measurements under atmospherically appropriate conditions.

  17. Modeling and experimental validation of water mass balance in a PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Araya, Samuel Simon; Olesen, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells require good hydration in order to deliver high performance and ensure long life operation. Water is essential for proton conductivity in the membrane which increases by nearly six orders of magnitude from dry to fully hydrated. Adequate water...... management in PEM fuel cell is crucial in order to avoid an imbalance between water production and water removal from the fuel cell. In the present study, a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model has been formulated for the water mass balance and hydration of a polymer electrolyte membrane. This model...... is validated against experimental data. In the results it is shown that the fuel cell water balance calculated by this model shows better fit with experimental data-points compared with model where only steady state operation were considered. We conclude that this discrepancy is due a different rate of water...

  18. Role of mixed boundaries on flow in open capillary channels with curved air-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan

    2012-09-04

    Flow in unsaturated porous media or in engineered microfluidic systems is dominated by capillary and viscous forces. Consequently, flow regimes may differ markedly from conventional flows, reflecting strong interfacial influences on small bodies of flowing liquids. In this work, we visualized liquid transport patterns in open capillary channels with a range of opening sizes from 0.6 to 5.0 mm using laser scanning confocal microscopy combined with fluorescent latex particles (1.0 μm) as tracers at a mean velocity of ∼0.50 mm s(-1). The observed velocity profiles indicate limited mobility at the air-water interface. The application of the Stokes equation with mixed boundary conditions (i.e., no slip on the channel walls and partial slip or shear stress at the air-water interface) clearly illustrates the increasing importance of interfacial shear stress with decreasing channel size. Interfacial shear stress emerges from the velocity gradient from the adjoining no-slip walls to the center where flow is trapped in a region in which capillary forces dominate. In addition, the increased contribution of capillary forces (relative to viscous forces) to flow on the microscale leads to increased interfacial curvature, which, together with interfacial shear stress, affects the velocity distribution and flow pattern (e.g., reverse flow in the contact line region). We found that partial slip, rather than the commonly used stress-free condition, provided a more accurate description of the boundary condition at the confined air-water interface, reflecting the key role that surface/interface effects play in controlling flow behavior on the nanoscale and microscale.

  19. Mass-controlled capillary viscometer for a Newtonian liquid: Viscosity of water at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, Rafael M.; Reiner, M.

    2007-03-01

    The operation principle of the mass-controlled capillary viscometer is presented for a Newtonian liquid. The derived equation for the temporal changes of the mass in a liquid column draining under gravity through a discharge capillary tube accounts self-consistently for the inertial convective term associated with the acceleration effect. The viscosity of water measured at different temperatures using the new approach is in good agreement with literature data.

  20. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Buelow, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  1. Mixing at double-Tee junctions with unequal pipe sizes in water distribution systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pipe flow mixing with various solute concentrations and flow rates at pipe junctions is investigated. The degree of mixing affects the spread of contaminants in a...

  2. Improving mixing efficiency in a closed circuit water flow rig for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... pulse velocity method, indicating that the flow meters functioned correctly. The modified rig with scaled-up mixing techniques could serve as platform for training in evaluating mixing vessels and flow meters in industrial process plants.

  3. Mixing in Visakhapatnam harbour and nutrient inputs to nearshore waters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Sarma, V.V.; Raju, G.R.K.; Rao, V.S.

    The flushing time (t) and replacement time CD are computed for different seasons to understand mixing in Visakhapatnam harbour. Replacement times are higher than the flushing times indicating that the transverse mixing in the tidal flow...

  4. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E o = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  5. Molecular theory of mass transfer kinetics and dynamics at gas-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akihiro; Garrett, Bruce C

    2008-01-01

    The mass transfer mechanism across gas-water interface is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD results provide a robust and qualitatively consistent picture to previous studies about microscopic aspects of mass transfer, including interface structure, free energy profiles for the uptake, scattering dynamics and energy relaxation of impinging molecules. These MD results are quantitatively compared with experimental uptake measurements, and we find that the apparent inconsistency between MD and experiment could be partly resolved by precise decomposition of the observed kinetics into elemental steps. Remaining issues and future perspectives toward constructing a comprehensive multi-scale description of interfacial mass transfer are summarized.

  6. Numerical Investigations of Mixed Convection of Incompressible Viscous Fluid in LNG Storage with a Various Locations of Input and Output Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyarenko Kristina A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of mathematical simulation of mixed convection in the low-temperature storage of liquefied natural gas with a regenerative cooling. The regimes of mixed convection in a closed area with the different arrangement of the input and output sections of the masses are investigated. Two-dimensional nonstationary problem in the model of the Navier-Stokes in dimensionless variables “vorticity - stream function - temperature” was examined. Are obtained distributions of the hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures, characteristic basic laws governing the processes being investigated. Detailed circulating currents and carried out analysis of the mechanism of vortices formation and the temperature distribution in the solution for mixed convection mode with low Reynolds and Grashof numbers (Gr = 106, 100 mass sections and input stream velocity on the structure of liquid flow and temperature in the low temperature LNG storage tanks.

  7. Determination of membrane degradation products in the product water of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zedda, Marco

    2011-05-12

    The predominant long term failure of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) is caused by hydroxyl radicals generated during fuel cell operation. These radicals attack the polymer, leading to chain scission, unzipping and consequently to membrane decomposition products. The present work has investigated decomposition products of novel sulfonated aromatic hydrocarbon membranes on the basis of a product water analysis. Degradation products from the investigated membrane type and the possibility to detect these compounds in the product water for diagnostic purposes have not been discovered yet. This thesis demonstrates the potential of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) for the extraction, separation, characterization, identification and quantification of membrane degradation products in the product water of fuel cells. For this purpose, several polar aromatic hydrocarbons with different functional groups were selected as model compounds for the development of reliable extraction, separation and detection methods. The results of this thesis have shown that mixed mode sorbent materials with both weak anion exchange and reversed phase retention properties are well suited for reproducible extraction of both molecules and ions from the product water. The chromatographic separation of various polar aromatic hydrocarbons was achieved by means of phase optimized liquid chromatography using a solvent gradient and on a C18 stationary phase. Sensitive and selective detection of model compounds could be successfully demonstrated by the analysis of the product water using tandem mass spectrometry. The application of a hybrid mass spectrometer (Q Trap) for the characterization of unknown polar aromatic hydrocarbons has led to the identification and confirmation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in the product water. In addition, 4-HBA could be verified as a degradation product resulting from PEM decomposition by hydroxyl radicals using an

  8. Diffusive-dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe: Impact of water table fluctuations and heterogeneities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathwohl, Peter; Haberer, Cristina; Ye, Yu

    Diffusive–dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe is important for many groundwater quality issues such as transfer of volatile compounds into (and out of) the groundwater, the supply of oxygen for aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons as well as for precipitation of minerals (e.g. iron...... hydroxides). 2D-laboratory scale experiments were used to investigate the transfer of oxygen into groundwater under non-reactive and reactive conditions, at steady state and with water table fluctuations. Results show that transfer of oxygen is limited by transverse dispersion in the capillary fringe...... and the dispersion coefficients are the same as below the water table. Water table fluctuations cause temporarily increased fluxes of oxygen into groundwater during draining conditions and entrapped air after water table rise. High-permeability inclusions in the capillary fringe enhance mass transfer of oxygen...

  9. Coolant Mixing in a Pressurized Water Reactor: Deboration Transients, Steam-Line Breaks, and Emergency Core Cooling Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael; Grunwald, Gerhard; Hoehne, Thomas; Kliem, Soeren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-01

    The reactor transient caused by a perturbation of boron concentration or coolant temperature at the inlet of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) depends on the mixing inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Initial steep gradients are partially lessened by turbulent mixing with coolant from the unaffected loops and with the water inventory of the RPV. Nevertheless the assumption of an ideal mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of the reactor leads to unrealistically small reactivity inserts. The uncertainties between ideal mixing and total absence of mixing are too large to be acceptable for safety analyses. In reality, a partial mixing takes place. For realistic predictions it is necessary to study the mixing within the three-dimensional flow field in the complicated geometry of a PWR. For this purpose a 1:5 scaled model [the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) facility] of the German PWR KONVOI was built. Compared to other experiments, the emphasis was put on extensive measuring instrumentation and a maximum of flexibility of the facility to cover as much as possible different test scenarios. The use of special electrode-mesh sensors together with a salt tracer technique provided distributions of the disturbance within downcomer and core entrance with a high resolution in space and time. Especially, the instrumentation of the downcomer gained valuable information about the mixing phenomena in detail. The obtained data were used to support code development and validation. Scenarios investigated are the following: (a) steady-state flow in multiple coolant loops with a temperature or boron concentration perturbation in one of the running loops, (b) transient flow situations with flow rates changing with time in one or more loops, such as pump startup scenarios with deborated slugs in one of the loops or onset of natural circulation after boiling-condenser-mode operation, and (c) gravity-driven flow caused by large density gradients, e.g., mixing of cold

  10. Carbonate system in the water masses of the Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during February and March 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. González-Dávila

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate system variables were measured in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from South Africa to the southern limit of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC from February to March 2008. Eddies detached from the retroflection of the Agulhas Current increased the gradients observed along the fronts. Minima in the fugacity of CO2, fCO2, and maxima in pH on either side of the frontal zone were observed, noting that within the frontal zone fCO2 reached maximum values and pH was at a minimum.

    Vertical distributions of water masses were described by their carbonate system properties and their relationship to CFC concentrations. Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW and Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW offered pHT,25 values of 7.56 and 7.61, respectively. The UCDW also had higher concentrations of CFC-12 (>0.2 pmol kg−1 as compared to deeper waters, revealing that UCDW was mixed with recently ventilated waters. Calcite and aragonite saturation states (Ω were also affected by the presence of these two water masses with high carbonate concentrations. The aragonite saturation horizon was observed at 1000 m in the subtropical area and north of the Subantarctic Front. At the position of the Polar Front, and under the influence of UCDW and LCDW, the aragonite saturation horizon deepened from 800 m to 1500 m at 50.37° S, and reached 700 m south of 57.5° S. High latitudes proved to be the most sensitive areas to predicted anthropogenic carbon increase. Buffer coefficients related to changes in [CO2], [H+] and Ω with changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (CT and total alkalinity (AT offered minima values in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and UCDW layers. These coefficients suggest that a small increase in CT will sharply decrease the status of pH and carbonate saturation

  11. Large-Scale Ichthyoplankton and Water Mass Distribution along the South Brazil Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27′ and 34°51′S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients. PMID:24614798

  12. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Pinto de Macedo-Soares

    Full Text Available Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  13. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  14. Sources and fate of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and water mass ventilation in the upper Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. A.; Amon, R. M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    waters are dominated by terrestrial inputs and suggest this water mass likely originated from Eurasian runoff. In CB surface waters (0-50m) the humic-like CDOM signal was depleted and unrelated to lignin phenol concentrations. These results were unexpected given the significant inputs of runoff predicted in CB surface waters during AOS 2005 using alkalinity/salinity relationships by Jones et al., 2008. In CB halocline waters (50-300m), a significant relationship was observed between the humic-like CDOM components and apparent oxygen utilization, CO2, and nutrient concentrations suggesting degradation and marine secondary production has a significant effect on the quality of DOM in these waters. Overall, the ability to differentiate and qualitatively trace the different sources of fluorescent components and determine the underlying factors controlling CDOM speciation during transport and mixing opens new possibilities for the use of CDOM as a more specific tracer in oceanography.

  15. Break-through of Mass Integration in Textile Industry through Development of Generic Water Recycle Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    processing is one of the largest and oldest industries world-wide and responsible for a substantial resource consumption and pollution. Especially the wet processing part of the industry, i.e. pre-treatment, dyeing, printing and finishing, is polluting and resource consuming in terms of both water, energy...... dyehouse, Trevira Neckelmann A/S, has now for two consecutive years successfully implemented direct water recycling saving 40 % water. Mass Integration and water pinch techniques were used to identify the potentials and combined with textile intelligence to achieve the best system design for the reuse...... of water, energy and chemicals. The same approach of combining pinch techniques and textile intelligence was applied in South African textile industry. System designs for water recycling in both cotton and acrylic wet treatment were developed. The system for cotton was successfully documented in full scale...

  16. Application of cylinder symmetry to iron and titanium oxidation by oxygen or hydrogen-water vapour mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, Pierre

    1980-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the oxidation reaction in the case of corrosion of iron by oxygen, hydrogen sulphide or hydrogen-water vapour mixes, and in the case of oxidation of titanium and of titanium nitride by hydrogen-water vapour mixes. It first addresses the corrosion of iron by oxygen with an experiment performed in cylinder symmetry: description of operational conditions, discussion of kinetic curves, development of a law of generation of multiple layers in cylinder symmetry, analytical exploitation of experimental results. The second part addresses the oxidation of iron by hydrogen-water vapour mixes: experimental conditions, influence of temperature on kinetics, micrographic study (oxide morphology, coating morphology, interpretation of differences with the case of plane symmetry), discussion of the influence of cylinder symmetry on oxidation kinetics. The third part addresses the oxidation of titanium by hydrogen-water vapour mixes: global kinetic evolution, reaction products and micrographic examination, morphology and texture studies, discussion of the oxidation mechanism and of cylinder symmetry [fr

  17. Reverse electrodialysis : Performance of a stack with 50 cells on the mixing of sea and river water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.; Saakes, M.; Metz, S. J.; Harmsen, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of reverse electrodialysis (RED) is to produce electricity upon the mixing of two solutions. We studied the power density (W/m(2)) and the energy efficiency (the amount of energy produced from specified volumes of river and sea water in relation to the thermodynamic maximum). With a

  18. The water masses and volumetry of the southern Agulhas Current region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, H. R.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Brundrit, G. B.

    1993-06-01

    It has been suggested that the southern termination of the Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the global circulation of thermocline water and thus in global climate. Due to a lack of modern hydrographic observations in this region, no detailed description of water masses or a fine-scale volumetric census for this geographic area had been carried out. Such an analysis of a collection of recent high-quality hydrographic measurements shows that the warm, saline, surface water of Agulhas Current origin contributes very little to the overall volume of the upper 1500 m of the water column in the area. Occasional equatorward leakages from south of the Subtropical Convergence are represented by a range of low-salinity outliers, but they represent <1% of the total volume. The distribution of water volume in temperature/salinity space for the Agulhas Retroflection is less diverse that that of the world ocean as a whole, 25% of the total volume of the region being contained in only 21 fine-scale temperature/salinity classes. North Atlantic Deep Water is the dominant water mass, accounting for 40% of the total volume. Deep Water in general accounts for 60% of the total volume.

  19. Bacterial flora analysis of coliforms in sewage, river water, and ground water using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Niina, Kouki; Matsuwaki, Tomonori; Nukazawa, Kei; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2018-01-28

    The aim of this study was to rapidly and effectively analyze coliforms, which are the most fundamental indicators of water quality for fecal pollution, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Coliform bacteria were isolated from municipal sewage, river water, and groundwater. For each sample, 100 isolates were determined by MALDI-TOF MS. In addition, these same 100 isolates were also identified via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Obtained MALDI-TOF MS data were compared with the 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, and the validity of MALDI-TOF MS for classification of coliform bacteria was examined. The concordance rate of bacterial identification for the 100 isolates obtained by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for sewage, river water, and ground water were 96%, 74%, and 62% at the genus level, respectively. Among the sewage, river water, and ground water samples, the coliform bacterial flora were distinct. The dominant genus of coliforms in sewage, river water, and groundwater were Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Serratia spp., respectively. We determined that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate tool that can be used to identify coliforms. Therefore, without using conventional 16S rRNA sequencing, it is possible to rapidly and effectively classify coliforms in water using MALDI-TOF MS.

  20. Mixed monolayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and ethyl palmitate at the air/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gzyl, Barbara [Department of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: gzyl@chemia.uj.edu.pl; Paluch, Maria [Department of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-06-30

    The behaviour of monolayers containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and ethyl palmitate and their mixtures at different molar fraction, using surface pressure-molecular area results, was investigated. The negative deviation from additivity of the mean molecular areas as a function of the mixture composition indicates the miscibility. The miscibility was confirmed by applying the two-dimensional phase rule, since the collapse pressure values vary with the composition of the mixtures. Also the free energy of mixing {delta}G{sub mix} and the excess free energy of mixing {delta}G{sub mix}{sup E} were determined. The negative values of {delta}G{sub mix} and {delta}G{sub mix}{sup E} indicate that the mixed monolayers are thermodynamically more stable compared to the pure ones and that the compounds in the two dimensional state experience mainly attractive interactions.

  1. Thermal aspects of mixed oxide fuel in application to supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.; Peiman, W.; Rodriguez-Prado, A.; Villamere, B.; Mikhael, S.; Allison, L.; Pioro, I., E-mail: lisa.grande@mycampus.uoit.ca, E-mail: igor.pioro@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs) are a renewed technology being developed as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts. This reactor type uses a light water coolant at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. These elevated operating conditions will improve Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermal efficiencies by 10 - 15% compared to those of current NPPs. Also, SCWRs will have the ability to utilize a direct cycle, thus decreasing NPP capital and operational costs. The SCWR core has 2 configurations: 1) Pressure Vessel (PV) -type enclosing a fuel assembly and 2) Pressure Tube (PT) -type consisting of individual pressurized channels containing fuel bundles. Canada and Russia are developing PT-type SCWRs. In particular, the Canadian SCWR reactor has an output of 1200 MW{sub el} and will operate at a pressure of 25 MPa with inlet and outlet fuel-channel temperatures of 350 and 625°C, respectively. These extreme operating conditions require alternative fuels and materials to be investigated. Current CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor fuel-channel design is based on the use of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) fuel; zirconium alloy sheath (clad) bundle, pressure and calandria tubes. Alternative fuels should be considered to supplement depleting world uranium reserves. This paper studies general thermal aspects of using Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel in an Inconel-600 sheath in a generic PT-type SCWR. The bulk fluid, sheath and fuel centerline temperatures along with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were calculated at uniform and non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs). (author)

  2. Optimum Mix for Pervious Geopolymer Concrete (GEOCRETE Based on Water Permeability and Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Arafa Salaheddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC consumes considerable natural resources and energy, and it also affects the emission of a significant quantity of CO2 in the atmosphere. This pervious geopolymer concrete study aims to explore an alternative binder without OPC. Pervious geopolymer concretes were prepared from fly ash (FA, sodium silicate (NaSiO3, sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution, and coarse aggregate (CA. The effects of pervious geopolymer concrete parameters that affect water permeability and compressive strength are evaluated. The FA to CA ratios of 1:6, 1:7,1:8, and 1:9 by weight, CA sizes of 5–10, 10–14, and 14–20 mm, constant NaSiO3/NaOH ratio of 2.5, alkaline liquid to fly ash (AL/FA ratios of 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, and NaOH concentrations of 8, 10, and 12 M were the pervious geopolymer concrete mix proportions. The curing temperature of 80 °C for 24 h was used. The results showed that a pervious geopolymer concrete with CA of 10 mm achieved water permeability of 2.3 cm/s and compressive strength of 20 MPa with AL/FA ratio of 0.5, NaOH concentration of 10 M, and FA:CA of 1:7. GEOCRETE is indicated to have better engineering properties than does pervious concrete that is made of ordinary Portland cement.

  3. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade mixed oxides ((U, Pu)O2)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade mixed oxides, (U, Pu)O2, powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Uranium in the Presence of Pu by Potentiometric Titration Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron (II) Nitrogen by Distillation Spectrophotometry Using Nessler Reagent 7 to 14 Carbon (Total) by Direct Combustion-Thermal Conductivity 15 to 26 Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis 27 to 34 Sulfur by Distillation-Spectrophotometry 35 to 43 Moisture by the Coulometric, Electrolytic Moisture Analyzer 44 to 51 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry Rare Earths by Copper Spark Spectroscopy 52 to 59 Trace Impurities by Carrier Distillation Spectroscopy 60 to 69 Impurities by Spark-Source Mass Spectrography 70 to 76 Total Gas in Reactor-Grade Mixed Dioxide P...

  4. Detecting Non-Gaussian and Lognormal Characteristics of Temperature and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, A.; Fletcher, S. J.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Many operational data assimilation and retrieval systems assume that the errors and variables come from a Gaussian distribution. This study builds upon previous results that shows that positive definite variables, specifically water vapor mixing ratio and temperature, can follow a non-Gaussian distribution and moreover a lognormal distribution. Previously, statistical testing procedures which included the Jarque-Bera test, the Shapiro-Wilk test, the Chi-squared goodness-of-fit test, and a composite test which incorporated the results of the former tests were employed to determine locations and time spans where atmospheric variables assume a non-Gaussian distribution. These tests are now investigated in a "sliding window" fashion in order to extend the testing procedure to near real-time. The analyzed 1-degree resolution data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Forecast System (GFS) six hour forecast from the 0Z analysis. These results indicate the necessity of a Data Assimilation (DA) system to be able to properly use the lognormally-distributed variables in an appropriate Bayesian analysis that does not assume the variables are Gaussian.

  5. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  6. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option

  7. Effect of miscibility and soil water content in movement of mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Since commercial low-level waste sites will not accept mixed low level wastes for disposal any longer, safer disposal of these wastes as well as hazardous waste becomes the growing concern. The objective of this study were to estimate the effect of some characteristics of organic material, such as solubility, density and volatility, on the movement in soil under various moisture contents. Attempts were made to fit the measured data to theoretical models for the movement of aqueous and airborne components through the vadose zone. Four different C-14 labeled organic materials, Methyl Alcohol, Toluene, Formic Acid, and Bromobenzene, differing in density, solubility, and volatility, were injected into test columns packed with a mixture of sands having known particles sizes and porosity. The method employed to make calibrated unsaturated conditions proved to be adequate for four different designated moisture contents, permitting sampling of both airborne and aqueous components at the same time. Significant solubility and density effects were found for the different organic materials associated with movement through water channels or air-filled pores, which became available at various unsaturated conditions. To analyze this mobility mechanism as a function of inherent properties of organic materials, a couple of mathematical equations were presented to describe both airborne release and aqueous migration and their wider applicability was discussed

  8. Mean activity coefficient measurement and thermodynamic modelling of the ternary mixed electrolyte (MgCl_2 + glucose + water) system at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhi, Azam; Bagherinia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The main goal of the work is to provide precise thermodynamic data for the system. • The method used was potentiometric method. • Pitzer ion interaction model and modified TCPC model were used. • The mass fractions of glucose were (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40)%. • The ionic strengths were from 0.0010 to 6.0000 mol · kg"−"1. - Abstract: In this work, the mean activity coefficients of MgCl_2 in pure water and (glucose + water) mixture solvent were determined using a galvanic cell without liquid junction potential of type: (Mg"2"+ + ISE)|MgCl_2 (m), glucose (wt.%), H_2O (100 wt.%)|AgCl|Ag. The measurements were performed at T = 298.15 K. Total ionic strengths were from (0.0010 to 6.0000) mol · kg"−"1. The various (glucose + water) mixed solvents contained (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40)% mass fractions percentage of glucose respectively. The mean activity coefficients measured were correlated with Pitzer ion interaction model and the Pitzer adjustable parameters were determined. Then these parameters were used to calculate the thermodynamics properties for under investigated system. The results showed that Pitzer ion interaction model can satisfactory describe the investigated system. The modified three-characteristic-parameter correlation (TCPC) model was applied to correlate the experimental activity coefficient data for under investigation electrolyte system, too.

  9. Effects of thinning intensities on soil infiltration and water storage capacity in a Chinese pine-oak mixed forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Yuan, Zhiyou; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Dexiang; Mu, Xingmin

    2014-01-01

    Thinning is a crucial practice in the forest ecosystem management. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity of pine-oak mixed forest under three different thinning intensity treatments (15%, 30%, and 60%) were studied in Qinling Mountains of China. The thinning operations had a significant influence on soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity in different thinning treatments followed the order of control (nonthinning): soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity of pine-oak mixed forest in Qinling Mountains. The soil initial infiltration rate, stable infiltration rate, and average infiltration rate in thinning 30% treatment were significantly increased by 21.1%, 104.6%, and 60.9%, compared with the control. The soil maximal water storage capacity and noncapillary water storage capacity in thinning 30% treatment were significantly improved by 20.1% and 34.3% in contrast to the control. The soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity were significantly higher in the surface layer (0~20 cm) than in the deep layers (20~40 cm and 40~60 cm). We found that the soil property was closely related to soil infiltration rate and water storage capacity.

  10. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  11. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : A Mass Spectrometric Study of Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the microscopic solvent structure of dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixtures and its influence on the solvation structure of solute from a clustering point of View, by means of a specially designed mass spectrometric system. It was observed that the propensity to the cluster formation is

  12. Determination of vibration frequency depending on abrasive mass flow rate during abrasive water jet cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hreha, P.; Radvanská, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Peržel, V.; Krolczyk, G.; Monková, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, 1-4 (2014), s. 763-774 ISSN 0268-3768 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Abrasive water jet * Abrasive mass flow rate * Vibration Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.458, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00170-014-6497-9#page-1

  13. Effect of aging on mass transfer naphthalene from creosotes to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshafie, M.; Ghoshal, S.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-gelatinous interfacial films or 'skins' have been observed to form at the interface of creosote and water when creosote is aged (contacted over an extended time period) in water under quiescent conditions for a few days. The objective of the research is to investigate whether aging of creosote-water interfaces and the formation of interfacial films retard dissolution of a target solute, naphthalene, from samples of creosote. Mass transfer experiments were conducted in gently stirred flow-through reactors where the NAPL was coated on glass beads so as to keep the NAPL and the aqueous phases segregated. The aqueous concentration in the reactor effluent was determined in samples collected at different time points and the equilibrium partitioning coefficients and area-independent mass transfer coefficients were calculated. Over the period of one week, the mass transfer rate coefficients of the naphthalene from creosote to water underwent approximately 30% reduction. Further reduction was observed up to 3 weeks of aging. This significant reduction in mass transfer coefficient has important implications on potential rates of dissolution of the solutes, and thus on rates of clean up of creosote-contaminated sites. (author)

  14. Formation and spreading of Arabian Sea high-salinity water mass

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Prasad, T.G.

    The formation and seasonal spreading of the Arabian Sea High-Salinity Water (ASHSW) mass were studied based on the monthly mean climatology of temperature and salinity in the Arabian Sea, north of the equator and west of 80 degrees E, on a 2 degrees...

  15. Sequential estimation of surface water mass changes from daily satellite gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, G. L.; Frappart, F.; Gratton, S.; Vasseur, X.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a recursive Kalman filtering approach to map regional spatio-temporal variations of terrestrial water mass over large continental areas, such as South America. Instead of correcting hydrology model outputs by the GRACE observations using a Kalman filter estimation strategy, regional 2-by-2 degree water mass solutions are constructed by integration of daily potential differences deduced from GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) measurements. Recovery of regional water mass anomaly averages obtained by accumulation of information of daily noise-free simulated GRACE data shows that convergence is relatively fast and yields accurate solutions. In the case of cumulating real GRACE KBRR data contaminated by observational noise, the sequential method of step-by-step integration provides estimates of water mass variation for the period 2004-2011 by considering a set of suitable a priori error uncertainty parameters to stabilize the inversion. Spatial and temporal averages of the Kalman filter solutions over river basin surfaces are consistent with the ones computed using global monthly/10-day GRACE solutions from official providers CSR, GFZ and JPL. They are also highly correlated to in situ records of river discharges (70-95 %), especially for the Obidos station where the total outflow of the Amazon River is measured. The sparse daily coverage of the GRACE satellite tracks limits the time resolution of the regional Kalman filter solutions, and thus the detection of short-term hydrological events.

  16. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain))

    2008-08-15

    in geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. This report presents the modelling work performed by the University of Zaragoza group as part of the work planned for Forsmark during stages 2.2 and 2.3. The chemical characteristics of the groundwaters in the Forsmark and Laxemar areas are the result of a complex mixing process driven by the input of different recharge waters since the last glaciation. The successive penetration at different depths of dilute glacial melt-waters, Littorina Sea waters and dilute meteoric waters has triggered complex density and hydraulically driven flows that have mixed them with long residence time, highly saline waters present in the fractures and in the rock matrix. A general description of the main characteristics and processes controlling the hydrogeochemical evolution with depth in the Forsmark groundwater system is presented in this report: The hydrochemical characteristics and evolution of the Near surface waters (up to 20 m depth) is mainly determined by weathering reactions and especially affected by the presence of limestones. The biogenic CO{sub 2} input (derived from decay of organic matter and root respiration) and the associated weathering of carbonates control the pH and the concentrations of Ca and HCO{sub 3}- in the near-surface environment. Current seasonal variability of CO{sub 2} input produces variable but high calcium and bicarbonate contents in the Forsmark near-surface waters: up to 240 mg/L Ca and 150 to

  17. Water-rock interaction modelling and uncertainties of mixing modelling. SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia

    2008-08-01

    geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. This report presents the modelling work performed by the University of Zaragoza group as part of the work planned for Forsmark during stages 2.2 and 2.3. The chemical characteristics of the groundwaters in the Forsmark and Laxemar areas are the result of a complex mixing process driven by the input of different recharge waters since the last glaciation. The successive penetration at different depths of dilute glacial melt-waters, Littorina Sea waters and dilute meteoric waters has triggered complex density and hydraulically driven flows that have mixed them with long residence time, highly saline waters present in the fractures and in the rock matrix. A general description of the main characteristics and processes controlling the hydrogeochemical evolution with depth in the Forsmark groundwater system is presented in this report: The hydrochemical characteristics and evolution of the Near surface waters (up to 20 m depth) is mainly determined by weathering reactions and especially affected by the presence of limestones. The biogenic CO 2 input (derived from decay of organic matter and root respiration) and the associated weathering of carbonates control the pH and the concentrations of Ca and HCO 3 - in the near-surface environment. Current seasonal variability of CO 2 input produces variable but high calcium and bicarbonate contents in the Forsmark near-surface waters: up to 240 mg/L Ca and 150 to 900 mg/L HCO 3 - . These

  18. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    OpenAIRE

    X. Carton; P. L'Hegaret

    2011-01-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, some aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Water outflow is strong in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found there between 600 and 1000 m depths. The Red Sea Water is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, and fragments of this ...

  19. Molar enthalpy of mixing and refractive indices of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Chunyan; Guo, Yanhua; Li, Dongxue; Zong, Jianpeng; Ji, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Molar enthalpy of mixing and refractive indices for binary mixtures of different deep eutectic solvents with water. • The Redlich–Kister equation and the NRTL model was used to fit the experimental data. • The NRTL model with fitted parameters were used to predict the vapour pressure and compared with experimental data. - Abstract: The molar enthalpies of mixing were measured for binary systems of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents (glycerol, ethylene glycol and malonic acid) with water at 298.15 K and 308.15 K, and atmospheric pressure with an isothermal calorimeter. Refractive indices were also measured at 303.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The binary mixtures of {chcl/glycerol (1:2) + water, chcl/ethylene glycol (1:2) + water} showed exothermic behaviour over the entire range of composition, while the binary mixture of {chcl/malonic acid (1:1) + water} showed endothermic behaviour at first and then changed to be exothermic with the increasing content of chcl/malonic acid (1:1). Experimental refractive indices were fitted with the Redlich–Kister equation, and experimental molar enthalpies of mixing were correlated with the Redlich–Kister equation and the non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model. The NRTL model with the fitted parameters was used to predict the vapour pressures of these three mixtures. For mixtures of {chcl/glycerol (1:2) + water} and {chcl/ethylene glycol (1:2) + water}, the predicted vapour pressures agreed well with the experimental results from the literature. While for mixture of {chcl/malonic acid (1:1) + water}, the predicted vapour pressures showed deviation at the high concentration of chcl/malonic acid (1:1), and this was probably because of the complex molecular interaction between chcl/malonic acid (1:1) and water.

  20. Portable mass spectrometer for express analysis of dissolved in water substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, V.T.; Pavlov, A.K.; Savchenko, M.I.; Dobychin, O.E.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometer for analysis under field conditions of chemical composition of dissolved in water substances is described. Special attention is paid to developing portable mass analyzer and device for a probe inlet. The device is intended for the systems of direct autonomous control of water basins contamination. Depending on the level of required work degree of autonomy and loading rate of the device, its dimensions and consumption way vary. The tests of the pilot device having 370x420x570 mm size, 23 kg mass and ≤ 40 W consumption capacity were carried out. The resolution capacity of the device is 100 (at the level of ≤ 3%) and relative sensitivity - ≤ 10 -6 [ru

  1. Eukaryotic Plankton Species Diversity in the Western Channel of the Korea Strait using 18S rDNA Sequences and its Implications for Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Eun Hye; Lee, Tongsup

    2018-03-01

    Organisms entering the East Sea (Sea of Japan) through the Korea Strait, together with water, salt, and energy, affect the East Sea ecosystem. In this study, we report on the biodiversity of eukaryotic plankton found in the Western Channel of the Korea Strait for the first time using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA) sequences. We also discuss the characteristics of water masses and their physicochemical factors. Diverse taxonomic groups were recovered from 18S rDNA clone libraries, including putative novel, higher taxonomic entities affiliated with Cercozoa, Raphidophyceae, Picozoa, and novel marine Stramenopiles. We also found that there was cryptic genetic variation at both the intraspecific and interspecific levels among arthropods, diatoms, and green algae. Specific plankton assemblages were identified at different sampling depths and they may provide useful information that could be used to interpret the origin and the subsequent mixing history of the water masses that contribute to the Tsushima Warm Current waters. Furthermore, the biological information highlighted in this study may help improve our understanding about the complex water mass interactions that were highlighted in the Korea Strait.

  2. Onset of transition from laminar to chaos in MHD mixed convection of a lid-driven trapezoidal cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, Mohammad, E-mail: azam09mebuet@gmail.com; Hasanuzzaman, Md., E-mail: hasanuzzaman138@gmail.com; Saha, Sumon, E-mail: sumonsaha@me.buet.ac.bd [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    The present study investigates the thermal mixing scenarios of steady magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection in a two-dimensional lid-driven trapezoidal cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid. The top wall of the cavity slides with a uniform velocity from left to right direction, while the other walls are fixed. The bottom wall is kept with a constant higher temperature than the top one. The governing mass, momentum and energy equations are expressed in non-dimensional forms and Galerkin finite element method has been employed to solve these equations. Special attention is paid on investigating the onset of transition from laminar to chaos at pure mixed convection case. Hence, the computations are carried out for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re = 0.1 − 400) and Grashof numbers (Gr = 10{sup −2} − 1.6 × 10{sup 5}) at unity Richardson number and fixed Hartmann number (Ha = 10). The variation of average Nusselt number of the bottom heated wall indicates the influence of governing parameters (Re and Gr) on heat transfer characteristics. The results are presented and explained through the visualisation of isotherms, streamlines and heatlines.

  3. Regional GRACE-based estimates of water mass variations over Australia: validation and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, L.; Ramillien, G.; Frappart, F.; Leblanc, M.

    2013-04-01

    Time series of regional 2°-by-2° GRACE solutions have been computed from 2003 to 2011 with a 10 day resolution by using an energy integral method over Australia [112° E 156° E; 44° S 10° S]. This approach uses the dynamical orbit analysis of GRACE Level 1 measurements, and specially accurate along-track K Band Range Rate (KBRR) residuals (1 μm s-1 level of error) to estimate the total water mass over continental regions. The advantages of regional solutions are a significant reduction of GRACE aliasing errors (i.e. north-south stripes) providing a more accurate estimation of water mass balance for hydrological applications. In this paper, the validation of these regional solutions over Australia is presented as well as their ability to describe water mass change as a reponse of climate forcings such as El Niño. Principal component analysis of GRACE-derived total water storage maps show spatial and temporal patterns that are consistent with independent datasets (e.g. rainfall, climate index and in-situ observations). Regional TWS show higher spatial correlations with in-situ water table measurements over Murray-Darling drainage basin (80-90%), and they offer a better localization of hydrological structures than classical GRACE global solutions (i.e. Level 2 GRGS products and 400 km ICA solutions as a linear combination of GFZ, CSR and JPL GRACE solutions).

  4. Rapid determination of trace nitrophenolic organics in water by combining solid-phase extraction with surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y C; Shiea, J; Sunner, J

    2000-01-01

    A rapid technique for the screening of trace compounds in water by combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) with activated carbon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry is demonstrated. Activated carbon is used both as the sorbent in SPE and as the solid in the SALDI matrix system. This eliminates the need for an SPE elution process. After the analytes have been adsorbed on the surfaces of the activated carbon during SPE extraction, the activated carbon is directly mixed with the SALDI liquid and mass spectrometric analysis is performed. Trace phenolic compounds in water were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The detection limit for these compounds is in the ppb to ppt range. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  6. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumner Starrfield

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic Variables (CVs are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 1012 cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs

  7. Comparison of mass transfer coefficient approach and Nernst-Planck formulation in the reactive transport modeling of Co, Ni, and Ag removal by mixed-bed ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachet, Martin; Jauberty, Loic; De Windt, Laurent; Dieuleveult, Caroline de; Tevissen, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Experiments performed under chemical and flow conditions representative of pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary fluid purification by ion exchange resins (Amberlite IRN9882) are modeled with the OPTIPUR code, considering 1D reactive transport in the mixed-bed column with convective/dispersive transport between beads and electro-diffusive transport within the boundary film around the beads. The effectiveness of the purification in these dilute conditions is highly related to film mass transfer restrictions, which are accounted for by adjustment of a common mass transfer coefficient (MTC) on the experimental initial leakage or modeling of species diffusion through the bead film by the Nernst-Planck equation. A detailed analysis of the modeling against experimental data shows that the Nernst-Planck approach with no adjustable parameters performs as well as, or better than, the MTC approach, particularly to simulate the chromatographic elution of silver by nickel and the subsequent enrichment of the solution in the former metal. (authors)

  8. Site investigation SFR. Water-rock interaction and mixing modelling in the SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (University of Zaragoza (Spain))

    2011-10-15

    the major geochemical processes controlling the behaviour of variables such as pH and Eh and, in general, all the parameters controlled by microbial or water-rock interaction processes. Thus, an integration of the mineralogical and microbiological data has also been performed. The other aim is to characterise the mixing processes that have affected the groundwaters over time. Thus, a statistical analysis has been performed with M3 in order to obtain a more quantitative approach to the mixing processes in the system, as well as to provide a mathematical basis to take into account all the variability of the system and to evaluate the reliability of the categorised groundwater types which are based on expert judgement (Nilsson et al. 2010). Therefore, this report should be considered as a supporting document to the final hydrogeochemical site description version 1.0 (Nilsson et al. 2011). Most of the main geochemical characters and trends observed in the SFR groundwaters are similar to those observed at Forsmark, especially if only groundwaters with marine contributions are compared. This applies to the carbonate, sulphate, silica and fluoride systems. No clear pH trend with depth has been found in these waters which may reflect the lateral heterogeneity of the groundwater system. The high and variable HCO{sub 3}{sup -} values found in groundwaters with a marine signature seem to be the result of the biological activity during infiltration of marine waters through seabed sediments. Calcite equilibrium is the main pH controlling process, and its presence has been detected at all depths. Marine waters are the main source of sulphur, and neither heterogeneous reactions with sulphate minerals (undersaturated, in the case of gypsum or in equilibrium in the case of barite), nor sulphate reducing microbial activity have played an important role on the control of dissolved sulphate concentrations (conditioned, therefore, mainly by mixing). Dissolved silica and fluoride

  9. Site investigation SFR. Water-rock interaction and mixing modelling in the SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    the major geochemical processes controlling the behaviour of variables such as pH and Eh and, in general, all the parameters controlled by microbial or water-rock interaction processes. Thus, an integration of the mineralogical and microbiological data has also been performed. The other aim is to characterise the mixing processes that have affected the groundwaters over time. Thus, a statistical analysis has been performed with M3 in order to obtain a more quantitative approach to the mixing processes in the system, as well as to provide a mathematical basis to take into account all the variability of the system and to evaluate the reliability of the categorised groundwater types which are based on expert judgement (Nilsson et al. 2010). Therefore, this report should be considered as a supporting document to the final hydrogeochemical site description version 1.0 (Nilsson et al. 2011). Most of the main geochemical characters and trends observed in the SFR groundwaters are similar to those observed at Forsmark, especially if only groundwaters with marine contributions are compared. This applies to the carbonate, sulphate, silica and fluoride systems. No clear pH trend with depth has been found in these waters which may reflect the lateral heterogeneity of the groundwater system. The high and variable HCO 3 - values found in groundwaters with a marine signature seem to be the result of the biological activity during infiltration of marine waters through seabed sediments. Calcite equilibrium is the main pH controlling process, and its presence has been detected at all depths. Marine waters are the main source of sulphur, and neither heterogeneous reactions with sulphate minerals (undersaturated, in the case of gypsum or in equilibrium in the case of barite), nor sulphate reducing microbial activity have played an important role on the control of dissolved sulphate concentrations (conditioned, therefore, mainly by mixing). Dissolved silica and fluoride concentrations are

  10. Winter and summer monsoon water mass, heat and freshwater transport changes in the Arabian Sea near 8°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramma, Lothar; Brandt, Peter; Schott, Friedrich; Quadfasel, Detlef; Fischer, Jürgen

    The differences in the water mass distributions and transports in the Arabian Sea between the summer monsoon of August 1993 and the winter monsoon of January 1998 are investigated, based on two hydrographic sections along approximately 8°N. At the western end the sections were closed by a northward leg towards the African continent at about 55°E. In the central basin along 8°N the monsoon anomalies of the temperature and density below the surface-mixed layer were dominated by annual Rossby waves propagating westward across the Arabian Sea. In the northwestern part of the basin the annual Rossby waves have much smaller impact, and the density anomalies observed there were mostly associated with the Socotra Gyre. Salinity and oxygen differences along the section reflect local processes such as the spreading of water masses originating in the Bay of Bengal, northward transport of Indian Central Water, or slightly stronger southward spreading of Red Sea Water in August than in January. The anomalous wind conditions of 1997/98 influenced only the upper 50-100 m with warmer surface waters in January 1998, and Bay of Bengal Water covered the surface layer of the section in the eastern Arabian Sea. Estimates of the overturning circulation of the Arabian Sea were carried out despite the fact that many uncertainties are involved. For both cruises a vertical overturning cell of about 4-6 Sv was determined, with inflow below 2500 m and outflow between about 300 and 2500 m. In the upper 300-450 m a seasonally reversing shallow meridional overturning cell appears to exist in which the Ekman transport is balanced by a geostrophic transport. The heat flux across 8°N is dominated by the Ekman transport, yielding about -0.6 PW for August 1993, and 0.24 PW for January 1998. These values are comparable to climatological and model derived heat flux estimates. Freshwater fluxes across 8°N also were computed, yielding northward freshwater fluxes of 0.07 Sv in January 1998 and 0

  11. Water mass census in the Nordic seas using climatological and observational data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piacsek, S.; Allard, R.; McClean, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have compared and evaluated the water mass census in the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (Gin) Sea area from climatologies, observational data sets and model output. The four climatologies evaluated were: the 1998 and 2001 versions of the World Ocean Atlas (WOA98, WOA01), and the United States Navy's GDEM90 (Generalized Digital Environmental Model) and MODAS01 (Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System) climatologies. Three observational data sets were examined: the multidecadal (1965-1995) set contained on the National Oceano- graphic Data Centre's (NODC) WOD98 (World Ocean Data) Cd-Rom, and two seasonal data sets extracted from observations taken on six cruises by the SACLANT Research Center (SACLANTCEN) of NATO/Italy between 1986-1989. The model data is extracted from a global model run at 1/3 degree resolution for the years 1983-1997, using the Pop (Parallel Ocean Program) model of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The census computations focused on the Norwegian Sea, in the southern part of the Gin Sea, between 10 0 W-10 0 E and 60 0 N-70 0 N, especially for comparisons with the hydro casts and the model. Cases of such evaluation computations included: (a) short term comparisons with quasi-synoptic CTD surveys carried out over a 4-year period in the southeastern Gin Sea; (b) climatological comparisons utilizing all available casts from the WOD98 Cd-Rom, with four climatologies; and (c) a comparison between the WOA01 climatology and the Pop model output ending in 1997. In this region in the spring, the fraction of ocean water that has salinity above 34.85 is ∼94%, and that has temperatures above 0 0 C is ∼33%. Three principal water masses dominated the census: the Atlantic water A W, the deep water D W and an intermediate water mass defined as Lower Arctic Intermediate Water (LAIW). Besides these classes, both the climatologies and the observations exhibited the significant presence of deep water masses with T-S characteristics that do not fall into the named

  12. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  13. Logs and completion data for water and mass balance wells in Mortandad and Ten Site Canyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLin, S.G.; Koch, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    Twenty-four monitoring wells were drilled and completed in December 1994 as part of a water and mass balance study for the shallow perched aquifer in the Mortandad Canyon alluvium and in the lower part of Ten-Site Canyon. The wells penetrated the alluvium containing the aquifer and were completed into the top of the weathered tuff. Twelve of these wells encountered the Tshirege Member (Cooing Unit 1 g) of the Bandelier Tuff below the canyon alluvium, while ten wells made contact with the Cerro Toledo interval, which lies between the Tshirege and Otowi Members of the Bandelier Tuff. The remaining two wells were completed into the alluvium above the weathered tuff contact. These wells provide access for continuous water level measurement and water sampling. Data from these new wells will be used to determine changes in alluvial aquifer water storage, water quality sampling, and estimation of seepage into the unsaturated Bandelier Tuff below the alluvium. This report documents drilling activities and well completion logs for the water and mass balance study. These wells also provide critical new data for fourteen north-south vertical cross-sections constructed for the canyon alluvium

  14. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world’s coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  15. Geochemical controls on the composition of soil pore waters beneath a mixed waste disposal site in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Soil pore waters are collected routinely to monitor a thick unsaturated zone that separates a mixed waste disposal site containing transuranic and low-level radioactive wastes from the Snake River Plain aquifer. The chemistry of the soil pore waters has been studied to evaluate the possible control on the water composition by mineral equilibria and determine the extent, if any, of migration of radionuclides from the disposal site. Geochemical codes were used to perform speciation calculations for the waters. The results of speciation calculations suggest that the installation of the lysimeters affects the observed silica contents of the soil pore waters. The results also establish those chemical parameters that are controlled by secondary mineral precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, John P. [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H2/CO2 selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO2-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H2/CO2 selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H2/CO2 selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux and selectivity at 300 °C, which is comparable to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  17. Potentials of using mixed culture bacteria incorporated with sodium bicarbonate for hydrogen production from water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazeri, Alaa; Elsamadony, Mohamed; Roux, Sophie Le; Peu, Pascal; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2018-05-08

    The aim of this study is to assess the potentials of using mixed culture bacteria incorporated with different concentrations of NaHCO 3 for hydrogen production from water hyacinth (WH). The lowest hydrogen yield (HY) of 30.4 ± 1.9 mL/g TVS , H 2 content (HC) of 19.5 ± 1.5% and hydrogenase enzyme (HE) activity of 0.06 ± 0.01 mgM.B reduced /min were registered for the cultures without supplementation of NaHCO 3 . The HY, HC, and HE activity were maximized at levels of 69.2 ± 4.3 mL/g TVS, 58.4 ± 3.6% and 0.18 ± 0.01 mgM.B reduced /min. respectively for the anaerobes supplied with 3.0 g NaHCO 3 /L. Furthermore, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin destruction efficiencies were 37.2 ± 2.3, 30.0 ± 1.9 and 20.9 ± 1.3% respectively due to the increase of cellulase and xylanase activities up to 2.73 ± 0.17 and 1.87 ± 0.12 U/mL, respectively. Moreover, the abundance of Firmicutes was substantially increased and accounted for 71% of the total OTU's. Microbes belonging to the order Clostridiales and OPB54 were particularly enriched in the medium supplemented with NaHCO 3 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  19. Early Detection of Biofouling on Water Purification Membranes by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka Ravindran, Swathy; Kumar, Ramesh; Srimany, Amitava; Philip, Ligy; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2018-01-02

    By direct analysis of water purification membranes using ambient ionization mass spectrometry, an attempt has been made to understand the molecular signatures of bacterial fouling. Membrane based purification methods are used extensively in water treatment, and a major challenge for them is biofouling. The buildup of microbes and their extracellular polymeric matrix clog the purification membranes and reduce their efficiency. To understand the early stages of bacterial fouling on water purification membranes, we have used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), where ion formation occurs in ambient conditions and the ionization event is surface sensitive. Biosurfactants at the air-water interface generated by microorganisms as a result of quorum sensing, influence the water-membrane interface and are important for the bacterial attachment. We show that these biosurfactants produced by bacteria can be indicator molecular species signifying initiation of biofilms on membrane surfaces, demonstrated by specific DESI MS signatures. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the best studied models for biofilm formation, this process is mediated by rhamnolipids forewarning bacterial fouling. Species dependent variation of such molecules can be used for the precise identification of the microorganisms, as revealed by studies on P. aeroginosa (ATCC 25619). The production of biosurfactants is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level by the quorum-sensing (QS) response. Thus, secretion of these extracellular molecules across the membrane surface allows rapid screening of the biofilm community. We show that, the ambient ionization mass spectrometry can detect certain toxic heavy metals present in water, using surfactant-metal complexes as analytes. We believe that such studies conducted on membranes in various input water streams will help design suitable membrane processes specific to the input streams.

  20. Mass Spectrometry Identification of N-Chlorinated Dipeptides in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xing-Fang

    2017-04-04

    We report the identification of N-chlorinated dipeptides as chlorination products in drinking water using complementary high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) and quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry techniques. First, three model dipeptides, tyrosylglycine (Tyr-Gly), tyrosylalanine (Tyr-Ala), and phenylalanylglycine (Phe-Gly), reacted with sodium hypochlorite, and these reaction solutions were analyzed by QTOF. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala were identified as the major products based on accurate masses, 35 Cl/ 37 Cl isotopic patterns, and MS/MS spectra. These identified N-chlorinated dipeptides were synthesized and found to be stable in water over 10 days except N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly. To enable sensitive detection of N-chlorinated dipeptides in authentic water, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala along with their corresponding dipeptides were detected in authentic tap water samples. The dipeptides were clearly detected in the raw water, but the N-chlorinated dipeptides were at background levels. These results suggest that the N-chlorinated dipeptides are produced by chlorination. This study has identified N-chlorinated dipeptides as new disinfection byproducts in drinking water. The strategy developed in this study can be used to identify chlorination products of other peptides in drinking water.

  1. Engineering of Mixed Matrix Membranes for Water Treatment, Protective Coating and Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Hammami, Mohamed Amen

    2017-11-01

    Mixed Matrix Membranes (MMMs) have received worldwide attention during the last decades. This is due to the fact that the resulting materials can combine the good processability and low cost of polymer membranes with the diverse functionality, high performance and thermal properties of the fillers. This work explores the fabrication and application of MMMs. We focused on the design and fabrication of nanofillers to impart target functionality to the membrane for water treatment, protective coating and gas separation. This thesis is divided into three sections according to the application including: I- Water Treatment: This part is divided into three chapters, two related to the membrane distillation (MD) and one related to the oil spill. Three different nanofillers have been used: Periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO), graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT). Those nanofillers were homogeneously incorporated into polyetherimide (PEI) electrospun nanofiber membranes. The doped nanoparticle not only improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of the pristine fiber but also enhanced the MD and oil spill performance due to the functionality of those nanofillers. II- Protective coating: This part includes two chapters describing the design and the fabrication of a smart antibacterial and anti-corrosion coating. In the first project, we fabricated colloidal lysozyme-templated gold nanoclusters gating antimicrobial-loaded silica nanoparticles (MSN-AuNCs@lys) as nano-fillers in poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(butylene terephthalate) polymer matrix. MSN-AuNCs@lys dispersed homogeneously within the polymer matrix with zero NPs leaching. The system was coated on a common radiographic dental imaging device that is prone to oral bacteria contamination. This coating can successfully sense and inhibit bacterial contamination via a controlled release mechanism that is only triggered by bacteria. In the second project, the coaxial electrospinning approach has been applied to

  2. Mass fluxes and spatial trends of xenobiotics in the waters of the city of Halle, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, K.; Glaeser, H.-R.; Moeder, M.; Wennrich, R.; Osenbrueck, K.; Schirmer, M.

    2008-01-01

    The behaviour and the effects of xenobiotics including pharmaceuticals and fragrances in the environment are widely unknown. In order to improve our knowledge, field investigations and modelling approaches for the entire area of the city of Halle/Saale, Germany, were performed. The distribution of the concentration values and mass fluxes are exemplified using indicators such as Bisphenol A, t-Nonylphenol, Carbamacepine, Galaxolide, Tonalide, Gadolinium and isotopes. Concentrations at a magnitude of ng/L to μg/L were found ubiquitously in the ground and surface waters. Using the concentration values, the impact of the city concerning the indicators was not always evident. Only the assessment of the mass fluxes shows significant urban impacts along the city passage. The calculation of the mass fluxes shows increasing values for all investigated xenobiotics during the city passage; only Bisphenol A stagnates. A balance model of water and indicator mass fluxes was built up for the entire city area. - Xenobiotics are ubiquitous in the investigated urban aquatic system and are quantified by a large scale mass balance to find spatial trends

  3. Simulation of heat and mass transfer in boiling water with the Melodif code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freydier, P.; Chen, O.; Olive, J.; Simonin, O.

    1991-04-01

    The Melodif code is developed at Electricite de France, Research and Development Division. It is an eulerian two dimensional code for the simulation of turbulent two phase flows (a three dimensional code derived from Melodif, ASTRID, is currently being prepared). Melodif is based on the two fluid model, solving the equations of conservation for mass, momentum and energy, for both phases. In such a two fluid model, the description of interfacial transfers between phases is a crucial issue. The model used applies to a dominant continuous phase, and a dispersed phase. A good description of interfacial momentum transfer exists in the standard MELODIF code: the drag force, the apparent mass force... are taken into account. An important factor for interfacial transfers is the interfacial area per volume unit. With the assumption of spherical gas bubbles, an equation has been written for this variable. In the present wok, a model has been tested for interfacial heat and mass transfer in the case of boiling water: it is assumed that mass transfer is controlled by heat transfer through the latent massic energy taken in the phase that vaporizes (or condenses). This heat and mass transfer model has been tested in various configurations: - a cylinder with water flowing inside, is being heated. Boiling takes place near the wall, while bubbles migrating to the core of the flow recondense. This roughly simulates a sub-cooled boiling phenomenon. - a box containing liquid water is depressurized. Boiling takes place in the whole volume of the fluid. The Melodif code can simulate this configuration due to the implicitation of the relation between interphase mass transfer and the pressure variable

  4. Study of mass transfer at the air-water interface by an isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlivat, L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown by analysing the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes distribution in liquid and water vapor, that the processes taking place on a very small scale near the liquid can be investigated. The effect of molecular mass transfer is directly obtained without having to perform difficult measurements in the air in the immediate vicinity of the water surface. Experiments are carried out in the air-water tunnel especially designed for the simulation of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges. The wind velocities vary from 0.7 to 7m/sec. The experimental results obtained do not support the classical Reynolds' analogy between momentum and mass transfer down to the interface and the theory proposed by Sheppard, but they are in agreement with Sverdrup's, Kitaigorodskiy and Volkov's and Brutsaert's theories, all of which involve a layer just above the air-water interface through which mass transfer is dominated by molecular diffusion. The thickness of this layer in the two first theories is shown to decrease with increasing wind velocity. Direct application of Brutsaert's theory for roughness Reynolds numbers smaller than one is in good agreement with the experimental data obtained [fr

  5. Bd0-bar Bd0 mixing and the prediction of the top-quark mass in an independent particle potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, N.; Das, P.; Panda, A.R.; Roy, K.C.

    1993-01-01

    Considering B d 0 -bar B d 0 mixing in a potential model of independent quarks by taking the effective interaction Hamiltonian of the standard Salam-Weinberg-Glashow model and subsequently diagonalizing the corresponding mass matrix with respect to B d 0 and bar B d 0 states, we obtain an expression for the mass difference ΔM Bd 0 in terms of the t-quark mass m t . Using the recent observation of the mixing parameter x d =0.72±0.15 by the ARGUS Collaboration, we predict the lower bound on the top-quark mass as m t ≥149 GeV. Further, a consideration of experimental mass difference ΔM Bd 0 =(4.0±0.8)x10 -13 GeV also leads to m t =167 -17 +16 GeV which is in agreement with the recent experimental bound as well as other theoretical predictions. However, such a prediction of m t that utilizes the experimental value of the CKM matrix element |V td | may not appear convincing in view of the large uncertainties in the measurement of |V td | so far reported. Therefore using the range of m t values within its bounds predicted from other independent works, we make a reasonable estimation of |V td |

  6. Fermion masses and mixings in the 3-3-1 model with right-handed neutrinos based on the S{sub 3} flavor symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A.E.C. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-15

    We propose a 3-3-1 model where the SU(3){sub C} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X} symmetry is extended by S{sub 3} x Z{sub 3} x Z{sub 3}{sup '} x Z{sub 8} x Z{sub 16} and the scalar spectrum is enlarged by extra SU(3){sub L} singlet scalar fields. The model successfully describes the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. In this framework, the light active neutrino masses arise via an inverse seesaw mechanism and the observed charged fermion mass and quark mixing hierarchy is a consequence of the Z{sub 3} x Z{sub 3}{sup '} x Z{sub 8} x Z{sub 16} symmetry breaking at very high energy. The obtained physical observables for both quark and lepton sectors are compatible with their experimental values. The model predicts the effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay to be m{sub ββ} = 4 and 48 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino spectra, respectively. Furthermore, we found a leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase close to (π)/(2) and a Jarlskog invariant close to about 3 x 10{sup -2} for both normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. (orig.)

  7. Lepton mixing and cancellation of the Dirac mass hierarchy in SO(10) GUTs with flavor symmetries T7 and Σ(81)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael A.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2009-01-01

    In SO(10) grand unified theories the hierarchy which is present in the Dirac mass term of the neutrinos is generically as strong as the one in the up-type quark mass term. We propose a mechanism to partially or completely cancel this hierarchy in the light neutrino mass matrix in the seesaw context. The two main ingredients of the cancellation mechanism are the existence of three fermionic gauge singlets and of a discrete flavor symmetry G f which is broken at a higher scale than SO(10). Two realizations of the cancellation mechanism are presented. The realization based on the Frobenius group T 7 ≅Z 7 xZ 3 leads to a partial cancellation of the hierarchy and relates maximal 2-3 lepton mixing with the geometric hierarchy of the up-quark masses. In the realization with the group Σ(81) the cancellation is complete and tribimaximal lepton mixing is reproduced at the lowest order. In both cases, to fully accommodate the leptonic data we take into account additional effects such as effects of higher-dimensional operators involving more than one flavon. The heavy neutral fermion mass spectra are considered. For both realizations we analyze the flavon potential at the renormalizable level as well as ways to generate the Cabibbo angle.

  8. Distribution and ventilation of water masses in the western Ross Sea inferred from CFC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Magi, Emanuele; Massolo, Serena; Budillon, Giorgio; Smethie, William M.

    2015-03-01

    During the CLIMA Project (R.V. Italica cruise PNRA XVI, January-February 2001), hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) observations were obtained, particularly in the western Ross Sea. Their distribution demonstrated water mass structure and ventilation processes in the investigated areas. In the surface waters (AASW) the CFC saturation levels varied spatially: CFCs were undersaturated in all the areas (range from 80 to 90%), with the exception of few stations sampled near Ross Island. In particular, the Terra Nova Bay polynya, where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is produced, was a low-saturated surface area (74%) with respect to CFCs. Throughout most of the shelf area, the presence of modified circumpolar deep water (MCDW) was reflected in a mid-depth CFC concentration minima. Beneath the MCDW, CFC concentrations generally increased in the shelf waters towards the seafloor. We estimated that the corresponding CFCs saturation level in the source water region for HSSW was about 68-70%. Waters with high CFC concentrations were detected in the western Ross Sea on the down slope side of the Drygalski Trough, indicating that AABW was being supplied to the deep Antarctic Basin. Estimates of ventilation ages depend strongly on the saturation levels. We calculated ventilation ages using the saturation level calibrated tracer ratio, CFC11/CFC12. We deduced a mean residence time of the shelf waters of about 6-7 years between the western Ross Sea source and the shelf break.

  9. Mass transfer between waste canister and water seeping in rock fractures. Revisiting the Q-equivalent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Liu Longcheng; Moreno, Luis

    2010-03-01

    Models are presented for solute transport between seeping water in fractured rock and a copper canister embedded in a clay buffer. The migration through an undamaged buffer is by molecular diffusion only as the clay has so low hydraulic conductivity that water flow can be neglected. In the fractures and in any damaged zone seeping water carries the solutes to or from the vicinity of the buffer in the deposition hole. During the time the water passes the deposition hole molecular diffusion aids in the mass transfer of solutes between the water/buffer interface and the water at some distance from the interface. The residence time of the water and the contact area between the water and the buffer determine the rate of mass transfer between water and buffer. Simple analytical solutions are presented for the mass transfer in the seeping water. For complex migration geometries simplifying assumptions are made that allow analytical solutions to be obtained. The influence of variable apertures on the mass transfer is discussed and is shown to be moderate. The impact of damage to the rock around the deposition hole by spalling and by the presence of a cemented and fractured buffer is also explored. These phenomena lead to an increase of mass transfer between water and buffer. The overall rate of mass transfer between the bulk of the water and the canister is proportional to the overall concentration difference and inversely proportional to the sum of the mass transfer resistances. For visualization purposes the concept of equivalent flowrate is introduced. This entity can be thought as of the flowrate of water that will be depleted of its solute during the water passage past the deposition hole. The equivalent flowrate is also used to assess the release rate of radionuclides from a damaged canister. Examples are presented to illustrate how various factors influence the rate of mass transfer

  10. Investigation of tungsten mass transfer in rarefied air oxygen and water vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evsikov, A.S.; Makeev, A.A.; Lyubimova, L.L.; Sinyavskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of oxygen and water vapor effect on the rate of tungsten evaporation are presented. Methods for carrying out an experiment are presented. The experiments are carried out at the 2600 degC tungsten wire temperature and the pressure of oxygen and water vapors (2x10 -3 -5) Pa. Registration of final products of mass transfer is carried out by the DRON-2.0 diffractometer using a detachable substrate. Empirical dependence taking into account oxygen and water vapor effect on the rate of tungsten evaporation is suggested. It is marked that air oxygen and water vapor increase evaporation rate uniformly the difference is observed only in final products of interaction

  11. Analysis of bromate in drinking water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Koji; Asami, Mari; Takei, Kanako; Akiba, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method for determining bromate in drinking water was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The (18)O-enriched bromate was used as an internal standard. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of bromate was 0.2 µg/L. The peak of bromate was separated from those of coexisting ions (i.e., chloride, nitrate and sulfate). The relative and absolute recoveries of bromate in two drinking water samples and in a synthesized ion solution (100 mg/L chloride, 10 mg N/L nitrate, and 100 mg/L sulfate) were 99-105 and 94-105%, respectively. Bromate concentrations in 11 drinking water samples determined by LC-MS/MS were water without sample pretreatment.

  12. Mixing Phenomena in a Bottom Blown Copper Smelter: A Water Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lang; Cui, Zhixiang; Ma, Xiaodong; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Nguyen, Anh; Zhao, Baojun

    2015-03-01

    The first commercial bottom blown oxygen copper smelting furnace has been installed and operated at Dongying Fangyuan Nonferrous Metals since 2008. Significant advantages have been demonstrated in this technology mainly due to its bottom blown oxygen-enriched gas. In this study, a scaled-down 1:12 model was set up to simulate the flow behavior for understanding the mixing phenomena in the furnace. A single lance was used in the present study for gas blowing to establish a reliable research technique and quantitative characterisation of the mixing behavior. Operating parameters such as horizontal distance from the blowing lance, detector depth, bath height, and gas flow rate were adjusted to investigate the mixing time under different conditions. It was found that when the horizontal distance between the lance and detector is within an effective stirring range, the mixing time decreases slightly with increasing the horizontal distance. Outside this range, the mixing time was found to increase with increasing the horizontal distance and it is more significant on the surface. The mixing time always decreases with increasing gas flow rate and bath height. An empirical relationship of mixing time as functions of gas flow rate and bath height has been established first time for the horizontal bottom blowing furnace.

  13. Importance of the virtual mass force in accelerating steam/water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Virtual mass force is one of the forces that must be considered against accelerating a dispersed fluid flowing in the bulk of a continuous fluid. This force depends on the geometry of the interface and the flow pattern of the two fluids. For dilute two-phase flow mixtures where the bubbles are singly dispersed, the value of the virtual mass force coefficient is dependent on the geometry of the bubble. However, for high void fraction cases, such as depressurization initiated by a pipe break in light water reactors, more intense interaction is expected between the two phase and, therefore, the value of the virtual mass force must be well defined. The effects of implementing the virtual mass force term in the momentum equations of a two-fluid model may be significant for improving the stability of the solution of the conservation equations, the accuracy of the numerical results, and the computation time. In the current work, a new stability criterion is derived after implementing Hancox's model for the virtual mass force in the momentum equations of the six-equation two-phase flow model of TERMIT. A one-dimensional blow-down in a horizontal pipe is considered to investigate the importance of incorporating the virtual mass force in accelerating mixtures flows

  14. Thermodynamic and structural studies of mixed monolayers: Mutual mixing of DPPC and DPPG with DoTAP at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, Amiya Kumar; Vasilev, Krasimir; Orgeig, Sandra; Prestidge, Clive A.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid monomolecular films at the air-water interface are useful model membranes to understand miscibility among various components. Surface pressure (π)-area (A) isotherms of pure and mixed monolayers of dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane (DoTAP)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DoTAP-dipalmitoyphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were constructed using a surface balance. DPPC and DPPG produced isotherms as expected and reported earlier. DoTAP, an unsaturated lipid, demonstrated a continuous π-A isotherm. Associative interactions were identified in DPPC-DoTAP mixtures compared to the pure components, while DPPG-DoTAP mixtures showed repulsive interaction up to an equimolar ratio. Compression moduli of the monolayers revealed that DPPC-DoTAP mixtures had increasing stability with increasing surface pressure, but addition of DoTAP to DPPG showed instability at low and intermediate concentrations. In both cases increased stability was returned at higher X DoTAP values and surface pressures. Lipid monolayer film thickness values, determined on a gold coated glass substrate by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), indicated a systematic change in height profile for DPPC-DoTAP mixtures with increasing X DoTAP . However, DPPG-DoTAP mixed monolayer systems demonstrated a biphasic response. The SPR data were in excellent agreement with our interpretation of the structure of solid supported lipid monolayers.

  15. Thermodynamic and structural studies of mixed monolayers: Mutual mixing of DPPC and DPPG with DoTAP at the air-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Amiya Kumar, E-mail: akpanda1@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling-734 013, West Bengal (India); Vasilev, Krasimir [Mawson Institute for Advanced Manufacturing, Mawson Lakes, University of South Australia, SA-5095 (Australia); Orgeig, Sandra [Sansom Institute for Health Research and School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Prestidge, Clive A. [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-05-10

    Phospholipid monomolecular films at the air-water interface are useful model membranes to understand miscibility among various components. Surface pressure ({pi})-area (A) isotherms of pure and mixed monolayers of dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane (DoTAP)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DoTAP-dipalmitoyphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were constructed using a surface balance. DPPC and DPPG produced isotherms as expected and reported earlier. DoTAP, an unsaturated lipid, demonstrated a continuous {pi}-A isotherm. Associative interactions were identified in DPPC-DoTAP mixtures compared to the pure components, while DPPG-DoTAP mixtures showed repulsive interaction up to an equimolar ratio. Compression moduli of the monolayers revealed that DPPC-DoTAP mixtures had increasing stability with increasing surface pressure, but addition of DoTAP to DPPG showed instability at low and intermediate concentrations. In both cases increased stability was returned at higher X{sub DoTAP} values and surface pressures. Lipid monolayer film thickness values, determined on a gold coated glass substrate by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), indicated a systematic change in height profile for DPPC-DoTAP mixtures with increasing X{sub DoTAP}. However, DPPG-DoTAP mixed monolayer systems demonstrated a biphasic response. The SPR data were in excellent agreement with our interpretation of the structure of solid supported lipid monolayers.

  16. Influence of water mixing and food web status on the response of planktonic communities to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostajir, B.; Uvbr Team

    2003-04-01

    Two series of mesocosm experiments were carried out in 1996 and 1997 using the natural planktonic assemblage, ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm) at the community level. The water used in the first experiment was rich in nitrate (ca. 8-10 μM) and phytoplankton biomass (5 μg Chlorophyll a L-1: Chl a), conditions typical of an eutrophic coastal zone with herbivorous food web characteristics. In contrast, the water used in the second experiment was poor in nitrate (food web. Furthermore, to understand the influence of vertical mixing on the effects of UVBR on the planktonic community, two mixing regimes (fast and slow) were tested during the mesocosm experiments of 1997. The results showed that the mixing regime can moderate the effects of UVBR on the planktonic community and can also modify completely the species composition in the mesocosms much more than the UVBR. Comparison between the impact of UVBR on the planktonic community presented in these two experiments suggested that regenerated production-based systems (e.g. microbial food webs) tolerate the effects of UVBR more efficiently than do new production-based systems (herbivorous food webs). Results regarding the potential effects of UVBR in different marine systems, coastal versus oceanic, where different physical systems dominate, fast versus slow mixing, and consequently the development of different food webs are favored, herbivorous versus microbial, will be discussed.

  17. Spring 2009 Water Mass Distribution, Mixing and Transport in the Southern Adriatic after a Low Production of Winter Dense Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Research Council of Italy, ISMAR - Marine Sciences Institute in Venezia, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice , Italy c DISVA, Universitá Politecnica delle...Pozzuolo di Lerici (SP), Italy1a r t i c l e i n f o Article history : Received 2 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 March 2013 Accepted 17 April

  18. Eastern South Pacific water mass geometry during the last glacial-interglacial transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Reyes, D.; Mohtadi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern South Pacific is characterized today by a complex thermocline structure where large salinity and oxygen changes as a function of depth coexist. Surface waters from tropical origin float on top of subantarctic fresher water (the so-called 'shallow salinity minimum of the eastern south Pacific'), which in turn, flow above aged equatorial and deeper recently ventilated Antarctic Intermediate waters. Little is known however about the water mass geometry changes that could have occurred during the last glacial maximum boundary conditions (about 20,000 years before the present), despite this information being critical for the assessment of potential mechanisms that have been proposed as explanations for the deglacial onset of low oxygen conditions in the area and the atmospheric CO2 increase during the same time. Here we present benthic and planktonic foraminifera stable isotope and radiocarbon data from a set of sediment cores from the Chilean continental margin covering a large -yet still limited- geographical area and depth range. Sedimentations rates were relatively high (>10 cm/kyr) precluding major caveats from bioturbation in all of our archives. The distribution of δ13C of ΣCO2 shows the presence of a very depleted (δ13C < -1‰ V-PDB) water mass overlaying more recently ventilated waters at intermediate depths as indicated by thermocline foraminifer dwellers being more depleted in 13C than the benthic species. The origin of this depleted end-member is probably upwelling from the Southern Ocean as expressed by the radiocarbon content and the large reservoir effect associated with the last glacial maximum and the beginning of the deglaciation along the margin. Our data suggest that the Tropical waters that today bath the lower latitude cores was displaced by surface waters of southern origin and therefore in line with the evidence of a latitudinal shift of the frontal systems.

  19. Mixed-spectrum generation mechanism analysis of dispersive hyperspectral imaging for improving environmental monitoring of coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Xiao, Gonghai; Qi, Hongxing; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu; Xue, Yongqi

    2010-11-01

    At present, most part of coast zone in China belong to Case II waters with a large volume of shallow waters. Through theories and experiences of ocean water color remote sensing has a prominent improvement, there still exist many problems mainly as follows: (a) there is not a special sensor for heat pollution of coast water remote sensing up to now; (b) though many scholars have developed many water quality parameter retrieval models in the open ocean, there still exists a large gap from practical applications in turbid coastal waters. It is much more difficult due to the presence of high concentrations of suspended sediments and dissolved organic material, which overwhelm the spectral signal of sea water. Hyperspectral remote sensing allows a sensor on a moving platform to gather emitted radiation from the Earth's surface, which opens a way to reach a better analysis and understanding of coast water. Operative Modular Imaging Spectrometer (OMIS) is a type of representative imaging spectrometer developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. OMIS collects reflective and radiation light from ground by RC telescope with the scanning mirror cross track and flight of plane along track. In this paper, we explore the use of OMIS as the airborne sensor for the heat pollution monitoring in coast water, on the basis of an analysis on the mixed-spectrum arising from the image correcting process for geometric distortion. An airborne experiment was conducted in the winter of 2009 on the coast of the East Sea in China.

  20. Radiative decays involving f0(980) and a0(980) and mixing between low and high mass scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, T.; Kitamura, I.; Morisita, N.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the experimental data for φ->f 0 (980)γ, φ->a 0 (980)γ, f 0 (980)->γγ and a 0 (980)->γγ decay widths in a framework where f 0 (980) and a 0 (980) are assumed to be mainly qqq-bar q-bar low mass scalar mesons and mixed with qq-bar high mass scalar mesons. Applied the vector meson dominance model (VDM), these decays amplitudes are expressed by coupling parameters B describing the S (qqq-bar q-bar scalar meson)-V (vector meson)-V (vector meson) coupling and B ' describing the S ' (qq-bar scalar meson)-V-V coupling. Adopting the magnitudes for B and B ' as 3∼2.8 GeV -1 and ∼12 GeV -1 , respectively, the mixing angle between a 0 (980) and a 0 (1450) as ∼9 o , and the mixing parameter λ 01 causing the mixing between I=0 qqq-bar q-bar state and qq-bar state as ∼0.24 GeV 2 , we can interpret these experimental data, consistently

  1. Water mass distribution in Fram Strait and over the Yermak Plateau in summer 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rudels

    Full Text Available The water mass distribution in northern Fram Strait and over the Yermak Plateau in summer 1997 is described using CTD data from two cruises in the area. The West Spitsbergen Current was found to split, one part recirculated towards the west, while the other part, on entering the Arctic Ocean separated into two branches. The main inflow of Atlantic Water followed the Svalbard continental slope eastward, while a second, narrower, branch stayed west and north of the Yermak Plateau. The water column above the southeastern flank of the Yermak Plateau was distinctly colder and less saline than the two inflow branches. Immediately west of the outer inflow branch comparatively high temperatures in the Atlantic Layer suggested that a part of the extraordinarily warm Atlantic Water, observed in the boundary current in the Eurasian Basin in the early 1990s, was now returning, within the Eurasian Basin, toward Fram Strait. The upper layer west of the Yermak Plateau was cold, deep and comparably saline, similar to what has recently been observed in the interior Eurasian Basin. Closer to the Greenland continental slope the salinity of the upper layer became much lower, and the temperature maximum of the Atlantic Layer was occasionally below 
    0.5 °C, indicating water masses mainly derived from the Canadian Basin. This implies that the warm pulse of Atlantic Water had not yet made a complete circuit around the Arctic Ocean. The Atlantic Water of the West Spitsbergen Current recirculating within the strait did not extend as far towards Greenland as in the 1980s, leaving a broader passage for waters from the Atlantic and intermediate layers, exiting the Arctic Ocean. A possible interpretation is that the circulation pattern alternates between a strong recirculation of the West Spitsbergen Current in the strait, and a larger exchange of Atlantic Water between the Nordic Seas and the inner parts of the Arctic Ocean.

    Key words: Oceanography: general

  2. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    OpenAIRE

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-01-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relative...

  3. Calculating the permeability coefficients of mixed matrix membranes of polydimethylsiloxane and silicalite crystals to various ethanol-water solutions using molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability coefficients of mixed matrix membranes of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and silicalite crystal are taken as the sum of the permeability coefficients of membrane components each weighted by their associated mass fraction. The permeability coefficient of a membrane c...

  4. Treatment of Slaughterhouse Waste Water Mixed with Serum from Lacteal Industry of Extremadura in Spain to Produce Clean Energy

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Marcos; A. Al-Kassir; Francisco Cuadros; Talal Yusaf

    2017-01-01

    The problem of slaughterhouse waste water can be resolved by mixing it with serum from lacteal industry to produce a biogas. The effect of serum addition on the anaerobic co-digestion of solid and liquid slaughterhouse waste has been studied. The experimental device consisted of a continuous digester by recirculation of biogas produced in the anaerobic digestion. The input effluent was a mixture of slaughterhouse waste from Badajoz city (Spain) and animal serum in a proportion of 20%. The ana...

  5. Distribution of oxygen isotopes in the water masses of Drake Passage and the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Grose, Katie E.; McDonagh, Elaine L.; Heywood, Karen J.; Frew, Russell D.; Dennis, Paul F.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of oxygen (18O and 16O) from samples collected on World Ocean Circulation Experiment sections SR1b (eastern Drake Passage) and A11 (Punta Arenas to Cape Town) are used, together with hydrographic data, to deduce information about the formation and variability of South Atlantic and Southern Ocean water masses. The Drake Passage surface waters south of the Polar Front (PF) are isotopically light (δ18O around -0.4‰) owing to the influence of meteoric waters. The salinity and δ18O of the A11 surface waters yield an apparent freshwater end-member which is much isotopically lighter than the local precipitation, thus advection of these waters from farther south dominates over local effects in determining the surface water properties. The Drake Passage section shows unusual proximity of the two main fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (the PF and Subantarctic Front (SAF)), and we observe cold, fresh, and isotopically light water derived from the temperature-minimum Winter Water at the SAF. This water is of the correct density to freshen the intermediate water north of the SAF and thus play a role in the formation of the comparatively fresh Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) of the South Atlantic. This confirms the role of Antarctic water in forming the South Atlantic variety of AAIW. Across the A11 section the oxygen isotope and salinity data at the AAIW core show very similar traces, with waters in the Malvinas Current loop showing lowest values of both. At the eastern boundary of the South Atlantic, the input of Red Sea Water from east of South Africa is observed via the presence of anomalously isotopically heavy AAIW. We deduce potentially significant temporal variability in the isotopic composition of Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW) by comparing the Drake Passage data to earlier data covering the outflow of the Weddell Sea. The A11 data show WSDW consistent with such variability, indicating that its effects could

  6. Engineering of Mixed Matrix Membranes for Water Treatment, Protective Coating and Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Hammami, Mohamed Amen

    2017-01-01

    Mixed Matrix Membranes (MMMs) have received worldwide attention during the last decades. This is due to the fact that the resulting materials can combine the good processability and low cost of polymer membranes with the diverse functionality, high

  7. Surface water iron supplies in the Southern Ocean sustained by deep winter mixing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tagliabue, A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of iron limit primary productivity across much of the Southern Ocean. At the basin scale, most dissolved iron is supplied to surfacewaters from subsurface reservoirs, because land inputs are spatially limited. Deep mixing in winter...

  8. Investigating the Interannual Variability of the Circulation and Water Mass Formation in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, S. S.; Papadopoulos, V. P.; Denaxa, D.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The interannual variability of the circulation and water mass formation in the Red Sea is investigated with the use of a numerical model and the combination of satellite and in-situ observations. The response of Red Sea to the large-scale variability of atmospheric forcing is studied through a 30-years simulation experiment, using MICOM model. The modeling results demonstrate significant trends and variability that are mainly located in the central and northern parts of the basin. On the other hand, the exchange pattern between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean at the strait of Bab el Mandeb presents very weak interannual variability. The results verify the regularity of the water mass formation processes in the northern Red Sea but also show significant variability of the circulation and thermohaline conditions in the areas of formation. Enhanced water mass formation conditions are observed during specific years of the simulation (approximately five years apart). Analysis of recent warm and cold events in the northernmost part of the basin, based on a combination of atmospheric reanalysis results and oceanic satellite and in-situ observations, shows the importance of the cyclonic gyre that is prevailing in this part of the basin. This gyre can effectively influence the sea surface temperature (SST) and intensify or mitigate the winter effect of the atmospheric forcing. Upwelling induced by persistent periods of the gyre functioning drops the SST over the northernmost part of the Red Sea and can produce colder than normal winter SST even without extreme atmospheric forcing. These mechanisms are crucial for the formation of intermediate and deep water masses in the Red Sea and the strength of the subsequent thermohaline cells.

  9. Thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Hu Yu; Zuo Zheng; Jin Feng; Li Qingbin

    2012-01-01

    Removal of hydration heat from mass concrete during construction is important for the quality and safety of concrete structures. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element program for thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes was developed based on the equivalent equation of heat conduction including the effect of cooling water pipes and hydration heat of concrete. The cooling function of the double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling pipes in a concrete slab was derived from the principle of equivalent cooling. To improve the applicability and precision of the equivalent heat conduction equation under small flow, the cooling function was revised according to its monotonicity and empirical formulas of single-phase forced-convection heat transfer in tube flow. Considering heat hydration of concrete at later age, a double exponential function was proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve of concrete. Subsequently, the temperature variation of concrete was obtained, and the outlet temperature of cooling water was estimated through the energy conservation principle. Comparing calculated results with actual measured data from a monolith of an arch dam in China, the numerical model was proven to be effective in sufficiently simulating accurate temperature variations of mass concrete. - Highlights: ► Three-dimensional program is developed to model temperature history of mass concrete. ► Massive concrete is embedded with double-layer heterogeneous cooling pipes. ► Double exponential function is proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve. ► Outlet temperature of cooling water is estimated. ► A comparison is made between the calculated and measured data.

  10. CFD modeling of turbulent mixing through vertical pressure tube type boiling water reactor fuel rod bundles with spacer-grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shashi Kant; Sinha, S. L.; Chandraker, D. K.

    2018-05-01

    Numerical simulation has been carried out for the study of natural mixing of a Tracer (Passive scalar) to describe the development of turbulent diffusion in an injected sub-channel and, afterwards on, cross-mixing between adjacent sub-channels. In this investigation, post benchmark evaluation of the inter-subchannel mixing was initiated to test the ability of state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to numerically predict the important turbulence parameters downstream of a ring type spacer grid in a rod-bundle. A three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool (STAR-CCM+) was used to model the single phase flow through a 30° segment or 1/12th of the cross segment of a 54-rod bundle with a ring shaped spacer grid.