WorldWideScience

Sample records for water light gases

  1. Gas-liquid-liquid equilibria in mixtures of water, light gases, and hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    Phase equilibrium in mixtures of water + light gases and water + heavy hydrocarbons has been investigated with the development of new local composition theory, new equations of state, and new experimental data. The preferential segregation and orientation of molecules due to different energies of molecular interaction has been simulated with square well molecules. Extensive simulation has been made for pure square well fluids and mixtures to find the local composition at wide ranges of states. A theory of local composition has been developed and an equation of state has been obtained for square well fluids. The new local composition theory has been embedded in several equations of state. The pressure of water is decoupled into a polar pressure and non-polar pressure according to the molecular model of water of Jorgensen et al. The polar pressure of water is combined with the BACK equation for the general description of polar fluids and their mixtures. Being derived from the steam table, the Augmented BACK equation is particularly suited for mixtures of water + non-polar substances such as the hydrocarbons. The hydrophobic character of the hydrocarbons had made their mixtures with water a special challenge. A new group contribution equation of state is developed to describe phase equilibrium and volumetric behavior of fluids while requiring only to know the molecular structure of the components. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Noble Gases in Lakes and Ground Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kipfer, Rolf; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Peeters, Frank; Stute, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to most other fields of noble gas geochemistry that mostly regard atmospheric noble gases as 'contamination,' air-derived noble gases make up the far largest and hence most important contribution to the noble gas abundance in meteoric waters, such as lakes and ground waters. Atmospheric noble gases enter the meteoric water cycle by gas partitioning during air / water exchange with the atmosphere. In lakes and oceans noble gases are exchanged with the free atmosphere at the surface...

  3. Elimination of gases and contamination from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, A. P.

    1970-01-01

    Filtration system with membrane type hydrophilic and hydrophobic filters gives absolute filtration with automatic venting of freed gases, and prevents backward transmission of contamination with no bacterial growth through the filters. Filter aids in degassing industrial solutions and in removing oxygen from sea water.

  4. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial control of 220Rn occurrence in the environment, e.g., making an argument why 220Rn is not detectable in water, but in soil air. As 220Rn occurrence is of 'very local origin

  5. Rare gases, water, and carbon in kaersutites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreda, Robert J.; Basu, Asish R.

    1984-07-01

    Kaersutites from Kakanui, New Zealand and from three localities in the southwestern United States have been analyzed for rare gases, water and carbon to investigate the volatile signature of the sub-continental mantle. This study does not confirm the high 3He/ 4He and 21Ne/ 22Ne ratios reported by Saito et al. [1] for the Kakanui kaersutite. Instead, a 3He/ 4He ratio of 6 RA and atmospheric 21Ne/ 22Ne ratios were measured which are consistent with our current knowledge of the earth's mantle. A low 40Ar/ 36Ar of 320 and more than 10 -8 cm 3/g of 36Ar confirms the argon results of Saito et al. and indicates that significant quantities of 36Ar reside in this portion of the mantle. Kaersutites from the southwestern United States (Arizona) have a heterogeneous helium isotope signature, ranging from 8.8 RA at San Carlos to 0.46 at Hoover Dam. All D/H ratios for the water in kaersutites (-56‰ to -78‰) represent typical mantle values with no apparent correlation with 3He/ 4He. The correlation of increasing carbon content (140-400 ppm) with increasing δ 13C (-24.5‰ to -16.7‰) may reflect differences in the proportions of oxidized and reduced carbon in these samples.

  6. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

    1998-08-31

    Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and

  7. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  8. Phase equilibria at low temperature for light hydrocarbons-methanol-water-acid gases mixtures: measurements and modelling; Equilibres de phases a basse temperature de systemes complexes CO{sub 2} - hydrocarbures legers - methanol - eau: mesures et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffine, L.

    2005-10-15

    The need to develop and improve natural gas treatment processes is real. The petroleum industry usually uses separation processes which require phase equilibrium phenomena. Yet, the complexity of the phase equilibria involved results in a lack of data, which in turn limits the development of thermodynamic models. The first part of this work is devoted to experimental investigations for systems containing light hydrocarbons, methanol, water and acid gases. We present a new apparatus that was developed to measure vapor-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria. It allowed us to obtain new phase composition data for the methanol-ethane binary system and different mixtures, and also to determine a part of the three phases equilibrium envelope of the same systems. In the second part of this work, we have developed a thermodynamic model based on the CPA equation of state. This choice may be justified by the presence of associating components like methanol, hydrogen sulfide and water in the systems. Such model is necessary for the design of gas treatment plants. Our model provides good results for phase equilibrium calculations for binaries systems without binary interaction parameter in many cases, and describes correctly the vapour-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria for complex mixtures. (author)

  9. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  10. Light beating spectroscopy of Brillouin scattering in gases and solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogi, Takeshi; Sakai, Keiji; Takagi, Kenshiro

    2006-07-01

    The experimental system of optical beating spectroscopy was improved, and the increased sensitivity and frequency resolution were demonstrated in the Brillouin scattering experiments in solids, crown glass (BK7), and polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA), and also in gases, air, and nitrogen. For their weak light scattering ability, these substances are very tough specimens for Brillouin scattering studies, and the classical spectrometer of Fabry-Pérot étalon has been so far used for the frequency analysis. The phonon peaks were observed with the present light beating system in BK7 at room temperature over the wave number range from k /2π=1.03×104to8.84×104m-1 (corresponding frequency from 61.6to548MHz), and the spectra were fitted with Gaussian curves since a condenser lens in the incident light path caused a large instrumental width that overwhelmed the intrinsic phonon width. The spectra in PMMA were analyzed with Voigt functions. The dispersion relations obtained in these solids were in good agreement with the literature values of ultrasonic velocity. The spectra in air were well fitted with Lorentzian curve representing the phonon lifetime, and the absorption as well as the phase velocity was obtained.

  11. Phase Behavior of Light Gases in Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L., Jr.; Trvedi, N.J., Gao, W.

    1997-09-01

    Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, our solubility apparatus was refurbished and restored to full service. To test the experimental apparatus and procedures used, measurements were obtained for the solubility Of C0{sub 2} in benzene at 160{degrees}F. Having confirmed the accuracy of the newly acquired data in comparison with our previous measurements and data reported in the literature for this test system, we have begun to measure the solubility of hydrogen in hexane. The measurements

  12. Simultaneous analysis of noble gases, sulfur hexafluoride, and other dissolved gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennwald, Matthias S; Hofer, Markus; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-08-06

    We developed an analytical method for the simultaneous measurement of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, SF6, N2, and O2 concentrations in a single water sample. The gases are extracted from the water using a head space technique and are transferred into a vacuum system for purification and separation into different fractions using a series of cold traps. Helium is analyzed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The remaining gas species are analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for analysis of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, and O2 and an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for SF6 analysis. Standard errors of the gas concentrations are approximately 8% for He and 2-5% for the remaining gas species. The method can be extended to also measure concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Tests of the method in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) showed that dissolved gas concentrations agree with measurements from other methods and concentrations of air saturated water. In a small artificial pond, we observed systematic gas supersaturations, which seem to be linked to adsorption of solar irradiation in the pond and to water circulation through a gravel bed.

  13. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  14. Apparatus and method for purging hydrogen sulfide gases from well water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwall, J.A.

    1984-04-24

    An apparatus and method of ridding objectionable hydrogen sulfide gases from well water before pumping the water from the well is provided, wherein the water at the water table level in the well is aerated, causing turbulence in the well water, and facilitating the escape of hydrogen sulfide gases to the atmosphere. The apparatus (10) for ridding hydrogen sulfide gases from well water comprises means (16) for pumping well water (19) under pressure to a water delivery system of an edifice (30, 33), additional means (38) associated with the pumping means (16) for delivering a relatively small portion of the well water under pressure to the well water (19) in the well (12) to cause turbulence in the water to facilitate the escape of hydrogen sulfide gases from the well water, and further means (13) to vent the freed hydrogen sulfide gases to the atmosphere. The process for carrying out the invention comprises the steps of: pumping water under pressure from a well to a water delivery system, delivering a relatively small portion of water under pressure to the surface of the water in the well, causing turbulence in the well water to facilitate release of hydrogen sulfide gases from the well water, and venting the released hydrogen sulfide gases to the atmosphere.

  15. Membrane systems for energy efficient separation of light gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Archuleta, T.; Barbero, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and propylene are two of the largest commodity chemicals in the United States and are major building blocks for the petrochemicals industry. These olefins are separated currently by cryogenic distillation which demands extremely low temperatures and high pressures. Over 75 billion pounds of ethylene and propylene are distilled annually in the US at an estimated energy requirement of 400 trillion BTU`s. Non-domestic olefin producers are rapidly constructing state-of-the-art plants. These energy-efficient plants are competing with an aging United States olefins industry in which 75% of the olefins producers are practicing technology that is over twenty years old. New separation opportunities are therefore needed to continually reduce energy consumption and remain competitive. Amoco has been a leader in incorporating new separation technology into its olefins facilities and has been aggressively pursuing non-cryogenic alternatives to light gas separations. The largest area for energy reduction is the cryogenic isolation of the product hydrocarbons from the reaction by-products, methane and hydrogen. This separation requires temperatures as low as {minus}150{degrees}F and pressures exceeding 450 psig. This CRADA will focus on developing a capillary condensation process to separate olefinic mixtures from light gas byproducts at temperatures that approach ambient conditions and at pressures less than 250 psig; this technology breakthrough will result in substantial energy savings. The key technical hurdle in the development of this novel separation concept is the precise control of the pore structure of membrane materials. These materials must contain specially-shaped channels in the 20-40A range to provide the driving force necessary to remove the condensed hydrocarbon products. In this project, Amoco is the technology end-user and provides the commercialization opportunity and engineering support.

  16. Predicting enhanced absorption of light gases in polyethylene using simplified PC-SAFT and SAFT-VR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslam, Andrew J.; von Solms, Nicolas; Adjiman, Claire S.

    2006-01-01

    Absorption of light gases in polyethylene (PE) is studied using two versions of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT): SAFT for chain molecules with attractive potentials of variable range (VR) and simplified perturbed-chain (PC) SAFT. Emphasis is placed on the light gases typically pre...

  17. Influence of nearly resonant light on the scattering length in low-temperature atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Fedichev, P O; Shlyapnikov, G V; Walraven, J T M

    1996-01-01

    We develop the idea of manipulating the scattering length a in low-temperature atomic gases by using nearly resonant light. As found, if the incident light is close to resonance with one of the bound p levels of electronically excited molecule, then virtual radiative transitions of a pair of interacting atoms to this level can significantly change the value and even reverse the sign of a. The decay of the gas due to photon recoil, resulting from the scattering of light by single atoms, and due to photoassociation can be minimized by selecting the frequency detuning and the Rabi frequency. Our calculations show the feasibility of optical manipulations of trapped Bose condensates through a light-induced change in the mean field interaction between atoms, which is illustrated for ^7Li.

  18. Light-Regulated Electrochemical Sensor Array for Efficiently Discriminating Hazardous Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongqiu; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Huihui; Jin, Han; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jin, Qinghui; Zou, Jie; Haick, Hossam; Jian, Jiawen

    2017-10-27

    Inadequate detection limit and unsatisfactory discrimination features remain the challenging issues for the widely applied electrochemical gas sensors. Quite recently, we confirmed that light-regulated electrochemical reaction significantly enhanced the electrocatalytic activity, and thereby can potentially extend the detection limit to the parts per billion (ppb) level. Nevertheless, impact of the light-regulated electrochemical reaction on response selectivity has been discussed less. Herein, we systematically report on the effect of illumination on discrimination features via design and fabrication of a light-regulated electrochemical sensor array. Upon illumination (light on), response signal to the examined gases (C3H6, NO, and CO) is selectively enhanced, resulting in the sensor array demonstrating disparate response patterns when compared with that of the sensor array operated at light off. Through processing all the response patterns derived from both light on and light off with a pattern recognition algorithm, a satisfactory discrimination feature is observed. In contrast, apparent mutual interference between NO and CO is found when the sensor array is solely operated without illumination. The impact mechanism of the illumination is studied and it is deduced that the effect of the illumination on the discriminating features can be mainly attributed to the competition of electrocatalytic activity and gas-phase reactivity. If the enhanced electrocatalytic activity (to specific gas) dominates the whole sensing progress, enhancements in the corresponding response signal would be observed upon illumination. Otherwise, illumination gives a negligible impact. Hence, the response signal to part of the examined gases is selectively enhanced by illumination. Conclusively, light-regulated electrochemical reaction would provide an efficient approach to designing future smart sensing devices.

  19. A fiber optic sensor with a metal organic framework as a sensing material for trace levels of water in industrial gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Miki, Yusuke; Matsuzaki, Toru; Nakamura, Nao; Sato, Yu-ki; Hirose, Yasuo; Toda, Kei

    2015-07-30

    Industrial gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and helium are easily contaminated with water during production, transfer and use, because there is a high volume fraction of water in the atmosphere (approximately 1.2% estimated with the average annual atmospheric temperature and relative humidity). Even trace water (quality problems in the process such as production of semiconductors. Therefore, it is important to monitor and to control trace water levels in industrial gases at each supplying step, and especially during their use. In the present study, a fiber optic gas sensor was investigated for monitoring trace water levels in industrial gases. The sensor consists of a film containing a metal organic framework (MOF). MOFs are made of metals coordinated to organic ligands, and have mesoscale pores that adsorb gas molecules. When the MOF, copper benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (Cu-BTC), was used as a sensing material, we investigated the color of Cu-BTC with water adsorption changed both in depth and tone. Cu-BTC crystals appeared deep blue in dry gases, and then changed to light blue in wet gases. An optical gas sensor with the Cu-BTC film was developed using a light emitting diode as the light source and a photodiode as the light intensity detector. The sensor showed a reversible response to trace water, did not require heating to remove the adsorbed water molecules. The sample gas flow rate did not affect the sensitivity. The obtained limit of detection was 40 parts per billion by volume (ppbv). The response time for sample gas containing 2.5 ppmvH2O was 23 s. The standard deviation obtained for daily analysis of 1.0 ppmvH2O standard gas over 20 days was 9%. Furthermore, the type of industrial gas did not affect the sensitivity. These properties mean the sensor will be applicable to trace water detection in various industrial gases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  1. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  2. Optical propagation in linear media atmospheric gases and particles, solid-state components, and water

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    PART I: Background Theory and Measurement. 1. Optical Electromagnetics I. 2. Optical Electromagnetics II. 3. Spectroscopy of Matter. 4. Electrodynamics I: Macroscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 5. Electrodynamics II: Microscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 6. Experimental Techniques. PART II: Practical Models for Various Media. 7. Optical Propagation in Gases and the Atmosphere of the Earth. 8. Optical Propagation in Solids. 9. Optical Propagation in Liquids. 10. Particle Absorption and Scatter. 11. Propagation Background and Noise

  3. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dexin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  4. Diffusion of light gases in 6FDA/BPDA-DAM Carbon Molecular Sieve membranes by Pulsed Field Gradient NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Robert; Kanungo, Rohit; Kiyono-Shimobe, Mayumi; Koros, William J.; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy to reveal detailed knowledge of self-diffusion of light gases and light gas mixtures in carbon molecular sieve membranes on small length scales. PFG NMR is used to investigate intra-membrane diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane for a broad range of temperatures and mean square displacements in a carbon molecular sieve membrane derived from a 6FDA/BPDA-DAM polyimide film. Diffusion is investigated...

  5. Isotopically light carbon dioxide in nitrogen rich gases: the gas distribution pattern in the French Massif Central, the Eifel and the western Eger Rift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. Weinlich

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on characteristics of the distribution pattern of the western Eger Rift spring gases, a distribution pattern is presented for the gases of the French Massif Central. The central parts of these areas with ascending magmatic CO2 are characterised by high gas fluxes, high CO2 contents of up to 99.99 vol% and isotopially heavy CO2. In the peripheries, the decrease of d13C values of CO2 and CO2 contents in the gas phase is compensated by a rise in N2 contents. It can be demonstrated that gas fractionation in contrary to mixtures with isotopically light biogenic or crustal CO2 controls the distribution pattern of gas composition and isotopic composition of CO2 in these spring gases. Dissolution of CO2 results in formation of HCO3 ? causing isotope fractionation of CO2 and an enrichment of N2 in the gas phase. With multiple equilibrations, values of about ?17 ? or lower are obtained. The scale of gas alteration depends on the gas flux and the gas-water ratios respectively and can result in N2-rich gases. Essential for the interpretation are gas flux measurements with mass balances derived for most of the springs. Without such mass balances it is not possible to discriminate between mixture and fractionation. The processes of isotopic and chemical solubility fractionations evidently control the gas distribution pattern in other regions as well.

  6. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Evaluation of various planar gaseous detectors with Cs1 photocathodes for the detection of primary scintillation light from noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Carlson, Per J; Iacobaeus, C; Francke, T; Pavlopoulos, N; Pietropaoplo, F; Sokolova, T; Picchi, P

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases and liquids are excellent scintillators and this opens a unique opportunity to directly detect the primary scintillation light produced in these media by photons or particles. This signal can be used for several purposes, for example as a start signal for TPCs or for particle's identification. Usually photomultipliers (PMs) are used for the detection of the scintillation light. In our previous work we have demonstrated that costly PMs could be replaced by gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes. Such detectors have the same quantum efficiency as the best PMs but at the same time are cheap, simple and have high position and time resolutions. The aim of this work is to evaluate various planar type gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes in order to choose the best one for the detection of the primary scintillation light from noble gases and liquids. (10 refs).

  8. Collisions of noble gases with supercooled sulfuric acid-water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Peter; Scharfenort, Ulrich; Zellner, Reinhard

    2009-09-07

    The collisions of hyperthermal noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) with supercooled binary sulfuric acid-water mixtures (57-77 wt%) were explored in the temperature range between 210 and 240 K. The experiments were performed by directing a molecular beam of the respective gases onto a continuously renewed liquid surface and monitoring the velocity of the scattered molecules by mass spectrometry. Depending on the initial translational energies and molecular masses, we observe both inelastic scattering from the surface as well as thermalization followed by subsequent desorption. The experiments indicate that the repulsive momentum transfer in the inelastic scattering channel increases with increasing mass of the impinging gas, while it is only weakly affected by the initial velocities. The final energy of the thermally desorbing atoms can always be approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution equal to the liquid bulk phase temperature. The influence of the binary composition of the liquid phase is only noticeable in the case of Ne, whilst this dependence diminishes for gases with molecular masses >or=40 amu. The probability of thermalisation relative to inelastic scattering increases with the bulk phase temperature, independent of the molecular masses of the colliding gas. In contrast, the fractional energy transfer during collision does not increase with temperature, except for Neon. These results can be interpreted in the model framework of hard-sphere collisions of noble gases with the surface, during which water and sulfuric acid molecules interact independently with the impinging gas.

  9. Diffusion of light gases in advanced nanoporous membranes and catalysts via NMR diffusometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert A.

    Diffusion in nanoporous gas separation membranes and catalysts plays an important role in their selectivity and performance. As a result, there is an intense effort towards development of novel membranes and catalysts with microstructures tailored for improved transport properties. Fundamental understanding and prediction of the mass transport properties of these materials can be obtained by studies of mass transport on a broad range of microscopic length scales. In this dissertation, a novel NMR diffusometry technique is employed to study the influence of the pore network properties on light gas diffusion for several nanoporous systems, which represent promising advanced gas separation membranes and catalysts. The following systems were investigated: (i) carbon molecular sieve membranes, (ii) mixed-matrix membranes and (iii) rare-earth aerogel catalysts. For carbon molecular sieve membranes, the self-diffusion properties of several light gases of industrial importance are characterized by investigating the dependences of the self diffusivity on displacement length scale, temperature, sorbate loading and composition. Analysis of these dependences and comparison of the measured microscopic transport data with the corresponding results of membrane permeation enabled the determination of membrane structural properties which lead to the remarkable diffusion selectivity of these membranes. For mixed-matrix membranes, detailed measurements of light gas sorbate diffusion over a broad range of microscopic length scales enables resolution of the different modes of sorbate self-diffusion inside mixed-matrix membranes. Finally for samaria-aerogel catalyst, the influence of catalyst packing is explored based on detailed microscopic diffusion measurements over a broad range of sorbate loading pressures and detailed data analysis. These studies were enabled by application of a novel pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique, developed in part by this work

  10. Simultaneous treatment of SO2 containing stack gases and waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A process for simultaneously removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and the like and purifying waste water such as derived from domestic sewage is described. A portion of the gas stream and a portion of the waste water, the latter containing dissolved iron and having an acidic pH, are contacted in a closed loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone to effect absorption of the sulfur dioxide into the waste water. A second portion of the gas stream and a second portion of the waste water are controlled in an open loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone. The second portion of the waste water contains a lesser amount of iron than the first portion of the waste water. Contacting in the openloop scrubbing zone is sufficient to acidify the waste water which is then treated to remove solids originally present.

  11. A comparative summary on streamers of positive corona discharges in water and atmospheric pressure gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kunihide; Motomura, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    From an intention of summarizing present understandings of positive corona discharges in water and atmospheric pressure gases, we tried to observe streamers in those media by reproducing and complementing previously reported results under a common experimental setup. We used a point-to-plane electrode configuration with different combinations of electrode gap (7 and 19 mm length) and pulsed power sources (0.25 and 2.5 ɛs duration). The general features of streamers were similar and the streamer-to-spark transition was also observed in both the media. However, in the details large differences were observed due to inherent nature of the media. The measured propagation speed of streamers in water of 0.035 × 106 ms-1 was much smaller than the speed in gases (air, N2 and Ar) from 0.4 to 1.1 × 106 ms-1 depending on species. In He the discharge looked glow-like and no streamer was observed. The other characteristics of streamers in gases, such as inception voltage, number of branches and thickness did also depend on the species. The thickness and the length of streamers in water were smaller than those in gases. From the volumetric expansion of a streamer in water after the discharge, the molecular density within the streamer medium was estimated to be rarefied from the density of water by about an order of magnitude in the active discharge phase. We derived also the electron density from the analysis of Stark broadened spectral lines of H and O atoms on the order of 1025 m-3 at the earlier time of the streamer propagation. The analyzed background blackbody radiation, rotational temperature of OH band emission and population density of Cu atomic lines yielded a consistent temperature of the streamer medium between 7000 and 10 000 K. Using the present data with a combination of the analysis of static electric field and previously reported results, we discuss the reason for the relatively low streamer inception voltage in water as compared to the large difference in the

  12. LIGHT SOURCE: Terahertz emission in tenuous gases irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Wit, Hui-Chun; Chen, Min; Li, Chun; Zhang, Jie; Mima, K.

    2009-06-01

    Mechanism of terahertz (THz) pulse generation in gases irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses is investigated theoretically. Quasi-static transverse currents produced by laser field ionization of gases and the longitudinal modulation in formed plasmas are responsible for the THz emission at the electron plasma frequency, as demonstrated by particle-in-cell simulations including field ionization. The THz field amplitude scaling with the laser amplitude within a large range is also discussed.

  13. THE OPERATION OF POWER EQUIPMENT DURING THE DISPOSAL OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES ASSOCIATED WITH GEOTHERMAL WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Akhmedov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to assess the appropriateness of utilising combustible gases associated with geothermal water with  low gas factor and the possibility of its practical implementation with  the provision of power equipment operation of geothermal systems  with a nonscaling mode.Methods. The investigations were carried out by analysing the content of associated combustible gases in the underground  thermomineral waters of the Cis-Caucasian deposits on the basis of  an assessment of the feasibility of their utilisation for heating and  hot water supply.Results. A review of practically existing heat and power schemes  utilising geothermal water sources is carried out. Based on the  studies conducted, it is found that methane (70-90% is prevalent in the water under consideration; meanwhile, the content of heavy hydrocarbons does not exceed 10%. The concentration of carbon  dioxide is 3 ÷ 6%, nitrogen 1 ÷ 4%. Depending on the depth of the  aquifer, gas factors range from 1 to 5 m3/ m3. As a result of the  analysis of the operation of typical thermal distribution stations, it is  established that a violation of the carbon dioxide equilibrium in water leads to the formation of a solid phase of calcium carbonate on the  heat exchange surface. A technique for estimating the relationship between the partial pressure of methane and carbon dioxide with the total pressure in a solution of geothermal water is proposed. A  scheme for the efficient operation of thermal distribution stations  with the prevention of carbonate deposits formation by using the  combustion products of the used gas combined with the injection of waste water back into the aquifer is presented.Conclusion. As a result of the conducted studies, the possibility of  using associated combustible gases in geothermal wells is  established using differences in their solubility and that of carbon  dioxide. In this case, the protection of

  14. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Smith, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10-1 mbar methane or 10-5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10-5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence of the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water-gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~100 K. Similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.

  15. Improving the efficiency of water purification from dissolved gases at TPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.; Shagieva, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The method for increasing the efficiency of thermal deaerators and calciners of a TPP is considered; it consists of the use of a turbulent mass transfer device with random small packing. Before entering the packed bed in water, air (decarbonization) or water vapor (deaeration) is supplied. Chaotic nozzle creates intense turbulent interaction mode of air (vapor) with water and splitting it into small bubbles; thus the specific surface area of the contact of phases significantly increases, and high efficiency of mass transfer (extraction of dissolved gases) is ensured. A turbulent mass transfer device is a circular channel with connections for connecting of the source water to a pipeline. Inzhekhim chaotic nozzle is used with large free volume (95%) and the specific surface area of 150-300 m2/m3. The nozzle is made of a thin metal strip that may have a rough surface and is retained in the channel by means of two grids. For the calculation of turbulent mixer, mathematical model of the flow structure is presented, which is built with the use of a one-parameter diffusion model and a semiempirical reverse mixing ratio. Accounting of interphase transfer of dissolved gases is carried out via volume source of weight. The equation to determine the weight source and calculation of its parameters is presented. In the particular case, transition to the cell model is made and an expression for calculating the profile of concentrations of dissolved gas is obtained along the channel with a nozzle. An example of calculating the efficiency of turbulent mixer upon removing dissolved carbon dioxide from water at a TPP is shown. Recommendations on the use of the considered technical device are given.

  16. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  17. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  18. Light-water reactor accident classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art.

  19. Geochemical studies of rocks, water, and gases at Mt. Hood, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Bowen, R.E.; Bowman, H.R.; Strisower, B.

    1979-02-01

    Mr. Hood, a composite andesitic volcano, located near Portland, Oregon, is one of several large eruptive centers which dominate the Cascade Mountains of the western United States. As part of a program of geologic, geophysical and geochemical studies to examine Mt. Hood's geothermal resource potential, samples of warm-and cold-spring water, water from a geothermal test well in Old Maid Flat, fumarolic gases, and rocks were collected and analyzed for major chemical constituents and trace elements. The only warm-spring area on Mt. Hood is Swim Springs, located on the south flank. Orifices at Swim were sampled repeatedly with little overall change noted in water chemistry between summer and winter. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data and mixing calculations based on analyses of Swim Springs and numerous cold springs, indicate that a large component of the warm water at Swim is from near-surface runoff. Chemical geothermometry suggests that temperatures at depth in the Swim Springs system are within the range 104 to 170/sup 0/C; the temperature of unmixed hot water may exceed 200/sup 0/C. Higher-than-background chloride contents and specific conductances of cold springs on the south flank of the mountain suggest that there is a small component of thermal water in these sources. A geothermal model of Mt. Hood is proposed wherein snow- and glacier-melt water near the summit comes in close promimity to the hot central neck of the mountain, manifested by the summit-crater fumaroles.Iridium was detected in warm and cold spring waters and in a sample of altered andesite.

  20. Automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0-100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  1. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O. Cadena-Pereda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  2. Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

    2002-08-01

    This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

  3. [Effects of antiseptic on the analysis of greenhouse gases concentrations in lake water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi-Tao; Hu, Zheng-Hu; James, Deng; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shou-Dong; Li, Xu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into antiseptic effects on the concentrations of CO2, CH4, and N2O in lake water, antisepetic (CuSO4 and HgCl2) were added into water sample, and concentrations of greenhouse gases were measured by the gas chromatography based on water equilibrium method. Experiments were conducted as following: the control group without antisepetic (CK), the treatment group with 1 mL CuSO4 solution (T1), the treatment group with 5 mL CuSO4 solution (T2), and the treatment group with 0.5 mL HgCl2 solution (T3). All groups were divided into two batches: immediately analysis (I), and after 2 days analysis (II). Results showed that CuSO4 and HgCl2 significantly increased CO2 concentration, the mean CO2 concentration (Mco2) of CK (I) and CK (II) were (11.5 +/- 1.47) micromol x L(-1) and (14.38 +/- 1.59) micromol x L(-1), respectively; the Mco2 of T1 (I) and T1 (II) were (376 +/- 70) micromol x L(-1) and (448 +/- 246.83) micromol x L(-1), respectively; the Mco2 of T2 (I) and T2 (II) were (885 +/- 51.53) micromol x L(-1) and (988.83 +/- 101.96) micromol x L(-1), respectively; the Mco2 of T3 (I) and T3 (II) were (287.19 +/- 30.01) micromol x L(-1) and (331.33 +/- 22.06) micromol x L(-1), respectively. The results also showed that there was no difference in CH4 and N2O concentrations among treatments. Water samples should be analyzed as soon as possible after pretreatment. Our findings suggest that adding antiseptic may lead an increase in CO2 concentration.

  4. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G. [Stanford Univ., Dept. of Economics, CA (United States); Van der Zwaan, B. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam, Inst. for Environmental Studies (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  5. Materials for high performance light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, K.; Konys, J.; Heikinheimo, L.

    2004-05-01

    A state-of-the-art study was performed to investigate the operational conditions for in-core and out-of-core materials in a high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) and to evaluate the potential of existing structural materials for application in fuel elements, core structures and out-of-core components. In the conventional parts of a HPLWR-plant the approved materials of supercritical fossil power plants (SCFPP) can be used for given temperatures (⩽600 °C) and pressures (≈250 bar). These are either commercial ferritic/martensitic or austenitic stainless steels. Taking the conditions of existing light water reactors (LWR) into account an assessment of potential cladding materials was made, based on existing creep-rupture data, an extensive analysis of the corrosion in conventional steam power plants and available information on material behaviour under irradiation. As a major result it is shown that for an assumed maximum temperature of 650 °C not only Ni-alloys, but also austenitic stainless steels can be used as cladding materials.

  6. Influence of water vapour and permanent gases on the atmospheric optical depths and transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, V.

    1991-05-01

    The influence of the atmospheric state on the extinction of direct solar radiation has been studied by using a four layer atmospheric model. Simple analytical formulae are established for the spectral optical depths of permanent gases and water vapour. These formulae use the ground level values of air pressure, temperature and relative huniidity. An additional parameter, related to the vertical distribution of the hunmidity content, is used for a better estimation of the water vapour optical depth. Good agreement between theory and measurements is found. The paper shows the dependence of the atmospheric spectral transmittance on the above mentioned parameters. L'influence de l'état atmosphérique sur l'extinction de la radiation solaire directe a été étudiée à l'aide d'un modèle atmosphérique développé antérieurement par l'auteur. Des formules simples ont été établies pour l'épaisseur optique spectrale des gaz et de la vapeur d'eau. Ces formules utilisent les valeurs de la pression atmosphérique, de la température et de l'humidité relative, mesurées au niveau du sol. Un paramètre supplémentaire, lié à la distribution verticale du contenu d'humidité, est utilisé pour calculer l'épaisseur optique due à la vapeur d'eau. La théorie est en bon accord avec les résultats des mesures. Le travail montre la dépendance de la transmittance atmosphérique spectrale en fonction des paramètres spécifiés ci-dessus.

  7. Multidimensional gas chromatography for the characterization of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons in catalytic cracking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Cortes, H J; Shellie, R A

    2013-01-04

    An integrated gas chromatographic system has been successfully developed and implemented for the measurement of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbons in one single analysis. These analytes are frequently encountered in critical industrial petrochemical and chemical processes like catalytic cracking of naphtha or diesel fuel to lighter components used in gasoline. The system employs a practical, effective configuration consisting of two three-port planar microfluidic devices in series with each other, having built-in fluidic gates, and a mid-point pressure source. The use of planar microfluidic devices offers intangible advantages like in-oven switching with no mechanical moving parts, an inert sample flow path, and a leak-free operation even with multiple thermal cycles. In this way, necessary features such as selectivity enhancement, column isolation, column back-flushing, and improved system cleanliness were realized. Porous layer open tubular capillary columns were employed for the separation of hydrocarbons followed by flame ionization detection. After separation has occurred, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were converted to methane with the use of a nickel-based methanizer for detection with flame ionization. Flow modulated thermal conductivity detection was employed to measure oxygen and nitrogen. Separation of all the target analytes was achieved in one single analysis of less than 12 min. Reproducibility of retention times for all compounds were found to be less than 0.1% (n=20). Reproducibility of area counts at two levels, namely 100 ppm(v) and 1000 ppm(v) over a period of two days were found to be less than 5.5% (n=20). Oxygen and nitrogen were found to be linear over a range from 20 ppm(v) to 10,000 ppm(v) with correlation coefficients of at least 0.998 and detection limits of less than 10 ppm(v). Hydrocarbons of interest were found to be linear over a range from 200 ppb(v) to 1000 ppm(v) with correlation

  8. ARTICLES: Amplification of visible light by S2 molecules in a supersonically cooled mixture of gases containing sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimova, L. B.; Krivonosova, O. É.; Losev, S. A.; Makarov, V. N.; Shatalov, Oleg P.

    1985-08-01

    A calculation was made of the gain as a result of interaction of light with S2 molecules formed by recombination of sulfur atoms during cooling of a mixture of gases containing sulfur, first heated in a forechamber, by supersonic expansion. The optimal parameters of the gas flow and nozzle (initial composition of the mixture, pressure, temperature, nozzle profile and coordinates) corresponding to the maximum possible values of the optical gain were found. Gas mixtures CS2-Ar and S2-Ar were considered. A calculation of steady-state flow of a gas in a nozzle was carried out allowing for chemical reactions in the one-dimensional approximation. A search for the gain maximum (for a given initial gas pressure in the forechamber) was made by the method of configurations. At gas pressures of 10-100 atm in the forechamber, calculations yielded maximum values of the gain in the range 10-4-2 × 10-3 cm-1(corresponding to the initial relative concentrations 13-5% and 17-5% of the CS2 and S2 molecules, respectively).

  9. Evaluation of various planar gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes for the detection of primary scintillation light from noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Iacobaeus, C; Pavlopoulos, P; Pietropaolo, F; Sokolova, T

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases and liquids are excellent scintillators and this opens a unique opportunity to directly detect the primary scintillation light produced in these media by photons or particles. This signal can be used for several purposes, for example as a start signal for TPCs or for particles identification. Usually photomultipliers (PMs) are used for the detection of the scintillation light. In our previous work we have demonstrated that costly PMs could be replaced by gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes . Such detectors have the same quantum efficiency as the best PMs but at the same time are cheap, simple and have high position and time resolutions. The aim of this work is to evaluate various planar type gaseous detectors with CsI photocahodes in order to choose the best one for the detection of the primary scintillation light from noble gases and liquids.

  10. Attosecond light sources in the water window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Li, Jie; Yin, Yanchun; Zhao, Kun; Chew, Andrew; Wang, Yang; Hu, Shuyuan; Cheng, Yan; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chini, Michael; Chang, Zenghu

    2018-02-01

    As a compact and burgeoning alternative to synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers, high harmonic generation (HHG) has proven its superiority in static and time-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy for the past two decades and has recently gained many interests and successes in generating soft x-ray emissions covering the biologically important water window spectral region. Unlike synchrotron and free-electron sources, which suffer from relatively long pulse width or large time jitter, soft x-ray sources from HHG could offer attosecond time resolution and be synchronized with their driving field to investigate time-resolved near edge absorption spectroscopy, which could reveal rich structural and dynamical information of the interrogated samples. In this paper, we review recent progresses on generating and characterizing attosecond light sources in the water window region. We show our development of an energetic, two-cycle, carrier-envelope phase stable laser source at 1.7 μm and our achievement in producing a 53 as soft x-ray pulse covering the carbon K-edge in the water window. Such source paves the ways for the next generation x-ray spectroscopy with unprecedented temporal resolution.

  11. Method of reducing environmental pollution by utilizing stack gases, resulting from the burning of fossil fuels, and water, including sea water and waste water, to manufacture hydrocarbon energy fuel, potable water and other commercial products. [processing of flue gases and seawater or waste water to produce methane and useful by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, R.V.

    1974-06-28

    A method and apparatus is described for treating smoke stack gases diverted to minimize air pollution to recover from the stack gases the individual constituents thereof, namely, carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), water (H/sub 2/O) and nitrogen (N/sub 2/) freed of other products, such as oxides; and to recover from water (including nonpotable water such as sea water, waste water and even polluted water sources) the individual constituents thereof of interest here, namely, hydrogen (H/sub 2/); and delivering the recovered carbon dioxide and the recovered hydrogen into a catalytic reaction chamber under sufficiently high temperature conditions in the presence of a suitable catalyst to establish therein a reaction temperature to support a Sabatier catalytic reaction (CO/sub 2/ + 4H/sub 2/ = CH/sub 4/ + 2H/sub 2/O) hydrogenating the carbon dioxide to form methane for use as fuel, and potable water for commercial usage. (Official Gazette)

  12. Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atmosphere, creating a greenhouse effect that results in global warming and climate change. Many gases exhibit these greenhouse properties. Some gases occur naturally and are also produced by human activities. Some, such as industrial gases, are exclusively ...

  13. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHood, M D

    2000-10-12

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Commercial Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  14. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  15. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  16. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  19. A membrane inlet mass spectrometry system for noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ate; Singleton, Michael J; Hillegonds, Darren J; Velsko, Carol A; Moran, Jean E; Esser, Bradley K

    2013-11-15

    Noble gases dissolved in groundwater can reveal paleotemperatures, recharge conditions, and precise travel times. The collection and analysis of noble gas samples are cumbersome, involving noble gas purification, cryogenic separation and static mass spectrometry. A quicker and more efficient sample analysis method is required for introduced tracer studies and laboratory experiments. A Noble Gas Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (NG-MIMS) system was developed to measure noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples. The NG-MIMS system consists of a membrane inlet, a dry-ice water trap, a carbon-dioxide trap, two getters, a gate valve, a turbomolecular pump and a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electron multiplier. Noble gases isotopes (4)He, (22)Ne, (38)Ar, (84)Kr and (132)Xe are measured every 10 s. The NG-MIMS system can reproduce measurements made on a traditional noble gas mass spectrometer system with precisions of 2%, 8%, 1%, 1% and 3% for He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, respectively. Noble gas concentrations measured in an artificial recharge pond were used to monitor an introduced xenon tracer and to reconstruct temperature variations to within 2 °C. Additional experiments demonstrated the capability to measure noble gases in gas and in water samples, in real time. The NG-MIMS system is capable of providing analyses sufficiently accurate and precise for introduced noble gas tracers at managed aquifer recharge facilities, groundwater fingerprinting based on excess air and noble gas recharge temperature, and field and laboratory studies investigating ebullition and diffusive exchange. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Visible Light Activated Photocatalytic Water Polishing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal targets development of a LED light activated photocatalytic water polishing system that enables reduction of organic impurities (TOC and...

  1. Fractionated Noble Gases in Martian Meteorite ALH 84001 — An Indicator for Water-Rock Interaction, or a Sample of Ancient Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bart, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Crowther, S. A.; Filiberto, J.; Gilmour, J. D.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Ott, U.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2017-10-01

    Noble gases in the nakhlite and ALH84001 Martian meteorites are still a mystery, but could tell us about either the history of the Martian atmosphere, Martian water rock interaction or - likely - both!

  2. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  3. Gas Gun Model and Comparison to Experimental Performance of Pipe Guns Operating with Light Propellant Gases and Large Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Carmichael, J. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL); Gebhart, T. E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R. [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A. [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J. [ORNL; Lyttle, Mark S. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    Injection of multiple large (~10 to 30 mm diameter) shattered pellets into ITER plasmas is presently part of the scheme planned to mitigate the deleterious effects of disruptions on the vessel components. To help in the design and optimize performance of the pellet injectors for this application, a model referred to as “the gas gun simulator” has been developed and benchmarked against experimental data. The computer code simulator is a Java program that models the gas-dynamics characteristics of a single-stage gas gun. Following a stepwise approach, the code utilizes a variety of input parameters to incrementally simulate and analyze the dynamics of the gun as the projectile is launched down the barrel. Using input data, the model can calculate gun performance based on physical characteristics, such as propellant-gas and fast-valve properties, barrel geometry, and pellet mass. Although the model is fundamentally generic, the present version is configured to accommodate cryogenic pellets composed of H2, D2, Ne, Ar, and mixtures of them and light propellant gases (H2, D2, and He). The pellets are solidified in situ in pipe guns that consist of stainless steel tubes and fast-acting valves that provide the propellant gas for pellet acceleration (to speeds ~200 to 700 m/s). The pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event. The calculated speeds from the code simulations of experiments were typically in excellent agreement with the measured values. With the gas gun simulator validated for many test shots and over a wide range of physical and operating parameters, it is a valuable tool for optimization of the injector design, including the fast valve design (orifice size and volume) for any operating pressure (~40 bar expected for the ITER application) and barrel length for any pellet size (mass, diameter, and length). Key design parameters and proposed values for the pellet injectors for

  4. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  5. Light scattering by particles in water theoretical and experimental foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering-based methods are used to characterize small particles suspended in water in a wide range of disciplines ranging from oceanography, through medicine, to industry. The scope and accuracy of these methods steadily increases with the progress in light scattering research. This book focuses on the theoretical and experimental foundations of the study and modeling of light scattering by particles in water and critically evaluates the key constraints of light scattering models. It begins with a brief review of the relevant theoretical fundamentals of the interaction of light with condensed matter, followed by an extended discussion of the basic optical properties of pure water and seawater and the physical principles that explain them. The book continues with a discussion of key optical features of the pure water/seawater and the most common components of natural waters. In order to clarify and put in focus some of the basic physical principles and most important features of the experimental data o...

  6. Air-Xe enrichments in Elk Hills oil field gases: role of water in migration and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B. M.

    1999-04-01

    Hydrocarbons from the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve (NPR#1), Bakersfield, CA, are enriched in heavy noble gases. The 132Xe/ 36Ar ratios are as high as ˜576 times the ratio in air and represent the largest relative Xe-enrichments ever observed in terrestrial fluids. The Xe isotopic composition is indistinguishable from air. We show that these samples cannot be explained by equilibration of oil with air saturated water and secondary enrichment via a Rayleigh distillation gas stripping process. Based on laboratory studies of others with potential petroleum source rocks, we believe the source of this enriched heavy noble gas component was adsorbed air initially trapped in/on the source rocks that was expelled and mixed with the hydrocarbons during expulsion and primary migration. Kr and Xe enrichments decrease with increasing 36Ar concentration. We propose a model in which an initial Kr-Xe-enriched hydrocarbon becomes diluted with noble gases extracted from air saturated groundwater during expulsion, migration, and storage. The model generates an integrated water/hydrocarbon ratio for the production fluid which indicates a minimal role for water in hydrocarbon expulsion and migration. The results are interpreted to provide time/geometrical constraints on the mechanisms by which hydrocarbons can migrate as a separate phase.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  8. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of ade...

  9. Effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and prokaryotic communities in rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Sik; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Gun-Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    The effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and soil prokaryotic communities were investigated in an experimental rice field. The water layer was kept at 1-2 cm in the water-saving (WS) irrigation treatment and at 6 cm in the continuous flooding (CF) irrigation treatment. WS irrigation decreased CH(4) emissions by 78 % and increased N(2)O emissions by 533 %, resulting in 78 % reduction of global warming potential compared to the CF irrigation. WS irrigation did not affect the abundance or phylogenetic distribution of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the abundance of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNAs. The transcript abundance of CH(4) emission-related genes generally followed CH(4) emission patterns, but the difference in abundance between mcrA transcripts and amoA/pmoA transcripts best described the differences in CH(4) emissions between the two irrigation practices. WS irrigation increased the relative abundance of 16S rRNAs and functional gene transcripts associated with Anaeromyxobacter and Methylocystis spp., suggesting that their activities might be important in emissions of the greenhouse gases. The N(2)O emission patterns were not reflected in the abundance of N(2)O emission-related genes and transcripts. We showed that the alternative irrigation practice was effective for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields and that it did not affect the overall size and structure of the soil prokaryotic community but did affect the activity of some groups.

  10. A Simple Guiding Principle for the Temperature Dependence of the Solubility of Light Gases in Imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids Derived from Molecular Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kerlé, Daniela; Ludwig, Ralf; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Paschek, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the temperature dependence of the solvation behavior of a large collection of light gases in imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids (ILs) with the help of extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The solubility of molecular hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, methane, krypton, argon, neon and carbon dioxide in the imidazolium based ILs of type 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C$_n$mim][NTf$_2$]) with varying chain lengths $n\\!=\\!2,4,6,8$ are computed for a temperature range between $300\\,\\mbox{K}$ and $500\\,\\mbox{K}$ at $1\\,\\mbox{bar}$. By applying Widom's particle insertion technique and Bennet's overlapping distribution method, we are able to determine the temperature dependent solvation free energies for those selected light gases in simulated imidazolium based ILs with high statistical accuracy. Our simulations show that the magnitude of the solvation free energy of a gas molecule at a chosen reference temperature and its temperature-derivatives are intimately related...

  11. Chemistry of ice: Migration of ions and gases by directional freezing of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Shafique

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Redistribution of anions and cations creates an electrical imbalance in ice grown from electrolyte solutions. Movement of acidic and basic ions in cooling solutions can permanently change the pH of frozen and unfrozen parts of the system, largely. The extent of pH change associated with freezing is determined by solute concentration and the extent of cooling. In the present work, redistribution of hydrogen, hydroxyl, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions was studied during directional freezing in batch aqueous systems. Controlled freezing was employed vertically as well as radially in acidic and basic solutions. In each case, the ions substantially migrated along with moving freezing front. Conductometry and pH-metry were employed to monitor the moving ions. Besides, some other experiments were carried out with molecular gases, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and chlorine and an azeotropic mixture like water–ethanol. Findings can be used to understand possible changes that can occur in preserving materials by freezing.

  12. Light induced degradation of testosterone in waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliet, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.vulliet@sca.cnrs.fr [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France); Falletta, Marine; Marote, Pedro [Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques - UMR 5180, Universite Claude Bernard, 43 bd du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lomberget, Thierry [Laboratoire de Chimie Therapeutique, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Pharmacie-ISPB, EA 4443 Biomolecules, Cancer et Chimioresistances, INSERM U863 Hormones steroides et proteines de liaison, IFR 62, 8 avenue Rockefeller, F-69373, Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Paisse, Jean-Olivier; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France)

    2010-08-01

    The degradation of testosterone under simulated irradiations was studied in phosphate buffers and in natural waters at various excitation wavelengths. The quantum yield of photolysis was significantly lower at 313 nm (2.4 x 10{sup -3}) than at 254 nm (0.225). The formation of several photoproducts was observed, some of them being rapidly transformed in turn while others show higher stability towards subsequent irradiations. The nature of the main products was tentatively identified, both deduced from their spectral and spectrometric data and by comparison with synthesised standard compounds. Among the obtained photoproducts, the main one is possibly a spiro-compound, hydroxylated derivative of testosterone originating from the photohydratation of the enone group. The photodegradation pathway includes also photorearrangements. One of them leads to (1,5,10)-cyclopropyl-17{beta}-hydroxyandrostane-2-one. The pH of the water does not seem to affect the rate of phototransformation and the nature of the by-products.

  13. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen.

  14. Thermodynamic Functions of Solvation of Hydrocarbons, Noble Gases, and Hard Spheres in Tetrahydrofuran-Water Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, I A; Magsumov, T I

    2015-07-16

    Thermodynamic solvation properties of mixtures of water with tetrahydrofuran at 298 K are studied. The Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of solvation of n-octane and toluene are determined experimentally. For molecular dynamics simulations of the binary solvent, we have modified a TraPPE-UA model for tetrahydrofuran and combined it with the SPC/E potential for water. The excess thermodynamic functions of neon, xenon, and hard spheres with two different radii are calculated using the particle insertion method. Simulated and real systems share the same characteristic trends for the thermodynamic functions. A maximum is present on dependencies of the enthalpy of solvation from the composition of solvent at 70-90 mol % water, making it higher than in both of the cosolvents. It is caused by a high enthalpy of cavity formation in the mixtures rich with water due to solvent reorganization around the cavity, which is shown by calculation of the enthalpy of solvation of hard spheres. Addition of relatively small amounts of tetrahydrofuran to water effectively suppresses the hydrophobic effect, leading to a quick increase of both the entropy and enthalpy of cavity formation and solvation of low polar molecules.

  15. Surface tension of water and acid gases from Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoufi, A.; Goujon, F.; Lachet, V.; Malfreyt, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report direct Monte Carlo (MC) simulations on the liquid-vapor interfaces of pure water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. In the case of water, the recent TIP4P/2005 potential model used with the MC method is shown to reproduce the experimental surface tension and to accurately describe the coexistence curves. The agreement with experiments is also excellent for CO2 and H2S with standard nonpolarizable models. The surface tensions are calculated by using the mechanical and the thermodynamic definitions via profiles along the direction normal to the surface. We also discuss the different contributions to the surface tension due to the repulsion-dispersion and electrostatic interactions. The different profiles of these contributions are proposed in the case of water.

  16. Modeling the infrastructure dynamics of China -- Water, agriculture, energy, and greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, S.H.; Drennen, T.E.; Engi, D.; Harris, D.L.; Jeppesen, D.M.; Thomas, R.P.

    1998-08-01

    A comprehensive critical infrastructure analysis of the People`s Republic of China was performed to address questions about China`s ability to meet its long-term grain requirements and energy needs and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in China likely to result from increased agricultural production and energy use. Four dynamic computer simulation models of China`s infrastructures--water, agriculture, energy and greenhouse gas--were developed to simulate, respectively, the hydrologic budgetary processes, grain production and consumption, energy demand, and greenhouse gas emissions in China through 2025. The four models were integrated into a state-of-the-art comprehensive critical infrastructure model for all of China. This integrated model simulates diverse flows of commodities, such as water and greenhouse gas, between the separate models to capture the overall dynamics of the integrated system. The model was used to generate projections of China`s available water resources and expected water use for 10 river drainage regions representing 100% of China`s mean annual runoff and comprising 37 major river basins. These projections were used to develop estimates of the water surpluses and/or deficits in the three end-use sectors--urban, industrial, and agricultural--through the year 2025. Projections of the all-China demand for the three major grains (corn, wheat, and rice), meat, and other (other grains and fruits and vegetables) were also generated. Each geographic region`s share of the all-China grain demand (allocated on the basis of each region`s share of historic grain production) was calculated in order to assess the land and water resources in each region required to meet that demand. Growth in energy use in six historically significant sectors and growth in greenhouse gas loading were projected for all of China.

  17. Strategic Targeting of Light Water Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Effects of Nuclear Weapons. U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Energy, 1977. 15. Glasstone, Samuel and Walter H. Jordan . Nuclear Power and...0 ’Nhi Mi V ni M 10 NN -4 M2 0 M 0-42(N N Mi 𔃺 - i hi V 10M N (N M2𔃾 - 0 0 0’ 1 0 %r N -T0 m - q- 0 It 14 qTm 4T mi hi m’ 10m N m 02 m 0- m 0 m -i...AFIT/GNE/PF/8ZM- 7 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S.’ T’ PE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED STRATEGIC TARGETING MS THESIS OF LIGUfl WATER REACTORS 6. PERFORMING OIG

  18. ABSORPTION OF GASES INTO ACTIVATED CARBON WATER SLURRIES IN A STIRRED CELL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TINGE, JT; DRINKENBURG, AAH

    A surface-aerated stirred cell with a flat liquid surface was used to investigate the absorption of propane and ethene gas into slurries of activated carbon and water. Slurries with a solids concentration up to 4% by weight and particle diameters up to 565-mu-m were used. The experimental mass

  19. A capacitance sensor for water: trace moisture measurement in gases and organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Goto, Kayoko; Toda, Kei; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-10-16

    The determination of water in various matrices is one of the most important analytical measurements. We report on a high-resolution capacitance-based moisture sensor utilizing a thin film of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer (PFSI)-H(3)PO(4) composite in a flow-through configuration, for both gas and liquid samples. Incorporation of H(3)PO(4) into a PFSI sensing film improved the limit of detection (LOD) (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N = 3) by a factor of 16 in the gas phase to 0.075% relative humidity (RH) (dew point = -56 °C). The response time was dependent on the sensing film thickness and composition and was as low as ∼60 ms. The temperature dependence of the sensor response, and its relative selectivity over alcohol and various other solvents, are reported. Measurement of water in organic solvents was carried out in two different ways. In one procedure, the sample was vaporized and swept into the detector (e.g., in a gas chromatograph (GC) without a column); it permitted a throughput of 80 samples/h. This is well-suited for higher (%) levels of water. In the other method, a flow injection analysis system integrated to a tubular dialysis membrane pervaporizer (PV-FIA) was used; the LOD for water in ethanol was 0.019% (w/w). We demonstrated the temporal course of drying of ethanol by Drierite; the PV-FIA results showed excellent correspondence (r(2) > 0.99) with results from GC-thermal conductivity detection. The system can measure trace water in many types of organic solvents; no reagent consumption is involved.

  20. [Diurnal changes in greenhouse gases at water-air interface of Xiangxi River in autumn and their influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Min; Zhu, Kong-Xian; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Bo-Shi; Yuan, Xi-Gong; Feng, Rui-Jie; Bi, Yong-Hong; Hu, Zheng-Yu

    2013-04-01

    With the closed chamber and gas chromatography method, a 24-hour continuous monitoring was carried out to understand the greenhouse gases fluxes across the water-air interface of the Xiangxi River Bay, the Three-Gorges Reservoir in Autumn. Results indicated that the fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O across the water-air interface showed an obvious diurnal variation. The absorption and emission process of CH4 showed strong diurnal variation during the experimental period, reaching the highest emission at 1 am, whereas CO2 and N2O were emitted all day. The fluxes of CO2 ranged from 20.1-97.5 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) at day and 32.7-42.5 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) at night, the fluxes of N2O ranged from 18.4-133.7 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) at day and 42.1-102.6 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) at night. The fluxes of CO2 had positive correlation with wind speed and negative correlation with pH. The fluxes of N2O had positive correlation with pH.

  1. Diverging effects of isotopic fractionation upon molecular diffusion of noble gases in water: mechanistic insights through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto de Magalhães, Halua; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-03-22

    Atmospheric noble gases are routinely used as natural tracers to analyze gas transfer processes in aquatic systems. Their isotopic ratios can be employed to discriminate between different physical transport mechanisms by comparison to the unfractionated atmospheric isotope composition. In many applications of aquatic systems molecular diffusion was thought to cause a mass dependent fractionation of noble gases and their isotopes according to the square root ratio of their masses. However, recent experiments focusing on isotopic fractionation within a single element challenged this broadly accepted assumption. The determined fractionation factors of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopes revealed that only Ar follows the prediction of the so-called square root relation, whereas within the Ne, Kr and Xe elements no mass-dependence was found. The reason for this unexpected divergence of Ar is not yet understood. The aim of our computational exercise is to establish the molecular-resolved mechanisms behind molecular diffusion of noble gases in water. We make the hypothesis that weak intermolecular interactions are relevant for the dynamical properties of noble gases dissolved in water. Therefore, we used ab initio molecular dynamics to explicitly account for the electronic degrees of freedom. Depending on the size and polarizability of the hydrophobic particles such as noble gases, their motion in dense and polar liquids like water is subject to different diffusive regimes: the inter-cavity hopping mechanism of small particles (He, Ne) breaks down if a critical particle size achieved. For the case of large particles (Kr, Xe), the motion through the water solvent is governed by mass-independent viscous friction leading to hydrodynamical diffusion. Finally, Ar falls in between the two diffusive regimes, where particle dispersion is propagated at the molecular collision time scale of the surrounding water molecules.

  2. Effects of 17β-estradiol on emissions of greenhouse gases in simulative natural water body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Aidong; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Chenxiao; Zong, Fengjiao; Yu, Zhongbo

    2015-05-01

    Environmental estrogens are widely spread across the world and are increasingly thought of as serious contaminators. The present study looks at the influence of different concentrations of 17β-estradiol on greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O) in simulated systems to explore the relationship between environmental estrogen-pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in natural water bodies. The present study finds that 17β-estradiol pollution in simulated systems has significant promoting effects on the emissions of CH4 and CO2 , although no significant effects on N2 O emissions. The present study indicates that 17β-estradiol has different effects on the different elements cycles; the mechanism of microbial ecology is under review. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. Attenuation of concentration fluctuations of water vapor and other trace gases in turbulent tube flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massman, W.J.; Ibrom, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    the turbulent tube flow issue for both passive and sorbing tracers with the intent of developing a physically-based semi-empirical model that describes the attenuation associated with water vapor fluctuations. Toward this end, we develop a new model of tube flow dynamics (radial profiles of the turbulent...... diffusivity and tube airstream velocity). We compare our new passive-tracer formulation with previous formulations in a systematic and unified way in order to assess how sensitive the passive-tracer results depend on fundamental modeling assumptions. We extend the passive tracer model to the vapor sorption....../desorption case by formulating the model's wall boundary condition in terms of a physically-based semi-empirical model of the sorption/desorption vapor fluxes. Finally we synthesize all modeling and observational results into a single analytical expression that captures the effects of the mean ambient humidity...

  4. Effect of dissolved gases in water on acoustic cavitation and bubble growth rate in 0.83 MHz megasonic of interest to wafer cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong-Kyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the cavitation intensity of gases dissolved in water, including H2, N2, and Ar, have been established in studies of acoustic bubble growth rates under ultrasonic fields. Variations in the acoustic properties of dissolved gases in water affect the cavitation intensity at a high frequency (0.83 MHz) due to changes in the rectified diffusion and bubble coalescence rate. It has been proposed that acoustic bubble growth rates rapidly increase when water contains a gas, such as hydrogen faster single bubble growth due to rectified diffusion, and a higher rate of coalescence under Bjerknes forces. The change of acoustic bubble growth rate in rectified diffusion has an effect on the damping constant and diffusivity of gas at the acoustic bubble and liquid interface. It has been suggested that the coalescence reaction of bubbles under Bjerknes forces is a reaction determined by the compressibility and density of dissolved gas in water associated with sound velocity and density in acoustic bubbles. High acoustic bubble growth rates also contribute to enhanced cavitation effects in terms of dissolved gas in water. On the other hand, when Ar gas dissolves into water under ultrasound field, cavitation behavior was reduced remarkably due to its lower acoustic bubble growth rate. It is shown that change of cavitation intensity in various dissolved gases were verified through cleaning experiments in the single type of cleaning tool such as particle removal and pattern damage based on numerically calculated acoustic bubble growth rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk management and decision rules for light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesmeyer, J. M.; Okrent, D.

    1981-01-01

    The process of developing and adopting safety objectives in quantitative terms can provide a basis for focusing societal decision making on the suitability of such objectives and upon questions of compliance with those objectives. A preliminary proposal for a light water reactor (LWR) risk management framework is presented as part of that process.

  6. Phases equilibria at low temperature between light hydrocarbons mixtures, methanol and water: measures and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossilhol, N.

    1995-12-01

    In this work we discuss phase equilibria of mixtures similar to those formed during natural gas treatment (transportation and purification). The mixtures can contain light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, etc), acid gases (hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide), methanol (solvent, inhibitor) and (water). We present a low temperature phase equilibrium equipment to obtain two and three phase equilibrium data of light hydrocarbon-methanol-water mixtures. The realisation of the equipment, the measuring procedure and some determination of binary, ternary and quaternary systems are described. The range of application is - 100 deg. C to 0 deg. C in temperature and between 0 and 100 bar in pressure. The binary subsystems of the systems mentioned above are calculated in order to study the possibilities of the MHV2 and Wong and Sandler methods to represent simultaneously their vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria. According to the formalism proposed by the two methods, the cubic Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state is systematically combined with the NRTL excess Gibbs energy model. (authors). 72 refs., 47 figs., 38 tabs.

  7. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Supercritical pressure light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Kosizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1998-09-01

    The supercritical pressure light water cooling reactor is a nuclear reactor concept with the once through type and the direct cycle reactor cooled with supercritical pressure water. The cooling water controlled with the feed pump flows directly to the turbine and a recirculation is never done by the nuclear reactor of this type. Therefore, this system isn`t equipped with the recirculation system and the steam separator, the system becomes simple. As for this system, it is expected that the cost performance improves. Here, the outline of former study is described. (author)

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The Prototype repository is an international project to build and study a full-scale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The Prototype repository differs from a real storage in that it is drained. For example, this makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype repository compared with a real storage. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and one of the specific aims is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype repository. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside and outside the Prototype in 2009. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed in the following sampling points in the Prototype repository: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10006, KBU10008, KFA01 and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e., the biovolume), cultivable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), autotrophic acetogens (AA) and in some cases iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). Cultivation methods were also compared with qPCR molecular techniques to evaluate these before next year's decommission of the Prototype repository. The collected pore water from the Prototype repository was subject to chemistry analysis (as many analyses were conducted as the amount of water allowed). In addition, groundwater from two borehole sections in the rock surrounding the Prototype was analysed regarding its gas composition, microbiology and redox. Chemistry data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype repository were compared with the pore water

  9. Gas chromatography for in situ analysis of a cometary nucleus. II. Analysis of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons with a carbon molecular sieve porous layer open tubular column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, C; Sternberg, R; Coscia, D; Raulin, F; Vidal-Madjar, C

    2000-12-22

    Considering the severe constraints of space instrumentation, a great improvement for the in situ gas chromatographic (GC) determination of permanent and noble gases in a cometary nucleus is the use of a new carbon molecular sieve porous layer open tubular (PLOT) column called Carbobond. No exhaustive data dealing with this column being available, studies were carried out to entirely characterize its analytical performances, especially when used under the operating conditions of the cometary sampling and composition (COSAC) experiment of the European Space Agency (ESA) Rosetta space mission to be launched in 2003 for a rendezvous with comet 46 P/Wirtanen in 2011. The high efficiency and speed of analysis of this column at both atmospheric and vacuum outlet column pressure is demonstrated, and the kinetic mass transfer contribution of this carbon molecular sieve adsorbent is calculated. Besides, differential adsorption enthalpies of several gases and light hydrocarbons were determined from the variation of retention volume with temperature. The data indicate close adsorption behaviors on the Carbobond porous layer adsorbent and on the carbon molecular sieve Carboxen support used to prepare the packed columns. Moreover, taking into account the in situ operating conditions of the experiment, a study of two columns with different porous layer thicknesses allowed one to optimize the separation of the target components and to select the column parameters compatible with the instrument constraints. Comparison with columns of similar selectivity shows that these capillary columns are the first ones able to perform the same work as the packed and micro-packed columns dedicated to the separation of this range of compounds in GC space exploration.

  10. Effects of flow rate of atmosphere gases on the characteristics of Zn-doped ITO (ZITO) thin films for organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hwa-Kyun; Lee, Kyu-Mann

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of ambient gases on the structural, electrical, and optical characteristics of Zn-doped indium tin oxide (ZITO) thin films intended for use as anode contacts in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) devices. These ZITO thin films are deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering under different ambient gases (Ar, Ar + O2 and Ar + H2) at 300°C. In order to investigate the influences of the oxygen and hydrogen, the flow rate of oxygen and hydrogen in argon mixing gas has been changed from 0.1 sccm to 0.5 sccm and from 0.1 sccm to 1 sccm, respectively. The intensity of the (400) peak in the ZITO thin films increases with increasing H2 flow rate whilst the (400) peak was nearly invisible in an atmosphere of Ar + O2. The electrical resistivity of the ZITO thin films increases with increasing O2 flow rate, whereas the electrical resistivity decreases with increasing H2 flow rate. The change of electrical resistivity with changes in the ambient gas composition is mainly interpreted in terms of the charge carrier mobility and the charge carrier concentration. All the films show an average transmittance of over 80% in the visible range. The optical bandgap of the ZITO films increases with increasing H2 flow rates, whereas the optical bandgap of the ZITO films deposited in an O2 atmosphere decreases with increasing O2 flow rates. The current density and the luminance of the OLED devices with ZITO thin films deposited in 1 sccm of H2 ambient gas are the highest among all the films. The optical bandgap energy of ZITO thin films plays a major role in OLED device performance, especially the current density and luminance.

  11. Planetary noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  12. Irritant gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, J

    Acute inhalation injury can result from the use of household cleaning agents (e.g. chlorine, ammonia), industrial or combustion gases (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) or bioterrorism. The severity of the injury is to a great extent determined by the circumstances of exposure. If exposure was

  13. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 10, January 1--March 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee Wai

    1989-05-19

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. In this reporting period, we have utilized samples of magnesia differing in their pretreatment temperature. Both the hydrido-ruthenium complex H{sub 4}Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and its reaction product with triethyl aluminum were reacted with these samples. The two ruthenium clusters are expected to react with the magnesia surface in different ways: by deprotonation of the hydride through an acid-base reaction with the basic surface, or by hydrolysis of the aluminum-carbon bond of the triethyl aluminum adduct. The concentration of hydroxyl groups on the magnesia surface able to hydrolyze the aluminum-carbon bond for immobilation should vary depending on the temperature of the pretreatment; the concentration of basic sites which can deprotonate the cluster should also vary with temperature. These differences were borne out by the experiment. We also compared the activity of two batches of AlRu{sub 4}/MgO which had been synthesized at different times in the project. Both batches had approximately the same activity, but the newer batch had greater selectivity for C{sub 6+} hydrocarbons.

  14. Assessment of the high performance light water reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE, (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    From 2006-2010, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) was investigated within a European Funded project called HPLWR Phase 2. Operated at 25MPa with a heat-up rate in the core from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C, this reactor concept provides a technological challenge in the fields of design, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer, materials, and safety. The assessment of the concept with respect to the goals of the technology roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors of the Generation IV International Forum shows that the HPLWR has a potential to fulfil the goals of economics, safety and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In terms of sustainability, the HPLWR with a thermal neutron spectrum investigated within this project, does not differ from existing Light Water Reactors in terms of usage of fuel and waste production. (author)

  15. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee Wai

    1989-03-10

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we completed our IR spectroscopic examination of the Ru{sub 4}/MgO and FeRu{sub 3}/MgO systems under nitrogen and methane by examining FeRu{sub 3}/MgO under methane. This system behaved quite differently than the same system under nitrogen. Under methane, only one very broad peak is observed at room temperature. Upon heating, the catalyst transformed so that by 300{degrees}C, the spectrum of FeRu{sub 3}/MgO under methane was the same as that of Ru{sub 4}/MgO. This suggests that methane promotes the segregation of the metals in the mixed metal system. The differences in catalytic activity between the FeRu{sub 3}/MgO and Ru{sub 4}/MgO systems may then be due to the presence of IR transparent species such as iron ions which cause different nucleation in the ruthenium clusters. We examined several systems for activity in the methane dehydrogenation reaction. Focusing on systems which produce C{sub 6} hydrocarbons since this is the most useful product. These systems all displayed low activity so that the amount of hydrocarbon product is very low. Some C{sub 6} hydrocarbon is observed over zeolite supports, but its production ceases after the first few hours of reaction. We prepared a new system, Ru{sub 4} supported on carbon, and examined its reactivity. Its activity was very low and in fact the carbon support had the same level of activity. We synthesized four new systems for examination as catalysts in the partial oxidation of methane. Three of these (PtTSPC/MgO, PtTSPC and PdTSPC on carbon) are analogs of PdTSPC/MgO. This system is of interest because we have observed the production of ethane from methane oxidation over PdTSPC/MgO at relatively low temperatures and we wished to explore its generality among close analogs.

  16. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  17. Noble gases in crude oils from the Paris Basin, France: Implications for the origin of fluids and constraints on oil-water-gas interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Marty, Bernard

    1995-08-01

    In order to investigate the potential of noble gases to trace the dynamics of oil reservoirs, we have analysed the abundance and isotopic composition of all noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in crude oils from the Paris Basin, France, using a new extraction and purification procedure. The main oil reservoirs are presently located in the Jurassic (Dogger) limestone and in the Triassic (Keuper) sandstone, but hydrocarbons originated from a common source rock formation located in the interbedded Liassic sequence. Despite this common origin, the abundance and isotopic ratios of the noble gases differ between the Dogger and the Keuper. The isotopic compositions of Kr and Xe are indistinguishable from that of air. 3He/ 4He ratios, higher than those predicted from radiogenic production in the sediments or in the crust, are attributed to the occurrence of mantle-derived 3He in the basin. Each sedimentary sequence is characterised by well defined and homogeneous 21Ne/ 22Ne and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, which average 0.0306 ± 0.0008 and 312 ± 10 for the Dogger and 0.0367 ± 0.0012 and 664 ± 30 for the Keuper, respectively. The main source of radiogenic noble gases appears to be the continental crust underlying the basin, with possible regional contributions of noble gas isotopes produced in the sediments. The helium and argon isotopic ratios of the Dogger oils are very similar to those observed in geothermal waters flowing in the Dogger aquifer throughout the basin, demonstrating that noble gases in oils derive from associated groundwaters. Oil reservoirs in the Paris Basin therefore accumulate noble gases from wide regions of the continental crust through cross-formational flow of groundwaters and subsequent partitioning into oil. This observation implies that noble gases cannot be directly used to date oils, but can provide time constraints if (1) water/oil interactions are quantified and (2) the residence time as well as the noble gas characteristics of associated

  18. Design concept of the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear and Energy Technologies; Bittermann, Dietmar [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). NEP-G Process

    2009-04-15

    The 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor operating with supercritical water as coolant. At a pressure of 25 MPa in the core, water is heated up from 280 to 500 C. For these conditions, the envisaged net plant efficiency is 43.5%. The core design concept is based on a so-called '3-pass-core' in which the coolant is heated up in three subsequent steps. After each step, the coolant is mixed avoiding hot streaks possibly leading to unacceptable wall temperatures. The design of such a core comprises fuel assemblies containing 40 fuel rods and an inner and outer box for a better neutron moderation. Nine of these are assembled to a cluster with common head- and foot piece. The coolant is mixed inside an upper and inside a lower mixing chamber and leaves the reactor pressure vessel through a co-axial pipe, which protects the vessel wall against too high temperatures. (orig.)

  19. Critical heat flux experiments in a circular tube with heavy water and light water. (AWBA Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.L.; Beus, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments were performed to establish the critical heat flux (CHF) characteristics of heavy water and light water. Testing was performed with the up-flow of heavy and of light water within a 0.3744 inch inside diameter circular tube with 72.3 inches of heated length. Comparisons were made between heavy water and light water critical heat flux levels for the same local equilibrium quality at CHF, operating pressure, and nominal mass velocity. Results showed that heavy water CHF values were, on the average, 8 percent below the light water CHF values.

  20. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, B. A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); D' Alessio, P.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pontoppidan, K., E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  1. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases, and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    The prototype repository (hereafter, 'Prototype') is an international project to build and study a fullscale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. However, the Prototype differs from a real storage in that it is drained, which makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype than in a real storage facility. The heat from the radioactive decay is simulated by electrical heaters. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and a specific aim is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside the Prototype in 2010. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed at the following sampling points in the Prototype: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10008, and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e. the biovolume), culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). The pore water collected from the Prototype was subject to as many chemical analyses as the amount of water allowed. Chemical analyses were also performed on pore water from two additional sampling points, KBU10005 and KBU10006. Chemical data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype were compared with the pore water chemistry. The improved sampling and analysis protocols introduced in 2007 worked very well. The International Progress Report (IPR) 08-01 (Eriksson 2008) revealed that many of the hydrochemical sampling points differ greatly from each other. The 16 sampling points were

  2. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  3. The radiochemistry of nuclear power plants with light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeb, K.H.

    1997-12-31

    In this book, radioactivity and the chemical reactions of radionuclides within the different areas of a nucler power plant are discussed. The text concentrates on commercially operated light water reactors which currently represent the greatest fraction by far of the world`s nuclear power capacity. This book is not only intended for experts working in the various fields of radiochemistry in nuclear power plants. It also provides an overview of the topics dealt with for the operators of nuclear power plants, for people working in design and development and safety-related areas, as well as for those working in licensing and supervision. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  5. Toward visible light response: Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Extensive energy conversion of solar energy can only be achieved by large-scale collection of solar flux. The technology that satisfies this requirement must be as simple as possible to reduce capital cost. Overall water splitting by powder-form photocatalysts directly produces a mixture of H 2 and O2 (chemical energy) in a single reactor, which does not require any complicated parabolic mirrors and electronic devices. Because of its simplicity and low capital cost, it has tremendous potential to become the major technology of solar energy conversion. Development of highly efficient photocatalysts is desired. This review addresses why visible light responsive photocatalysts are essential to be developed. The state of the art for the photocatalysts for overall water splitting is briefly described. Moreover, various fundamental aspects for developing efficient photocatalysts, such as particle size of photocatalysts, cocatalysts, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 De Gruyter.

  6. The application of noble metals in light-water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Niedrach, Leonard W.; Indig, Maurice E.; Andresen, Peter L.

    1992-04-01

    Corrosion potential is a primary determinant of the stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of structural materials in high-temperature water. Efforts to minimize stress-corrosion cracking in light-water reactors include adding hydrogen. In someplants' out-of-core regions, the hydrogen required to achieve the desired corrosion potential is relatively high. In-core, more hydrogen is needed for an equivalent reduction in corrosion potential. Additionally, sIDe effects of high hydrogen-addition rates, including increased 16N turbine shine and 60CO deposition, have also been observed in some cases. An approach involving noble-metal coatings on and alloying additions to engineering materials dramatically improves the efficiency with which the corrosion potential is decreased as a function of hydrogen addition, such that very low potentials are obtained once a stoichiometric concentration of hydrogen (versus oxygen) is achieved.

  7. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  8. Light water reactor fuel response during reactivity initiated accident experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P. E.; McCardell, R. K.; Martinson, Z. R.; Seiffert, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results from six recent Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests are compared with data from previous Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT), and Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) tests. The RIA fuel behavior experimental program recently started in the PBF is being conducted with coolant conditions typical of hot-startup conditions in a commercial boiling water reactor. The SPERT and NSRR test programs investigated the behavior of single or small clusters of light water reactor (LWR) type fuel rods under approximate room temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions in capsules containing stagnant water. As observed in the SPERT and NSRR tests, energy deposition, and consequent enthalpy increase in the PBF test fuel, appears to be the single most important variable. However, the consequences of failure at boiling water hot-startup system conditions appear to be more severe than previously observed in either the stagnant capsule SPERT or NSRR tests. Metallographic examination of both previously unirradiated and irradiated PBF fuel rod cross sections revealed extensive variation in cladding wall thicknesses (involving considerable plastic flow) and fuel shattering along grain boundaries in both restructured and unrestructured fuel regions. Oxidation of the cladding resulted in fracture at the location of cladding thinning and disintegration of the rods during quench. In addition,swelling of the gaseous and potentially volatile fission products in previously irradiated fuel resulted in volume increases of up to 180% and blockage of the coolant channels within the flow shrouds surrounding the fuel rods.

  9. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  10. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  11. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  12. Noble Gases in Iddingsite from the Lafayette Meteorite: Evidence for Liquid Water on Mars in the Last Few Hundred Million Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Brkland, M. K.; Cohen, B. A.; Grier, J. A.; Li, B.; Olson, E. K.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases from 18 samples of weathering products ("iddingsite") from the Lafayette meteorite. Potassium-argon ages of 12 samples range from near zero to 670 +/- 91 Ma. These ages confirm the martian origin of the iddingsite, but it is not clear whether any or all of the ages represent iddingsite formation as opposed to later alteration or incorporation of martian atmospheric Ar-40. In any case, because iddingsite formation requires liquid water, this data requires the presence of liquid water near the surface of Mars at least as recently as 1300 Ma ago, and probably as recently as 650 Ma ago. Krypton and Xe analysis of a single 34 microg sample indicates the presence of fractionated martian atmosphere within the iddingsite. This also confirms the martian origin of the iddingsite. The mechanism of incorporation could either be through interaction with liquid water during iddingsite formation or a result of shock implantation of adsorbed atmospheric gas.

  13. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation.

  14. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  15. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M R

    2000-01-11

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  16. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  17. Hydrogeochemical data for thermal and nonthermal waters and gases of the Valles Caldera- southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Vuataz, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Janik, C.J.; Evans, W.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents field, chemical, gas, and isotopic data for thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, north of San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near-surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters at Sulphur Springs (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters in the ring fracture zone (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal waters of the Baca geothermal field and derivative waters in the Soda Dam and Jemez Springs area (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. Data in this report will help in interpreting the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and will provide background for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

  18. Plant Control of the High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlagenhaufer, Marc; Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Wuertemberg 76344 (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The latest design concept of the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) includes a thermal core in which supercritical water at 25 MPa inlet pressure is heated up from 280 deg. C reactor inlet temperature to 500 deg. C core exit temperature in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing to minimize peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods. A direct supercritical steam cycle of the HPLWR has been designed with high, intermediate and low pressure turbines with a single reheat to 441 deg. C at 4.04 MPa pressure. Three low pressure pre-heaters and four high pressure pre-heaters are foreseen to achieve the envisaged reactor inlet temperature of 280 deg. C at full load. A feedwater tank of 603 m{sup 3} at 0.55 MPa pressure serves as an accumulator for normal and accidental conditions. The steam cycle has been modelled with APROS, developed by VTT Finland, to provide thermodynamic data and cycle efficiency values under full load and part load operation conditions as well as the transient response to load changes. A plant control system has been designed in which the reactor inlet pressure is controlled by the turbine valve, the reactor power is controlled by the feedwater pumps while the life steam temperature is controlled by control rods, and the reheat temperature is controlled by the reheater valve. Neglecting the reactivity control, the core power can also be treated as input parameter such that the life steam temperature is directly controlled by the feedwater mass flow. The plant control can handle all loading and de-loading cycles including complete shut down. A constant pressure at reactor inlet is foreseen for all load cases. Peak temperatures of the fuel pins are checked with a simplified core model. Two shut down procedures starting at 50% load are presented. A reactor scram with turbine states the safe shut down of the whole plant. To avoid hard material temperature changes, a controlled shut down procedure is designed. The rotational speed of the

  19. Reactions of Criegee Intermediates with Non-Water Greenhouse Gases: Implications for Metal Free Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2017-09-07

    High-level theoretical calculations suggest that a Criegee intermediate preferably interacts with carbon dioxide compared to two other greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide and methane. The results also suggest that the interaction between Criegee intermediates and carbon dioxide involves a cycloaddition reaction, which results in the formation of a cyclic carbonate-type adduct with a barrier of 6.0-14.0 kcal/mol. These results are in contrast to a previous assumption that the reaction occurs barrierlessly. The subsequent decomposition of the cyclic adduct into formic acid and carbon dioxide follows both concerted and stepwise mechanisms. The latter mechanism has been overlooked previously. Under formic acid catalysis, the concerted decomposition of the cyclic carbonate may be favored under tropospheric conditions. Considering that there is a strong nexus between carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and global warming, the high reactivity of Criegee intermediates could be utilized for designing efficient carbon capture technologies.

  20. Water soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol compounds in the tropical boundary layer. An analysis based on real time measurements at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trebs, I.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the behavior of water-soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol species in the tropical boundary layer. Mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO;,) and the corresponding water-soluble

  1. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  2. Controlling radiation fields in siemans designed light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Marchl, T. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    An essential item for the control of radiation fields is the minimization of the use of satellites in the reactor systems of Light Water Reactors (LWRs). A short description of the qualification of Co-replacement materials will be followed by an illustration of the locations where these materials were implemented in Siemens designed LWRs. Especially experiences in PWRs show the immense influence of reduction of cobalt sources on dose rate buildup. The corrosion and the fatique and wear behavior of the replacement materials has not created concern up to now. A second tool to keep occupational radiation doses at a low level in PWRs is the use of the modified B/Li-chemistry. This is practized in Siemens designed plants by keeping the Li level at a max. value of 2 ppm until it reaches a pH (at 300{degrees}C) of {approximately}7.4. This pH is kept constant until the end of the cycle. The substitution of cobalt base alloys and thus the removal of the Co-59 sources from the system had the largest impact on the radiation levels. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of the coolant chemistry should not be neglected either. Several years of successful operation of PWRs with the replacement materials resulted in an occupational radiation exposure which is below 0.5 man-Sievert/plant and year.

  3. Universal Long-Range Nanometric Bending of Water by Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-10-01

    Resolving mechanical effects of light on fluids has fundamental importance with wide applications. Most experiments to date on optofluidic interface deformation exploited radiation forces exerted by normally incident lasers. However, the intriguing effects of photon momentum for any configuration, including the unique total internal reflection regime, where an evanescent wave leaks above the interface, remain largely unexplored. A major difficulty in resolving nanomechanical effects has been the lack of a sensitive detection technique. Here, we devise a simple setup whereby a probe laser produces high-contrast Newton-ring-like fringes from a sessile water drop. The mechanical action of the photon momentum of a pump beam modulates the fringes, thus allowing us to perform a direct noninvasive measurement of a nanometric bulge with sub-5-nm precision. Remarkably, a <10 nm difference in the height of the bulge due to different laser polarizations and nonlinear enhancement in the bulge near total internal reflection is isolated. In addition, the nanometric bulge is shown to extend far longer, 100 times beyond the pump spot. Our high precision data validate the century-old Minkowski theory for a general angle and offer potential for novel optofluidic devices and noncontact nanomanipulation strategies.

  4. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  5. Study on unstable fracture characteristics of light water reactor piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-08-01

    Many testing studies have been conducted to validate the applicability of the leak before break (LBB) concept for the light water reactor piping in the world. It is especially important among them to clarify the condition that an inside surface crack of the piping wall does not cause an unstable fracture but ends in a stable fracture propagating only in the pipe thickness direction, even if the excessive loading works to the pipe. Pipe unstable fracture tests performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute had been planned under such background, and clarified the condition for the cracked pipe to cause the unstable fracture under monotonous increase loading or cyclic loading by using test pipes with the inside circumferential surface crack. This paper examines the pipe unstable fracture by dividing it into two parts. One is the static unstable fracture that breaks the pipe with the inside circumferential surface crack by increasing load monotonously. Another is the dynamic unstable fracture that breaks the pipe by the cyclic loading. (author). 79 refs.

  6. Interactive effects of water, light and heat stress on photosynthesis in Fremont cottonwood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TOZZI, EMILY S; EASLON, HSIEN MING; RICHARDS, JAMES H

    2013-01-01

    .... However, stomatal closure during water stress predisposed Fremont cottonwood leaves to light and heat stress, resulting in greatly reduced photosynthesis beginning at 31 ° C versus at 41 ° C for well‐watered plants...

  7. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  8. The influence of humidification and temperature differences between inlet gases on water transport through the membrane of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Jen; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lai, Wei-Hsiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses the effects of humidification and temperature differences of the anode and cathode on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Heaters are used to cause a difference in gas temperature between two electrodes before the gases enter the fuel cell. The results show that when the temperature of the cathode is higher than that of the anode, the electro-osmotic drag is suppressed. In contrast, when the temperature of the anode is higher than that of cathode, it is enhanced. These effects are more significant when the temperature difference between the anode and cathode is greater. The same trends are seen with back diffusion. Three cases are tested, and the results show that the suppression due to the temperature difference occurs even when the relative humidity is low at the hotter side. The water transport tendencies of electro-osmotic drag and back diffusion in different situations can be expressed as dominant percentages calculated by the water masses collected at the anode and cathode. The suppression effect due to the temperature difference is relatively insignificant with regard to back diffusion compared to electro-osmosis, so water tends to accumulate on the anode rather than the cathode side.

  9. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the “explosive” destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to “explosive” destruction obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  11. The 1997 El Niño impact on clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases in the troposphere, as measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The El Niño event of 1997/1998 caused dry conditions over the Indonesian area that were followed by large scale forest and savannah fires over Kalimantan, Sumatra, Java, and parts of Irian Jaya. Biomass burning was most intense between August and October 1997, and large amounts of ozone precursors, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were emitted into the atmosphere. In this work, we use satellite measurements from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME sensor to study the teleconnections between the El Niño event of 1997 and the Indonesian fires, clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases (nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and ozone in the troposphere.

  12. Water and wastewater services: a contribution to greenhouse gases mitigation. Methodologies and experience feedback; Service d'eau et d'assainissement: contribuer a reduire les emissions de gaz a effet de serre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugendre, J.P. [Lyonnaise des Eaux, 75 - Paris (France); Arama, G. [Veolia Eau, 75 - Paris (France); Reungoat, E. [Saur - Les Cyclades, 78 - Guyancourt (France); Schafer, E. [SIAAP, 75 - Paris (France); Ginsburger, C. [FNCCR, 75 - Paris (France); Duguet, J.P. [Eau de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Gourdon, T. [Ademe, 49 - Angers (France); Senante, E. [Suez Environnement, 78 - Le Pecq (France); Hassine, M. [Sade - CGTH, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    Energy efficiency and contribution to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are at the heart of environmental concerns of communities and the public. Without waiting for the regulations that may affect them in the future on climate/energy, water and sanitation services will need to explore options aimed at saving energy, producing renewable energy and reducing direct or indirect emissions of greenhouse gases on their territory. In terms of controlling emissions of greenhouse gases, the results of initial assessments of GHGs emissions (including some made with the French 'Bilan Carbone' model, developed by the French Environment and Energy Management Agency - Ademe) help to identify the importance of emissions related to the management of water and wastewater services, to propose action plans to reduce them, and contribute to reducing emissions of other local actors through the creation of new renewable energy sources. A joint working group of Astee (French Scientific and Technical Association for Water and Environment) water and wastewater commissions prepared some guidelines for calculating emissions of greenhouse gases of water and wastewater services. These guidelines have been made available on the association web-site since September 2009. This article takes stock on the initial feedbacks relating to its implementation among operators of water and wastewater services. (authors)

  13. Stability analysis of the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Gomez, Tino

    2009-03-15

    In the Generation IV international advanced nuclear reactor development program, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the most promising candidates. Important features are its inherently high thermodynamic efficiency (of approximately 45 %) and the ability to use existing supercritical water technology which previously has been developed and deployed for fossil fired power plants. Within a HPLWR core, the fluid experiences a drastic change in thermal and transport properties such as density, dynamic viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity, as the supercritical water is heated from 280 C to 500 C. The density change substantially exceeds that in a Boiling Water Reactor (i.e., HPLWR: density changes from 780 kg/m{sup 3} to 90 kg/m{sup 3}; BWR: density changes from 750 kg/m{sup 3} to 198 kg/m3). Due to this density change, the HPLWR can be - under certain operation parameters - susceptible to various thermal-hydraulic flow instabilities, which have to be avoided. In this thesis a stability analysis for the HPLWR is presented. This analysis is based on analytical considerations and numerical results, which were obtained by a computer code developed by the author. The heat-up stages of the HPLWR three-pass core are identified in respect to the relevant flow instability phenomena. The modeling approach successfully used for BWR stability analysis is extended to supercritical pressure operation conditions. In particular, a one-dimensional equation set representing the coolant flow of HPLWR fuel assemblies has been implemented in a commercial software named COMSOL to perform steady-state, time-dependent, and modal analyses. An investigation of important static instabilities (i.e., Ledinegg instabilities, flow maldistribution) and Pressure Drop Oscillations (PDO) have been carried out and none were found under operation conditions of the HPLWR. Three types of Density Wave Oscillation (DWO) modes have been studied: the single channel DWO, the

  14. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Busby, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Barnard, Cathy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  18. Sorption of water, ethanol or ethanol/water solutions by light-cured dental dimethacrylate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M

    2011-10-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the sorption and desorption process of water, ethanol or ethanol/water solution 50% (v/v) or 75% (v/v) by the dental resins prepared by light curing of Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA or D₃MA. A thin resin disc is placed in a bath of time to obtain the sorption curve m(t)=f(t). Then the liquid is desorbed until a constant mass for the disc is reached and the desorption curve is recorded. These experimental curves help in the determination of the sorbed/desorbed liquid amount at equilibrium, the percentage of the extracted mass of unreacted monomer known as "solubility", and the sorption/desorption diffusion coefficient which expresses correspondingly the rate of the liquid sorption/desorption. The highest liquid uptake by dental resins was 13.3wt% ethanol for Bis-GMA-resin, 12.0wt% ethanol for UDMA-resin, 10.10wt% ethanol/water solution for TEGDMA-resin, 7.34wt% ethanol for D(3)MA-resin and 6.61wt% ethanol for Bis-EMA-resin. The diffusion coefficient for all resins was higher in water than in ethanol/water solution or ethanol. Bis-GMA-resin showed the highest diffusion coefficient (11.01 × 10⁻⁸cm² s⁻¹) followed by Bis-EMA-resin (7.43 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹), UDMA-resin (6.88 × 10⁻⁸cm² s⁻¹), D(3)MA-resin (6.22 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹) and finally by TEGDMA-resin (1.52 ×10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹). All studied dental resins, except TEGDMA-resin, absorbed higher amount of pure ethanol than water or ethanol water solution. TEGDMA-resin absorbed higher amount of ethanol/water solution (50/50 or 75/25 (v/v)) than water or ethanol. For all studied dental resins the diffusion coefficient was higher in water than in ethanol/water solution or ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The tip-sample water bridge and light emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Michael G; Mitra, J; Dawson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Light emission spectrum from a scanning tunnelling microscope (LESTM) is investigated as a function of relative humidity and shown to be a novel and sensitive means for probing the growth and properties of a water meniscus in the nm-scale. An empirical model of the light emission process is formulated and applied successfully to replicate the decay in light intensity and spectral changes observed with increasing relative humidity. The modelling indicates a progressive water filling of the tip...

  20. Solubility of natural gases in water under high pressure; Solubilite des gaz naturels dans l`eau a pression elevee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhima, A.

    1998-10-08

    Under high pressure (up to 1200 bar) and high temperature (up to 200 deg C) petroleum reservoir conditions the hydrocarbon-water mutual solubilities may become important. Under such conditions, the prediction of hydrocarbon water solubilities is a challenge for petroleum engineers. Indeed, very few studies have been done ar pressures higher that 700 bars. New solubility data for methane, ethane, n-butane, CO{sub 2} and their mixtures in pure water were obtained at 344.25 K and from 2.5 to 100 MPa. The results agree very well with those of the literature in the case of pure hydrocarbons in water, but differ for the hydrocarbon mixtures. A rigorous thermodynamic analysis allows the elaboration of a model that combines a cubic equation of state (Peng-Robinson with k{sub ij} given in literature) with the Henry`s law approach. The (P,T) functional form of Henry`s constant is given by the Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation which involves two important parameters: partial molar volume at infinite dilution and Henry`s constant at the vapour pressure of water. For a given solute both parameters are only functions of temperature. A critical selection of binary solubility data for a large number of solutes has been used as a basis for a new correlation for calculating both this partial molar volume and the corresponding Henry`s constants as a function of temperature. (author) 169 refs.

  1. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Trebs

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3, nitric acid (HNO3, nitrous acid (HONO, hydrochloric acid (HCl, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+, nitrate (NO3-, nitrite (NO2-, chloride (Cl- and sulfate (SO42-, and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil. This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate. Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity, through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions. Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder (WAD in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition were ≤0.015ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong

  2. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  5. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  6. Light penetration in the coastal waters off Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Observations of light penetration have been carried out at 6 stations along the Goa Coast, India, for different periods during 1975-76, using a submarine photometer. Seasonal and spatial variations in the values of irradiance attenuation coefficient...

  7. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air Water Purification Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated TIO2 catalyst visible light responsive (VLR) and achieve high and sustaining catalytic activity under the visible region of the solar spectrum.

  8. New class of photocatalytic materials and a novel principle for efficient water splitting under infrared and visible light: MgB2 as unexpected example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, V G; Grigorenko, A N

    2015-11-30

    Water splitting is unanimously recognized as environment friendly, potentially low cost and renewable energy solution based on the future hydrogen economy. Especially appealing is photocatalytic water splitting whereby a suitably chosen catalyst dramatically improves efficiency of the hydrogen production driven by direct sunlight and allows it to happen even at zero driving potential. Here, we suggest a new class of stable photocatalysts and the corresponding principle for catalytic water splitting in which infrared and visible light play the main role in producing the photocurrent and hydrogen. The new class of catalysts - ionic or covalent binary metals with layered graphite-like structures - effectively absorb visible and infrared light facilitating the reaction of water splitting, suppress the inverse reaction of ion recombination by separating ions due to internal electric fields existing near alternating layers, provide the sites for ion trapping of both polarities, and finally deliver the electrons and holes required to generate hydrogen and oxygen gases. As an example, we demonstrate conversion efficiency of ~27% at bias voltage Vbias = 0.5V for magnesium diboride working as a catalyst for photoinduced water splitting. We discuss its advantages over some existing materials and propose the underlying mechanism of photocatalytic water splitting by binary layered metals.

  9. A comparative study of vertical flow and free-water surface constructed wetlands for low C/N ratio domestic wastewater treatment and its greenhouse gases emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K.; Liu, C.; Ebie, Y.; Inamori, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) systems are reliable, flexible in design, and can be built, operated, and maintained at lower costs compared to conventional methods of chemical treatment. Therefore, CW systems are widely used for controlling water-body eutrophication as an ease-operation and cost-effective ecological technology in developing countries. However, growing attention has been directed to its greenhouse side-effect and global-warming potential in recent years. In this study, two typical constructed wetlands: Vertical flow (VF) and Free-water surface (FWS) constructed wetlands were used not only to compare the nutrients removal performance for treatment of low C/N ratio loading domestic wastewater, but also to investigate and compare their CH4 and N2O greenhouse gases emission characteristics. The results indicated that the VF CW showed a comparatively good performance for nitrogen and phosphorus removal than FWS constructed wetland, which was 98.5, 95.9, 93.2 and 90.7 percent for BOD5, SS, NH4-N and TP under 6 days HRT, respectively. It was found that the FWS CW had the higher tendency to emit CH4 than the VF CW during four seasons of one year.

  10. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  11. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  12. Critical behavior of 2,6-dimethylpyridine-water: Measurements of specific heat, dynamic light scattering, and shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaev, S. Z.; Behrends, R.; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2006-01-01

    2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April......2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April...

  13. [Summer Greenhouse Gases Exchange Flux Across Water-air Interface in Three Water Reservoirs Located in Different Geologic Setting in Guangxi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-hong; Pu, Jun-bing; Sun, Ping-an; Yuan, Dao-xian; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Tao; Mo, Xue

    2015-11-01

    Due to special hydrogeochemical characteristics of calcium-rich, alkaline and DIC-rich ( dissolved inorganic carbon) environment controlled by the weathering products from carbonate rock, the exchange characteristics, processes and controlling factors of greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) across water-air interface in karst water reservoir show obvious differences from those of non-karst water reservoir. Three water reservoirs (Dalongdong reservoir-karst reservoir, Wulixia reservoir--semi karst reservoir, Si'anjiang reservoir-non-karst reservoir) located in different geologic setting in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China were chosen to reveal characteristics and controlling factors of greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface. Two common approaches, floating chamber (FC) and thin boundary layer models (TBL), were employed to research and contrast greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface from three reservoirs. The results showed that: (1) surface-layer water in reservoir area and discharging water under dam in Dalongdong water reservoir were the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in reservoir area in Wulixia water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and the source of atmospheric CH4, while discharging water under dam was the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in Si'anjiang water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and source of atmospheric CH4. (2) CO2 and CH4 effluxes in discharging water under dam were much more than those in surface-layer water in reservoir area regardless of karst reservoir or non karst reservoir. Accordingly, more attention should be paid to the CO2 and CH4 emission from discharging water under dam. (3) In the absence of submerged soil organic matters and plants, the difference of CH4 effluxes between karst groundwater-fed reservoir ( Dalongdong water reservoir) and non-karst area ( Wulixia water reservoir and Si'anjiang water reservoir) was less. However, CO2

  14. Light-Initiated Transformation of C60 Clusters in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although Buckminster fullerene (C60) has an extremely low water solubility (~8 ng/L), the formation of stable clusters (aqu/nC60) not only greatly increases the mass of C60 dispersed in water, but also alters its physicochemical properties. This research focused on investigating ...

  15. Measurements of the conduction of heat in water vapor, nitrogen and mixtures of these gases in an extended temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, A.; Westerdorf, M.

    Experimental and analytical results are presented from trials with heat conduction in water vapor, nitrogen, and mixtures of the two in a cylindrical heat transfer cell. The pressures examined ranged from 100-0.01 mbar, corresponding to Knudsen numbers of 0.01-100. Formulations are defined for the continuum conditions, the free molecule conditions, the transition region, and the momentum equation solution. Experimentation with an instrumented configuration of an inner and outer cylinder over the temperature range 300-725 K is described, noting the use of a vacuum around the inner, gas-filled container in order to measure the radiative heat losses. The results are useful for predicting heat transfer in high altitude flight or among small droplets in natural fogs, cooling towers, and combustion chambers.

  16. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  17. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power reactors...

  18. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Approvals § 50.46 Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide...

  19. 10-fold enhancement in light-driven water splitting using niobium oxynitride microcone array films

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2016-03-26

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the synthesis of highly ordered niobium oxynitride microcones as an attractive class of materials for visible-light-driven water splitting. As revealed by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), photoelectrochemical and transient photocurrent measurements, the microcones showed enhanced performance (~1000% compared to mesoporous niobium oxide) as photoanodes for water splitting with remarkable stability and visible light activity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Results report. Sampling and analyses of gases and microorganisms in the water from MINICAN in 2007, 2008 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara; Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    The MINICAN project is located at the depth of 450 m in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and was initiated to study how corrosion of the cast iron insert inside a perforated copper canister would evolve with time. Miniature canisters with different perforations and with and without bentonite buffer in steel cages were installed and monitored. Samples for microbiological and gas composition together with samples for groundwater chemistry have been analysed at three occasions in 2007, 2008 and 2010. The results show how the microbial populations outside the canisters have evolved from a mixture of microorganism able to grow on organic material, like heterotrophic organisms, and acetogens that grow on hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide in 2007, to populations with a large proportion of sulphate-reducing bacteria in 2010. The highest number of sulphate-reducing bacteria was found in MINICAN experiment A02C, canister with one hole at the top of the copper canister, in 2010 with 2.4 x 104 mL-1 followed by 8 x 103 mL-1 in A03 (hole in the bottom of the canister) and 7 x 103 mL-1 in A06 (two holes at the top and no bentonite). The numbers of culturable heterotrophic bacteria were between 200 and 530 mL-1 in the experiments with bentonite in 2007 but below detection in all experiments in 2010. The same trend was shown for acetogenes. Measurable amounts of hydrogen gas were found in all experiments at all sampling occasions. There was no general trend for the amounts of hydrogen but there was an increase in three of the experiments and in the groundwater outside MINICAN. It was found that the water chemistry differed between A06 and A02-A04 experiment by higher sulphate and chloride concentrations in A06 compared to the others. By plotting the concentrations of chloride, sulphate against time, a decrease in sulphate concentration was found in all canister experiments. The chloride concentrations were stable during the same period. On the other hand, an increase in sulphate

  1. Water cooling of high power light emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The development in light technologies for entertainment is moving towards LED based solutions. This progress is not without problems, when more than a single LED is used. The amount of generated heat is often in the same order as in a conventional discharge lamp, but the allowable operating tempe......; axial flow through mini channels or a s-channel. Experiments showed that the channel design utilizing swirling flows had up to 4 times the pressure loss as the mini channel/s-channel....

  2. Temporal Quantum Correlation in Inelastic Light Scattering from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Andre; Kasperczyk, Mark; de Aguiar Junior, Filomeno; Rabelo, Cassiano; Santos, Marcelo; Novotny, Lukas; Jorio, Ado

    Water is one of the most prevalent chemicals on our planet, an integral part of both our environment and our existence as a species. Yet it is also rich in anomalous behaviors. Here we reveal that liquid water is a novel - yet ubiquitous - source for quantum correlated photon pairs. The photon pairs are produced through Raman scattering, and the correlations arise from the shared quantum of a vibrational mode between the Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering events. We confirm the nonclassical nature of the produced photon pairs by showing that the cross-correlation and autocorrelations of the signals violate a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by over five orders of magnitude. The unprecedented degree of violating the inequality in pure water, as well as the well-defined polarization properties of the photon pairs, points to its usefulness in quantum information.

  3. Temporal Quantum Correlations in Inelastic Light Scattering from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperczyk, Mark; de Aguiar Júnior, Filomeno S.; Rabelo, Cassiano; Saraiva, Andre; Santos, Marcelo F.; Novotny, Lukas; Jorio, Ado

    2016-12-01

    Water is one of the most prevalent chemicals on our planet, an integral part of both our environment and our existence as a species. Yet it is also rich in anomalous behaviors. Here we reveal that water is a novel—yet ubiquitous—source for quantum correlated photon pairs at ambient conditions. The photon pairs are produced through Raman scattering, and the correlations arise from the shared quantum of a vibrational mode between the Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering events. We confirm the nonclassical nature of the produced photon pairs by showing that the cross-correlation and autocorrelations of the signals violate a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by over 5 orders of magnitude. The unprecedented degree of violating the inequality in pure water, as well as the well-defined polarization properties of the photon pairs, points to its usefulness in quantum information.

  4. Solar light irradiation significantly reduced cytotoxicity and disinfection byproducts in chlorinated reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Tong; Zhang, Xue; Du, Ye; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Lu, Yun; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-11-15

    Chlorinated reclaimed water is widely used for landscaping and recreational purposes, resulting in human exposure to toxic disinfection byproducts. Although the quality of chlorinated reclaimed water might be affected by sunlight during storage, the effects of solar light irradiation on the toxicity remain unknown. This study investigated the changes in cytotoxicity and total organic halogen (TOX) of chlorinated reclaimed water exposed to solar light. Irradiation with solar light for 12 h was found to significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of chlorinated reclaimed water by about 75%, with ultraviolet light being responsible for the majority of this reduction. Chlorine residual in reclaimed water tended to increase the cytotoxicity, and the synergy between solar light and free chlorine could not enhance the reduction of cytotoxicity. Adding hydroxyl radical scavengers revealed that the contribution of hydroxyl radical to cytotoxicity reduction was limited. Solar light irradiation concurrently reduced TOX. The low molecular weight (1 kDa) fraction was probably caused by photoconversion from high toxic TOX to low toxic TOX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effects of light on submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Sha, Zou; Ze-Yu, Nie; Xiao-Yan, Yao; Ji-Yan, Shi

    2013-07-01

    The restoration of submerged macrophytes is the key to remediate eutrophic water and maintain the health of aquatic ecosystem, while light is the main limiting factor. This paper summarized the factors affecting the light extinction in water and the mechanisms of light intensity affecting the physiology of submerged macrophytes, with the focuses on the metabolic mechanisms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, the responses of antioxidant enzyme system, and the feedbacks of pigment composition and concentration in the common submerged macrophytes under low light stress. Several engineering techniques applied in the ecological restoration of submerged macrophytes were presented, and the framework of the restoration of submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water was proposed. Some problems in current research and several suggestions on future research were addressed, which could help the related research and engineering practices.

  6. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P., E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.r [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation); Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-11

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  7. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  8. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian Light Crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: A 96-hour bioassay was conducted using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil sample on. Clarias gariepinus ... metal and total hydrocarbon contents of the water and fish were analyzed at 96 hour and 14 days which marked the end of the recovery ..... ligand model of the acute toxicity of metals. 1.

  9. Conventional and high intensity halogen light effects on water sorption and microhardness of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Sener, Yagmur; Botsali, Murat Selim; Demir, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    To test the null hypothesis that when the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there is no difference between the microhardness and water sorption values regardless of the curing light sources. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light-Bond, Transbond XT) and two light intensities (quartz tungsten halogen [QTH] and high intensity quartz tungsten halogen [HQTH]). One half of each of the 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH light source, and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH light source. Water sorption was determined and Vickers hardness was established with three measurements per sample at the top, center, and bottom. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple comparisons (Tukey-HSD). Statistically significant differences were found among all adhesives for water sorption and hardness values cured with QTH and HQTH. The HQTH curing unit resulted in higher values than did the QTH. The highest water sorption values were observed for Kurasper F cured with HQTH and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH. For microhardness Light-Bond cured with HQTH produced the highest values, and Transbond XT cured with QTH produced the lowest. When the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there are significant differences between the microhardness and water sorption values cured with the QTH and HQTH light source. The null hypothesis is rejected.

  10. Petal abscission in rose flowers: effects of water potential, light intensity and light quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Vojinovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    Petal abscission was studied in roses (Rosa hybrida L.), cvs. Korflapei (trade name Frisco), Sweet Promise (Sonia) and Cara Mia (trade name as officially registered cultivar name). Unlike flowers on plants in greenhouses, cut flowers placed in water in the greenhouse produced visible symptoms of

  11. Design and Fluid Dynamic Investigations for a High Performance Light Water Reactor Fuel Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Jan; Laurin, Eckart; Class, Andreas G.

    2005-11-01

    Within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission a nuclear light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions has been investigated called High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). This reactor concept is distinct from conventional light water reactor concepts by the fact, that supercritical water is used to achieve higher core outlet temperatures. The reactor operates with a high system pressure, high heat-up of the coolant within the core, and high outlet temperatures of the coolant resulting in a thermal efficiency of up to 44%. We present the design concept proposed by IKET, and a fluid dynamic problem in the foot piece of the fuel assembly, where unacceptable temperature variations must be omitted.

  12. Handbook of purified gases

    CERN Document Server

    Schoen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Technical gases are used in almost every field of industry, science and medicine and also as a means of control by government authorities and institutions and are regarded as indispensable means of assistance. In this complete handbook of purified gases the physical foundations of purified gases and mixtures as well as their manufacturing, purification, analysis, storage, handling and transport are presented in a comprehensive way. This important reference work is accompanied with a large number of Data Sheets dedicated to the most important purified gases.  

  13. Evaluation of Additives to Eliminate Free Water from Aviation Fuel Light Obscuration Particle Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    SiO2 extracted the water from the fuel samples via hydrogen bonding. This absorption of the free water to the walls of the glass bottles resulted in...contamination on light obscuration particle counting data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS fuel, JP-8, diesel, contamination, particulate, free water , absorption ...ISO 12103-1 A3 medium test dust and free water evaluation in glass bottles. 1 Table 3. 1.0 mg/L ISO 12103-1 A3 medium test dust and 15 ppm free water 2

  14. Gases (CH4, CO2 and N2 and pore water chemistry in the surface sediments of Lake Orta, Italy: acidification effects on C and N gas cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald D. ADAMS

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Lake Orta, a subalpine, warm monomictic lake in northwestern Italy was heavily polluted from rayon factory discharges of ammonium and copper since 1926. In the 1950s accumulations of contaminants resulted in whole lake pHs of 3.8-4.0 from ammonium oxidation. Partial remediation started in the 1950s, but by 1985-89 the water remained acidified at pHs of 4.0. Artificial liming (14,500 t in 1989-90 resulted in improved water quality and substantial recovery of the biological community. Sediment gases, sampled in 1989 before liming, from the lake's four basins showed severe inhibition of methanogenesis (CH4 = 0.0-0.15 mM in the surface sediments (0.5-5 cm of the southern basin, location of the plant effluent, as compared to the deep central and northern basins (0.9-1.4 mM. Four years after liming, cores collected in 1994 near the 1989 southern basin sites showed a slight change in surface sediment methane (0.07-0.82 mM, yet suggested continual sediment toxicity, at least to carbon cycling through methanogenesis. Calculations of diffuse flux of CH4 at the sediment-water interface (SWI in 1989 were 6.6-7.4 mM m-2 day-1 for the central and northern basins and 0.13 for the southern basin. CH4 fluxes increased 16x to 2 mM m-2 day-1 in 1994 in the southern basin, possibly from remediation of near surface sediments. The impact of pollution on denitrification (formation of sediment N2 gas was not so obvious since two processes could counteract each other (high NO3 - stimulating denitrification versus possible negative effects from acidity and metals. The calculated flux of N2 from the southern basin sediments increased 5x four years after liming compared to the period of acidification, suggesting possible toxicity towards denitrifiers during the earlier period. Core overlying water (0.68 mM exhibited N2 concentrations close to saturation, while most surface sediments were twice as much (1.5 mM. Surface (0-6 cm sediment N2 was similar at most sites, with the

  15. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  16. A role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water: acceleration of the reaction under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroyasu; Tsujino, Hidekazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Masaya

    2014-04-01

    Organic environmental pollutants are now being detected with remarkably high frequency in the aquatic environment. Photodegradation by ultraviolet light is sometimes used as a method for removing organic chemicals from water; however, this method is relatively inefficient because of the low degradation rates involved, and more efficient methods are under development. Here we show that the removal of various organic pollutants can be assisted by calcined dolomite in aqueous solution under irradiation with ultraviolet light. It was possible to achieve substantial removal of bisphenol A, chlorophenols, alkylphenols, 1-naphthol and 17β-estradiol. The major component of dolomite responsible for the removal was calcium hydroxide. Our results demonstrate that the use of calcium hydroxide with ultraviolet light irradiation can be a very effective method of rapidly removing organic environmental pollutants from water. This is a new role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Co(II)-Ru(II) dyad relevant to light-driven water oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro Montellano; Natali, Mirco; Pizzolato, Erica; Chiorboli, Claudio; Bonchio, Marcella; Sartorel, Andrea; Scandola, Franco

    2014-06-28

    Artificial photosynthesis aims at efficient water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen, by exploiting solar light. As a priority requirement, this process entails the integration of suitable multi-electron catalysts with light absorbing units, where charge separation is generated in order to drive the catalytic routines. The final goal could be the transposition of such an asset into a photoelectrocatalytic cell, where the two half-reactions, proton reduction to hydrogen and water oxidation to oxygen, take place at two appropriately engineered photoelectrodes. We herein report a covalent approach to anchor a Co(II) water oxidation catalyst to a Ru(II) polypyridine photosensitizer unit; photophysical characterisation and the catalytic activity of such a dyad in a light activated cycle are reported, and implications for the development of regenerative systems are discussed.

  18. Study of greenhouse gases reduction alternatives for the exploitation of non conventional oil sands in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchonneau, Deborah [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    High energy prices and greenhouse gases reduction represent the main challenges the current worldwide energetic situation has to face. As a consequence, paradox strategies can be highlighted: oil prices are sufficiently high to exploit non conventional oil resources, like extra heavy oils and oil sands. But the production of these resources emits larger GHG than the conventional oil path and implies other major environmental issues (water management, risks of soil pollution, destruction of the boreal forest), incompatible with the rules validated by the protocol of Kyoto. At the light of the new greenhouse gases reduction regulation framework announced by the Canadian Federal government, this work focuses on the study of greenhouse gases reduction alternatives applied to the non conventional oil sands exploitation in Canada. (author)

  19. Stray light effects in above-water remote-sensing reflectance from hyperspectral radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Ansko, Ilmar; Banks, Andrew Clive; Kuusk, Joel

    2016-05-20

    Stray light perturbations are unwanted distortions of the measured spectrum due to the nonideal performance of optical radiometers. Because of this, stray light characterization and correction is essential when accurate radiometric measurements are a necessity. In agreement with such a need, this study focused on stray light correction of hyperspectral radiometers widely applied for above-water measurements to determine the remote-sensing reflectance (RRS). Stray light of sample radiometers was experimentally characterized and a correction algorithm was developed and applied to field measurements performed in the Mediterranean Sea. Results indicate that mean stray light corrections are appreciable, with values generally varying from -1% to +1% in the 400-700 nm spectral region for downward irradiance and sky radiance, and from -1% to +4% for total radiance from the sea. Mean corrections for data products such as RRS exhibit values that depend on water type varying between -0.5% and +1% in the blue-green spectral region, with peaks up to 9% in the red in eutrophic waters. The possibility of using one common stray light correction matrix for the analyzed class of radiometers was also investigated. Results centered on RRS support such a feasibility at the expense of an increment of the uncertainty typically well below 0.5% in the blue-green and up to 1% in the red, assuming sensors are based on spectrographs from the same production batch.

  20. Investigation into the Use of Water Based Brake Fluid for Light Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Akpan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the possibility of using water based fluid as a brake fluid for light loads. Characterization of both standard and water based braked fluids formulated was carried out. The properties of the latter were compared with that of a standard commercial brake fluid. The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus of University of Uyo and the braking efficiency obtained attest to its suitability for light loads.

  1. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  2. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    of laser incidence) and to analyse the laser-light backscattering changes caused by additional hot air drying and proteolysis of dry-cured ham slices. The feasibility of the technology to determine water content and proteolysis (which is related to textural characteristics) of commercial sliced dry...... was only detected when the water content was decreased (618 mm(2) per 1% weight loss). Changes on scattering of light profiles were only observed when the water content changed. Although there is a good correlation between water content and LBI parameters when analysing commercial samples, proteolysis...... index has an important effect on the response. This fact hinder estimation of dry-cured ham composition and textural characteristics of dry-cured ham. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.; Smart, Christine D.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid...

  4. Self-propagating solar light reduction of graphite oxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Boukos, N.; Vermisoglou, E. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece); Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide was partially reduced by solar light irradiation in water media. • No addition of catalysts nor reductive agent were used for the reduction. • Specific capacitance increased stepwise with increase of irradiation time. • Self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide by solar light is suggested. - Abstract: Graphite Oxide (GtO) is commonly used as an intermediate material for preparation of graphene in the form of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Being a semiconductor with tunable band gap rGO is often coupled with various photocatalysts to enhance their visible light activity. The behavior of such rGO-based composites could be affected after prolonged exposure to solar light. In the present work, the alteration of the GtO properties under solar light irradiation is investigated. Water dispersions of GtO manufactured by oxidation of natural graphite via Hummers method were irradiated into solar light simulator for different periods of time without addition of catalysts or reductive agent. The FT-IR analysis of the treated dispersions revealed gradual reduction of the GtO with the increase of the irradiation time. The XRD, FT-IR and XPS analyses of the obtained solid materials confirmed the transition of GtO to rGO under solar light irradiation. The reduction of the GtO was also manifested by the CV measurements that revealed stepwise increase of the specific capacitance connected with the restoration of the sp{sup 2} domains. Photothermal self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide in aqueous media under solar light irradiation is suggested as a possible mechanism. The self-photoreduction of GtO utilizing solar light provides a green, sustainable route towards preparation of reduced graphene oxide. However, the instability of the GtO and partially reduced GO under irradiation should be considered when choosing the field of its application.

  5. Recent progress in oxynitride photocatalysts for visible-light-driven water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Chengsi; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen is a method to directly convert light energy into storable chemical energy, and has received considerable attention for use in large-scale solar energy utilization. Particulate semiconductors are generally used as photocatalysts, and semiconductor properties such as bandgap, band positions, and photocarrier mobility can heavily impact photocatalytic performance. The design of active photocatalysts has been performed with the consideration of such semiconductor properties. Photocatalysts have a catalytic aspect in addition to a semiconductor one. The ability to control surface redox reactions in order to efficiently produce targeted reactants is also important for photocatalysts. Over the past few decades, various photocatalysts for water splitting have been developed, and a recent main concern has been the development of visible-light sensitive photocatalysts for water splitting. This review introduces the study of water-splitting photocatalysts, with a focus on recent progress in visible-light induced overall water splitting on oxynitride photocatalysts. Various strategies for designing efficient photocatalysts for water splitting are also discussed herein.

  6. Damage from light and antioxidative protective mechanisms in plants exposed to various stresses including traffic exhaust gases. Final report; Lichtschaeden und antioxidative Schutzeinrichtungen in Pflanzen bei Einwirkung von Stressfaktoren und Automobilabgasen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feierabend, J.

    1992-12-31

    In intact leaves the catalose enzyme is photinactivated and degraded. Similarly to the D1 protein of photosystem II (PSII) it therefore has a high turnover in a bright environment and must continually be resynthesised. Mildly oxidative conditions induce greater catalase activity. With growing stress (cold, heat, salt, osmotic stress, senescence) there is a gradual shift of the steady state equilibrium due to enhanced photodegradation and inhibition of repair mechanisms. A rapid drop`n catalase concentration and photoinhibition of PSII are therefore early indicators of first photooxidative damage. The stress caused by experimental, realistic, doses of automobile exhaust gases and ozone was not so severe as to induce photoinhibition of catalase or PSII but merely led to a slight increase in antioxidative enzymes. The concentrations and redox equilibria of antioxidatives was not significantly affected. Exposition to these air pollutants in combination with cold and light had a far stronger effect on light-sensitive cumber leaves in the recovery phase than without additional stressors. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Enzym Katalase wird in intakten Blaettern photoinaktiviert und abgebaut. Daher weist es wie das D1-Protein des Photosystems II (PSII) im Licht einen schnellen Turnover auf und muss staendig durch Neusynthese ersetzt werden. Milde oxidative Bedingungen induzieren eine hoehere Katalaseaktivitaet. Unter staerkeren Stressbelastungen (Kaelte, Hitze, Salz, osmotischer Stress, Schwermetalle, Seneszenz) verschiebt sich durch verstaerkte Photodegradation oder Behinderung der Reparatur das Gleichgewicht des Turnovers, und ein schneller apparenter Katalaseverlust und die Photoinhibition von PSII sind fruehe Indikatoren beginnender photooxidativer Schaeden. Belastungen mit realistischen Dosen von Automobilabgasen und Ozon waren nicht so gravierend, dass sie die Photoinhibition von Katalase oder PSII ausloesten, sondern sie induzierten teils eine leichte Erhoehung antioxidativer

  7. Blood Gases Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LDL Particle Testing (LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver ... such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suspected. Blood gases may also be used ...

  8. On Classical Ideal Gases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacques Arnaud; Laurent Chusseau; Fabrice Philippe

    2013-01-01

      We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent...

  9. Kinetic theory of gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kauzmann, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Monograph and text supplement for first-year students of physical chemistry focuses chiefly on the molecular basis of important thermodynamic properties of gases, including pressure, temperature, and thermal energy. 1966 edition.

  10. European research activities within the project: High Performance Light Water Reactor phase 2 (HPLWR phase 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe (Germany); Marsault, P. [CEA Cadarache (DER/SESI), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP, NEPR-G, Erlangen (Germany); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary); Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. IKE (Germany); Lycklama, J.A. [NRG Petten, NL (Netherlands); Anglart, H. [KTH Energy Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Aksan, N. [Paul Scherrer Institut CH, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ruzickova, M. [UJV Rez plc, Husinec-Rez c.p. (Czech Republic); Heikinheimo, L. [VTT, FIN (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor (LWR) operating at supercritical pressure (25 MPa). It belongs to the six reactors currently being investigated under the framework of the Generation IV International Forum. The most visible advantage of the HPLWR shall be the low construction costs in the order of 1000 Euro/kWe, because of size reduction of components and buildings compared to current Light Water Reactors, and the low electricity production costs which are targeted at 3-4 cents/kWh. In Europe, investigations on the HPLWR have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 (HPLWR Phase 2), which is co-funded by the European Commission. Within 42 months, ten partners from eight European countries working on critical scientific issues shall show the feasibility of the HPLWR concept. This paper reports on 5 points relevant for HPLWR: 1) design and integration, 2) core design, 3) safety, 4) materials, and 5) heat transfer. The final goal is to assess the future potential of this reactor in the electricity market.

  11. The influence of savanna trees on nutrient, water and light availability and the understorey vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, F.; Kroon, de H.; Berendse, F.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2004-01-01

    In an East African savanna herbaceous layer productivity and species composition were studied around Acacia tortilis trees of three different age classes, as well as around dead trees and in open grassland patches. The effects of trees on nutrient, light and water availability were measured to

  12. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  13. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  14. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  15. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in <180 minutes of contact

  16. Study of gases and volatiles in samples of underground water bodies in the State of Mexico; Estudio de gases y volatiles en muestras de cuerpos de agua subterranea en el Estado de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, N.; Segovia, N.; Cisniega, G.; Tamez, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It was realized a preliminary study of radon and volatile organic compounds (VOC ) in spring water of the State of Mexico. The radon was determined by the liquid scintillation method and the VOC by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. The radon concentration range was between 0.50 - 4.42 KBq/m{sup 3}. Its were found some VOC of probably anthropogenic origin. (Author)

  17. The optical properties of greenlandic coastal waters: Modelling light penetration in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stedmon, Colin; Markager, S.S.; Pedersen, T.J.

    of these waters. Although solar elevation and sea ice cover play an important role, during the summer month’s light is also regulated by water constituents such as dissolved and particulate organic matter, phytoplankton and suspended sediments. The relative importance of each of these constituents varies...... depending on the influence of shelf water entering the fjords, extent of glacial ice melt and the size and vertical distribution of the phytoplankton biomass. In this study the data from two contrasting sites are compared: Young Sound, a fjord system in Northeast Greenland that imports shelf waters...... with a considerable amount of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Arctic Ocean; and Godthåbsfjord a fjord in Southwest Greenland where strong tides ensure a regular supply of warm shelf water which melt glacial ice before it can leave the fjord...

  18. Recent advancements in plasmon-enhanced visible light-driven water splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhe Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the combination of plasmonic noble metallic nanostructures with semiconductors for plasmon-enhanced visible light-driven water splitting (WS has attracted considerable attention. This review first presents three prime enhancement mechanisms for plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic WS, and then some state-of-the-art representative studies are introduced according to different enhancement mechanisms. Furthermore, the design parameters of plasmonic-metal/semiconductor photocatalysts are discussed in detail, focusing on the effect of shape, size and geometric position of metallic nanostructures on the photocatalytic activity of visible light-driven WS. Finally, the challenges and perspectives for plasmon-enhanced solar WS are proposed.

  19. Conjugated Microporous Polymer Nanosheets for Overall Water Splitting Using Visible Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wan, Yangyang; Ding, Yanjun; Wu, Sikai; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xinlei; Zhang, Guoqing; Xiong, Yujie; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Xu, Hangxun

    2017-10-01

    Direct water splitting into H2 and O2 using photocatalysts by harnessing sunlight is very appealing to produce storable chemical fuels. Conjugated polymers, which have tunable molecular structures and optoelectronic properties, are promising alternatives to inorganic semiconductors for water splitting. Unfortunately, conjugated polymers that are able to efficiently split pure water under visible light (400 nm) via a four-electron pathway have not been previously reported. This study demonstrates that 1,3-diyne-linked conjugated microporous polymer nanosheets (CMPNs) prepared by oxidative coupling of terminal alkynes such as 1,3,5-tris-(4-ethynylphenyl)-benzene (TEPB) and 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene (TEB) can act as highly efficient photocatalysts for splitting pure water (pH ≈ 7) into stoichiometric amounts of H2 and O2 under visible light. The apparent quantum efficiencies at 420 nm are 10.3% and 7.6% for CMPNs synthesized from TEPB and TEB, respectively; the measured solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency using the full solar spectrum can reach 0.6%, surpassing photosynthetic plants in converting solar energy to biomass (globally average ≈0.10%). First-principles calculations reveal that photocatalytic H2 and O2 evolution reactions are energetically feasible for CMPNs under visible light irradiation. The findings suggest that organic polymers hold great potential for stable and scalable solar-fuel generation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Stress analysis of the reactor pressure vessel of the high performance light water reactors (HPLWR); Festigkeitsanalyse fuer den Reaktordruckbehaelter des High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelton, E.; Fischer, K.

    2006-12-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the concepts of the Generation IV program. The main difference compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWR) results from the supercritical steam condition of the coolant. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and coolant, flows as a single phase through the core. The temperatures at the outlet are above 500 C. These conditions have a major impact on the design of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). For the modelling a RPV concept is proposed, which resembles the design of current LWR and allows the use of approved materials on one side and also meets the additional demands on the other side. A first dimensioning of the RPV wall thicknesses and the geometrical proportions has been performed using the german KTA-guidelines. To verify these results, a stress analysis using the finite element method has been performed with the program ANSYS. The combined mechanical and thermal calculations provide the primary, secondary and peak stresses which are evaluated using the KTA-guidelines design loading (Level 0) and service loading level A for the different components. The results confirm the wall thicknesses estimated by Fischer et al. (2006), but there are peak stresses in the vicinity of the inlet and outlet flanges, which are very close to the allowed design limit. For larger diameters of the RPV those regions will become critical and the stresses might exceed the design limits. Design optimizations for those regions are proposed and evaluated. A readjusted geometry of the inlet flange reduces those stresses by 65%. (orig.)

  1. Artificial light on water attracts turtle hatchlings during their near shore transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thums, Michele; Whiting, Scott D; Reisser, Julia; Pendoley, Kellie L; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B; Proietti, Maira; Hetzel, Yasha; Fisher, Rebecca; Meekan, Mark G

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effect of artificial light on the near shore trajectories of turtle hatchlings dispersing from natal beaches. Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings were tagged with miniature acoustic transmitters and their movements tracked within an underwater array of 36 acoustic receivers placed in the near shore zone. A total of 40 hatchlings were tracked, 20 of which were subjected to artificial light during their transit of the array. At the same time, we measured current speed and direction, which were highly variable within and between experimental nights and treatments. Artificial lighting affected hatchling behaviour, with 88% of individual trajectories oriented towards the light and spending, on average, 23% more time in the 2.25 ha tracking array (19.5 ± 5 min) than under ambient light conditions (15.8 ± 5 min). Current speed had little to no effect on the bearing (angular direction) of the hatchling tracks when artificial light was present, but under ambient conditions it influenced the bearing of the tracks when current direction was offshore and above speeds of approximately 32.5 cm s(-1). This is the first experimental evidence that wild turtle hatchlings are attracted to artificial light after entering the ocean, a behaviour that is likely to subject them to greater risk of predation. The experimental protocol described in this study can be used to assess the effect of anthropogenic (light pollution, noise, etc.) and natural (wave action, current, wind, moonlight) influences on the in-water movements of sea turtle hatchlings during the early phase of dispersal.

  2. Artificial light on water attracts turtle hatchlings during their near shore transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thums, Michele; Whiting, Scott D.; Reisser, Julia; Pendoley, Kellie L.; Proietti, Maira; Hetzel, Yasha; Fisher, Rebecca; Meekan, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of artificial light on the near shore trajectories of turtle hatchlings dispersing from natal beaches. Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings were tagged with miniature acoustic transmitters and their movements tracked within an underwater array of 36 acoustic receivers placed in the near shore zone. A total of 40 hatchlings were tracked, 20 of which were subjected to artificial light during their transit of the array. At the same time, we measured current speed and direction, which were highly variable within and between experimental nights and treatments. Artificial lighting affected hatchling behaviour, with 88% of individual trajectories oriented towards the light and spending, on average, 23% more time in the 2.25 ha tracking array (19.5 ± 5 min) than under ambient light conditions (15.8 ± 5 min). Current speed had little to no effect on the bearing (angular direction) of the hatchling tracks when artificial light was present, but under ambient conditions it influenced the bearing of the tracks when current direction was offshore and above speeds of approximately 32.5 cm s−1. This is the first experimental evidence that wild turtle hatchlings are attracted to artificial light after entering the ocean, a behaviour that is likely to subject them to greater risk of predation. The experimental protocol described in this study can be used to assess the effect of anthropogenic (light pollution, noise, etc.) and natural (wave action, current, wind, moonlight) influences on the in-water movements of sea turtle hatchlings during the early phase of dispersal. PMID:27293795

  3. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  4. Equilibrium Molecular Interactions in Pure Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris I. Sedunov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium molecular interactions in pure real gases are investigated based on the chemical thermodynamics principles. The parallels between clusters in real gases and chemical compounds in equilibrium media have been used to improve understanding of the real gas structure. A new approach to the equilibrium constants for the cluster fractions and new methods to compute them and their significant parameters from the experimental thermophysical data are developed. These methods have been applied to some real gases, such as Argon and Water vapors and gaseous Alkanes. It is shown that the four-particle clusters make a noticeable contribution in the thermophysical properties of the equilibrium Water vapor. It is shown also that the effective bond energy for dimers in Alkanes linearly grows with the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

  5. GREENHOUSE GASES AND MEANS OF PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Stojanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse effect can be defined as the consequence of increased heating of the Earth's surface, as well as the lower atmosphere by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other trace amounts gases. It is well-known that human industrial activities have released large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, about 900 billion tons of carbon dioxide, and it is estimated that up to 450 billion are still in the atmosphere. In comparison to greenhouse gases water vapor is one of the greatest contributors to the greenhouse effect on Earth. Many projects, as does the PURGE project, have tendences to build on the already conducted research and to quantify the positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing of the population with greenhouse gas reduction strategies that are curently being implemented and should be increasingly applied in various sectors and urban areas, having offices in Europe, China and India.

  6. W ion implantation boosting visible-light photoelectrochemical water splitting over ZnO nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Zhou, Wu; Ren, Feng; Chen, Jie; Cai, Guangxu; Liu, Yichao; Guan, Xiangjiu; Shen, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    W ions were doped into ZnO nanorod arrays hydrothermally grown on the F-doped tin-oxide-coated glass substrates via an advanced ion implantation technique for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting under visible light. It was found that W incorporation could narrow the bandgap of ZnO and shift the optical absorption into visible light regions obviously, with the one-dimensional nanorod structure maintained for superior charge transfer. As a result, the W-doped ZnO nanorod arrays exhibit considerable PEC performance relative to ZnO nanorod arrays under visible light illumination (λ>420 nm), with photocurrent density achieved up to 15.2 μA/cm2 at 1.0 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The obtained PEC properties indicate that ion implantation can be an alternative approach to develop unique materials for efficient solar energy conversion.

  7. 111 oriented gold nanoplatelets on multilayer graphene as visible light photocatalyst for overall water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Diego; Esteve-Adell, Iván; Albero, Josep; Royo, Juan F. Sánchez; Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-01

    Development of renewable fuels from solar light appears as one of the main current challenges in energy science. A plethora of photocatalysts have been investigated to obtain hydrogen and oxygen from water and solar light in the last decades. However, the photon-to-hydrogen molecule conversion is still far from allowing real implementation of solar fuels. Here we show that 111 facet-oriented gold nanoplatelets on multilayer graphene films deposited on quartz is a highly active photocatalyst for simulated sunlight overall water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen in the absence of sacrificial electron donors, achieving hydrogen production rate of 1.2 molH2 per gcomposite per h. This photocatalytic activity arises from the gold preferential orientation and the strong gold-graphene interaction occurring in the composite system.

  8. Investigation of the effect of scattering agent and scattering albedo on modulated light propagation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Linda; Alley, Derek; Cochenour, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    A recent paper described experiments completed to study the effect of scattering on the propagation of modulated light in laboratory tank water [Appl. Opt.48, 2607 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.002607]. Those measurements were limited to a specific scattering agent (Maalox antacid) with a fixed scattering albedo (0.95). The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of different scattering agents and scattering albedos on modulated light propagation in water. The results show that the scattering albedo affects the number of attenuation lengths that the modulated optical signal propagates without distortion, while the type of scattering agent affects the degree to which the modulation is distorted with increasing attenuation length. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Glebov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network.

  10. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  11. A calibrated UV-LED based light source for water purification and characterisation of photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergejevs, A; Clarke, C T; Allsopp, D W E; Marugan, J; Jaroenworaluck, A; Singhapong, W; Manpetch, P; Timmers, R; Casado, C; Bowen, C R

    2017-11-08

    Photocatalysis has a potential to become a cost effective industrial process for water cleaning. One of the most studied photocatalysts is titanium dioxide which, as a wide band gap semiconductor, requires ultraviolet (UV) light for its photoactivation. This is at the wavelengths where the efficiency of present-day light emitting diodes (LEDs) decreases rapidly, which presents a challenge in the use of UV-LEDs for commercially viable photocatalysis. There is also a need for accurate photocatalysis measurement of remediation rates of water-borne contaminants for determining optimum exposure doses in industrial applications. In response to these challenges, this paper describes a UV-LED based photocatalytic test reactor that provides a calibrated adjustable light source and pre-defined test conditions to remove as many sources of uncertainty in photocatalytic analysis as possible and thereby improve data reliability. The test reactor provides a selectable intensity of up to 1.9 kW m -2 at the photocatalyst surface. The comparability of the results is achieved through the use of pre-calibration and control electronics that minimize the largest sources of uncertainty; most notably variations in the intensity and directionality of the UV light emission of LEDs and in LED device heating.

  12. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat; Luca Ammirabile

    2015-01-01

    Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron s...

  13. Establishment of a Hub for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy J. Lybeck; Magdy S. Tawfik; Binh T. Pham

    2011-08-01

    Implementation of online monitoring and prognostics in existing U.S. nuclear power plants will involve coordinating the efforts of national laboratories, utilities, universities, and private companies. Internet-based collaborative work environments provide necessary communication tools to facilitate interaction between geographically diverse participants. Available technologies were considered, and a collaborative workspace was established at INL as a hub for the light water reactor sustainability online monitoring community.

  14. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  15. Self-biasing photoelectrochemical cell for spontaneous overall water splitting under visible-light illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanpeng; Li, Jinhua; Li, Xuejin; Huang, Ke; Zhou, Baoxue; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2013-07-01

    A self-biasing photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell that could work for spontaneous overall water splitting in a neutral solution was established based on the mismatched Fermi levels between the photoelectrodes. A Pt-catalyst-decorated crystalline silicon photovoltaic cell (Pt/PVC) was prepared and employed as an effective photocathode. This was coupled with a poly(ethylene glycol)-directed WO3/W photoanode prepared by a hydrothermal process. Both of the photoelectrodes showed a response to visible light. The WO3/W photoanode had a positively located valence band edge, the energy level of which was enough for water oxidation, and the Pt/PVC photocathode possessed a negatively located conduction band edge, which was capable of water reduction. More importantly, the Fermi level of the WO3/W photoanode was more positive than that of the Pt/PVC photocathode because of the p-n junction of the PVC that decoupled the band bending and enlarged the photovoltage. Under visible-light irradiation, the WO3/W photoanode provided a negative bias for the Pt/PVC photocathode, and the Pt/PVC photocathode provided a positive bias for the WO3/W photoanode. An interior bias was generated that could relax the strict criteria of overall water splitting by cooperatively separating the hole-electron pairs at both photoelectrodes. In this system, the short-circuit current and the open-circuit voltage increased with increasing light intensity (AM 1.5 illumination) to reach 121 μA cm(-2) and 0.541 V, respectively, at a light intensity of 100 mW cm(-2). Such a combination provides a promising method for the fabrication of self-driven devices for solar-energy storage. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  17. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  19. Light emission of sputtered particles induced by ion bombardment on water-enriched molecular ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Shuang; Ip, Wing; Liu, S. H.; Hsu, G. Y.; Lee, Shyong

    2007-03-01

    We had measured the light of sputtered particles in a visible region induced by various projectiles bombarding water-enriched molecular ices, like mixed ices of CH4 + NH3 + H2O (1:1:1). In this experiment, each constituent contained in this iced sample was found to emit a characteristic wavelength of light. We believe this characteristic is due to certain ion attached to parent molecule (constituent) that are dissociated with parent molecule in the collision process. Some of those ions, before emerging out the iced film, will become neutralized and develop into excited states due to electron capture. Then the characteristic wavelengths of light will decay from these excited sputtered particles; hence, from the light emission, one can analyze the constituents of an unknown ice. On the other hand, the intensity of the distribution of light emission during ion bombardment can be interpreted as an ion-ice interaction following the similar collision mechanism as ion-metal interaction, i.e. mainly the linear-cascade collision model.

  20. Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chinaru Nwosu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae. Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6% than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41% in 2008 [4.92=0.0001]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [>0.05; (>0.18=0.4286 and >0.28=0.3897]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.

  1. Competition for light and water in a coupled soil-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Huang, Cheng-Wei; Bonetti, Sara; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    It is generally accepted that resource availability shapes the structure and function of many ecosystems. Within the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system, resource availability fluctuates in space and time whereas access to resources by individuals is further impacted by plant-to-plant competition. Likewise, transport and transformation of resources within an individual plant is governed by numerous interacting biotic and abiotic processes. The work here explores the co-limitations on water losses and carbon uptake within the SPA arising from fluctuating resource availability and competition. In particular, the goal is to unfold the interplay between plant access and competition for water and light, as well as the impact of transport/redistribution processes on leaf-level carbon assimilation and water fluxes within forest stands. A framework is proposed that couples a three-dimensional representation of soil-root exchanges with a one-dimensional description of stem water flow and storage, canopy photosynthesis, and transpiration. The model links soil moisture redistribution, root water uptake, xylem water flow and storage, leaf potential and stomatal conductance as driven by supply and demand for water and carbon. The model is then used to investigate plant drought resilience of overstory-understory trees simultaneously competing for water and light. Simulation results reveal that understory-overstory interactions increase ecosystem resilience to drought (i.e. stand-level carbon assimilation rates and water fluxes can be sustained at lower root-zone soil water potentials). This resilience enhancement originates from reduced transpiration (due to shading) and hydraulic redistribution in soil supporting photosynthesis over prolonged periods of drought. In particular, the presence of different rooting systems generates localized hydraulic redistribution fluxes that sustain understory transpiration through overstory-understory interactions. Such complex SPA dynamics

  2. Remote Assessment of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    PETROLEUM REFINERIES SUPERPHOSPHATE MANUFACTURE CHEMICAL FACTORIES UFg MANUFACTURE SI LICONE AND PLASTICS STEEL MILLS AND METAL FABRICATION...manufacture, enrichment , and reprocessing; gases evolved are, for example, SF-, UFg, HF, organic solvents such as ether, NO , Kr, Xe, I-, Br». c

  3. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  4. Underwater light field determined by water constituents in highly turbid water: the case of Taihu lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chun Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between optical properties and water constituents in highly turbid productivewater were studied on the basis of the multiple bio-optical measurements and samplings of water constituents made during five cruises from 2006 to 2008 in Taihu lake. Taihu lake is a high dynamic ratio [(square root of area/depth] inland shallow lake. The spatial and temporal variation of water constituents and optical properties is significant. The inorganic suspended matter (ISMhas become the primary constituent in Taihu lake: its average percentage can reach 65.21%. The concentration of ISM is highly correlated to the optical properties in Taihu lake due to the sediment resuspension. Consequently, the ISM can be taken into account as an important optically-active constituent in Taihu lake. Resuspended sediments also lead to a poor correlation between scattering optical property and chlorophyll-a concentration (CChl-a. However, empirical relationship between the CChl-a and phytoplankton absorption coefficient at 675 nm is still valid when the package effect is removed. The parameters of linear equation in the present study have slight temporal variation, especially for the relationship between inherent optical properties (IOPs and concentration of total suspended matter (TSM. The relationship between apparent optical property (AOP (diffuse attenuation coefficient of particle, Kdbio and ISM has been examined as well. The Kdbio is strongly affected by ISM, and correlates to it with linear function. Thedifference between specific diffuse attenuation coefficients of organic [K*dOSM(λ] and inorganic [K*dISM(λ] particles is significant. K*dOSM(λ includes the absorption property of chlorophyll-a (chl-a at 675 nm, which is much higher than that of K*dISM(λ. This indicates that the attenuation ability of OSM is stronger than that of ISM although the Kdbio induced by large concentration of ISM is bigger than the Kdbio induced by small concentration of OSM

  5. Mixing of cooling water in the mixing chambers of the HPLWR-High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wank, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.wank@siemens.co [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurien, Eckart [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), a supercritical water cooled reactor concept with multiple heat-up steps, requires efficient mixing of the coolant between these steps to minimize hot spots in the core. Analyzing and improving the mixing in the mixing chamber above the core, situated between evaporator and superheater assemblies, and below the core, between the first and second superheater, is one of the challenges in the design process of the HPLWR. Different measures to enhance mixing have been studied with CFD analyses, in which a new design approach has been applied to the upper mixing chamber. It simplifies the complex structures and takes the effects of the disregarded structures into account by introducing source terms into the momentum equations.

  6. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  7. Efficient Light-Driven Water Oxidation Catalysis by Dinuclear Ruthenium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Serena; Francàs, Laia; Neudeck, Sven; Maji, Somnath; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Meyer, Franc; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    Mastering the light-induced four-electron oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key step towards the achievement of overall water splitting to produce alternative solar fuels. In this work, we report two rugged molecular pyrazolate-based diruthenium complexes that efficiently catalyze visible-light-driven water oxidation. These complexes were fully characterized both in the solid state (by X-ray diffraction analysis) and in solution (spectroscopically and electrochemically). Benchmark performances for homogeneous oxygen production have been obtained for both catalysts in the presence of a photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron acceptor at pH 7, and a turnover frequency of up to 11.1 s(-1) and a turnover number of 5300 were obtained after three successive catalytic runs. Under the same experimental conditions with the same setup, the pyrazolate-based diruthenium complexes outperform other well-known water oxidation catalysts owing to both electrochemical and mechanistic aspects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  9. Effects of the light--dark cycle on a water tank social interaction test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejdi, A; Guastavino, J M; Lalonde, R

    1996-01-01

    Mice were exposed to a water tank interaction test in which food could be obtained either by wading in the water or by attacking littermates. A tank with progressively rising water levels caused mice in groups of four to differentiate into those willing to wade (carrier mice) from those unwilling to wade (noncarrier mice). Noncarrier mice could only obtain food by stealing it from carrier mice or from other noncarrier mice. It was found that mice during the dark period of the light--dark cycle were more willing to wade in the search for food rather than attempt to steal food from other mice. Because mice are generally more active during the dark period, this result suggests that higher activity levels increase the willingness to share the work load, a form of altruism, rather than promote parasitic behavior and aggression.

  10. Proposed Photosynthesis Method for Producing Hydrogen from Dissociated Water Molecules Using Incident Near-Infrared Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient solar energy utilization is very desirable in photocatalytic water splitting. However, until now, the infrared part of the solar spectrum, which constitutes almost half of the solar energy, has not been used, resulting in significant loss in the efficiency of solar energy utilization. Here, we propose a new mechanism for water splitting in which near-infrared light can be used to produce hydrogen. This ability is a result of the unique electronic structure of the photocatalyst, in which the valence band and conduction band are distributed on two opposite surfaces with a large electrostatic potential difference produced by the intrinsic dipole of the photocatalyst. This surface potential difference, acting as an auxiliary booster for photoexcited electrons, can effectively reduce the photocatalyst's band gap required for water splitting in the infrared region. Our electronic structure and optical property calculations on a surface-functionalized hexagonal boron-nitride bilayer confirm the existence of such photocatalysts and verify the reaction mechanism.

  11. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multiyear ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie River-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multiyear ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to subsurface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to subsurface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ∼6 and ∼8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particle concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of meltwater on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering non-uniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV (ultraviolet domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM (particulate organic matter photobleaching.

  12. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  13. Visible light driven overall water splitting using cocatalyst/BiVO4 photoanode with minimized bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunmei; Shi, Jingying; Wang, Donge; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Nan; Liu, Guiji; Xiong, Fengqiang; Li, Can

    2013-04-07

    BiVO4 and many other semiconductor materials are ideal visible light responsive semiconductors, but are insufficient for overall water splitting. Upon loading water oxidation cocatalyst, for example Co-borate (denoted as CoBi) used here, onto BiVO4 photoanode, it is found that not only the onset potential is negatively shifted but also the photocurrent and the stability are significantly improved. And more importantly, PEC overall water splitting to H2 and O2 is realized using CoBi/BiVO4 as photoanode with a rather low applied bias (less than 0.3 V vs. counter electrode) in a two-electrode scheme, while at least 0.6 V is needed for bare BiVO4. This work demonstrates the practical possibility of achieving overall water splitting using the PEC strategy under a bias as low as the theoretical minimum, which is the difference between the flat band and proton reduction potential for a photoanode thermodynamically insufficient for water reduction. As long as the water oxidation overpotential is overcome with an efficient cocatalyst, the applied bias of the whole system is only used for that thermodynamically required for the proton reduction.

  14. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  16. Light Refraction by Water as a Rationale for the Poggendorff Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-08-24

    The Poggendorff illusion in its classical form of parallel lines interrupting a transversal is viewed from the perspective of being related to the everyday experience of observing the light refraction in water. It is argued that if one considers a transversal to be a light ray in air and the parallel lines to form an occluding strip of a medium with the refractive index being between that of air and water, then one should be able to account, both qualitatively and quantitatively, for most of the features associated with the Poggendorff illusion. Statistical treatment of the visual experiments conducted with seven participants, each analyzing 50 configurations having different intercepting angles and strip widths, resulted in the effective refractive index of the occluding strip N = 1.13 ± 0.15, which is sufficiently close to the average (between that of water and air) refractive index of ∼1.17. It is further argued that the same mechanism can also be employed to account for many variants of the Poggendorff illusion, including the corner-Poggendorff pattern, as well as for the Hering illusion. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Neutron Deep Penetration Calculations in Light Water with Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® Variance Reduction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear decommissioning takes place in several stages due to the radioactivity in the reactor structure materials. A good estimation of the neutron activation products distributed in the reactor structure materials impacts obviously on the decommissioning planning and the low-level radioactive waste management. Continuous energy Monte-Carlo radiation transport code TRIPOLI-4 has been applied on radiation protection and shielding analyses. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 application in nuclear decommissioning activities, both experimental and computational benchmarks are being performed. To calculate the neutron activation of the shielding and structure materials of nuclear facilities, the knowledge of 3D neutron flux map and energy spectra must be first investigated. To perform this type of neutron deep penetration calculations with the Monte Carlo transport code, variance reduction techniques are necessary in order to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron activation estimation. In this study, variance reduction options of the TRIPOLI-4 code were used on the NAIADE 1 light water shielding benchmark. This benchmark document is available from the OECD/NEA SINBAD shielding benchmark database. From this benchmark database, a simplified NAIADE 1 water shielding model was first proposed in this work in order to make the code validation easier. Determination of the fission neutron transport was performed in light water for penetration up to 50 cm for fast neutrons and up to about 180 cm for thermal neutrons. Measurement and calculation results were benchmarked. Variance reduction options and their performance were discussed and compared.

  18. Neutron Deep Penetration Calculations in Light Water with Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® Variance Reduction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Kang

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear decommissioning takes place in several stages due to the radioactivity in the reactor structure materials. A good estimation of the neutron activation products distributed in the reactor structure materials impacts obviously on the decommissioning planning and the low-level radioactive waste management. Continuous energy Monte-Carlo radiation transport code TRIPOLI-4 has been applied on radiation protection and shielding analyses. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 application in nuclear decommissioning activities, both experimental and computational benchmarks are being performed. To calculate the neutron activation of the shielding and structure materials of nuclear facilities, the knowledge of 3D neutron flux map and energy spectra must be first investigated. To perform this type of neutron deep penetration calculations with the Monte Carlo transport code, variance reduction techniques are necessary in order to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron activation estimation. In this study, variance reduction options of the TRIPOLI-4 code were used on the NAIADE 1 light water shielding benchmark. This benchmark document is available from the OECD/NEA SINBAD shielding benchmark database. From this benchmark database, a simplified NAIADE 1 water shielding model was first proposed in this work in order to make the code validation easier. Determination of the fission neutron transport was performed in light water for penetration up to 50 cm for fast neutrons and up to about 180 cm for thermal neutrons. Measurement and calculation results were benchmarked. Variance reduction options and their performance were discussed and compared.

  19. Visible light photocatalytic water disinfection and its kinetics using Ag-doped titania nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Hassan; Qazi, Ishtiaq A; Hashmi, Imran; Awan, M Ali; Mahmood, Asif; Qayyum, Hafiz Adil

    2014-01-01

    The UN estimated about five million deaths every year due to water-borne diseases, accounting from four billion patients. Keeping in view, the ever increasing health issues and to undermine this statistics, a reliable and sustainable water-treatment method has been developed using visible light for water treatment. titania nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized successfully by a more applicable method Viz: liquid impregnation (LI) method. The bacterial death rate by photocatalysis under visible light was studied by employing a typical fluorescent source and was found to follow pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. The nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to deduce their size range, surface morphology, and elemental compositions, respectively. Among all the prepared grades, 1% Ag-TiO2 was found to be a very effective photocatalytic agent against Escherichia coli. The resulted photoinactivated data were also evaluated by different empirical kinetic models for bacterial inactivation. Hom, Hom-power, Rational, and Selleck models were not able to explain the disinfection kinetics but modified-Hom model fitted best with the experimentally obtained data by producing a shoulder, log-linear, and a tail region.

  20. Sudden releases of gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloupecká Hana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  1. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaifa, F E

    2012-12-18

    A 96-hour bioassay was conducted using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil sample on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 mls of water soluble fractions (WSF) of the oil were added to 1000 litres of de-chlorinated tap water to form 0, 25, 50 , 75 and 100 parts per million representing treatments 1 to 5 respectively. Each treatment had two replicates with fifteen fish per replicate. At the end of the 96-hour period of exposure, the fish were transferred into separate bowls containing fresh water without oil for recovery for ten more days. Heavy metal and total hydrocarbon contents of the water and fish were analyzed at 96 hour and 14 days which marked the end of the recovery period. No mortalities were recorded on all treatments during the 96-hour period. Mortalities were observed between 120 and 144 hours after the onset of the experiment with the maximum number of dead fish (pfish. No mortalities were recorded after 144 hours till the termination of the experiment at 14 days . The 96-hour LC50 could not be calculated since no deaths occurred during the period. The Total hydrocarbon contents of the water were 0, 0.026 ,0.316 ,0.297, 0.253 mg/l for treatments 1(0 ppmWSF)) to 5(100ppm WSF) respectively. Lead , iron and cadmium were not detected in water during the study, lead was also not detected in fish muscles from all treatments. The iron contents of all the treatments were lower than the control except for treatment 3(50 ppm WSF). THC concentrations in fish were higher at 96 hours and 14 days than in the water indicating bioconcentration in fish and a retention in the fish long after exposure.

  2. Using Thermal Infrared Absorption and Emission to Determine Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; Drummond, James R.; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Orphal, Johannes

    The light emerging from the top of the atmosphere in the greater part of the infrared region is thermal radiation from the Earth's surface. The resultant spectra obtained depend on the temperature difference between the emitting feature and absorbing gas. In this region the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, CO2, methane, CH4, ozone, O3, and water, H2O, are observed as well as carbon monoxide, CO, a product indicative of fossil fuel combustion, methanol, CH3OH, from biomass burning, and ammonia, NH3, from agriclulture. Chapter 3 describes the techniques for retrieving atmospheric abundances of these and other species from a number of satellite instruments, and concludes with suggestions for future developments.

  3. UV light inactivation of human and plant pathogens in unfiltered surface irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 10(8) or 10(9) CFU/liter for bacteria or 10(4) or 10(5) zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively.

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, April 1994--September 1994, Volume 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from April to September 1994. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in piping and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) and Alloy 600, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B and A533-Gr B steels in oxygenated water to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of SSs and Alloy 600 to investigate EAC in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor environments at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions from crack growth correlations developed at ANL for SSs in water and from rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  5. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  6. Antimicrobial materials for water disinfection based on visible-light photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pinggui

    Since the discovery of photocatalytic water-splitting on TiO2 in 1972, enormous effort has been devoted to the study of TiO2. Since the optical properties of TiO2 and e--h + recombination are essential to the photon-driven applications, these two areas have drawn tremendous research attention in the past few years. But there is no single optimal system to date that has visible-light activity, high photo-efficiency and easy recovery. In this study, chemical co-doping approach was adopted to achieve desirable properties of TiO2-based photocatalyst. Nitrogen and metal ions selected from the transition metal or the rare earth element group were incorporated into TiO2 to induce a red-shift to the visible-light absorption regime and to enhance photocatalytic activity. The anion and cation co-doped TiO2 was made into various forms, including thin film, fiber, and foam that circumvent the problems associated with catalyst recovery. Chemical composition, structure, microstructure, optical, and photocatalytic properties were investigated to characterize each type of the materials. Electronic structure calculation and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy were conducted to understand the role of nitrogen and metal ions. The photocatalytic property of these visible-light-active photocatalysts were studied in the inactivation of bacteria and bacterial spores in water. Fast killing rate was obtained for the inactivation of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and B. subtilis endospores. The results of mechanistic study provided evidence of oxidative damages, and indicated that hydroxyl radicals are one of the key killing species. Atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy showed that the cell walls were attacked by photocatalytic inactivation. The potential application of the photocatalyst in water disinfection was demonstrated by flow-through tests.

  7. Development of Advanced High Uranium Density Fuels for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, James [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Butt, Darryl [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Meyer, Mitchell [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    This work conducts basic materials research (fabrication, radiation resistance, thermal conductivity, and corrosion response) on U3Si2 and UN, two high uranium density fuel forms that have a high potential for success as advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels. The outcome of this proposed work will serve as the basis for the development of advance LWR fuels, and utilization of such fuel forms can lead to the optimization of the fuel performance related plant operating limits such as power density, power ramp rate and cycle length.

  8. Study of High Fluence Radiation-induced Swelling and Hardening under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents a comprehensive model that has been developed to enable simulations of microstructural evolution under the irradiation conditions typical of light water reactor (LWR) internal components. The model, which accounts cascade production of point defects and vacancy, interstitial faulted dislocation loops, interstitial clusters migrating one-dimensionally and the evolution of the network dislocation structure, has been parameterized to account damage accumulation in austenitic stainless steels. Nucleation and growth of an ensemble of cavities is based on accounting the residual and produced by irradiation He atoms and existence of the dislocation and production biases. Additional applications and potential future developments for the model are also discussed.

  9. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  10. Carrier dynamics of a visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 photoanode for water oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of a tantalum nitride (Ta3N5) photoanode were investigated in detail to understand the fundamental aspects associated with the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. The Ta3N5 thin films were synthesized using DC magnetron sputtering followed by annealing in air and nitridation under ammonia (NH3). A polycrystalline structure with a dense morphology of the monoclinic Ta3N5 films was obtained. A relatively low absorption coefficient (104 to 105 cm-1) in the visible light range was measured for Ta3N5, consistent with the nature of the indirect band-gap. Ultra-fast spectroscopic measurements revealed that the Ta3N5 with different thicknesses films possess low transport properties and fast carrier recombination (<10 ps). These critical kinetic properties of Ta3N5 as a photoanode may necessitate high overpotentials to achieve appreciable photocurrents for water oxidation (onset ∼0.6 V vs. RHE). This journal is

  11. Visible light photoactivity of Polypropylene coated Nano-TiO2 for dyes degradation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, R.; Amato, C. A. D’; Zannotti, M.; Rommozzi, E.; Gunnella, R.; Minicucci, M.; Di Cicco, A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of Polypropylene as support material for nano-TiO2 photocatalyst in the photodegradation of Alizarin Red S in water solutions under the action of visible light was investigated. The optimization of TiO2 pastes preparation using two commercial TiO2, Aeroxide P-25 and Anatase, was performed and a green low-cost dip-coating procedure was developed. Scanning electron microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction analysis were used in order to obtain morphological and structural information of as-prepared TiO2 on support material. Equilibrium and kinetics aspects in the adsorption and successive photodegradation of Alizarin Red S, as reference dye, are described using polypropylene-TiO2 films in the Visible/TiO2/water reactor showing efficient dyes degradation. PMID:26627118

  12. Clustering in Water Based Magnetic Nanofluids: Investigations by Light Scattering Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socoliuc, Vlad; Taculescu, Alina; Podaru, Camelia; Dobra, Andreea; Daia, Camelia; Marinica, Oana; Turcu, Rodica; Vekas, Ladislau

    2010-12-01

    Nanosized magnetite particles, with mean physical diameter of about 7 nm, obtained by chemical coprecipitation procedure were dispersed in water carrier by applying sterical stabilization of particles in order to prevent their aggregation and to ensure colloidal stability of the systems. Different chain length (C12, C14, C18) carboxylic acids (lauric (LA), myristic (MA) and oleic (OA)) were used for double layer coating of magnetite nanoparticles. Structural and magnetic properties were investigated by electron microscopy (TEM), dynamical and static light scattering (DLS, SLS) and magnetometry (VSM) to evaluate the role of chain length and of the saturated/unsaturated nature of surfactant layers. Also investigated were two water based magnetic nanocomposites obtained by encapsulating the magnetic nanoparticles in polymers with different functional properties.

  13. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  14. 40 CFR 86.214-94 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.214-94 Section 86.214-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium-Duty...

  15. Parameterization of light scattering for solving the inverse problem of determining the concentrations of the principal light scattering and absorbing admixtures in shelf waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Pelevin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for estimating the water backscattering coefficient was put forward on the basis of experimental data of diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance and irradiance reflectance. Calculations were carried out for open sea waters of different types and the spectral dependencies were found ("anomalous" spectra and explained. On this basis, a new model of light backscattering on particles in the sea is proposed. This model may be useful for modelling remote sensing reflectance spectra in order to solve the inverse problems of estimating the concentration of natural admixtures in shelf waters.

  16. Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Water Pollutants Promoted by Sulfite Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhao, Huilei; Pan, Fuping; Feng, Xuhui; Jung, Bahngmi; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Batchelor, Bill; Li, Ying

    2017-11-21

    Solar-driven heterogeneous photocatalysis has been widely studied as a promising technique for degradation of organic pollutants in wastewater. Herein, we have developed a sulfite-enhanced visible-light-driven photodegradation process using BiOBr/methyl orange (MO) as the model photocatalyst/pollutant system. We found that the degradation rate of MO was greatly enhanced by sulfite, and the enhancement increased with the concentration of sulfite. The degradation rate constant was improved by 29 times in the presence of 20 mM sulfite. Studies using hole scavengers suggest that sulfite radicals generated by the reactions of sulfite (sulfite anions or bisulfite anions) with holes or hydroxyl radicals are the active species for MO photodegradation using BiOBr under visible light. In addition to the BiOBr/MO system, the sulfite-assisted photocatalysis approach has been successfully demonstrated in BiOBr/rhodamine B (RhB), BiOBr/phenol, BiOI/MO, and Bi 2 O 3 /MO systems under visible light irradiation, as well as in TiO 2 /MO system under simulated sunlight irradiation. The developed method implies the potential of introducing external active species to improve photodegradation of organic pollutants and the beneficial use of air pollutants for the removal of water pollutants since sulfite is a waste from flue gas desulfurization process.

  17. Technologies For Maintaining Animals In Space: Lighting, Air Quality, Noise, Food And Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, C. M.; Skidmore, M. G.; Holley, D. C.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In the terrestrial environment multiple time cues exist. Zeitgebers have been identified and studied for their ability to convey temporal information to various physiological systems. In the microgravity experiment it is necessary to define time cues within the flight hardware prior to flight. During flight if changes in the Circadian System (e.g., mean, phase angle, period) occur this would indicate that the gravity vector is important relative to biological timing. This presentation is concerned with the environmental parameter: to support rodent experiments in microgravity. The Animal Enclosure Module (AEM) provides solid food bars and water via lixits and ad libitum. Flight animals (Sprague-Dawley rats, 60 - 300g) when compared to ground controls show similar growth (mean growth per day g, plus or minus SD; flight 5.4 plus or minus 2.0, ground 5.9 plus or minus 2.1). Current AEMs use incandescent lighting (approx. 5 Lux). Light emitting diode (LED) arrays are being developed that provide a similar light environment as cool-white fluorescent sources (40 Lux). In ground based tests (12L:12D), these arrays show normal circadian entrainment (Tau = 24.0) with respect to the behavioral responses, measured (drinking, eating, gross locomotor activity). A newly developed ultra high efficiency filter system can entrap all feces, urine and odors from 6 rats for 24 days. Maximum sound level exposure limits (per octave band 22 Hz - 179 kHz) have been established. The AEM will effectively support animal experiments in microgravity.

  18. Effect of light conditions and chemical characteristics of water on dissipation of glyphosate in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Veena; Kaur, Pervinder; Kaur, Paawan

    2017-11-06

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of light conditions and chemical properties of water on dissipation of glyphosate. The residues of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were quantified using fluorescence spectrophotometer after derivatization with 9-fluoroenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) and orthopthaldehyde (OPA). Average percent recoveries of glyphosate and AMPA from distilled, tap, and ground water ranged from 87.5 to 94.9, 87.3 to 93.7, and 80.6 to 92.0, respectively, with relative standard deviation less than 10%. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of glyphosate and AMPA from different water matrices ranged from 0.001 to 0.03 μg mL -1 and 0.003 to 0.01 μg mL -1 , respectively. The dissipation of glyphosate followed the first-order kinetics, and half-life varied from 1.56 to 14.47 and 13.14 to 42.38 days under UV and sunlight, respectively. The pH and electrical conductivity (EC) of water has differential influence on dissipation of glyphosate, and it increased with increase in pH and EC.

  19. [Phytoplankton Light Absorption Properties During the Blooms in Adjacent Waters of the Changjiang Estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang-yang; Shen, Fang; Li, Xiu-zhen

    2015-06-01

    Phytoplankton dominant species and their light absorption properties during the blooms occurred in August 2013 in adjacent waters of the Changjiang Estuary were analyzed. The results showed that phytoplankton blooms broke out in 10 out of 34 investigation stations, among which diatom blooms occurred in 6 stations while 3 stations were predominated by dinoflagellate. Phytoplankton absorption coefficients of both bloom and non-bloom waters exhibited large variations, with respective ranges of 0.199-0.832 m(-1) and 0.012-0.109 m(-1), while phytoplankton specific absorption coefficients spanned much narrower range, with the average values of bloom and non-bloom waters being 0.023 and 0.035 m2 x mg(-1), respectively. When transitioned from bloom to non-bloom waters, the proportion of phytoplankton with larger cell size lowered while that of smaller phytoplankton elevated, causing a less extent of package effect and thus higher specific absorption coefficients. Distinctive absorption spectra were observed between different types of bloom (such as diatom and dinoflagellate blooms) with similar phytoplankton cell size, mostly attributed to distinctive accessory pigment composition. The ratios of diadinoxanthin and chlorophyll-c2 concentrations to chlorophyll-a concentration in dinoflagellate blooms were higher than those in diatom blooms, which largely contributed to the shoulder peaks at 465 nm in dinoflagellate blooms.

  20. Inactivation of indigenous coliform bacteria in unfiltered surface water by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Raymond E; Hofmann, Ron

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the potential for naturally occurring particles to protect indigenous coliform from ultraviolet (UV) disinfection in four surface waters. Tailing in the UV dose-response curve of the bacteria was observed in 3 of the 4 water samples after 1.3-2.6-log of log-linear inactivation, implying particle-related protection. The impact of particles was confirmed by comparing coliform UV inactivation data for parallel filtered (11 microm pore-size nylon filters) and unfiltered surface water. In samples from the Grand River (UVT: 65%/cm; 5.4 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU)) and the Rideau Canal (UVT: 60%/cm; 0.84 NTU), a limit of approximately 2.5 log inactivation was achieved in the unfiltered samples for a UV dose of 20 mJ/cm2 while both the filtered samples exhibited >3.4-log inactivation of indigenous coliform bacteria. The results suggest that particles as small as 11 microm, naturally found in surface water with low turbidity (<3NTU), are able to harbor indigenous coliform bacteria and offer protection from low-pressure UV light.

  1. Sensitivity of the threshold voltage of organic thin-film transistors to light and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Cong; Marinov, Ognian; Deen, M. Jamal; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi [McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wu, Yiliang [Xerox Research Centre, 2660 Speakman Dr., Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1 (Canada)

    2015-05-14

    Analyses of extensive experiments with organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) indicate that the threshold voltage V{sub T} of an OTFT has a temporal differential sensitivity. In particular, V{sub T} changes initially by changing the light illumination intensity or making/removing a contact of water with the organic semiconductor. Keeping the conditions stationary, then the initial shift of V{sub T} diminishes, since the time dependence of V{sub T} gradually recovers the OTFT to the state before applying the change in the environmental conditions. While still causing a differential and time-variant shift of V{sub T}, the deionized water does not have a dramatic impact on OTFTs that use the polymer DKPP-βT (diketopyrrolopyrrole β-unsubstituted quaterthiophene) as the active semiconductor material. Observations for the impact of water are made from experiments with an OTFT that has a microfluidic channel on the top the electrical channel, with the water in the microfluidic channel in direct contact with the electrical channel of the OTFT. This arrangement of electrical and microfluidic channels is a novel structure of the microfluidic OTFT, suitable for sensing applications of liquid analytes by means of organic electronics.

  2. Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

    1997-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

  3. Application of Photocatalysts and LED Light Sources in Drinking Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Achari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates a cross-section of TiO2 compositions for which existing evidence suggests the prospect of improved performance compared to standard Degussa P25. In the context of a program aimed toward a 365 nm LED based photo-reactor, the question is whether a distinctly superior photocatalyst composition for drinking water treatment is now available that would shape design choices. An answer was sought by synthesizing several photocatalysts with reported high reactivity in some context in the literature, and by performing photocatalysts reactivity tests using common pollutants of water system including Natural Organic Matter (NOM and Emerging Contaminants (ECs from the pesticide and pharmaceutical classes. 365 nm Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs were used as the irradiation source. Since LEDs are now available in the UV, we did not examine the TiO2 modifications that bring band gap excitation into the region beyond 400 nm. The results suggest that the choice of the photocatalyst should be best made to fit the reactor design and photocatalyst mounting constraints such as mass transport, reactive surface, and light field. No photocatalyst composition overall, superior for all classes emerged.

  4. Drinking water treatment with ultraviolet light for travelers -- Evaluation of a mobile lightweight system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Lisa F; Ritter, Klaus; Hillebrandt, David; Küpper, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The SteriPEN(®) is a handheld device for disinfecting water with ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The manufacturer claims a reduction of at least 99.9% of bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The present study intends to verify the general effectiveness of the device. Furthermore, the influence of bottle geometry and water movement is examined and the issue of user safety with regard to UV-C radiation is addressed. The device was applied on water containing a known number of microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and the spore of Geobacillusstearothermophilus) and the survival rate was examined. Three different types of bottles commonly used among travelers served as test containers. All tests were conducted with and without agitating the water during irradiation. Furthermore, a spectral analysis was performed on the light of the device. The SteriPEN(®) reached a mean reduction of more than 99.99% of bacteria and 99.57% of the spores when applied correctly. However, the results of the trials without agitating the water only yielded a 94.98% germ reduction. The device's maximal radiation intensity lies at 254 nm which is the wavelength most efficient in inactivating bacteria. The UV-C fraction is filtered out completely by common bottle materials. However, when applied in larger containers a portion of the UV-C rays exits the water surface. If applied according to the instructions the device manages a satisfactory inactivation of bacteria. However, it bears the danger of user errors relevant to health. Therefore, education on the risks of incorrect application should be included in the travel medical consultation. Also there are still aspects that need to be subject to further independent research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors. Volume 16: Semiannual report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, October 1993--March 1994. Volume 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Erck, R.A.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1993 to March 1994. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns in operating plants and as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A302-Gr B low-alloy steel to verify whether the current predictions of modest decreases of fatigue life in simulated pressurized water reactor water are valid for high-sulfur heats that show environmentally enhanced fatigue crack growth rates. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of austenitic SSs to investigate threshold stress intensity factors for EAC in high-purity oxygenated water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating boiling water reactors were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements, which are not specified in the ASTM specifications, may contribute to IASCC of solution-annealed materials.

  7. Self-action of continuous laser radiation and Pearcey diffraction in a water suspension with light-absorbing particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Water suspension of light-absorbing nano-sized particles is an example of a medium in which non-linear effects are present at moderate light intensities favorable for optical treatment of organic and biological objects. We study experimentally the phenomena emerging in a thin layer of such a medium...... under the action of inhomogeneous light field formed due to the Pearcey diffraction pattern near a microlens focus. In this high-gradient field, the light energy absorbed by the particles induces inhomogeneous distribution of the medium refraction index, which results in observable self...

  8. On Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chusseau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the laws of motion, aside from the law of energy conservation. Only a single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath submitted to a z and t-invariant force is considered. Most of the end results are known but the method appears to be novel. The mathematics being elementary, the present paper should facilitate the understanding of the ideal gas law and of classical thermodynamics even though not-usually-taught concepts are being introduced.

  9. Measurement of the water content in oil and oil products using IR light-emitting diode-photodiode optrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, M. V.; Kabanau, D. M.; Lebiadok, Y. V.; Shpak, P. V.; Ryabtsev, A. G.; Ryabtsev, G. I.; Shchemelev, M. A.; Andreev, I. A.; Kunitsyna, E. V.; Ivanov, E. V.; Yakovlev, Yu. P.

    2017-02-01

    The feasibility of using light-emitting devices, the radiation spectrum of which has maxima at wavelengths of 1.7, 1.9, and 2.2 μm for determining the water concentration in oil and oil products (gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel) has been demonstrated. It has been found that the measurement error can be lowered if (i) the temperature of the light-emitting diode is maintained accurate to 0.5-1.0°C, (ii) by using a cell through which a permanently stirred analyte is pumped, and (iii) by selecting the repetition rate of radiation pulses from the light-emitting diodes according to the averaging time. A meter of water content in oil and oil products has been developed that is built around IR light-emitting device-photodiode optrons. This device provides water content on-line monitoring accurate to 1.5%.

  10. New evaluation of thermal neutron scattering libraries for light and heavy water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquez Damian Jose Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the design and safety of thermal nuclear reactors and for verification of criticality safety conditions on systems with significant amount of fissile materials and water, it is necessary to perform high-precision neutron transport calculations and estimate uncertainties of the results. These calculations are based on neutron interaction data distributed in evaluated nuclear data libraries. To improve the evaluations of thermal scattering sub-libraries, we developed a set of thermal neutron scattering cross sections (scattering kernels for hydrogen bound in light water, and deuterium and oxygen bound in heavy water, in the ENDF-6 format from room temperature up to the critical temperatures of molecular liquids. The new evaluations were generated and processable with NJOY99 and also with NJOY-2012 with minor modifications (updates, and with the new version of NJOY-2016. The new TSL libraries are based on molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS and recent experimental data, and result in an improvement of the calculation of single neutron scattering quantities. In this work, we discuss the importance of taking into account self-diffusion in liquids to accurately describe the neutron scattering at low neutron energies (quasi-elastic peak problem. To improve modeling of heavy water, it is important to take into account temperature-dependent static structure factors and apply Sköld approximation to the coherent inelastic components of the scattering matrix. The usage of the new set of scattering matrices and cross-sections improves the calculation of thermal critical systems moderated and/or reflected with light/heavy water obtained from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP handbook. For example, the use of the new thermal scattering library for heavy water, combined with the ROSFOND-2010 evaluation of the cross sections for deuterium, results in an improvement of the C/E ratio in 48 out of

  11. New evaluation of thermal neutron scattering libraries for light and heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez Damian, Jose Ignacio; Granada, Jose Rolando; Cantargi, Florencia; Roubtsov, Danila

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the design and safety of thermal nuclear reactors and for verification of criticality safety conditions on systems with significant amount of fissile materials and water, it is necessary to perform high-precision neutron transport calculations and estimate uncertainties of the results. These calculations are based on neutron interaction data distributed in evaluated nuclear data libraries. To improve the evaluations of thermal scattering sub-libraries, we developed a set of thermal neutron scattering cross sections (scattering kernels) for hydrogen bound in light water, and deuterium and oxygen bound in heavy water, in the ENDF-6 format from room temperature up to the critical temperatures of molecular liquids. The new evaluations were generated and processable with NJOY99 and also with NJOY-2012 with minor modifications (updates), and with the new version of NJOY-2016. The new TSL libraries are based on molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS and recent experimental data, and result in an improvement of the calculation of single neutron scattering quantities. In this work, we discuss the importance of taking into account self-diffusion in liquids to accurately describe the neutron scattering at low neutron energies (quasi-elastic peak problem). To improve modeling of heavy water, it is important to take into account temperature-dependent static structure factors and apply Sköld approximation to the coherent inelastic components of the scattering matrix. The usage of the new set of scattering matrices and cross-sections improves the calculation of thermal critical systems moderated and/or reflected with light/heavy water obtained from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) handbook. For example, the use of the new thermal scattering library for heavy water, combined with the ROSFOND-2010 evaluation of the cross sections for deuterium, results in an improvement of the C/E ratio in 48 out of 65

  12. Transfer effects on training the refraction of light when hitting the target in the water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Blagoje V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental research of the effects of training students in the principles of light refraction to succeed in hitting the target in the water. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the veracity of the conclusions reached by Judd in 1908, since this experiment has been crucial in educational psychology - it represents the experimental basis of the generalized theory of transfers. Namely, Judd demonstrated that general experience (not identical elements is transferred in the process of transfer. There were two groups in the research: the experimental and the control group. The following variables were controlled: hitting the target in the air; the knowledge of the refraction of light, age, gender, and number. Unlike the control group, the experimental group received training in the principles of light reflection. Having completed the training of the experimental group, the hitting of the target in the water was performed, firstly at the depth of 50 cm and then at the depth of 20 cm. The sample included two classes of eighth - grade students from the elementary school in Pečenjevac (the experimental group and Razgojna (the control group. The research was conducted at the beginning of the school year (1975/76. In the process, there were errors in hitting the target. For the processing of data, the analyses of variance and measures of statistical descriptions have shown the following: 1 the success of the experimental group in hitting the targets at the first depth of water is significantly better than the success of the control group F (1,102 = 5.240 , p <0.05; 2 the experimental group has achieved significantly better results than the control group when hitting the targets at the altered depth of water F (1,102 = 27.767 , p <0.01; 3 when comparing the progresses of groups or differences of differences showed that the experimental group was significantly better than the control group F (1,192=9,5300, p<0.01. Even though

  13. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Stockwell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning, crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS, and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg−1 fuel burned, single scattering albedos (SSAs, and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs. From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC emission factors (g kg−1 fuel burned. The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg−1 for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ∼ 80 gases in all. The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68 was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10. Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg−1, organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg−1, and HCN

  14. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Christian, Ted J.; Goetz, J. Douglas; Jayarathne, Thilina; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Saikawa, Eri; Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-09-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient) combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning), crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS), and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm) based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs) for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg-1 fuel burned), single scattering albedos (SSAs), and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs). From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC) emission factors (g kg-1 fuel burned). The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg-1) for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ˜ 80 gases in all). The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68) was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10). Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg-1), organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg-1), and HCN (2.01 ± 1.25 g kg-1), where the latter could

  15. [Pollution Characteristics and Light Extinction Effects of Water-soluble Ions in PM2.5 During Winter Hazy Days at North Suburban Nanjing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao-yao; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Fen-ping; Wang, Li

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the characteristics of water-soluble ions in PM2.5 and their contribution to light extinction in haze days, on-line monitoring of PM2.5. was conducted at North Suburban Nanjing from 25 January through 3 February, 2013. Water-soluble components were collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS), and analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) for the contents of SO4(2-), NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ Simultaneously particle size distributions were measured using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The absorption and scattering coefficients were measured by three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3). Trace gases (SO2, NO2 etc.) were also monitored. The results showed that the average concentrations of total water-soluble ions were 70.3 and 22.9 microg x m(-3) in haze and normal days, respectively. Secondary hygroscopic components including SO4(2-), NO3- and NH4+ were the major ionic pollutants. Hazy days favored the conversion of SO2 and NOx, to SO4(2-) and NO3-, respectively, and in particular the oxidation of NOx. Using multiple linear regression statistical method, the empirical relationship between the dry aerosol extinction coefficient and the chemical composition was established. NH4NO3 was found to be the largest contributor to aerosol extinction in winter in Nanjing, followed by (NH4)2SO4, OC and EC. In two heavy pollution events, the increase of ion concentrations was influenced by the increase of primary emissions and secondary transformation.

  16. Removal of light petroleum hydrocarbons from water sources using polypropylene and titanium dioxide nano-composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Karyab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Petroleum hydrocarbons are the most important pollutants which threat human health and aquatics. Adsorbents are one of the common equipment in water pollution management; however, their applications have been associated with limitations. Objective: To evaluate the potential of polypropylene/titanium dioxide Nano-composite in adsorption of light petroleum hydrocarbons from water sources. Methods: This experimental study was conducted at school of health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. Activation of polypropylene fibers, with 1 cm length and 300 microns diameters, was achieved with wet heating. To synthesize of nano-composite the fibers were coated with nano-titanium dioxide with 20 nm diameter. The sonication was performed at 26 kHz and 100 W of power in 40ºc. The morphology of the fractured surfaces of impact specimens was examined by FESEM. The adsorption rate of petrol and gasoline, as surrogate of TPH, was evaluated in different retention time within polyamide mesh aperture diameter of 250 nm. Average of TPH adsorbing, per unit weight of adsorbent, were analyzed with analysis of variance and Scheffe post hoc tests. Findings: The FESEM micrographs showed that the dispersion of the nano-Tio2 particles was relatively good and only few aggregations exist. The maximum adsorption capacity of petrol and gasoline was obtained in 30 minute. The adsorption rate of gasoline was 6.49±0.10 g/g and oil was 7.01±0.13 g/g. Conclusion: According to the results and in comparison with commercial imported adsorbents, the synthesized Nano-composite had favorable performance. The results show that the polypropylene/Tio2 Nano-composite can be used effectively in light petroleum hydrocarbons removal from polluted water sources.

  17. Light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis: energetics, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    The essential steps of photosynthetic water splitting take place in Photosystem II (PSII) and comprise three different reaction sequences: (i) light induced formation of the radical pair P680(+)Q(A)(-), (ii) P680(+) driven oxidative water splitting into O(2) and four protons, and (iii) two step plastoquinone reduction to plastoquinol by Q(A)(-). This mini-review briefly summarizes our state of knowledge on energetics, kinetics and mechanism of oxidative water splitting. Essential features of the two types of reactions involved are described: (a) P680(+) reduction by the redox active tyrosine Y(z) and (b) sequence of oxidation steps induced by Y(z)(ox) in the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The rate of the former reaction is limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer (NET) step and the multi-phase kinetics shown to originate from a sequence of relaxation processes. In marked contrast, the rate of the stepwise oxidation by Y(z)(ox) of the WOC up to the redox level S(3) is not limited by NET but by trigger reactions which probably comprise proton shifts and/or conformational changes. The overall rate of the final reaction sequence leading to formation and release of O(2) is assumed to be limited by the electron transfer step from the S(3) state of WOC to Y(z)(ox) due to involvement of an endergonic redox equilibrium. Currently discussed controversial ideas on possible pathways are briefly outlined. Several crucial points of the mechanism of oxidative water splitting, like O-O bond formation, role of local proton shift(s), details of hydrogen bonding, are still not clarified and remain a challenging topic of future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydraulic analysis of a backflow limiter for the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Philippsburg (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems; Class, A.G.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) is one of the six concepts of the Generation IV program. It develops current light water reactor technologies and combines them with those of supercritical fossil fired power plants, using a once-through direct steam cycle. Water is used both as moderator and as coolant and flows as a single phase fluid through the core at a supercritical pressure of 25 MPa. The coolant exits with temperatures around 500 C. A conceptual design of the RPV and its internals has been presented by Fischer et al (2006). It features four circumferentially arranged inlets which are placed well above the four outlets. As recirculation pumps will not be required for this concept, a postulated break of one of the inlet feedwater lines will cause an immediate loss of flow and reduce the available water inventory in the vessel to cool the core. The following temperature peak can be reduced significantly if an additional safety component is installed in the feedwater lines to control and minimize this outflow until further steps are executed in order to maintain a reasonable amount of water inside the vessel to cool the core. The design of the backflow limiter features 10 inlet swirler vanes with an angle of 10 deg and 30 exit swirler vanes with an angle of 60 deg, the swirl chamber has an overall diameter of 0.95 m. The component fits inside the inlet flange and is therefore protected against damage from the outside. In case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), e.g. in case of a postulated break of one of the four inlet feedwater lines, the backflow limiter is able to reduce the mass flow for normal operation in reverse direction by a factor of approximately 5. Further work will include a sensitivity-study of the applied mesh and a comparison of the k-w SST turbulence model to non-linear RANS models, since the prediction of swirl flow is rather imprecise using the isotropic models.

  19. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P., E-mail: hans-peter.seifert@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S.; Leber, H.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion fatigue in austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of major parameters of influence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical system conditions for environmental acceleration of fatigue crack growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposal for new code fatigue curves, which consider environmental effects. - Abstract: The corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of different wrought low-carbon and stabilised austenitic stainless steels was characterised under simulated boiling water and primary pressurised water reactor conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in the temperature range from 70 to 320 Degree-Sign C. The major parameter effects and critical conjoint threshold conditions, which result in relevant environmental acceleration of fatigue crack growth are discussed and summarised. Furthermore, the observed corrosion fatigue behaviour is compared with the corresponding (corrosion) fatigue curves in the ASME and JSME boiler and pressure vessel code or open literature and conclusions with regard to their adequacy and conservatism are given.

  20. Application of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for water disinfection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an effective technology for the inactivation of pathogens in water and is of growing interest for industrial application. A new UV source - ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) - has emerged in the past decade with a number of advantages compared to traditional UV mercury lamps. This promising alternative raises great interest in the research on application of UV-LEDs for water treatment. Studies on UV-LED water disinfection have increased during the past few years. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent studies on UV-LEDs with various wavelengths for the inactivation of different microorganisms. Many inconsistent and incomparable data were found from published studies, which underscores the importance of establishing a standard protocol for studying UV-LED inactivation of microorganisms. Different UV sensitivities to UV-LEDs and traditional UV lamps were observed in the literature for some microorganisms, which requires further investigation for a better understanding of microorganism response to UV-LEDs. The unique aspects of UV-LEDs improve inactivation effectiveness by applying LED special features, such as multiple wavelengths and pulsed illumination; however, more studies are needed to investigate the influencing factors and mechanisms. The special features of UV-LEDs offer the flexibility of novel reactor designs for a broad application of UV-LED reactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterizing light attenuation within Northwest Florida Estuaries: Implications for RESTORE Act water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conmy, Robyn N; Schaeffer, Blake A; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph; Aukamp, Jessica; Duffy, Allyn; Lehrter, John C; Greene, Richard M

    2017-01-30

    Water Quality (WQ) condition is based on ecosystem stressor indicators (e.g. water clarity) which are biogeochemically important and critical when considering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill restoration efforts under the 2012 RESTORE Act. Nearly all of the proposed RESTORE projects list restoring WC as a goal, but 90% neglect water clarity. Here, dynamics of optical constituents impacting clarity are presented from a 2009-2011 study within Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and St. Joseph estuaries (targeted RESTORE sites) in Northwest Florida. Phytoplankton were the smallest contribution to total absorption (at-wPAR) at 412nm (5-11%), whereas colored dissolved organic matter was the largest (61-79%). Estuarine at-wPAR was significantly related to light attenuation (KdPAR), where individual contributors to clarity and the influence of climatic events were discerned. Provided are conversion equations demonstrating interoperability of clarity indicators between traditional State-measured WQ measures (e.g. secchi disc), optical constituents, and even satellite remote sensing for obtaining baseline assessments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effects of temperature and light intensity on growth and physiology in purple root water hyacinth and common water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, QuanFa; Wang, WeiBo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the interaction between temperature and light intensity was investigated in common water hyacinth (CWH) and purple root water hyacinth (PRWH). Effects of different temperatures (11/5, 18/11, 25/18, and 32/25 °C day/night) simultaneously applied at various light intensities (100, 300, and 600 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) to the plants were detected by measuring changes in the root lengths, protein content, sugar content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, photosynthesis, and dissolved oxygen (DO). Temperature and light intensity significantly influence the growth of water hyacinths, and there was significant interaction among these environmental factors. The results suggest that several environmental factors act synergistically on the growth and physiology of water hyacinths. The higher new root length (NRL) in PRWH indicated that its root growth capacity is higher than in CWH. The soluble sugar content in leaves of CWH was higher than PRWH, indicating that relatively higher sugar content in CWH to low-temperature stress may support its tolerant nature. Lower temperature and light intensity can stimulate the accumulation of MDA content. The net photosynthetic rate (Pn) in leaves of CWH was higher than PRWH. In low temperature, increase light intensity can stimulate the Pn of PRWH and CWH. In CWH and PRWH, Pn showed a similar trend as noted for stomatal conductance (Cond) and transpiration rate (Tr). The capacity of PRWH in adding oxygen to the water column is better than those of CWH.

  3. Multimodal Imaging and Lighting Bias Correction for Improved μPAD-based Water Quality Monitoring via Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Katherine E.; Angus, Scott V.; Reynolds, Kelly A.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-06-01

    Smartphone image-based sensing of microfluidic paper analytical devices (μPADs) offers low-cost and mobile evaluation of water quality. However, consistent quantification is a challenge due to variable environmental, paper, and lighting conditions, especially across large multi-target μPADs. Compensations must be made for variations between images to achieve reproducible results without a separate lighting enclosure. We thus developed a simple method using triple-reference point normalization and a fast-Fourier transform (FFT)-based pre-processing scheme to quantify consistent reflected light intensity signals under variable lighting and channel conditions. This technique was evaluated using various light sources, lighting angles, imaging backgrounds, and imaging heights. Further testing evaluated its handle of absorbance, quenching, and relative scattering intensity measurements from assays detecting four water contaminants - Cr(VI), total chlorine, caffeine, and E. coli K12 - at similar wavelengths using the green channel of RGB images. Between assays, this algorithm reduced error from μPAD surface inconsistencies and cross-image lighting gradients. Although the algorithm could not completely remove the anomalies arising from point shadows within channels or some non-uniform background reflections, it still afforded order-of-magnitude quantification and stable assay specificity under these conditions, offering one route toward improving smartphone quantification of μPAD assays for in-field water quality monitoring.

  4. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors annual report January - December 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.

    2007-08-31

    This report summarizes work performed from January to December 2005 by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors (LWRs). Existing statistical models for estimating the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions were updated. Also, the ASME Code fatigue adjustment factors of 2 on stress and 20 on life were critically reviewed to assess the possible conservatism in the current choice of the margins. An approach, based on an environmental fatigue correction factor, for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Section III fatigue evaluations is discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and their welds to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is being evaluated as a function of the fluence level, water chemistry, material chemistry, and fabrication history. For this task, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests are being conducted on various austenitic SSs irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor. The SSRT tests are currently focused on investigating the effects of the grain boundary engineering process on the IASCC of the austenitic SSs. The CGR tests were conducted on Type 316 SSs irradiated to 0.45-3.0 dpa, and on sensitized Type 304 SS and SS weld heat-affected-zone material irradiated to 2.16 dpa. The CGR tests on materials irradiated to 2.16 dpa were followed by a fracture toughness test in a water environment. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic SS core internals to IASCC and void swelling is also being evaluated for pressurized water reactors. Both SSRT tests and microstructural examinations are being conducted on specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor in Russia to doses up to 20 dpa. Crack growth rate data

  6. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

    2013-11-05

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  7. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  8. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Memmott, Matthew [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Boy, Guy [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Muldrow, Lycurgus [Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Haghighat, Alierza [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project “Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I2S-LWR)”. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  9. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Baldwin; Magdy Tawfik; Leonard Bond

    2010-06-01

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R&D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10–12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I&C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE has

  10. Influence of water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering coefficients of the Central European aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zieger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aerosol water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering was examined at the regional continental research site Melpitz, Germany. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH, defined as the aerosol particle scattering coefficient at a certain relative humidity (RH divided by its dry value, was measured using a humidified nephelometer. The chemical composition and other microphysical properties were measured in parallel. f(RH showed a strong variation, e.g. with values between 1.2 and 3.6 at RH=85% and λ=550 nm. The chemical composition was found to be the main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH, since the magnitude of f(RH clearly correlated with the inorganic mass fraction measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. Hysteresis within the recorded humidograms was observed and explained by long-range transported sea salt. A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the measured parameters.

  11. ENFORM II: a calculational system for light water reactor logistics and effluent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.; Lewallen, M.A.; Purcell, W.L.; Cole, B.M.

    1979-09-01

    ENFORM is a computer-based information system that addresses the material logistics, environmental releases and economics of light water reactor (LWR) operation. The most important system inputs consist of electric energy generation requirements, details of plant construction scheduling, unit costs, and environmental release factors. From these inputs the ENFORM system computes the mass balances and generates the environmental release information for noxious chemicals and radionuclides from various fuel cycle facilities (except waste disposal). Fuel cycle costs and electric power costs are also computed. All code development subsequent to 1977 is summarized. Programming instructions are provided for the modules that are comprised in the ENFORM system. ENGEN, a code that uses a generation schedule specified by the user and isotopic data generated by ORIGEN, has been developed to produce a scenario-specific data base. Other codes (ENMAT, ENRAD, etc) have been developed to use data base information to estimate radioactive and nonradioactive release information.

  12. Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1981-09-01

    The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  14. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  15. Visible Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified Ti02 for Air and Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, paul; Clausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The method of photocatalysis utilizing titanium dioxide, TiO2, as the catalyst has been widely studied for trace contaminant control for both air and water applications because of its low energy consumption and use of a regenerable catalyst. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors and are a setback for the technology for space application due to the possibility of Hg contamination. The development of a visible light responsive (VLR) TiO2-based catalyst could lead to the use of solar energy in the visible region (approx.45% of the solar spectrum lies in the visible region; > 400 nm) or highly efficient LEDs (with wavelengths > 400 nm) to make PCO approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Though VLR catalyst development has been an active area of research for the past two decades, there are few commercially available VLR catalysts; those that are available still have poor activity in the visible region compared to that in the UV region. Thus, this study was aimed at the further development of VLR catalysts by a new method - coupling of quantum dots (QD) of a narrow band gap semiconductor (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, ZnSe, etc.) to the TiO2 by two preparation methods: 1) photodeposition and 2) mechanical alloying using a high-speed ball mill. A library of catalysts was developed and screened for gas and aqueous phase applications, using ethanol and 4-chlorophenol as the target contaminants, respectively. Both target compounds are well studied in photocatalytic systems serve as model contaminants for this research. Synthesized catalysts were compared in terms of preparation method, type of quantum dots, and dosage of quantum dots.

  16. Mechanism of light induced water splitting in Photosystem II of oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot

    2012-08-01

    The reactions of light induced oxidative water splitting were analyzed within the framework of the empirical rate constant-distance relationship of non-adiabatic electron transfer in biological systems (C. C. Page, C. C. Moser, X. Chen , P. L. Dutton, Nature 402 (1999) 47-52) on the basis of structure information on Photosystem II (PS II) (A. Guskov, A. Gabdulkhakov, M. Broser, C. Glöckner, J. Hellmich, J. Kern, J. Frank, W. Saenger, A. Zouni, Chem. Phys. Chem. 11 (2010) 1160-1171, Y. Umena, K. Kawakami, J-R Shen, N. Kamiya, Crystal structure of oxygen-evolving photosystem II at a resolution of 1.9Å. Nature 47 (2011) 55-60). Comparison of these results with experimental data leads to the following conclusions: 1) The oxidation of tyrosine Y(z) by the cation radical P680(+·) in systems with an intact water oxidizing complex (WOC) is kinetically limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer step and the extent of this reaction is thermodynamically determined by relaxation processes in the environment including rearrangements of hydrogen bond network(s). In marked contrast, all Y(z)(ox) induced oxidation steps in the WOC up to redox state S(3) are kinetically limited by trigger reactions which are slower by orders of magnitude than the rates calculated for non-adiabatic electron transfer. 3) The overall rate of the triggered reaction sequence of Y(z)(ox) reduction by the WOC in redox state S(3) eventually leading to formation and release of O(2) is kinetically limited by an uphill electron transfer step. Alternative models are discussed for this reaction. The protein matrix of the WOC and bound water molecules provide an optimized dynamic landscape of hydrogen bonded protons for catalyzing oxidative water splitting energetically driven by light induced formation of the cation radical P680(+·). In this way the PS II core acts as a molecular machine formed during a long evolutionary process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research

  17. A novel water-assisted pulsed light processing for decontamination of blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Sample heating and shadowing effect have limited the application of pulsed light (PL) technology for decontamination of fresh produce. In this study, a novel setup using water-assisted PL processing was developed to overcome these limitations. Blueberries inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella were either treated with PL directly (dry PL treatment) or immersed in agitated water during the PL treatment (wet PL treatment) for 5-60 s. Although both pathogens were effectively inactivated by the dry PL treatments, the appearance of the blueberries was adversely affected and a maximum temperature of 64.8 °C on the blueberry surface was recorded. On the other hand, the visual appearance of blueberries remained unchanged after wet PL treatments and sample heating was significantly reduced. The wet PL treatments were more effective than chlorine washing on inactivating both pathogens. After a 60-s wet PL treatment, the populations of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated on calyx and skin of blueberries were reduced by 3.0 and >5.8 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella on blueberry calyx and skin was reduced by 3.6 and >5.9 log CFU/g, respectively. No viable bacterial cells were recovered from the water used in the wet PL treatments, demonstrating that this setup could prevent the risk of cross-contamination during fresh produce washing. Our results suggest that this new water-assisted PL treatment could be a potential non-chemical alternative (residue free) to chlorine washing since it is both more effective and environmentally friendly than chlorine washing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetically engineering cyanobacteria to convert CO₂, water, and light into the long-chain hydrocarbon farnesene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfmann, Charles; Gu, Liping; Gibbons, William; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2014-12-01

    Genetically engineered cyanobacteria offer a shortcut to convert CO2 and H2O directly into biofuels and high value chemicals for societal benefits. Farnesene, a long-chained hydrocarbon (C15H24), has many applications in lubricants, cosmetics, fragrances, and biofuels. However, a method for the sustainable, photosynthetic production of farnesene has been lacking. Here, we report the photosynthetic production of farnesene by the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using only CO2, mineralized water, and light. A codon-optimized farnesene synthase gene was chemically synthesized and then expressed in the cyanobacterium, enabling it to synthesize farnesene through its endogenous non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Farnesene excreted from the engineered cyanobacterium volatilized into the flask head space and was recovered by adsorption in a resin column. The maximum photosynthetic productivity of farnesene was 69.1 ± 1.8 μg·L(-1)·O.D.(-1)·d(-1). Compared to the wild type, the farnesene-producing cyanobacterium also exhibited a 60 % higher PSII activity under high light, suggesting increased farnesene productivity in such conditions. We envision genetically engineered cyanobacteria as a bio-solar factory for photosynthetic production of a wide range of biofuels and commodity chemicals.

  19. Oil flow in deep waters: comparative study between light oils and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreolli, Ivanilto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Ultra deeper waters fields are being exploited due to technological development. Under this scenario, the flow design is accomplished through pipelines subjected to low temperature and high pressure. Moreover, these flow lines are usually long causing a fast fluid cooling, which may affect flow assurance in some cases. Problems during topsides production plant's restart might occur if the oil is viscous and even in steady state a significant different behavior can be noticed, if compared to a less viscous oil. A comparison between light and heavy oil through a case study with the objective to show some heavy oil flow particularities is the purpose of this paper. Permanent and transient analyses for a specific geometry are presented. The results showed that thermal and proper viscosity modeling are required for heavy oil flow, differently from that of light oil flow, due to the exponential viscosity dependence to temperature and because the predominant laminar regime. In addition, on heavier and heavier oil flow systems, it is essential to consider exportation system's restart. (author)

  20. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program.

  2. Expert assessments of the cost of light water small modular reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Ahmed; Azevedo, Inês Lima; Morgan, M Granger

    2013-06-11

    Analysts and decision makers frequently want estimates of the cost of technologies that have yet to be developed or deployed. Small modular reactors (SMRs), which could become part of a portfolio of carbon-free energy sources, are one such technology. Existing estimates of likely SMR costs rely on problematic top-down approaches or bottom-up assessments that are proprietary. When done properly, expert elicitations can complement these approaches. We developed detailed technical descriptions of two SMR designs and then conduced elicitation interviews in which we obtained probabilistic judgments from 16 experts who are involved in, or have access to, engineering-economic assessments of SMR projects. Here, we report estimates of the overnight cost and construction duration for five reactor-deployment scenarios that involve a large reactor and two light water SMRs. Consistent with the uncertainty introduced by past cost overruns and construction delays, median estimates of the cost of new large plants vary by more than a factor of 2.5. Expert judgments about likely SMR costs display an even wider range. Median estimates for a 45 megawatts-electric (MWe) SMR range from $4,000 to $16,300/kWe and from $3,200 to $7,100/kWe for a 225-MWe SMR. Sources of disagreement are highlighted, exposing the thought processes of experts involved with SMR design. There was consensus that SMRs could be built and brought online about 2 y faster than large reactors. Experts identify more affordable unit cost, factory fabrication, and shorter construction schedules as factors that may make light water SMRs economically viable.

  3. Method of treatment of a mixture of air and at least partially radioactive rare gases. [Cryogenic distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faugeras, P.; Lecoq, P.; Miquel, P.; Rouyer, H.; Simonet, G.

    1977-10-25

    The method of treatment of a mixture of air and at least partially radioactive gases such as xenon and krypton in particular, especially gaseous effluents derived from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels, comprises a stage of concentration of the rare gases in solution in liquid oxygen by cryogenic distillation of the light gases and especially nitrogen from the liquefied mixture.

  4. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  5. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  6. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels.

  7. The Development of the Advanced Light Water Reactor in Korea - The Korean Next Generation Reactor -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.G.; Park, Y.S.; Kim, B.S.; Cho, S.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    Korean next generation reactor (KNGR), which is to be designed as a standard evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR) in Korea, has been developed from 1992 as one of long-term government projects. The major characteristics of the KNGR are as follows; KNGR is 2-loop PWR and its design lift time is 60 years. The CDF and the CFF will be much lower than 10{sup -5}/RY and 10{sup -6}/RY, respectively. For the design improvement, KNGR adopted inconel-690 as a steam generator tube material, four train ECCS, refueling water storage tank inside containment, and double cylindrical concrete containment. For more reliable and easier control, compact workstations have been adopted in the design of main control complex and digital I and C technology is used for protection, control, and monitoring. In addition, KNGR has some passive design features such as fluidic device in safety injection tank, passive secondary condensing system, and passive auto-catalytic hydrogen recombiner to enhance safety. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Computational Neutronics Methods and Transmutation Performance Analyses for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Asgari; B. Forget; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; S. Bays

    2007-03-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One obvious path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCm, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu.

  9. Visible-Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified TiO2 for Air and Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Clausen, Christian A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalysis, the oxidation or reduction of contaminants by light-activated catalysts, utilizing titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the catalytic substrate has been widely studied for trace contaminant control in both air and water applications. The interest in this process is due primarily to its low energy consumption and capacity for catalyst regeneration. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its relatively large band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors; however, the use of mercury precludes the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure.

  10. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-15

    In Sweden, most of the nuclear power plants are planning power uprates within the next few years. The Dept. of Occupational and Medical Exposures at the Swedish Radiation Protection Agency, SSI, has initiated a research project to investigate the radiological implications of power uprates on light-water reactors throughout the world. The project was divided into three tasks: 1. A compilation of power uprates of light-water reactors worldwide. The compilation contains a technical description in brief of how the power uprates were carried out. 2. An analysis of the radiological consequences at four selected Nuclear Power Plants, which was the main objective of the inquiry. Affects on the radiological and chemical situation due to the changed situation were discussed. 3. Review of technical and organisational factors to be considered in uprate projects to keep exposures ALARA. The project was carried out, starting with the collecting of information on the implemented and planned uprates on reactors internationally. The information was catalogued in accordance with criteria focusing on radiological impact. A detailed analysis followed of four plants selected for uprates chosen according to established criteria, in line with the project requirements. The selected plants were Olkiluoto 1 and 2, Cofrentes, Asco and Tihange. The plants were selected with design and operation conditions close to the Swedish plants. All information was compiled to identify good and bad practices that are impacting on the occupational exposure. Important factors were discussed concerning BWRs and PWRs which affect radiation levels and occupational exposures in general, and especially at power uprates. Conclusions related to each task are in detail presented in a particular chapter of the report. Taking into account the whole project and its main objective the following conclusions are considered to be emphasized: Optimisation of the work processes to limit the duration of the time spent in

  11. Reaction pattern and mechanism of light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot; Kühn, Philipp

    2007-06-01

    This mini review is an attempt to briefly summarize our current knowledge on light driven oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis. The reaction leading to molecular oxygen and four protons via photosynthesis comprises thermodynamic and kinetic constraints that require a balanced fine tuning of the reaction coordinates. The mode of coupling between electron (ET) and proton transfer (PT) reactions is shown to be of key mechanistic relevance for the redox turnover of Y(Z) and the reactions within the WOC. The WOC is characterized by peculiar energetics of its oxidation steps in the WOC. In all oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms the redox state S(1) is thermodynamically most stable and therefore this general feature is assumed to be of physiological relevance. Available information on the Gibbs energy differences between the individual redox states S(i+1) and S(i) and on the activation energies of their oxidative transitions are used to construct a general reaction coordinate of oxidative water splitting in photosystem II (PS II). Finally, an attempt is presented to cast our current state of knowledge into a mechanism of oxidative water splitting with special emphasis on the formation of the essential O-O bond and the active role of the protein environment in tuning the local proton activity that depends on time and redox state S(i). The O-O linkage is assumed to take place within a multistate equilibrium at the redox level of S(3), comprising both redox isomerism and proton tautomerism. It is proposed that one state, S(3)(P), attains an electronic configuration and nuclear geometry that corresponds with a hydrogen bonded peroxide which acts as the entatic state for the generation of complexed molecular oxygen through S(3)(P) oxidation by Y(Z)(ox).

  12. Emerging evidence on the crystalline water-light interface in ophthalmology and therapeutic implications in photobiomodulation: first communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Santana, Elizabeth; Santana-Blank, Luis

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to present preliminary evidence of the exclusion zone (EZ) and photobiomodulation (PBM) phenomena relating to ophthalmology. Water is the main media and fluid found in ocular tissues. Water is also an important photoacceptor and energy storage medium. Eyes are abundantly exposed to environmental radiant energy. Therefore, multiple light-energy-absorption mechanisms may exist, including those associated with the recently discovered fourth phase of water, known as EZ. Retrospective analysis of published data indicative of EZ phenomena related, in this first communication, to the retina and optic nerve (ON), using surgical microscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Images showing removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) aided by preservative-free triamcinolone acetonide (TA) during macular hole surgery show continuous whitish lines indicative of water-layer ordering at the interface between collagen matrices and TA crystals. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) results further exhibit an axis parallel to the ON, which may be an ocular expression of the EZ linked to the steady potential of the eye. Although existing results are still being decoded and analyzed in light of the state of the art studies of light-water interactions, they suggest a new understanding of the eye's bioenergetic environment, which may have deep implications in ocular physiology as well as in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of blinding diseases using light-based therapies such as photobiomodulation. Research is needed to confirm the interpretation of these findings and validate potential ophthalmic applications.

  13. Unexpected Attraction of Polarotactic Water-Leaving Insects to Matt Black Car Surfaces: Mattness of Paintwork Cannot Eliminate the Polarized Light Pollution of Black Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Blaho, Miklos; Herczeg, Tamas; Kriska, Gyorgy; Egri, Adam; Szaz, Denes; Farkas, Alexandra; Tarjanyi, Nikolett; Czinke, Laszlo; Barta, Andras; Horvath, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    The horizontally polarizing surface parts of shiny black cars (the reflection-polarization characteristics of which are similar to those of water surfaces) attract water-leaving polarotactic insects. Thus, shiny black cars are typical sources of polarized light pollution endangering water-leaving insects. A new fashion fad is to make car-bodies matt black or grey. Since rough (matt) surfaces depolarize the reflected light, one of the ways of reducing polarized light pollution is to make matt ...

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Digital Technology Business Case Methodology Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hart, Adam [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Vlahoplus, Chris [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program aims to develop and deploy technologies that will make the existing U.S. nuclear fleet more efficient and competitive. The program has developed a standard methodology for determining the impact of new technologies in order to assist nuclear power plant (NPP) operators in building sound business cases. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway is part of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. It conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the NPP operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation’s energy and environmental security. The II&C Pathway is conducting a series of pilot projects that enable the development and deployment of new II&C technologies in existing nuclear plants. Through the LWRS program, individual utilities and plants are able to participate in these projects or otherwise leverage the results of projects conducted at demonstration plants. Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on

  15. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  16. Water-filtered infrared a irradiation in combination with visible light inhibits acute chlamydial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Marti

    Full Text Available New therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome drawbacks in treatment of infections with intracellular bacteria. Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative bacteria implicated in acute and chronic diseases such as abortion in animals and trachoma in humans. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA is short wavelength infrared radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. In clinical settings, wIRA alone and in combination with visible light (VIS has proven its efficacy in acute and chronic wound healing processes. This is the first study to demonstrate that wIRA irradiation combined with VIS (wIRA/VIS diminishes recovery of infectious elementary bodies (EBs of both intra- and extracellular Chlamydia (C. in two different cell lines (Vero, HeLa regardless of the chlamydial strain (C. pecorum, C. trachomatis serovar E as shown by indirect immunofluorescence and titration by subpassage. Moreover, a single exposure to wIRA/VIS at 40 hours post infection (hpi led to a significant reduction of C. pecorum inclusion frequency in Vero cells and C. trachomatis in HeLa cells, respectively. A triple dose of irradiation (24, 36, 40 hpi during the course of C. trachomatis infection further reduced chlamydial inclusion frequency in HeLa cells without inducing the chlamydial persistence/stress response, as ascertained by electron microscopy. Irradiation of host cells (HeLa, Vero neither affected cell viability nor induced any molecular markers of cytotoxicity as investigated by Alamar blue assay and Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection, irradiation, and the combination of both showed a similar release pattern of a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MIF/GIF, Serpin E1, RANTES, IL-6, IL-8 and chemokines (IL-16, IP-10, ENA-78, MIG, MIP-1α/β from host cells. Initial investigation into the mechanism indicated possible thermal effects on Chlamydia due to irradiation. In summary, we demonstrate a non-chemical reduction of chlamydial infection using the combination

  17. Performance of Ag-TiO2 Photocatalysts towards the Photocatalytic Disinfection of Water under Interior-Lighting and Solar-Simulated Light Irradiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Castro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the characterization and photoactivity of Ag-TiO2 materials using different amounts of silver during the hydrothermal synthesis. Photocatalysts were characterized by means of TEM, XPS, XRD, DRS, and N2 sorption isotherms to determine the textural properties. The photocatalyst's configuration was observed to be as anatase-brookite mixed phase particles with Ag partially oxidized aggregates on the TiO2 surface, which increased visible light absorption of the material. Moreover, photoproduction of singlet oxygen was followed by EPR analysis under visible light irradiations following the formation of TEMPOL. Such photoproduction was totally decreased by using the singlet oxygen scavenger DABCO. Photocatalysts were tested towards the photocatalytic disinfection of water suing a solar light simulator and an interior-light irradiation setup. Results evidenced an increase in the photooxidative effect of TiO2, while dark processes evidenced that part of the inactivation process is due to the Ag-TiO2 surface bactericidal effect and possible lixiviated Ag+.

  18. VAPoR - Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith - an Instrument for In Situ Detection of Water, Noble Gases, and Organics on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, I. L.; Cardiff, E. H.; Feng, S. H.; Holmes, V.; Malespin, C.; Stern, J. G.; Swindle, T. D.; Glavin, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present the Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (VAPoR) instrument design and demonstrate the validity of an in situ pyrolysis mass spectrometer for evolved gas analyses of lunar and planetary regolith samples. In situ evolved gas analyses of the lunar regolith have not yet been carried out and no atmospheric or evolved gas measurements have been made at the lunar poles. VAPoR is designed to do both kinds of measurements, is currently under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and will be able to heat powdered regolith samples or rock drill fines up to 1400 C in vacuo. To validate the instrument concept, evolved gas species released from different planetary analogs were determined as a function of temperature using a laboratory breadboard. Evolved gas measurements of an Apollo 16 regolith sample and a fragment of the carbonaceous meteorite Murchison were made by VAPoR and our results compared with existing data. The results imply that in situ evolved gas measurements of the lunar regolith at the polar regions by VAPoR will be a very powerful tool for identifying water and other volatile signatures of lunar or exogenous origin as potential resources for future human exploration.

  19. Blue-Light Therapy following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on White Matter Water Diffusion in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Bajaj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a common and often inconspicuous wound that is frequently associated with chronic low-grade symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Previous evidence suggests that daily blue wavelength light therapy may be effective at reducing fatigue and improving sleep in patients recovering from mTBI. However, the effects of light therapy on recovering brain structure remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed white matter diffusion properties, including generalized fractional anisotropy, and the quantity of water diffusion in isotropic (i.e., isotropic diffusion and anisotropic fashion (i.e., quantitative anisotropy, QA for fibers crossing 11 brain areas known to be significantly affected following mTBI. Specifically, we investigated how 6 weeks of daily morning blue light exposure therapy (compared to an amber-light placebo condition impacted changes in white matter diffusion in individuals with mTBI. We observed a significant impact of the blue light treatment (relative to the placebo on the amount of water diffusion (QA for multiple brain areas, including the corpus callosum, anterior corona radiata, and thalamus. Moreover, many of these changes were associated with improvements in sleep latency and delayed memory. These findings suggest that blue wavelength light exposure may serve as one of the potential non-pharmacological treatments for facilitating structural and functional recovery following mTBI; they also support the use of QA as a reliable neuro-biomarker for mTBI therapies.

  20. Sediment transport, light and algal growth in the Markermeer : a two-dimensional water quality model for a shallow lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van E.H.S.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis reports on a study of the water quality in the Markermeer, focusing on the relationships between sediment transport, the light field and the growth of Oscillatoria agardhii . The study comprises two aspects: an extensive data collection program with the data

  1. Persistence of Native Trees in an Invaded Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest: Experimental Evaluation of Light and Water Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodie R. Schulten; T. Colleen Cole; Susan Cordell; Keiko M. Publico; Rebecca Ostertag; Jaime E. Enoka; Jené D. Michaud

    2014-01-01

    Hawaiian lowland wet forests are heavily invaded and their restoration is most likely to be successful if native species selected for restoration have efficient resource-use traits. We evaluated growth, survival, and ecophysiological responses of four native and four invasive species in a greenhouse experiment that simulated reduced light and water conditions commonly...

  2. Photocatalytic Hydrogen or Oxygen Evolution from Water over S- or N-Doped TiO2 under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumoto Nishijima

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available S- or N-doping of TiO2 powder having an anatase or rutile phase extended the photocatalytic activity for water oxidation and reduction under UV light and visible light irradiation. For the reduction of water, anatase-doped TiO2 showed higher level of activity than that of doped TiO2 having a rutile phase using ethanol as an electron donor. Furthermore, the activity level of S-doped TiO2 for hydrogen evolution was higher than that of N-doped TiO2 photocatalysts under visible light. Photocatalytic oxidation of water on doped TiO2 having a rutile phase proceeded with fairly high efficiency when Fe3+ ions were used as electron acceptors compared to that on doped TiO2 having an anatase phase. In addition, water splitting under visible light irradiation was achieved by construction of a Z-scheme photocatalysis system employing the doped TiO2 having anatase and rutile phases for H2 and O2 evolution and the I−/IO3− redox couple as an electron relay.

  3. Development of Radiation-Resistant In-Water Wireless Transmission System Using Light Emitting Diodes and Photo Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Shibata, H.; Otsuka, N.; Uehara, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Shibagaki, T.; Komanome, H.

    2016-10-01

    Several kinds of commercially available light emitting diodes (LED) and photo diodes (PD) were irradiated with 60Co gamma ray up to 1 MGy for development of a radiation-resistant in-water wireless transmission system using visible light. The lens parts of the LEDs turned brown by the irradiation and their colors became dark with the absorbed dose. The total luminous fluxes decreased with the absorbed dose and the LED with shorter emission wavelength had the higher decrease rate. Meanwhile, the current-voltage characteristics hardly changed. These results indicate that the decreases of the total luminous flux of the LEDs were mainly caused not by the degradation of the semiconductor parts but by the coloring of the lens parts by the irradiation. On the other hand, the light sensitivities of the PDs decreased with the absorbed dose. The PDs with the window part which turned a darker color had the higher decrease rate. These results indicate that the decreases of light sensitivities of the PDs were also mainly caused by the coloring of the resin parts by the irradiation. If the wireless transmission is performed using the candidate LED and PD between 5 meters in water, using a few LEDs and PDs, the PD's output current generated by the emission light of the LED is estimated to be detectable even considering the effects of the absorption of the light in water and the increased dark current by the irradiation. Therefore, a radiation resistant in-water transmission system can be constructed using commercially available LEDs and PDs in principle.

  4. Photoactivation: The light-driven assembly of the water oxidation complex of photosystem II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han eBao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic water oxidation is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II. The assembly of the Mn4O5Ca requires light and involves a sequential process called photoactivation. This process harnesses the charge-separation of the photochemical reaction center and the coordination environment provided by the amino acid side chains of the protein to oxidize and organize the incoming manganese ions to form the oxo-bridged metal cluster capable of H2O-oxidation. Although most aspects of this assembly process remain poorly understood, recent advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the fully assembled cyanobacterial PSII complex help in the interpretation of the rich history of experiments designed to understand this process. Moreover, recent insights on the structure and stability of the constituent ions of the Mn4CaO5 cluster may guide future experiments. Here we consider the literature and give a possible model of assembly involving single Mn2+ oxidation site and ion relocation.

  5. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron spectrum and slightly more uniform axial power distribution. It achieves a cycle length of 18 months with sufficient excess reactivity. At Beginning of Cycle the fuel temperature coefficient of the hydride assembly is higher whereas the moderator and void coefficients are lower. The thermal hydraulic results show that the achievable fuel temperature in the hydride assembly is well below the design limits. The potential benefits of the use of hydride fuel in the current design of the HPLWR with the achieved improvements in the core neutronics characteristics are not sufficient to justify the replacement of the oxide fuel. Therefore for a final evaluation of the use of hydride fuels in HPLWR concepts additional studies which include modification of subassembly and core layout designs are required.

  6. Research and Development Methodology for Practical Use of Accident Tolerant Fuel in Light Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kurata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and development (R&D methodology for the practical use of accident tolerant fuel (ATF in commercial light water reactors is discussed in the present review. The identification and quantification of the R&D-metrics and the attribute of candidate ATF-concepts, recognition of the gap between the present R&D status and the targeted practical use, prioritization of the R&D, and technology screening schemes are important for achieving a common understanding on technology screening process among stakeholders in the near term and in developing an efficient R&D track toward practical use. Technology readiness levels and attribute guides are considered to be proper indices for these evaluations. In the midterm, the selected ATF-concepts will be developed toward the technology readiness level-5, at which stage the performance of the prototype fuel rods and the practicality of industrial scale fuel manufacturing will be verified and validated. Regarding the screened-out concepts, which are recognized to have attractive potentials, the fundamental R&D should be continued in the midterm to find ways of addressing showstoppers.

  7. Development Status of Accident-tolerant Fuel for Light Water Reactors in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Gil Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, a top priority in the nuclear industry was the safe, reliable, and economic operation of light water reactors. However, the development of accident-tolerant fuel (ATF became a hot topic in the nuclear research field after the March 2011 events at Fukushima, Japan. In Korea, innovative concepts of ATF have been developing to increase fuel safety and reliability during normal operations, operational transients, and also accident events. The microcell UO2 and high-density composite pellet concepts are being developed as ATF pellets. A microcell UO2 pellet is envisaged to have the enhanced retention capabilities of highly radioactive and corrosive fission products. High-density pellets are expected to be used in combination with the particular ATF cladding concepts. Two concepts—surface-modified Zr-based alloy and SiC composite material—are being developed as ATF cladding, as these innovative concepts can effectively suppress hydrogen explosions and the release of radionuclides into the environment.

  8. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  9. Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Motoyuki; Shinoda, Wataru

    2005-10-01

    As an application of atomistic simulation methods to heat capacities, path-integral molecular dynamics has been used to calculate the constant-volume heat capacities of light and heavy water in the gas, liquid, and solid phases. While the classical simulation based on conventional molecular dynamics has estimated the heat capacities too high, the quantum simulation based on path-integral molecular dynamics has given reasonable results based on the simple point-charge/flexible potential model. The calculated heat capacities (divided by the Boltzmann constant) in the quantum simulation are 3.1 in the vapor H2O at 300 K, 6.9 in the liquid H2O at 300 K, and 4.1 in the ice Ih H2O at 250 K, respectively, which are comparable to the experimental data of 3.04, 8.9, and 4.1, respectively. The quantum simulation also reproduces the isotope effect. The heat capacity in the liquid D2O has been calculated to be 10% higher than that of H2O, while it is 13% higher in the experiment. The results demonstrate that the path-integral simulation is a promising approach to quantitatively evaluate the heat capacities for molecular systems, taking account of quantum-mechanical vibrations as well as strongly anharmonic motions.

  10. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  11. Development plan for the External Hazards Experimental Group. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Burns, Douglas Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kammerer, Annie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the development plan for a new multi-partner External Hazards Experimental Group (EHEG) coordinated by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) technical pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Currently, there is limited data available for development and validation of the tools and methods being developed in the RISMC Toolkit. The EHEG is being developed to obtain high-quality, small- and large-scale experimental data validation of RISMC tools and methods in a timely and cost-effective way. The group of universities and national laboratories that will eventually form the EHEG (which is ultimately expected to include both the initial participants and other universities and national laboratories that have been identified) have the expertise and experimental capabilities needed to both obtain and compile existing data archives and perform additional seismic and flooding experiments. The data developed by EHEG will be stored in databases for use within RISMC. These databases will be used to validate the advanced external hazard tools and methods.

  12. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  13. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  14. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  15. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTICAL HOLOGRAPHY FOR THE INSPECTION OF LIGHT WATER REACTOR WELD ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, H. D.; Gribble, R. P.

    1982-06-01

    The primary objective of this program was the evaluation of acoustical holography techniques for characterization of the light water reactor weld surface signatures in the nuclear safeguards program. The accurate characterization of weld surface irregulari ties and vertical deviations was achieved using acoustical holographic interferometric techniques. Preselected weld surfaces were inspected and the vertical deviations characterized by phase measurements or fringe densities in the image. Experimental results on Sandia samples verify depth deviation sensitivities of 0.11 {micro}m to 0.16 {micro}m. The two point interferogram technique is recommended for surveillance of the weld surface associated wi th fuel rod removal in the nuclear safeguard program. The use of this unique holographic signal processing provides essentially a fail-safe method for surveillance of clandestine fuel rod removal. Statistical analysis indicates 99.99% (weld surface deviation) confidence interval between 2~m and 3~m can be achieved. These results illustrate the extremely high resolution capabilities of the surveillance technique employing coherent signal processing.

  16. A probability model: Tritium release into the coolant of a light water tritium production reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D N

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a probability model of the total amount of tritium that will be released from a core of tritium target rods into the coolant of a light water reactor during a tritium production cycle.The model relates the total tritium released from a core to the release characteristics of an individual target rod within the core. The model captures total tritium release from two sources-release via target rod breach and release via permeation through the target rod. Specifically, under conservative assumptions about the breach characteristics of a target rod, total tritium released from a core is modeled as a function of the probability of a target breach and the mean and standard deviation of the permeation reduction factor (PRF) of an individual target rod. Two dominant facts emerge from the analysis in this report. First, total tritium release cannot be controlled and minimized solely through the PRF characteristics of a target rod. Tritium release via breach must be abated if acceptable tritium production is to be achieved. Second, PRF values have a saturation point to their effectiveness. Specifically, in the presence of any realistic level of PRF variability, increasing PRF values above approximately 1000 wig contribute little to minimizing total tritium release.

  17. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, S.K. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel.

  18. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  19. How do Light and Water Acquisition Strategies Affect Species Selection during Secondary Succession in Moist Tropical Forests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schönbeck

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pioneer tree species have acquisitive leaf characteristics associated with high demand of light and water, and are expected to be shade and drought intolerant. Using leaf functional traits (specific leaf area, photosynthetic rate, relative water content and stomatal conductance and tree performance (mortality rate in the field, we assessed how shade and drought tolerance of leaves are related to the species’ positions along a successional gradient in moist tropical forest in Chiapas, Mexico. We quantified morphological and physiological leaf shade and drought tolerance indicators for 25 dominant species that characterize different successional stages. We found that light demand decreases with succession, confirming the importance of light availability for species filtering during early stages of succession. In addition, water transport levels in the leaves decreased with succession, but high water transport did not increase the leaf’s vulnerability to drought. In fact, late successional species showed higher mortality in dry years than early successional ones, against suggestions from leaf drought tolerance traits. It is likely that pioneer species have other drought-avoiding strategies, like deep rooting systems and water storage in roots and stems. More research on belowground plant physiology is needed to understand how plants adapt to changing environments, which is crucial to anticipate the effects of climate change on secondary forests.

  20. Influence of manure gases on puberty in gilts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malayer, J.R.; Kelly, D.T.; Diekman, M.A.; Brandt, K.E.; Sutton, A.L.; Long, G.G.; Jones, D.D.

    1987-05-01

    To determine whether manure gases can influence onset of puberty in gilts, 42 crossbred gilts were reared from 10 to 40 wk of age on concrete slats over a 1.22-m deep pit that was drained and refilled with clean water biweekly (clean group). Forty-one gilts were reared over a similar type pit where manure was allowed to accumulate (control group). Treatments were in two separate rooms of the same building with similar feeding, water, floor space, lighting and room temperature. Ventilation fans with timer controls in each room were set so fans in the clean environment ran twice as long as fans in the control environment. Aerial concentrations of ammonia in the control room were fourfold higher than in the clean room (21 vs 5 ppm), while aerial concentrations of hydrogen sulfide were similar. Average daily gain and feed efficiency were similar for both groups (.69 vs .72 kg/d (P = .31) and 1.61 vs 1.54 kg feed/kg gain (P = .52)). From 20 to 40 wk of age, all gilts were exposed to a mature boar three times weekly, utilizing four boars in rotation. Blood samples were collected weekly from each gilt by venipuncture and analyzed for progesterone to establish time of first ovulation. A greater proportion of gilts in the clean group attained puberty by 24 to 26 wk (P less than .05) and 27 to 29 wk of age (P less than .10) compared with the control group.

  1. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  2. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  3. Hydrodynamics of unitary Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan E.

    Unitary fermi gases have been widely studied as they provide a tabletop archetype for re- search on strongly coupled many body systems and perfect fluids. Research into unitary fermi gases can provide insight into may other strongly interacting systems including high temperature superconductor, quark-gluon plasmas, and neutron stars. Within the unitary regime, the equilib- rium transport coefficients and thermodynamic properties are universal functions of density and temperature. Thus, unitary fermi gases provide a archetype to study nonperturbative many-body physics, which is of fundamental significance and crosses several fields. This thesis reports on two topics regarding unitary fermi gases. A recent string theory conjecture gives a lower bound for the dimensionless ratio of shear viscosity of entropy, η/s ≥ 4pi /kb . Unitary fermi gases are a candidate for prefect fluids, yet η/s is well above the string theory bound. Using a stochastic formulation of hydrodynamics, we calculate a lower bound for this ratio accounting for the momentum dissipation from fluctuations. This lower bound is in good agreement with both theoretical and experimental results. The second question addressed is the simulation of elliptic flow. Elliptic flow, first observed in 2002, is a characteristic of strongly coupled systems and has been studied in both quark-gluon plasmas and unitary fermi gases. As such, simulations of these systems are of interest. We test a variety of lattice Boltzmann models and compare the simulation results to the theoretical and experimental findings.

  4. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, Gough Yumu, E-mail: gough@student.unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Roser, David, E-mail: djroser@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Corkish, Richard, E-mail: r.corkish@unsw.edu.au [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ashbolt, Nicholas J., E-mail: ashbolt@ualberta.ca [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); School of Public Health, South Academic Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Stuetz, Richard, E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270–740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6 h. Five log{sub 10} and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log{sub 10}s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6 h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for > 3-log{sub 10} reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5–2.5 fold at 365–455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. - Highlights: • Disinfection of E. coli and E. faecalis achieved with 270 and 365–455 nm LEDs • No significant disinfection was found with 310 and > 455 nm LEDs

  5. Light and turgor affect the water permeability (aquaporins) of parenchyma cells in the midrib of leaves of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangmin X; Steudle, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    In response to light, water relation parameters (turgor, half-time of water exchange, T(1/2), and hydraulic conductivity, Lp; T(1/2) proportional 1/Lp) of individual cells of parenchyma sitting in the midrib of leaves of intact corn (Zea mays L.) plants were investigated using a cell pressure probe. Parenchyma cells were used as model cells for the leaf mesophyll, because they are close to photosynthetically active cells at the abaxial surface, and there are stomata at both the adaxial and abaxial sides. Turgor ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 MPa under laboratory light condition (40 micromol m(-2) s(-1) at the tissue level), and individual cells could be measured for up to 6 h avoiding the variability between cells. In accordance with earlier findings, there was a big variability in T(1/2)s measured ranging from 0.5 s to 100 s, but the action of light on T(1/2)s could nevertheless be worked out for cells having T(1/2)s greater than 2 s. Increasing light intensity ranging from 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1) to 650 micromol m(-2) s(-1) decreased T(1/2) by a factor up to five within 10 min and increased Lp (and aquaporin activity) by the same factor. In the presence of light, turgor decreased due to an increase in transpiration, and this tended to compensate or even overcompensated for the effect of light on T(1/2). For example, during prolonged illumination, cell turgor dropped from 0.2 to 1.0 MPa to -0.03 to 0.4 MPa, and this drop caused an increase of T(1/2) and a reduction of cell Lp, i.e. there was an effect of turgor on cell Lp besides that of light. To separate the two effects, cell turgor (water potential) was kept constant while changing light intensity by applying gas pressure to the roots using a pressure chamber. At a light intensity of 160 micromol m(-2) s(-1), there was a reduction of T(1/2) by a factor of 2.5 after 10-30 min, when turgor was constant within +/-0.05 MPa. Overall, the effects of light on T(1/2) (Lp) were overriding those of turgor only when decreases in

  6. Food web efficiency differs between humic and clear water lake communities in response to nutrients and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faithfull, C L; Mathisen, P; Wenzel, A; Bergström, A K; Vrede, T

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates that clear and humic freshwater pelagic communities respond differently to the same environmental stressors, i.e. nutrient and light availability. Thus, effects on humic communities cannot be generalized from existing knowledge about these environmental stressors on clear water communities. Small humic lakes are the most numerous type of lake in the boreal zone, but little is known about how these lakes will respond to increased inflows of nutrients and terrestrial dissolved organic C (t-DOC) due to climate change and increased human impacts. Therefore, we compared the effects of nutrient addition and light availability on pelagic humic and clear water lake communities in a mesocosm experiment. When nutrients were added, phytoplankton production (PPr) increased in both communities, but pelagic energy mobilization (PEM) and bacterial production (BP) only increased in the humic community. At low light conditions, the addition of nutrients led to increased PPr only in the humic community, suggesting that, in contrast to the clear water community, humic phytoplankton were already adapted to lower ambient light levels. Low light significantly reduced PPr and PEM in the clear water community, but without reducing total zooplankton production, which resulted in a doubling of food web efficiency (FWE = total zooplankton production/PEM). However, total zooplankton production was not correlated with PEM, PPr, BP, PPr:BP or C:nutrient stoichiometry for either community type. Therefore, other factors such as food chain length, food quality, ultra-violet radiation or duration of the experiment, must have determined total zooplankton production and ultimately FWE.

  7. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurepin, V.A.; Kulik, D.A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO{sub 2} by incremental additions of O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni

  8. Light-induced transpiration alters cell water relations in figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings exposed to low root temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hee; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Chung, Gap Chae

    2008-06-01

    Water relation parameters including elastic modulus (epsilon), half-times of water exchange (T(w)(1/2)), hydraulic conductivity and turgor pressure (P) were measured in individual root cortical and cotyledon midrib cells in intact figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings, using a cell pressure probe. Transpiration rates (E) of cotyledons were also measured using a steady-state porometer. The seedlings were exposed to low ambient (approximately 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) or high supplemental irradiance (approximately 300 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPF density) at low (8 degrees C) or warm (22 degrees C) root temperatures. When exposed to low irradiance, all the water relation parameters of cortical cells remained similar at both root temperatures. The exposure of cotyledons to supplemental light at warm root temperatures, however, resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in T(w)(1/2) values accompanied with the reduced hydraulic conductivity in both root cortical (Lp) and cotyledon midrib cells (Lp(c)). Low root temperature (LRT) further reduced Lp(c) and E, whether it was measured under low or high irradiance levels. The reductions of Lp as the result of respective light and LRT treatments were prevented by the application of 1 microM ABA. Midrib cells required higher concentrations of ABA (2 microM) in order to prevent the reduction in Lp(c). When the exposure of cotyledons to light was accompanied by LRT, however, ABA proved ineffective in reversing the inhibition of Lp. LRT combined with high irradiance triggered a drastic 10-fold reduction in water permeability of cortical and midrib cells and increased epsilon and T(w)(1/2) values. Measurement of E indicated that the increased water demand by the transpiring plants was fulfilled by an increase in the apoplastic pathway as principal water flow route. The importance of water transport regulation by transpiration affecting the hydraulic conductivity of the roots is discussed.

  9. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel: Main oxide phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Keri R.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E.; Colgan, James P.; Kilcrease, David P.; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is explored using a simplified version of the main oxide phase. The main oxide phase consists of the actinides, lanthanides, and zirconium. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, quantitative technique for measuring zirconium in a uranium dioxide matrix without the need to dissolve the material. A second set of materials including cerium oxide is also analyzed to determine precision and limit of detection (LOD) using LIBS in a complex matrix. Two types of samples are used in this study: binary and ternary oxide pellets. The ternary oxide, (U,Zr,Ce)O2 pellets used in this study are a simplified version the main oxide phase of used nuclear fuel. The binary oxides, (U,Ce)O2 and (U,Zr)O2 are also examined to determine spectral emission lines for Ce and Zr, potential spectral interferences with uranium and baseline LOD values for Ce and Zr in a UO2 matrix. In the spectral range of 200 to 800 nm, 33 cerium lines and 25 zirconium lines were identified and shown to have linear correlation values (R2) > 0.97 for both the binary and ternary oxides. The cerium LOD in the (U,Ce)O2 matrix ranged from 0.34 to 1.08 wt% and 0.94 to 1.22 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 33 of Ce emission lines. The zirconium limit of detection in the (U,Zr)O2 matrix ranged from 0.84 to 1.15 wt% and 0.99 to 1.10 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 25 Zr lines. The effect of multiple elements in the plasma and the impact on the LOD is discussed.

  12. Conducting thermomechanical fatigue test in air at light water reactor relevant temperature intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, Mageshwaran [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Leber, Hans J., E-mail: hans.leber@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Diener, Markus; Spolenak, Ralph [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-01

    In Light Water Reactors (LWR), many structural components are made of austenitic stainless steels (SS). These components are subject to extreme conditions, such as large temperature gradients and pressure loads during service. Hence, the fatigue and fracture behavior of austenitic SS under these conditions has evoked consistent interest over the years. Most studies dealing with this problem in the past, investigated the isothermal fatigue (IF) condition, which is not the case in the service, and less attention has been paid to thermomechanical fatigue (TMF). Moreover, the existing codes of practice and standards for TMF testing are mainly derived from the high temperature TMF tests (T{sub mean} > 400 deg. C). This work presents the development of a facility to perform TMF tests under LWR relevant temperature interval in air. The realized testing parameters and tolerances are compared with the recommendations of existing codes of practice and standards from high temperature tests. The effectiveness of the testing facility was verified with series of TMF and IF tests performed on specimens made out of a commercial austenitic SS TP347 pipe material. The results revealed that the existing tolerances in standards are quite strict for the application of lower temperature ranges TMF tests. It was found that the synchronous, in-phase (IP) TMF tested specimens possess a higher lifetime than those subjected to the asynchronous, out-of-phase (OP) TMF and IF at T{sub max} in the investigated strain range for austenitic SS. Nevertheless, the fatigue lifetime of all the test conditions was similar in the engineering scale.

  13. Compilation of criticality data involving thorium or 233U and light water moderation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, B.F.

    1978-07-01

    The literature has been searched for criticality data for light water moderated systems which contain thorium or /sup 233/U, and data found are compiled herein. They are from critical experiments, extrapolations, and exponential experiments performed with homogeneous solutions and metal spheres of /sup 233/U; with lattices of fuel rods containing highly enriched /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ and /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/; and with arrays of cyclinders of /sup 233/U solutions. The extent of existing criticality data has been compared with that necessary to implement a thorium-based fuel cycle. No experiments have been performed with any solutions containing thorium. Neither do data exist for homogeneous /sup 233/U systems with H/U < 34, except for solid metal systems. Arrays of solution cylinders up to 3 x 3 x 3 have been studied. Data for solutions containing fixed or soluble poisons are very limited. All critical lattices using /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels (LWBR program) were zoned radially, and in most cases axially also. Only lattice experiments using /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels have been performed using a single fuel rod type. Critical lattices of /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods poisoned with boron have been measured, but only exponential experiments have been performed using boron-poisoned lattices of /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods. No criticality data exist for denatured fuels (containing significant amounts of /sup 238/U) in either solution or lattice configurations.

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, July 1998-December 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Kassner, T. F.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Smith, J. L.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain; R. V. (Energy Technology); ( APS-USR)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1998 to December 1998. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests have been conducted to determine the crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Procedures are presented for incorporating the effects of reactor coolant environments on the fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping steels. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in helium at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results have been used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were also conducted on two heats of Type 304 SS that were irradiated to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. Crack-growth-rate tests have been conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloys 600 and 690 under constant load to evaluate the resistance of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking in LWR environments.

  15. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  18. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V (Ver.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-09-01

    A light water fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V is an advanced version which has been produced by integrating FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), high burn-up fuel code EXBURN-I, and a number of functional improvements and extensions, to predict fuel rod behavior in normal and transient (not accident) conditions. The present report describes in detail the basic theories and structure, models and numerical solutions applied, improvements and extensions, and the material properties adopted in FEMAXI-V(Ver.1). FEMAXI-V deals with a single fuel rod. It predicts thermal and mechanical response of fuel rod to irradiation, including FP gas release. The thermal analysis predicts rod temperature distribution on the basis of pellet heat generation, changes in pellet thermal conductivity and gap thermal conductance, (transient) change in surface heat transfer to coolant, using radial one-dimensional geometry. The heat generation density profile of pellet can be determined by adopting the calculated results of burning analysis code. The mechanical analysis performs elastic/plastic, creep and PCMI calculations by FEM. The FP gas release model calculates diffusion of FP gas atoms and accumulation in bubbles, release and increase in internal pressure of rod. In every analysis, it is possible to allow some materials properties and empirical equations to depend on the local burnup or heat flux, which enables particularly analysis of high burnup fuel behavior and boiling transient of BWR rod. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, formats and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  19. Modeling the behavior of a light-water production reactor target rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been conducting a series of in-reactor experiments in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the amount of tritium released by permeation from a target rod under neutron irradiation. The model discussed in this report was developed from first principles to model the behavior of the first target rod irradiated in the ATR. The model can be used to determine predictive relationships for the amount of tritium that permeates through the target rod cladding during irradiation. The model consists of terms and equations for tritium production, gettering, partial pressure, and permeation, all of which are described in this report. The model addressed only the condition of steady state and features only a single adjustable parameter. The target rod design for producing tritium in a light-water reactor was tested first in the WC-1 in-reactor experiment. During irradiation, tritium is generated in the target rod within the ceramic lithium target material. The target rod has been engineered to limit the release of tritium to the reactor coolant during normal operations. The engineered features are a nickel-plated Zircaloy-4 getter and a barrier coating on the cladding surfaces. The ceramic target is wrapped with the getter material and the resulting ``pencils`` are inserted into the barrier coated cladding. These features of the rod are described in the report, along with the release of tritium from the ceramic target. The steady-state model could be useful for the design procedure of target rod components.

  20. Modeling the behavior of a light-water production reactor target rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been conducting a series of in-reactor experiments in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the amount of tritium released by permeation from a target rod under neutron irradiation. The model discussed in this report was developed from first principles to model the behavior of the first target rod irradiated in the ATR. The model can be used to determine predictive relationships for the amount of tritium that permeates through the target rod cladding during irradiation. The model consists of terms and equations for tritium production, gettering, partial pressure, and permeation, all of which are described in this report. The model addressed only the condition of steady state and features only a single adjustable parameter. The target rod design for producing tritium in a light-water reactor was tested first in the WC-1 in-reactor experiment. During irradiation, tritium is generated in the target rod within the ceramic lithium target material. The target rod has been engineered to limit the release of tritium to the reactor coolant during normal operations. The engineered features are a nickel-plated Zircaloy-4 getter and a barrier coating on the cladding surfaces. The ceramic target is wrapped with the getter material and the resulting pencils'' are inserted into the barrier coated cladding. These features of the rod are described in the report, along with the release of tritium from the ceramic target. The steady-state model could be useful for the design procedure of target rod components.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009–2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement

  2. A two-step photoexcitation system for photocatalytic water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ryu

    2011-10-01

    The developments of water-splitting systems that can efficiently use visible light have been a major challenge for many years in order to realize efficient conversion of solar light. We have developed a new type of photocatalysis system that can split water into H2 and O2 under visible light irradiation, which was inspired by the two-step photoexcitation (Zscheme) mechanism of natural photosynthesis in green plants. In this system, the water splitting reaction is broken up into two stages: one for H2 evolution and the other for O2 evolution; these are combined by using a shuttle redox couple (Red/Ox) in the solution. The introduction of a Z-scheme mechanism reduces the energy required to drive each photocatalysis process, extending the usable wavelengths significantly (~460 nm for H2 evolution and ~600 nm for O2evolution) from that in conventional water splitting systems (~460 nm) based on one-step photoexcitation in single semiconductor material.

  3. Improvement of water and light availability after thinning at a xeric site: which matters more? A dual isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuggiola, Arnaud; Ogée, Jérôme; Rigling, Andreas; Gessler, Arthur; Bugmann, Harald; Treydte, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Thinning fosters individual tree growth by increasing the availability of water, light and nutrients. At sites where water rather than light is limiting, thinning also enhances soil evaporation and might not be beneficial. Detailed knowledge of the short- to long-term physiological response underlying the growth responses to thinning is crucial for the management of forests already suffering from recurrent drought-induced dieback. We applied a dual isotope approach together with mechanistic isotope models to study the physiological processes underlying long-term growth enhancement of heavily thinned Pinus sylvestris in a xeric forest in Switzerland. This approach allowed us to identify and disentangle thinning-induced changes in stomatal conductance and assimilation rate. At our xeric study site, the increase in stomatal conductance far outweighed the increase in assimilation, implying that growth release in heavily thinned trees is primarily driven by enhanced water availability rather than increased light availability. We conclude that in forests with relatively isohydric species (drought avoiders) that are growing close to their physiological limits, thinning is recommended to maintain a less negative water balance and thus foster tree growth, and ultimately the survival of forest trees under drought. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Addition of ash on drained forested peatlands in southern Sweden. Effects on forest production, fluxes of greenhouse gases and water chemistry; Tillfoersel av aska i tallskog paa dikad torvmark i soedra Sverige. Effekter paa skogsproduktion, avgaang av vaexthusgaser och vattenkemi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikstroem, Ulf; Jacobson, Staffan; Ring, Eva [Skogforsk, Uppsala (Sweden); Ernfors, Maria; Klemedtsson, Leif [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences; Nilsson, Mats [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    In Sweden, about one million tones of wood ashes are produced annually, of which about 250,000-300,000 tones originate from biofuels, e.g. forest residues. Some of the ashes produced are deposited today. One alternative use is bringing back the ashes to the forest, recycling the mineral nutrients and base compounds. In bioashes, most essential mineral nutrients for plants are included, except for N, which is gasified at combustion. On most mineral soils in Sweden, plant available nitrogen is the nutrient limiting tree growth. On organic soils, tree growth is usually increased after addition of phosphorous and potassium. Thus, there is a potential for increased forest production on peatlands after ash fertilization. This can be a profitable measure. Nutrient compensation after harvesting involve ash addition with quite low doses. This is especially important in peatlands after whole-tree harvesting in order to prevent nutrient deficiency and reduced tree growth. However, there is a need for better knowledge concerning other environmental effects before ash addition can be put into large-scale practice. The general objective of this project is to study the effects of wood-ash addition on forest production and some other environmental variables on drained, forested peatlands. The studies concern tree growth, emissions of greenhouse gases and water chemistry (ground water and run off). An important issue addressed was if an expected increased accumulation of carbon (CO{sub 2}) due to increased tree growth can compensate for an expected increased emission of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) from the peat. In addition, the very effective greenhouse gas laughing gas (N{sub 2}O), must be taken into consideration. In 2003, two field experiments were established in the county of Smaaland in southeast Sweden, where wood ashes from biofuels were applied. One experiment was designed as a randomized block experiment (273 Anderstorp) where effects on forest

  5. Addition of ash on drained forested peatlands in southern Sweden. Effects on forest production, fluxes of greenhouse gases and water chemistry; Tillfoersel av aska i tallskog paa dikad torvmark i soedra Sverige. Effekter paa skogsproduktion, avgaang av vaexthusgaser och vattenkemi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikstroem, Ulf; Ernfors, Maria; Jacobson, Staffan; Klemedtsson, Leif; Nilsson, Mats; Ring, Eva

    2006-04-15

    In Sweden, about one million tones of wood ashes are produced annually, of which about 250,000 - 300,000 tones originate from forest residues. Some of the ashes produced are deposited today. One alternative use is bringing back the ashes to the forest, recycling the mineral nutrients and base compounds. In bioashes, most essential mineral nutrients for plants are included, except for N, which is gasified at combustion. On most mineral soils in Sweden, plant available nitrogen is the nutrient limiting tree growth. On organic soils, tree growth is usually increased after addition of phosphorous and potassium. Thus, there is a potential for increased forest production on peatlands after ash fertilization. This can be a profitable measure. Nutrient compensation after harvesting involve ash addition with quite low doses. This is especially important in peatlands after whole-tree harvesting in order to prevent nutrient deficiency and reduced tree growth. However, there is a need for better knowledge concerning other environmental effects before ash addition can be put into large-scale practice. The general objective of this project is to study the effects of wood-ash addition on forest production and some other environmental variables on drained, forested peatlands. The studies concern tree growth, emissions of greenhouse gases and water chemistry (ground water and run off). An important issue addressed was if an expected increased accumulation of carbon (CO{sub 2}) due to increased tree growth can compensate for an expected increased emission of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) from the peat. In addition, the very effective greenhouse gas laughing gas (N2O), must be taken into consideration. In 2003, two field experiments were established in the county of Smaaland in south Sweden, where wood ashes from biofuels were applied. One experiment was designed as a randomized block experiment where effects on forest production and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2}, CH

  6. Effects of water stress and light intensity on chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and pigments of Aloe vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Saeid; Tahmasebi-Sarvestani, Zeinolabedin; Modarres-Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Mokhtassi-Bidgoli, Ali; Nicola, Silvana

    2016-09-01

    Aloe vera L. is one of the most important medicinal plants in the world. In order to determine the effects of light intensity and water deficit stress on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and pigments of A. vera, a split-plot in time experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications in a research greenhouse. The factorial combination of three light intensities (50, 75 and 100% of sunlight) and four irrigation regimes (irrigation after depleting 20, 40, 60 and 80% of soil water content) were considered as main factors. Sampling time was considered as sub factor. The first, second and third samplings were performed 90, 180 and 270 days after imposing the treatments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the highest light intensity and the severe water stress decreased maximum fluorescence (Fm), variable fluorescence (Fv)/Fm, quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ФPSII), Chl and photochemical quenching (qP) but increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), minimum fluorescence (F0) and Anthocyanin (Anth). Additionally, the highest Fm, Fv/Fm, ФPSII and qP and the lowest NPQ and F0 were observed when 50% of sunlight was blocked and irrigation was done after 40% soil water depletion. Irradiance of full sunlight and water deficit stress let to the photoinhibition of photosynthesis, as indicated by a reduced quantum yield of PSII, ФPSII, and qP, as well as higher NPQ. Thus, chlorophyll florescence measurements provide valuable physiological data. Close to half of total solar radiation and irrigation after depleting 40% of soil water content were selected as the most efficient treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Semi-autonomous inline water analyzer: design of a common light detector for bacterial, phage, and immunological biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Elodie C T; Meunier, Damien; Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Franche, Nathalie; Bazin, Ingrid; Miclot, Bertrand; Larosa, Philippe; Escoffier, Camille; Fantino, Jean-Raphael; Garcia, Daniel; Ansaldi, Mireille; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Cholat, Pierre; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The use of biosensors as sensitive and rapid alert systems is a promising perspective to monitor accidental or intentional environmental pollution, but their implementation in the field is limited by the lack of adapted inline water monitoring devices. We describe here the design and initial qualification of an analyzer prototype able to accommodate three types of biosensors based on entirely different methodologies (immunological, whole-cell, and bacteriophage biosensors), but whose responses rely on the emission of light. We developed a custom light detector and a reaction chamber compatible with the specificities of the three systems and resulting in statutory detection limits. The water analyzer prototype resulting from the COMBITOX project can be situated at level 4 on the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale and this technical advance paves the way to the use of biosensors on-site.

  8. Modeling of Complex Wear Behavior Associated with Grid-to-Rod Fretting in Light Water Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations can be a significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. The multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. This paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  9. Heterophase Photocatalysts from Water-Soluble Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: An Example of Self-Initiation under Visible Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasimi, Saman; Prescher, Simon; Wang, Zi Jun; Landfester, Katharina; Yuan, Jiayin; Zhang, Kai A I

    2015-11-23

    We herein report a new design route to stable, heterophase photocatalysts, which function as highly dispersible conjugated polymer nanoparticles and porous monoliths under visible light in aqueous medium. They were constructed by attachment of the ionic-liquid species 1-alkyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide onto the side chains of a photoactive polymer. The structure configuration allows not only photocatalysis in aqueous environment but also a unique self-initiation radical cross-linking process to transform the water-soluble photoactive polymer into a heterophase system, either as nanoparticles or a porous monolith. High photocatalytic activity and reusability of the heterophase system were demonstrated in the degradation of organic dyes and reduction of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in water under visible-light irradiation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Research Update: Photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic hydrogen production using ferrites (MFe2O4 under visible light irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Dillert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of solar light for the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic production of molecular hydrogen from water is a scientific and technical challenge. Semiconductors with suitable properties to promote solar-driven water splitting are a desideratum. A hitherto rarely investigated group of semiconductors are ferrites with the empirical formula MFe2O4 and related compounds. This contribution summarizes the published results of the experimental investigations on the photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties of these compounds. It will be shown that the potential of this group of compounds in regard to the production of solar hydrogen has not been fully explored yet.

  11. Visible light mediated fast iterative RAFT synthesis of amino-based reactive copolymers in water at 20 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jianyu; Shi, Yi; Liu, Guhuan; Huang, Tao; Xu, Na; Zhu, Zhengguang; Cai, Yuanli

    2013-12-01

    The attempts to mediate iterative RAFT polymerization of ionic monomers through visible light irradiation in water at 20 °C is reported, in which complete conversions are attained in several tens of minutes and the propagation suspends/restarts immediately for multiple times on cycling irradiation. This technique suits the one-pot synthesis of NH2 /imidazole-based polymers with tuned structures from homo to random, block, random-block, and block-random-block, thus is robust and promising to control the sequence of the ionized water-soluble reactive copolymers. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Desulphurization of exhaust gases in chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur content of exhaust gases can be reduced by: desulphurization of fuels; modification of processes; or treatment of resultant gases. In this paper a few selected examples from the chemical industry in the German Democratic Republic are presented. Using modified processes and treating the resultant gases, the sulphuric content of exhaust gases is effectively reduced. Methods to reduce the sulfur content of exhaust gases are described in the field of production of: sulphuric acid; viscose; fertilizers; and paraffin.

  13. Stress analysis of the O-element pipe during the process of flue gases purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekvasil R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Equipment for flue gases purification from undesired substances is used throughout power and other types of industry. This paper deals with damaging of the O-element pipe designed to remove sulphur from the flue gases, i.e. damaging of the pipe during flue gases purification. This purification is conducted by spraying the water into the O-shaped pipe where the flue gases flow. Thus the sulphur binds itself onto the water and gets removed from the flue gas. Injection of cold water into hot flue gases, however, causes high stress on the inside of the pipe, which can gradually damage the O-element pipe. In this paper initial injection of water into hot pipe all the way to stabilization of temperature fields will be analyzed and the most dangerous places which shall be considered for fatigue will be determined.

  14. Characteristics and origin of natural gases in the Kuqa Depression of Tarim Basin, NW China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Y.R.; Zhao, C.Y.; Wang, Y.P.; Zhao, W.Z.; Peng, P.A.; Shuai, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Guangdong (China)

    2006-07-01

    Significant gas condensate as well as some black oils have been discovered in the Kuqa Depression of Tarim Basin, NW China. Dry gases with high {delta}{sup 13}C values occur in the Kelasu structural belt, wet, isotopically light gases in the Yiqikelik belt, whereas condensates are distributed mainly in the Front Uplift area. Kinetic modeling results show that the variation of methane and ethane isotopes with increasing vitrinite reflectance is independent of heating rates for a given source rock. Two maturity trends have been observed on a C2/C1-{delta}{sup 13}C plot, one for thermogenic gases associated with coal, another for oil-associated gases with minor contribution from biogenic gas. It is most likely that the gases in the Kelasu belt and Front Uplift area were derived from the Jurassic coal measures and Triassic lacustrine shales, respectively, with those in the Yiqikelik belt being the mixtures of gases from the two sources.

  15. Thermohydraulische Auslegung des Zwischenüberhitzers eines High Performance Light Water Reactors. (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7595)

    OpenAIRE

    Herbell, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    Der High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) ist ein Reaktorkonzept der IV. Generation (25 MPa und 500°C am Reaktoraustritt). In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden numerische Untersuchungen über den Einfluss von Auftriebseffekten auf gekühlte Rohrströmungen von Fluiden mit überkritischem Druck durchgeführt. Für das HPLWR Konzept werden eine Auslegung und thermodynamische Optimierung des Zwischenüberhitzers unter Berücksichtigung der Turbinenauslegung vorgestellt.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce Perry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  18. Light absorption and the photoformation of hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen in fog waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, R.; Anastasio, C.

    2017-09-01

    The atmospheric aqueous-phase is a rich medium for chemical transformations of organic compounds, in part via photooxidants generated within the drops. Here we measure light absorption, photoformation rates and steady-state concentrations of two photooxidants - hydroxyl radical (•OH) and singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) - in 8 illuminated fog waters from Davis, California and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Mass absorption coefficients for dissolved organic compounds (MACDOC) in the samples are large, with typical values of 10,000-15,000 cm2 g-C-1 at 300 nm, and absorption extends to wavelengths as long as 450-600 nm. While nitrite and nitrate together account for an average of only 1% of light absorption, they account for an average of 70% of •OH photoproduction. Mean •OH photoproduction rates in fogs at the two locations are very similar, with an overall mean of 1.2 (±0.7) μM h-1 under Davis winter sunlight. The mean (±1σ) lifetime of •OH is 1.6 (±0.6) μs, likely controlled by dissolved organic compounds. Including calculated gas-to-drop partitioning of •OH, the average aqueous concentration of •OH is approximately 2 × 10-15 M (midday during Davis winter), with aqueous reactions providing approximately one-third of the hydroxyl radical source. At this concentration, calculated lifetimes of aqueous organics are on the order of 10 h for compounds with •OH rate constants of 1 × 1010 M-1 s-1 or higher (e.g., substituted phenols such as syringol (6.4 h) and guaiacol (8.4 h)), and on the order of 100 h for compounds with rate constants near 1 × 109 M-1 s-1 (e.g., isoprene oxidation products such as glyoxal (152 h), glyoxylic acid (58 h), and pyruvic acid (239 h)). Steady-state concentrations of 1O2* are approximately 100 times higher than those of •OH, in the range of (0.1-3.0) × 10-13 M. Since 1O2* is a more selective oxidant than •OH, it will only react appreciably with electron-rich species such as dimethyl furan (lifetime of 2.0 h) and

  19. Application of water-assisted ultraviolet light in combination of chlorine and hydrogen peroxide to inactivate Salmonella on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuanghuan; Huang, Runze; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-09-18

    With the demand for fresh produce increases in recent decades, concerns for microbiological safety of fresh produce are also raised. To identify effective ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for fresh produce decontamination, we first determined the effect of three forms of UV treatment, dry UV (samples were treated by UV directly), wet UV (samples were dipped in water briefly and then exposed to UV), and water-assisted UV (samples were treated by UV while being immersed in agitated water) on inactivation of Salmonella inoculated on tomatoes and fresh-cut lettuce. In general, the water-assisted UV treatment was found to be the most effective for both produce items. Chlorine and hydrogen peroxide were then tested to determine whether they could be used to enhance the decontamination efficacy of water-assisted UV treatment and prevent transfer of Salmonella via wash water by completely eliminating it. Neither of them significantly enhanced water-assisted UV inactivation of Salmonella on tomatoes. Chlorine significantly improved the decontamination effectiveness of the water-assisted UV treatment for baby-cut carrots and lettuce, but not for spinach. In general, the single water-assisted UV treatment and the combined treatment of water-assisted UV and chlorine were similar or more effective than the chlorine washing treatment. In most of the cases, no Salmonella was detected in the wash water when the single water-assisted UV treatment was used to decontaminate tomatoes. In a few cases when Salmonella was detected in the wash water, the populations were very low,≤2CFU/mL, and the wash water contained an extremely high level of organic load and soil level. Therefore, the single water-assisted UV treatment could potentially be used as an environmentally friendly and non-chemical alternative to chlorine washing for tomatoes after validation in industrial scale. For lettuce, spinach and baby-cut carrots, the combined treatment of water-assisted UV treatment and chlorine

  20. Plasmonic enhancement of visible-light water splitting with Au-TiO2 composite aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSario, Paul A; Pietron, Jeremy J; DeVantier, Devyn E; Brintlinger, Todd H; Stroud, Rhonda M; Rolison, Debra R

    2013-09-07

    We demonstrate plasmonic enhancement of visible-light-driven splitting of water at three-dimensionally (3D) networked gold-titania (Au-TiO2) aerogels. The sol-gel-derived ultraporous composite nanoarchitecture, which contains 1 to 8.5 wt% Au nanoparticles and titania in the anatase form, retains the high surface area and mesoporosity of unmodified TiO2 aerogels and maintains stable dispersion of the ~5 nm Au guests. A broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) feature centered at ~550 nm is present for the Au-TiO2 aerogels, but not Au-free TiO2 aerogels, and spans a wide range of the visible spectrum. Gold-derived SPR in Au-TiO2 aerogels cast as films on transparent electrodes drives photoelectrochemical oxidation of aqueous hydroxide and extends the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 from the ultraviolet region to visible wavelengths exceeding 700 nm. Films of Au-TiO2 aerogels in which Au nanoparticles are deposited on pre-formed TiO2 aerogels by a deposition-precipitation method (DP Au/TiO2) also photoelectrochemically oxidize aqueous hydroxide, but less efficiently than 3D Au-TiO2, despite having an essentially identical Au nanoparticle weight fraction and size distribution. For example, 3D Au-TiO2 containing 1 wt% Au is as active as DP Au/TiO2 with 4 wt% Au. The higher photocatalytic activity of 3D Au-TiO2 derives only in part from its ability to retain the surface area and porosity of unmodified TiO2 aerogel. The magnitude of improvement indicates that in the 3D arrangement either a more accessible photoelectrochemical reaction interphase (three-phase boundary) exists or more efficient conversion of excited surface plasmons into charge carriers occurs, thereby amplifying reactivity over DP Au/TiO2. The difference in photocatalytic efficiency between the two forms of Au-TiO2 demonstrates the importance of defining the structure of Au[parallel]TiO2 interfaces within catalytic Au-TiO2 nanoarchitectures.

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors : semiannual report, July 2000 - December 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from July 2000 to December 2000. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. The fatigue strain-vs.-life data are summarized for the effects of various material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Effects of the reactor coolant environment on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation are discussed. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. A fracture toughness J-R curve test was conducted on a commercial heat of Type 304 SS that was irradiated to {approx}2.0 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. The results were compared with the data obtained earlier on steels irradiated to 0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) (0.45 and 1.35 dpa). Neutron irradiation at 288 C was found to decrease the fracture toughness of austenitic SSs. Tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloy 600 under cyclic loading to evaluate the enhancement of crack growth rates in LWR environments. Then, the existing fatigue crack growth data on Alloys 600 and 690 were analyzed to establish the effects of temperature, load ratio, frequency, and stress intensity range

  2. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  3. [CFC gases in medicinal sprays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P H; Svendsen, U G

    1989-03-20

    In 1987, approximately 1.18 million aerosol dispensers for medicinal use were sold in Denmark. These contained approximately 29 tons of completely halogenized CFC gases ("Freon") and the preparations were employed for the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. The possibilities of substitutes are discussed in this article. Preparations are already available which do not contain CFC. Producers of CFC are also attempting to develop new aerosol gases which do not damage the environment. Perhaps these will be found in medicinal preparations in the future.

  4. CO2 and water vapour exchange in four alpine herbs at two altitudes and under varying light and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, A S; Purohit, A N

    1991-06-01

    CO2 and water vapour exchange rates of four alpine herbs namely: Rheum emodi, R. moorcroftianum, Megacarpaea polyandra and Rumex nepalensis were studied under field conditions at 3600 m (natural habitat) and 550 m altitudes. The effect of light and temperature on CO2 and water vapour exchange was studied in the plants grown at lower altitude. In R. moorcroftianum and R. nepalensis, the average photosynthesis rates were found to be about three times higher at 550 m as compared to that under their natural habitat. However, in M. polyandra, the CO2 exchange rates were two times higher at 3600 m than at 550 m but in R. emodi, there were virtually no differences at the two altitudes. These results indicate the variations in the CO2 exchange rates are species specific. The change in growth altitude does not affect this process uniformly.The transpiration rates in R. emodi and M. polyandra were found to be very high at 3600 m compared to 550 m and are attributed to overall higher stomatal conductance in plants of these species, grown at higher altitude. The mid-day closure of stomata and therefore, restriction of transpirational losses of water were observed in all the species at 550 m altitude. In addition to the effect of temperature and relative humidity, the data also indicate some endogenous rhythmic control of stomatal conductance.The temperature optima for photosynthesis was close to 30°C in M. polyandra and around 20°C in the rest of the three species. High temperature and high light intensity, as well as low temperature and high light intensity, adversely affect the net rate of photosynthesis in these species.Both light compensation point and dark respiration rate increased with increasing temperature.The effect of light was more prominent on photosynthesis than the effect of temperature, however, on transpiration the effect of temperature was more prominent than the effect of light intensity.No definite trends were found in stomatal conductance with respect to

  5. Competition for nutrients and light among phytoplankton species in a mixed water column : Theoretical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J; Weissing, FJ

    1995-01-01

    A brief overview is given of modelling studies that aim to analyse the effects of nutrient and light limitations on the development of phytoplankton communities and lead to a qualitative understanding of the competitive interactions involved.

  6. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  7. Novel System for Continuous Measurements of Dissolved Gases in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, D. S.; Liem, J.; Owano, T. G.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases in lakes, rivers and oceans may be used to quantify underwater greenhouse gas generation, air-surface exchange, and pollution migration. Studies involving quantification of dissolved gases typically require obtaining water samples (from streams, lakes, or ocean water) and transporting them to a laboratory, where they are degased. The gases obtained are then generally measured using gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for concentrations and isotope ratios, respectively. This conventional, off-line, discrete-sample methodology is time consuming and labor intensive, and thus severely inhibits detailed spatial and temporal mapping of dissolved gases. In this work, we describe the commercial development of a new portable membrane-based gas extraction system (18.75" x 18.88" x 10.69", 16 kg, 85 watts) that interfaces directly to our cavity enhanced laser absorption based (or Off-Axis ICOS) gas analyzers to continuously and quickly measure concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved gases. By accurately controlling the water flow rate through the membrane contactor, gas pressure on the outside and water pressure on the inside of the membrane, the system can generate precise and highly reproducible results. Furthermore, the gas-phase mole fractions (parts per million, ppm) may be converted into dissolved gas concentrations (nM), by accurately measuring the gas flow rates in and out of the extraction system. We will present detailed laboratory test data that quantifies the performance (linearity, precision, and dynamic range) of the system for measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide) continuously and in real time.

  8. Effect of ultraviolet light on water- and fat-soluble vitamins in cow and goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneser, O; Karagul Yuceer, Y

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of UV light and heat treatment on vitamins A, B(2), C, and E in cow and goat milk. Vitamins were analyzed by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Ultraviolet and pasteurization treatments caused loss in vitamin C in milk. Pasteurization did not have any significant effect on vitamin B(2). However, UV light treatment decreased the amount of vitamin B(2) after several passes of milk through the UV system. In addition, UV light treatment decreased the amount of vitamins A and E. Vitamins C and E are more sensitive to UV light. UV light sensitivities of vitamins were C>E>A>B(2). These results show that UV light treatment decreases the vitamin content in milk. Also, the number of passes through the UV system and the initial amount of vitamins in milk are important factors affecting vitamin levels. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Water Grabbing and the Role of Power: Shifting Water Governance in the Light of Agricultural Foreign Direct Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bues

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the trend for foreign actors to secure land for agricultural production in low-income countries has increased substantially. The concurrent acquisition of water resources changes the institutional arrangement for water management in the investment areas. The consequences of 'land grabbing' on the local water governance systems have not so far been adequately examined. This paper presents an institutional analysis of a small-scale irrigation scheme in Ethiopia, where foreign and national horticultural farms started to use water from an irrigation canal that was formerly managed as a user-group common-pool resource by local smallholders. The study follows a qualitative case-study approach with semi-structured interviews as the main source of data. For the analysis we employed the Common-pool Resource Theory and the Distributional Theory of Institutional Change. We found that the former management regime changed in that most of the farmers’ water rights shifted to the investment farms. We found three key characteristics responsible for the different bargaining power of the two actor groups: dependency on natural resources, education and knowledge, and dependency on government support. We conclude that not only the struggle for land but also the directly linked struggle for water is led by diverging interests, which are determined by diverging power resources.

  10. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  11. Noble Gases as Mantle Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. R.; Porcelli, D.

    2003-12-01

    The study of the noble gases has been associated with some of the most illustrious names in experimental science, and some of the most profound discoveries. Fundamental advances in nuclear chemistry and physics - including the discovery of isotopes - have resulted from their study, earning Nobel Prizes for a number of early practitioners (Rutherford in 1908; Soddy in 1921; Aston in 1922) as well as for their discoverers (Ramsay and Rayleigh in 1904). Within the Earth Sciences, the noble gases found application soon after discovery - helium was used as a chronometer to estimate formation ages of various minerals (Strutt, 1908). In more recent times, the emphasis of noble gas research has shifted to include their exploitation as inert tracers of geochemical processes. In large part, this shift stems from the realization that primordial volatiles have been stored within the Earth since the time of planetary accretion and are still leaking to the surface today. In this introduction, we give a brief overview of the discovery of the noble gases and their continuing utility in the Earth Sciences, prior to setting into perspective the present contribution, which focuses on noble gases in the Earth's mantle.

  12. Mitigation options for accidental releases of hazardous gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies include: secondary confinement, deinventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented.

  13. Mechanical Analysis of an Innovative Assembly Box with Honeycomb Structures Designed for a High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbell, Heiko [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, 76661 Philippsburg (Germany); Himmel, Steffen; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a water cooled reactor concept of the 4. generation, operated at a pressure beyond the critical point of water. Assemblies of this innovative reactor concept need to be built with assembly and moderator boxes, like boiling water reactors, to provide enough moderator water between them to compensate the low coolant density in the core. Hot, superheated steam conditions, on the other hand, require thermally insulated box walls rather than solid box walls to reduce the heat up of the moderator water. As a new an innovative approach, this paper describes moderator- and assembly boxes built from stainless steel honeycomb sandwich structures, in which the honeycomb cells are filled with alumina for thermal insulation. In comparison to solid box walls, the use of the presented design can provide the same stiffness but allows a drastic reduction of structural material and thus less neutron absorption. Finite element analyses are used to verify the required stiffness, to identify stress concentrations and to optimize the design. (authors)

  14. Application of light-weight filtration media in an anoxic biofilter for nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Fei, Xiang; He, Shengbing; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili

    The research investigated nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water by the single-stage process of anoxic biofilter using light-weight polystyrene beads as filtration media. In this study, sodium acetate was used as an external carbon source and the nitrate removal efficiency under different regimes of hydraulic loading rate (HLR), water temperature, and C/N ratio was studied. In addition, the effect of backwash on denitrification efficiency was investigated. The results show that the biofilter achieved a high nitrate removal efficiency in 2 weeks at water temperatures ranging between 22 and 25 °C at a C/N ratio (COD:NO3(-)-N) of 6:1. Besides, the average removal efficiency of nitrate at HLRs of 5.66, 7.07 and 8.49 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) were 87.5, 87.3 and 87.1%, respectively. The average removal efficiency of nitrate nitrogen was 13.9% at a HLR of 5.66 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) at water temperatures of 12-14 °C, then it increased to 93.7% when the C/N ratio increased to 10. It suggests that the optimal hydraulic retention time is at water temperatures of 8-10 °C. The water consumption rate of backwash was about 0.2-0.3%, and denitrification efficiency returned to the normal level in 12 h after backwash.

  15. Changes in olive oil volatile organic compounds induced by water status and light environment in canopies of Olea europaea L. trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Caruso, Giovanni; Giunti, Giulia; Cuzzola, Angela; Saba, Alessandro; Raffaelli, Andrea; Gucci, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    Light and water are major factors in fruit development and quality. In this study, the effect of water and light in Olea europaea trees on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil was studied over 2 years. Mature fruits were harvested from three zones of the canopy with different light exposure (64%, 42% and 30% of incident light) of trees subjected to full, deficit or complementary irrigation. VOCs were determined by SPME GC-MS and analysed by principal component analysis followed by discriminant analysis to partition treatment effects. Fruit fresh weight and mesocarp oil content decreased in zones where intercepted light was less. Low light levels significantly slowed down fruit maturation, whereas conditions of water deficit accelerated the maturation process. The presence of cyclosativene and α-muurulene was associated with water deficit, nonanal, valencene with full irrigation; α-muurulene, (E)-2-hexanal were related to low light conditions, while trans-β-ocimene, α-copaene, (Z)-2-penten-1-ol, hexanal and nonanal to well exposed zones. The year strongly affected the VOC profile of olive oil. This is the first report on qualitative changes in VOCs induced by light environment and/or water status. This information is valuable to better understand the role of environmental factors on the sensory quality of virgin olive oil. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. PENETRATION OF NITROGEN INTO WATER AS A RESULT OF FERTILIZATION OF LIGHT SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Steinhoff-Wrześniewska; Agnieszka Rajmund; Joanna Godzwon

    2014-01-01

    The studies covered the branches: milk industry, meat processing and slaughterhouses. Performed in the paper were analyses of water consumption Comparison of water management in two branches showed that the highest water absorbability is in meat processing and slaughterhouses. The values obtained for meat industry indicate that it is the least diversified branch. Water consumption in the plants under study amounted from 1,2-4,7 m3/Mg for milk industry and 10,75 m3/Mg (average) for meat branches.

  17. PENETRATION OF NITROGEN INTO WATER AS A RESULT OF FERTILIZATION OF LIGHT SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Steinhoff-Wrześniewska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies covered the branches: milk industry, meat processing and slaughterhouses. Performed in the paper were analyses of water consumption Comparison of water management in two branches showed that the highest water absorbability is in meat processing and slaughterhouses. The values obtained for meat industry indicate that it is the least diversified branch. Water consumption in the plants under study amounted from 1,2-4,7 m3/Mg for milk industry and 10,75 m3/Mg (average for meat branches.

  18. Application of water-assisted ultraviolet light processing on the inactivation of murine norovirus on blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuhan; Li, Xinhui; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-12-02

    In this study, a novel set-up using water-assisted UV processing was developed and evaluated for its decontamination efficacy against murine norovirus (MNV-1) inoculated on fresh blueberries for both small and large-scale experimental setups. Blueberries were skin-inoculated with MNV-1 and treated for 1-5 min with UV directly (dry UV) or immersed in agitated water during UV treatment (water-assisted UV). The effect of the presence of 2% (v/v) blueberry juice or 5% crushed blueberries (w/w) in wash water was also evaluated. Results showed that water-assisted UV treatment generally showed higher efficacies than dry UV treatment. With 12,000 J/m(2) UV treatment in small-scale setup, MNV reductions of >4.32- and 2.48-log were achieved by water-assisted UV and dry UV treatments, respectively. Water-assisted UV showed similar inactivating efficacy as 10-ppm chlorine wash. No virus was detected in wash water after UV treatment or chlorine wash. MNV-1 was more easily killed on skin-inoculated blueberries compared with calyx-inoculated berries. When clear water was used as wash water in the large-scale setup, water-assisted UV treatment (UV dose of 12,000 J/m(2)) resulted in >3.20 log and 1.81 log MNV-1 reductions for skin- and calyx-inoculated berries, respectively. The presence of 2% blueberry juice in wash water decreased the decontamination efficacy of water-assisted UV and chlorine washing treatments. To improve the inactivation efficacy, the effect of combining water-assisted UV treatment with chlorine washing was also evaluated. The combined treatment had better or similar inactivation efficacy compared to water-assisted UV treatment and chlorine washing alone. Findings of this study suggest that water-assisted UV treatment could be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and potentially for other fresh produce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Grizzly Year-End Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Spencer; Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner; Marie Backman; Brian Wirth; Stephen Novascone; Jason Hales

    2013-09-01

    The Grizzly software application is being developed under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to address aging and material degradation issues that could potentially become an obstacle to life extension of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years of operation. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE multiphysics simulation environment, and can simultaneously solve a variety of tightly coupled physics equations, and is thus a very powerful and flexible tool with a wide range of potential applications. Grizzly, the development of which was begun during fiscal year (FY) 2012, is intended to address degradation in a variety of critical structures. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen for an initial application of this software. Because it fulfills the critical roles of housing the reactor core and providing a barrier to the release of coolant, the RPV is clearly one of the most safety-critical components of a nuclear power plant. In addition, because of its cost, size and location in the plant, replacement of this component would be prohibitively expensive, so failure of the RPV to meet acceptance criteria would likely result in the shutting down of a nuclear power plant. The current practice used to perform engineering evaluations of the susceptibility of RPVs to fracture is to use the ASME Master Fracture Toughness Curve (ASME Code Case N-631 Section III). This is used in conjunction with empirically based models that describe the evolution of this curve due to embrittlement in terms of a transition temperature shift. These models are based on an extensive database of surveillance coupons that have been irradiated in operating nuclear power plants, but this data is limited to the lifetime of the current reactor fleet. This is an important limitation when considering life extension beyond 60 years. The currently available data cannot be extrapolated with confidence further out in time because there is a potential for additional damage mechanisms (i

  20. Structural Analysis of Surface-Modified Oxidation-Resistant Zirconium Alloy Cladding for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; No, Hee Cheon; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    While the current zirconium-based alloy cladding (Zircaloy, here after) has served well for fission-product barrier and heat transfer medium for the nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) in steady-states, concerns surrounding its mechanical behavior during accidents have drawn serious attentions. In accidents, strength degradation of the current-zirconium based alloy cladding manifests at temperature around ∼800 .deg. C, which results in fuel ballooning. Above 1000 .deg. C, zircaloy undergoes rapid oxidation with steam. Formation of brittle oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) and underlying oxygen-saturated α-zircaloy as a consequence of steam oxidation leads to loss of cladding ductility. Indeed, the loss of zircaloy ductility upon the steam oxidation has been taken as a measure of fuel failure criteria as stated in 10 CFR 50.46. In addition, zircaloy steam oxidation is an exothermic reaction, which is an energy source that sharply accelerates temperature increase under loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) before significant fuel/core melting starts. Hydrogen generated as a result of zircaloy oxidation could cause an explosion if certain conditions are met. In steady-state operation, zircaloy embrittlement limits the burnup of the fuel rod to assure remaining cladding ductility to cope with accidents. As a way to suppress hydrogen generation and cladding embrittlement by oxidation, ideas of cladding coating with an oxidation-preventive layer have emerged. Indeed, among a numbers of 'accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF)' concepts, the concept of coating the current fuel rod. Some signs of success on the lab-scale oxidation-prevention have been confirmed with a few coating candidates. Yet, relatively less attention has been given to structural integrity of coated zirconium-based alloy cladding. It is important to note that oxidation

  1. Development of high-fidelity multiphysics system for light water reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magedanz, Jeffrey W.

    There has been a tendency in recent years toward greater heterogeneity in reactor cores, due to the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, burnable absorbers, and longer cycles with consequently higher fuel burnup. The resulting asymmetry of the neutron flux and energy spectrum between regions with different compositions causes a need to account for the directional dependence of the neutron flux, instead of the traditional diffusion approximation. Furthermore, the presence of both MOX and high-burnup fuel in the core increases the complexity of the heat conduction. The heat transfer properties of the fuel pellet change with irradiation, and the thermal and mechanical expansion of the pellet and cladding strongly affect the size of the gap between them, and its consequent thermal resistance. These operational tendencies require higher fidelity multi-physics modeling capabilities, and this need is addressed by the developments performed within this PhD research. The dissertation describes the development of a High-Fidelity Multi-Physics System for Light Water Reactor Analysis. It consists of three coupled codes -- CTF for Thermal Hydraulics, TORT-TD for Neutron Kinetics, and FRAPTRAN for Fuel Performance. It is meant to address these modeling challenges in three ways: (1) by resolving the state of the system at the level of each fuel pin, rather than homogenizing entire fuel assemblies, (2) by using the multi-group Discrete Ordinates method to account for the directional dependence of the neutron flux, and (3) by using a fuel-performance code, rather than a Thermal Hydraulics code's simplified fuel model, to account for the material behavior of the fuel and its feedback to the hydraulic and neutronic behavior of the system. While the first two are improvements, the third, the use of a fuel-performance code for feedback, constitutes an innovation in this PhD project. Also important to this work is the manner in which such coupling is written. While coupling involves combining

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peko, D. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Farmer, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Humrickhouse, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osborn, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    “end user” of the results from this DOE-sponsored work. The response to the Fukushima accident has been global, and there is a continuing multinational interest in collaborations to better quantify accident consequences and to incorporate lessons learned from the accident. DOE will continue to seek opportunities to facilitate collaborations that are of value to the U.S. industry, particularly where the collaboration provides access to vital data from the accident or otherwise supports or leverages other important R&D work. The purpose of the Reactor Safety Technology R&D is to improve understanding of beyond design basis events and reduce uncertainty in severe accident progression, phenomenology, and outcomes using existing analytical codes and information gleaned from severe accidents, in particular the Fukushima Daiichi events. This information will be used to aid in developing mitigating strategies and improving severe accident management guidelines for the current light water reactor fleet.

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-01

    “end user” of the results from this DOE-sponsored work. The response to the Fukushima accident has been global, and there is a continuing multinational interest in collaborations to better quantify accident consequences and to incorporate lessons learned from the accident. DOE will continue to seek opportunities to facilitate collaborations that are of value to the U.S. industry, particularly where the collaboration provides access to vital data from the accident or otherwise supports or leverages other important R&D work. The purpose of the Reactor Safety Technology R&D is to improve understanding of beyond design basis events and reduce uncertainty in severe accident progression, phenomenology, and outcomes using existing analytical codes and information gleaned from severe accidents, in particular the Fukushima Daiichi events. This information will be used to aid in developing mitigating strategies and improving severe accident management guidelines for the current light water reactor fleet.

  4. External magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2014-12-01

    We study the magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water emulsion of droplet diameter ~220 nm, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. Up to a magnetic field of 50 Gauss, the nanoemulsion remains opaque due to intense Mie scattering. Above 50 Gauss, the transmitted light intensity increases with external magnetic field up to a critical field (BC). Further increase in the magnetic field leads to a reduction in the transmitted intensity. The BC shifts to a lower magnetic field with increasing volume fraction (ϕ) and follows a power law dependence with ϕ, indicating a disorder-order transition. The scattered light intensity at the lobe part is found to increase with external magnetic field. The analysis of the lobe part reveals that the speckle contrast increases with external magnetic field due to the coarsening of the linear chain-like aggregates formed along the direction of the external magnetic field. The angular speckle correlation coefficient is found to be symmetrical on either side of the transmitted bright spot and decays exponentially with measurement angles.

  5. External magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Lahiri, B.B.; Philip, John, E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in

    2014-12-01

    We study the magnetic field dependent light transmission and scattered speckle pattern in a magnetically polarizable oil-in-water emulsion of droplet diameter ∼220 nm, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. Up to a magnetic field of 50 Gauss, the nanoemulsion remains opaque due to intense Mie scattering. Above 50 Gauss, the transmitted light intensity increases with external magnetic field up to a critical field (B{sub C}). Further increase in the magnetic field leads to a reduction in the transmitted intensity. The B{sub C} shifts to a lower magnetic field with increasing volume fraction (ϕ) and follows a power law dependence with ϕ, indicating a disorder–order transition. The scattered light intensity at the lobe part is found to increase with external magnetic field. The analysis of the lobe part reveals that the speckle contrast increases with external magnetic field due to the coarsening of the linear chain-like aggregates formed along the direction of the external magnetic field. The angular speckle correlation coefficient is found to be symmetrical on either side of the transmitted bright spot and decays exponentially with measurement angles.

  6. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  7. Aquatic environmental assessment of Lake Balaton in the light of physical-chemical water parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Vitkor; Németh, József; Juzsakova, Tatjana; Domokos, Endre; Kovács, Zsófia; Rédey, Ákos

    2017-11-01

    One of the issues of the Hungarian Water Management Strategy is the improvement and upgrading of the water of Lake Balaton. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) specifies and sets forth the achievement of the good ecological status. However, the assessment of the water quality of the lake as a complex system requires a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation procedure. Measurements were carried out around the Lake Balaton at ten different locations/sites and 13 physical-chemical parameters were monitored at each measurement site.For the interpretation of the water chemistry parameters the Aquatic Environmental Assessment (AEA) method devised by authors was used for the water body of the Lake Balaton. The AEA method can be used for all types of the water bodies since it is flexible and using individual weighting procedure for the water chemistry parameters comprehensive information can be obtain. The AEA method was compared with existing EIA methods according to a predefined criterion system and proved to be the most suitable tool for evaluating the environmental impacts in our study.On the basis of the results it can be concluded that the status of the quality of studied area on the Lake Balaton can be categorized as proper quality (from the outcome of the ten measurement sites this conclusion was reached at seven sites).

  8. Characterizing light attenuation within Northwest Florida Estuaries: Implications for RESTORE Act water quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Quality (WQ) condition is based on ecosystem stressor indicators (e.g. water clarity) which are biogeochemically important and critical when considering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill restoration efforts under the 2012 RESTORE Act. Nearly all of the proposed RESTORE proj...

  9. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, J.I.

    1985-02-08

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  10. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  11. Flexural behavior of visible light-cured composites as a function of temperature under water immersion test conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, T V; Hsiao, J

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature of the flexural behavior for four visible light-cured hybrid composite materials. Light-cured samples were post-cured for 24 h at 37 degrees C in 100% relative humidity prior to testing. Flexural tests were performed at the following water immersion temperatures: 5, 15, 25, 37, 45 and 55 degrees C, as well as in the dry condition which served as control. The following flexural property parameters were obtained as a function of test temperature: flexural strength, sigma fs, flexural modulus, Efs, flexural stress at 0.06% total offset strain, 0.06% (yield stress), and the total displacement at fracture, delta fs. Statistically significant differences (p creep behavior.

  12. Combined effects of low light and water stress on Jatropha curcas L. promotes shoot growth and morphological adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Christina Silveira Carneiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas (physic nut is a plant with economic and pharmaceutical uses. Basic studies on the influence of environmental factors on the early development of J. curcas are important for improving farming techniques and increasing productivity. This study investigated the adjustments of J. curcas to the environmental factors of drought and light stress in order to determine which factors most strongly affect the allocation of biomass during early growth. Leaves, stems, and roots of young plants were sampled and leaf area was measured during January and June in 2011. Plants of J. curcas that were grown in shade and subjected to water stress showed higher biomass allocation to aerial parts (mainly stems, which can be explained as a strategy for maximizing carbon assimilation. The pattern of biomass allocation between aerial components and the root system changed in plants grown in shade. During June 2011, biomass in shade-grown J. curcas was preferentially allocated to stems, indicating long-term adjustment. The lower biomass allocation to the root system suggests reduced exploitation of soil water even when this resource is scarce. Thus, over the long term, growth of J. curcas may be compromised by the combined effects of light stress and water deficit.

  13. Water and light improvement after thinning at a xeric site: Which weights the most? A dual isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuggiola, Arnaud; Ogée, Jérôme; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Bugmann, Harald; Treydte, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Reductions in stand density foster individual tree growth due to increases of resources such as water, light and nutrients. Detailed knowledge of the short- to long-term physiological response underlying the growth response to thinning is crucial for the management of forests already suffering from recurrent drought-induced dieback. We applied a dual isotope approach together with mechanistic isotope models such as MuSICA to study the physiological processes underlying growth enhancement in a long-term thinning experiment in a xeric Pinus sylvestris forest in Switzerland. This approach allowed for identifying and disentangling changes in stomatal conductance and assimilation rate. Our results indicate that an increase in stomatal conductance outweighs an increase in assimilation, meaning that the observed growth releases in heavy thinned trees at our xeric site are primarily driven by enhanced water availability rather than by the increase in light availability. We conclude that in areas with isohydric species (drought avoiders) that tend to grow close to their physiological limits, thinning is highly recommended to maintain a less negative water balance and thus foster tree growth, and ultimately the survival rate of individual trees and forests.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  15. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  16. Development of CFD thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics coupling methodologies for the prediction of local safety parameters for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Manes, Jorge

    2013-02-26

    This dissertation contributes to the development of high-fidelity coupled neutron kinetic and thermal hydraulic simulation tools with high resolution of the spatial discretization of the involved domains for the analysis of Light Water Reactors transient scenarios.

  17. Response of the physiological parameters of mango fruit (transpiration, water relations and antioxidant system) to its light and temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léchaudel, Mathieu; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Vidal, Véronique; Sallanon, Huguette; Joas, Jacques

    2013-04-15

    Depending on the position of the fruit in the tree, mango fruit may be exposed to high temperature and intense light conditions that may lead to metabolic and physiological disorders and affect yield and quality. The present study aimed to determine how mango fruit adapted its functioning in terms of fruit water relations, epicarp characteristics and the antioxidant defence system in peel, to environmental conditions. The effect of contrasted temperature and light conditions was evaluated under natural solar radiation and temperature by comparing well-exposed and shaded fruit at three stages of fruit development. The sun-exposed and shaded peels of the two sides of the well-exposed fruit were also compared. Depending on fruit position within the canopy and on the side of a well-exposed fruit, the temperature gradient over a day affected fruit characteristics such as transpiration, as revealed by the water potential gradient as a function of the treatments, and led to a significant decrease in water conductance for well-exposed fruits compared to fruits within the canopy. Changes in cuticle thickness according to fruit position were consistent with those of fruit water conductance. Osmotic potential was also affected by climatic environment and harvest stage. Environmental conditions that induced water stress and greater light exposure, like on the sunny side of well-exposed fruit, increased the hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde and total and reduced ascorbate contents, as well as SOD, APX and MDHAR activities, regardless of the maturity stage. The lowest values were measured in the peel of the shaded fruit, that of the shaded side of well-exposed fruit being intermediate. Mango fruits exposed to water-stress-induced conditions during growth adapt their functioning by reducing their transpiration. Moreover, oxidative stress was limited as a consequence of the increase in antioxidant content and enzyme activities. This adaptive response of mango fruit to its

  18. Modularized and water-cooled photo-catalyst cleaning devices for aquaponics based on ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Henglong; Lung, Louis; Wei, Yu-Chien; Huang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Zi-Yu; Chou, Yu-Yang; Lin, Anne-Chin

    2017-08-01

    The feasibility of applying ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LED's) as triggering sources of photo-catalyst based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-coating specifically for water-cleaning process in an aquaponics system was designed and proposed. The aquaponics system is a modern farming system to integrate aquaculture and hydroponics into a single system to establish an environmental-friendly and lower-cost method for farming fish and vegetable all together in urban area. Water treatment in an aquaponics system is crucial to avoid mutual contamination. we proposed a modularized watercleaning device composed of all commercially available components and parts to eliminate organic contaminants by using UV-LED's for TiO2 photo-catalyst reaction. This water-cleaning module consisted of two coaxial hollowed cylindrical pipes can be submerged completely in water for water treatment and cooling UV-LED's. The temperature of the UV-LED after proper thermal management can be reduced about 16% to maintain the optimal operation condition. Our preliminary experimental result by using Methylene Blue solution to simulate organic contaminants indicated that TiO2 photo-catalyst triggered by UV-LED's can effectively decompose organic compound and decolor Methylene Blue solution.

  19. Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland); Kilpinen, P. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    Funding from the Nordic Energy Research Programme and from Helsinki University of Technology allowed for the preparation of this e-book, accompanied by overhead sheets as presented during the lectures. All material can be downloaded as pdf documents from the internet-address http://www.hut.fi/-rzeveho//gasbook, hence the qualification e- book Updates will be produced chapter-by-chapter in the future. Objectives and scope. Textbooks on this subject are, in general, limited to what can be called 'conventional' flue gas cleaning for conventional pulverised coal combustion processes, i.e. wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD), bag filters and electrostatic precipitators for flyash and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control. Other books address waste incineration within a discussion on waste management. The scope of this material we tried to make more up-to-date and therefore wider than these texts. Apart from pollutant control the formation of the pollutants is briefly addressed, which often provides the key to abatement methods as an alternative to control methods. Secondly, more species are addressed such HS in addition to SO{sub 2}; N{sub 2}0, HCN and NH{sub 3} in addition to NO{sub x}; alkali metals and trace elements such as mercury, halogenic compounds such as HO and dioxines and furanes; and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Also greenhouse gases, mainly CO{sub 2}, and ozone-depleting gases, such as CFCs, are briefly discussed. The motivation for this was to cover flue gases from combustion as well as fuel gases from gasification processes, using various types of furnaces and boilers, and to extend the range of chemical compounds to those found in the product gases in waste incineration and energy-from-waste processes. Finally, not only 'cold' gas cleaning but also 'hot' gas cleaning is addressed. All this in an attempt to cover the wide spectrum of pollutants found in

  20. Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R.; Kilpinen, P.

    2004-07-01

    Textbooks on this subject are, in general, limited to what can be called 'conventional' flue gas cleaning for conventional pulverised coal combustion processes, i.e. wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD), bag filters and electrostatic precipitators for flyash and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control. Other books address waste incineration within a discussion on waste management. The scope of this material we tried to make more up-to-date and therefore wider than these texts. Apart from pollutant control the formation of the pollutants is briefly addressed, which often provides the key to abatement methods as an alternative to control methods. Secondly, more species are addressed such HS in addition to SO{sub 2}; N{sub 2}O, HCN and NH{sub 3} in addition to NO{sub x}; alkali metals and trace elements such as mercury, halogenic compounds such as HO and dioxines and furanes; and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Also greenhouse gases, mainly CO{sub 2}, and ozone-depleting gases, such as CFCs, are briefly discussed. The motivation for this was to cover flue gases from combustion as well as fuel gases from gasification processes, using various types of furnaces and boilers, and to extend the range of chemical compounds to those found in the product gases in waste incineration and energy-from- waste processes. Finally, not only 'cold' gas cleaning but also 'hot' gas cleaning is addressed. All this in an attempt to cover the wide spectrum of pollutants found in gas streams in modern thermal power generation processes, being based on combustion or gasification, with a fossil fuel, biomass or waste-derived fuel as input. Recovery boilers for black liquor are, however, not specifically-dealt with. Updates of the textbook has been produced and will also be so in future chapter by chapter. For the third edition, tine latest emission standards data for SO{sub x}, NO{sub x} and

  1. Near infrared light-driven water oxidation in a molecule-based artificial photosynthetic device using an upconversion nano-photosensitizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Chen, H.C.; Kong, X.; Zhang, Y.; Tu, L.; Chang, Y.; Wu, F.; Wang, T.; Reek, J.N.H.; Brouwer, A.M.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first demonstration of a near infrared light driven water oxidation reaction in a molecule-based artificial photosynthetic device using an upconversion nano-photosensitizer. One very attractive advantage of this system is that using NIR light irradiation does not cause significant

  2. Light induces phosphorylation of glucan water dikinase, which precedes starch degradation in turions of the duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Rezarta; Hippler, Michael; Machelett, Bernd; Appenroth, Klaus-J

    2004-05-01

    Degradation of storage starch in turions, survival organs of Spirodela polyrhiza, is induced by light. Starch granules isolated from irradiated (24 h red light) or dark-stored turions were used as an in vitro test system to study initial events of starch degradation. The starch-associated pool of glucan water dikinase (GWD) was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by western blotting using antibodies raised against GWD. Application of this technique allowed us to detect spots of GWD, which are light induced and absent on immunoblots prepared from dark-adapted plants. These spots, showing increased signal intensity following incubation of the starch granules with ATP, became labeled by randomized [betagamma-33P]ATP but not by [gamma-33P]ATP and were removed by acid phosphatase treatment. This strongly suggests that they represent a phosphorylated form(s) of GWD. The same light signal that induces starch degradation was thus demonstrated for the first time to induce autophosphorylation of starch-associated GWD. The in vitro assay system has been used to study further effects of the light signal that induces autophosphorylation of GWD and starch degradation. In comparison with starch granules from dark-adapted plants, those from irradiated plants showed increase in (1) binding capacity of GWD by ATP treatment decreased after phosphatase treatment; (2) incorporation of the beta-phosphate group of ATP into starch granules; and (3) rate of degradation of isolated granules by starch-associated proteins, further enhanced by phosphorylation of starch. The presented results provide evidence that autophosphorylation of GWD precedes the initiation of starch degradation under physiological conditions.

  3. Light Induces Phosphorylation of Glucan Water Dikinase, Which Precedes Starch Degradation in Turions of the Duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Rezarta; Hippler, Michael; Machelett, Bernd; Appenroth, Klaus-J.

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of storage starch in turions, survival organs of Spirodela polyrhiza, is induced by light. Starch granules isolated from irradiated (24 h red light) or dark-stored turions were used as an in vitro test system to study initial events of starch degradation. The starch-associated pool of glucan water dikinase (GWD) was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by western blotting using antibodies raised against GWD. Application of this technique allowed us to detect spots of GWD, which are light induced and absent on immunoblots prepared from dark-adapted plants. These spots, showing increased signal intensity following incubation of the starch granules with ATP, became labeled by randomized [βγ-33P]ATP but not by [γ-33P]ATP and were removed by acid phosphatase treatment. This strongly suggests that they represent a phosphorylated form(s) of GWD. The same light signal that induces starch degradation was thus demonstrated for the first time to induce autophosphorylation of starch-associated GWD. The in vitro assay system has been used to study further effects of the light signal that induces autophosphorylation of GWD and starch degradation. In comparison with starch granules from dark-adapted plants, those from irradiated plants showed increase in (1) binding capacity of GWD by ATP treatment decreased after phosphatase treatment; (2) incorporation of the β-phosphate group of ATP into starch granules; and (3) rate of degradation of isolated granules by starch-associated proteins, further enhanced by phosphorylation of starch. The presented results provide evidence that autophosphorylation of GWD precedes the initiation of starch degradation under physiological conditions. PMID:15122031

  4. Catalytic combustion of actual low and medium heating value gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of both low and medium heating value gases using actual coal derived gases obtained from operating gasifiers was demonstrated. A fixed bed gasifier with a complete product gas cleanup system was operated in an air blown mode to produce low heating value gas. A fluidized bed gasifier with a water quench product gas cleanup system was operated in both an air enriched and an oxygen blown mode to produce low and medium, heating value gas. Noble metal catalytic reactors were evaluated in 12 cm flow diameter test rigs on both low and medium heating value gases. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5% were obtained with all coal derived gaseous fuels. The NOx emissions ranged from 0.2 to 4 g NO2 kg fuel.

  5. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author).

  6. KIT multi-physics tools for the analysis of design and beyond design basis accidents of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Victor Hugo; Miassoedov, Alexei; Steinbrueck, M.; Tromm, W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes the KIT numerical simulation tools under extension and validation for the analysis of design and beyond design basis accidents (DBA) of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The description of the complex thermal hydraulic, neutron kinetics and chemo-physical phenomena going on during off-normal conditions requires the development of multi-physics and multi-scale simulations tools which are fostered by the rapid increase in computer power nowadays. The KIT numerical tools for DBA and beyond DBA are validated using experimental data of KIT or from abroad. The developments, extensions, coupling approaches and validation work performed at KIT are shortly outlined and discussed in this paper.

  7. Efficient separation of conjugated polymers using a water soluble glycoprotein matrix: from fluorescence materials to light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Netta; Wildeman, Jurjen; Mentovich, Elad D; Schnitzler, Tobias; Belgorodsky, Bogdan; Prusty, Deepak K; Rimmerman, Dolev; Herrmann, Andreas; Richter, Shachar

    2014-03-01

    Optically active bio-composite blends of conjugated polymers or oligomers are fabricated by complexing them with bovine submaxilliary mucin (BSM) protein. The BSM matrix is exploited to host hydrophobic extended conjugated π-systems and to prevent undesirable aggregation and render such materials water soluble. This method allows tuning the emission color of solutions and films from the basic colors to the technologically challenging white emission. Furthermore, electrically driven light emitting biological devices are prepared and operated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Vivifying properties of water in the light of new concepts of catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalninsh, K. K.; Pavlova, L. P.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we try to turn a new page in the research on the relationships between water and life. The authors rely on the idea that water is an active catalytic medium which governs the proceeding of chemical and biochemical life processes. This point of view has not been considered in scientific literature until very recently. This principally new approach is presented in this study in its theoretical aspect, focusing on the catalytic role of water in life's anti-entropic tendency. The role of water in the origins of life is discussed with respect to the continuity of views of eminent scientists V.I. Vernadsky and A.I. Oparin, and the development of anticipatory representation on the basis of accelerated catalytic processes as proposed by P.K. Anokhin.

  9. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used.

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  11. Atmospheric greenhouse gases detection by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concerns the theoretical and experimental development of a new methodology for greenhouse gases detection based on the optical absorption. The problem relies on the unambiguous retrieval of a gas concentration from differential absorption measurements, in which the spectral width of the light source is wider than one or several absorption lines of the considered target gas given that the detection is not spectrally resolved. This problem could lead to the development of a robust r...

  12. Landfill gases and some effects on vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin B. Flower; Ida A. Leone; Edward F. Gilman; John J. Arthur

    1977-01-01

    Gases moving from refuse landfills through soil were studied in New Jersey. The gases, products of anaerobic decomposition of organic matter in the refuse, caused injury and death of peach trees, ornamentals, and commercial farm crops, and create possible hazards to life and property because of the entrance of combustible gases into residences. Remedial measures are...

  13. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  14. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  15. Dipolar quantum gases and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    Dipolar interactions are fundamentally different from the usual van der Waals forces in real gases. Besides the anisotropy the dipolar interaction is nonlocal and as such allows for self organized structure formation. Candidates for dipolar species are polar molecules, Rydberg atoms and magnetic atoms. More than ten years ago the first dipolar effects in a quantum gas were observed in an ultracold Chromium gas. By the use of a Feshbach resonance a purely dipolar quantum gas was observed three years after. By now dipolar interaction effects have been observed in lattices and also for polar molecules. Recently it became possible to study degenerate gases of lanthanide atoms among which one finds the most magnetic atoms. Similar to the Rosensweig instability in classical magnetic ferrofluids self-organized structure formation was expected. In our experiments with quantum gases of Dysprosium atoms we could recently observe the formation of a droplet crystal. In contrast to theoretical mean field based predictions the superfluid droplets did not collapse. We find that this unexpected stability is due to beyond meanfield quantum corrections of the Lee-Huang-Yang type. We observe and study self-bound droplets which can interfere with each other. These droplets are 100 million times less dense than liquid helium droplets and open new perspectives as a truly isolated quantum system.

  16. Investigation of very high burnup UO{sub 2} fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappia, Fabiola

    2017-03-27

    Historically, the average discharge burnup of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel has increased almost continuously. On one side, increase in the average discharge burnup is attractive because it contributes to decrease part of the fuel cycle costs. On the other side, it raises the practical problem of predicting the performance, longevity and properties of reactor fuel elements upon accumulation of irradiation damage and fission products both during in-reactor operation and after discharge. Performance of the fuel and structural components of the core is one of the critical areas on which the economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear energy production hinges. Along the pellet radius, the fuel matrix is subjected to extremely heterogeneous alteration and damage, as a result of temperature and burnup gradients. In particular, in the peripheral region of LWR UO{sub 2} fuel pellets, when the local burnup exceeds 50-70 GWd/tHM, a microstructural transformation starts to take place, as a consequence of enhanced accumulation of radiation damage, fission products and limited thermal recovery. The newly formed structure is commonly named High Burnup Structure (HBS). The HBS is characterised by three main features: (a) formation of submicrometric grains from the original grains, (b) depletion of fission gas from the fuel matrix, (c) steep increase in the porosity, which retains most of the gas depleted from the fuel matrix. The last two aspects rose significant attention because of the important impact of the fission gas behaviour on integral fuel performance. The porosity increase controls the gas-driven swelling, worsening the cladding loading once the fuel-cladding gap is closed. Another concern is that the large retention of fission gas within the HBS could lead to significant release at high burnups through the degradation of thermal conductivity or contribute to fuel pulverisation during accidental conditions. Need of more experimental investigations about the

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enterica on Blueberries in Water Using Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuhan; Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-07-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) has antimicrobial effects, but the shadowing effect has limited its application. In this study, a novel setup using UV processing in agitated water was developed to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on blueberries. Blueberries were dip- or spot-inoculated with E. coli or Salmonella. Blueberries inoculated with E. coli were treated for 2 to 10 min with UV directly (dry UV) or immersed in agitated water during UV treatment (wet UV). E. coli was most easily killed on spot-inoculated blueberries with a 5.2-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Dip-inoculated blueberries were the most difficult to be decontaminated with only 1.6-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Wet UV treatment generally showed higher efficacies than dry UV treatment, achieving an average of 1.4 log more reduction for spot-inoculated blueberries. For dip-inoculated blueberries, chlorine washing and UV treatments were less effective, achieving blueberries were UV-treated while being immersed in agitated water containing 100 ppm SDS, 0.5% levulinic acid or 10 ppm chlorine. The 3 chemicals did not significantly enhance the wet UV treatment. Findings of this study suggest that UV treatment could be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and potentially for other fresh produce. A novel UV light system for decontamination of blueberries in water was developed and evaluated. Results demonstrated that the decontamination efficacy of this system was generally as effective as chlorine washing, indicating that it could potentially be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and other fresh produce. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins.

  19. The Influence of Water Sorption of Dental Light-Cured Composites on Shrinkage Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Bociong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contraction stress generated during the photopolymerization of resin dental composites is the major disadvantage. The water sorption in the oral environment should counteract the contraction stress. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of the water sorption of composite materials on polymerization shrinkage stress generated at the restoration-tooth interface. The following materials were tested: Filtek Ultimate, Gradia Direct LoFlo, Heliomolar Flow, Tetric EvoCeram, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Tetric EvoFlow, Tetric EvoFlow Bulk Fill, X-tra Base, Venus BulkFil, and Ceram.X One. The shrinkage stress was measured immediately after curing and after: 0.5 h, 24 h, 72 h, 96 h, 168 h, 240 h, 336 h, 504 h, 672 h, and 1344 h by means of photoelastic study. Moreover, water sorption and solubility were evaluated. Material samples were weighted on scale in time intervals to measure the water absorbency and the dynamic of this process. The tested materials during polymerization generated shrinkage stresses ranging from 6.3 MPa to 12.5 MPa. Upon water conditioning (56 days, the decrease in shrinkage strain (not less than 48% was observed. The decrease in value stress in time is material-dependent.

  20. Modeling of water lighting process and calculation of the reactor-clarifier to improve energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolubovich, Yuriy; Skolubovich, Aleksandr; Voitov, Evgeniy; Soppa, Mikhail; Chirkunov, Yuriy

    2017-10-01

    The article considers the current questions of technological modeling and calculation of the new facility for cleaning natural waters, the clarifier reactor for the optimal operating mode, which was developed in Novosibirsk State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering (SibSTRIN). A calculation technique based on well-known dependences of hydraulics is presented. A calculation example of a structure on experimental data is considered. The maximum possible rate of ascending flow of purified water was determined, based on the 24 hour clarification cycle. The fractional composition of the contact mass was determined with minimal expansion of contact mass layer, which ensured the elimination of stagnant zones. The clarification cycle duration was clarified by the parameters of technological modeling by recalculating maximum possible upward flow rate of clarified water. The thickness of the contact mass layer was determined. Likewise, clarification reactors can be calculated for any other lightening conditions.

  1. INACTIVATION OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA USING PULSED UV-LIGHT AND ITS APPLICATION IN WATER DISINFECTION AND QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sharifi-Yazdi H. Darghahi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The lethality of pulsed ultra-violet (UV rich light for the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria has been investigated. A low pressure xenon filled flash lamps that produced UV intensities have been used. The pulsed operation of the system enable the release of electrical energy stored in the capacitor into the flash lamp within a short time and produces the high current and high peak power required for emitting the intense UV flash. The flash frequency was adjusted to one pulse per second. Several types of bacteria were investigated for their susceptibility to pulsed UV illumination. The treated bacterial populations were reduced and determined by direct viable counts. Among the tested bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most susceptible to the pulsed UV- light with a 8 log10 cfu/ml reduction after 11 pulses, while the spores of Bacillus megaterium was the most resistant and only 4 log10 cfu/ml reduction achieved after 50 pulses of illumination. The results of this study demonstrated that pulsed UV- light technology could be used as an effective method for the inactivation, of pathogenic bacteria in different environments such as drinking water.

  2. Improved Drinking Water Disinfection with UVC-LEDs for Escherichia Coli and Bacillus Subtilis Utilizing Quartz Tubes as Light Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is investigated utilizing light guidance capabilities of optical pure quartz glass in order to maximize drinking water disinfection efficiency with UVC-light-emitting diodes (LEDs. Two experimental setups consisting of soda-lime AR® glass (VWR, Darmstadt, Germany or HSQ® 100 quartz glass (Heraeus, Wasserburg, Germany reactors were designed to compare disinfection rates with and without total reflection of UVC radiation along the reactor walls. Each reactor was filled with 9 mL bacteria samples containing either E. coli DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen 498 or B. subtilis DSM 402 strains (concentration 1–3 × 106 colony forming units (CFU/mL with and without additional mixing and irradiation periods of 10, 40, and 90 s. Disinfection rates were increased up to 0.95 log10 (E. coli and 0.75 log10 (B. subtilis by the light guide approach in stagnant samples. The same experiments with mixing of the samples resulted in an increased disinfection efficiency of 3.07 log10 (E. coli and 1.59 log10 (B. subtilis. Optical calculations determine that total reflection is achieved with the applied UVC-LED’s viewing angle of 15°. Furthermore measurements show that HSQ® 100 quartz has a transmittance of 92% at 280 nm UVC irradiation compared to the transmittance of soda-lime glass of 2% (1 mm wall thickness.

  3. Plasticity of whole plant and leaf traits in Rubia peregrina in response to light, nutrient and water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Marie-Laure; Garnier, Eric

    2002-12-01

    This study aims at testing whether whole plant and aerial metamer traits of Rubia peregrina L., a small clonal shrub, differed in magnitude of response to variations in light, nutrient or water availability, comparing plants at the same age. The second aim was to test whether it was possible to identify a limited set of traits to assess phenotypic plasticity. Almost all traits significantly differed among treatments. These differences were partly due to changes in plant size for two whole plant and one metamer traits. No difference in grand plasticity, calculated with adjusted means correcting for size effect, was found between whole plant and aerial metamer traits. Some traits responded only to one resource (e.g. mean internode length to light) or two resources (e.g. SLA to light and nutrient). Root Mass Ratio was the most responsive of traits showing similar magnitude of plasticity to each of the three resources. These results suggest that (i) no clear difference in plasticity exists between whole plant and aerial metamer traits; (ii) allocation-related traits are of more general value than aerial metamer traits to assess the plasticity of a species.

  4. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P contaminated with water or saliva showed significantly worse performance than the other procedures evaluated (P Contamination (with water or saliva) did not affect either bond strength or adhesive remaining on the teeth for TSEP/ Transbond XT, TSEP/Transbond PLUS, or TMIP/Transbond PLUS (P > .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  5. In situ, high sensitivity, measurement of sup 9 sup 0 strontium in ground water using Cherenkov light

    CERN Document Server

    Bowyer, T W; Hossbach, T W; Hansen, R; Wilcox, W A

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of sup 9 sup 0 Sr in soils and ground water is important for characterization and remediation of radioactively contaminated sites. Measuring the sup 9 sup 0 Sr content to a few pCi/g of soil has been accomplished based on a design of scintillating fibers in a multilayered configuration measuring the high-energy beta emitted from sup 9 sup 0 Y decay (when in secular equilibrium with sup 9 sup 0 Sr), but has not been applied to water because the technique is sensitive to only the first few mm of soil. The volume of the source to which the detector is sensitive limits the theoretical sensitivity of such a detector, unless chemical preprocessing to strip the sup 9 sup 0 Sr from the water is performed. sup 9 sup 0 Sr activity in water can be quantified by detecting the high-energy beta particle by the Cherenkov light it produces when the high-energy beta from sup 9 sup 0 Y passes through the medium. We have used this phenomenon to sensitively measure sup 9 sup 0 Sr ( sup 9 sup 0 Y) from a volume of...

  6. Light absorption by water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric fine particles in the central Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YanGe; Xu, JianZhong; Shi, JinSen; Xie, CongHui; Ge, XinLei; Wang, JunFeng; Kang, ShiChang; Zhang, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Brown carbon (BrC) has recently received much attention because of its light absorption features. The chemical compositions, optical properties, and sources of fine aerosol at a high-elevation mountain observatory (4730 m a.s.l.) in the central Tibetan Plateau were measured between 31 May and 1 July 2015. A low flow-rate sampler was used to collect 24-h average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) filter samples. Water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and light absorption by water-soluble BrC were determined for 26 filter samples. The mean (± 1σ) OC and WSOC concentrations were 0.76 ± 0.43 and 0.39 ± 0.15 μgC/m3, respectively, and the mean WSOC/OC mass ratio was 0.59 ± 0.22. The OC and WSOC concentrations were relatively higher (0.59-1.80 and 0.33-0.83 μgC/m3, respectively) during the pre-monsoon period (2-13 June) and were relatively lower (0.27-0.77 and 0.12-0.50 μgC/m3, respectively) during the monsoon period (14 June to 1 July), probably because of wet scavenging of aerosols during long-range transport and the presence of cleaner marine air masses during the monsoon period. The absorption spectra of PM2.5 water extracts smoothly increase from visible range to ultraviolet range. The absorption Ångström exponent, which describes the wavelength dependence of water-soluble BrC, was 2.74-10.61 (mean 6.19 ± 1.70), and its value was similar in the pre-monsoon period (6.57 ± 0.56) to that in the monsoon period (5.91 ± 2.14). The water-soluble BrC mass absorption efficiency, 0.38 ± 0.16 m2/(g C), was much lower than those observed in most urban areas but similar to those in other remote sites. Absorption coefficient at 365 nm, typically used as a proxy for water-soluble BrC, correlated well with the WSOC concentration (R 2  = 0.57), K+ concentration (R 2  = 0.75), and organic aerosol biomass burning markers characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (C2H4O2+ + C3H5O2

  7. Larviculture of two neotropical species with different distributions in the water column in light- and dark-colored tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mattos Pedreira

    Full Text Available The influence of tank color on the visual perception of fish larvae and the success of their cultivation depends on the characteristics of each species combined with environmental factors. In this study, we determined the effect of light and dark tank colors on the larviculture of pacamã (Lophiosilurusalexandri, a species with a benthonic habit, and curimatá-pioa (Prochilodus costatus, which swims actively in the water column. Larvae of pacamã and curimatá-pioa were cultivated for 10 days in 5-L tanks, at a density of 15 larvae L-1 and luminosity of 141.7 ± 8.95 lux, and fed Artemia nauplii. Four tank colors were used: green, light blue, brown, and black (with four replications. Survival, biomass and Fulton's condition factor for pacamã larvae were similar in the different colored tanks. However, the larvae in the green tanks showed lower weight than those cultivated in black and brown tanks, as well as shorter total length than that of larvae in the brown-colored tanks. These results are probably due to the association between tank color and benthonic habitat of the pacamã. For the curimatá-pioa, survival and biomass were similar for the different colors. The weight and Fulton's condition factor were higher for the larvae cultivated in green and blue tanks. This result could be associated with the adaptation of curimatá-pioa larvae to active swimming in the water column, searching for prey.

  8. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

  9. Oxygen vacancies and intense luminescence in manganese loaded Zno microflowers for visible light water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Balaji; Michael, Robin Jude Vimal; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T.

    2015-08-01

    ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the photocatalytic effect when comparing the three different nanomaterials, viz. pure ZnO, Mn/ZnO before and after annealing, all having been made exactly by the same methodologies.ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the

  10. Light-water-reactor safety program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, R G; Kyger, J A

    1977-01-01

    The report summarizes work performed on the following water-reactor-safety problems: (1) loss-of-coolant accident research in heat transfer and fluid dynamics; (2) transient fuel response and fission-product release; (3) mechanical properties of zircaloy containing oxygen; and (4) steam-explosion studies.

  11. Theoretical and Numerical Study of Heat Transfer Deterioration in High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Palko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of the heat transfer deterioration (HTD phenomena is performed using the low-Re k-ω turbulence model. Steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved together with equations for the transport of enthalpy and turbulence. Equations are solved for the supercritical water flow at different pressures, using water properties from the standard IAPWS (International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam tables. All cases are extensively validated against experimental data. The influence of buoyancy on the HTD is demonstrated for different mass flow rates in the heated pipes. Numerical results prove that the RANS low-Re turbulence modeling approach is fully capable of simulating the heat transfer in pipes with the water flow at supercritical pressures. A study of buoyancy influence shows that for the low-mass flow rates of coolant, the influence of buoyancy forces on the heat transfer in heated pipes is significant. For the high flow rates, buoyancy influence could be neglected and there are clearly other mechanisms causing the decrease in heat transfer at high coolant flow rates.

  12. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian Light Crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The iron contents of all the treatments were lower than the control except for treatment 3(50 ppm WSF). THC concentrations in fish were higher at 96 hours and 14days than in the water indicating bioconcentration in fish and a retention in the fish long after exposure. Keywords: WSF, C.gariepinus , Toxicity , Heavy metals ...

  13. Effects of prolonged light exposure times on water sorption, solubility and cross-linking density of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambier, Letícia; Malaquias, Tamirez; Wambier, Denise Stadler; Patzlaff, Rafael T; Bauer, José; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of light exposure times on water sorption, solubility, and polymer cross-linking density of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives. Four commercial adhesives (XP Bond, Adper Single Bond 2, Tetric N-Bond, and Ambar) were selected, and resin disks 5 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm thick were prepared and light cured for 20, 40, or 80 s using an LED light-curing unit at 1200 mW/cm2. Water sorption and solubility were evaluated over a 28-day period. For polymer cross-linking density, additional specimens were prepared and their Knoop hardness measured before and after immersion in 100% ethanol. The data from each test were evaluated using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The XP Bond adhesive showed higher water sorption (similar to Adper Single Bond 2) and solubility (p adhesive composition. Prolonged light exposure times reduced the solubility of the materials.

  14. Quality Changes of Light Flesh Tuna at Water of Tomini Bay, Gorontalo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wila Rumina Nento

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuna is one of the mainstay fisheries commodities that involve many of the ordinary fishermen. The handling usually still not follows the principles of good handling that causing the poor quality as the result.The aims of this research were to analyze and to determine the quality of tuna meat (the abdominal wall, dorsal fin, and caudal fin. Raw material yellowfin tuna meat prepared for the light, the meat section of the abdominal wall, dorsal fin, and caudal fin. The result of organoleptic analysis showed that the tuna meat was above the minimum value for the criteria of fresh fish. The result of TVB analysis showed that the meat on the caudal fin had the highest value and significantly different with the other, but still exist on the safe limits and on the fresh category. For the result of analysis in histamine, it shown that at the fourth hour the meat at the dorsal fin had the histamine content which were above the minimum that have been recommended. For the result of analysis in peroxide number, it shown that the tuna meat did not sustain the fat damage until the fourth hour after the catching process. And for the result of analysis in TPC, it showed that at the fourth hour the tuna meat on the pectoral fin had the highest number of total colony and significantly different with the other.Keywords: handling, histamine, light flesh, microbiology, yellowfin

  15. Oxygen vacancies and intense luminescence in manganese loaded Zno microflowers for visible light water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Balaji; Michael, Robin Jude Vimal; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T

    2015-09-07

    ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F(+) centres as a consequence of the V. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the photocatalytic effect when comparing the three different nanomaterials, viz. pure ZnO, Mn/ZnO before and after annealing, all having been made exactly by the same methodologies.

  16. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout Caused by External Flooding Using the RISMC Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Prescott, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the application of a RISMC detailed demonstration case study for an emergent issue using the RAVEN and RELAP-7 tools. This case study looks at the impact of a couple of challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a power uprate, (2) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (3) and earthquake induces station-blackout, and (4) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  18. VGB guideline for the water in nuclear power plants with light water reactors (BWR). VGB-R 401 J; VGB-Richtlinie fuer das Wasser in Kernkraftwerken mit Leichtwasserreaktoren (SWR). VGB-R 401 J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosskamp, M. [Vattenvall Europe Nuclear Energy, Kernkraftwerk Brunsbuettel GmbH und Co OHG (Germany); Albrecht, N. [Vattenvall Europe Nuclear Energy, Kernkraftwerk Kruemmel GmbH und Co OHG, Geesthacht (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg (Germany); Neder, H. [E.ON Kernkraftwerk GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Isar, Essenbach (Germany); Reitzner, U. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Riedmueller, B. [Kernkraftwerk Gundremmingen GmbH (Germany); Rutschow, D. [VGB-Geschaeftsstelle, Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new VGB guideline for light water reactor (BWR) is presented. The guideline specifies the classical, oxidative water chemistry for BWR. Principal strategies of water chemistry are described. Recommendations are made for deviations of normal operation. The guideline specifies - based on latest findings - especially chloride and sulphate in reactor water in view to corrosion resistance of austenitic materials, normal operating values and action levels. (orig.)

  19. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  20. Light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, July--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    Progress is summarized on the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1977 on water-reactor-safety problems. The following research and development areas are covered: (1) loss-of-coolant accident research: heat transfer and fluid dynamics; (2) transient fuel response and fission-product release program; (3) mechanical properties of Zircaloy containing oxygen; and (4) steam-explosion studies.

  1. Analysis of a Partial MOX Core Design with Tritium Targets for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anistratov, Dmitriy Y. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Adams, Marvin L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-04-19

    This report constitutes tangible and verifiable deliverable associated with the task To study the effects of using WG MOX fuel in tritium-producing LWR” of the subproject Water Reactor Options for Disposition of Plutonium. The principal investigators of this subproject are Naeem M. Abdurrahman of the University of Texas at Austin and Marvin L. Adams of Texas A&M University. This work was sponsored by the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium.

  2. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting on nanoporous GaN thin films for energy conversion under visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dezhong; Xiao, Hongdi; Fang, Jiacheng; Liu, Jianqiang; Gao, Qingxue; Liu, Xiangdong; Ma, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous (NP) GaN thin films, which were fabricated by an electrochemical etching method at different voltages, were used as photoelectrodes during photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting in 1 M oxalic acid solution. Upon illumination at a power density of 100 mW cm-2 (AM 1.5), water splitting is observed in NP GaN thin films, presumably resulting from the valence band edge which is more positive than the redox potential of the oxidizing species. In comparison with NP GaN film fabricated at 8 V, NP GaN obtained at 18 V shows nearly twofold enhancement in photocurrent with the maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 1.05% at ~0 V (versus Ag/AgCl). This enhancement could be explained with (i) the increase of surface area and surface states, and (ii) the decrease of resistances and carrier concentration in the NP GaN thin films. High stability of the NP GaN thin films during the PEC water splitting further confirms that the NP GaN thin film could be applied to the design of efficient solar cells and solar fuel devices.

  4. Mechanics of liquids and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Loitsyanskii, L G; Jones, W P

    1966-01-01

    Mechanics of Liquids and Gases, Second Edition is a 10-chapter text that covers significant revisions concerning the dynamics of an ideal gas, a viscous liquid and a viscous gas.After an expanded introduction to the fundamental properties and methods of the mechanics of fluids, this edition goes on dealing with the kinetics and general questions of dynamics. The next chapters describe the one-dimensional pipe flow of a gas with friction, the elementary theory of the shock tube; Riemann's theory of the wave propagation of finite intensity, and the theory of plane subsonic and supersonic flows.

  5. Ultrasonic waves in classical gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Grygoriev, U. V.

    2017-12-01

    The velocity and absorption coefficient for the plane sound waves in a classical gas are obtained by solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation, which describes the reaction of the single-particle distribution function to a periodic external field. Within the linear response theory, the nonperturbative dispersion equation valid for all sound frequencies is derived and solved numerically. The results are in agreement with the approximate analytical solutions found for both the frequent- and rare-collision regimes. These results are also in qualitative agreement with the experimental data for ultrasonic waves in dilute gases.

  6. Versatile Oxide Films Protect FeCrAl Alloys Under Normal Operation and Accident Conditions in Light Water Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2018-02-01

    The US has currently a fleet of 99 nuclear power light water reactors which generate approximately 20% of the electricity consumed in the country. Near 90% of the reactors are at least 30 years old. There are incentives to make the existing reactors safer by using accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Compared to the standard UO2-zirconium-based system, ATF need to tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. Ferritic iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys have been identified as an alternative to replace current zirconium alloys. They contain Fe (base) + 10-22 Cr + 4-6 Al and may contain smaller amounts of other elements such as molybdenum and traces of others. FeCrAl alloys offer outstanding resistance to attack by superheated steam by developing an alumina oxide on the surface in case of a loss of coolant accident like at Fukushima. FeCrAl alloys also perform well under normal operation conditions both in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors because they are protected by a thin oxide rich in chromium. Under normal operation condition, the key element is Cr and under accident conditions it is Al.

  7. Fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor environments : mechanism and prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    1998-01-27

    Section 111 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be shorter than those in air by a factor of {approx}70. The crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments are presented. Decreases in fatigue life of these steels in high-dissolved-oxygen water are caused primarily by the effect of environment on growth of short cracks < 100 {micro}m in depth. The material and loading parameters that influence fatigue life in LWR environments are defined. Fatigue life is decreased significantly when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously, viz., applied strain range, service temperature, dissolved oxygen in water, and S content in steel are above a threshold level, and loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue life of these steels in LWR environments. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve is evaluated.

  8. Versatile Oxide Films Protect FeCrAl Alloys Under Normal Operation and Accident Conditions in Light Water Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2017-12-01

    The US has currently a fleet of 99 nuclear power light water reactors which generate approximately 20% of the electricity consumed in the country. Near 90% of the reactors are at least 30 years old. There are incentives to make the existing reactors safer by using accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Compared to the standard UO2-zirconium-based system, ATF need to tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. Ferritic iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys have been identified as an alternative to replace current zirconium alloys. They contain Fe (base) + 10-22 Cr + 4-6 Al and may contain smaller amounts of other elements such as molybdenum and traces of others. FeCrAl alloys offer outstanding resistance to attack by superheated steam by developing an alumina oxide on the surface in case of a loss of coolant accident like at Fukushima. FeCrAl alloys also perform well under normal operation conditions both in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors because they are protected by a thin oxide rich in chromium. Under normal operation condition, the key element is Cr and under accident conditions it is Al.

  9. Rapid molecular detection of invasive species in ballast and harbor water by integrating environmental DNA and light transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Scott P; Grey, Erin; Olds, Brett; Feder, Jeffery L; Ruggiero, Steven T; Tanner, Carol E; Lodge, David M

    2015-04-07

    Invasive species introduced via the ballast water of commercial ships cause enormous environmental and economic damage worldwide. Accurate monitoring for these often microscopic and morphologically indistinguishable species is challenging but critical for mitigating damages. We apply eDNA sampling, which involves the filtering and subsequent DNA extraction of microscopic bits of tissue suspended in water, to ballast and harbor water sampled during a commercial ship's 1400 km voyage through the North American Great Lakes. Using a lab-based gel electrophoresis assay and a rapid, field-ready light transmission spectroscopy (LTS) assay, we test for the presence of two invasive species: quagga (Dreissena bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels. Furthermore, we spiked a set of uninfested ballast and harbor samples with zebra mussel tissue to further test each assay's detection capabilities. In unmanipulated samples, zebra mussel was not detected, while quagga mussel was detected in all samples at a rate of 85% for the gel assay and 100% for the LTS assay. In the spiked experimental samples, both assays detected zebra mussel in 94% of spiked samples and 0% of negative controls. Overall, these results demonstrate that eDNA sampling is effective for monitoring ballast-mediated invasions and that LTS has the potential for rapid, field-based detection.

  10. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  11. Thermal-Hydraulic Research Review and Cooperation Outcome for Light Water Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Lee, Chan; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The fuel assembly for pressurized water reactor (PWR) consists of fuel rod bundle, spacer grid and bottom/top end fittings. The cooling water in high pressure and temperature is introduced in lower plenum of reactor core and directed to upper plenum through the subchannel which is formed between the fuel rods. The main thermalhydraulic performance parameters for the PWR fuel are pressure drop and critical heat flux in normal operating condition, and quenching time in accident condition. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an advanced PWR fuel, dual-cooled annular fuel and accident tolerant fuel for the enhancement of fuel performance and the localization. For the key thermal-hydraulic technology development of PWR fuel, the KAERI LWR fuel team has conducted the experiments for pressure drop, turbulent flow mixing and heat transfer, critical heat flux(CHF) and quenching. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was also performed to predict flow and heat transfer in fuel assembly including the spent fuel assembly in dry cask for interim repository. In addition, the research cooperation with university and nuclear fuel company was also carried out to develop a basic thermalhydraulic technology and the commercialization.

  12. Recharging infiltration of precipitation water through the light soil, in the absence of surface runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czyżyk Franciszek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the value of recharging infiltration of precipitation through the light soil and its distribution over time, based on five-year of lysimetric research. The effect of organic and mineral fertilization on the infiltration was studied. In lysimeters does not occur the phenomenon of surface runoff, and thus, by analogy, the results of the research can be applied to agriculturally used lowland areas with sandy soils. The results showed that the infiltration is very changeable in time. On its value, in addition to precipitation, the greatest influence has evapotranspiration. The largest infiltration occurs in March after the spring thaws (IE = 70-81% monthly precipitation and the smallest in August (IE = 1.2-15.0% precipitation, depending on the type of fertilizer used and the level of fertilization. The soil fertilization, especially by using organic fertilizer (compost, is a factor, which has significantly influence on reduction of the recharging infiltration. The soil fertilization with compost reduced the infiltration of 7.4-9.0%, and with mineral fertilization of 5.4-7.0% of annual precipitation totals, compared with the infiltration through the soil not fertilized. The average annual index of infiltration was 21.8-25.3% of annual precipitation totals in variant of soil fertilized and 30.7% in case of the soil not fertilized.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of brookite-rich, visible light-active TiO2 films for water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hui [ORNL; Qiu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Zhu, Wenguang [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We report that mild oxidation of Ti foils in air results in brookite-rich titanium oxide (TiO2) films with similar spectral response to that of dye-sensitized TiO2. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy show that the onset of brookite formation occurs at 500 8C, and the material is characterized by a strong absorption band in the visible spectral range. The first-principle calculations show that enhanced visible light absorption correlates with the presence of Ti interstitials. Photocurrent density measurements of water splitting reveal that the brookite-rich TiO2 exhibits the highest photocatalytic performance among the different forms of TiO2 produced by oxidation of Ti foils. With increasing oxidation temperature transformation to the rutile phase accompanied by declining visible range photoactivity is observed.

  14. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2). Detailed structure and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    A light water reactor fuel behavior analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2) was developed as an improved version of FEMAXI-IV. Development of FEMAXI-IV has been already finished in 1992, though a detailed structure and input manual of the code have not been open to users yet. Here, the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied to FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), and the material properties adopted in the code are described in detail. In FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), programming bugs in previous FEMAXI-IV were eliminated, renewal of the pellet thermal conductivity was performed, and a model of thermal-stress restraint on FP gas release was incorporated. For facilitation of effective and wide-ranging application of the code, methods of input/output of the code are also described in detail, and sample output is included. (author)

  15. Pilot program to identify valve failures which impact the safety and operation of light water nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsacoyeanes, J. C.; Raju, P. P.

    1980-04-01

    The pilot program described has been initiated under the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Safety Research and Development Program and has the following specific objectives: to identify the principal types and causes of failures in valves, valve operators and their controls and associated hardware, which lead to, or could lead to plant trip; and to suggest possible remedies for the prevention of these failures and recommend future research and development programs which could lead to minimizing these valve failures or mitigating their effect on plant operation. The data surveyed cover incidents reported over the six-year period, beginning 1973 through the end of 1978. Three sources of information on valve failures have been consulted: failure data centers, participating organizations in the nuclear power industry, and technical documents.

  16. Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  18. Granular encapsulation of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) in LHL-salt water systems: Particle induced densification with quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin; Sukop, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Addition of granular materials to floating crude oil slicks can be effective in capturing and densifying the floating hydrophobic phase, which settles by gravity. Interaction of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) with quartz sand was investigated in LHL-salt water systems. The LHLs studied were decane, tetradecane, hexadecane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 2-cholorotoluene. Experiments were conducted with fine quartz sand (passing sieve No. 40 with openings 0.425 mm). Each LHL was dyed with few crystals of Sudan IV dye for ease of visual observation. A volume of 0.5 mL of each LHL was added to 100 mL salt water (34 g/L). Addition of one gram of quartz sand to the floating hydrophobic liquid layer resulted in formation of sand-encapsulated globules, which settled due to increased density. All LHLs (except for a few globules of decane) formed globules covered with fine sand particles that were heavy enough to settle by gravity. The encapsulated globules were stable and retained their shape upon settling. Polarity of hydrophobic liquids as the main factor of aggregation with minerals was found to be insufficient to explain LHL aggregation with sand. Contact angle measurements were made by submerging a large quartz crystal with the LHL drop on its surface into salt water. A positive correlation was observed between the wetting angle of LHL and the LHL volume captured (r = 0.75). The dependence of the globule density on globule radius was analyzed in relation to the coverage (%) of globule surface (LHL-salt water interface) by fine quartz particles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intervex. A new process for desulphurisation of flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberg, Lars [Radscan Intervex AB, Vaesteras (Sweden); Eriksson, Mats

    2011-07-01

    A new process for flue gas desulphurisation of flue gases is presented. In a reactor, flue gases pass counter flow through a bed of granular limestone. Water is sprayed over the bed. The limestone is slowly circulated through the bed when the bed material is slowly moving downward in the reactor. Sulphur oxide from the flue gas forms calcium sulphite and sulphate in the spray water flow. A first plant for a 20 MW boiler has been operated during a long development period and now shows interesting properties and results: high degrees of reduction of sulphur, chlorides, fluorides and fly ash, the sorbent is cheap, the pressure drop is low, the yield of the limestone is 75 % and the investment cost is also low. (orig.)

  20. Electric spark discharges in water. Low-energy nuclear transmutations and light leptonic magnetic monopoles in an extended standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Harald [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Theoretical Physics

    2017-11-01

    Light leptonic magnetic monopoles were predicted by Lochak [G. Lochak, Intern. J. Theor. Phys. 24, 1019 (1985).]. Experimental indications based on nuclear transmutations were announced by Urutskoiev et al. [L. I. Urutskoiev, V. I. Liksonov, V. G. Tsinoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 27, Nr.4, 791 (2002).] and Urutskoev [L. J. Urutskoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 29, 1149 (2004).]. A theoretical interpretation of these transmutations is proposed under the assumption that light leptonic magnetic monopoles are created during spark discharges in water. The latter should be excited neutrinos according to Lochak. This hypothesis enforces the introduction of an extended Standard Model described in previous papers. The most important results of this study are (i) that multiple proton captures are responsible for the variety of transmutations and that leptonic magnetic monopoles are involved in these processes (ii) that electromagnetic duality can be established for bound states of leptonic monopoles although massive monopoles are in general unstable (iii) that criteria for the emission of leptonic magnetic monopoles and for their catalytic effect on weak decays are set up and elaborated. The study can be considered as a contribution to the efforts of Urutskoiev and Lochak to understand the reasons for accidents in power plants.

  1. Homeostatic response to sleep/rest deprivation by constant water flow in larval zebrafish in both dark and light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vilma; Vainikka, Maija; Puttonen, Henri A J; Ikonen, Heidi M K; Salminen, Tiia; Panula, Pertti; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa

    2017-06-01

    Sleep-or sleep-like states-have been reported in adult and larval zebrafish using behavioural criteria. These reversible quiescent periods, displaying circadian rhythmicity, have been used in pharmacological, genetic and neuroanatomical studies of sleep-wake regulation. However, one of the important criteria for sleep, namely sleep homeostasis, has not been demonstrated unequivocally. To study rest homeostasis in zebrafish larvae, we rest-deprived 1-week-old larvae with a novel, ecologically relevant method: flow of water. Stereotyped startle responses to sensory stimuli were recorded after the rest deprivation to study arousal threshold using a high-speed camera, providing an appropriate time resolution to detect species-specific behavioural responses occurring in a millisecond time-scale. Rest-deprived larvae exhibited fewer startle responses than control larvae during the remaining dark phase and the beginning of the light phase, which can be interpreted as a sign of rest homeostasis-often used as equivalent of sleep homeostasis. To address sleep homeostasis further, we probed the adenosinergic system, which in mammals regulates sleep homeostasis. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist, cyclohexyladenosine, administered during the light period, decreased startle responses and increased immobility bouts, while the adenosine antagonist, caffeine, administered during the dark period, decreased immobility bouts. These results suggest that the regulation of sleep homeostasis in zebrafish larvae consists of the same elements as that of other species. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Electric Spark Discharges in Water. Low-energy Nuclear Transmutations and Light Leptonic Magnetic Monopoles in an Extended Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Light leptonic magnetic monopoles were predicted by Lochak [G. Lochak, Intern. J. Theor. Phys. 24, 1019 (1985).]. Experimental indications based on nuclear transmutations were announced by Urutskoiev et al. [L. I. Urutskoiev, V. I. Liksonov, V. G. Tsinoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 27, Nr.4, 791 (2002).] and Urutskoev [L. J. Urutskoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 29, 1149 (2004).]. A theoretical interpretation of these transmutations is proposed under the assumption that light leptonic magnetic monopoles are created during spark discharges in water. The latter should be excited neutrinos according to Lochak. This hypothesis enforces the introduction of an extended Standard Model described in previous papers. The most important results of this study are (i) that multiple proton captures are responsible for the variety of transmutations and that leptonic magnetic monopoles are involved in these processes (ii) that electromagnetic duality can be established for bound states of leptonic monopoles although massive monopoles are in general unstable (iii) that criteria for the emission of leptonic magnetic monopoles and for their catalytic effect on weak decays are set up and elaborated. The study can be considered as a contribution to the efforts of Urutskoiev and Lochak to understand the reasons for accidents in power plants.

  3. Conceptual design and economic analysis of a light water reactor fuel enricher/regenerator. FY 1978 year-end report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, P; Kouts, H J; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M; Takahashi, H

    1979-05-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the use of high-energy particle accelerators as nuclear fuel enrichers and nuclear fuel regenerators. This builds on ideas that have been current for many years. The new study has, however, explored some novel approaches that have not been examined before. A specific conceptual system chosen for more detailed study would stretch the energy available from natural uranium by a factor of about 3, reduce the separative work requirements by a factor of about 4, and reduce the volume of spent fuel to be stored by a factor of 2, compared to the current once-through light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle. The concept avoids the need for chemical reprocessing of spent fuel, and would permit continued use of LWR's beyond the time when limitations on fuel resources might otherwise lead to their being phased out. This concept, which is called the Linear Accelerator Fuel Enricher/Regenerator, is therefore viewed as offering a practical means of stretching the use of the nuclear fuel resource in the framework of the existing light water reactor fuel cycle. This report describes and analyzes the concept referred to. An explanation of the principles underlying the concept is given. Particular attention is devoted to engineering feasibility, proliferation resistance, and economics. It is seen that the concept draws on only proven technology as regards bothaccelerator design and the fuel irradiation process, and is adapted to existing LWR designs with no change except in fuel-handling practices. A preliminary evaluation of radiation damage, coolant options, and power conversion systems is provided. Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and burnup calculations are presented. An analysis is made of fuel economy. Approximate costs of electric power produced using this concept are evaluated and discussed. Estimated development costs of commercialization are provided.

  4. Evaluation of integral continuing experimental capability (CEC) concepts for light water reactor research: PWR scaling concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condie, K G; Larson, T K; Davis, C B; McCreery, G E

    1987-02-01

    In this report reactor transients and thermal-hydraulic phenomena of importance (based on probabilistic risk assessment and the International Code Assessment Program) to reactor safety were examined and identified. Established scaling methodologies were used to develop potential concepts for integral thermal-hydraulic testing facilities. Advantages and disadvantages of each concept are evaluated. Analysis is conducted to examine the scaling of various phenomena in each of the selected concepts. Results generally suggest that a facility capable of operating at typical reactor operating conditions will scale most phenomena reasonably well. Although many phenomena in facilities using Freon or water at nontypical pressure will scale reasonably well, those phenomena that are heavily dependent on quality (heat transfer or critical flow for example) can be distorted. Furthermore, relation of data produced in facilities operating with nontypical fluids or at nontypical pressures to large plants will be a difficult and time consuming process.

  5. Electrical signals in avocado trees: responses to light and water availability conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarce, Patricio; Gurovich, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to environmental changes are associated with electrical excitability and signaling; automatic and continuous measurements of electrical potential differences (DeltaEP) between plant tissues can be effectively used to study information transport mechanisms and physiological responses that result from external stimuli on plants. The generation and conduction of electrochemical impulses within plant different tissues and organs, resulting from abiotic and biotic changes in environmental conditions is reported. In this work, electrical potential differences are monitored continuously using Ag/AgCl microelectrodes, inserted 5 mm deep into sapwood at two positions in the trunks of several Avocado trees. Electrodes are referenced to a non polarisable Ag/AgCl microelectrode installed 20 cm deep in the soil. Systematic patterns of DeltaEP during absolute darkness, day-night cycles and different conditions of soil water availability are discussed as alternative tools to assess early plant stress conditions.

  6. Laser generation of shock waves in a water suspension with light-absorbing particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaga, Vira R; Maksimyak, Andrew P; Maksimyak, Peter P

    2014-04-01

    We report the generation of shock waves in a disperse medium with absorbing particles of black pigment in the water using continuous laser radiation. As a result of the experimental investigation it was found that the illuminating beam diameter growth at the constant laser power results in the decrease of the signals' modulation frequencies, improving their stability and increasing their amplitudes. In turn, the decrease of the signal's modulation frequency is caused by the growth of time, which is needed for heating the medium to the critical temperature of cavitation. Improving the stability and the increase of optical and acoustic signal amplitudes take place, due to the growth of the medium volume and hence the number of pigment particles that participate in cavitation.

  7. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-25

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane's lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon's strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  8. Dually Prewetted Underwater Superoleophobic and under Oil Superhydrophobic Fabric for Successive Separation of Light Oil/Water/Heavy Oil Three-Phase Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guoliang; Zhang, Wenbo; Jia, Zhen; Liu, Feng; Yang, Haiyue; Yu, Qianqian; Wang, Yazhou; Di, Xin; Wang, Chengyu; Ho, Shih-Hsin

    2017-10-18

    Remediation of oil spills requires new technologies to separate light oil/water/heavy oil mixtures. Low-cost, biological, and environmentally friendly materials are needed to treat water pollution caused by oils. In this study, a corn straw powder (CSP)-coated fabric (CSPF) was fabricated by spraying waste CSP and polyurethane onto amphiphilic cotton fabric, and thus, the wettability of CSPF is enhanced by taking advantage of the hierarchical structure and increased surface roughness. Therefore, the CSPF could be dually prewetted (DCSPF) with both water and oil, and it showed underwater superoleophobic and under oil superhydrophobic properties without any further chemical modification. When applied to light oil/water/heavy oil separation, the DCSPF could be used to successively separate light oil/water/heavy oil three-phase mixtures under gravity with a high separation efficiency and flux. In addition, the DCSPF showed excellent structural and chemical stability according to repeated cycling and corrosive solution/oil separation experiments. The results of this study are of value in providing a simple, low-cost, and environment-friendly approach for application in the field of successive separation of light oil/water/heavy oil three-phase mixtures.

  9. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor