WorldWideScience

Sample records for water gas processes

  1. Gas stripping and recirculation process in heavy water separation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazzer, D.B.; Thayer, V.R.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is stripped from hot effluent, in a heavy water separation plant of the dual temperature isotope separation type, by taking liquid effluent from the hot tower before passage through the humidifier, passing the liquid through one or more throttle devices to flash-off the H 2 S gas content, and feeding the gas into an absorption tower containing incoming feed water, for recycling of the gas through the process

  2. Process for water-gas generation from degassed combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1906-05-23

    A process for water-gas generation in a continuous operation from degassed combustibles in the lower part of a vertical exterior-heated retort, whose middle part can serve to degas the combustibles, is described. It is characterized in that the water vapor employed is obtained by vaporizing water in the upper part of the retort by means of the waste heat from the heating gases, which had effected the coking of the combustibles before the water-gas recovery or after the latter.

  3. WAG (water-alternating-gas) process design: an update review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, M.K. [University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Petroleum and Gas Engineering], e-mail: mkzahoor@uet.edu.pk; Derahman, M.N.; Yunan, M.H. [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor (Malaysia). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2011-04-15

    The design and implementation of water-alternating-gas (WAG) process in an improved and cost-effective way are still under process. Due to the complexities involved in implementing the process and the lack of information regarding fluid and reservoir properties, the water-alternating-gas process has not yet been as successful as initially expected. This situation can be overcome by better understanding the fluid distribution and flow behavior within the reservoir. The ultimate purpose can be achieved with improved knowledge on wettability and its influence on fluid distribution, capillary pressure, relative permeability, and other design parameters. This paper gives an insight on the WAG process design and the recently developed correlations which are helpful in incorporating the effects of wettability variations on fluid dynamics within the reservoir. (author)

  4. Essentials of water systems design in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza; Boyd, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Essentials of Water Systems Design in the Oil, Gas and Chemical Processing Industries provides valuable insight for decision makers by outlining key technical considerations and requirements of four critical systems in industrial processing plants—water treatment systems, raw water and plant water systems, cooling water distribution and return systems, and fire water distribution and storage facilities. The authors identify the key technical issues and minimum requirements related to the process design and selection of various water supply systems used in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries. This book is an ideal, multidisciplinary work for mechanical engineers, environmental scientists, and oil and gas process engineers.

  5. Methane gas generation from waste water extraction process of crude palm oil in experimental digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A.; Penafiel, R.; Garzón, P. V.; Ochoa, V.

    2015-12-01

    Industrial processes to extract crude palm oil, generates large amounts of waste water. High concentrations of COD, ST, SV, NH4 + and low solubility of O2, make the treatment of these effluents starts with anaerobic processes. The anaerobic digestion process has several advantages over aerobic degradation: lower operating costs (not aeration), low sludge production, methane gas generation. The 4 stages of anaerobic digestion are: hydrolysis, acidogenic, acetogenesis and methanogenesis. Through the action of enzymes synthesized by microbial consortia are met. The products of each step to serve as reagents is conducted as follows. The organic load times and cell hydraulic retention, solids content, nutrient availability, pH and temperature are factors that influence directly in biodigesters. The objectives of this presentation is to; characterize the microbial inoculum and water (from palm oil wasted water) to be used in biodigestores, make specific methanogenic activity in bioassays, acclimatize the microorganisms to produce methane gas using basal mineral medium with acetate for the input power, and to determine the production of methane gas digesters high organic load.

  6. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  7. Process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas and catalyst assembly therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bithermal, catalytic, hydrogen isotope exchange process between liquid water and hydrogen gas to effect concentration of the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is described. Liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted with one another and with at least one catalytically active metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table; the catalyst body has a water repellent, gas and water vapor permeable, organic polymer or resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone resin coating, so that the isotope exchange takes place by two simultaneously occurring, and closely coupled in space, steps and concentration is effected by operating two interconnected sections containing catalyst at different temperatures. (U.S.)

  8. Reliability Omnipotent Analysis For First Stage Separator On The Separation Process Of Gas, Oil And Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sony Tjahyani, D. T.; Ismu W, Puradwi; Asmara Santa, Sigit

    2001-01-01

    Reliability of industry can be evaluated based on two aspects which are risk and economic aspects. From these points, optimation value can be determined optimation value. Risk of the oil refinery process are fire and explosion, so assessment of this system must be done. One system of the oil refinery process is first stage separator which is used to separate gas, oil and water. Evaluation of reliability for first stage separator system has been done with FAMECA and HAZap method. The analysis results, the probability of fire and explosion of 1.1x10 - 2 3 /hour and 1.2x10 - 1 1 /hour, respectively. The reliability value of the system is high because each undesired event is anticipated with safety system or safety component

  9. Qualification of the ALKASORB sorbent for the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Dijk, Van H.A.J.; Walspurger, S.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Jansen, D.

    2013-07-01

    For the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process, a new sorbent material has been qualified in a reactor of 2 m length under conditions close to industrial designs. The sorbent ALKASORB is a potassium-carbonate promoted hydrotalcite-based compound. ALKASORB is shown to have many favourable properties in comparison to the reference sorbent, in particular with respect to mechanical stability. The cyclic capacity of the new compound is substantially higher than the cyclic capacity of the reference sorbent, and it allows a reduction of the steam requirement of 50%. The sorbent has demonstrated catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that is sufficient to omit a separate catalyst. It is demonstrated that the sorbent remains chemically and mechanically stable during operation of at least 2000 adsorption-desorption cycles, even in the presence of H2S in the feed. H2S is shown not to influence CO2 adsorption capacity and is co-captured with the CO2. In contrast to the reference material that showed mechanical degradation during extended adsorption-desorption cycles, the new material is stable and allows to obtain carbon capture levels exceeding 95% more efficiently and more economically since the required size of the vessels will be smaller.

  10. LYAPUNOV-Based Sensor Failure Detection and Recovery for the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambous, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    Livingstone, a model-based AI software system, is planned for use in the autonomous fault diagnosis, reconfiguration, and control of the oxygen-producing reverse water gas shift (RWGS) process test-bed located in the Applied Chemistry Laboratory at KSC. In this report the RWGS process is first briefly described and an overview of Livingstone is given. Next, a Lyapunov-based approach for detecting and recovering from sensor failures, differing significantly from that used by Livingstone, is presented. In this new method, models used are in t e m of the defining differential equations of system components, thus differing from the qualitative, static models used by Livingstone. An easily computed scalar inequality constraint, expressed in terms of sensed system variables, is used to determine the existence of sensor failures. In the event of sensor failure, an observer/estimator is used for determining which sensors have failed. The theory underlying the new approach is developed. Finally, a recommendation is made to use the Lyapunov-based approach to complement the capability of Livingstone and to use this combination in the RWGS process.

  11. Water into gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodord, Julian.

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the move by water utilities into the gas market and potentially into the electricity supply market. Operation by Dee Valley Holdings, York Waterworks, York Gas, and North Wales Gas are reported, and investment, use of mail campaigns and telemarketing to secure customers, and the opportunities offered by diversification are considered. (UK)

  12. Exhaust gas processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Shin-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The facility of the present invention comprises a radioactive liquid storage vessel, an exhaust gas dehumidifying device for dehumidifying gases exhausted from the vessel and an exhaust gas processing device for reducing radioactive materials in the exhaust gases. A purified gas line is disposed to the radioactive liquid storage vessel for purging exhaust gases generated from the radioactive liquid, then dehumidified and condensed liquid is recovered, and exhaust gases are discharged through an exhaust gas pipe disposed downstream of the exhaust gas processing device. With such procedures, the scale of the exhaust gas processing facility can be reduced and exhaust gases can be processed efficiently. (T.M.)

  13. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  14. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  15. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; K.A. Lokhandwala; Membrane Group; Module Group; Systems Group

    2001-01-11

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  16. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

    2003-02-14

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  17. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dew point and Btu value, and the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. The BP-Amoco gas processing plant in Pascagoula, MS was finalized as the location for the field demonstration. Detailed drawings of the MTR membrane skid (already constructed) were submitted to the plant in February, 2000. However, problems in reaching an agreement on the specifications of the system compressor delayed the project significantly, so MTR requested (and was subsequently granted) a no-cost extension to the project. Following resolution of the compressor issues, the goal is to order the compressor during the first quarter of 2002, and to start field tests in mid-2002. Information from potential users of the membrane separation process in the natural gas processing industry suggests that applications such as fuel gas conditioning and wellhead gas processing are the most promising initial targets. Therefore, most of our commercialization effort is focused on promoting these applications. Requests for stream evaluations and for design and price quotations have been received through MTR's web site, from direct contact with potential users, and through announcements in industry publications. To date, about 90 commercial quotes have been supplied, and orders totaling about$1.13 million for equipment or rental of membrane units have been received

  18. FFTF gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, T.G.

    1977-01-01

    The design and operation of the two radioactive gas processing systems at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) exemplifies the concept that will be used in the first generation of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR's). The two systems, the Radioactive Argon Processing System (RAPS) and the Cell Atmosphere Processing System (CAPS), process the argon and nitrogen used in the FFTF for cover gas on liquid metal systems and as inert atmospheres in steel lined cells housing sodium equipment. The RAPS specifically processes the argon cover gas from the reactor coolant system, providing for decontamination and eventual reuse. The CAPS processes radioactive gasses from inerted cells and other liquid metal cover gas systems, providing for decontamination and ultimate discharge to the atmosphere. The cryogenic processing of waste gas by both systems is described

  19. Simulation of non-isothermal gas-water processes in complex fracture-matrix systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobs, H.

    2004-01-01

    Degassing effects may occur in fractures in the vicinity of deep radioactive-waste-disposal sites as a result of a pressure drop. These effects play an important role in the investigation of the hydraulic conditions in the near field of the disposal sites. The assumption of single-phase conditions may lead to the misinterpretation of experimental data as degassing leads to two-phase conditions and to a reduction of the effective permeability. The aim of this work is to contribute to the simulation of non-isothermal behaviour of water-gas systems in the near field of atomic waste disposal sites in fractured porous media. We distinguish between sub-REV effects within single fractures and effects due to super-REV heterogeneities which result from the fracture matrix system. We assume to have undisturbed physical conditions as report from the AespoeHard Rock Laboratory in Sweden, i.e.: - a fully water saturated system - a hydrostatic pressure of 5 million Pa. For the simulation on the laboratory scale we use a percolation model. To transfer the information from the laboratory scale to the field scale we use a renormalisation scheme. On the field scale we use a numerical simulator which solves the multiphase flow equations based on the extended form of Darcy's law. In order to investigate the limits of our models we analyse the importance of the forces taken into account, i.e., capillary forces, gravity forces, and viscous forces. This method allows us to quantify the constraints of our models. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of strong parameter heterogeneities caused by the fracture-matrix system on the flow behaviour of gas and water. We consider in particular the influence of the large difference between the entry pressures of matrix and fracture on the migration of the gas phase from the fracture system into the matrix system. (orig.)

  20. Water recovery from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijboer, R.; Van Deelen-Bremer, M.H.; de Vos, F.; Zeijseink, A.G.L. [KEMA Nederland B.V. (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    In the power generation process a large amount of water is needed, for steam generation, flue gas cleaning etc. On the other hand a large amount of water is emitted to the atmosphere via the stack. For example a 400 MW coal fired power plant with a flue gas desulfurisation plant emits about 1,500,000 m{sup 3} per hour with a water concentration of about 11%. The emitted water has a rather good quality compared to surface water and needs less effort to be treated for use as make-up water. As the available amount of water in the flue gas from the earlier mentioned power plant is about 150 tons per hour, recovering 20% of this amount covers the make-up water needs of this 400 MW power plant. Direct condensation of the flue gas needs large cooling power and the condensed water is acidic and corrosive and needs cleanup treatment before it can be used in the water/steam cycle. KEMA developed a technology based on gas separation membranes which makes it possible to recover water from flue gas. The process is covered by a wide patent. The principle of the membrane is comparable to the material that is used in fabric like SympaTex{reg_sign} and GORE-TEX{reg_sign}. The GORE-TEX material is permeable to water vapor but rejects liquid water. The driving force is the water vapor pressure close to the human skin which is the higher than the water vapor pressure open the outside of the clothing. The selectivity of the GORE-TEX material however is not good enough to be used at the temperature of flue gas. The University of Twente (Netherlands) developed a membrane material based on modified PEEK which is highly selective of water vapor at flue gas temperatures. Based on the fact that flat membranes have an uneconomical surface to volume ratio, the choice has been made to use hollow fibre membranes. 6 figs.

  1. Gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji.

    1991-01-01

    State of electric discharge is detected based on a gas pressure in a sealed container and a discharging current flowing between both of electrodes. When electric arc discharges occur, introduction of gases to be processed is stopped and a voltage applied to both of the electrodes is interrupted. Then, when the gas pressure in the sealed container is lowered to a predetermined value, a power source voltage is applied again to both of the electrodes to recover glow discharges, and the introduction of the gas to be processed is started. With such steps, even if electric arc discharges occur, they are eliminated automatically and, accordingly, normal glow discharges can be recovered, to prevent failures of the device due to electric arc discharges. The glow discharges are recovered automatically without stopping the operation of the gas processing device, and gas injection and solidification processing can be conducted continuously and stably. (T.M.)

  2. Integrated treatment process using a natural Wyoming clinoptilolite for remediating produced waters from coalbed natural gas operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Vance, G.F.; Urynowicz, M.A.; Gregory, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in western U.S. states has resulted in an increase in an essential energy resource, but has also resulted in environmental impacts and additional regulatory needs. A concern associated with CBNG development relates to the production of the copious quantities of potentially saline-sodic groundwater required to recover the natural gas, hereafter referred to as CBNG water. Management of CBNG water is a major environmental challenge because of its quantity and quality. In this study, a locally available Na-rich natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) from Wyoming (WY) was examined for its potential to treat CBNG water to remove Na+ and lower the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, mmol1/2 L- 1/2). The zeolite material was Ca-modified before being used in column experiments. Column breakthrough studies indicated that a metric tonne (1000??kg) of Ca-WY-zeolite could be used to treat 60,000??L of CBNG water in order to lower SAR of the CBNG water from 30 to an acceptable level of 10??mmol1/2 L- 1/2. An integrated treatment process using Na-WY-zeolite for alternately treating hard water and CBNG water was also examined for its potential to treat problematic waters in the region. Based on the results of this study, use of WY-zeolite appears to be a cost-effective water treatment technology for maximizing the beneficial use of poor-quality CBNG water. Ongoing studies are evaluating water treatment techniques involving infiltration ponds lined with zeolite. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radioactive gas waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive gas waste processing device which extracts exhaust gases from a turbine condensator in a BWR type reactor and releases them after decaying radioactivity thereof during temporary storage. The turbine condensator is connected with an extracting ejector, a preheater, a recombiner for converting hydrogen gas into steams, an off gas condensator for removing water content, a flow rate control valve, a dehumidifier, a hold up device for removing radiation contaminated materials, a vacuum pump for sucking radiation decayed-off gases, a circulation water tank for final purification and an exhaustion cylinder by way of connection pipelines in this order. An exhaust gas circulation pipeline is disposed to circulate exhaust gases from an exhaust gas exit pipeline of the recycling water tank to an exhaust gas exit pipeline of the exhaust gas condensator, and a pressure control valve is disposed to the exhaust gas circulation pipeline. This enable to perform a system test for the dehumidification device under a test condition approximate to the load of the dehumidification device under actual operation state, and stabilize both of system flow rate and pressure. (T.M.)

  4. Water And Waste Water Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Byeong Ju

    1988-04-01

    This book shows US the distribution diagram of water and waste water processing with device of water processing, and device of waste water processing, property of water quality like measurement of pollution of waste water, theoretical Oxygen demand, and chemical Oxygen demand, processing speed like zero-order reactions and enzyme reactions, physical processing of water and waste water, chemical processing of water and waste water like neutralization and buffering effect, biological processing of waste water, ammonia removal, and sludges processing.

  5. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  6. Flue Gas Desulphurization Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.I.M.; Halhouli, K.A.; Abu-Ashur, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Flue gas desulphurization process are discussed. These processes can be grouped into non-regenerable systems and regenerable systems. The non-regenerable systems produce a product which is either disposed of as waste or sold as a by-product e.g. lime/limestone process. While in the regenerable systems, e.g. Wellman-Lord process, the SO 2 is regenerated from the sorbent(sodium sulphite), which is returned to absorb more SO 2 . Also a newer technology for flue gas desulphurization is discussed. The Ispra process uses bromine as oxidant, producing HBr, from which bromine is regenerated by electrolysis. The only by-products of this process are sulphuric acid and hydrogen, which are both valuable products, and no waste products are produced. Suggested modifications on the process are made based on experimental investigations to improve the efficiency of the process and to reduce its costs

  7. Gas recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.B.; Lewis, W.W.; Edmiston, A.; Klauser, G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to decontaminate a gas stream containing radioactive krypton, a preliminary step of removing oxygen and oxides of nitrogen by catalytic reaction with hydrogen is performed. The gas stream is then passed serially through a drier, a carbon dioxide adsorber and a xenon adsorber to remove sequentially water, CO 2 and xenon therefrom. The gas exiting the xenon adsorber is passed to a krypton recovery plant wherein krypton is concentrated to a first level in a primary distillation column by contact with a reflux liquid in a packed section of the column. The liquid and vapour collecting at the bottom of the column is passed to a separator in which the liquid is separated from the vapour. The liquid is partially evaporated in a vessel to increase concentration thereof and is brought to a concentration of approximately 90 mole % or greater in a second distillation column thereby enabling efficient storage of a radioactive krypton product. (author)

  8. Radioactive gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Akira; Kumagaya, Koji.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of a gas processing system which has hitherto been much complicated by the recyclic use of molecular sieve regeneration gas, by enabling to release the regeneration gas to outside in a once-through manner. Constitution: The system comprises a cooler for receiving and cooling gases to be processed containing radioactive rare gases, moisture-removing pipelines each connected in parallel to the exit of the cooler and having switching valves and a moisture removing column disposed between the valves and a charcoal absorber in communication with the moisture removing pipelines. Pipelines for flowing regeneration heating gases are separately connected to the moisture removing columns, and molecular sieve is charged in the moisture removing column by the amount depending on the types of the radioactive rare gases. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling water and dissolved gas chemistry at the Accesa sinkhole (southern Tuscany, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 38.5 m deep Lake Accesa is a sinkhole located in southern Tuscany (Italy that shows a peculiar water composition, being characterized by relatively high total dissolved solids (TDS values (2 g L-1 and a Ca(Mg-SO4 geochemical facies. The presence of significant amounts of extra-atmospheric gases (CO2 and CH4, which increase their concentrations with depth, is also recognized. These chemical features, mimicking those commonly shown by volcanic lakes fed by hydrothermal-magmatic reservoirs, are consistent with those of mineral springs emerging in the study area whose chemistry is produced by the interaction of meteoric-derived waters with Mesozoic carbonates and Triassic evaporites. Although the lake has a pronounced thermocline, water chemistry does not show significant changes along the vertical profile. Lake water balance calculations demonstrate that Lake Accesa has >90% of its water supply from sublacustrine springs whose subterranean pathways are controlled by the local structural assessment that likely determined the sinking event, the resulting funnel-shape being then filled by the Accesa waters. Such a huge water inflow from the lake bottom (~9·106 m3 yr-1 feeds the lake effluent (Bruna River and promotes the formation of water currents, which are able to prevent the establishment of a vertical density gradient. Consequently, a continuous mixing along the whole vertical water column is established. Changes of the drainage system by the deep-originated waters in the nearby former mining district have strongly affected the outflow rates of the local mineral springs; thus, future intervention associated with the ongoing remediation activities should carefully be evaluated to preserve the peculiar chemical features of Lake Accesa.

  10. Process gas solidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A process for withdrawing gaseous UF 6 from a first system and directing same into a second system for converting the gas to liquid UF 6 at an elevated temperature, additionally including the step of withdrawing the resulting liquid UF 6 from the second system, subjecting it to a specified sequence of flash-evaporation, cooling and solidification operations, and storing it as a solid in a plurality of storage vessels. (author)

  11. CHRISGAS Project. WP13: Ancillary and Novel Processes. Final Report: Separation of Hydrogen with Membranes Combined with Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Hervas, J. M.; Marono, M.; Barreiro, M. M.

    2011-05-13

    Oxygen pressurized gasification of biomass out stands as a very promising approach to obtain energy or hydrogen from renewable sources. The technical feasibility of this technology has been investigated under the scope of the VI FP CHRISGAS project, which started in September 2004 and had a duration of five and a half years. The Division of Combustion and Gasification of CIEMAT participated in this project in Work Package 13: Ancillary and novel processes, studying innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems. Such systems include novel or available high temperature water gas shift catalysts and commercially available membranes not yet tried in this type of atmosphere. This report describes the activities carried out during the project regarding the performance of high temperature water gas shift catalysts for upgrading of synthesis gas obtained from biomass gasification, the separation of H2 with selective membranes and the combination of both processes in one by means of a catalytic membrane reactor. (Author) 20 refs.

  12. CHRISGAS Project. WP13: Ancillary and Novel Processes. Final Report: Separation of Hydrogen with Membranes Combined with Water Gas Shift Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Hervas, J. M.; Marono, M.; Barreiro, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen pressurized gasification of biomass out stands as a very promising approach to obtain energy or hydrogen from renewable sources. The technical feasibility of this technology has been investigated under the scope of the VI FP CHRISGAS project, which started in September 2004 and had a duration of five and a half years. The Division of Combustion and Gasification of CIEMAT participated in this project in Work Package 13: Ancillary and novel processes, studying innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems. Such systems include novel or available high temperature water gas shift catalysts and commercially available membranes not yet tried in this type of atmosphere. This report describes the activities carried out during the project regarding the performance of high temperature water gas shift catalysts for upgrading of synthesis gas obtained from biomass gasification, the separation of H2 with selective membranes and the combination of both processes in one by means of a catalytic membrane reactor. (Author) 20 refs.

  13. Processing of coke oven gas. Primary gas cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, H [Otto (C.) und Co. G.m.b.H., Bochum (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-11-01

    The primary cooler is an indispensable part of all byproduct processing plants. Its purpose is to cool the raw gas from the coke oven battery and to remove the accompanying water vapor. The greater part of the cooling capacity is utilized for the condensation of water vapor and only a small capacity is needed for the gas cooling. Impurities in the gas, like naphthalene, tar and solid particles, necessitate a special design in view of the inclination to dirt accumulation. Standard types of direct and indirect primary gas coolers are described, with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Shale gas: the water myth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, Kerry [Dillon Consulting Limited (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, due to the depletion of traditional fossil fuel resources and the rising price of energy, production from unconventional gas activities has increased. Large shale gas plays are available in Quebec but environmental concerns, mainly in terms of water resources, have been raised. The aim of this paper is to provide information on the impact of shale gas exploitation on water resources. It is shown herein that shale gas water use is not significant, the water use of 250 wells represents only 0.3% of the Quebec pulp and paper industry's water use, or 0.0004% of the flow of the St Lawrence. It is also shown that the environmental risk associated with fracking and drilling activities is low. This paper demonstrated that as long as industry practices conform to a well-designed regulatory framework, shale gas development in Quebec will have a low impact on water resources and the environment.

  15. Conceptual design for a food production, water and waste processing, and gas regeneration module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, O. W.

    1986-01-01

    During the first six month period, the RECON (Regenerative Concepts Group) team collected reference material, made visits to consult with other researchers, and invited distinguished visitors to speak on the status of closed life support activities. A decision was made to develop the data base and modeling such that artificial intelligence (AI) methods could be used to manipulate data and examine concept alternatives. Six discrete tasks and a project schedule were outlined for the first year. The first two tasks have been essentially completed and have resulted in a sample set of assumptions for general use in defining candidate systems and for the specification of closed system characteristics. To model a closed environment, decisions were necessary to establish the amounts of food, air, water and waste products. Although recognized that data would eventually be normalized on the basis of a single human, the amount of data in existence for four person crews led to the decision to use this as a baseline. Information on existing concepts was collected from NASA sources, from industry, and libraries. Concept modeling was begun, hardware and software obtained, technical tasks identified and experimental work initiated.

  16. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  17. Gas in your water well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    In Alberta, the presence of carbon dioxide, methane or hydrogen sulphide in water wells is common. The aim of this paper is to provide information to private owners of water wells. It is stated in this document that spurting taps or a gurgling noise indicate that there is gas in your water well; you can determine which gas it is by collecting a sample and having it analyzed. In order to address the risks associated with the presence of gas in the water well, the well pit or well pump should be properly vented to avoid any oxygen deficiency in the atmosphere. It is also possible to get rid of the gas by lowering the pump intake. It is also mentioned that the development of coalbed methane in Alberta should not contaminate private wells since regulations aimed at avoiding this have been implemented. This paper provided useful information to help private owners manage the presence of gas in their water wells.

  18. Chemisorption of H2O and CO2 on hydrotalcites for sorptionenhanced water-gas-shift processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, K.T.; Gallucci, F.; Cobden, P.; van Dijk, E; Hensen, E.J.M.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2017-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis and breakthrough experiments in a packed bed reactor were used to validate a developed adsorption model to describe the cyclic working capacity of CO2 and H2O on a potassium-promoted hydrotalcite, a very promising adsorbent for sorption-enhanced water-gas-shift

  19. Chemisorption of H2O and CO2 on hydrotalcites for sorptionenhanced water-gas-shift processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, K.T.; Gallucci, F.; Cobden, P.; van Dijk, E.; Hensen, E.J.M.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis and breakthrough experiments in a packed bed reactor were used to validate a developed adsorption model to describe the cyclic working capacity of CO¬2 and H2O on a potassium-promoted hydrotalcite, a very promising adsorbent for sorption-enhanced water-gas-shift

  20. Emergency gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taruishi, Yoshiaki; Sasaki, Susumu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the reduction of radioactive substances released out of reactor buildings irrespective of the aging change in the buildings. Constitution: There are provided an exhaust gas flow channel for cleaning contaminated airs within a reactor building by way of a series of filters and exhausting the cleaned airs by means of exhaust fans to the outside and a gas recycling flow channel having a cooler in connection with the exhaust gas flow channel at a position downstream of the exhaust fans for returning the cleaned airs in the exhaust gas flow channel to the inside of the reactor buildings. The pressure difference between the outside and the inside of the reactor buildings is made constant by controlling the air flow channel within the gas recycling flow channel by a flow control valve. The airs cleaned by the series of the filters are recycled to the inside of the buildings to decrease the radioactive substance within the buildings. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Gas processing industrial hygiene needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orsie, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Handling of gases and natural gas liquids provides many opportunities for workers to be exposed to adverse chemical and physical agents. A brief overview of common hazards found in the processing of gas and natural gas liquids is presented in this paper. Suggestions on how an employer can obtain assistance in evaluating his workplace are also presented.presented

  2. Impact of direct greenhouse gas emissions on the carbon footprint of water reclamation processes employing nitrification–denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Andrew G.; Townsend-Small, Amy; Rosso, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Water reclamation has the potential to reduce water supply demands from aquifers and more energy-intensive water production methods (e.g., seawater desalination). However, water reclamation via biological nitrification–denitrification is also associated with the direct emission of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO 2 , N 2 O, and CH 4 . We quantified these direct emissions from the nitrification–denitrification reactors of a water reclamation plant in Southern California, and measured the 14 C content of the CO 2 to distinguish between short- and long-lived carbon. The total emissions were 1.5 (± 0.2) g-fossil CO 2 m −3 of wastewater treated, 0.5 (± 0.1) g-CO 2 -eq of CH 4 m −3 , and 1.8 (± 0.5) g-CO 2 -eq of N 2 O m −3 , for a total of 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO 2 -eq m −3 . This demonstrated that water reclamation can be a source of GHGs from long lived carbon, and thus a candidate for GHG reduction credit. From the 14 C measurements, we found that between 11.4% and 15.1% of the CO 2 directly emitted was derived from fossil sources, which challenges past assumptions that the direct CO 2 emissions from water reclamation contain only modern carbon. A comparison of our direct emission measurements with estimates of indirect emissions from several water production methods, however, showed that the direct emissions from water reclamation constitute only a small fraction of the plant's total GHG footprint. - Highlights: • Direct greenhouse gas emissions were measured at a wastewater reclamation plant. • These greenhouse gas emissions amounted to 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO 2 -eq m −3 of wastewater. • 14 C analysis of the CO 2 emissions was conducted to determine the fossil component. • 11.4% to 15.1% of the emitted CO 2 was derived from fossil sources

  3. Impact of direct greenhouse gas emissions on the carbon footprint of water reclamation processes employing nitrification–denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Andrew G., E-mail: andrew.schneider@yale.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Geology, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Townsend-Small, Amy [University of Cincinnati, Department of Geology, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); University of Cincinnati, Department of Geography, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Rosso, Diego [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Water reclamation has the potential to reduce water supply demands from aquifers and more energy-intensive water production methods (e.g., seawater desalination). However, water reclamation via biological nitrification–denitrification is also associated with the direct emission of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4}. We quantified these direct emissions from the nitrification–denitrification reactors of a water reclamation plant in Southern California, and measured the {sup 14}C content of the CO{sub 2} to distinguish between short- and long-lived carbon. The total emissions were 1.5 (± 0.2) g-fossil CO{sub 2} m{sup −3} of wastewater treated, 0.5 (± 0.1) g-CO{sub 2}-eq of CH{sub 4} m{sup −3}, and 1.8 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq of N{sub 2}O m{sup −3}, for a total of 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq m{sup −3}. This demonstrated that water reclamation can be a source of GHGs from long lived carbon, and thus a candidate for GHG reduction credit. From the {sup 14}C measurements, we found that between 11.4% and 15.1% of the CO{sub 2} directly emitted was derived from fossil sources, which challenges past assumptions that the direct CO{sub 2} emissions from water reclamation contain only modern carbon. A comparison of our direct emission measurements with estimates of indirect emissions from several water production methods, however, showed that the direct emissions from water reclamation constitute only a small fraction of the plant's total GHG footprint. - Highlights: • Direct greenhouse gas emissions were measured at a wastewater reclamation plant. • These greenhouse gas emissions amounted to 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq m{sup −3} of wastewater. • {sup 14}C analysis of the CO{sub 2} emissions was conducted to determine the fossil component. • 11.4% to 15.1% of the emitted CO{sub 2} was derived from fossil sources.

  4. Noble gas absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A method of removing a noble gas from air comprising the use of activated carbon filters in stages in which absorption and desorption steps in succession are conducted in order to increase the capacity of the filters is described. (U.S.)

  5. Formation of gas bubbles in gas superheated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The phenomenon of bubbles formation in supersaturated solutions of gases in water is a transport process, the final result of which is a separation of phases. In spite of its widespread appearance in industry and in nature, no model exists that can explain it and predict the degree of supersaturation which a gas-water solution can tolerate before bubbles are formed. The objective of this study was to fill this gap, and indeed, an extensive experimental work was carried out, a model was established and simple but accurate means were developed for predicting the tolerable degree of supersaturation of gas-water solutions. The model is also capable of predicting quite accurately the activation phenomenon in water. Superheating and supercooling phenomena were also examined in the light of the new model. (author)

  6. New directions in gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Papers presented at the Insight conference held on January 30, 1996 in Calgary, Alberta, were contained in this volume. The conference was devoted to a discussion of new directions in the gas processing business, the changing business environment, new processing technologies, and means by which current facilities agreements can be adapted to the new commercial reality. High operating costs which have resulted in the downsizing and restructuring of the industry, and partnering with a third party in the gathering and processing operations, with apparently beneficial result both to plant owners, as well to third party processors, received the most attention. The relationship between the gas processor and the gas producer as they relate to the Petroleum Joint Venture Association (PJVA) Gas Processing Agreement, which defines the obligations of third parties, was the center of discussion. Regulatory changes and the industry's response to the changes was also on the agenda. Refs., tabs., figs

  7. Theoretical analysis of a biogas-fed PEMFC system with different hydrogen purifications: Conventional and membrane-based water gas shift processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authayanun, Suthida; Aunsup, Pounyaporn; Patcharavorachot, Yaneeporn; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis of the biogas-fed PEMFC system is performed. • Conventional and membrane-based WGS processes for H 2 purification are studied. • A flowsheet model of the PEMFC system is developed. • Effect of key parameters on yields of H 2 and carbon in the biogas reformer is shown. • Performance of PEMFC systems with different H 2 purification processes is analyzed. - Abstract: This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of biogas reforming and proton electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) integrated process with different hydrogen purifications: conventional and membrane-based water gas shift processes. The aim is to determine the optimal reforming process for hydrogen production from biogas in the PEMFC system. The formation of carbon is concerned in the hydrogen production. The simulation results show that increases in the steam-to-methane ratio and reformer temperature can improve the hydrogen yield and reduce the carbon formation. From the performance analysis, it is found that when the PEMFC is operated at high temperature and fuel utilization, the overall system efficiency enhances. The performance of the PEMFC system with the installation of a water gas shift membrane unit in the hydrogen purification step is slightly increased, compared with a conventional process

  8. Geochemical evidence of water-soluble gas accumulation in the Weiyuan gas field, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengfei Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are several different opinions on the formation process of the Weiyuan gas field in the Sichuan Basin and the source of its natural gas. In view of the fact that the methane carbon isotope of the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is abnormally heavy, the geologic characteristics of gas reservoirs and the geochemical characteristics of natural gas were first analyzed. In the Weiyuan gas field, the principal gas reservoirs belong to Sinian Dengying Fm. The natural gas is mainly composed of methane, with slight ethane and trace propane. The gas reservoirs are higher in water saturation, with well preserved primary water. Then, it was discriminated from the relationship of H2S content vs. methane carbon isotope that the heavier methane carbon isotope of natural gas in this area is not caused by thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR. Based on the comparison of methane carbon isotope in this area with that in adjacent areas, and combined with the tectonic evolution background, it is regarded that the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is mainly derived from water-soluble gas rather than be migrated laterally from adjacent areas. Some conclusions are made. First, since methane released from water is carbon isotopically heavier, the water-soluble gas accumulation after degasification results in the heavy methane carbon isotope of the gas produced from Weiyuan gas field. Second, along with Himalayan movement, great uplift occurred in the Weiyuan area and structural traps were formed. Under high temperature and high pressure, the gas dissolved in water experienced decompression precipitation, and the released natural gas accumulated in traps, consequently leading to the formation of Weiyuan gas field. Third, based on calculation, the amount of natural gas released from water which is entrapped in the Weiyuan gas field after the tectonic uplift is basically equal to the proved reserves of this field, confirming the opinion of water

  9. Supercritical water decontamination of town gas soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, B.S.; Azzam, F.O.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    Town gas sites represent a large environmental problem that exists in more than 2,000 sites across North America alone. The major contaminants in town gas sods are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These are stable compounds that migrate deep into the soil and are traditionally very difficult to remove by conventional remediation processes. Supercritical fluids offer enhanced solvating properties along with reduced mass transfer resistances that make them ideal for removing compounds that are difficult or impossible to remove by conventional processes. Supercritical water is ideal for removing PAHs and other hydrocarbons from soil due to its high solvating power towards most hydrocarbon species. Supercritical water was investigated for its ability to remediate two different town gas sods containing from 3--20 wt% contamination. The sod was remediated in a 300-cc semi-continuous system to a more environmentally acceptable level

  10. Water vapor and gas transport through PEO PBT block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.; Potreck, Jens; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Introduction At the bore well natural gas is saturated with water. Downstream the presence of water may cause: formation of methane hydrates (blocking eventually the pipeline), condensation of water in the pipeline and corrosion effects. A process used for the dehydration of natural gas is glycol

  11. Exhaust gas clean up process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  12. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Paek, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung Hong Suk

    2007-06-01

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 ∼ 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 ∼ 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al 2 O 3 . The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D 2 -H 2 gas mixture

  13. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  14. Gas storage and processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the gas solidification processing performance in a gas storing and processing device for solidifying treatment of radioactive gaseous wastes (krypton 85) by ion injection method. Constitution: The device according to the present invention is constituted by disposing a coil connected with a magnetic field power source to the outer circumference of an outer cathode vessel, so that axial magnetic fields are formed to the inside of the outer cathode vessel. With such a device, thermoelectrons released from the thermocathode downwardly collide against gaseous radioactive wastes at high probability while moving spirally by the magnetic fields. The thus formed gas ions are solidified by sputtering in the cathode in the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Inhibition of the Nitrification Process of Activated Sludge Micro-Organism by Scrubber Water from an Industrial Flue Gas Cleaning Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2007-01-01

    the nitrogen removal. A major sewage cleaning plant in the southern part of Denmark is a recipient of industrial sewage from a major fish meal industry. Severe nitrification inhibition was observed in scrubber water from an incineration of process air, and the processes that lead to the production were stopped......The microbial transformation of ammonia to nitrate, the nitrification, is a central process in the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle. In a modern wastewater treatment plant, the nitrification process is a key process in the removal of nitrogen and inhibitory compounds in sewage can seriously affect....... In order to investigate the relation between incineration temperatures and the production of inhibitory compounds, the process air was burned at temperatures from 800°C to 1000°C. The termically affected condensate was collected and the nitrification inhibition effect of the condensate was tested using...

  16. Process for the production of hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, E.; Desai, A.; Ilgner, H.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the production of hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas is described in which the enriched condensate obtained from the production of a hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas mixture is collected and subjected to a direct exchange of isotopes with the feedsteam admitted to the process. Such condensate can be brought into direct exchange of isotopes with the gas water vapor mixture within the process, viz. ahead of the CO conversion section. The exchange of isotopes may be performed according to the counter-current principle. If it is intended to maintain in the hydrogen/deuterium-containing gas a certain definite content of water vapor whose phase condition is superior to the condition achieved when using normal cooling water, this gas, at least 0.6 kg/m 3 of gas, is subjected to an exchange of isotopes with the water fed additionally into the process

  17. Conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakopoulos, P.J.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-05-01

    The mechanisms of conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water (HTO) have been examined for several tritium gaseous mixtures. The physical and chemical processes involved in the self-radiolysis of such mixtures have been analyzed and the kinetics involved in the formation of HTO has been presented. It has been determined that the formation of the H and/or OH free radicals, as intermediate species, are of significance in the formation of HTO. Therefore, the problem of reducing the rate of formation of tritiated water in a mixture of gaseous tritium with atmospheric components is one of finding an effective scavenger for the H and/or OH free radicals

  18. Treatment of Oil & Gas Produced Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Production of oil and gas reserves in the New Mexico Four Corners Region results in large volumes of "produced water". The common method for handling the produced water from well production is re-injection in regulatory permitted salt water disposal wells. This is expensive (%7E $5/bbl.) and does not recycle water, an ever increasingly valuable commodity. Previously, Sandia National Laboratories and several NM small business tested pressure driven membrane-filtration techniques to remove the high TDS (total dissolved solids) from a Four Corners Coal Bed Methane produced water. Treatment effectiveness was less than optimal due to problems with pre-treatment. Inadequate pre-treatment allowed hydrocarbons, wax and biological growth to foul the membranes. Recently, an innovative pre-treatment scheme using ozone and hydrogen peroxide was pilot tested. Results showed complete removal of hydrocarbons and the majority of organic constituents from a gas well production water. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was made possible through funding from the New Mexico Small Business Administration (NMSBA) Program at Sandia National Laboratories. Special thanks to Juan Martinez and Genaro Montoya for guidance and support from project inception to completion. Also, special thanks to Frank McDonald, the small businesses team POC, for laying the ground work for the entire project; Teresa McCown, the gas well owner and very knowledgeable- fantastic site host; Lea and Tim Phillips for their tremendous knowledge and passion in the oil & gas industry.; and Frank Miller and Steve Addleman for providing a pilot scale version of their proprietary process to facilitate the pilot testing.

  19. Gas storing and processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Takano, Yosoko.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the gas injection processing performance and obtain stable accumulation layers by increasing the thickness of the accumulation layers of amorphous alloy. Constitution: The gas storing processing device comprises a cylindrical vessel constituting an outer cathode for introducing gases to be processed, an inner cathode in which transition metal material and rare earth metal material as a sputtering target disposed in the vessel are combined by way of insulating material, an anode cover disposed to the upper portion of the vessel and an anode bottom disposed at the bottom thereof. It is adapted such that DC high voltage sources are connected respectively to the outer and the inner cathodes and sputtering voltage can be applied, removed and controlled independently to the transition metal and the rare earth metal of the inner cathode. This enables to control the composition ratio of the accumulation layers of amorphous alloy formed to the surface of the outer cathode, thereby enabling operation related with the gas injection ratio. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Castro-Dominguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS. Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR for MSR, (ii a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  1. Impact of direct greenhouse gas emissions on the carbon footprint of water reclamation processes employing nitrification-denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrew G; Townsend-Small, Amy; Rosso, Diego

    2015-02-01

    Water reclamation has the potential to reduce water supply demands from aquifers and more energy-intensive water production methods (e.g., seawater desalination). However, water reclamation via biological nitrification-denitrification is also associated with the direct emission of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO₂, N₂O, and CH₄. We quantified these direct emissions from the nitrification-denitrification reactors of a water reclamation plant in Southern California, and measured the (14)C content of the CO₂ to distinguish between short- and long-lived carbon. The total emissions were 1.5 (±0.2) g-fossil CO₂ m(-3) of wastewater treated, 0.5 (±0.1) g-CO₂-eq of CH₄ m(-3), and 1.8 (±0.5) g-CO₂-eq of N₂O m(-3), for a total of 3.9 (±0.5) g-CO₂-eqm(-3). This demonstrated that water reclamation can be a source of GHGs from long lived carbon, and thus a candidate for GHG reduction credit. From the (14)C measurements, we found that between 11.4% and 15.1% of the CO₂ directly emitted was derived from fossil sources, which challenges past assumptions that the direct CO₂ emissions from water reclamation contain only modern carbon. A comparison of our direct emission measurements with estimates of indirect emissions from several water production methods, however, showed that the direct emissions from water reclamation constitute only a small fraction of the plant's total GHG footprint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Paek, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung Hong Suk

    2007-06-15

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 {approx} 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 {approx} 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture.

  3. Potentiometric analytical microsystem based on the integration of a gas-diffusion step for on-line ammonium determination in water recycling processes in manned space missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-López, Antonio; Ymbern, Oriol; Puyol, Mar; Casalta, Joan Manel; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián

    2015-05-18

    The design, construction and evaluation of a versatile cyclic olefin copolymer (COC)-based continuous flow potentiometric microanalyzer to monitor the presence of ammonium ion in recycling water processes for future manned space missions is presented. The microsystem integrates microfluidics, a gas-diffusion module and a detection system in a single substrate. The gas-diffusion module was integrated by a hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. The potentiometric detection system is based on an all-solid state ammonium selective electrode and a screen-printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The analytical features provided by the analytical microsystem after the optimization process were a linear range from 0.15 to 500 mg L(-1) and a detection limit of 0.07 ± 0.01 mg L(-1). Nevertheless, the operational features can be easily adapted to other applications through the modification of the hydrodynamic variables of the microfluidic platform. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray W. Sheldon

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (stripper gas water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  5. Method of optimization of the natural gas refining process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykh-Zade, E.S.; Bagirov, A.A.; Mardakhayev, I.M.; Razamat, M.S.; Tagiyev, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The SATUM (automatic control system of technical operations) system introduced at the Shatlyk field should assure good quality of gas refining. In order to optimize the natural gas refining processes and experimental-analytical method is used in compiling the mathematical descriptions. The program, compiled in Fortran language, in addition to parameters of optimal conditions gives information on the yield of concentrate and water, concentration and consumption of DEG, composition and characteristics of the gas and condensate. The algorithm for calculating optimum engineering conditions of gas refining is proposed to be used in ''advice'' mode, and also for monitoring progress of the gas refining process.

  6. Panorama 2011: Unconventional gas and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vially, R.

    2011-01-01

    For a number of years now, the rapid development of unconventional gas use in North America has been revolutionising the natural gas market. This generic term refers to several production types, such as tight gas, shale gas and coal bed methane. What they have in common is that the rock needs to be 'stimulated' in order to extract gas from it that can be commercially produced. These methods (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing) all involve sensible management of the water needed for gas production. (author)

  7. Process for purification of gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, S Z; Letitschevskij, V I; Maergojz, I I; Michailov, L A; Puschkarev, L I

    1977-06-23

    The process relates to the purification of gas mixtures of N, H, and Ar, or N and H, or N and O which contain CO, CO/sub 2/ and water vapour. Single-stage adsorption occurs under standard pressure at temperatures from -40 to +4/sup 0/C up to the point of CO penetration through the zeolite layer. Zeolite is of type A or X combined with Ca, Na, Ag, Cd, Co, Ni, Mn or a natural zeolite of the type klinoptilolite. Regeneration is achieved at constant temperature and pressure of 1-5x10/sup -1/ Torr or by heating to 120-600/sup 0/C.

  8. Process for the gas extraction of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquhart, D B

    1976-05-20

    The object of the invention is a process for the hydroextraction of coal is treated with water and carbon monoxide at a temperature in the region of 300 - 380/sup 0/C. After treatment is completed, the gases are separated from the treated gas; the treated coal is then extracted with an extraction medium during the gas phase at a temperature of at least 400/sup 0/C, the remainder is separated from the gas phase and the coal extract is obtained from the extraction medium. Hydrogenation is preferably carried out at a temperature in the region of 320 - 370/sup 0/C and at a pressure of 200 - 400 at. The time required for treatment with carbon monoxide and water is 1/4 - 2 hours, and in special cases 3/4 - 1 1/2 hours. The coal material itself is nutty slack, of which more than 95% of the coal particles pass through a 1.5 mm mesh sieve. After the hydrogenation the extraction is carried out at a temperature in the region of 400 - 450/sup 0/C. The patent claims relate to the types of extraction media used.

  9. Gas prices and price process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenewegen, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    On a conference (Gas for Europe in the 1990's) during the Gasexpo '91 the author held a speech of which the Dutch text is presented here. Attention is paid to the current European pricing methods (prices based on the costs of buying, transporting and distributing the natural gas and prices based on the market value, which is deducted from the prices of alternative fuels), and the transparency of the prices (lack of information on the way the prices are determined). Also attention is paid to the market signal transparency and gas-gas competition, which means a more or less free market of gas distribution. The risks of gas-to-gas competition for a long term price stability, investment policies and security of supply are discussed. Opposition against the Third Party Access (TPA), which is the program to implement gas-to-gas competition, is caused by the fear of natural gas companies for lower gas prices and lower profits. Finally attention is paid to government regulation and the activities of the European Commission (EC) in this matter. 1 fig., 6 ills., 1 tab

  10. Gas manufacture, processes for: condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W

    1876-11-29

    In the production of illuminating gas from coal, shale, hydrocarbon oil, or other substance used in the production of gas, the volatile products inside the retort are agitated by means of moving pistons or jets of compressed gas, steam, or vapor in order to decompose them into permanent gases, and in some cases to increase the volume of gas by the decomposition of the injected gas, etc. or by blending or carburetting this gas with the decomposition products of the volatile matters. To separate the condensible hydrocarbons from the crude gas it is passed through heated narrow tortuous passages or is caused to impinge on surfaces. If the crude gases are cold these surfaces are heated and vice versa.

  11. Method of processing radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the quantity of radioactive gas discharged at the time of starting a nuclear power plant. Method: After the stoppage of a nuclear power plant air containing a radioactive gas is extracted from a main condenser by operating an air extractor. The air is sent into a gaseous waste disposal device, and then introduced into the activated carbon adsorptive tower of a rare gas holdup device where xenon and krypton are trapped. Thereafter, the air passes through pipelines and returned to the main condenser. In this manner, the radioactive gas contained in air within the main condenser is removed during the stoppage of the operation of the nuclear power plant. After the plant has been started, when it enters the normal operation, a flow control valve is closed and another valve is opened, and a purified gas exhausted from the rare gas holdup device is discharged into the atmosphere through an exhaust cylinder. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Process of gas manufacture: retorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, N M

    1883-01-01

    Improvements in the process and apparatus for the destructive distillation of shale, etc., described in Specification No. 1327, A.D. 1873. According to one modification a series of vertical retorts are arranged opposite to each other in two rows, the retorts in each row having flue spaces between them. The retorts have inclined bottoms beneath which are combustion chambers connected by flues to the spaces, and by flues to regenerative chambers, provided with flues, arranged with suitable valves. The fresh air and combustible gas enter at the bottom of one pair of regenerators, and after being heated enter one of the chambers, where they are ignited. The products pass through the adjacent spaces, which are connected at the top, and having heated the retorts pass through the other chamber and through the other pair of regenerators to the chimney. The retorts opposite to each other are connected by a port at the top, and they are charged alternately with fresh material. Each retort is fitted with an outlet pipe leading to a main, and with a steam jet by which air and steam may be forced into the mouth piece. The fresh charge is subjected to a comparatively low temperature at first to distill the oil, and then a higher heat is applied to the partially-spent shale and highly-superheated steam, and air admitted to the retort to decompose the coke and drive off the remaining carbon and ammonia.

  13. Shale Gas Development and Drinking Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Elaine; Ma, Lala

    2017-05-01

    The extent of environmental externalities associated with shale gas development (SGD) is important for welfare considerations and, to date, remains uncertain (Mason, Muehlenbachs, and Olmstead 2015; Hausman and Kellogg 2015). This paper takes a first step to address this gap in the literature. Our study examines whether shale gas development systematically impacts public drinking water quality in Pennsylvania, an area that has been an important part of the recent shale gas boom. We create a novel dataset from several unique sources of data that allows us to relate SGD to public drinking water quality through a gas well's proximity to community water system (CWS) groundwater source intake areas.1 We employ a difference-in-differences strategy that compares, for a given CWS, water quality after an increase in the number of drilled well pads to background levels of water quality in the geographic area as measured by the impact of more distant well pads. Our main estimate finds that drilling an additional well pad within 1 km of groundwater intake locations increases shale gas-related contaminants by 1.5–2.7 percent, on average. These results are striking considering that our data are based on water sampling measurements taken after municipal treatment, and suggest that the health impacts of SGD 1 A CWS is defined as the subset of public water systems that supplies water to the same population year-round. through water contamination remains an open question.

  14. Process for preparing a normal lighting and heating gas etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J

    1910-12-11

    A process for preparing a normal lighting and heating gas from Australian bituminous shale by distillation and decomposition in the presence of water vapor is characterized by the fact that the gasification is suitably undertaken with gradual filling of a retort and with simultaneous introduction of water vapor at a temperature not exceeding 1,000/sup 0/ C. The resulting amount of gas is heated in the same or a second heated retort with freshly supplied vapor.

  15. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Using Noble Gas Measurements to Derive Air-Sea Process Information and Predict Physical Gas Saturations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Emerson, Steven R.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Long, Matthew C.; Yashayaev, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Dissolved gas distributions are important because they influence oceanic habitats and Earth's climate, yet competing controls by biology and physics make gas distributions challenging to predict. Bubble-mediated gas exchange, temperature change, and varying atmospheric pressure all push gases away from equilibrium. Here we use new noble gas measurements from the Labrador Sea to demonstrate a technique to quantify physical processes. Our analysis shows that water-mass formation can be represented by a quasi steady state in which bubble fluxes and cooling push gases away from equilibrium balanced by diffusive gas exchange forcing gases toward equilibrium. We quantify the rates of these physical processes from our measurements, allowing direct comparison to gas exchange parameterizations, and predict the physically driven saturation of other gases. This technique produces predictions that reasonably match N2/Ar observations and demonstrates that physical processes should force SF6 to be ˜6% more supersaturated than CFC-11 and CFC-12, impacting ventilation age calculations.

  17. Study of a three-phase flow metering process for oil-water-gas flows; Etude d`un procede de mesure des debits d`un ecoulement triphasique de type eau-huile-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Ch.

    1996-11-01

    We propose a theoretical and experimental study of a three-phase flow metering process for oil-water-gas flows. The selected process is based on a combination of a mixer, a Venturi and ultrasonic methods. To perform an experimental validation of this process an instrumented set-up for three-phase air-oil-water flows has been designed, conceived and adjusted. An original theoretical model have been built to predict three-phase dispersed flows across a contraction. Once validated with two-phase air-water, oil-water and air-oil-water flows data, this model has been used to solve the Venturi metering problems. After a critical review of the available techniques, the ultrasonic propagation velocity has been selected to determine two-phase liquid-liquid flow composition. Two original models have been developed to describe the ultrasonic propagation with the dispersed phase fraction. The comparison with experimental data in oil-water flows show the superiority of one of the two models, the scattering model. For the void fraction determination in air-water flows, the work of Bensler (1990) based on the ultrasonic attenuation measurement has been extended to take into account the multiple scattering effects. Finally these techniques have been combined to determine the different flow rates in air-water, oil-water flows. For two-phase air-water and oil-water flows the problem is solved and the flow rates are measured with a very good accuracy ({+-} 3%). The results quality obtained with three-phase oil-water-gas flows and the secure theoretical bases allowing their interpretation give us the opportunity to strongly recommend the development of an industrial prototype based on the process we studied. (author) 183 refs.

  18. A comparative study of gas-gas miscibility processes in underground gas storage reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, M.M.; Schmitz, S. [DBI - Gastechnologisches Institut gGmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Intermixture of gases in underground gas reservoirs have had great weight for natural gas storage in UGS projects with substitution of cushion gas by inert gases or changing the stored gas quality or origin, as for the replacement of town gas by natural gas. It was also investigated during the last years for Enhanced Gas Recovery (EGR) and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects. The actual importance of its mechanisms is discussed for the H{sub 2} storage in Power to Gas to Power projects (PGP). In these approaches miscibility of the injected gas with the gas in place in the reservoir plays an important role in the displacement process. The conditions and parameters for the gas-gas displacement and mixing have been investigated in previous projects, as e.g. the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with natural gas (CLEAN). Furthermore the miscibility process of town gas with natural gas and sauer gas with sweet gas were also previously measured and compared in laboratory. The objective of this work is to investigate the miscibility of H{sub 2} injection into natural gas reservoirs using a compositional and a black oil reservoir simulator. Three processes of convection, dispersion and diffusion are considered precisely. The effect of gas miscibility is studied for both simulators and the results are compared to find optimum miscibility parameters. The findings of this work could be helpful for further pilot and field case studies to predict and monitor the changes in gas composition and quality. In future this monitoring might become more important when PGP together with H{sub 2}-UGS, as storage technology, will help to successfully implement the change to an energy supply from more renewable sources. Similarly the method confirms the use of the black oil simulator as an alternative for gas-gas displacement and sequestration reservoir simulation in comparison to the compositional simulator. (orig.)

  19. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  20. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  1. Water in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Valentin, Ch. Claveau A.D. Bykov, N.N. Lavrentieva, VN. Saveliev , L.N. Sinitsa « THE TCPE MANY-BODY MODEL FOR WATER » 79 M. Masella and J-P. Flament...Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et Applications, CNRS Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. A.D. Bykov, N.N. Lavrentieva, V.N. Saveliev , L.N...T19 Lozada M. T4 Rothman L.S. T22 Lutz B. L. T33 Ruiz J. P24 Lynch R. P3 Sadlej A. T5 Lynden-Bell R. M. P8 Saveliev V.N. P4 Maemets V. P18 Saykally

  2. Review on biofuel oil and gas production processes from microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Sarmidi

    2009-01-01

    Microalgae, as biomass, are a potential source of renewable energy, and they can be converted into energy such as biofuel oil and gas. This paper presents a brief review on the main conversion processes of microalgae becoming energy. Since microalgae have high water content, not all biomass energy conversion processes can be applied. By using thermochemical processes, oil and gas can be produced, and by using biochemical processes, ethanol and biodiesel can be produced. The properties of the microalgae product are almost similar to those of offish and vegetable oils, and therefore, it can be considered as a substitute of fossil oil.

  3. Process for exchanging tritium between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of exchanging and concentrating the radioactive isotope of hydrogen from water or hydrogen gas is described. This heavy water enrichment system involves a low pressure, dual temperature process. (U.K.)

  4. Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbl, Daniel G.; Lee, Bernard S.; Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Lam, Henry W.

    1976-07-06

    In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

  5. Working under the PJVA gas processing agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, S.

    1996-01-01

    The trend in the natural gas industry is towards custom processing. New gas reserves tend to be smaller and in tighter reservoirs than in the past. This has resulted in plants having processing and transportation capacity available to be leased to third parties. Major plant operators and owners are finding themselves in the business of custom processing in a more focused way. Operators recognize that the dilution of operating costs can result in significant benefits to the plant owners as well as the third party processor. The relationship between the gas processor and the gas producer as they relate to the Petroleum Joint Venture Association (PJVA) Gas Processing Agreement were discussed. Details of the standard agreement that clearly defines the responsibilities of the third party producer and the processor were explained. In addition to outlining obligations of the parties, it also provides a framework for fee negotiation. It was concluded that third party processing can lower facility operating costs, extend facility life, and keep Canadian gas more competitive in holding its own in North American gas markets

  6. Contact heating of water products of combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronov, I Z

    1978-01-01

    The USSR's NIIST examined the processes and equipment for heating water by submerged combustion using natural gas. Written for engineers involved with the design and application of thermal engineering equipment operating with natural gas, the book emphasizes equipment, test results, and methods of calculating heat transfer for contact gas economizers developed by Scientific Research Institute of Sanitary Engineering and other Soviet organizations. The economic effectiveness of submerged-combustion heating depends on several factors, including equipment design. Recommendations cover cost-effective designs and applications of contact economizers and boilers.

  7. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  8. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  9. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1984-01-01

    The objects of this invention are achieved by a dual temperature isotopic exchange process employing hydrogen-water exchange with water passing in a closed recirculation loop between a catalyst-containing cold tower and the upper portion of a catalyst-containing hot tower, with feed water being introduced to the lower portion of the hot tower and being maintained out of contact with the water recirculating in the closed loop. Undue retarding of catalyst activity during deuterium concentration can thus be avoided. The cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower can be operated with relatively expensive catalyst material of higher catalyst activity, while the lower portion of the hot tower can be operated with a relatively less expensive, more rugged catalyst material of lesser catalyst activity. The feed water stream, being restricted solely to the lower portion of the hot tower, requires minimal pretreatment for the removal of potential catalyst contaminants. The catalyst materials are desirably coated with a hydrophobic treating material so as to be substantially inaccessible to liquid water, thereby retarding catalyst fouling while being accessible to the gas for enhancing isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor. A portion of the water of the closed loop can be passed to a humidification zone to heat and humidify the circulating hydrogen gas and then returned to the closed loop

  10. Wetland Surface Water Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1993-01-01

    .... Temporary storage includes channel, overbank, basin, and groundwater storage. Water is removed from the wetland through evaporation, plant transpiration, channel, overland and tidal flow, and groundwater recharge...

  11. New technological developments in gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    The changes that the natural gas industry has undergone over the last few years was discussed. Low natural gas prices forced companies to react to their high reserves replacements costs. They were forced to downsize and undergo major restructuring because they were losing money due to high operating costs; the future for natural gas prices looked pessimistic. The changes have led to a new kind of business practice, namely 'partnering with third party processor', mid-stream companies known as aggregators, to build and operate facilities as part of a move towards cost effective improvements for gas producers. Besides reducing capital and operating costs, the producer under this arrangements can dedicate his capital to finding new gas which is the basis of growth. Recent technological changes in the gas processing industry were also touched upon. These included enhanced technologies such as increased liquid hydrocarbon recovery, segregation of C3+ and C5+, installation of gas separation membrane systems, small sulphur plants, acid gas injection and selective or mixed solvents. Details of some of these technologies were described. 2 refs., 2 figs

  12. Modeling of the Process of Three-Isotope (H, D, T) Exchange Between Hydrogen Gas and Water Vapour on Pt-SDBC Catalyst over a Wide Range of Deuterium Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Tchijov, A.S.; Uborsky, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The large scale studies of Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process in Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute showed a complicated influence of various factors on the process caused by the presence of two simultaneous isotope exchange sub processes: counter-current phase exchange (between liquid water and water vapour) and co-current catalytic exchange (between hydrogen gas and water vapour). A laboratory scale set-up of glass made apparatuses was established in such a way that it allows us to study phase and catalytic exchange apart. A computer model of the set-up has been developed.The catalytic isotope exchange model formulation is presented. A collection of reversible chemical reactions is accompanied by diffusion of the gaseous reactants and reaction products in the pores of catalyst carrier. This has some interesting features that are demonstrated. Thus it was noted that the flow rates ratio (gas to vapour - λ = G/V) as well as the concentrations of reactants exert influence on the process efficiency

  13. Electron beam flue gas treatment process. Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkonen, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of the process for electron beam flue gas treatment are presented in the report. In tabular form the history of the research is reviewed. Main dependences of SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies on different physico-chemical parameters are discussed. Trends concerning industrial process implementation are presented in the paper,finally. (author). 74 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  14. Combustible gas recombining method and processing facility for gas waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Atsushi; Murakami, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    Combustible gases (hydrogen, oxygen) generated by radiation decomposition of reactor water in the vicinity of a reactor core in a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type nuclear power plant pass, together with flow of steams, through a gas/water separator and a steam dryer disposed at the upper portion of a reactor core. A catalyst for allowing hydrogen and oxygen to react efficiently and recombine them into water is plated on the surface of the steam dryer. The catalyst comprises palladium (Pd) or platinum (Pt) or a Pd-Pt alloy. The combustible gases passing through the steam dryer are recombined and formed into steams by the catalyst. A slight amount of hydrogen and oxygen which are not recombined transfers, together with main steams, from a main steam pipe to a main condensator by way of a turbine. Then they are released, together with air from an air extraction device, from an activated carbon-type rare gas hold up tower. (I.N.)

  15. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or

  16. Gas processing in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    This article is a brief overview of code requirements in the nuclear air cleaning arena. NRC standards, which employ the various ASME codes, are noted. It is also noted that DOE facilities do not fall under the purview of the NRC and that DOE facilities (especially fuel cycle facilities) typically have broader gas processing activities than for power reactors. The typical differences between DOE facilities` and power reactor facilities` gas processing needs are listed, as are DOE facility components not covered by the ASME AG-1 code.

  17. Gas processing at DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, J.

    1995-02-01

    The term {open_quotes}Gas Processing{close_quotes} has many possible meanings and understandings. In this paper, and panel, we will be using it to generally mean the treatment of gas by methods other than those common to HVAC and Nuclear Air Treatment. This is only a working guideline not a rigorous definition. Whether a rigorous definition is desirable, or even possible is a question for some other forum. Here we will be discussing the practical aspects of what {open_quotes}Gas Processing{close_quotes} includes and how existing Codes, Standards and industry experience can, and should, apply to DOE and NRC Licensed facilities. A major impediment to use of the best engineering and technology in many nuclear facilities is the administrative mandate that only systems and equipment that meet specified {open_quotes}nuclear{close_quotes} documents are permissible. This paper will highlight some of the limitations created by this approach.

  18. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  19. A Rapid Process for Fabricating Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a low-toxicity and environmentally-friendly material applied on devices, sensors or actuators for “green” usage. A porous ZnO film deposited by a rapid process of aerosol deposition (AD was employed as the gas-sensitive material in a CO gas sensor to reduce both manufacturing cost and time, and to further extend the AD application for a large-scale production. The relative resistance change (△R/R of the ZnO gas sensor was used for gas measurement. The fabricated ZnO gas sensors were measured with operating temperatures ranging from 110 °C to 180 °C, and CO concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 1000 ppm. The sensitivity and the response time presented good performance at increasing operating temperatures and CO concentrations. AD was successfully for applied for making ZnO gas sensors with great potential for achieving high deposition rates at low deposition temperatures, large-scale production and low cost.

  20. Tax issues in structuring gas process arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverach, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The current status of various tax issues regarding ownership, operation and financing of gas processing facilities in Canada was discussed. Frequently, energy companies are not taxed because of their large pools of un-depreciated capital cost and other resource related accounts. In addition, their time horizons for taxability are being extended in line with the expansion of their businesses. However, other investors are fully taxable, hence they wish to shelter their income through the use of tax efficient investment arrangements. This paper provides a detailed description of the tax treatment of gas processing facilities, tax implications of various structures between the producer and the investor such as lease, processing fee arrangements etc., and use of 'Canadian Renewable and Conservation Expense' (CRCE) for cogeneration projects within processing plants. All these need to be considered before completing a financing transaction involving a gas processing facility, since the manner in which the transaction is completed will determine the advantages and benefits from an income tax perspective. The accounting and legal aspects must be similarly scrutinized to ensure that the intended results for all parties are achieved. 8 figs

  1. Economics of natural gas conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradassi, M.J.; Green, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the potential profitability of a selected group of possible natural gas conversion processes from the perspective of a manufacturing entity that has access to substantial low cost natural gas reserves, capital to invest, and no allegiance to any particular product. The analysis uses the revenues and costs of conventional methanol technology as a framework to evaluate the economics of the alternative technologies. Capital requirements and the potential to enhance cash margins are the primary focus of the analysis. The basis of the analysis is a world-scale conventional methanol plant that converts 3.2 Mm 3 per day (120 MMSCFD) of natural gas into 3510 metric tonnes (3869 shorts tons) per day of methanol. Capital and operating costs are for an arbitrary remote location where natural gas is available at 0.47 US dollars per GJ (0.50 US dollars per MMBtu). Other costs include ocean freight to deliver the product to market at a US Gulf Coast location. Payout time, which is the ratio of the total capital investment to cash margin (revenue less total operating expenses), is the economic indicator for the analysis. Under these conditions, the payout time for the methanol plant is seven years. The payout time for the alternative natural gas conversion technologies is generally much higher, which indicates that they currently are not candidates for commercialization without consideration of special incentives. The analysis also includes an evaluation of the effects of process yields on the economics of two potential technologies, oxidative coupling to ethylene and direct conversion to methanol. This analysis suggests areas for research focus that might improve the profitability of natural gas conversion. 29 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Heater test in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri URL. Gas release and water redistribution - Contribution to heater experiment (HE); Rock and bentonite thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the nearfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beside salt and granite, clay formations are investigated as potential host rocks for disposing radioactive waste. In Switzerland in the canton Jura close to the city of St. Ursanne, an underground laboratory was built in the vicinity of the reconnaissance gallery of a motorway tunnel. Since 1995, a consortium of 12 international organisations is running this laboratory for investigating the suitability of the Opalinus clay formation with regard to disposal of radioactive waste. In 1999, the Heater Experiment B (HE-B) was started for investigating the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes of the Opalinus clay in interaction with the bentonite buffer. The principal contractors of this project were the Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S. A. (ENRESA), the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, and the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA). GRS participated in that experiment for determining the subjects of gas generation, gas release, water content, and water redistribution in the Opalinus clay during heating. This was achieved by analysing gas and water samples from the test field before, during, and after the heating period and by performing geoelectric tomography measurements in the heated region. The in-situ measurements were supported by an additional laboratory programme. This report deals with the work of GRS performed in this project during the years 1999 to 2005. All the results obtained in the frame of the project are presented. Additional laboratory measurements conducted by the Pore Water Laboratory at CIEMAT in Madrid are also presented. The participation of GRS was funded by German Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWA) under the contract No. 02 E 9602 and by the Commission of the European Communities under the contract No. FIKW.CT-2001-00132. (orig.)

  3. Introduction to gas lasers with emphasis on selective excitation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Colin S

    1974-01-01

    Introduction to Gas Lasers: Population Inversion Mechanisms focuses on important processes in gas discharge lasers and basic atomic collision processes that operate in a gas laser. Organized into six chapters, this book first discusses the historical development and basic principles of gas lasers. Subsequent chapters describe the selective excitation processes in gas discharges and the specific neutral, ionized and molecular laser systems. This book will be a valuable reference on the behavior of gas-discharge lasers to anyone already in the field.

  4. Primary processes during water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Briefly reviewed are investigations of primary process mechanism taking place during radiolysis of water and similar systems, executed by direct and indirect methods. A conclusion is made on the important role of the water structure during radiolysis of aqueous solutions of some substances. A necessity to take account of this factor during consideration of radiolysis theoretical models is pointed out

  5. 1991 worldwide refining and gas processing directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book ia an authority for immediate information on the industry. You can use it to find new business, analyze market trends, and to stay in touch with existing contacts while making new ones. The possibilities for business applications are numerous. Arranged by country, all listings in the directory include address, phone, fax and telex numbers, a description of the company's activities, names of key personnel and their titles, corporate headquarters, branch offices and plant sites. This newly revised edition lists more than 2000 companies and nearly 3000 branch offices and plant locations. This east-to-use reference also includes several of the most vital and informative surveys of the industry, including the U.S. Refining Survey, the Worldwide Construction Survey in Refining, Sulfur, Gas Processing and Related Fuels, the Worldwide Refining and Gas Processing Survey, the Worldwide Catalyst Report, and the U.S. and Canadian Lube and Wax Capacities Report from the National Petroleum Refiner's Association

  6. Water processing in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquardt, K.

    1984-01-01

    Surface water can be treated to a high degree of efficiency by means of new compact processes. The quantity of chemicals to be dosed can easily be adjusted to the raw water composition by intentional energy supply via agitators. In-line coagulations is a new filtration process for reducing organic substances as well as colloids present in surface water. The content of organic substances can be monitored by measuring the plugging index. Advanced ion-exchanger processes (fluidised-bed, compound fluidised-bed and continuously operating ion exchanger plants) allow the required quantity of chemicals as well as the plant's own water consumption to be reduced, thus minimising the adverse effect on the environment. The reverse-osmosis process is becoming more and more significant due to the low adverse effect on the environment and the given possibilities of automation. As not only ionogenic substances but also organic matter are removed by reverse osmosis, this process is particularly suited for treating surface water to be used as boiler feed water. The process of vacuum degassing has become significant for the cold removal of oxygen. (orig.) [de

  7. Heavy Water - Industrial Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1984-01-01

    This monograph devoted to the heavy water production mainly presents the Romanian experience in the field which started in early sixties from the laboratory scale production and reached now the level of large scale industrial production at ROMAG-Drobeta, Romania. The book is structured in eleven chapters entitled: Overview, The main physical properties, Sources, Uses, Separation factor and equilibrium constant, Mathematical modelling of the separation process, Thermodynamical considerations on the isotope separation, Selection criteria for heavy water separation processes, Industrial installations for heavy water production, Prospects, Acknowledgements. 200 Figs., 90 Tabs., 135 Refs

  8. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  9. Gas retorts: gas manufacture, process for distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J

    1874-05-23

    In apparatus for distilling shale, coal, etc. for making oil and gas, tubular retorts are supported horizontally in a chamber by plates from a brick setting and are heated partly by jets of gas from a pipe supplied through a cock from a gas holder, and partly by the waste gases from a furnace, which heats gas retorts placed in a chamber, air being supplied beneath the grate by a fan.

  10. Project Safe. Gas related processes in SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Skagius, K.; Soedergren, S.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-06-01

    The radionuclide release from the SFR repository caused by gas generation was calculated for different scenarios for three repository parts (Silo, BMA and 1BTF). The calculation cases are based on the way the gas escapes from the concrete structures. In the basic cases the gas escapes through the evacuation pipes in the concrete lid of the Silo, through existing gaps between the concrete walls and the lid in BMA, and through the concrete backfill surrounding the waste packages in 1BTF. These cases correspond to the situation that we expect to occur. Another category of cases corresponds to the situation where an initial fracture exists in the concrete structures. The fracture is assumed to exist at the bottom of the respective concrete structure in the Silo and BMA. For 1BTF the initial defect is represented by a fracture transversely crossing the section containing the steel drums with ashes. Other cases were also calculated with the purpose of studying some special situations. For example, the consequences of a silo repository without evacuation pipes and backfill in the interior of BMA. The radionuclide release, for some radionuclides, may be increased by several orders of magnitude when contaminated water is expelled by gas from the interior of the concrete structures. However, the impact on the total doses during the first thousands years after closure of the repository is limited. The total dose is dominated by the release of organic {sup 14}C. Since the radionuclides are released to the coastal area during the first thousand years the dilution is considerable, which results in a very low dose.

  11. Project Safe. Gas related processes in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, L.

    2001-06-01

    The radionuclide release from the SFR repository caused by gas generation was calculated for different scenarios for three repository parts (Silo, BMA and 1BTF). The calculation cases are based on the way the gas escapes from the concrete structures. In the basic cases the gas escapes through the evacuation pipes in the concrete lid of the Silo, through existing gaps between the concrete walls and the lid in BMA, and through the concrete backfill surrounding the waste packages in 1BTF. These cases correspond to the situation that we expect to occur. Another category of cases corresponds to the situation where an initial fracture exists in the concrete structures. The fracture is assumed to exist at the bottom of the respective concrete structure in the Silo and BMA. For 1BTF the initial defect is represented by a fracture transversely crossing the section containing the steel drums with ashes. Other cases were also calculated with the purpose of studying some special situations. For example, the consequences of a silo repository without evacuation pipes and backfill in the interior of BMA. The radionuclide release, for some radionuclides, may be increased by several orders of magnitude when contaminated water is expelled by gas from the interior of the concrete structures. However, the impact on the total doses during the first thousands years after closure of the repository is limited. The total dose is dominated by the release of organic 14 C. Since the radionuclides are released to the coastal area during the first thousand years the dilution is considerable, which results in a very low dose

  12. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  13. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process, called the HSM (Hydrogen Sulfide-Methane) Process, consists of two steps that each utilize a catalyst and sulfur-containing intermediates: (1) converting natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) converting CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Catalysts have been found that convert methane to carbon disulfide in yields up to 98%. This exceeds the target of 40% yields for the first step. The best rate for CS{sub 2} formation was 132 g CS{sub 2}/kg-cat-h. The best rate for hydrogen production is 220 L H{sub 2} /kg-cat-h. A preliminary economic study shows that in a refinery application hydrogen made by the HSM technology would cost $0.25-R1.00/1000 SCF. Experimental data will be generated to facilitate evaluation of the overall commercial viability of the process.

  14. Simulation of Water Gas Shift Zeolite Membrane Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Rizki, Z.; Zunita, Megawati; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    The search of alternative energy sources keeps growing from time to time. Various alternatives have been introduced to reduce the use of fossil fuel, including hydrogen. Many pathways can be used to produce hydrogen. Among all of those, the Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction is the most common pathway to produce high purity hydrogen. The WGS technique faces a downstream processing challenge due to the removal hydrogen from the product stream itself since it contains a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and also the excess reactants. An integrated process using zeolite membrane reactor has been introduced to improve the performance of the process by selectively separate the hydrogen whilst boosting the conversion. Furthermore, the zeolite membrane reactor can be further improved via optimizing the process condition. This paper discusses the simulation of Zeolite Membrane Water Gas Shift Reactor (ZMWGSR) with variation of process condition to achieve an optimum performance. The simulation can be simulated into two consecutive mechanisms, the reaction prior to the permeation of gases through the zeolite membrane. This paper is focused on the optimization of the process parameters (e.g. temperature, initial concentration) and also membrane properties (e.g. pore size) to achieve an optimum product specification (concentration, purity).

  15. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  16. Citrus processing waste water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawash, S; Hafez, A J; El-Diwani, G

    1988-02-01

    The process utilizes biological treatment to decompose organic matter and decreases the COD to a value of 230 ppm, using 161 of air per 1 of treated waste water for a contact time of 2.5 h. Ozone is used subsequently for further purification of the waste water by destroying refractory organics. This reduces the COD to a value of 40 ppm, and consequently also lowers the BOD. Ozone also effectively removed the yellow-brown colour due to humic substances in dissolved or colloidal form; their oxidation leaves the water sparkling. Iron and manganese are also eliminated.

  17. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  18. Membranes for Flue Gas Treatment - Transport behavior of water and gas in hydrophilic polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potreck, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Fossil fuel fired power plants produce electricity and in addition to that large volume flows of flue gas, which mainly contain N2, O2, and CO2, but also large quantities of water vapor. To prevent condensation of the water vapor present in this flue gas stream, water needs to be removed before

  19. Life cycle water consumption for shale gas and conventional natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Corrie E; Horner, Robert M; Harto, Christopher B

    2013-10-15

    Shale gas production represents a large potential source of natural gas for the nation. The scale and rapid growth in shale gas development underscore the need to better understand its environmental implications, including water consumption. This study estimates the water consumed over the life cycle of conventional and shale gas production, accounting for the different stages of production and for flowback water reuse (in the case of shale gas). This study finds that shale gas consumes more water over its life cycle (13-37 L/GJ) than conventional natural gas consumes (9.3-9.6 L/GJ). However, when used as a transportation fuel, shale gas consumes significantly less water than other transportation fuels. When used for electricity generation, the combustion of shale gas adds incrementally to the overall water consumption compared to conventional natural gas. The impact of fuel production, however, is small relative to that of power plant operations. The type of power plant where the natural gas is utilized is far more important than the source of the natural gas.

  20. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Dallas T.; Chou, Chun-Chao

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  1. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Chou, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO /SUB x/ , hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140 0 to -160 0 C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140 0 to -160 0 C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton

  2. Gas consumption for water heating in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, R.; Weegink, R.

    1995-01-01

    In 1994 the total gas consumption of Dutch households increased slightly. This is mainly due to an increase in the number of occupied homes by about 75,000, an advancing penetration of gas-fired tap water heaters and a marginal increase in gas consumption for space heating. Another striking feature is the stabilisation of gas consumption of an average household for hot water purposes, since it decreased in 1992 and 1993 by 3% and 4,5% respectively. The so-called Dutch BAK (basic survey of the small-scale gas consumption) study also shows that the penetration of gas appliances with higher outputs and changing water tapping behaviour, the major reasons for consumption increases in the previous years, have changed only moderately. Gas consumption for cooking purposes remained almost stable, though. 7 tabs., 1 ill

  3. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  4. Water vapor and Gas Transport through Polymeric Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air).

  5. Decomposition of water into highly combustible hydroxyl gas used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method proposed involves the decomposition of water into highly combustible hydroxyl gas via electrolysis, which is used in internal combustion engines of electrical generators for electricity generation. The by-product obtained from combustion of this gas is water vapour and oxygen to replenish the atmosphere.

  6. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldhuis, A.; Goudriaan, F.; Groeneveld, M.; Samson, R.

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  7. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  8. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors and process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with ceramic-coated microspheres of uranium and thorium oxides/carbides embedded in graphite blocks which are cooled with helium. Promising areas of HTGR application are in cogeneration, energy transport using Heat Transfer Salt, recovery of oils from oil shale, steam reforming of methane for chemical production, coal gasification, and in energy transfer using chemical heat jpipes in the long term. Further, HTGRs could be used as the energy source for hydrogen production through thermochemical water splitting in the long term. The potential market for Process Heat HTGRs is 100-200 large units by about the year 2020

  9. Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [Davis Energy Group, Davis, CA (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [Davis Energy Group, Davis, CA (United States); Backman, Christine [Davis Energy Group, Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-02-28

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the 1/2 inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements. Simulations were completed under a 'peak day' sizing scenario with 183 gpd hot water loads in a Minnesota winter climate case. Full-year simulations were then completed in three climates (ranging from Phoenix to Minneapolis) for three hot water load scenarios (36, 57, and 96 gpd). Model projections indicate that the alternative hybrid offers an average 4.5% efficiency improvement relative to the 0.60 EF gas storage unit across all scenarios modeled. The alternative hybrid water heater evaluated does show promise, but the current low cost of natural gas across much of the country and the relatively small incremental efficiency improvement poses challenges in initially building a market demand for the product.

  10. Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Backman, Christine [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the 1/2 inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements. Simulations were completed under a 'peak day' sizing scenario with 183 gpd hot water loads in a Minnesota winter climate case. Full-year simulations were then completed in three climates (ranging from Phoenix to Minneapolis) for three hot water load scenarios (36, 57, and 96 gpd). Model projections indicate that the alternative hybrid offers an average 4.5% efficiency improvement relative to the 0.60 EF gas storage unit across all scenarios modeled. The alternative hybrid water heater evaluated does show promise, but the current low cost of natural gas across much of the country and the relatively small incremental efficiency improvement poses challenges in initially building a market demand for the product.

  11. Process for the preparation of ammonia and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A process for the production of ammonia and heavy water comprises the steps of enriching a flow of water with deuterium in a monothermal isotropic process; supplying a first portion of the deuterium-enriched water to a heavy water preparation plant to produce heavy water and hydrogen; storing a second portion of the deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the colder half of a year; electrolytically dissociating the stored deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the wamer half of a year to form hydrogen; storing a portion of the electrolytically-produced hydrogen during said warmer half of a year while supplying the remainder to a synthesis circuit of a synthesizing plant and subsequently supplying the stored hydrogen to the synthesis circuit during said colder half of a year; removing some of the synthesis gas mixture from the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant; burning the removed synthesis gas mixture with air to produce a mixture consisting mainly of water and nitrogen; thereafter condensing and separating the water from the mixture of water and nitrogen; supplying the nitrogen of the mixture of water and nitrogen, the hydrogen from the heavy water preparation plant and the electrolytically-produced hydrogen to the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant to produce ammonia; and collecting deuterium-depleted water resulting from said burning step and feeding the collected deuterium-depleted water into the monothermal process

  12. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide emissions from a cement plant into dimethyl ether, a case study of an integrated process in France using a Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibhatavata, Phuangphet; Borgard, Jean-Marc; Tabarant, Michel; Bianchi, Daniel; Mansilla, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) into liquid fuel technology has recently gained wide public interest since it is a potential pathway to increase the liquid fuel supply and to mitigate CO 2 emissions simultaneously. In France, the majority of the electricity production is derived from nuclear and renewable energy which have a low CO 2 footprint. This electricity power enables a potential for massive hydrogen production with low carbon emissions. We studied the possibility to develop this technology at an industrial scale in the French context on a typical industrial example of a cement manufacture in the south of France. An integrated process is proposed, which enables the use of the heat released by the CO 2 to fuel process to help to capture the CO 2 released by the cement manufacture. Some technological issues are discussed, and a potential solution is proposed for the catalyst used in the critical step of the Reverse Water Gas-Shift reaction (RWGS) of the process. (authors)

  13. Sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides gas treating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A process is disclosed for treating particle-containing gas streams by removing particles and gaseous atmospheric pollutants. Parallel passage contactors are utilized to remove the gaseous pollutants. The minimum required gas flow rate for effective operation of these contactors is maintained by recycling a variable amount of low temperature gas which has been passed through a particle removal zone. The recycled gas is reheated by heat exchange against a portion of the treated gas

  14. Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert B; Vengosh, Avner; Darrah, Thomas H; Warner, Nathaniel R; Down, Adrian; Poreda, Robert J; Osborn, Stephen G; Zhao, Kaiguang; Karr, Jonathan D

    2013-07-09

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing are transforming energy production, but their potential environmental effects remain controversial. We analyzed 141 drinking water wells across the Appalachian Plateaus physiographic province of northeastern Pennsylvania, examining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells. Methane was detected in 82% of drinking water samples, with average concentrations six times higher for homes gas wells (P = 0.0006). Ethane was 23 times higher in homes gas wells (P = 0.0013); propane was detected in 10 water wells, all within approximately 1 km distance (P = 0.01). Of three factors previously proposed to influence gas concentrations in shallow groundwater (distances to gas wells, valley bottoms, and the Appalachian Structural Front, a proxy for tectonic deformation), distance to gas wells was highly significant for methane concentrations (P = 0.007; multiple regression), whereas distances to valley bottoms and the Appalachian Structural Front were not significant (P = 0.27 and P = 0.11, respectively). Distance to gas wells was also the most significant factor for Pearson and Spearman correlation analyses (P gas wells was the only statistically significant factor (P gas (4)He to CH4 in groundwater were characteristic of a thermally postmature Marcellus-like source in some cases. Overall, our data suggest that some homeowners living gas wells have drinking water contaminated with stray gases.

  15. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  16. Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Zaida [Katy, TX; Del Paggio, Alan Anthony [Spring, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX

    2011-12-06

    A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

  17. Implementing process safety management in gas processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodman, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard entitled Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals; Explosives and Blasting Agents was finalized February 24, 1992. The purpose of the standard is to prevent or minimize consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, flammable, or explosive chemicals. OSHA believes that its rule will accomplish this goal by requiring a comprehensive management program that integrates technologies, procedures, and management practices. Gas Processors Association (GPA) member companies are significantly impacted by this major standard, the requirements of which are extensive and complex. The purpose of this paper is to review the requirements of the standard and to discuss the elements to consider in developing and implementing a viable long term Process Safety Management Program

  18. Safety distance between underground natural gas and water pipeline facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Majid, Z.A.; Yusof, M.Z.

    2014-01-01

    A leaking water pipe bursting high pressure water jet in the soil will create slurry erosion which will eventually erode the adjacent natural gas pipe, thus causing its failure. The standard 300 mm safety distance used to place natural gas pipe away from water pipeline facilities needs to be reviewed to consider accidental damage and provide safety cushion to the natural gas pipe. This paper presents a study on underground natural gas pipeline safety distance via experimental and numerical approaches. The pressure–distance characteristic curve obtained from this experimental study showed that the pressure was inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance. Experimental testing using water-to-water pipeline system environment was used to represent the worst case environment, and could be used as a guide to estimate appropriate safety distance. Dynamic pressures obtained from the experimental measurement and simulation prediction mutually agreed along the high-pressure water jetting path. From the experimental and simulation exercises, zero effect distance for water-to-water medium was obtained at an estimated horizontal distance at a minimum of 1500 mm, while for the water-to-sand medium, the distance was estimated at a minimum of 1200 mm. - Highlights: • Safe separation distance of underground natural gas pipes was determined. • Pressure curve is inversely proportional to separation distance. • Water-to-water system represents the worst case environment. • Measured dynamic pressures mutually agreed with simulation results. • Safe separation distance of more than 1200 mm should be applied

  19. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H(sub 2) removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H(sub 2)-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H(sub 2) to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO(sub 2)-rich gases, a Cu-CeO(sub 2) catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H(sub 2) permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window

  20. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  1. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  2. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  3. Influence of surfactants on gas-hydrate formation' kinetics in water-oil emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemenkov, Yu D.; Shirshova, A. V.; Arinstein, E. A.; Shuvaev, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    The kinetics of gas hydrate formation of propane in a water-oil emulsion is experimentally studied when three types of surfactants (SAA (surface acting agent)) - anionic type emulsifiers - are added to the aqueous phase. It is shown that all three types of surfactants decelerate the growth of the gas-hydrate in the emulsion and can be considered as anti-agglutinating and kinetic low-dose inhibitors. The most effective inhibitor of hydrate formation in water-oil emulsion of SV-102 surfactant was revealed. For comparison, experimental studies of gas-hydrate formation under the same conditions for bulk water have been carried out. It is shown that in bulk water, all the surfactants investigated act as promoters (accelerators) of hydrate formation. A qualitative explanation of the action mechanisms of emulsifiers in the process of gas-hydrate formation in water-oil emulsion is given.

  4. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Sheila M.; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl−) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl− concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl− concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

  5. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidal, H.

    1992-06-01

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO 2 in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140 o C, for CO 2 loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO 2 into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO 2 in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO 2 /TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO 2 partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs

  6. Carbon dioxide removal in gas treating processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidal, H

    1992-06-01

    The main contribution of this work is the development of a simple and reliable modelling technique on carbon dioxide removal describing the vapor-liquid equilibria of CO{sub 2} in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. By making use of measured pH data, the author has circumvented the problem of estimating interaction parameters, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants in the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The applicability of the model is best demonstrated on the tertiary amine system using MDEA. For this system, the VLE is accurately represented for temperatures in the range 25 to 140{sup o}C, for CO{sub 2} loadings from 0.001 to 1 mol/mol, and for amine molarities usually encountered in acid gas treating processes. The absorption of CO{sub 2} into solutions containing the sterically hindered amine AMP, is also well described by the model. The equilibrium of CO{sub 2} in mixed solvents containing a glycol (TEG,DEG) and an alkonolamine (MEA,DEA) has been measured at temperatures encountered in the absorption units. An equilibrium model has been developed for the CO{sub 2}/TEG/MEA system for estimation of CO{sub 2} partial pressures, covering loadings and temperatures for both absorption and desorption conditions. An important spin-off of the work described is that two new experimental set-ups have been designed and built. 154 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Fire damp gas in a heavy water reactor; Praskavi gas u teskovodnom reaktoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, V D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-07-01

    This document describes the process of fire damp gas creation in the reactor core and dependence of the gas percentage on the temperature, i.e. reactor power. It contains a detailed plan for measuring the the percent of fire damp gas at the RA reactor: before start-up, after longer shut-down periods, immediately after safety shutdown, periodically during operation campaign.

  8. Cooling process in separation devices of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, S; Sugimoto, K

    1975-06-11

    To prevent entry of impurities into purified gases and to detect leaks of heat exchanger in a separation and recovering device of krypton gas by means of liquefaction and distillation, an intermediate refrigerant having the same or slightly higher boiling point than that of gas to be cooled is used between the gas to be cooled (process gas) and refrigerant (nitrogen), and the pressure of the gas to be cooled is controlled to have a pressure higher than the intermediate refrigerant to cool the gas to be cooled.

  9. Development of high purity CO gas recovery system for BOF gas by modified PSA process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuraya, Toshikazu; Fujii, Tetsuya; Yaji, Motoyasu; Matsuki, Takao; Matsui, Shigeo; Hayashi, Shigeki

    1985-01-01

    COPISA process (where two processes for separating CO-adsorptive gases and desorbing desorption-difficult gas are added to conventional PSA gas separation process) is outlined. In two units of PSA, CO/sub 2/ gas is adsorbed and separated in first PSA unit. The gas excluding CO/sub 2/ is fed to second PSA unit, where CO is adsorbed and separated from N/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/, and then desorbed and recovered under reduced pressure. For optimizing the process, a pilot plant was operated for about 1000 hrs. in a half year. The results confirm possibility of simplifying pre-treatment of coal gas. CO-PSA pressure swing pattern suitable for elimination of Co-adsorptive N/sub 2/ is established. Recovery of CO gas is enhanced. Optimization of gas flow pattern between adsorption towers required for reduction in operating cost is performed. (7 figs, 1 tab, 8 refs)

  10. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastandieva, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of "cooling down" liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  11. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tastandieva G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of “cooling down” liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  12. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    OpenAIRE

    Tastandieva G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the...

  13. Ceramic membranes for gas processing in coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, S.; Lin, C.X.C.; Ding, L.; Thambimuthu, K.; da Costa, J.C.D. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    Pre-combustion options via coal gasification, especially integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes, are attracting the attention of governments, industry and the research community as an attractive alternative to conventional power generation. It is possible to build an IGCC plant with CCS with conventional technologies however; these processes are energy intensive and likely to reduce power plant efficiencies. Novel ceramic membrane technologies, in particular molecular sieving silica (MSS) and pervoskite membranes, offer the opportunity to reduce efficiency losses by separating gases at high temperatures and pressures. MSS membranes can be made preferentially selective for H{sub 2}, enabling both enhanced production, via a water-gas shift membrane reactor, and recovery of H{sub 2} from the syngas stream at high temperatures. They also allow CO{sub 2} to be concentrated at high pressures, reducing the compression loads for transportation and enabling simple integration with CO{sub 2} storage or sequestration operations. Perovskite membranes provide a viable alternative to cryogenic distillation for air separation by delivering the tonnage of oxygen required for coal gasification at a reduced cost. In this review we examine ceramic membrane technologies for high temperature gas separation and discuss the operational, mechanical, design and process considerations necessary for their successful integration into IGCC with CCS systems.

  14. On-line optimal control improves gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, P.N.; Papadopoulos, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the authors' companies jointly funded the first phase of a gas processing liquids optimization project that has the specific purposes to: Improve the return of processing natural gas liquids, Develop sets of control algorithms, Make available a low-cost solution suitable for small to medium-sized gas processing plants, Test and demonstrate the feasibility of line control. The ARCO Willard CO 2 gas recovery processing plant was chosen as the initial test site to demonstrate the application of multivariable on-line optimal control. One objective of this project is to support an R ampersand D effort to provide a standardized solution to the various types of gas processing plants in the U.S. Processes involved in these gas plants include cryogenic separations, demethanization, lean oil absorption, fractionation and gas treating. Next, the proposed solutions had to be simple yet comprehensive enough to allow an operator to maintain product specifications while operating over a wide range of gas input flow and composition. This had to be a supervisors system that remained on-line more than 95% of the time, and achieved reduced plant operating variability and improved variable cost control. It took more than a year to study various gas processes and to develop a control approach before a real application was finally exercised. An initial process for C 2 and CO 2 recoveries was chosen

  15. Gas treatment processes for keeping the environment of nuclear plants free from gas-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, H.

    1977-01-01

    The separation processes in gas treatment steps for the decontamination of circuit or offgas streams are described and their practicability is evaluated. Examples of the effectiveness of gas separation plants for keeping the environment within and without nuclear plants free from harmful gas-borne activity are presented. (orig.) [de

  16. Emergency management in the gas and water supply; Notfallmanagement in der Gas- und Wasserversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Stephan [KKI GmbH, Kompetenzzentrum Kritische Infrastrukturen GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Gas and water pipes belong to the critical infrastructure in Germany. Their protection requires a holistic risk analysis, which also keep an eye on the dependence of the power supply. [German] Gas- und Wasserleitungen gehoeren zu den kritischen Infrastrukturen in Deutschland. Ihr Schutz erfordert eine ganzheitliche Risikoanalyse, die auch die Abhaengigkeit von der Stromversorgung im Blick hat.

  17. Cooling performance of helium-gas/water coolers in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Shoji; Hayashi, Haruyoshi; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Ohta, Yukimaru; Shimomura, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) has four helium-gas/water coolers where the cooling water flows in the tubes and helium gas on the shell side. Their cooling performance was studied using the operational data from 1982 to 1991. The heat transfer of helium gas on the shell was obtained for segmental and step-up baffle type coolers. Also, the change with operation time was investigated. The cooling performance was lowered by the graphite powder released from the graphite components for several thousand hours and thereafter recovered because the graphite powder from the components was reduced and the powder in the cooler shell was blown off during the operation. (orig.)

  18. Gas-processing profit margin series begins in OGJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the bases and methods employed by the WK (Wright, Killen and Co, Houston) profit-margin indicator for U.S. gas-processing plants. Additionally, this article reviews the historical profitability of the gas-processing industry and key factors affecting these trends. Texas was selected as the most representative for the industry, reflecting the wide spectrum of gas-processing plants. The profit performance of Texas' gas plants is of special significance because of the large number of plants and high volume of NGL production in the region

  19. Analysis of an innovative process for landfill gas quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, L.; Carnevale, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Low methane content landfill gas is not suitable for feeding engines and is generally flared. This type of landfill gas may be enriched by removing the inert carbon dioxide. An innovative process, based on the carbon dioxide captured by means of accelerated carbonation of bottom ash was proposed and studied for the above purpose. The process was investigated at a laboratory scale, simulating different landfill gas compositions. The enrichment process is able to decrease the carbon dioxide concentration from 70 to 80% in volume to 60% in volume, requiring about 36 kg of bottom ash per Nm"3 of landfill gas. Using this result it was estimated that an industrial scale plant, processing 100–1000 Nm"3/h of low methane content landfill gas requires about 28,760–2,87,600 t of bottom ash for a one year operation. The specific cost of the studied enrichment process was evaluated as well and ranges from 0.052 to 0.241 Euro per Nm"3 of entering landfill gas. The energy balance showed that about 4–6% of the energy entered with the landfill gas is required for carrying out the enrichment, while the use of the enriched landfill gas in the engine producing electricity allows for negative carbon dioxide emission. - Highlights: • The process uses a waste stream as material to capture CO_2. • The process uses a simple gas/solid fixed bed contact reactor at ambient conditions. • The process captures the CO_2 to enrich low-CH4 landfill gas. • The specific cost ranges from 0.052 to 0.241 Euro per Nm"3 of entering landfill gas. • The process consumes about 4–6% of the entering energy and acts as CO_2 sink.

  20. Off-gas processing method in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji.

    1990-01-01

    Off-gases containing a radioactive Kr gas generated in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant are at first sent to a Kr gas separator. Then, the radioactive Kr gas extracted there is introduced to a Kr gas fixing device. A pretreatment and a post-treatment are applied by using a non-radioactive clean inert gas except for the Kr gas as a purge gas. If the radioactive Kr gas is contained in the off-gases discharged from the Kr gas fixing device after applying the post-treatment, the off gases are returned to the Kr gas separator. Accordingly, in a case where the radioactive Kr gas is contained in the off-gases discharged from the Kr gas fixing device, it is not necessary to apply the fixing treatment to all of the off gases. In view of the above, increase of the amount of processing gases can be suppressed and the radioactive Kr gas can be fixed efficiently and economically. (I.N.)

  1. Permeability of volcanic rocks to gas and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Reuschlé, T.; Farquharson, J. I.; Baud, P.

    2018-04-01

    The phase (gas or liquid) of the fluids within a porous volcanic system varies in both time and space. Laboratory experiments have shown that gas and water permeabilities can differ for the same rock sample, but experiments are biased towards rocks that contain minerals that are expected react with the pore fluid (such as the reaction between liquid water and clay). We present here the first study that systematically compares the gas and water permeability of volcanic rocks. Our data show that permeabilities to argon gas and deionised water can differ by a factor between two and five in two volcanic rocks (basalt and andesite) over a confining pressure range from 2 to 50 MPa. We suggest here that the microstructural elements that offer the shortest route through the sample-estimated to have an average radius 0.1-0.5 μm using the Klinkenberg slip factor-are accessible to gas, but restricted or inaccessible to water. We speculate that water adsorption on the surface of these thin microstructural elements, assumed here to be tortuous/rough microcracks, reduces their effective radius and/or prevents access. These data have important implications for fluid flow and therefore the distribution and build-up of pore pressure within volcanic systems.

  2. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  3. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program to advance the technology of oxygen- and hydrogen-generating subsystems based on water electrolysis was studied. Major emphasis was placed on static feed water electrolysis, a concept characterized by low power consumption and high intrinsic reliability. The static feed based oxygen generation subsystem consists basically of three subassemblies: (1) a combined water electrolysis and product gas dehumidifier module; (2) a product gas pressure controller and; (3) a cyclically filled water feed tank. Development activities were completed at the subsystem as well as at the component level. An extensive test program including single cell, subsystem and integrated system testing was completed with the required test support accessories designed, fabricated, and assembled. Mini-product assurance activities were included throughout all phases of program activities. An extensive number of supporting technology studies were conducted to advance the technology base of the static feed water electrolysis process and to resolve problems.

  4. Process for cooling waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohner, P

    1976-12-16

    The process for avoiding thermal pollution of waters described rests on the principle of the heat conduction tube, by which heat is conducted from the liquid space into the atmosphere at a lower temperature above it. Such a tube, here called a cooling tube, consists in its simplest form of a heat conducting corrugated tube, made, for example, of copper or a copper alloy or of precious metals, which is sealed to be airtight at both ends, and after evacuation, is partially filled with a medium of low boiling point. The longer leg of the tube, which is bent at right angles, lies close below the surface of the water to be cooled and parallel to it; the shorter leg projects vertically into the atmosphere. The liquid inside the cooling tube fills the horizontal part of the tube to about halfway. A certain part of the liquid is always evaporated in this part. The vapor rising in the vertical part of the tube condenses on the internal wall cooled by the air outside, and gives off its heat to the atmosphere. The condensed medium flows back down the vertical internal wall into the initial position in a continuous cycle. A further development contains a smooth plastic inner tube in an outer corrugated tube, which is shorter than the outer tube; it ends at a distance from the caps sealing the outer tube at both ends. In this design the angle between the vertical and horizontal leg is less than 90/sup 0/. The shorter leg projects vertically from the water surface, below which the longer leg rises slightly from the knee of tube. The quantity of the liquid is gauged as a type of siphon, so that the space between the outer and inner tube at the knee of the tube remains closed by the liquid medium. The medium evaporated from the surface in the long leg of the tube therefore flows over the inner tube, which starts above the level of the medium. Thus evaporation and condensation paths are separated.

  5. Lithium recovery from shale gas produced water using solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Eunyoung; Jang, Yunjai; Chung, Eunhyea

    2017-01-01

    Shale gas produced water is hypersaline wastewater generated after hydraulic fracturing. Since the produced water is a mixture of shale formation water and fracturing fluid, it contains various organic and inorganic components, including lithium, a useful resource for such industries as automobile and electronics. The produced water in the Marcellus shale area contains about 95 mg/L lithium on average. This study suggests a two-stage solvent extraction technique for lithium recovery from shale gas produced water, and determines the extraction mechanism of ions in each stage. All experiments were conducted using synthetic shale gas produced water. In the first-stage, which was designed for the removal of divalent cations, more than 94.4% of Ca"2"+, Mg"2"+, Sr"2"+, and Ba"2"+ ions were removed by using 1.0 M di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an extractant. In the second-stage, for lithium recovery, we could obtain a lithium extraction efficiency of 41.2% by using 1.5 M D2EHPA and 0.3 M tributyl phosphate (TBP). Lithium loss in the first-stage was 25.1%, and therefore, the total amount of lithium recovered at the end of the two-step extraction procedure was 30.8%. Through this study, lithium, one of the useful mineral resources, could be selectively recovered from the shale gas produced water and it would also reduce the wastewater treatment cost during the development of shale gas. - Highlights: • Lithium was extracted from shale gas produced water using an organic solvent. • Two-stage solvent extraction technique was applied. • Divalent cations were removed in the first stage by D2EHPA. • Lithium was selectively recovered in the second stage by using TBP with D2EHPA.

  6. Concentration of saline produced water from coalbed methane gas wells in multiple-effect evaporator using waste heat from the gas compressor and compressor drive engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, L.Y.; George, O.

    1995-01-01

    The use of heat of compression from the gas compressor and waste heat from the diesel compressor drive engine in a triple-effect feed forward evaporator was studied as a means of concentrating saline produced water to facilitate its disposal. The saline water, trapped in deeply buried coal seams, must be continuously pumped from coalbed natural gas wells so that the gas can desorb from the coal and make its way to the wellbore. Unlike conventional natural gas which is associated with petroleum and usually reaches the wellhead at high pressure, coalbed natural gas reaches the wellhead at low pressure, usually around 101 kPa (1 atm), and must be compressed near the well site for injection into gas transmission pipelines. The water concentration process was simulated for a typical 3.93 m 3 /s (500 MCF/h), at standard conditions (101 kPa, 289K), at the gas production field in the Warrior Coal Basin of Alabama, but has application to the coalbed gas fields being brought into production throughout the world. It was demonstrated that this process can be considered for concentrating saline water produced with natural gas in cases where the gas must be compressed near the wellhead for transportation to market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  8. Floating natural gas processing plants. Technical ideal or feasible technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, H

    1977-04-01

    Realizability of floating natural gas processing plants is decisively influenced by the economy of the system. Illustrated by the example of the natural gas product LPG (liquefied petroleum gas), a model cost calculation is carried out. It is demonstrated that the increase in the price level during the 1973/1974 energy crisis is an important factor for the realiability in terms of economy of such complicated technical systems. Another aspect which the model calculation revealed is that the economy of floating natural gas processing plants and storage systems can only be estimated in connection with other system components.

  9. Desalination and reuse of high-salinity shale gas produced water: drivers, technologies, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Devin L; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-03

    In the rapidly developing shale gas industry, managing produced water is a major challenge for maintaining the profitability of shale gas extraction while protecting public health and the environment. We review the current state of practice for produced water management across the United States and discuss the interrelated regulatory, infrastructure, and economic drivers for produced water reuse. Within this framework, we examine the Marcellus shale play, a region in the eastern United States where produced water is currently reused without desalination. In the Marcellus region, and in other shale plays worldwide with similar constraints, contraction of current reuse opportunities within the shale gas industry and growing restrictions on produced water disposal will provide strong incentives for produced water desalination for reuse outside the industry. The most challenging scenarios for the selection of desalination for reuse over other management strategies will be those involving high-salinity produced water, which must be desalinated with thermal separation processes. We explore desalination technologies for treatment of high-salinity shale gas produced water, and we critically review mechanical vapor compression (MVC), membrane distillation (MD), and forward osmosis (FO) as the technologies best suited for desalination of high-salinity produced water for reuse outside the shale gas industry. The advantages and challenges of applying MVC, MD, and FO technologies to produced water desalination are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. We find that desalination for reuse of produced water is technically feasible and can be economically relevant. However, because produced water management is primarily an economic decision, expanding desalination for reuse is dependent on process and material improvements to reduce capital and operating costs.

  10. Heat-reactivatable adsorbent gas fractionator and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrando, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus are provided for removing a first polar gas from a mixture thereof with a second gas. The gas mixture is passed through a sorbent bed having a preferential affinity for the first polar gas and the first polar gas is sorbed thereon so as to produce a gaseous effluent which has a concentration of first polar gas therein below a predetermined maximum. Then the polar gas sorbed on the sorbent bed is removed therefrom by application of microwave energy, at a temperature at which the sorbent is transparent to such energy, while passing a purge flow of gas in contact with the bed to flush out desorbed first polar gas from the bed. The bed is allowed to cool to a relatively efficient temperature for adsorption. The gas mixture is then again passed in contact with the bed. If two beds are used, one bed can be desorbed while the other is on-stream thereby maintaining a substantially continuous flow of effluent gas. The apparatus of the invention provides a sorbent bed assembly having a microwave energy generator positioned to direct such energy into the sorbent bed for desorption of first polar gas from the bed

  11. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  12. Natural gas from coal : the community consultation process in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    2005-01-01

    The community consultation process was examined with reference to natural gas from coal (NGC) development in Alberta. It was suggested that NGC has a huge potential in Canada, and can be developed in an environmentally responsible manner which considers all stakeholders. However, water supply shortages and the effects of development on groundwater remain key stakeholder concerns in Alberta. Issues concerning water protection and handling were discussed, along with issues concerning surface disruption during resource development activities. An outline of road needs and pipeline corridors was presented. An outline of a typical NGC compressor station were given. Issues concerning public anxiety over air quality were discussed with reference to flaring and landowner complaints. It was noted NGC is not sour and contains no liquid hydrocarbons or foreign contaminants. A review of government regulations and best practices was presented with regards to flaring. Multi-stakeholder advisory committee practices were reviewed. It was concluded that Alberta is currently using a variety of consultation processes to enable better communications between industry and stakeholders. figs

  13. Gas Migration Processes through the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone at Four-Way Closure Ridge Offshore SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, P.; Chi, W. C.; Berndt, C.; Liu, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    We have used 3D P-Cable seismic data from Four-Way-Closure Ridge, a NW-SE trending anticlinal ridge within the lower slope domain of accretionary wedge, to investigate the geological constraints influencing the fluid migration pattern in the shallow marine sediments. In the seismic data, fluid migration feature manifests itself as high reflection layers of dipping strata, which originate underneath a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) and extend towards the seafloor. Shoaling of the BSR near fluid migration pathways indicates a focused fluid flux, perturbing the temperature field. Furthermore, seafloor video footage confirmed the presence of recent methane seepage above seismically imaged fluid migration pathways. We plan to test two hypotheses for the occurrence of these fluid migration pathways: 1) the extensional regime under the anticlinal ridge crest caused the initiation of localized fault zones, acting as fluid conduits in the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). 2) sediment deformation induced by focused fluid flow and massive growth and dissolution of gas hydrate, similar to processes controlling the evolution of pockmarks on the Nigerian continental margin. We suggest that these processes may be responsible for the formation of a massive hydrate core in the crest of the anticline, as inferred from other geophysical datasets. Triggering process for fluid migration cannot be clearly defined. However, the existence of blind thrust faults may help to advect deep-seated fluids. This may be augmented by biogenic production of shallow gas underneath the ridge, where the excess of gas enables the coexistence of gas, water, and gas hydrate within the GHSZ. Fluid migration structures may exists because of the buoyancy of gas-bearing fluids. This study shows a potential model on how gas-bearing fluids migrate upward towards structural highs, which might occur in other anticlinal structures around the world. Keywords: P-Cable, gas-hydrate, fluid flow, fault-related fold

  14. Impact of shale gas development on regional water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, R D; Brantley, S L; Vandenbossche, J M; Yoxtheimer, D; Abad, J D

    2013-05-17

    Unconventional natural gas resources offer an opportunity to access a relatively clean fossil fuel that could potentially lead to energy independence for some countries. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing make the extraction of tightly bound natural gas from shale formations economically feasible. These technologies are not free from environmental risks, however, especially those related to regional water quality, such as gas migration, contaminant transport through induced and natural fractures, wastewater discharge, and accidental spills. We review the current understanding of environmental issues associated with unconventional gas extraction. Improved understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants of concern and increased long-term monitoring and data dissemination will help manage these water-quality risks today and in the future.

  15. Thermodynamic Modeling of Natural Gas Systems Containing Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakatsani, Eirini K.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for dew point specifications remains very urgent in the natural gas industry, the development of accurate thermodynamic models, which will match experimental data and will allow reliable extrapolations, is needed. Accurate predictions of the gas phase water content in equilibrium...... with a heavy phase were previously obtained using cubic plus association (CPA) coupled with a solid phase model in the case of hydrates, for the binary systems of water–methane and water–nitrogen and a few natural gas mixtures. In this work, CPA is being validated against new experimental data, both water...... content and phase equilibrium data, and solid model parameters are being estimated for four natural gas main components (methane, ethane, propane, and carbon dioxide). Different tests for the solid model parameters are reported, including vapor-hydrate-equilibria (VHE) and liquid-hydrate-equilibria (LHE...

  16. Great gas plants : these five natural gas processing facilities demonstrate decades of top-flight technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-07-15

    The natural gas purification and pipeline sector is a major economic driver in Canada. Gas processing facilities are growing in number, and several large gas projects are being planned for future construction in the western provinces. This article outlined 5 gas plants in order to illustrate the sector's history and breadth in Canada. The Shell Jumping Pound gas complex was constructed in 1951 after a sulfur-rich gas discovery near Calgary in 1944. The Empress Straddle plant was built in 1971 in southeastern Alberta and is one of the largest single industrial consumers of electrical power in the province. The Fort Nelson gas processing plant is North America's largest sour gas processing facility. The Shell Caroline complex was built 1993. The Sable offshore energy project is located on the coast of Nova Scotia to handle gas produced from the Thebaud wells. A consortium is now considering the development of new gas fields in the Sable area. 5 figs.

  17. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axson, Jessica L.; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O.; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, KP, for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, ΔG°, obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20142510

  18. Combination gas producing and waste-water disposal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinchak, Raymond M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

  19. Treatment of waste water from flue gas cleaning; Behandlung von Abwasser der Rauchgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiermann, Klaus; Meyerhoff, Thomas [Berkefeld - VWS Deutschland GmbH, Celle (Germany); Hagen, Klaus [Berkefeld - VWS Deutschland GmbH, Bayreuth (Germany); Basabe, Juan Luis [HPD Process Engineering S.A., Bilbao (Spain); Vendrup, Michael [Krueger A/S, Soeborg (Denmark)

    2012-11-01

    Strict limits must be adhered to for treating waste water incurred during flue gas desulphurisation (FGD). One and two-stage precipitation processes have proven themselves in FGD waste water treatment. Metals can be removed with the MetClean {sup registered} process. Another option is evaporation. Waste water ZLD systems (Zero Liquid Discharge) recover, via a falling film evaporator with subsequent crystallisation, more than 98 % of the water and produce, aside from the condensate, only solid material that can be disposed of in landfill. A further development, named ZLD CoLD trademark, significantly reduces the investment and operating costs of this solution. (orig.)

  20. Process gas generator feeding internal combustion piston engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwantscheff, G; Kostka, H; Henkel, H J

    1978-10-26

    The invention relates to a process gas generator feeding gaseous fuel to internal combustion piston engines. The cylinder linings of the internal combustion engine are enclosed by the catalytic reaction chamber of the process gas generator which contains perforated sintered nozzle bricks as carriers of the catalysts needed for the conversion. The reaction chamber is surrounded by the exhaust gas chamber around which a tube coil is ound which feeds the fuel charge to the reaction chamber after evaporation and mixing with exhaust gas and air. The fuel which may be used for this purpose, e.g., is low-octane gasoline or diesel fuel. In the reaction chamber the fuel is catalytically converted at temperatures above 200/sup 0/C, e.g., into low-molecular paraffins, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Operation of the internal combustion engine with a process gas generator greatly reduces the pollutant content of the exhaust gases.

  1. Opportunities in the United States' gas processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.S.; Leppin, D.

    1997-01-01

    To keep up with the increasing amount of natural gas that will be required by the market and with the decreasing quality of the gas at the well-head, the gas processing industry must look to new technologies to stay competitive. The Gas Research Institute (GR); is managing a research, development, design and deployment program that is projected to save the industry US dollar 230 million/year in operating and capital costs from gas processing related activities in NGL extraction and recovery, dehydration, acid gas removal/sulfur recovery, and nitrogen rejection. Three technologies are addressed here. Multivariable Control (MVC) technology for predictive process control and optimization is installed or in design at fourteen facilities treating a combined total of over 30x10 9 normal cubic meter per year (BN m 3 /y) [1.1x10 12 standard cubic feet per year (Tcf/y)]. Simple pay backs are typically under 6 months. A new acid gas removal process based on n-formyl morpholine (NFM) is being field tested that offers 40-50% savings in operating costs and 15-30% savings in capital costs relative to a commercially available physical solvent. The GRI-MemCalc TM Computer Program for Membrane Separations and the GRI-Scavenger CalcBase TM Computer Program for Scavenging Technologies are screening tools that engineers can use to determine the best practice for treating their gas. (au) 19 refs

  2. Physical simulation of gas reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 deep-water gas field in the Baiyun sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To figure out the process and controlling factors of gas reservoir formation in deep-waters, based on an analysis of geological features, source of natural gas and process of reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 gas field, physical simulation experiment of the gas reservoir formation process has been performed, consequently, pattern and features of gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag has been found out. The results of the experiment show that: ① the formation of the Liwan 3-1 faulted anticline gas field is closely related to the longstanding active large faults, where natural gas is composed of a high proportion of hydrocarbons, a small amount of non-hydrocarbons, and the wet gas generated during highly mature stage shows obvious vertical migration signs; ② liquid hydrocarbons associated with natural gas there are derived from source rock of the Enping & Zhuhai Formation, whereas natural gas comes mainly from source rock of the Enping Formation, and source rock of the Wenchang Formation made a little contribution during the early Eocene period as well; ③ although there was gas migration and accumulation, yet most of the natural gas mainly scattered and dispersed due to the stronger activity of faults in the early period; later as fault activity gradually weakened, gas started to accumulate into reservoirs in the Baiyun sag; ④ there is stronger vertical migration of oil and gas than lateral migration, and the places where fault links effective source rocks with reservoirs are most likely for gas accumulation; ⑤ effective temporal-spatial coupling of source-fault-reservoir in late stage is the key to gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag; ⑥ the nearer the distance from a trap to a large-scale fault and hydrocarbon source kitchen, the more likely gas may accumulate in the trap in late stage, therefore gas accumulation efficiency is much lower for the traps which are far away from large-scale faults and hydrocarbon source

  3. Leader completes installation of process water evaporation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-11-01

    The installation of a patent-pending evaporation system at a facility in northeast British Columbia was discussed. The system captures excess waste exhaust heat from natural gas-fired compressor engines and is used to evaporate process water. The disposal of process water is a major cost in the production of natural gas and is usually hauled and disposed at water disposal wells located off-site. The cost to truck and dispose of the water at the facility was estimated at between $30 to $40 per cubic metre. The evaporation system can evaporate 4 to 8 cubic metres of process water every 24 hours and has an estimated useful life of 20 years. The evaporator relies on heat that would otherwise be expelled directly into the atmosphere, and the systems are expected to provide substantial savings. A wide-ranging manufacturing and marketing strategy was expected to commence by the end of 2005. With rising energy prices, operators of facilities are seeking more efficient ways of managing energy needs. The system was created by Leader Energy Services Ltd., a company that provides essential field services for oil and gas well stimulation in Alberta.

  4. Facile nanofibrillation of chitin derivatives by gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-10-29

    In this paper, we report that nanofiber network structures were constructed from chitin derivatives by gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water. When chitin was first subjected to N2 gas bubbling with ultrasonication in water, the SEM images of the product showed nanofiber network morphology. However, nanofiber network was not re-constructed by the same N2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments after agglomeration. We then have paid attention to an amidine group to provide the agglomeration-nanofibrillation behavior of chitin derivatives. An amidinated chitin was synthesized by the reaction of the amino groups in a partially deacetylated chitin with N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl acetal, which was subjected to CO2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water to convert into an amidinium chitin by protonation. The SEM images of the product clearly showed nanofiber network morphology. We further examined re-nanofibrillation of the agglomerated material, which was obtained by mixing the nanofibrillated amidinium chitin with water, followed by drying under reduced pressure. Consequently, the material was re-nanofibrillated by N2 gas bubbling with ultrasonication in water owing to electrostatic repulsion between the amidinium groups. Furthermore, deprotonation of the amidinium chitin and re-protonation of the resulting amidinated chitin were conducted by alkaline treatment and CO2 gas bubbling-ultrasonic treatments, respectively. The material showed the agglomeration-nanofibrillation behavior during the processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A preliminary analysis of floating production storage and offloading facilities with gas liquefaction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Carranza-Sánchez, Yamid Alberto; Junior, Silvio de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Floating, production, storage and offloading (FPSO) plants are facilities used in upstream petroleum processing. They have gained interest because they are more flexible than conventional plants and can be used for producing oil and gas in deep-water fields. In general, gas export is challenging...... because of the lack of infrastructure in remote locations. The present work investigates the possibility of integrating liquefaction processes on such facilities, considering two mixed-refrigerant and two expansion-based processes suitable for offshore applications. Two FPSO configurations are considered...... in this work, and they were suggested by Brazilian operators for fields processing natural gas with moderate to high content of carbon dioxide. The performance of the combined systems is analysed by conducting energy and exergy analyses. The integration of gas liquefaction results in greater power consumption...

  6. Storm water permitting for oil and gas facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Blanc, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    After several false starts, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published new federal storm water regulations in the November 16, 1990 Federal Register. These regulations identify facilities which must apply for a storm water permit and detail permit application requirements. The regulations appear at 40 CFR 122 Subpart B and became effective December 17, 1990. An outline of these regulations and their applicability to oil and gas facilities is presented. They are: facilities which require a storm water permit; types of storm water permits; permit application deadlines; permit application forms; facilities with existing storm water permits; storm water permit application data requirements; storm water sampling and analysis requirements; and EPA contacts for additional information

  7. Contracting out gas processing : the pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of competition within the energy industry on the midstream infrastructure was discussed. It was demonstrated that it is no longer necessary to own all or a portion of a processing facility to be a successful exploration company. It is now possible for midstream operators to manage the transmission business, the gas storage sector and the gas processing segment of the industry. Contract options and issues that should be addressed by natural gas producers in determining risks involved in contracting out were summarized. Changes in the industry has greatly expanded the options and opportunities for companies, both upstream and midstream. The industry has been contracting out gas processing for many years. However, the entry into the business of the specialized midstream player should further enhance the producer's options. The ultimate goal for the producer should be to benefit from lower costs, long term offerings, and a reduced need to invest potential exploration capital into non-core processing facilities

  8. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  9. Device and method to enrich and process heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    A device to process and enrich heavy water is proposed which is based on a combined electrolysis catalyst exchange system in which a D 2 O enrichment of more than 99.8% is achieved in the end stage. Water partly enriched with D 2 -containing hydrogen gas from an electrolysis cell is brought into contact in a catalyst column. The water is further enriched here with deuterium. It is then fed to the electrolysis cell. Details of the apparatus are closely described. (UWI) [de

  10. The world economy: Its impact on the gas processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teleki, A.

    1994-01-01

    Gas processors are in the business of extracting C 2-7 hydrocarbons from natural gas streams and converting them to commercial grade gas liquids, valued at or slightly below oil product prices. If the margin of oil prices over gas prices is higher, the gas processing business is more profitable. An approximate index of profitability is the ratio of the price of a bbl of oil divided by the price of a million Btu of gas (the oil-gas ratio). Since the mid-1980s, by which time both the oil and gas markets had been largely deregulated, the oil-gas ratio fluctuated in the 10-12 range then peaked to over 15 in 1990-91. The recent fall in oil prices has driven the ratio to historically low levels of 6-7, which leads to gas processors curtailing ethane recovery. Various aspects of the world economy and the growth of oil consumption are discussed to forecast their effect on gas processors. It is expected that oil demand should grow at least 4% annually over 1994-98, due to factors including world economic growth and low energy prices. Oil prices are forecast to bottom out in late 1995 and rise thereafter to the mid-20 dollar range by the end of the 1990s. A close supply-demand balance could send short-term prices much higher. Some widening of the gas-oil ratio should occur, providing room for domestic natural gas prices to rise, but with a lag. 8 figs

  11. Absorption process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.; Reed, W.D.; Pashley, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant selective absorption process for the collection and recovery of krypton and xenon is being further developed to demonstrate, on a pilot scale, a fluorocarbon-based process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant. The new ORGDP selective absorption pilot plant consists of a primary absorption-stripping operation and all peripheral equipment required for feed gas preparation, process solvent recovery, process solvent purification, and krypton product purification. The new plant is designed to achieve krypton decontamination factors in excess of 10 3 with product concentration factors greater than 10 4 while processing a feed gas containing typical quantities of common reprocessing plant off-gas impurities, including oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, water, xenon, iodine, and methyl iodide. Installation and shakedown of the facility were completed and some short-term tests were conducted early this year. The first operating campaign using a simulated reprocessing plant off-gas feed is now underway. The current program objective is to demonstrate continuous process operability and performance for extended periods of time while processing the simulated ''dirty'' feed. This year's activity will be devoted to routine off-gas processing with little or no deliberate system perturbations. Future work will involve the study of the system behavior under feed perturbations and various plant disturbances. (U.S.)

  12. The Water-Induced Linear Reduction Gas Diffusivity Model Extended to Three Pore Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, T. K. K. Deepagoda; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    . Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally...... gas diffusivity from moist to dry conditions across differently structured porous media, including narrow soil size fractions, perforated plastic blocks, fractured limestone, peaty soils, aggregated volcanic ash soils, and particulate substrates for Earth- or space-based applications. The new Cip...

  13. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector's centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel's wall in the form of a ''wavy film,'' while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs

  14. Modelling a deep water oil/gas spill under conditions of gas hydrate formation and decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L.; Yapa, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    A model for the behavior of oil and gas spills at deepwater locations was presented. Such spills are subjected to pressures and temperatures that can convert gases to gas hydrates which are lighter than water. Knowing the state of gases as they rise with the plume is important in predicting the fate of an oil or gas plume released in deepwater. The objective of this paper was to develop a comprehensive jet/plume model which includes computational modules that simulate the gas hydrate formation/decomposition of gas bubbles. This newly developed model is based on the kinetics of hydrate formation and decomposition coupled with mass and heat transfer phenomena. The numerical model was successfully tested using results of experimental data from the Gulf of Mexico. Hydrate formation and decomposition are integrated with an earlier model by Yapa and Zheng for underwater oil or gas jets and plumes. The effects of hydrate on the behavior of an oil or gas plume was simulated to demonstrate the models capabilities. The model results indicate that in addition to thermodynamics, the kinetics of hydrate formation/decomposition should be considered when studying the behavior of oil and gas spills. It was shown that plume behavior changes significantly depending on whether or not the local conditions force the gases to form hydrates. 25 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  15. Organic Pollutants in Shale Gas Flowback and Produced Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butkovskyi, Andrii; Bruning, Harry; Kools, Stefan A.E.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Wezel, van Annemarie P.

    2017-01-01

    Organic contaminants in shale gas flowback and produced water (FPW) are traditionally expressed as total organic carbon (TOC) or chemical oxygen demand (COD), though these parameters do not provide information on the toxicity and environmental fate of individual components. This review addresses

  16. Gas exchange under water. Acclimation of terrestrial plants to submergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L.

    2005-01-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be prolonged photosynthesis under water, but this has received only little

  17. Conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Shohei

    1985-01-01

    The literature on conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water in various environments is reviewed. The conversion mechanisms and the conversion rates are as follows. 1. In the oxidation with oxygen and the isotopic exchange with water, tritium β-rays and metal catalyst are effective. The oxidation rate is ∼ 0.02 %/day at initial tritium concentration ≤ 10 -2 Ci/l and ∼ 2 %/day at 1 Ci/l. In the presence of oxygen and water, it is not clear whether the exchange reaction occurs or not because of the small amount of data. 2. For biological conversion, soil microorganisms contribute significantly. The conversion rate is greater than 10 %/hr. The tritium gas deposition velocity, which includes the uptake rate of tritium gas by soil and the conversion rate, ranges from 0.0025 to 0.11 cm/sec and is influenced by temperature and moisture of the soil. 3. Tritium gas is converted to the tritiated water through the reaction with hydroxyl radical produced by sunlight in the atmosphere. (author)

  18. Determination of thiobencarb in water samples by gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction via flotation assistance (HLLME-FA) coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was applied for the extraction and determination of thiobencarb in water samples. In this study, a special extraction cell was designed to facilitate collection of the ...

  19. Electricity, Gas and Water Supply. Industry Training Monograph No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Australia's electricity, gas, and water supply industry employs only 0.8% of the nation's workers and employment in the industry has declined by nearly 39% in the last decade. This industry is substantially more dependent on the vocational education and training (VET) sector for skilled graduates than is the total Australian labor market. Despite…

  20. Gas-driven pump for ground-water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signor, Donald C.

    1978-01-01

    Observation wells installed for artificial-recharge research and other wells used in different ground-water programs are frequently cased with small-diameter steel pipe. To obtain samples from these small-diameter wells in order to monitor water quality, and to calibrate solute-transport models, a small-diameter pump with unique operating characteristics is required that causes a minimum alternation of samples during field sampling. A small-diameter gas-driven pump was designed and built to obtain water samples from wells of two-inch diameter or larger. The pump is a double-piston type with the following characteristics: (1) The water sample is isolated from the operating gas, (2) no source of electricity is ncessary, (3) operation is continuous, (4) use of compressed gas is efficient, and (5) operation is reliable over extended periods of time. Principles of operation, actual operation techniques, gas-use analyses and operating experience are described. Complete working drawings and a component list are included. Recent modifications and pump construction for high-pressure applications also are described. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Removal of organic compounds from shale gas flowback water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butkovskyi, Andrii; Faber, Ann-Hélène; Wang, Yue; Grolle, Katja; Hofman-Caris, Roberta; Bruning, Harry; Van Wezel, Annemarie P.; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2018-01-01

    Ozonation, sorption to granular activated carbon and aerobic degradation were compared as potential treatment methods for removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions and selected organic compounds from shale gas flowback water after pre-treatment in dissolved air flotation unit. Flowback

  2. Mechanistic Processes Controlling Gas Sorption in Shale Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Davidson, C. L.; Owen, T.; Hoyt, D.; Glezakou, V. A.; McGrail, B. P.; Thompson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of CO2 to stimulate natural gas production in previously fractured shale-dominated reservoirs where CO2 remains in place for long-term storage may be an attractive new strategy for reducing the cost of managing anthropogenic CO2. A preliminary analysis of capacities and potential revenues in US shale plays suggests nearly 390 tcf in additional gas recovery may be possible via CO2 driven enhanced gas recovery. However, reservoir transmissivity properties, optimum gas recovery rates, and ultimate fate of CO2 vary among reservoirs, potentially increasing operational costs and environmental risks. In this paper, we identify key mechanisms controlling the sorption of CH4 and CO2 onto phyllosilicates and processes occurring in mixed gas systems that have the potential of impacting fluid transfer and CO2 storage in shale dominated formations. Through a unique set of in situ experimental techniques coupled with molecular-level simulations, we identify structural transformations occurring to clay minerals, optimal CO2/CH4 gas exchange conditions, and distinguish between adsorbed and intercalated gases in a mixed gas system. For example, based on in situ measurements with magic angle spinning NMR, intercalation of CO2 within the montmorillonite structure occurs in CH4/CO2 gas mixtures containing low concentrations (hydrocarbon recovery processes.

  3. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  4. Non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natrual gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shair, F.H.; Ravimohan, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natural gas processing into ethane and ethylene comprising means of producing a non-equilibrium chemical plasma wherein selective conversion of the methane in natural gas to desired products of ethane and ethylene at a pre-determined ethane/ethylene ratio in the chemical process may be intimately controlled and optimized at a high electrical power efficiency rate by mixing with a recycling gas inert to the chemical process such as argon, helium, or hydrogen, reducing the residence time of the methane in the chemical plasma, selecting the gas pressure in the chemical plasma from a wide range of pressures, and utilizing pulsed electrical discharge producing the chemical plasma. (author)

  5. Minimization of water consumption under uncertainty for PC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, J.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is becoming increasingly important for the development of advanced power generation systems. As an emerging technology different process configurations have been heuristically proposed for IGCC processes. One of these schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion for the CO2 removal prior the fuel gas is fed to the gas turbine reducing its size (improving economic performance) and producing sequestration-ready CO2 (improving its cleanness potential). However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be used to obtain optimal flowsheets and designs. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). For the alternative designs, large differences in the performance parameters (for instance, the utility requirements) predictions from AEA and AP were observed, suggesting the necessity of solving the HENS problem within the AP simulation environment and avoiding the AEA simplifications. A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case.

  6. Relationships between water and gas chemistry in mature coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashin, Jack C.; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella R.; Mann, Steven D.; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Water and gas chemistry in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin reflects a complex interplay among burial processes, basin hydrodynamics, thermogenesis, and late-stage microbial methanogenesis. These factors are all important considerations for developing production and water management strategies. Produced water ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride brine. The hydrodynamic framework of the basin is dominated by structurally controlled fresh-water plumes that formed by meteoric recharge along the southeastern margin of the basin. The produced water contains significant quantities of hydrocarbons and nitrogen compounds, and the produced gas appears to be of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin.Late-stage microbial methanogenesis began following unroofing of the basin, and stable isotopes in the produced gas and in mineral cements indicate that late-stage methanogenesis occurred along a CO2-reduction metabolic pathway. Hydrocarbons, as well as small amounts of nitrate in the formation water, probably helped nourish the microbial consortia, which were apparently active in fresh to hypersaline water. The produced water contains NH4+ and NH3, which correlate strongly with brine concentration and are interpreted to be derived from silicate minerals. Denitrification reactions may have generated some N2, which is the only major impurity in the coalbed gas. Carbon dioxide is a minor component of the produced gas, but significant quantities are dissolved in the formation water. Degradation of organic compounds, augmented by deionization of NH4+, may have been the principal sources of hydrogen facilitating late-stage CO2 reduction.

  7. Analysis of paper machine process waters; Paperikoneen prosessivesianalytiikka - MPKT 09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuutinen, J; Alen, R; Harjula, P; Kilpinen, J; Pallonen, R; Jurvela, V

    1999-12-31

    The closure of paper machine circuits demands a better knowledge of the chemical structures and behaviour of organic compounds in pulp mill process waters. Nonionic or negatively charged detrimental substances (anionic trash) which will eventually cause runnability. Paper quality problems are of special interest. The main purpose of the project was to develop routine `fingerprint` analytical procedures to study various process waters. Our major interest was focused on low molecular weight carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and lignin based material. The `fingerprints` (chromatograms and electropherograms) can be used to differentiate various process waters or to find out changes between the composition of organic compounds in various stages of the papermaking process. Until now the most characteristic `fingerprints` were obtained by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and by pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Examples of using these techniques are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of paper machine process waters; Paperikoneen prosessivesianalytiikka - MPKT 09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuutinen, J.; Alen, R.; Harjula, P.; Kilpinen, J.; Pallonen, R.; Jurvela, V.

    1998-12-31

    The closure of paper machine circuits demands a better knowledge of the chemical structures and behaviour of organic compounds in pulp mill process waters. Nonionic or negatively charged detrimental substances (anionic trash) which will eventually cause runnability. Paper quality problems are of special interest. The main purpose of the project was to develop routine `fingerprint` analytical procedures to study various process waters. Our major interest was focused on low molecular weight carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and lignin based material. The `fingerprints` (chromatograms and electropherograms) can be used to differentiate various process waters or to find out changes between the composition of organic compounds in various stages of the papermaking process. Until now the most characteristic `fingerprints` were obtained by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and by pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Examples of using these techniques are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of the bottom water reservoir VAPEX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frauenfeld, T.W.J.; Jossy, C.; Kissel, G.A. [Alberta Research Council, Devon, AB (Canada); Rispler, K. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The mobilization of viscous heavy oil requires the dissolution of solvent vapour into the oil as well as the diffusion of the dissolved solvent into the virgin oil. Vapour extraction (VAPEX) is an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) process which involves injecting a solvent into the reservoir to reduce the viscosity of hydrocarbons. This paper describes the contribution of the Alberta Research Council to solvent-assisted oil recovery technology. The bottom water process was also modelled to determine its feasibility for a field-scale oil recovery scheme. Several experiments were conducted in an acrylic visual model in which Pujol and Boberg scaling were used to produce a lab model scaling a field process. The model simulated a slice of a 30 metre thick reservoir, with a 10 metre thick bottom water zone, containing two horizontal wells (25 metres apart) at the oil water interface. The experimental rates were found to be negatively affected by continuous low permeability layers and by oil with an initial gas content. In order to achieve commercial oil recovery rates, the bottom water process must be used to increase the surface area exposed to solvents. A large oil water interface between the wells provides contact for solvent when injecting gas at the interface. High production rates are therefore possible with appropriate well spacing. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 16 figs.

  10. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  11. System evaluation of offshore platforms with gas liquefaction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; de Oliveira Júnior, Silvio

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Floating, production, storage and offloading plants are facilities used for offshore processing of hydrocarbons in remote locations. At present, the produced gas is injected back into the reservoir instead of being exported. The implementation of refrigeration processes offshore for liqu......Abstract Floating, production, storage and offloading plants are facilities used for offshore processing of hydrocarbons in remote locations. At present, the produced gas is injected back into the reservoir instead of being exported. The implementation of refrigeration processes offshore...... improvements are discussed based on an energy and exergy analysis. Compared to a standard platform where gas is directly injected into the reservoir, the total power consumption increases by up to 50%, and the exergy destruction within the processing plant doubles when a liquefaction system is installed....... It is therefore essential to conduct a careful analysis of the trade-off between the capital costs and operating revenues for such options....

  12. Process design analyses of co/sub 2/ capture from natural gas by polymer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A.; Nasir, H.; Ahsan, M. [National Univ. of Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2014-06-15

    Membrane-based natural gas separation has become one of the promising technologies due to its compactness, energy efficiency, environment friendliness and economic advantages. In this work, a three stage membrane process for the separation of CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ is proposed based on a novel fixed site carrier membrane which has the potential to meet the CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ separation and durability requirement. A simulation analysis, which utilizes the Aspen Hysys capabilities to calculate and couple energy balances in the process model, has been conducted to investigate the effect of process parameters on the gas processing cost. Two different natural gas mixtures containing 9.5% and 2.9% CO/sub 2/ have been simulated for various process conditions. This fixed site carrier membrane performs well when wetted with water. Therefore, natural gas feed streams are saturated with water. It is evident from the analysis that it is possible to maintain 2% CO/sub 2/ in retentate and methane loss in permeate below 2% by optimizing the process conditions. The analysis shows that fixed site carrier membrane offers a viable solution for natural gas sweetening. (author)

  13. Process design analyses of co/sub 2/ capture from natural gas by polymer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Nasir, H.; Ahsan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-based natural gas separation has become one of the promising technologies due to its compactness, energy efficiency, environment friendliness and economic advantages. In this work, a three stage membrane process for the separation of CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ is proposed based on a novel fixed site carrier membrane which has the potential to meet the CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ separation and durability requirement. A simulation analysis, which utilizes the Aspen Hysys capabilities to calculate and couple energy balances in the process model, has been conducted to investigate the effect of process parameters on the gas processing cost. Two different natural gas mixtures containing 9.5% and 2.9% CO/sub 2/ have been simulated for various process conditions. This fixed site carrier membrane performs well when wetted with water. Therefore, natural gas feed streams are saturated with water. It is evident from the analysis that it is possible to maintain 2% CO/sub 2/ in retentate and methane loss in permeate below 2% by optimizing the process conditions. The analysis shows that fixed site carrier membrane offers a viable solution for natural gas sweetening. (author)

  14. Water retention in mushroom during sustainable processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, E.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with the understanding of the water holding capacity of mushroom, in the context of a redesign of their industrial processing. For designing food process the retention of food quality is of the utmost importance. Water holding capacity is an important quality aspect of

  15. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Thomas F.; Parsons, Jr., Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  16. Gas Bubbles Investigation in Contaminated Water Using Optical Tomography Based on Independent Component Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Taufiq Mohd Khairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of concentration profiles for gas bubble flow in a vertical pipeline containing contaminated water using an optical tomography system. The concentration profiles for the bubble flow quantities are investigated under five different flows conditions, a single bubble, double bubbles, 25% of air opening, 50% of air opening, and 100% of air opening flow rates where a valve is used to control the gas flow in the vertical pipeline. The system is aided by the independent component analysis (ICA algorithm to reconstruct the concentration profiles of the liquid-gas flow. The behaviour of the gas bubbles was investigated in contaminated water in which the water sample was prepared by adding 25 mL of colour ingredients to 3 liters of pure water. The result shows that the application of ICA has enabled the system to detect the presence of gas bubbles in contaminated water. This information provides vital information on the flow inside the pipe and hence could be very significant in increasing the efficiency of the process industries.

  17. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  18. Experimental study on total dissolved gas supersaturation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available More and more high dams have been constructed and operated in China. The total dissolved gas (TDG supersaturation caused by dam discharge leads to gas bubble disease or even death of fish. Through a series of experiments, the conditions and requirements of supersaturated TDG generation were examined in this study. The results show that pressure (water depth, aeration, and bubble dissolution time are required for supersaturated TDG generation, and the air-water contact area and turbulence intensity are the main factors that affect the generation rate of supersaturated TDG. The TDG supersaturation levels can be reduced by discharging water to shallow shoals downstream of the dam or using negative pressure pipelines. Furthermore, the TDG supersaturation levels in stilling basins have no direct relationship with those in reservoirs. These results are of great importance for further research on the prediction of supersaturated TDG generation caused by dam discharge and aquatic protection.

  19. An overview on exploration and environmental impact of unconventional gas sources and treatment options for produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia L S; Morales-Torres, Sergio; Castro-Silva, Sérgio; Figueiredo, José L; Silva, Adrián M T

    2017-09-15

    Rising global energy demands associated to unbalanced allocation of water resources highlight the importance of water management solutions for the gas industry. Advanced drilling, completion and stimulation techniques for gas extraction, allow more economical access to unconventional gas reserves. This stimulated a shale gas revolution, besides tight gas and coalbed methane, also causing escalating water handling challenges in order to avoid a major impact on the environment. Hydraulic fracturing allied to horizontal drilling is gaining higher relevance in the exploration of unconventional gas reserves, but a large amount of wastewater (known as "produced water") is generated. Its variable chemical composition and flow rates, together with more severe regulations and public concern, have promoted the development of solutions for the treatment and reuse of such produced water. This work intends to provide an overview on the exploration and subsequent environmental implications of unconventional gas sources, as well as the technologies for treatment of produced water, describing the main results and drawbacks, together with some cost estimates. In particular, the growing volumes of produced water from shale gas plays are creating an interesting market opportunity for water technology and service providers. Membrane-based technologies (membrane distillation, forward osmosis, membrane bioreactors and pervaporation) and advanced oxidation processes (ozonation, Fenton, photocatalysis) are claimed to be adequate treatment solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  1. Microwave Plasma Sources for Gas Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizeraczyk, J.; Jasinski, M.; Dors, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing the non-thermal plasmas for processing of gases are presented. The main part of the paper concerns the microwave plasma sources (MPSs) for environmental protection applications. A few types of the MPSs, i.e. waveguide-based surface wave sustained MPS, coaxial-line-based and waveguide-based nozzle-type MPSs, waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS and MPS for microdischarges are presented. Also, results of the laboratory experiments on the plasma processing of several highly-concentrated (up to several tens percent) volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including Freon-type refrigerants, in the moderate (200-400 W) waveguide-based nozzle-type MPS (2.45 GHz) are presented. The results showed that the microwave discharge plasma fully decomposed the VOCs at relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of VOCs decomposition reached 1000 g/kWh. This suggests that the microwave discharge plasma can be a useful tool for environmental protection applications. In this paper also results of the use of the waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS to methane reforming into hydrogen are presented

  2. The Dependence of Water Permeability in Quartz Sand on Gas Hydrate Saturation in the Pore Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossel, E.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.

    2018-02-01

    Transport of fluids in gas hydrate bearing sediments is largely defined by the reduction of the permeability due to gas hydrate crystals in the pore space. Although the exact knowledge of the permeability behavior as a function of gas hydrate saturation is of crucial importance, state-of-the-art simulation codes for gas production scenarios use theoretically derived permeability equations that are hardly backed by experimental data. The reason for the insufficient validation of the model equations is the difficulty to create gas hydrate bearing sediments that have undergone formation mechanisms equivalent to the natural process and that have well-defined gas hydrate saturations. We formed methane hydrates in quartz sand from a methane-saturated aqueous solution and used magnetic resonance imaging to obtain time-resolved, three-dimensional maps of the gas hydrate saturation distribution. These maps were fed into 3-D finite element method simulations of the water flow. In our simulations, we tested the five most well-known permeability equations. All of the suitable permeability equations include the term (1-SH)n, where SH is the gas hydrate saturation and n is a parameter that needs to be constrained. The most basic equation describing the permeability behavior of water flow through gas hydrate bearing sand is k = k0 (1-SH)n. In our experiments, n was determined to be 11.4 (±0.3). Results from this study can be directly applied to bulk flow analysis under the assumption of homogeneous gas hydrate saturation and can be further used to derive effective permeability models for heterogeneous gas hydrate distributions at different scales.

  3. Process for producing alcohols from synthesis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for making alcohols comprising contacting a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide with a catalyst comprising: (1) as a first component, at least one element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and tungsten in free or combined form; (2) as a second component, at least one element selected from the group consisting of cobalt and nickel in free or combined form; (3) as a third component, a promoter comprising an alkali or alkaline earth element in free or combined form; the catalyst excluding rhodium and ruthenium and containing less than two (2) weight percent copper; at a pressure of at least about 500 psig and at conditions sufficient to form an alcohol fraction boiling in the range of motor gasoline in at least 20 percent CO/sub 2/ free carbon selectivity, the alcohol fraction containing a C/sub 1/ to C/sub 2-5/ alcohol weight ratio of less than about 1:1

  4. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  5. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  6. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Chou, C.-C.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. The method involves a sequence of adsorption and desorption steps which are specified. Particular reference is made to the separation of xenon and krypton from the off-gas stream, and to the use of silver-exchanged mordenite as the adsorbent. (U.K.)

  7. Process Investigation of Tube Expansion by Gas Detonation

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, F.-W.; Beerwald, C.; Brosius, A.; Gershteyn, G.; Hermes, M.; Kleiner, M.; Olivier, H.; Weber, M.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper deals with the expansion of tubes by direct application of gas detonation waves, i.e. the gas is both pressure medium and energy source. After an introduction to gas detonation forming, measurements of the motion process and the internal pressures are presented. Results of free expansion and of forming into a die are thoroughly studied and compared to the results of quasi-static burst tests and hydroforming. Using pure aluminum Al99.5 and a medium strength alloy AlMgSi1, ...

  8. Flue Gas Cleaning With Alternative Processes and Reaction Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Huang, Jun; Riisager, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Alternative methods to the traditional industrial NOX and SOXflue gas cleaning processes working at lower temperatures and/orleading to useful products are desired. In this work we presentour latest results regarding the use of molten ionic media inelectrocatalytic membrane separation, ionic liquid...... reversibleabsorption and supported ionic liquid deNOX catalysis. Furtherdevelopment of the methods will hopefully make them suitable forinstallation in different positions in the flue gas duct ascompared to the industrial methods available today....

  9. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  10. Numerical simulations of rarefied gas flows in thin film processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Many processes exist in which a thin film is deposited from the gas phase, e.g. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). These processes are operated at ever decreasing reactor operating pressures and with ever decreasing wafer feature dimensions, reaching into the rarefied flow regime. As numerical

  11. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H(sub 2)S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf(trademark) (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H(sub 2)S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H(sub 2)S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO(sub 2) at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H(sub 2)S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting periods new catalyst formulations were tested. The experiments showed that the newest catalyst has slightly better performance, but catalyst TDA No.2 is still superior overall for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process due to lower costs. Plans for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described

  12. A Numerical Investigation on the Effect of Gas Pressure on the Water Saturation of Compacted Bentonite-Sand Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Feng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In deep geological disposal for high-level radioactive waste, the generated gas can potentially affect the sealing ability of bentonite buffers. There is a competition between water and gas: the former provides sealing by swelling bentonite, and the latter attempts to desaturate the bentonite buffer. Thus, this study focused on numerically modelling the coupling effects of water and gas on the water saturation and sealing efficiency of compacted bentonite-sand samples. Different gas pressures were applied to the top surface of an upper sample, whereas the water pressure on the bottom side of the lower sample was maintained at 4 MPa. The results indicated that gas pressure did not significantly affect the saturation of the bentonite-sand sample until 2 MPa. At 2 MPa, the degree of water saturation of the upper sample was close to 1.0. As the gas pressure increased, this influence was more apparent. When the gas pressure was 6 MPa or higher, it was difficult for the upper sample to become fully saturated. Additionally, the lower sample was desaturated due to the high gas pressure. This indicated that gas pressure played an important role in the water saturation process and can affect the sealing efficiency of bentonite-based buffer materials.

  13. Measurements of gas permeability and non-Darcy flow in gas-water-hydrate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersland, G.; Husebo, J.; Graue, A.; Kvamme, B. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Baldwin, B. [Green Country Petrophysics LLC, Dewey, OK (United States); Stevens, J.; Howard, J. [ConocoPhillips, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in natural gas hydrate reservoirs may offer stable long-term storage of a greenhouse gas while benefiting from methane production, without requiring heat. By exposing hydrate to a thermodynamically preferred hydrate former, CO{sub 2}, the hydrate may be maintained macroscopically in the solid state and retain the stability of the formation. However, there is concern over the flow capacity in such reservoirs. This depends on several factors, notably thermodynamic destabilization of hydrate in small pores due to capillary effects; the presence of liquid channels separating the hydrate from the mineral surfaces; and, the connectivity of gas or liquid filled pores and channels. This paper described a technique for measuring gas permeability in gas-water-hydrate systems. It reported on several experiments that measured gas permeability during stages of hydrate growth in sandstone core plugs. Interactions between minerals and surrounding molecules were also discussed. The formation of methane hydrate in porous media was monitored and quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of hydrate growth within the porous rock were provided along with measurements of gas permeability and non-Darcy flow effects at various hydrate saturations. Gas permeability was measured at steady state flow of methane through the hydrate-bearing core sample. Significant gas permeability was recorded for porous sandstone even when hydrates occupied up to 60 per cent of the pore space. It was concluded that MRI imaging can be used effectively to map and quantify hydrate saturation in sandstone core plugs. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Process technologies for water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramilo, Lucia B.; Gomez de Soler, Susana M.; Coppari, Norberto R.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the nuclear energy for simultaneous electricity and potable water production is an attractive, technically feasible, and safe alternative to fossil energy options. In Argentina the nuclear desalination option is being studied together with the alternative uses of the innovative advanced Argentinean CAREM reactor, in the research contract CNEA - IAEA to evaluate projects of nuclear desalination. The objective and scope of this work is to know the advantages and disadvantages of each desalination technology, distinctive characteristics of each of them, that make them adapt better to different uses and outline conditions and analysis of related antecedents of its use in the world. In this report a summarized description of those technologies is included by way of introduction, so as to highlight the main advantages and disadvantages of each of them. The improvements and innovations found in the last years for the different technologies are also included. (author)

  15. Process technologies for water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramilo, Lucia B.; Gomez de Soler, Susana M.; Coppari, Norberto R.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the nuclear energy for simultaneous electricity and potable water production is an attractive, technically feasible and safe alternative to fossil energy options. In Argentina the nuclear desalination option is being studied together with the alternative uses of the innovative advanced Argentinean CAREM reactor, in a research contract between CNEA and the IAEA to evaluate projects of nuclear desalination. This paper analyses the benefits and drawbacks of each desalination technology, the distinctive characteristics of the technology that fit better the different uses, and outlines the related antecedents of its application in the world. In this report a summarized description of those technologies is included by way of introduction, so as to highlight the main advantages and disadvantages of each of them. The improvements and innovations made in the last years for the different technologies are also described. (author)

  16. PDMS membranes as sensing element in optical sensors for gas detection in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Torino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS has been introduced the first time about 20years ago. This polymer is worldwide used for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic device through a replica molding process. However, the great popularity of PDMS is not only related to its easy processability, but also to its chemical and physical properties. For its interesting properties, the polymer has been implied for several applications, including sensing. In this work, we investigated how to use functionalized PDMS membranes as sensing elements in optical sensors for gas detection in water samples. Keywords: Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR sensors, Gas sensor

  17. Process water treatment at the Ranger uranium mine, Northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, H; Russell, H; Davidson, J; Jones, D; Levy, V; Gilderdale, M; Davis, S; Ring, R; Conway, G; Macintosh, P; Sertorio, L

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual development and piloting of an innovative water treatment system for process water produced by a uranium mine mill is described. The process incorporates lime/CO2 softening (Stage 1), reverse osmosis (Stage 2) and biopolishing (Stage 3) to produce water of quality suitable for release to the receiving environment. Comprehensive performance data are presented for each stage. The unique features of the proposed process are: recycling of the lime/CO2 softening sludge to the uranium mill as a neutralant, the use of power station off-gas for carbonation, the use of residual ammonia as the pH buffer in carbonation; and the recovery and recycling of ammonia from the RO reject stream.

  18. Cryogenic system for collecting noble gases from boiling water reactor off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmauch, G.E.

    1973-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, noncondensible gases are expelled from the main condenser. This off-gas stream is composed largely of radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, air in-leakage, and traces of fission product krypton and xenon. In the Air Products' treatment system, the stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen are reacted to form water in a catalytic recombiner. The design of the catalytic recombiner is an extension of industrial gas technology developed for purification of argon and helium. The off-gas after the recombiner is processed by cryogenic air-separation technology. The gas is compressed, passed into a reversing heat exchanger where water vapor and carbon dioxide are frozen out, further cooled, and expanded into a distillation column where refrigeration is provided by addition of liquid nitrogen. More than 99.99 percent of the krypton and essentially 100 percent of the xenon entering the column are accumulated in the column bottoms. Every three to six months, the noble-gas concentrate accumulated in the column bottom is removed as liquid, vaporized, diluted with steam, mixed with hydrogen in slight excess of oxygen content, and fed to a small recombiner where all the oxygen reacts to form water. The resulting gas stream, containing from 20 to 40 percent noble gases, is compressed into small storage cylinders for indefinite retention or for decay of all fission gases except krypton-85, followed by subsequent release under controlled conditions and favorable meteorology. This treatment system is based on proven technology that is practiced throughout the industrial gas industry. Only the presence of radioactive materials in the process stream and the application in a nuclear power plant environment are new. Adaptations to meet these new conditions can be made without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety

  19. The comparison of greenhouse gas emissions in sewage treatment plants with different treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shuhei; Sano, Itsumi; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You; Nishimura, Osamu

    2018-02-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from different sewage treatment plants: oxidation ditch process, double-circulated anoxic-oxic process and anoxic-oxic process were evaluated based on the survey. The methane and nitrous oxide characteristics were discussed based on the gaseous and dissolved gas profiles. As a result, it was found that methane was produced in the sewer pipes and the primary sedimentation tank. Additionally, a ventilation system would promote the gasification of dissolved methane in the first treatment units. Nitrous oxide was produced and emitted in oxic tanks with nitrite accumulation inside the sewage treatment plant. A certain amount of nitrous oxide was also discharged as dissolved gas through the effluent water. If the amount of dissolved nitrous oxide discharge is not included, 7-14% of total nitrous oxide emission would be overlooked. Based on the greenhouse gas calculation, electrical consumption and the N 2 O emission from incineration process were major sources in all the plants. For greenhouse gas reduction, oxidation ditch process has an advantage over the other advanced systems due to lower energy consumption, sludge production, and nitrogen removal without gas stripping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of pollutants in air and water using gas chromatography and headspace gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The combination 'personal sampling' with headspace gas chromatography to determine traces of formaldehyde, phenol and benzene in air is investigated in this work, with the aim of developing maximum workplace concentration values (MWL values). Further possible applications of gas chromatography in trace analysis in the environmentally protected area. The analysis of chromium in waste waters (Cr III as acetyl acetonate complex) is investigated as further possible application, whereby optimum conditions are obtained. A modified flame ionization detector was used to increase the detection sensitivity.

  1. Uranium enrichment in Europe by the gas centrifuge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severin, D.J.E.

    1975-01-01

    To begin with, this lesson gives an outline of the expected energy demand of the Western World and the concentration of the European companies participating in uranium enrichment by the gas centrifuge method. Next, a) the principles of the gas centrifuge method are outlined, b) its advantages over other industrial processes are stressed, and c) the characteristic data of complete plants are given. The existing German, Dutch, and British pilot plants are mentioned as examples for the perfected state of the process. The Capenhurst (UK) and Almedo (NL) demonstration plants, each with a capacity of 200 t SW/a, will have been extended to 2 x 1.000 t SW/a by 1982. Finally, economic data of the gas centrifuge process are given. The term 'separative work' is explained in an annex. (GG) [de

  2. A catalytic distillation process for light gas oil hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Villamil, F.D.; Marroquin, J.O.; Paz, C. de la; Rodriguez, E. [Prog. de Matematicas Aplicadas y Computacion, Prog. de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A light gas oil hydrodesulfurization process via catalytic distillation is developed and compared to a conventional process. By integrating the separation and reaction into a single unit, the catalytic distillation may produce a diesel with low concentration of sulfur compounds at a lower cost than the traditional reaction/separation process. The process proposed in this work is compared to an optimised conventional hydrodesulfurization unit which represents fairly well a plant that belongs to the National System of Refineries. During the optimisation of the conventional process, a compromise is established among the production of diesel and naphtha and the operating costs. The results show that the light gas oil hydrodesulfurization via catalytic distillation is as or more efficient than the conventional process. However, the removal of the sulfur compounds is carried out under less rigorous conditions. This design reduces the fix and operational costs. (author)

  3. Gas turbine with two circuits and intermediate fuel conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachl, H.

    1978-01-01

    The combination of a fuel conversion process with a thermal process saves coolant and subsequent separation plant, in order to achieve the greatest possible use of the mechanical or electrical energy. The waste heat of a thermal circuit is taken to an endothermal chemical fuel conversion process arranged before a second circuit. The heat remaining after removal of the heat required for the chemical process is taken to a second thermal circuit. The reaction products of the chemical process which condense out during expansion in the second thermal process are selectively separated from the remaining gas mixture in the individual turbine stages. (HGOE) [de

  4. Suitability of pipeline material for buried gas and water piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, R

    1976-01-01

    Following a brief review of the development of the individual pipe materials and their use in the field of gas and water supply, the various stressing possibilities are dealt with. The corrosion influences from inside and outside, the material specifically for internal and external insulation, as well as the stressing due to sediments, are particularly brought out in this connection. A few remarks on the pressure pipes made of ductile cast iron, steel, reinforced concrete, asbestos cement and plastics are followed by comparisons with representations on material parameters to be proved, safety factors, tensile and pressure resistance, breaking tension and stress-strain diagram, wall thicknesses, friction losses, reactions depending on the E. modulus and distribution of the single pipe materials in the gas and water supply.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at a water/gas interface: A study of bath gas-dependent molecular species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M.; Padmanabhan, A.; Godfrey, G.J.; Rehse, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been performed on the surface of a bulk water sample in an air, argon, and nitrogen gas environment to investigate emissions from hydrogen-containing molecules. A microplasma was formed at the gas/liquid interface by focusing a Nd:YAG laser beam operating at 1064 nm onto the surface of an ultra-pure water sample. A broadband Echelle spectrometer with a time-gated intensified charge-coupled device was used to analyze the plasma at various delay times (1.0-40.0 μs) and for incident laser pulse energies ranging from 20-200 mJ. In this configuration, the dominant atomic spectral features at short delay times are the hydrogen H-alpha and H-beta emission lines at 656 and 486 nm, respectively, as well as emissions from atomic oxygen liberated from the water and air and nitrogen emission lines from the air bath gas. For delay times exceeding approximately 8 μs the emission from molecular species (particularly OH and NH) created after the ablation process dominates the spectrum. Molecular emissions are found to be much less sensitive to variations in pulse energy and exhibit a temporal decay an order of magnitude slower than the atomic emission. The dependence of both atomic hydrogen and OH emission on the bath gas above the surface of the water was studied by performing the experiment at standard pressure in an atmospheric purge box. Electron densities calculated from the Stark broadening of the H-beta and H-gamma lines and plasma excitation temperatures calculated from the ratio of H-beta to H-gamma emission were measured for ablation in the three bath gases

  6. Process for recovering water enriched with deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, H.

    1975-01-01

    By the process proposed herewith, enrichment of deuterium in water by cooling water recirculation through series-connection of several cooling ciruits in the form of columns is obtained. With this method, conventional, open-type cooling towers without special installations can be applied, which is an important advantage as compared with a formerly proposed single-stage process with specially designed, complicated cooling towers. Series-connection of the cooling towers is carried out in such a way that the circulating water of a certain cooling circuit, which has a corresponding output value of deuterium enrichment, is conveyed to a succeeding circuit where further enrichment is achieved. The water enriched with deuterium is removed from the last cooling circuit of the series while an amount of fresch water equivalent to the water removed or evaporated altogether is fed to the first circuit of the series. (RB) [de

  7. Tritium-gas/water-vapor monitor. Tests and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    A tritium gas/water-vapor monitor was designed and built by the Health Physics Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In its prototype configuration, the monitor took the shape of two separate instruments: a (total) tritium monitor and a water-vapor monitor. Both instruments were tested and evaluated. The tests of the (total) tritium monitor, basically an improved version of the standard flow-through ion-chamber instrument, are briefly reported here and more completely elsewhere. The tests of the water-vapor monitor indicated that the novel approach used to condense water vapor for scintillation counting has a number of serious drawbacks and that further development of the instrument is unwarranted

  8. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C.W. [State Key Laboratory of Structure Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-03-01

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water. (author)

  9. Overview of gas processing fee practices in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The negotiation of gas processing fees from the perspective of the natural gas producer are summarized. Some of the topics discussed are: evaluation of fee proposals, capital cost estimates, pipeline capital fees, compressor capital fees, plant capital fees, upper and lower limits on fees, (JP-90 and JP-95), negotiation options, operating costs, production allocation, and processing agreements. Several case studies involving one or more of these items were reviewed by way of illustration. The importance of documentation of all agreements, changes to agreements, commitments, etc., was stressed

  10. Effective energy management by combining gas turbine cycles and forward osmosis desalination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min Young; Shin, Serin; Kim, Eung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Innovative gas turbine system and FO integrated system was proposed. • The feasibility of the integrated system was analyzed thermodynamically. • GOR of the FO–gas turbine system is 17% higher than those of MED and MSF. • Waste heat utilization of the suggested system is 85.7%. • Water production capacity of the suggested system is 3.5 times higher than the MSF–gas turbine system. - Abstract: In the recent years, attempts to improve the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine cycles have been made. In order to enhance the energy management of the gas turbine cycle, a new integration concept has been proposed; integration of gas turbine cycle and forward osmosis desalination process. The combination of the gas turbine cycle and the forward osmosis (FO) desalination process basically implies the coupling of the waste heat from the gas turbine cycle to the draw solute recovery system in the FO process which is the most energy consuming part of the whole FO process. By doing this, a strong system that is capable of producing water and electricity with very little waste heat can be achieved. The feasibility of this newly proposed system was analyzed using UNISIM program and the OLI property package. For the analysis, the thermolytic draw solutes which has been suggested by other research groups have been selected and studied. Sensitivity analysis was conducted on the integration system in order to understand and identify the key parameters of the integrated system. And the integrated system was further evaluated by comparing the gain output ratio (GOR) values with the conventional desalination technologies such as multi stage flash (MSF) and multi effect distillation (MED). The suggested integrated system was calculated to have a GOR of 14.8, while the MSF and MED when integrated to the gas turbine cycle showed GOR value of 12. It should also be noted that the energy utilization of the suggested integrated system is significantly higher by 27

  11. Managing produced water from coal seam gas projects: implications for an emerging industry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter J; Gore, Damian B; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the environmental problems, impacts and risks associated with the generation and disposal of produced water by the emerging coal seam gas (CSG) industry and how it may be relevant to Australia and similar physical settings. With only limited independent research on the potential environmental impacts of produced water, is it necessary for industry and government policy makers and regulators to draw upon the experiences of related endeavours such as mining and groundwater extraction accepting that the conclusions may not always be directly transferrable. CSG is widely touted in Australia as having the potential to provide significant economic and energy security benefits, yet the environmental and health policies and the planning and regulatory setting are yet to mature and are continuing to evolve amidst ongoing social and environmental concerns and political indecision. In this review, produced water has been defined as water that is brought to the land surface during the process of recovering methane gas from coal seams and includes water sourced from CSG wells as well as flowback water associated with drilling, hydraulic fracturing and gas extraction. A brief overview of produced water generation, its characteristics and environmental issues is provided. A review of past lessons and identification of potential risks, including disposal options, is included to assist in planning and management of this industry.

  12. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    D ampersand D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D ampersand D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly

  13. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amount of water in an ideal gas. 1065... in an ideal gas. This section describes how to determine the amount of water in an ideal gas, which... of water in an ideal gas, x H20, as follows: ER30AP10.034 Where: x H20 = amount of water in an ideal...

  14. Desalination of Produced Water via Gas Hydrate Formation and Post Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a two-step desalination process, in which produced water is cleaned by forming gas hydrate in it and subsequently dewatering the hydrate to remove the residual produced water trapped in between the hydrate crystals. All experiments were performed with pressure in the range of 450 to 800psi and temperature in the range of -1 to 1°C using CO? as guest molecule for the hydrate crystals. The experiments were conducted using artificial produced waters containing different amoun...

  15. Impact of the Vancouver Island natural gas pipeline construction on water quality: Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G

    1993-01-01

    Prior to the construction of the Vancouver Island natural gas pipeline, concern was expressed for the potential defilement of community domestic water supplies when the construction work occurred in community watersheds. When drinking water becomes turbid from rainfall runoff passing through construction sites, the community disinfection process is rendered inefficacious. At a specified turbidity level, the water becomes too risky to drink without alternative disinfection such as boiling. This situation creates significant administrative problems for local health officials, intolerable social problems for residents and processing problems for industries which require clean water. This document is a review of the weekly environmental surveillance reports submitted by D. Tripp Biological Consultants to the B.C. Utilities Commission. The material is organized to relate construction practices with weather patterns thereby showing the resultant effects on water quality (turbidity).

  16. 78 FR 64905 - Carriage of Conditionally Permitted Shale Gas Extraction Waste Water in Bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ...-ZA31 Carriage of Conditionally Permitted Shale Gas Extraction Waste Water in Bulk AGENCY: Coast Guard... availability of a proposed policy letter concerning the carriage of shale gas extraction waste water in bulk... transport shale gas extraction waste water in bulk. The policy letter also defines the information the Coast...

  17. Variations of free gas content in water during pressure fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, A.; Zielke, W.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper an experimental programme is described in order to determine the influence of the cavitation nuclei distribution on cavitation inception. This programme has been used to measure air bubbles dimensions and number and particularly to determine the influence of quick pressure variations on the size on the number of bubbles in a pipe. An optical device counting scattered light is used as a measuring technique. Gas bubbles go through an optical control volume where they receive a high intensity light beam and scatter the light, then led to a photomultiplier; the signals are sorted and counted according to their size. If the number of nuclei, the dimensions of the control volume and the velocity of the water are known, it is possible to determine bubbles concentrations and the bulk modulus of the water. This measuring technique has been applied to a flow in a 140 mm diameter pipe with quick pressure variations from 2 bar to 0-10 bar. During the variations, the void fraction depends on the Reynolds number of the flow and on the gas content of the water. The bulk modulus has been computed with different conditions. Most results concern pressures slightly over the vapor pressure. Air content has a strong influence on cavitation and on water compressibility after a vapor cavity collapse

  18. Shale gas vs. coal: Policy implications from environmental impact comparisons of shale gas, conventional gas, and coal on air, water, and land in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenner, Steffen; Lamadrid, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the major environmental impacts of shale gas, conventional gas and coal on air, water, and land in the United States. These factors decisively affect the quality of life (public health and safety) as well as local and global environmental protection. Comparing various lifecycle assessments, this paper will suggest that a shift from coal to shale gas would benefit public health, the safety of workers, local environmental protection, water consumption, and the land surface. Most likely, shale gas also comes with a smaller GHG footprint than coal. However, shale gas extraction can affect water safety. This paper also discusses related aspects that exemplify how shale gas can be more beneficial in the short and long term. First, there are technical solutions readily available to fix the most crucial problems of shale gas extraction, such as methane leakages and other geo-hazards. Second, shale gas is best equipped to smoothen the transition to an age of renewable energy. Finally, this paper will recommend hybrid policy regulations. - Highlights: ► We examine the impacts of (un)conventional gas and coal on air, water, and land. ► A shift from coal to shale gas would benefit public health. ► Shale gas extraction can affect water safety. ► We discuss technical solutions to fix the most crucial problems of shale gas extraction. ► We recommend hybrid regulations.

  19. Gas discharge processes in the standard and metal channel PMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.A.; Morozova, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the potential difference at the focusing chamber electrodes of the XP2020, FEU-85, FEU-87, and FEU-93 photomultipliers on the intensity of afterpulses resulting from gas discharge processes is investigated. The time distribution of the afterpulses in the metal channel PMTs - H6780 and R7600U-200 - is studied as well

  20. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Craig R.; Bohlke, John Karl; Harvey, Judson W.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  1. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  2. Rate of Isotope Exchange Reaction Between Tritiated Water in a Gas Phase and Water on the Surface of Piping Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashio, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Junya; Kobayashi, Ryusuke; Nishikawa, Masabumi

    2001-01-01

    The system effect of tritium arises from the interaction of tritium in the gas phase with water on the surface of piping materials. It has been reported that the system effect can be quantified by applying the serial reactor model to the piping system and that adsorption and isotope exchange reactions play the main roles in the trapping of tritium. The isotope exchange reaction that occurs when the chemical form of tritium in the gas phase is in the molecular form, i.e., HT or T 2 , has been named isotope exchange reaction 1, and that which occurs when tritium in the gas phase is in water form, i.e., HTO or T 2 O, has been named isotope exchange reaction 2.The rate of isotope exchange reaction 2 is experimentally quantified, and the rate is observed to be about one-third of the rate of adsorption. The trapping and release behavior of tritium from the piping surface due to isotope exchange reaction 2 is also discussed. It is certified that swamping of water vapor to process gas is effective to release tritium from the surface contaminated with tritium

  3. Space Station Water Processor Process Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the development program conducted under contract NAS8-38250-12 related to the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor (WP) Process Pump. The results of the Process Pumps evaluation conducted on this program indicates that further development is required in order to achieve the performance and life requirements for the ISSWP.

  4. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes

  5. Hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, H.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium is concentrated in a hydrogen-water isotopic exchange process enhanced by the use of catalyst materials in cold and hot tower contacting zones. Water is employed in a closed liquid recirculation loop that includes the cold tower, in which deuterium is concentrated in the water, and the upper portion of the hot tower in which said deuterium is concentrated in the hydrogen stream. Feed water is fed to the lower portion of said hot tower for contact with the circulating hydrogen stream. The feed water does not contact the water in the closed loop. Catalyst employed in the cold tower and the upper portion of the hot tower, preferably higher quality material, is isolated from impurities in the feed water that contacts only the catalyst, preferably of lower quality, in the lower portion of the hot zone. The closed loop water passes from the cold zone to the dehumidification zone, and a portion of said water leaving the upper portion of the hot tower can be passed to the humidification zone and thereafter recycled to said closed loop. Deuterium concentration is enhanced in said catalytic hydrogen-water system while undue retarding of catalyst activity is avoided

  6. Plasmachemical oxidation processes in a hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukes, Petr; Locke, Bruce R [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, Florida (United States)

    2005-11-21

    Oxidation processes induced in water by pulsed electrical discharges generated simultaneously in the gas phase in close proximity to the water surface and directly in the liquid were investigated in a hybrid series gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor. The mechanism of phenol degradation was studied through its dependence on the gas phase and liquid phase compositions using pure argon and oxygen atmospheres above the liquid and different initial pH values in the aqueous solution. Phenol degradation was significantly enhanced in the hybrid-series reactor compared with the phenol removal by the single-liquid phase discharge reactor. Under an argon atmosphere the mechanism of phenol degradation was mainly caused by the electrophilic attack of OH{center_dot} radicals produced by the liquid phase discharge directly in water and OH{center_dot} radicals produced by the gas phase discharge at the gas-liquid interface. Under an oxygen atmosphere the formation of gaseous ozone dominated over the formation of OH{center_dot} radicals, and the contribution of the gas phase discharge in this case was determined mainly by the dissolution of gaseous ozone into the water and its subsequent interaction with phenol. At high pH phenol was degraded, in addition to the direct attack by ozone, also through indirect reactions of OH{center_dot} radicals formed via a peroxone process by the decomposition of dissolved ozone by hydrogen peroxide produced by the liquid phase discharge. Such a mechanism was proved by the detection of cis,cis-muconic acid and pH-dependent degradation of phenol, which resulted in significantly higher removal of phenol from alkaline solution observed under oxygen atmosphere than in argon.

  7. Plasmachemical oxidation processes in a hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, Petr; Locke, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Oxidation processes induced in water by pulsed electrical discharges generated simultaneously in the gas phase in close proximity to the water surface and directly in the liquid were investigated in a hybrid series gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor. The mechanism of phenol degradation was studied through its dependence on the gas phase and liquid phase compositions using pure argon and oxygen atmospheres above the liquid and different initial pH values in the aqueous solution. Phenol degradation was significantly enhanced in the hybrid-series reactor compared with the phenol removal by the single-liquid phase discharge reactor. Under an argon atmosphere the mechanism of phenol degradation was mainly caused by the electrophilic attack of OH· radicals produced by the liquid phase discharge directly in water and OH· radicals produced by the gas phase discharge at the gas-liquid interface. Under an oxygen atmosphere the formation of gaseous ozone dominated over the formation of OH· radicals, and the contribution of the gas phase discharge in this case was determined mainly by the dissolution of gaseous ozone into the water and its subsequent interaction with phenol. At high pH phenol was degraded, in addition to the direct attack by ozone, also through indirect reactions of OH· radicals formed via a peroxone process by the decomposition of dissolved ozone by hydrogen peroxide produced by the liquid phase discharge. Such a mechanism was proved by the detection of cis,cis-muconic acid and pH-dependent degradation of phenol, which resulted in significantly higher removal of phenol from alkaline solution observed under oxygen atmosphere than in argon

  8. Continuous measurement of air-water gas exchange by underwater eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Pace, Michael L.

    2017-12-01

    Exchange of gases, such as O2, CO2, and CH4, over the air-water interface is an important component in aquatic ecosystem studies, but exchange rates are typically measured or estimated with substantial uncertainties. This diminishes the precision of common ecosystem assessments associated with gas exchanges such as primary production, respiration, and greenhouse gas emission. Here, we used the aquatic eddy covariance technique - originally developed for benthic O2 flux measurements - right below the air-water interface (˜ 4 cm) to determine gas exchange rates and coefficients. Using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and a fast-responding dual O2-temperature sensor mounted on a floating platform the 3-D water velocity, O2 concentration, and temperature were measured at high-speed (64 Hz). By combining these data, concurrent vertical fluxes of O2 and heat across the air-water interface were derived, and gas exchange coefficients were calculated from the former. Proof-of-concept deployments at different river sites gave standard gas exchange coefficients (k600) in the range of published values. A 40 h long deployment revealed a distinct diurnal pattern in air-water exchange of O2 that was controlled largely by physical processes (e.g., diurnal variations in air temperature and associated air-water heat fluxes) and not by biological activity (primary production and respiration). This physical control of gas exchange can be prevalent in lotic systems and adds uncertainty to assessments of biological activity that are based on measured water column O2 concentration changes. For example, in the 40 h deployment, there was near-constant river flow and insignificant winds - two main drivers of lotic gas exchange - but we found gas exchange coefficients that varied by several fold. This was presumably caused by the formation and erosion of vertical temperature-density gradients in the surface water driven by the heat flux into or out of the river that affected the turbulent

  9. Continuous measurement of air–water gas exchange by underwater eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of gases, such as O2, CO2, and CH4, over the air–water interface is an important component in aquatic ecosystem studies, but exchange rates are typically measured or estimated with substantial uncertainties. This diminishes the precision of common ecosystem assessments associated with gas exchanges such as primary production, respiration, and greenhouse gas emission. Here, we used the aquatic eddy covariance technique – originally developed for benthic O2 flux measurements – right below the air–water interface (∼ 4 cm to determine gas exchange rates and coefficients. Using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and a fast-responding dual O2–temperature sensor mounted on a floating platform the 3-D water velocity, O2 concentration, and temperature were measured at high-speed (64 Hz. By combining these data, concurrent vertical fluxes of O2 and heat across the air–water interface were derived, and gas exchange coefficients were calculated from the former. Proof-of-concept deployments at different river sites gave standard gas exchange coefficients (k600 in the range of published values. A 40 h long deployment revealed a distinct diurnal pattern in air–water exchange of O2 that was controlled largely by physical processes (e.g., diurnal variations in air temperature and associated air–water heat fluxes and not by biological activity (primary production and respiration. This physical control of gas exchange can be prevalent in lotic systems and adds uncertainty to assessments of biological activity that are based on measured water column O2 concentration changes. For example, in the 40 h deployment, there was near-constant river flow and insignificant winds – two main drivers of lotic gas exchange – but we found gas exchange coefficients that varied by several fold. This was presumably caused by the formation and erosion of vertical temperature–density gradients in the surface water driven by the heat flux into or

  10. Soil Gas Sample Handling: Evaluation of Water Removal and Sample Ganging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abrecht, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendoza, Donaldo P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Soil gas sampling is currently conducted in support of Nuclear Test Ban treaty verification. Soil gas samples are collected and analyzed for isotopes of interest. Some issues that can impact sampling and analysis of these samples are excess moisture and sample processing time. Here we discuss three potential improvements to the current sampling protocol; a desiccant for water removal, use of molecular sieve to remove CO2 from the sample during collection, and a ganging manifold to allow composite analysis of multiple samples.

  11. The current investment climate for midstream gas processing assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Topics discussed in this paper dealing with the current investment climate for midstream gas processing assets include: (1) strategic reasons to retain or divest midstream assets, (2) available options for midstream asset divestment, (3) midstream market fundamentals, and (4) financial performance of midstream companies. There are some 700 gas plants in Alberta at present, of which about 20 per cent are owned by midstream companies . About one half of the plants are smaller than 12.5 MMCFD which represent inefficient use of resources; a clear indication that there are substantial opportunities for consolidation. 1 tab., 4 figs

  12. Coupling Effect of Intruding Water and Inherent Gas on Coal Strength Based on the Improved (Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When employing hydraulic processes to increase gas drainage efficiency in underground coal mines, coal seams become a three-phase medium, containing water intruding into the coal pores with the inherent occurrence of gas. This can change the stress state of the coal and cause instability. This work studied the mechanical properties of coal containing water and gas and derived an appropriate failure criterion. Based on mixture theory of unsaturated porous media, the effective stress of coal, considering the interaction of water and gas, was analyzed, and the failure criterion established by combining this with the Mohr–Coulomb criterion. By introducing the stress factor of matrix suction and using fitted curves of experimentally determined matrix suction and moisture content, the relationships between coal strength, gas pressure, and moisture content were determined. To verify the established strength theory, a series of triaxial compression strength tests of coal containing water and gas were carried out on samples taken from the Songzao, Pingdingshan, and Tashan mines in China. The experimental results correlated well with the theoretical predictions. The results showed a linear decrease in the peak strength of coal with increasing gas pressure and an exponential reduction in peak strength with increasing moisture content. The strength theory of coal containing water and gas can become an important part of multiphase medium damage theory.

  13. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E.; Ciccone, A.

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H 2 S, and its combustion product SO 2 . In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H 2 S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs

  14. Vibrations in water-gas heat exchangers. Design and tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, M.; Allard, G.; Vangedhen, A.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown on an example how to make a complete list of the possible vibrations and how to use the data of tests and technical literature to predict damaging vibrations. The water-heavy gas tubular heat-exchanger in case is briefly described. The sources of mechanical excitations are a compressor and earthquake loadings. The various eigenmodes are described and it is shown that no resonance is possible with the compressor and that the effect of the earthquake is negligible. The excitation of the tubes by the gas flow is examined by means of Connors stability criterion; and there is no resonance with the Benard-von Karman vortices. The magnification of this latter excitation by acoustical waves is not to be feared. Satisfactory tests have been carried successively on tubes, on the casing, on the casing plus part of the tubes, on a complete prototype in workshop and in operation on site [fr

  15. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alp, E; Ciccone, A [Concord Environmental Corp., Downsview, ON (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H{sub 2}S, and its combustion product SO{sub 2}. In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H{sub 2}S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs.

  16. Chemical contamination of groundwater at gas processing plants - the past, the present and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrubleski, R.M.; Drury, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    The chemicals used to remove the sour gas components (primarily H 2 S) from raw gas in the sour gas sweetening processes were discussed. The chemicals, mainly amines and physical absorbents, have been found as contaminants in soil and groundwater at several sites. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the behaviour of some of these chemicals. In particular, the contamination by sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA) which originate from the Sulfinol R sweetening process, was discussed. Prior to the mid 1970s wastes from these processes were disposed of on site in landfills that were not engineered for groundwater protection. By the mid 1970s the landfills were closed by capping. Many of the gas plant sites were located on elevated terrain where hydraulic gradient was available for downward movement of groundwater and any chemicals contained within. Contaminant movement in fractured bedrock has also affected drinking water. Ground water monitoring began in the mid 1980s to address environmental concerns, focusing on monitoring for potability, metals and organics. It was discovered that most of the plants using the Sulfinol process had groundwater contaminated with sulfolane levels ranging from 1 ppm to over 800 ppm. A research project was developed to determine the soil interaction parameters and biodegradation behaviour of pure sulfolane and DIPA to provide data in order to predict plume migration. Ecotoxicity tests were also performed to verify toxicity effects of sulfolane, DIPA, reclaimer bottoms and observed biodegradation metabolites to bio-organisms and aquatic life in aquatic receptors. 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  17. Gas permeation process for post combustion CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, Marc

    2017-01-01

    CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a promising solution to separate CO 2 from flue gas, to reduce the CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere, and hence to reduce global warming. In CCS, one important constraint is the high additional energy requirement of the different capture processes. That statement is partly explained by the low CO 2 fraction in the inlet flue gas and the high output targets in terms of CO 2 capture and purity (≥90%). Gas permeation across dense membrane can be used in post combustion CO 2 capture. Gas permeation in a dense membrane is ruled by a mass transfer mechanism and separation performance in a dense membrane are characterized by component's effective permeability and selectivity. One of the newest and encouraging type of membrane in terms of separation performance is the facilitated transport membrane. Each particular type of membrane is defined by a specific mass transfer law. The most important difference to the mass transfer behavior in a dense membrane is related to the facilitated transport mechanism and the solution diffusion mechanism and its restrictions and limitations. Permeation flux modelling across a dense membrane is required to perform a post combustion CO 2 capture process simulation. A CO 2 gas permeation separation process is composed of a two-steps membrane process, one drying step and a compression unit. Simulation on the energy requirement and surface area of the different membrane modules in the global system are useful to determine the benefits of using dense membranes in a post combustion CO 2 capture technology. (author)

  18. Gas and water flow in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J.; Talandier, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding the impact and fate of this gas phase is of significant importance within performance assessment and for the accurate long-term prediction of repository evolution. This paper describes the initial results from an ongoing experimental study to measure the two-phase flow behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Bure underground research laboratory (URL) in France, using the custom-designed BGS permeameter. The primary objectives of the study are to measure: (i) the hydraulic conductivity and intrinsic permeability; (ii) the capillary displacement pressure; (iii) the effective gas permeability and relative permeability to gas for a range of conditions; and (iv) the post-test gas saturation. During testing, the specimen, a cylinder of 54 mm thickness, cut perpendicular to bedding, is subject to an isotropic confining stress, with fluids injected through the base of the specimen. A novel feature of the apparatus is the use of porous annular guard-ring filters around the inflow and outflow filters. The pressures in these two 'guard-rings' can be independently monitored to provide data on the distribution of pressure and anisotropy of the sample. Initial measurements, performed on a specimen orientation perpendicular to the bedding plane, have been divided into three components: re-saturation and consolidation; hydraulic properties; gas behaviour. During the initial period of equilibration, re-saturation of the sample were noted. Net volume change due to re-saturation closely agreed with pre-test geotechnical measurements of water saturation, suggesting the bulk of the gas phase was resident in non-dilatant pores and that the specimen was fully saturated at the onset of testing. A two step consolidation test was then performed with confining pressure raised to 11 MPa for 5 days and then to 12.5 MPa for a further 8 days. Values for drained bulk modulus based on the total volume of fluid

  19. Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dandina N [Baton Rouge, LA

    2012-07-10

    A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

  20. Modelling the radiolysis of RSG-GAS primary cooling water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butarbutar, S. L.; Kusumastuti, R.; Subekti, M.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Water chemistry control for light water coolant reactor required a reliable understanding of radiolysis effect in mitigating corrosion and degradation of reactor structure material. It is known that oxidator products can promote the corrosion, cracking and hydrogen pickup both in the core and in the associated piping components of the reactor. The objective of this work is to provide the radiolysis model of RSG GAS cooling water and further more to predict the oxidator concentration which can lead to corrosion of reactor material. Direct observations or measurements of the chemistry in and around the high-flux core region of a nuclear reactor are difficult due to the extreme conditions of high temperature, pressure, and mixed radiation fields. For this reason, chemical models and computer simulations of the radiolysis of water under these conditions are an important route of investigation. FACSIMILE were used to calculate the concentration of O2 formed at relatively long-time by the pure water γ and neutron irradiation (pH=7) at temperature between 25 and 50 °C. This simulation method is based on a complex chemical reaction kinetic. In this present work, 300 MeV-proton were used to mimic γ-rays radiolysis and 2 MeV fast neutrons. Concentration of O2 were calculated at 10-6 - 106 s time scale.

  1. Biomass fueled closed cycle gas turbine with water injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardi, Silvia [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2001-01-01

    Direct water injection has been studied for a small scale ({approx} 8 MW fuel input) closed cycle gas turbine coupled to a biomass fueled CFB furnace. Two different working fluids have been considered (helium-water mixture and nitrogen-water mixture). The water injection could take place between the compressor stages, as an intercooler, or after the high pressure compressor, as an aftercooler. Both this options have been studied, varying the relative humidity levels after the injection and the temperatures of the injected water. The effect of water injection on thermodynamic properties of the working fluids has been studied, together with its effect on turbomachinery isentropic efficiency. A sensitivity analysis on turbomachinery efficiency and cycle base pressure has been included. The results from this study have been compared to the performance of a dry closed cycle without water injection. The wet cycle shows an electric efficiency in the range 29-32% with helium-water mixture as working fluid and 30-32% with nitrogen-water mixture as working fluid, while the total efficiency (referring to the fuel LHV) is always higher than 100%. In the non-injected cycle the electric efficiency is 30-35% with helium and 32-36 with nitrogen. The total efficiency in the dry case with two level intercooling and postcooling is 87-89%, while is higher than 100% when only one stage inter- and postcooling is present. Aside from this, the study also includes a sizing of the heat exchangers for the different cycle variations. The heat transfer area is very sensible to the working fluid and to the amount of injected water and it's always higher when a nitrogen-water mixture is used. Compared to the cycle without water injection, by the way, the number of heat exchangers is reduced. This will lead to a lower pressure drop and a simpler plant layout. The total heat transfer area, however, is higher in the wet cycle than in the dry cycle.

  2. A relative permeability model to derive fractional-flow functions of water-alternating-gas and surfactant-alternating-gas foam core-floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mossawy, Mohammed Idrees; Demiral, Birol; Raja, D M Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Foam is used in enhanced oil recovery to improve the sweep efficiency by controlling the gas mobility. The surfactant-alternating-gas (SAG) foam process is used as an alternative to the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection. In the WAG technique, the high mobility and the low density of the gas lead the gas to flow in channels through the high permeability zones of the reservoir and to rise to the top of the reservoir by gravity segregation. As a result, the sweep efficiency decreases and there will be more residual oil in the reservoir. The foam can trap the gas in liquid films and reduces the gas mobility. The fractional-flow method describes the physics of immiscible displacements in porous media. Finding the water fractional flow theoretically or experimentally as a function of the water saturation represents the heart of this method. The relative permeability function is the conventional way to derive the fractional-flow function. This study presents an improved relative permeability model to derive the fractional-flow functions for WAG and SAG foam core-floods. The SAG flow regimes are characterized into weak foam, strong foam without a shock front and strong foam with a shock front. (paper)

  3. Technical characterization and economic evaluation of recovery of flare gas in various gas-processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolfaghari, Mohabbat; Pirouzfar, Vahid; Sakhaeinia, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Today in the worldwide quest for production and economic preference, only industries will survive that have proper solutions for waste disposal and environmental pollution. In industrial applications, a blow down network of gases is used in order to control system pressure and safety instruments. At the end of this network, the excess gases are burnt in the flare tower, which have severe consequences on the environment. Different methods have been proposed and several alternatives have been introduced for reduction and recovery of flaring gases. In this paper, three methods including gas to liquid (GTL), gas turbines generation (GTG) and gas to ethylene (GTE) are introduced and compared with the best method from economic point of view being identified. For this purpose, a natural gas sample is taken from Asalloyeh Refinery Plant and the process has been simulated using Aspen HYSYS. Meanwhile, estimation of the capital and operating costs and evaluation of the processes involved were made using Aspen Capital Cost Estimator. According to the results obtained, production of the electric power from flaring gases is one of the most economical methods. GTG method, with an annual profit of about 480e+006 $, has a greater ROR percent. - Highlights: • Three methods including GTL, GTG and GTE are developed for flare gas recovery. • The processes has been simulated using Aspen HYSYS. • Estimation of the capital and operating costs of the processes were made. • According to the results obtained, GTG is one of the most economical methods. • GTE method has the highest annual benefit, it has the lowest ROR percent.

  4. Optimal design issues of a gas-to-liquid process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Interests in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis is increasing rapidly due to the recent improvements of the technology, clean-burning fuels (low sulphur, low aromatics) derived from the FT process and the realization that the process can be used to monetize stranded natural gas resources. The economy of GTL plants depends very much on the natural gas price and there is a strong incentive to reduce the investment cost and in addition there is a need to improve energy efficiency and carbon efficiency. A model is constructed based on the available information in open literature. This model is used to simulate the GTL process with UNISIM DESIGN process simulator. In the FT reactor with cobalt based catalyst, Co2 is inert and will accumulate in the system. Five placements of Co2 removal unit in the GTL process are evaluated from an economical point of view. For each alternative, the process is optimized with respect to steam to carbon ratio, purge ratio of light ends, amount of tail gas recycled to syngas and FT units, reactor volume, and Co2 recovery. The results show that carbon and energy efficiencies and the annual net cash flow of the process with or without Co2 removal unit are not significantly different and there is not much to gain by removing Co2 from the process. It is optimal to recycle about 97 % of the light ends to the process (mainly to the FT unit) to obtain higher conversion of CO and H2 in the reactor. Different syngas configurations in a gas-to-liquid (GTL) plant are studied including auto-thermal reformer (ATR), combined reformer, and series arrangement of Gas Heated Reformer (GHR) and ATR. The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactor is based on cobalt catalyst and the degrees of freedom are; steam to carbon ratio, purge ratio of light ends, amount of tail gas recycled to synthesis gas (syngas) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis units, and reactor volume. The production rate of liquid hydrocarbons is maximized for each syngas configuration. Installing a steam

  5. Inside Story of Gas Processes within Stormwater Biofilters: Does Greenhouse Gas Production Tarnish the Benefits of Nitrogen Removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Emily G I; Pham, Tracey; Cook, Perran L M; Deletic, Ana; Hatt, Belinda E; Fletcher, Tim D

    2017-04-04

    Stormwater biofilters are dynamic environments, supporting diverse processes that act to capture and transform incoming pollutants. However, beneficial water treatment processes can be accompanied by undesirable greenhouse gas production. This study investigated the potential for nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ) generation in dissolved form at the base of laboratory-scale stormwater biofilter columns. The influence of plant presence, species, inflow frequency, and inclusion of a saturated zone and carbon source were studied. Free-draining biofilters remained aerobic with negligible greenhouse gas production during storm events. Designs with a saturated zone were oxygenated at their base by incoming stormwater before anaerobic conditions rapidly re-established, although extended dry periods allowed the reintroduction of oxygen by evapotranspiration. Production of CH 4 and N 2 O in the saturated zone varied significantly in response to plant presence, species, and wetting and drying. Concentrations of N 2 O typically peaked rapidly following stormwater inundation, associated with limited plant root systems and poorer nitrogen removal from biofilter effluent. Production of CH 4 also commenced quickly but continued throughout the anaerobic interevent period and lacked clear relationships with plant characteristics or nitrogen removal performance. Dissolved greenhouse gas concentrations were highly variable, but peak concentrations of N 2 O accounted for nitrogen load. While further work is required to measure surface emissions, the potential for substantial release of N 2 O or CH 4 in biofilter effluent appears relatively low.

  6. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of a novel gas hydrate based CO2 capture process is presented.•Model predicts this process unsuitable for CO2 capture from power station flue gases. A thermodynamic modelling study of both fluid phase behaviour and hydrate phase behaviour is presented for the quaternary system...... of water, tetrahydrofuran, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The applied model incorporates the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state for the fluid phase description and the van der Waals-Platteeuw hydrate model for the solid (hydrate) phase. Six binary pairs are studied for their fluid phase behaviour...... accurate descriptions of both fluid- and hydrate phase equilibria in the studied system and its subsystems. The developed model is applied to simulate two simplified, gas hydrate-based processes for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases. The first process, an unpromoted...

  7. Polymer growth rate in a wire chamber with oxygen, water, or alcohol gas additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarski, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium:isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build-up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water, or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is trapped in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  8. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H(sub 2)S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf(sup SM) (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H(sub 2)S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H(sub 2)S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO(sub 2) at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H(sub 2)S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. In a previous reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H(sub 2)S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H(sub 2)S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H(sub 2)S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change

  9. Statistical dynamics of transient processes in a gas discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of a gas discharge plasma to a great extent depend on random processes whose study has recently become particularly important. The present work is concerned with analyzing the statistical phenomena that occur during the prebreakdown stage in a gas discharge. Unlike other studies of breakdown in the discharge gap, in which secondary electron effects and photon processes at the electrodes must be considered, here the authors treat the case of an electrodeless rf discharge or a laser photoresonant plasma. The analysis is based on the balance between the rates of electron generation and recombination in the plasma. The fluctuation kinetics for ionization of atoms in the hot plasma may also play an important role when the electron temperature changes abruptly, as occurs during adiabatic pinching of the plasma or during electron cyclotron heating

  10. Shell launches its Claus off-gas desulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenendaal, W; van Meurs, H C.A.

    1972-01-01

    The Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization (SFGD) Process was developed for removal of sulfur oxides from flue gases originating from oil-fired boilers or furnaces. It can also be used to remove sulfur dioxide from Claus sulfur recovery tail gases if they are combined with boiler/furnace flue gases. For Claus tail gas only, the Shell Claus off-gas desulfurization process was developed. Claus unit operation and desulfurization by low temperature Claus processes and conversion/concentration processes are discussed. The new Shell process consists of a conversion/concentration process involving a reduction section and an amine absorption section. In the reduction section, all sulfur compounds and free sulfur are completely reduced to hydrogen sulfide with hydrogen, or hydrogen plus carbon monoxide, over a cobalt/molybdenum-on-alumina catalyst at a temperature of about 300/sup 0/C. Extensive bench scale studies on the reduction system have been carried out. A life test of more than 4000 hr showed a stable activity of the reduction catalyst, which means that in commercial units, very long catalyst lives can be expected. The commercial feasibility of the reduction section was further demonstrated in the Godorf refinery of Deutsche Shell AG. More than 80 absorption units using alkanolamine (AIDP) solutions have been installed. Bench scale studies of the ADIP absorption units were compared to commercial experience.The total capital investment of the new Shell process is 0.7, 2.0, and 3.2 $ times 10 to the 6th power for 100, 500, and 1000 tons of sulfur/sd capacity Claus units, respectively. The total operating costs for these units are, respectively, 610, 1930 and 3310 $/stream day. The capital investment corresponds to about 75% of the capital investment of the preceding Claus unit.

  11. An Integrated Approach to Water-Energy Nexus in Shale-Gas Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhil Y. Al-Aboosi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas production is associated with significant usage of fresh water and discharge of wastewater. Consequently, there is a necessity to create proper management strategies for water resources in shale gas production and to integrate conventional energy sources (e.g., shale gas with renewables (e.g., solar energy. The objective of this study is to develop a design framework for integrating water and energy systems including multiple energy sources, the cogeneration process and desalination technologies in treating wastewater and providing fresh water for shale gas production. Solar energy is included to provide thermal power directly to a multi-effect distillation plant (MED exclusively (to be more feasible economically or indirect supply through a thermal energy storage system. Thus, MED is driven by direct or indirect solar energy and excess or direct cogeneration process heat. The proposed thermal energy storage along with the fossil fuel boiler will allow for the dual-purpose system to operate at steady-state by managing the dynamic variability of solar energy. Additionally, electric production is considered to supply a reverse osmosis plant (RO without connecting to the local electric grid. A multi-period mixed integer nonlinear program (MINLP is developed and applied to discretize the operation period to track the diurnal fluctuations of solar energy. The solution of the optimization program determines the optimal mix of solar energy, thermal storage and fossil fuel to attain the maximum annual profit of the entire system. A case study is solved for water treatment and energy management for Eagle Ford Basin in Texas.

  12. Chemical sensors and gas sensors for process control in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.E.

    1988-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the possibilities for chemical measurement of the progress of biotechnological processes which are offered by devices already developed for other demanding applications. It considers the potential use of ultrasonic instrumentation originally developed for the nuclear industry, gas measurement methods from the fields of environmental monitoring and combustion control, nuclear instruments developed for the oil, mining and chemical industries, robotic systems and advanced control techniques. (author)

  13. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosler, J.; Sliter, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  14. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, H. Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N.

    2010-01-01

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface t...

  15. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certificati...

  16. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30

    three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

  17. Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidic, Radisav [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-01-24

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using abandoned mine drainage (AMD) as make- up water for the reuse of produced water for hydraulic fracturing. There is an abundance of AMD sources near permitted gas wells as documented in this study that can not only serve as makeup water and reduce the demand on high quality water resources but can also as a source of chemicals to treat produced water prior to reuse. The assessment of AMD availability for this purpose based on proximity and relevant regulations was accompanied by bench- and pilot-scale studies to determine optimal treatment to achieve desired water quality for use in hydraulic fracturing. Sulfate ions that are often present in AMD at elevated levels will react with Ba²⁺ and Sr²⁺ in produced water to form insoluble sulfate compounds. Both membrane microfiltration and gravity separation were evaluated for the removal of solids formed as a result of mixing these two impaired waters. Laboratory studies revealed that neither AMD nor barite formed in solution had significant impact on membrane filtration but that some produced waters contained submicron particles that can cause severe fouling of microfiltration membrane. Coagulation/flocculation was found to be an effective process for the removal of suspended solids and both bench- and pilot-scale studies revealed that optimal process conditions can consistently achieve the turbidity of the finished water below 5 NTU. Adjusting the blending ratio of AMD and produced water can achieve the desired effluent sulfate concentration that can be accurately predicted by chemical thermodynamics. Co-treatment of produced water and AMD will result in elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the solid waste generated in this process due to radium co-precipitation with barium sulfate. Laboratory studies revealed that the mobility of barite that may form in the subsurface due to the presence of sulfate in the fracturing fluid can be

  18. Innovative in-line separators: removal of water or sand in oil/water and gas/liquid/solid pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, Paul; Cheolho Kang; Gopal, Madan [CC Technologies, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2003-07-01

    In oil and gas production, multiphase mixtures are often separated before downstream processing. The separators are large, often 20 - 40 feet long and large diameter and use sophisticated internals. The costs are in the millions of dollars. Further, the sand and water in the flow can cause severe internal erosion and corrosion respectively before the flow reaches the separators. The CC Technologies/MIST In line Separation System is a cost-effective, efficient device for use in multiphase environments. The device is applicable for gas/solid, gas/liquid/solid and oil/water systems and offers exceptional separation between phases for a fraction of the cost of expensive gravity separators and hydro cyclones. The System contains no moving parts and is designed to be of the same diameter as the pipe, and experiences low shear forces. It can be fabricated with standard pipes. The efficiency of the separator has been determined in an industrial scale, pilot plant test facility at CC Technologies in 4-inch diameter pipes and has been found to be in excess of 98-99% for the removal of sand. Two phase oil/water separation effectiveness is in excess of 90% in 1-stage and 95% in 2 - stage. (author)

  19. Performance analysis of solar energy integrated with natural-gas-to-methanol process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sheng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yifan; Chen, Qianqian; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar energy integrated with natural-gas-to-methanol process is proposed. • The two processes are modeled and simulated. • Performance analysis of the two processes are conducted. • The proposed process can cut down the greenhouse gas emission. • The proposed process can save natural gas consumption. - Abstract: Methanol is an important platform chemical. Methanol production using natural gas as raw material has short processing route and well developed equipment and technology. However, natural gas reserves are not large in China. Solar energy power generation system integrated with natural-gas-to-methanol (NGTM) process is developed, which may provide a technical routine for methanol production in the future. The solar energy power generation produces electricity for reforming unit and system consumption in solar energy integrated natural-gas-to-methanol system (SGTM). Performance analysis of conventional natural-gas-to-methanol process and solar energy integrated with natural-gas-to-methanol process are presented based on simulation results. Performance analysis was conducted considering carbon efficiency, production cost, solar energy price, natural gas price, and carbon tax. Results indicate that solar energy integrated with natural-gas-to-methanol process is able to cut down the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. In addition, solar energy can replace natural gas as fuel. This can reduce the consumption of natural gas, which equals to 9.2% of the total consumed natural gas. However, it is not economical considering the current technology readiness level, compared with conventional natural-gas-to-methanol process.

  20. Modelling of Convective Process of Water Desorption from Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakic, M.; Nikolic, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model developed to evaluate the influence of structural and operational factors on convective dehydration process (desorption of liquid phase from capillary-porous material), as well as the possibility to utilize this model for the case of water desorption from polystyrene cation resin CG-8. The model accounts for unsteady one-dimensional simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the gas (air) and the solid phase (resin). The identification of effective transport properties for the considered fixed bed of material (resin CG 8) is discussed. To this purpose available data from the literature are used. (author)

  1. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O. Cadena-Pereda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  2. Automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0-100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  3. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  4. Waste heat gas utilization for HTGR gas turbine plant for sea water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis is performed for a HTGR - Gas Turbine Plant, coupled with a Rankine cycle for additional power generation and/or desalination of sea water with a multistage flash evaporator. Three basic alternatives are studied: a) Brayton cycle with inter-cooling and without regeneration, coupled with a Rankine cycle for power generation and steam for evaporator. b) Same as a) but without inter-cooling and with regeneration. c) Brayton cycle with regeneration, without inter-cooling, coupled with a Rankine cycle for sea water evaporator steam generation. The behavior of the three alternatives is established with a parametric study for the most representative variables. Economy, safety and control aspects were considered for the three different conceptions. (Author) [pt

  5. Glovebox atmosphere detritiation process using gas separation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Digabel, M.; Truan, P.A.; Ducret, D.; Laquerbe, C.; Perriat, P.; Niepce, J.C.; Pelletier, T.

    2003-01-01

    The use of gas separation membranes in atmospheric detritiation systems has been studied. The main advantage of this new process is to reduce the number and/or the size of the equipment in comparison to conventional tritium removal systems. Owing to the constraints linked to tritium handling, the separation performances of several commercial hollow fiber organic membranes have been analyzed, under various operating conditions, with hydrogen/nitrogen or deuterium/nitrogen mixtures. The experiments are performed with small quantities of hydrogen or deuterium (5000 ppm). The experimental results allow to evaluate the separation efficiency of these membranes and to determine the appropriate operating conditions to apply to a membrane detritiation process

  6. Novel design of LNG (liquefied natural gas) reliquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, S., E-mail: s.baek@kaist.ac.kr [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, G.; Lee, C. [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, S., E-mail: skjeong@kaist.ac.kr [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, D. [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ship/Plant System R and D Team, Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd., 1, Ajoo, Koje, Kyungnam 656-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} We performed experiments with LN2 to mock up the new LNG reliquefaction process. {yields} Subcooled liquid goes to heat exchanger, heater, and phase separator. {yields} Reliquefaction occurs when vapor enters heat exchanger and verified by experiments. {yields} Reliquefaction ratio increases when subcooling degree or system pressure increases. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of novel LNG reliquefaction process where the cold exergy of subcooled LNG is utilized to recondense the vaporized light component of LNG after it is separated from the heavier component in a phase separator. The regeneration of cold exergy is especially effective as well as important in thermodynamic sense when a cryogenic process is involved. To verify the proposed idea, we performed an experimental study by facilitating liquid nitrogen apparatus to mock up the LNG reliquefaction process. Subcooled liquid nitrogen is produced for a commercial transportation container with a house-made atmospheric liquid nitrogen heat exchanger and then, having subooled degree of up to 19 K, it simulates the behavior of subcooled LNG in the lab-scale reliquefaction experiment. Recondensation of the vaporized gas is possible by using the cold exergy of subcooled liquid in a properly fabricated heat exchanger. Effect of heat exchanger performance factor and degree of subcooling on recondensation portion has been discussed in this paper. It is concluded that utilizing pressurized subcooled liquid that is obtained by liquid pump can surely reduce the pumping power of the vaporized natural gas and save the overall energy expenditure in LNG reliquefaction process.

  7. Novel design of LNG (liquefied natural gas) reliquefaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, S.; Hwang, G.; Lee, C.; Jeong, S.; Choi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We performed experiments with LN2 to mock up the new LNG reliquefaction process. → Subcooled liquid goes to heat exchanger, heater, and phase separator. → Reliquefaction occurs when vapor enters heat exchanger and verified by experiments. → Reliquefaction ratio increases when subcooling degree or system pressure increases. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of novel LNG reliquefaction process where the cold exergy of subcooled LNG is utilized to recondense the vaporized light component of LNG after it is separated from the heavier component in a phase separator. The regeneration of cold exergy is especially effective as well as important in thermodynamic sense when a cryogenic process is involved. To verify the proposed idea, we performed an experimental study by facilitating liquid nitrogen apparatus to mock up the LNG reliquefaction process. Subcooled liquid nitrogen is produced for a commercial transportation container with a house-made atmospheric liquid nitrogen heat exchanger and then, having subooled degree of up to 19 K, it simulates the behavior of subcooled LNG in the lab-scale reliquefaction experiment. Recondensation of the vaporized gas is possible by using the cold exergy of subcooled liquid in a properly fabricated heat exchanger. Effect of heat exchanger performance factor and degree of subcooling on recondensation portion has been discussed in this paper. It is concluded that utilizing pressurized subcooled liquid that is obtained by liquid pump can surely reduce the pumping power of the vaporized natural gas and save the overall energy expenditure in LNG reliquefaction process.

  8. The role of process intensification in cutting greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reay, David

    2008-01-01

    Between 1900 and 1955 the average rate of global energy use rose from about 1 TW to 2 TW. Between 1955 and 1999 energy use rose from 2 TW to about 12 TW, and to 2006 a further 16% growth in primary energy use was recorded world-wide. There are recommendations by the UK Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, subsequently supported by others in the UK, that we need to reduce CO 2 emissions by over 50% in order to stabilise their impact on global warming (CO 2 being the principal gas believed to be contributing to this phenomenon). One way in which we can address this is by judicious use of process intensification technology. Process intensification may be defined as: 'Any engineering development that leads to a substantially smaller, cleaner, safer and more energy-efficient technology.' It is most often characterised by a huge reduction in plant volume - orders of magnitude - but its contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions may also be significant. Potential energy savings due to investment in process intensification were studied by several UK organisations in the mid 1990s, to assist the UK Government in formulating a strategy on intensification. It is relevant to the themes of the PRES 07 Conference that process integration features in these analyses. Overall plant intensification in the UK was identified as having a technical potential of 40 PJ/year (about 1 million tonnes of oil equivalent/annum). The total potential energy savings due to investment in process intensification in a range of process unit operations were predicted to be over 74 PJ/year (1 PJ = 10 15 J). Projections for The Netherlands suggest that savings of 50-100 PJ/year should be achieved across chemicals and food processing by 2050. Substantial benefits to industry in the USA are highlighted by US Department of Energy studies. This paper relates by discussion and example process intensification to the main themes of the PRES 07 Conference, including process integration. It also

  9. Diurnal Variation in Gas Exchange: The Balance between Carbon Fixation and Water Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jack S A; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere R M; Lawson, Tracy

    2017-06-01

    Stomatal control of transpiration is critical for maintaining important processes, such as plant water status, leaf temperature, as well as permitting sufficient CO 2 diffusion into the leaf to maintain photosynthetic rates ( A ). Stomatal conductance often closely correlates with A and is thought to control the balance between water loss and carbon gain. It has been suggested that a mesophyll-driven signal coordinates A and stomatal conductance responses to maintain this relationship; however, the signal has yet to be fully elucidated. Despite this correlation under stable environmental conditions, the responses of both parameters vary spatially and temporally and are dependent on species, environment, and plant water status. Most current models neglect these aspects of gas exchange, although it is clear that they play a vital role in the balance of carbon fixation and water loss. Future efforts should consider the dynamic nature of whole-plant gas exchange and how it represents much more than the sum of its individual leaf-level components, and they should take into consideration the long-term effect on gas exchange over time. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Melt quenching and coolability by water injection from below: Co-injection of water and non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dae H.; Page, Richard J.; Abdulla, Sherif H.; Anderson, Mark H.; Klockow, Helge B.; Corradini, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of our work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University via test and analyses. In this paper, experiments on melt quenching by the injection of water from below are addressed. The test section represented one-dimensional flow-channel simulation of the bottom injection of water into a core melt in the reactor cavity. The melt simulant was molten lead or a lead alloy (Pb-Bi). For the experimental conditions employed (i.e., melt depth and water flow rates), it was found that: (1) the volumetric heat removal rate increased with increasing water mass flow rate and (2) the non-condensable gas mixed with the injected water had no impairing effect on the overall heat removal rate. Implications of these current experimental findings for ALWR ex-vessel coolability are discussed

  11. Thermodynamic and Process Modelling of Gas Hydrate Systems in CO2 Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen

    A novel gas separation technique based on gas hydrate formation (solid precipitation) is investigated by means of thermodynamic modeling and experimental investigations. This process has previously been proposed for application in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases...... formation may be performed at pressures of approximately 20 MPa and temperatures below 280 K. Thermodynamic promoters are needed, to reduce the pressure requirement of the process, thereby making it competitive to existing capture technologies. A literature study is presented focusing mainly...... on thermodynamic gas hydrate promotion by hydrate formers stabilising the classical gas clathrate hydrate structures (sI, sII and sH) at low to moderate pressures. Much literature is available on this subject. Both experimental and theoretical studies presented in the literature have pointed out cyclopentane...

  12. Landfill gas (LFG) processing via adsorption and alkanolamine absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Ankur; Park, Jin-Won; Song, Ho-Jun; Park, Jong-Jin [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Maken, Sanjeev [Department of Chemistry, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal-131 039, Haryana (India)

    2010-06-15

    Landfill gas (LFG) was upgraded to pure methane using the adsorption and absorption processes. Different toxic compounds like aromatics and chlorinated compounds were removed using granular activated carbon. The activated carbon adsorbed toxic trace components in the following order: carbon tetrachloride > toluene > chloroform > xylene > ethylbenzene > benzene > trichloroethylene {approx} tetrachloroethylene. After removing all trace components, the gas was fed to absorption apparatus for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Two alkanolamines, monoethanol amine (MEA) and diethanol amine (DEA) were used for the removal of CO{sub 2} from LFG. The maximum CO{sub 2} loading is obtained for 30 wt.% MEA which is around 2.9 mol L{sup -} {sup 1} of absorbent solution whereas for same concentration of DEA it is around 1.66 mol L {sup -} {sup 1} of solution. 30 wt% MEA displayed a higher absorption rate of around 6.64 x 10{sup -} {sup 5} mol L{sup -} {sup 1} min{sup -} {sup 1}. DEA displayed a higher desorption rate and a better cyclic capacity as compared to MEA. Methane obtained from this process can be further used in the natural gas network for city. (author)

  13. Water Supply Treatment Sustainability of Panching Water Supply Treatment Process - Water Footprint Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Edriyana A.; Malek, Marlinda Abdul; Moni, Syazwan N.; Zulkifli, Nabil F.; Hadi, Iqmal H.

    2018-03-01

    In many parts of the world, freshwater is scarce and overexploited. The purpose of this study is to determine the water footprint of Water Supply Treatment Process (WSTP) at Panching Water Treatment Plant (WTP) as well as to identify the sustainability of the Sg. Kuantan as an intake resource due to the effect of land use development. The total water footprint (WF) will be calculated by using WF accounting manual. The results obtained shows that the water intake resource is still available but it is believed that it will not be able to cope with the increasing WF. The increment of water demand percentage by 1.8% from 2015 to 2016 has increased 11 times higher of the water footprint percentage, 19.9%. This result shows that the water consumption during the water supply treatment process is two times higher than the demand thus it shows the inefficient of the water management

  14. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  15. Globally significant greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Bouillon, Steven

    2017-04-01

    The relevance of inland waters to global biogeochemical cycles is increasingly recognized, and of particular importance is their contribution of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. The latter remain largely unreported in African inland waters. Here we report dissolved CO2, CH4 and N2O from 12 rivers in Sub-Saharan Africa acquired during >30 field expeditions and additional seasonally resolved sampling at >30 sites between 2006 and 2014. Fluxes were calculated from reported gas transfer velocity values, and upscaled using available spatial datasets, with an estimated uncertainty of about ±19%. CO2 equivalent emissions ( 0.4±0.1 PgC yr-1) match 2/3 of the overall net carbon sink previously reported for Africa. Including emissions from wetlands of the Congo, the putative total emission ( 0.9±0.1 PgC yr-1) is about half of the global oceanic or land carbon sinks. In-situ respiration supported <14% of riverine CO2 emissions, which must therefore largely be driven by mineralization in wetlands or uplands. Riverine CO2 and CH4 emissions were directly correlated to wetland coverage and aboveground vegetation biomass, implying that future changes in wetland and upland vegetation cover will strongly impact GHG emissions from African inland waters.

  16. Process for dehydration of oregano using propane gas as fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Velásquez-Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes two important issues, the first is the process to design, implement and validate a mechanical dryer of oregano, using propane gas as fuel, and the second is the cost of the process of dehydrated, taking into account the cost of electric energy consumption by the fan and the cost of propane gas consumption by the heat exchanger. To achieve this, it was necessary review the state of the art and the study of the raw material (oregano, were established as premises of design the necessary technical specifications and the variables involved in the process, using conceptual methods and simulation to ensure that it complies with the ISO standard 7925:1999, which defines the requirements for the marketing of dried oregano and processed. Emphasis was made on the percentage of moisture that is 10%, the moisture of the product was found by the azeotropic distillation method, subsequently was validated the functionality and efficiency, comparing the results from an experimental design, then it was obtained the drying curve of oregano with the prototype of drying and it was checked if it meets ISO 7925:1999 standard and the NTC 4423 standard in order to obtain a final product dehydrated with the percentage of humidity appropriate.

  17. Distinguishing the Source of Natural Gas Accumulations with a Combined Gas and Co-produced Formation Water Geochemical Approach: a Case Study from the Appalachian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the use of gas and co-produced formation water geochemistry for identifying the source of natural gas and present gas geochemistry for the northern Appalachian Basin.

  18. Process and system for treating waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Douglas E.; Shuckrow, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

  19. Greenhouse gas and energy co-benefits of water conservation[Water Sustainability Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, C.

    2009-03-15

    Energy is needed to deliver water to, within and from communities to remove contaminants from water and wastewater, and to heat water in homes. The interconnections between water and energy are referred to as the water-energy nexus. Large volumes of water are needed to generate energy, notably to power turbines, to cool thermal or nuclear energy plants, and to extract oil from tar sands. At the same time, large amounts of energy are needed to pump, treat, heat and distribute water for urban, industrial and agricultural use and to collect and treat the resulting wastewater. The two sides of the water-energy nexus are generating new research and policy proposals to address the challenges of climate change, energy security and increasing water scarcity. This report demonstrated that a large untapped opportunity exists for water conservation to reduce energy, municipal costs and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The water-energy research in this study was based on a Soft Path for Water approach that incorporated facets of water demand management while moving beyond a short-term focus on cost-benefit criteria to examine how the services currently provided by water can be delivered to meet the need for economic, social and ecological sustainability. Although the research was conducted using data for municipalities in Ontario, the report is relevant to the rest of Canada and much of North America. Water conservation strategies included water efficiency measures such as high efficiency toilets and washing machines, as well as water saving measures such as xeriscaping and rainwater harvesting. The objectives of the study were to quantify the energy use associated with each component of the urban water use cycle and to determine the potential for energy and GHG emissions reductions associated with water conservation strategies. This report provided an overview of energy inputs needed for water provision. It outlined the methodology used to achieve the project objectives and

  20. Gas chromatographic measurement in water-steam circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschetke, J.; Nieder, R.

    1984-01-01

    A gas chromatographic technique for measurements in water-steam circuits, which has been well known for many years, has been improved by design modifications. A new type of equipment developed for special measuring tasks on nuclear engineering plant also has a general application. To date measurements have been carried out on the ''Otto Hahn'' nuclear powered ship, on the KNK and AVR experimental nuclear power plants at Karlsruhe and Juelich respectively and on experimental boiler circuits. The measurements at the power plants were carried out under different operating conditions. In addition measurements during the alkali operating mode and during combined cycle operation were carried out on the AVR reactor. It has been possible to draw new conclusion from the many measurements undertaken. (orig.) [de

  1. Entropy Generation Minimization for Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design and optimization for reverse water gas shift (RWGS reactors is particularly important to fuel synthesis in naval or commercial scenarios. The RWGS reactor with irreversibilities of heat transfer, chemical reaction and viscous flow is studied based on finite time thermodynamics or entropy generation minimization theory in this paper. The total entropy generation rate (EGR in the RWGS reactor with different boundary conditions is minimized subject to specific feed compositions and chemical conversion using optimal control theory, and the optimal configurations obtained are compared with three reference reactors with linear, constant reservoir temperature and constant heat flux operations, which are commonly used in engineering. The results show that a drastic EGR reduction of up to 23% can be achieved by optimizing the reservoir temperature profile, the inlet temperature of feed gas and the reactor length simultaneously, compared to that of the reference reactor with the linear reservoir temperature. These optimization efforts are mainly achieved by reducing the irreversibility of heat transfer. Optimal paths have subsections of relatively constant thermal force, chemical force and local EGR. A conceptual optimal design of sandwich structure for the compact modular reactor is proposed, without elaborate control tools or excessive interstage equipment. The results can provide guidelines for designing industrial RWGS reactors in naval or commercial scenarios.

  2. Review of hydrofracking, the environmental pollution and some new methods may be used to skip the water in fracking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.

    2013-12-01

    Shale gas is natural gas that is found trapped within shale formations. And it has become an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States since start of this century. Because shales ordinarily have insufficient permeability to allow significant fluid flow to a well bore, so gas production in commercial quantities requires fractures to provide permeability. Usually, the shale gas boom is due to modern technology in hydraulic fracturing to create extensive artificial fractures around well bores. In the same time, horizontal drilling is often used with shale gas wells, to create maximum borehole surface area in contact with shale. However, the extraction and use of shale gas can affect the environment through the leaking of extraction into water supplies, and the pollution caused by improper processing of natural gas. The challenge to prevent pollution is that shale gas extractions varies widely even in the two wells that in the same project. What's more, the enormous amounts of water will be needed for drilling, while some of the largest sources of shale gas are found in deserts. So if we can find some technologies to substitute the water in the fracking process, we will not only solve the environmental problems, but also the water supply issues. There are already some methods that have been studied for this purpose, like the CO2 fracking process by Tsuyoshi Ishida et al. I will also propose our new method called air-pressure system for fracking the shales without using water in the fracking process at last.

  3. Code of practice for the release of hydrostatic test water from hydrostatic testing of petroleum liquid and gas pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This booklet describes a series of administrative procedures regarding the code of practice in Alberta for the release of hydrostatic test water from hydrostatic testing of petroleum liquid and gas pipelines. The topics covered include the registration process, the type and quality of water to use during the test, and the analytical methods to be used. Reporting schedule and record keeping information are also covered. Schedule 1 discusses the requirements for the release of hydrostatic test water to land, while Schedule 2 describes the requirements for the release of hydrostatic test water to receiving water. 3 tabs

  4. Water Transfer Characteristics during Methane Hydrate Formation Processes in Layered Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousheng Deng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate formation processes in porous media are always accompanied by water transfer. To study the transfer characteristics comprehensively, two kinds of layered media consisting of coarse sand and loess were used to form methane hydrate in them. An apparatus with three PF-meter sensors detecting water content and temperature changes in media during the formation processes was applied to study the water transfer characteristics. It was experimentally observed that the hydrate formation configurations in different layered media were similar; however, the water transfer characteristics and water conversion ratios were different.

  5. Densification behavior of gas and water atomized 316L stainless steel powder during selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruidi; Shi, Yusheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Li; Liu, Jinhui; Jiang, Wei

    2010-04-01

    The densification during selective laser melting (SLM) process is an important factor determining the final application of SLM-part. In the present work, the densifications under different processing conditions were investigated and the densification mechanisms were elucidated. It was found that the higher laser power, lower scan speed, narrower hatch spacing and thinner layer thickness could enable a much smoother melting surface and consequently a higher densification. The gas atomized powder possessed better densification than water atomized powder, due to the lower oxygen content and higher packing density of gas atomized powder. A large number of regular-shaped pores can be generated at a wider hatch spacing, even if the scanning track is continuous and wetted very well. The densification mechanisms were addressed and the methods for building dense metal parts were also proposed as follows: inhibiting the balling phenomenon, increasing the overlap ratio of scanning tracks and reducing the micro-cracks.

  6. Investigation of produced waters radioactivity of oil and gas deposits in the Dnieper-Donets province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plyatsuk L. D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of radioactive pollution of produced waters, oilfield equipment, oil-contaminated soils and sludge is widely spread and differs within the various oil and gas regions. Formation waters contained radioactive element isotopes become the significant source and cause of elevated level of equivalent dose power and as a consequence, an increase in the incidence among the population. The author's idea is formulation of specific recommendations on the decontamination of the investigated objects by conducting the necessary appropriate experimental studies. The purpose of the article is to determine the content of radionuclides, γ- and α-emitters in technogenic objects of Bugruvate oil and gas fields, and to reveal the relationship with the features of mineralogical composition, geological structure and technological process. The γ-spectrometric analysis was used to determine the radionuclide composition of the natural radiators of the 238U (226Ra, 214Pо, 214Bi and 232Th (228Ac, 212Pb, 212Вi series in samples of technological sludge, oil, individual soil samples and water. The content of radionuclides of α-emitters was determined using separate radiochemical techniques. It was investigated that the radioactivity of the formation water is mainly determined by 226Ra and 228Ra and the products of their decay.

  7. Acid gas control process and apparatus for waste fired incinerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, P.Z.; Stepan, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for reducing noxious emission produced in a waste material incinerator. It comprises incinerating solid waste material in a furnace section of the waste material incinerator; providing an additive to an additive supply storage unit; conveying the additive to an additive injection means that communicates with the furnace section of the waste material incinerator; injecting the additive into a turbulent reaction zone of the furnace section such that acid gas content, acid dewpoint temperature and the level of corrosion in the incinerator are reduced

  8. The primary processes by impact of ionizing radiations with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Znamirovschi, V.; Mastan, I.; Cozar, O.

    1976-01-01

    The problem concerning primary processes in radiolysis of water is discussed. The results on the excitation and ionization of water molecule, dissociation of the parent-molecular ion of water and dissociation of excited molecule of water are presented. (author)

  9. Prediction of water formation temperature in natural gas dehydrators using radial basis function (RBF neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatar Afshin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Raw natural gases usually contain water. It is very important to remove the water from these gases through dehydration processes due to economic reasons and safety considerations. One of the most important methods for water removal from these gases is using dehydration units which use Triethylene glycol (TEG. The TEG concentration at which all water is removed and dew point characteristics of mixture are two important parameters, which should be taken into account in TEG dehydration system. Hence, developing a reliable and accurate model to predict the performance of such a system seems to be very important in gas engineering operations. This study highlights the use of intelligent modeling techniques such as Multilayer perceptron (MLP and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF-ANN to predict the equilibrium water dew point in a stream of natural gas based on the TEG concentration of stream and contractor temperature. Literature data set used in this study covers temperatures from 10 °C to 80 °C and TEG concentrations from 90.000% to 99.999%. Results showed that both models are accurate in prediction of experimental data and the MLP model gives more accurate predictions compared to RBF model.

  10. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  11. Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

  12. The impact of the Vancouver Island natural gas pipeline construction on water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gaoshe.

    1993-04-01

    A study was initiated to evaluate the impact of construction of the Vancouver Island natural gas pipeline on water quality, where the pipeline passed along or through lakes and streams. The main concern was for the potential defilement of community water supplies when construction occurred in community watersheds. When water becomes turbid from rainfall runoff passing through construction areas, disinfection processes are rendered inefficacious and at specified turbidity levels, the water becomes too risky to drink without alternative disinfection such as boiling. The weekly environmental surveillance reports generated during construction are reviewed. The material is organized to relate construction practices with weather patterns, thereby showing the resultant effects on water quality (turbidity). The effectiveness of construction measures in reducing the risk of contamination and water turbidity at intakes is assessed. Generally, water turbidity during project construction was acceptable although it sometimes reached very high levels. These high levels resulted from incidents or mistakes that were usually related to rainy days. Among the 12 types of work activity, bridge construction, drilling, and grading caused relatively slight increases in water turbidity levels, while backfilling and ditching caused the greatest increase in turbidity. Improvements in inspection and monitoring programs are recommended. A key recommendation is that construction work be stopped on rainy days. 6 refs., 4 figs., 20 tabs

  13. A comparative economic assessment of hydrogen production from coke oven gas, water electrolysis and steam reforming of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Y.V.; Ngo, Y.A.; Tinkler, M.J.; Cowan, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the comparative economics of producing hydrogen for the hydrogen economy by recovering it from waste gases from the steel industry, by water electrolysis and by conventional steam reforming of natural gas. Steel makers produce coke for their blast furnace operation by baking coal at high temperature in a reduced environment in their coke ovens. These ovens produce a coke oven gas from the volatiles in the coal. The gas, containing up to 60% hydrogen, is commonly used for its heating value with some of it being flared. The feasibility of recovering this hydrogen from the gas will be presented. A comparison of this opportunity with that of hydrogen from water electrolysis using low cost off-peak electricity from nuclear energy will be made. The impact of higher daily average electricity rate in Ontario will be discussed. The benefits of these opportunities compared with those from conventional steam reforming of natural gas will be highlighted. (author)

  14. Modeling of gas flow and deposition profile in HWCVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflug, Andreas; Höfer, Markus; Harig, Tino; Armgardt, Markus; Britze, Chris; Siemers, Michael; Melzig, Thomas; Schäfer, Lothar

    2015-11-30

    Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is a powerful technology for deposition of high quality films on large area, where drawbacks of plasma based technology such as defect generation by ion bombardment and high equipment costs are omitted. While processes for diamond coatings using H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} as precursor have been investigated in detail since 1990 and have been transferred to industry, research also focuses on silicon based coatings with H{sub 2}, SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} as process gases. HWCVD of silicon based coatings is a promising alternative for state-of-the-art radiofrequency-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors. The film formation in HWCVD results from an interaction of several concurrent chemical reactions such as gas phase chemistry, film deposition, abstraction of surplus hydrogen bonds and etching by atomic hydrogen. Since there is no easy relation between process parameters and resulting deposition profiles, substantial experimental effort is required to optimize the process for a given film specification and the desired film uniformity. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms and to enable an efficient way of process optimization, simulation methods come into play. While diamond deposition occurs at pressures in the range of several kPa HWCVD deposition of Si based coatings operates at pressures in the 0.1–30 Pa range. In this pressure regime, particle based simulation methods focused on solving the Boltzmann equation are computationally feasible. In comparison to computational fluid dynamics this yields improved accuracy even near small gaps or orifices, where characteristic geometric dimensions approach the order of the mean free path of gas molecules. At Fraunhofer IST, a parallel implementation of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method extended by a reactive wall chemistry model is developed. To demonstrate the feasibility of three-dimensional simulation of HWCVD processes

  15. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [fr

  16. Modeling the Gas Nitriding Process of Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Zimmerman, C.; Donahue, D.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    The effort to simulate the nitriding process has been ongoing for the last 20 years. Most of the work has been done to simulate the nitriding process of pure iron. In the present work a series of experiments have been done to understand the effects of the nitriding process parameters such as the nitriding potential, temperature, and time as well as surface condition on the gas nitriding process for the steels. The compound layer growth model has been developed to simulate the nitriding process of AISI 4140 steel. In this paper the fundamentals of the model are presented and discussed including the kinetics of compound layer growth and the determination of the nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone. The excellent agreements have been achieved for both as-washed and pre-oxided nitrided AISI 4140 between the experimental data and simulation results. The nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone is determined to be constant and only depends on the nitriding temperature, which is ~5 × 10-9 cm2/s at 548 °C. It proves the concept of utilizing the compound layer growth model in other steels. The nitriding process of various steels can thus be modeled and predicted in the future.

  17. Fracture lines: will Canada's water be protected in the rush to develop shale gas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfitt, Ben [Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    By combining hydraulic fracking with horizontal drilling, the gas industry has been able to unlock significant amounts of natural gas trapped inside deep and densely packed shale rock. The exploitation of shale gas has been a remarkable revolution in the last decade, going from hardly any production in 2000 to 20% of the United States' gas production in 2010. This cheap and abundant resource has been referred to as a game changer by North American industries and governments. However concerns about water usage and groundwater contamination have been raised. Indeed, the shale gas industry is responsible for the contamination of about 1,000 water wells and has been criticized for its important water withdrawals. This report intends to present the effects of shale gas production on the water supplies in Canada. It reviews the state of groundwater mapping in shale rich regions and reviews regulatory frameworks to determine if they are sufficient to protect water resources.

  18. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of

  19. Chemical contamination of groundwater at gas processing plants - the past, the present and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrubleski, R.M.; Drury, C.R. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Calgary Research Centre; Sevigny, J.H. [Komex Consultants Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The chemicals used to remove the sour gas components (primarily H{sub 2}S) from raw gas in the sour gas sweetening processes were discussed. The chemicals, mainly amines and physical absorbents, have been found as contaminants in soil and groundwater at several sites. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the behaviour of some of these chemicals. In particular, the contamination by sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA) which originate from the Sulfinol{sup R} sweetening process, was discussed. Prior to the mid 1970s wastes from these processes were disposed of on site in landfills that were not engineered for groundwater protection. By the mid 1970s the landfills were closed by capping. Many of the gas plant sites were located on elevated terrain where hydraulic gradient was available for downward movement of groundwater and any chemicals contained within. Contaminant movement in fractured bedrock has also affected drinking water. Ground water monitoring began in the mid 1980s to address environmental concerns, focusing on monitoring for potability, metals and organics. It was discovered that most of the plants using the Sulfinol process had groundwater contaminated with sulfolane levels ranging from 1 ppm to over 800 ppm. A research project was developed to determine the soil interaction parameters and biodegradation behaviour of pure sulfolane and DIPA to provide data in order to predict plume migration. Ecotoxicity tests were also performed to verify toxicity effects of sulfolane, DIPA, reclaimer bottoms and observed biodegradation metabolites to bio-organisms and aquatic life in aquatic receptors. 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  20. Process for generating substitute natural gas. Verfahren zur Erzeugung von Erdgasersatzgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerschmidt, D

    1984-09-13

    The invention deals with a process for the production of a substitute for natural gas from coal gas or other feed gases containing hydrogen and methane. For a simpler and economically more efficient process it is suggested to separate the feed gas, purified or unpurified, by selection of the molar sieve in a PSA plant so that the sweep gas of the PSA plant can reach the quality of a substitute gas. (orig.).

  1. Measurements of gas parameters in plasma-assisted supersonic combustion processes using diode laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, Mikhail A; Kuritsyn, Yu A; Liger, V V; Mironenko, V R; Leonov, S B; Yarantsev, D A

    2009-01-01

    We report a procedure for temperature and water vapour concentration measurements in an unsteady-state combustion zone using diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The procedure involves measurements of the absorption spectrum of water molecules around 1.39 μm. It has been used to determine hydrogen combustion parameters in M = 2 gas flows in the test section of a supersonic wind tunnel. The relatively high intensities of the absorption lines used have enabled direct absorption measurements. We describe a differential technique for measurements of transient absorption spectra, the procedure we used for primary data processing and approaches for determining the gas temperature and H 2 O concentration in the probed zone. The measured absorption spectra are fitted with spectra simulated using parameters from spectroscopic databases. The combustion-time-averaged (∼50 ms) gas temperature and water vapour partial pressure in the hot wake region are determined to be 1050 K and 21 Torr, respectively. The large signal-to-noise ratio in our measurements allowed us to assess the temporal behaviour of these parameters. The accuracy in our temperature measurements in the probed zone is ∼40 K. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Impact of Shale Gas Development on Water Resource in Fuling, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Huang, Xianjin; Yang, Qinyuan; Tu, Jianjun

    2015-04-01

    As a low-carbon energy, shale gas rapidly developed in U.S. in last years due to the innovation of the technique of hydraulic fracture, or fracking. Shale gas boom produces more gas with low price and reduced the reliance on fuel import. To follow the American shale gas success, China made an ambitious plan of shale gas extraction, 6.5 billion m3 by 2015. To extract shale gas, huge amount water is needed to inject into each gas well. This will intensify the competition of water use between industry, agricultural and domestic sectors. It may finally exacerbate the water scarcity in China. After the extraction, some water was returned to the ground. Without adequate treatment, the flowback water can introduce heavy metal, acids, pesticides, and other toxic material into water and land. This may inevitably worsen the water and land contamination. This study analysed the potential water consumption and wastewater generation in shale gas development in Fuling, Southwest China. The survey found the average water consumption is 30,000 cubic meter for one well, higher than shale well in U.S. Some 2%-20% water flowed back to the ground. The water quality monitoring showed the Total Suspended Solid (TSS) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) were the main factors above those specified by China's water regulation. Shale gas is a lower-carbon energy, but it is important to recognize the water consuming and environmental pollution during the fracking. Strict monitoring and good coordination during the shale gas exploitation is urgently needed for the balance of economic development, energy demand and environmental protection.

  3. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  4. Gas exchanges and water use efficiency in the selection of tomato genotypes tolerant to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, M E A; Maciel, G M; Fraga Júnior, E F; Machado Júnior, C S; Marquez, G R; Silva, I G; Almeida, R S

    2017-06-20

    Water stress can affect the yield in tomato crops and, despite this, there are few types of research aiming to select tomato genotypes resistant to the water stress using physiological parameters. This experiment aimed to study the variables that are related to the gas exchanges and the efficiency in water use, in the selection of tomato genotypes tolerant to water stress. It was done in a greenhouse, measuring 7 x 21 m, in a randomized complete block design, with four replications (blocks), being five genotypes in the F 2 BC 1 generation, which were previously obtained from an interspecific cross between Solanum pennellii versus S. lycopersicum and three check treatments, two susceptible [UFU-22 (pre-commercial line) and cultivar Santa Clara] and one resistant (S. pennellii). At the beginning of flowering, the plants were submitted to a water stress condition, through irrigation suspension. After that CO 2 assimilation, internal CO 2 , stomatal conductance, transpiration, leaf temperature, instantaneous water use efficiency, intrinsic efficiency of water use, instantaneous carboxylation efficiency, chlorophyll a and b, and the potential leaf water (Ψf) were observed. Almost all variables that were analyzed, except CO 2 assimilation and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency, demonstrated the superiority of the wild accession, S. pennellii, concerning the susceptible check treatments. The high photosynthetic rate and the low stomatal conductance and transpiration, presented by the UFU22/F 2 BC 1 #2 population, allowed a better water use efficiency. Because of that, these physiological characteristics are promising in the selection of tomato genotypes tolerant to water stress.

  5. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon

    2017-01-01

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  6. Modelling of Gas Flow in the Underground Coal Gasification Process and its Interactions with the Rock Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Janoszek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was the analysis of gas flow in the underground coal gasification process and interactions with the surrounding rock mass. The article is a discussion of the assumptions for the geometric model and for the numerical method for its solution as well as assumptions for modelling the geochemical model of the interaction between gas-rock-water, in terms of equilibrium calculations, chemical and gas flow modelling in porous mediums. Ansys-Fluent software was used to describe the underground coal gasification process (UCG. The numerical solution was compared with experimental data. The PHREEQC program was used to describe the chemical reaction between the gaseous products of the UCG process and the rock strata in the presence of reservoir waters.

  7. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  8. Surprisingly low natural gas consumption for hot water in the Netherlands in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geerse, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Dutch use hot water more efficient than previously expected. This conclusion is drawn from a recent study of hot water consumption in Dutch households and the corresponding natural gas consumption. Based on that (once-only) hot water use survey the hot water use models, as applied in the annual Basic Survey of Natural Gas Consumption of Small-scale Consumers in the Netherlands (BAK), will be modified. 6 tabs

  9. About one discrete model of splitting by the physical processes of a piezoconductive medium with gas hydrate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveshchenko, Yu A.; Podryga, V. O.; Rahimly, P. I.; Sharova, Yu S.

    2018-01-01

    The thermodynamically equilibrium model for splitting by the physical processes of a two-component three-phase filtration fluid dynamics with gas hydrate inclusions is considered in the paper, for which a family of two-layer completely conservative difference schemes of the support operators method with time weights profiled in space is constructed. On the irregular grids of the theory of the support-operators method applied to the specifics of the processes of transfer of saturations and internal energies of water and gas in a medium with gas hydrate inclusions, methods of directwind approximation of these processes are considered. These approximations preserve the continual properties of divergence-gradient operations in their difference form and are related to the velocity field providing saturations transfer and internal energies of fluids. Fluid dynamics with gas hydrate inclusions are also calculated on the basis of the proposed approach, in particular, in areas of severe pressure depression in the collector space.

  10. Energy Demodulation Algorithm for Flow Velocity Measurement of Oil-Gas-Water Three-Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurement was an important research of oil-gas-water three-phase flow parameter measurements. In order to satisfy the increasing demands for flow detection technology, the paper presented a gas-liquid phase flow velocity measurement method which was based on energy demodulation algorithm combing with time delay estimation technology. First, a gas-liquid phase separation method of oil-gas-water three-phase flow based on energy demodulation algorithm and blind signal separation technology was proposed. The separation of oil-gas-water three-phase signals which were sampled by conductance sensor performed well, so the gas-phase signal and the liquid-phase signal were obtained. Second, we used the time delay estimation technology to get the delay time of gas-phase signals and liquid-phase signals, respectively, and the gas-phase velocity and the liquid-phase velocity were derived. At last, the experiment was performed at oil-gas-water three-phase flow loop, and the results indicated that the measurement errors met the need of velocity measurement. So it provided a feasible method for gas-liquid phase velocity measurement of the oil-gas-water three-phase flow.

  11. Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Stigkær, Jens Peter; Løhndorf, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of plant-wide control philosophy to enhance the performance and capacity of the Produced Water Treatment (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material-based PWT innovation methods, the objective of this work...

  12. Oxo-exchange of gas-phase uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl with water and methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Ana F; Odoh, Samuel O; Zhao, Jing; Marçalo, Joaquim; Schreckenbach, Georg; Gibson, John K

    2014-02-17

    A challenge in actinide chemistry is activation of the strong bonds in the actinyl ions, AnO2(+) and AnO2(2+), where An = U, Np, or Pu. Actinyl activation in oxo-exchange with water in solution is well established, but the exchange mechanisms are unknown. Gas-phase actinyl oxo-exchange is a means to probe these processes in detail for simple systems, which are amenable to computational modeling. Gas-phase exchange reactions of UO2(+), NpO2(+), PuO2(+), and UO2(2+) with water and methanol were studied by experiment and density functional theory (DFT); reported for the first time are experimental results for UO2(2+) and for methanol exchange, as well as exchange rate constants. Key findings are faster exchange of UO2(2+) versus UO2(+) and faster exchange with methanol versus water; faster exchange of UO2(+) versus PuO2(+) was quantified. Computed potential energy profiles (PEPs) are in accord with the observed kinetics, validating the utility of DFT to model these exchange processes. The seemingly enigmatic result of faster exchange for uranyl, which has the strongest oxo-bonds, may reflect reduced covalency in uranyl as compared with plutonyl.

  13. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  14. Analysis of Ion-Exchange Resin Capability of the RSG-GAS Demineralized Water System (GCA01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diyah Erlina Lestari; Setyo Budi Utomo; Harsono

    2012-01-01

    The Demineralized water system (GCA01) is a system which is function to process raw water to be demineralized water using ion exchange resin unit consisting of a column of cation exchange resins, anion exchange resin column and the column resin mix bed. After certain time the ion exchange resins to be saturated so that is needed regeneration. The RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) not operated continuously and indication of when does an ion exchange resin regeneration on The RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) is the water conductivity from anion exchange resin column output indicates ≥ 5μS/cm. Analysis of capability of the ion exchange resin demineralized water system (GCA01) line I has been performed. The analysis was done by comparing the time required in the system operating cycle of regeneration to the next regeneration during the period 2011 and 2012. From the results of the analysis showed the cycle regeneration time is varies. This shows that ion exchange resin capability of the RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) is varies depending on the raw water quality and success of the regeneration ion exchange resin. (author)

  15. Life Support Systems: Wastewater Processing and Water Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems project Wastewater Processing and Water Management task: Within an integrated life support system, water...

  16. Simulation bidimensional of water and gas alternative injection; Simulacao bidimensional de injecao alternada de agua e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Ana Paula Silva C. de

    1999-07-01

    This dissertation presents a study of the unidimensional of water and gas alternate injection (WAG) using the stream line theory. It is considered incompressible fluid., unit mobility ratio, negligible capillary and gravitational effects, homogeneous and isotropic reservoir, isothermal flow two phases, oil and water, and three components, oil, water and gas. In the stream line theory, the following injection schemes are considered: staggered line five-spot, direct line and seven-spot. It is also considered that there is no flow among the streams. In the WAG calculations it is used the fractional flow theory and the method of characteristics, which consists of shock waves and rarefactions. The composition of these waves is said compatible if it satisfies the entropy condition. The solution goes through a certain path from the left to the right side constrained by the initial and boundary conditions. The gas injection is at a high pressure to ensure miscible displacement. It is considered first injection of a water bank and then, injection of a gas bank. We concluded that the gas injection at a high pressure recoveries all residual oil and the water saturation remains is greater than initial saturation. (author)

  17. Increase in gas output by active modification of the water pressure regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakirov, S N; Gordon, V Y; Kondrat, R M; Kravtsov, N A; Somov, B Y

    1981-01-01

    Based on gas-hydrodynamic calculations made on a planar model formation, two variants of formation working are examined. In the first variant, the modern ideology of working gas fields with a water pressure regime are simulated. In the second variant, working of the formation is modeled according to the suggested ideology of active modification of the water-pressure regime by operating the flooded gas wells. The calculations made indicate the efficiency of active modification of the water pressure regime from the viewpoint of controlling the fund of E wells, and most important, maximizing the final coefficient of gas bed output.

  18. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  19. Process for the production of fuel gas from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra G.; Sandstrom, William A.; Tarman, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

  20. Building America Case Study: Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, E. Weitzel, C. Backman

    2017-06-01

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the half-inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements.

  1. Water, gas and solute movement through argillaceous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseman, S.T.; Higgo, J.J.W.; Alexander, J.; Harrington, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    This report was commissioned by a consortium of companies and organisations with a common concern: the capacity of clay-rich media to act as barriers to the movement of radionuclides. Since the migration of such contaminants occurs primarily in aqueous solutions, considerable emphasis is placed on the motion of groundwater in the subsurface environment and on the advective and diffusive transport of solutes within this water. This report examines clay systems at a very wide range of scales, from the molecular-scale interactions between water molecules and clay surfaces, through to large-scale processes such as the movement of fluids in sedimentary basins. Its goal is to study the links between the colloidal interactions between clay mineral particles, the mechanical responses of the system and the movement of fluids. The Darcy's or Fick's laws were adopted as a basis for the phenomenological mass transfer calculations, and a very idealized porous medium having clearly identifiable characteristics and properties was considered to replace the inordinately complex and highly-variable geologic medium. It is also assumed that geological processes, other than transport processes, either cease to operate over the time-scale of interest or can have no secondary effect on mass transport. (J.S.). 737 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs., 2 appends

  2. Demonstration of the Tilting of the Gas-Water Interface under Hydrodynamic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretener, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus to demonstrate the tilting of an oil-water, gas-water, or gas-oil interface when the subsurface reservoir is under hydrodynamic conditions (i.e., when conditions of lateral flow exist). The model can be constructed of readily-available materials. (RE)

  3. The Value of Water in Extraction of Natural Gas from the Marcellus Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsaite, R.; Abdalla, C.; Collins, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale has increased the demand for the essential input of water in natural gas production. Increased utilization of water by the shale gas industry, and the development of water transport and storage related infrastructure suggest that the value of water is increasing where hydraulic fracturing is occurring. Few studies on the value of water in industrial uses exist and, to our knowledge, no studies of water's value in extracting natural gas from shale have been published. Our research aims to fill this knowledge gap by exploring several key dimensions of the value of water used in shale gas development. Our primary focus was to document the costs associated with water acquisition for shale gas extraction in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, two states located in the gas-rich Marcellus shale formation with active drilling and extraction underway. This research involved a) gathering data on the sources of and costs associated with water acquisition for shale gas extraction b) comparing unit costs with prices and costs paid by the gas industry users of water; c) determining factors that potentially impact total and per unit costs of water acquisition for the shale gas industry; and d) identifying lessons learned for water managers and policy-makers. The population of interest was all private and public entities selling water to the shale gas industry in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Primary data were collected from phone interviews with water sellers and secondary data were gathered from state regulatory agencies. Contact information was obtained for 40 water sellers in the two states. Considering both states, the average response rate was 49%. Relatively small amounts of water, approximately 11% in West Virginia and 29% in Pennsylvania, were purchased from public water suppliers by the shale gas industry. The price of water reveals information about the value of water. The average price charged to gas companies was 6.00/1000 gallons and 7

  4. Test facility for fast gas injections into a vessel filled with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Kirstahler, M.

    1987-11-01

    The Fast Gas Injection Facility (SGI) was set up to study the hydrodynamics during the expansion of a gas bubble into a vessel filled with water. The gas stored in a pressure vessel expands against gravity through a circular duct into a large cylindrical vessel partly with water. This report covers the description of the test facility and the data acquisition. Results of the first test series are added. (orig.) [de

  5. Differences in gas exchange contribute to habitat differentiation in Iberian columbines from contrasting light and water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, R; Serichol, C; Alcántara, J M; Rey, P J

    2014-03-01

    During photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration, gas exchange occurs via the stomata and so plants face a trade-off between maximising photosynthesis while minimising transpiration (expressed as water use efficiency, WUE). The ability to cope with this trade-off and regulate photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance may be related to niche differentiation between closely related species. The present study explored this as a possible mechanism for habitat differentiation in Iberian columbines. The roles of irradiance and water stress were assessed to determine niche differentiation among Iberian columbines via distinct gas exchange processes. Photosynthesis-irradiance curves (P-I curves) were obtained for four taxa, and common garden experiments were conducted to examine plant responses to water and irradiance stress, by measuring instantaneous gas exchange and plant performance. Gas exchange was also measured in ten individuals using two to four field populations per taxon. The taxa had different P-I curves and gas exchange in the field. At the species level, water stress and irradiance explained habitat differentiation. Within each species, a combination of irradiance and water stress explained the between-subspecies habitat differentiation. Despite differences in stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation, taxa did not have different WUE under field conditions, which suggests that the environment equally modifies photosynthesis and transpiration. The P-I curves, gas exchange in the field and plant responses to experimental water and irradiance stresses support the hypothesis that habitat differentiation is associated with differences among taxa in tolerance to abiotic stress mediated by distinct gas exchange responses. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Two-Phase Phenomena In Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minzer, U.; Moses, E.J.; Toren, M.; Blumenfeld, Y.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce sulfur oxides discharge, Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) is building a wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) facility at Rutenberg B power station. The primary objective of IEC is to minimize the occurrence of stack liquid discharge and avoid the discharge of large droplets, in order to prevent acid rain around the stack. Liquid discharge from the stack is the integrated outcome of two-phase processes, which are discussed in this work. In order to estimate droplets discharge the present investigation employs analytical models, empirical tests, and numerical calculations of two-phase phenomena. The two-phase phenomena are coupled and therefore cannot be investigated separately. The present work concerns the application of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) as an engineering complementary tool in the IEC investigation

  7. Effective water influx control in gas reservoir development: Problems and countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Feng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the diversity of geological characteristics and the complexity of percolation rules, many problems are found ineffective water influx control in gas reservoir development. The problems mainly focus on how to understand water influx rules, to establish appropriate countermeasures, and to ensure the effectiveness of technical measures. It is hard to obtain a complete applicable understanding through the isolated analysis of an individual gas reservoir due to many factors such as actual gas reservoir development phase, research work, pertinence and timeliness of measures, and so on. Over the past four decades, the exploration, practicing and tracking research have been conducted on water control in gas reservoir development in the Sichuan Basin, and a series of comprehensive water control technologies were developed integrating advanced concepts, successful experiences, specific theories and mature technologies. Though the development of most water-drive gas reservoirs was significantly improved, water control effects were quite different. Based on this background, from the perspective of the early-phase requirements of water influx control, the influencing factors of a water influx activity, the dynamic analysis method of water influx performance, the optimizing strategy of a water control, and the water control experience of typical gas reservoirs, this paper analyzed the key problems of water control, evaluated the influencing factors of water control effect, explored the practical water control strategies, and proposed that it should be inappropriate to apply the previous water control technological model to actual work but the pertinence should be improved according to actual circumstances. The research results in the paper provide technical reference for the optimization of water-invasion gas reservoir development.

  8. Effect of water injection on nitric oxide emissions of a gas turbine combustor burning natural gas fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of direct water injection on the exhaust gas emissions of a turbojet combustor burning natural gas fuel was investigated. The results are compared with the results from similar tests using ASTM Jet-A fuel. Increasing water injection decreased the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and increased the emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons. The greatest percentage decrease in NOX with increasing water injection was at the lowest inlet-air temperature tested. The effect of increasing inlet-air temperature was to decrease the effect of the water injection. The reduction in NOX due to water injection was almost identical to the results obtained with Jet-A fuel. However, the emission indices of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and percentage nitric oxide in NOX were not.

  9. Process for prevention of water build-up in cryogenic distillation column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopewell, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    In a process for the separation of a hydrocarbon and acid gas containing feed stream in a cryogenic distillation column, a zone of the column which is operated at a temperature of 60 0 F or less, wherein free water accumulates or forms hydrates in the column from water vapor in the feed stream during the cryogenic process, and which process comprises separating the feed stream in the column into an overhead stream and a bottom stream, this patent describes the improvement which comprises: withdrawing a hydrocarbon and acid gas vapor stream which stream is enriched in water vapor with respect to the feed stream, thereby preventing the excess accumulation of free water or the formation of hydrates in the cryogenic column

  10. Radon gas as a tracer for volcanic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Radon emissions from volcanic systems have been under investigation for several decades. Soil gas and groundwater radon activities have been used to map faults and to characterize geothermal systems, and measurements of atmospheric radon and radon daughter concentrations have been used to estimate the volume of magma chambers feeding active eruptions. Several studies have also shown that temporal variations in radon concentration have been associated with the onset of volcanic eruptions or changes in the rates or character of an eruption. Some of these studies have been able to clearly define the cause of the radon anomalies but others have proposed models of radon emission and transport that are not well supported by the known physical and chemical processes that occur in a volcanic system. In order to better characterize the processes that control radon activities in volcanic systems, it is recommended that future radon monitoring programs attempt to maintain continuous recording of radon activities; individual radon measurements should be made over the shortest time intervals possible that are consistent with acceptable counting statistics and geophysical, meteorological, and hydrological parameters should be measured in order to better define the physical processes that affect radon activities in volcanic systems. (author). 63 refs

  11. A plasma process controlled emissions off-gas demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battleson, D.; Kujawa, S.T.; Leatherman, G.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal technologies are currently identified as playing an important role in the treatment of many DOE waste streams, and emissions from these processes will be scrutinized by the public, regulators, and stakeholders. For some time, there has been a hesitancy by the public to accept thermal treatment of radioactive contaminated waste because of the emissions from these processes. While the technology for treatment of emissions from these processes is well established, it is not possible to provide the public complete assurance that the system will be in compliance with air quality regulations 100% of the operating time in relation to allowing noncompliant emissions to exit the system. Because of the possibility of noncompliant emissions and the public's concern over thermal treatment systems, it has been decided that the concept of a completely controlled emissions off-gas system should be developed and implemented on Department of Energy (DOE) thermal treatment systems. While the law of conservation of mass precludes a completely closed cycle system, it is possible to apply the complete control concept to emissions

  12. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

    1994-10-01

    The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

  13. CO₂ Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toy, Lora [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gupta, Raghubir [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO₂, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO₂ capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO₂ from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO₂ purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO₂-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO₂, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO₂ over N₂ and CO

  14. Diel biogeochemical processes in terrestrial waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimick, David A.; Gammons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Many biogeochemical processes in rivers and lakes respond to the solar photocycle and produce persistent patterns of measureable phenomena that exhibit a day–night, or 24-h, cycle. Despite a large body of recent literature, the mechanisms responsible for these diel fluctuations are widely debated, with a growing consensus that combinations of physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved. These processes include streamflow variation, photosynthesis and respiration, plant assimilation, and reactions involving photochemistry, adsorption and desorption, and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Diel changes in streamflow and water properties such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentration have been widely recognized, and recently, diel studies have focused more widely by considering other constituents such as dissolved and particulate trace metals, metalloids, rare earth elements, mercury, organic matter, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and nutrients. The details of many diel processes are being studied using stable isotopes, which also can exhibit diel cycles in response to microbial metabolism, photosynthesis and respiration, or changes in phase, speciation, or redox state. In addition, secondary effects that diel cycles might have, for example, on biota or in the hyporheic zone are beginning to be considered.This special issue is composed primarily of papers presented at the topical session “Diurnal Biogeochemical Processes in Rivers, Lakes, and Shallow Groundwater” held at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in October 2009 in Portland, Oregon. This session was organized because many of the growing number of diel studies have addressed just a small part of the full range of diel cycling phenomena found in rivers and lakes. This limited focus is understandable because (1) fundamental aspects of many diel processes are poorly understood and require detailed study, (2) the interests and expertise of individual

  15. Drought Resilience of Water Supplies for Shale Gas Extraction and Related Power Generation in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.; Nicot, J. P.; Uhlman, K.

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable concern about water availability to support energy production in Texas, particularly considering that many of the shale plays are in semiarid areas of Texas and the state experienced the most extreme drought on record in 2011. The Eagle Ford shale play provides an excellent case study. Hydraulic fracturing water use for shale gas extraction in the play totaled ~ 12 billion gallons (bgal) in 2012, representing ~7 - 10% of total water use in the 16 county play area. The dominant source of water is groundwater which is not highly vulnerable to drought from a recharge perspective because water is primarily stored in the confined portion of aquifers that were recharged thousands of years ago. Water supply drought vulnerability results primarily from increased water use for irrigation. Irrigation water use in the Eagle Ford play was 30 billion gallons higher in the 2011 drought year relative to 2010. Recent trends toward increased use of brackish groundwater for shale gas extraction in the Eagle Ford also reduce pressure on fresh water resources. Evaluating the impacts of natural gas development on water resources should consider the use of natural gas in power generation, which now represents 50% of power generation in Texas. Water consumed in extracting the natural gas required for power generation is equivalent to ~7% of the water consumed in cooling these power plants in the state. However, natural gas production from shale plays can be overall beneficial in terms of water resources in the state because natural gas combined cycle power generation decreases water consumption by ~60% relative to traditional coal, nuclear, and natural gas plants that use steam turbine generation. This reduced water consumption enhances drought resilience of power generation in the state. In addition, natural gas combined cycle plants provide peaking capacity that complements increasing renewable wind generation which has no cooling water requirement. However, water

  16. Measurement of gas phase characteristics using new monofiber optical probes and real time signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartellier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Single optical or impedance phase detection probes are able to measure gas velocities provided that their sensitive length L is accurately known. In this paper, it is shown that L can be controlled during the manufacture of optical probes. Beside, for a probe geometry in the form of a cone + a cylinder + a cone, the corresponding rise time / velocity correlation becomes weakly sensitive to uncontrollable parameter such as the angle of impact on the interface. A real time signal processing performing phase detection as well as velocity measurements is described. Since its sensitivity to the operator inputs is less than the reproducibility of measurements, it is a fairly objective tool. Qualifications achieved in air/water flows with various optical probes demonstrate that the void fraction is detected with a relative error less than 10 %. For bubbly flows, the gas flux is accurate within ±10%, but this uncertainty increases when large bubbles are present in the flow. (author)

  17. Spraying of metallic powders by hybrid gas/water torch and the effects of inert gas shrouding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavka, Tetyana; Matějíček, Jiří; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-4 (2012), s. 695-705 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA MPO FR-TI2/561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : copper * tungsten * hybrid water-gas torch * plasma facing materials * plasma spraying * gas shroud Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/j07t3222hnv87882/fulltext.pdf

  18. Organic contamination of ground water at Gas Works Park, Seattle, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, G.L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Gas Works Park, in Seattle, Washington, is located on the site of a coal and oil gasification plant that ceased operation in 1956. During operation, many types of wastes, including coal, tar, and oil, accumulated on-site. The park soil is currently (1986) contaminated with compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and cyanide. Analyses of water samples from a network of observation wells in the park indicate that these compounds are also present in the ground water. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds were identified in ground water samples in concentrations as large as 200 mg/L. Concentrations of organic compounds were largest where ground water was in contact with a non-aqueous phase liquid in the soil. Where no non-aqueous phase liquid was present, concentrations were much smaller, even if the ground water was in contact with contaminated soils. This condition is attributed to weathering processes in which soluble, low-molecular-weight organic compounds are preferentially dissolved from the non-aqueous phase liquid into the ground water. Where no non-aqueous phase liquid is present, only stained soils containing relatively insoluble, high-molecular-weight compounds remain. Concentrations of organic contaminants in the soils may still remain large

  19. Organic contamination of ground water at Gas Works Park, Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G.L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Gas Works Park, in Seattle, Washington, is located on the site of a coal and oil gasification plant that ceased operation in 1956. During operation, many types of wastes, including coal, tar, and oil, accumulated on-site. The park soil is currently (1986) contaminated with compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and cyanide. Analyses of water samples from a network of observation wells in the park indicate that these compounds are also present in the ground water. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds were identified in ground water samples in concentrations as large as 200 mg/L. Concentrations of organic compounds were largest where ground water was in contact with a non-aqueous phase liquid in the soil. Where no non-aqueous phase liquid was present, concentrations were much smaller, even if the ground water was in contact with contaminated soils. This condition is attributed to weathering processes in which soluble, low-molecular-weight organic compounds are preferentially dissolved from the non-aqueous phase liquid into the ground water. Where no non-aqueous phase liquid is present, only stained soils containing relatively insoluble, high-molecular-weight compounds remain. Concentrations of organic contaminants in the soils may still remain large.

  20. Building America Case Study: Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-19

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the half-inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements. Simulations were completed under a 'peak day' sizing scenario with 183 gpd hot water loads in a Minnesota winter climate case. Full-year simulations were then completed in three climates (ranging from Phoenix to Minneapolis) for three hot water load scenarios (36, 57, and 96 gpd). Model projections indicate that the alternative hybrid offers an average 4.5% efficiency improvement relative to the 0.60 EF gas storage unit across all scenarios modeled. The alternative hybrid water heater evaluated does show promise, but the current low cost of natural gas across much of the country and the relatively small incremental efficiency improvement poses challenges in initially building a market demand for the product.

  1. Cooling water systems design using process integration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flowrate and low cooling water return temperature thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  2. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vione, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter pollutants to be assessed and modelled. For instance, it is possible to predict pollutant half-life times by knowing absorption spectrum, direct photolysis quantum yield and reaction rate constants with °OH, CO3

  3. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    Full Text Available A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  4. Energy and greenhouse-gas emissions in irrigated agriculture of SE (southeast) Spain. Effects of alternative water supply scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Gorriz, B.; Soto-García, M.; Martínez-Alvarez, V.

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is leading to a water resources decrease in the Mediterranean basin, where future farming resilience depends on incorporating alternative water sources and improving water-energy use efficiency. This paper assesses water and energy consumption when natural water sources are partially replaced by desalinated sea water. Initially, energy consumption, water supply and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions were recorded for the current farming practices in SE (southeast) Spain. The results of our study indicate that citrus orchards have the lowest energy consumption and GHG emissions. Annual vegetables were the least energy efficient crops. Subsequently, two alternative water supply scenarios were analysed, in which the reduction of natural water resources associated to climate change was compensated with desalinated sea water. The use of 16.8% of desalinated seawater would increase energy consumption by 32.4% and GHG emissions by 19.6%, whereas for the use of 26.5% of desalinated seawater such increases would amount to 50.0% and 30.3%, respectively. Therefore maintaining irrigated agriculture in water-stressed regions by incorporating high energy demanding non-traditional water sources could negatively contribute to combat global warming. - Highlights: • Water supply, energy consumption and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions in irrigated agriculture are very connected. • The use of desalinated sea water will increase the energy consumption, and GHG emissions will rise. • The use of non-traditional water resources enhances global warming processes. • Citrus orchards are the less sensitive crop to alternative water supplied scenarios. • Artichoke is the most sensitive crop to alternative water supplied scenarios

  5. Importance of water Influx and waterflooding in Gas condensate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of losing valuable liquid and lower gas well deliverability have made gas condensate reservoirs very important and extra emphasizes are made to optimize hydrocarbon recovery from a gas condensate reservoir. Methods like methanol treatments, wettability alteration and hydraulic fracturing are done to restore the well deliverability by removing or by passing the condensate blockage region. The above mentioned methods are applied in the near wellbore region and only improve the w...

  6. Exhaust gas heat recovery through secondary expansion cylinder and water injection in an internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassiri Toosi Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance thermal efficiency and increase performance of an internal combustion engine, a novel concept of coupling a conventional engine with a secondary 4-stroke cylinder and direct water injection process is proposed. The burned gases after working in a traditional 4-stroke combustion cylinder are transferred to a secondary cylinder and expanded even more. After re-compression of the exhaust gases, pre-heated water is injected at top dead center. The evaporation of injected water not only recovers heat from exhaust gases, but also increases the mass of working gas inside the cylinder, therefore improves the overall thermal efficiency. A 0-D/1-D model is used to numerically simulate the idea. The simulations outputs showed that the bottoming cycle will be more efficient at higher engines speeds, specifically in a supercharged/turbocharged engine, which have higher exhaust gas pressure that can reproduce more positive work. In the modeled supercharged engine, results showed that brake thermal efficiency can be improved by about 17%, and brake power by about 17.4%.

  7. Pulsed-plasma gas-discharge inactivation of microbial pathogens in chilled poultry wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, N J; Espie, S; Harrower, J; Anderson, J G; Marsili, L; MacGregor, S J

    2007-12-01

    A pulsed-plasma gas-discharge (PPGD) system was developed for the novel decontamination of chilled poultry wash water. Treatment of poultry wash water in the plasma generation chamber for up to 24 s at 4 degrees C reduced Escherichia coli NCTC 9001, Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560, Campylobacter coli ATCC 33559, Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 9863, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931, and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 populations to non-detectable levels ( or = 3 log CFU/ml) in recalcitrant B. cereus NCTC 11145 endospore numbers within 30 s, the level of endospore reduction was dependent on the nature of the sparged gas used in the plasma treatments. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that significant damage occurred at the cellular level in PPGD-treated test organisms. This electrotechnology delivers energy in intense ultrashort bursts, generating products such as ozone, UV light, acoustic and shock waves, and pulsed electric fields that have multiple bactericidal properties. This technology offers an exciting complementary or alternative approach for treating raw poultry wash water and for preventing cross-contamination in processing environments.

  8. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production from excess energy and its storage can help increasing the efficiency of solar and wind in the energy mix. Therefore, hydrogen needs large-scale intermediate storage independent of the intended later use as hydrogen gas or as reactant to produce methane in the Sabatier process. A possible storage solution is using the geological subsurface such as caverns built in salt deposits or aquifers that are not used for drinking water production. However, underground storage of hydrogen gas potentially leads to accidental gas leakages into near-surface potable aquifers triggering subsequent geochemical processes. These leakages pose potential risks that are currently not sufficiently understood. To close this gap in knowledge, a high-pressure laboratory column system was used to simulate a hydrogen gas intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Water and sediment were gained from a sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Neumünster, Germany. In the first stage of the experiment, 100% hydrogen gas was used to simulate dissolved hydrogen concentrations between 800 and 4000 µM by varying pH2 between 2 and 15 bars. pH values rose to between 7.9 and 10.4, partly due to stripping CO2 from the groundwater used during H2 gas addition. In a second stage, the pH was regulated in a range of 6.7 to 7.9 by using a gas mixture of 99% H2 and 1% CO2 at 5 bars of total gas pressure. Observed processes included hydrogen oxidation, sulfate reduction, acetogenesis, formate production, and methanogenesis, which were independent of the hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction showed zeroth order reaction rates and rate constants (106 to 412 µM/h and 12 to 33 µM/h, respectively) in the pH range between 8 and 10. At pH levels between 7 and 8, both reactions started out faster near the column's inflow but then seemed limited towards the columns outflow, suggesting the dependence of sulfate reduction on the pH-value. Acetogenesis dominated the pH range between 8 and 10

  9. Technical Note: Detection of gas bubble leakage via correlation of water column multibeam images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider von Deimling, J.; Papenberg, C.

    2012-03-01

    Hydroacoustic detection of natural gas release from the seafloor has been conducted in the past by using singlebeam echosounders. In contrast, modern multibeam swath mapping systems allow much wider coverage, higher resolution, and offer 3-D spatial correlation. Up to the present, the extremely high data rate hampers water column backscatter investigations and more sophisticated visualization and processing techniques are needed. Here, we present water column backscatter data acquired with a 50 kHz prototype multibeam system over a period of 75 seconds. Display types are of swath-images as well as of a "re-sorted" singlebeam presentation. Thus, individual and/or groups of gas bubbles rising from the 24 m deep seafloor clearly emerge in the acoustic images, making it possible to estimate rise velocities. A sophisticated processing scheme is introduced to identify those rising gas bubbles in the hydroacoustic data. We apply a cross-correlation technique adapted from particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) to the acoustic backscatter images. Temporal and spatial drift patterns of the bubbles are assessed and are shown to match very well to measured and theoretical rise patterns. The application of this processing to our field data gives clear results with respect to unambiguous bubble detection and remote bubble rise velocimetry. The method can identify and exclude the main source of misinterpretations, i.e. fish-mediated echoes. Although image-based cross-correlation techniques are well known in the field of fluid mechanics for high resolution and non-inversive current flow field analysis, we present the first application of this technique as an acoustic bubble detector.

  10. Technical Note: Detection of gas bubble leakage via correlation of water column multibeam images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider von Deimling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydroacoustic detection of natural gas release from the seafloor has been conducted in the past by using singlebeam echosounders. In contrast, modern multibeam swath mapping systems allow much wider coverage, higher resolution, and offer 3-D spatial correlation. Up to the present, the extremely high data rate hampers water column backscatter investigations and more sophisticated visualization and processing techniques are needed. Here, we present water column backscatter data acquired with a 50 kHz prototype multibeam system over a period of 75 seconds. Display types are of swath-images as well as of a "re-sorted" singlebeam presentation. Thus, individual and/or groups of gas bubbles rising from the 24 m deep seafloor clearly emerge in the acoustic images, making it possible to estimate rise velocities. A sophisticated processing scheme is introduced to identify those rising gas bubbles in the hydroacoustic data. We apply a cross-correlation technique adapted from particle imaging velocimetry (PIV to the acoustic backscatter images. Temporal and spatial drift patterns of the bubbles are assessed and are shown to match very well to measured and theoretical rise patterns. The application of this processing to our field data gives clear results with respect to unambiguous bubble detection and remote bubble rise velocimetry. The method can identify and exclude the main source of misinterpretations, i.e. fish-mediated echoes. Although image-based cross-correlation techniques are well known in the field of fluid mechanics for high resolution and non-inversive current flow field analysis, we present the first application of this technique as an acoustic bubble detector.

  11. Online Continuous Trace Process Analytics Using Multiplexing Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Marco R; Lehnig, Rudolf; Trapp, Oliver

    2017-04-04

    The analysis of impurities at a trace level in chemical products, nutrition additives, and drugs is highly important to guarantee safe products suitable for consumption. However, trace analysis in the presence of a dominating component can be a challenging task because of noncompatible linear detection ranges or strong signal overlap that suppresses the signal of interest. Here, we developed a technique for quantitative analysis using multiplexing gas chromatography (mpGC) for continuous and completely automated process trace analytics exemplified for the analysis of a CO 2 stream in a production plant for detection of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the three structural isomers of xylene (BTEX) in the concentration range of 0-10 ppb. Additional minor components are methane and methanol with concentrations up to 100 ppm. The sample is injected up to 512 times according to a pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) with a mean frequency of 0.1 Hz into a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). A superimposed chromatogram is recorded which is deconvoluted into an averaged chromatogram with Hadamard transformation. Novel algorithms to maintain the data acquisition rate of the detector by application of Hadamard transformation and to suppress correlation noise induced by components with much higher concentrations than the target substances are shown. Compared to conventional GC-FID, the signal-to-noise ratio has been increased by a factor of 10 with mpGC-FID. Correspondingly, the detection limits for BTEX in CO 2 have been lowered from 10 to 1 ppb each. This has been achieved despite the presence of detectable components (methane and methanol) with a concentration about 1000 times higher than the target substances. The robustness and reliability of mpGC has been proven in a two-month field test in a chemical production plant.

  12. Gas-centrifuge unit and centrifugal process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    An invention involving a process and apparatus for isotope-separation applications such as uranium-isotope enrichment is disclosed which employs cascades of gas centrifuges. A preferred apparatus relates to an isotope-enrichment unit which includes a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges and an auxiliary cascade. Each cascade has an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating a gaseous-mixture feed including a compound of a light nuclear isotope and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope into light and heavy fractions respectively enriched and depleted in the light isotope. The cascades of the first group have at least one enriching stage and at least one stripping stage. The unit further includes means for introducing a gaseous-mixture feedstock into each input of the first group of cascades, means for withdrawing at least a portion of a product fraction from the light-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades, and means for withdrawing at least a portion of a waste fraction from the heavy-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades. The isotope-enrichment unit also includes a means for conveying a gaseous-mixture from a light-fraction output of a first cascade included in the first group to the input of the auxiliary cascade so that at least a portion of a light gaseous-mixture fraction produced by the first group of cascades is further separated into a light and a heavy fraction by the auxiliary cascade. At least a portion of a product fraction is withdrawn from the light fraction output of the auxiliary cascade. If the light-fraction output of the first cascade and the heavy-fraction output of the auxiliary cascade are reciprocal outputs, the concentraton of the light isotope in the heavy fraction produced by the auxiliary cascade essentially equals the concentration of the light isotope in the gaseous-mixture feedstock

  13. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus shale gas drilling flow back water

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S.; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation is known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these waste waters, flow back water from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of t...

  14. Water hammer and cavitational hammer in process plant pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudlik, A.; Schoenfeld, S.B.H.; Hagemann, O.; Fahlenkamp, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fast acting valves are often applied for quick safety shut-down of pipelines for liquids and gases in the chemical and petrochemical industry as well as in power plants and state water supplies. The fast deceleration of the liquid leads to water hammer upstream the valve and to cavitational hammer downstream the fast closing valve. The valve characteristics given by manufacturers are usually measured at steady state flow conditions of the liquid. In comparison, the dynamic characteristics depend on the initial liquid velocity, valve closing velocity, the absolute pipe pressure and the pipe geometry. Fraunhofer UMSICHT conducts various test series examining valve dynamic characteristics in order of the dynamic analysis of pressure surges in fast closing processes. Therefore a test rig is used which consists of two pipelines of DN 50 and DN 100 with an approximate length of 230 m each. In this paper the results of performed pressure surge experiments with fast closing and opening valves will be compared to calculations of commercial software programs such as MONA, FLOWMASTER 2. Thus the calculation software for water supply, power plants oil and gas and chemical industry can be permanently improved. (orig.)

  15. Measurements of water molecule density by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in dielectric barrier discharges with gas-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kunihide; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Umekawa, Toyofumi; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    We measured water molecule (H2O) density by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) for applications in dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with a gas-water interface. First, the effects of water temperature and presence of gas flow were tested using a Petri dish filled with water and a gas injection nozzle. Second, the TDLAS system was applied to the measurements of H2O density in two types of DBDs; one was a normal (non-inverted) type with a dielectric-covered electrode above a water-filled counter electrode and the other was an inverted type with a water-suspending mesh electrode above a dielectric-covered counter electrode. The H2O density in the normal DBD was close to the density estimated from the saturated vapor pressure, whereas the density in the inverted DBD was about half of that in the former type. The difference is attributed to the upward gas flow in the latter type, that pushes the water molecules up towards the gas-water interface.

  16. The hydrogen generated as a gas and storage in Zircaloy during water quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Eduardo A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional diffusion model has been developed for the complex process of Zircaloy oxidation during water quenching, calculating the hydrogen liberated as a gas and the hydrogen stored in the metal. The model was developed on the basis of small-scale separate-effects quench experiments performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The new oxide surface and the new metallic surface produced by cracking of the oxide during quenching are calculated for each experiment performed at 1200 , 1400 and 1600 C degrees using as-received Zircaloy-4 (no pre oxidation) and with Zircaloy specimens pre oxidised to give oxide thicknesses of 100μm and 300μm. The results are relevant to accident management in light water reactors. (author)

  17. Hot gas stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide from simulated and actual in situ retort waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    This study proved that ammonia and carbon dioxide could be removed from retort water by hot gas stripping and that overall transfer rates were slower than for physical desorption alone. The ammonia in solution complexed with the carbonate species with the result that the CO/sub 2/ transfer rates were linked to the relatively slower desorption of NH/sub 3/ from solution. Ionic reactions in the liquid phase limited the quantity of free NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/, thus decreasing the driving forces for mass transfer. The retort water exhibited foaming tendencies that affected the interfacial area which should be taken into account if a stripping tower is considered on a larger scale. Transfer unit heights were calculated for the process conditions studied and correlated such that scaleup to increased capacities is possible.

  18. Simulation, integration, and economic analysis of gas-to-liquid processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Buping; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M.; Elbashir, Nimir O.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-to-liquid (GTL) involves the chemical conversion of natural gas into synthetic crude that can be upgraded and separated into different useful hydrocarbon fractions including liquid transportation fuels. Such technology can also be used to convert other abundant natural resources such as coal and biomass to fuels and value added chemicals (referred to as coal-to-liquid (CTL) and biomass-to-liquid (BTL)). A leading GTL technology is the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process. The objective of this work is to provide a techno-economic analysis of the GTL process and to identify optimization and integration opportunities for cost saving and reduction of energy usage while accounting for the environmental impact. First, a base-case flowsheet is synthesized to include the key processing steps of the plant. Then, a computer-aided process simulation is carried out to determine the key mass and energy flows, performance criteria, and equipment specifications. Next, energy and mass integration studies are performed to address the following items: (a) heating and cooling utilities, (b) combined heat and power (process cogeneration), (c) management of process water, (c) optimization of tail gas allocation, and (d) recovery of catalyst-supporting hydrocarbon solvents. Finally, these integration studies are conducted and the results are documented in terms of conserving energy and mass resources as well as providing economic impact. Finally, an economic analysis is undertaken to determine the plant capacity needed to achieve the break-even point and to estimate the return on investment for the base-case study. (author)

  19. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep-water

  20. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of water transport in gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Liang; Cheng, Ping [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Power Machinery and Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, DongChuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-06-15

    The effect of wettability on water transport dynamics in gas diffusion layer (GDL) is investigated by simulating water invasion in an initially gas-filled GDL using the multiphase free-energy lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The results show that wettability plays a significant role on water saturation distribution in two-phase flow in the uniform wetting GDL. For highly hydrophobicity, the water transport falls in the regime of capillary fingering, while for neutral wettability, water transport exhibits the characteristic of stable displacement, although both processes are capillary force dominated flow with same capillary numbers. In addition, the introduction of hydrophilic paths in the GDL leads the water to flow through the hydrophilic pores preferentially. The resulting water saturation distributions show that the saturation in the GDL has little change after water breaks through the GDL, and further confirm that the selective introduction of hydrophilic passages in the GDL would facilitate the removal of liquid water more effectively, thus alleviating the flooding in catalyst layer (CL) and GDL. The LBM approach presented in this study provides an effective tool to investigate water transport phenomenon in the GDL at pore-scale level with wettability distribution taken into consideration. (author)

  2. Simultaneous stack-gas scrubbing and waste water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous treatment of wastewater and S02-laden stack gas make both treatments more efficient and economical. According to results of preliminary tests, solution generated by stack gas scrubbing cycle reduces bacterial content of wastewater. Both processess benefit by sharing concentrations of iron.

  3. Method and apparatus for rapid adjustment of process gas inventory in gaseous diffusion cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is specified for the operation of a gaseous diffusion cascade wherein electrically driven compressors circulate a process gas through a plurality of serially connected gaseous diffusion stages to establish first and second countercurrently flowing cascade streams of process gas, one of the streams being at a relatively low pressure and enriched in a component of the process gas and the other being at a higher pressure and depleted in the same, and wherein automatic control systems maintain the stage process gas pressures by positioning process gas flow control valve openings at values which are functions of the difference between reference-signal inputs to the systems, and signal inputs proportional to the process gas pressures in the gaseous diffusion stages associated with the systems, the cascade process gas inventory being altered, while the cascade is operating, by simultaneously directing into separate process-gas freezing zones a plurality of substreams derived from one of the first and second streams at different points along the lengths thereof to solidify approximately equal weights of process gas in the zone while reducing the reference-signal inputs to maintain the positions of the control valves substantially unchanged despite the removal of process gas inventory via the substreams. (author)

  4. Recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) for reliable and low inventory processing of highly tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseli, M.; Schaub, M.; Ulrich, D.

    1992-01-01

    The detritiation of highly tritiated water by liquid phase catalytic exchange needs dilution of the feed with water to tritium concentrations suitable for catalyst and safety rules and to assure flow rates large enough for wetting the catalyst. Dilution by recycling detritiated water from within the exchange process has three advantages: the amount and concentration of the water for dilution is controlled within the exchange process, there is no additional water load to processes located downstream RACE, and the ratio of gas to liquid flow rates in the exchange column could be adjusted by using several recycles differing in amount and concentration to avoid an excessively large number of theoretical separation stages. In this paper, the flexibility of the recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) and its effect on the cryogenic distillation are demonstrated for the detritiation of the highly tritiated water from a tritium breeding blanket

  5. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  6. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  7. Prediction of Mass Flow Rate in Supersonic Natural Gas Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Chuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mass flow rate of natural gas through the supersonic separator was numerically calculated by various cubic equations of state. The numerical results show that the compressibility factor and specific heat ratio for ideal gas law diverge remarkably from real gas models at a high inlet pressure. Simultaneously, the deviation of mass flow calculated by the ideal and real gas models reaches over 10 %. The difference increases with the lower of the inlet temperature regardless of the inlet pressure. A higher back pressure results in an earlier location of the shock wave. The pressure ratio of 0.72 is the first threshold to get the separator work normally. The second threshold is 0.95, in which case the whole flow is subsonic and cannot reach the choked state. The shock position moves upstream with the real gas model compared to the ideal gas law in the cyclonic separation section.

  8. Water and dissolved gas geochemistry of the monomictic Paterno sinkhole (central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Nocentini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the chemical and isotope features of water and dissolved gases from lake Paterno (max. depth 54 m, a sinkhole located in the NE sector of the S. Vittorino plain (Rieti, Central Italy, where evidences of past and present hydrothermal activity exists. In winter (February 2011 lake Paterno waters were almost completely mixed, whereas in summer time (July 2011 thermal and chemical stratifications established. During the stratification period, water and dissolved gas chemistry along the vertical water column were mainly controlled by biological processes, such as methanogenesis, sulfate-reduction, calcite precipitation, denitrification, and NH4 and H2 production. Reducing conditions at the interface between the bottom sediments and the anoxic waters are responsible for the relatively high concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe and manganese (Mn, likely present in their reduced oxidation state. Minerogenic and biogenic products were recognized at the lake bottom even during the winter sampling. At relatively shallow depth the distribution of CH4 and CO2 was controlled by methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthesis, respectively. The carbon isotope signature of CO2 indicates a significant contribution of deep-originated inorganic CO2 that is related to the hydrothermal system feeding the CO2-rich mineralized springs discharging in the surrounding areas of lake Paterno. The seasonal lake stratification likely controls the vertical and horizontal distribution of fish populations in the different periods of the year.

  9. Application of finite inverse gas chromatography in hypromellose acetate succinate-water-acetone systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Wei; Sturm, Derek R; Moser, Justin D; Danner, Ronald P

    2016-09-30

    A modification of a GC was developed to investigate both infinitely dilute and finite concentrations of solvents in polymers. Thermodynamic properties of hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-L)-acetone-water systems are important for the optimization of spray-drying processes used in pharmaceutical manufacturing of solid dispersion formulations. These properties, at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, were investigated using capillary column inverse gas chromatography (CCIGC). Water was much less soluble in the HPMCAS-L than acetone. Experiments were also conducted at infinitely dilute concentrations of one of the solvents in HPMCAS-L that was already saturated with the other solvent. Overall the partitioning of the water was not significantly affected by the presence of either water or acetone in the polymer. The acetone partition coefficient decreased as either acetone or water was added to the HPMCAS-L. A representation of the HPMCAS-L structure in terms of UNIFAC groups has been developed. With these groups, the UNIFAC-vdw-FV model did a reasonable job of predicting the phase equilibria in the binary and ternary systems. The Flory-Huggins correlation with fitted interaction parameters represented the data well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring of trace chloride ions at different stages of the gas production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y. El Naggar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty gas and liquid samples at different stages of Obaiyed gas plant in Egypt were selected and subjected for determining chloride ion and hydrocarbon compositions. The trace levels of chloride in the water extracted from natural gas, condensate, Benfield and glycol samples were achieved using ion chromatograph (IC, electrical, conductivity and potentiometric methods, respectively. The hydrocarbon compositions were analyzed and evaluated using capillary gas chromatography. The chloride ions in natural gas and condensate are a function of water content and their concentration mainly depends on the separation efficiency. Variability in natural gas and condensate compositions seasonally is not an uncommon occurrence. Our aim is monitoring of chloride ion to select and optimize the conditions of sweetening and dehydration regenerators in order to follow and prevent their gradient in gas plant.

  11. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... conclusion is that GERG-water must be used with caution outside its specified working range. For some selected natural gas mixtures the two models also perform very much alike. The water content of the mixtures decreases with increasing amount of heavier components, and it seems that both models slightly...

  12. Process for the preparation of deuterium enriched water in the production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    A synthesis gas facility is operated for n consecutive periods. During the first period excess feed water is added to the facility. The effluent from the resulting mixture is fed to a storage container. During the following n-1 operating periods the stored effluent water is used as feed for the synthesis gas facility. The effluent from each operating period is stored in layers with corresponding deuterium concentration in the storage container. The effluent from the last operating period involving the highest deuterium concentration is fed to a second container and from there to a heavy water production unit. In order to recuperate the deuterium contained in the gas mixture leaving the condensor (consisting of hydrogen, vapour and residual compounds), the mixture is fed to an exchange stage. There the mixture is isotopically exchanged with additional water in a cross flow whereby this water gets enriched in deuterium and is fed to the synthesis gas facility. The process leads to an improved yield of heavy water in the heavy water production facility

  13. Application of radiation to processing of raw water and waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1988-01-01

    Some studies and its results on irradiation of water are outlined. Ten precursory substances for trihalomethane, humic acid, resorcinol, methylglyoxal, phloroglucinol, pyruvic acid, 4-methoxyphenol, hydroquinone, n,n-diethylaniline and p-quinone, are separately dissolved in refined water and irradiated with cobalt-60 and gamma rays. Data on the dose required to reduce the total organic carbon by 50 percent are tabulated. An investigation is made on the effects of irradiation on the separation of fumic acid in liquid chromatography. The four peaks originally found in the spectrum decrease in peak area while two new peaks appear as the dose increases. The average molecular weight shows a maximum, indicating that irradiation seems to cause crosslinking. Capillary gas chromatography is performed to determine the effects of irradiation on the odor of water. For trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethane (inital concentration 90 ppb), which represent the major 'high-tech contaminants', 7.5 x 10 2 rad is required to meet the regulations. A study on the sterilization effects of irradiation is also outlined. Further studies are required to develop a practical process that uses irradiation to decompose organic substances in heavily contaminated waste water. (Nogami, K.)

  14. On factors influencing air-water gas exchange in emergent wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Engel, Victor C.; Ferron, Sara; Hickman, Benjamin; Choi, Jay; Harvey, Judson W.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of gas exchange in wetlands is important in order to determine fluxes of climatically and biogeochemically important trace gases and to conduct mass balances for metabolism studies. Very few studies have been conducted to quantify gas transfer velocities in wetlands, and many wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations used in oceanographic or limnological settings are inappropriate under conditions found in wetlands. Here six measurements of gas transfer velocities are made with SF6 tracer release experiments in three different years in the Everglades, a subtropical peatland with surface water flowing through emergent vegetation. The experiments were conducted under different flow conditions and with different amounts of emergent vegetation to determine the influence of wind, rain, water flow, waterside thermal convection, and vegetation on air-water gas exchange in wetlands. Measured gas transfer velocities under the different conditions ranged from 1.1 cm h−1 during baseline conditions to 3.2 cm h−1 when rain and water flow rates were high. Commonly used wind speed/gas exchange relationships would overestimate the gas transfer velocity by a factor of 1.2 to 6.8. Gas exchange due to thermal convection was relatively constant and accounted for 14 to 51% of the total measured gas exchange. Differences in rain and water flow among the different years were responsible for the variability in gas exchange, with flow accounting for 37 to 77% of the gas exchange, and rain responsible for up to 40%.

  15. Method for confirming flow pattern of gas-water flow in horizontal tubes under rolling state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Feng; Yan Changqi

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study on the flow patterns of gas-water flow was carried out in horizontal tubes under rolling state. It was found that the pressure drop of two phase flow was with an obvious periodical characteristic. The flow pattern of the gas-water flow was distinguished according to the characteristics of the pressure drop in this paper. It was proved that the characteristics of the pressure drop can distinguish the flow pattern of gas-water flow correctly through comparing with the result of careful observation and high speed digital camera. (authors)

  16. Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG - Marcellus Gas Well Water Sources View

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains all approved water sources within water managment plans (WMP). A WMP contains water sources utilized in the fracture stimulation of Marcellus...

  17. Reduction and Analysis of Low Temperature Shift Heterogeneous Catalyst for Water Gas Reaction in Ammonia Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain additional quantities of hydrogen after the reforming reactions of natural gas and protect the ammonia synthesis catalyst, it is crucial to achieve and maintain maximum possible activity, selectivity and stability of the low temperature shift catalyst for conversion of water gas reaction during its lifetime. Whereas the heterogeneous catalyst comes in oxidized form, it is of the utmost importance to conduct the reduction procedure properly. The proper reduction procedure and continuous analysis of its performance would ensure the required activity, selectivity and stability throughout the catalyst’s service time. For the proper reduction procedure ofthe low temperature shift catalyst, in addition to process equipment, also necessary is a reliable and realistic system for temperature measurements, which will be effective for monitoring the exothermal temperature curves through all catalyst bed layers. For efficiency evaluation of low shift temperature catalyst reduction and its optimization, it is necessary to determine at regular time intervals the temperature approach to equilibrium and temperature profiles of individual layers by means of "S" and "die off" temperature exothermal curves. Based on the obtained data, the optimum inlet temperature could be determined, in order to maximally extend the service life of the heterogeneous catalyst as much as possible, and achieve the optimum equilibrium for conversion of the water gas. This paper presents the methodology for in situ reduction of the low temperature shift heterogeneous catalyst and the developed system for monitoring its individual layers to achieve the minimum possible content of carbon monoxide at the exit of the reactor. The developed system for temperature monitoring through heterogeneous catalyst layers provides the proper procedure for reduction and adjustment of optimum process working conditions for the catalyst by the continuous increase of reactor inlet

  18. Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry's attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand

  19. Waste water reuse pathways for processing tomato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battilani, A; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

      Direct or indirect water reuse involves several aspects: contamination by faecal, inorganic and xenobiotic pollutants; high levels of suspended solids and salinity; rational use of the dissolved nutrients (particularly nitrogen). The challenge is apply new strategies and technologies which allows...... to use the lowest irrigation water quality without harming nor food safety neither yield and fruit or derivatives quality. The EU project SAFIR aims help farmers solve problems with low quality water and decreased access to water. New water treatment devices (prototypes) are under development to allow...... a safe use of waste water produced by small communities/industries (≤2000 EI) or of treated water discharged in irrigation channels. Water treatment technologies are coupled with irrigation strategies and technologies to obtain a flexible, easy to use, integrated management....

  20. In situ water and gas injection experiments performed in the Hades Underground Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volckaert, G.; Ortiz, L.; Put, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium). Geological Waste Disposal Unit

    1995-12-31

    The movement of water and gas through plastic clay is an important subject in the research at SCK-CEN on the possible disposal of high level radioactive waste in the Boom clay layer at Mol. Since the construction of the Hades underground research facility in 1983, SCK-CEN has developed and installed numerous piezometers for the geohydrologic characterization and for in situ radionuclide migration experiments. In situ gas and water injection experiments have been performed at two different locations in the underground laboratory. The first location is a multi filter piezometer installed vertically at the bottom of the shaft in 1986. The second location is a three dimensional configuration of four horizontal multi piezometers installed from the gallery. This piezometer configuration was designed for the MEGAS (Modelling and Experiments on GAS migration through argillaceous rocks) project and installed in 1992. It contains 29 filters at distances between 10 m and 15 m from the gallery in the clay. Gas injection experiments show that gas breakthrough occurs at a gas overpressure of about 0.6 MPa. The breakthrough occurs by the creation of gas pathways along the direction of lowest resistance i.e. the zone of low effective stress resulting from the drilling of the borehole. The water injections performed in a filter -- not used for gas injection -- show that the flow of water is also influenced by the mechanical stress conditions. Low effective stress leads to higher hydraulic conductivity. However, water overpressures up to 1.3 MPa did not cause hydrofracturing. Water injections performed in a filter previously used for gas injections, show that the occluded gas hinders the water flow and reduces the hydraulic conductivity by a factor two.

  1. Study of the heavy water regeneration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavcic, E.

    1965-11-01

    Experience derived from heavy water reactor operation showed degradation and dilution of heavy water to be inevitable and depends on the type of reactor. Dilution of heavy water during operation of the RA and the RB reactors is shown in this report. Principles and procedures of heavy water regeneration by electrolysis, fractional distillation, cleaning, prevention of tritium contamination are described as well as separation columns

  2. Chemical hot gas purification for biomass gasification processes; Chemische Heissgasreinigung bei Biomassevergasungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The German government decided to increase the percentage of renewable energy up to 20 % of all energy consumed in 2020. The development of biomass gasification technology is advanced compared to most of the other technologies for producing renewable energy. So the overall efficiency of biomass gasification processes (IGCC) already increased to values above 50 %. Therefore, the production of renewable energy attaches great importance to the thermochemical biomass conversion. The feedstock for biomass gasification covers biomasses such as wood, straw and further energy plants. The detrimental trace elements released during gasification of these biomasses, e.g. KCl, H{sub 2}S and HCl, cause corrosion and harm downstream devices. Therefore, gas cleaning poses an especial challenge. In order to improve the overall efficiency this thesis aims at the development of gas cleaning concepts for the allothermic, water blown gasification at 800 C and 1 bar (Guessing-Process) as well as for the autothermic, water and oxygen blown gasification at 950 C and 18 bar (Vaernamo-Process). Although several mechanisms for KCl- and H{sub 2}S-sorption are already well known, the achievable reduction of the contamination concentration is still unknown. Therefore, calculations on the produced syngas and the chemical hot gas cleaning were done with a thermodynamic process model using SimuSage. The syngas production was included in the calculations because the knowledge of the biomass syngas composition is very limited. The results of these calculations prove the dependence of syngas composition on H{sub 2}/C-ratio and ROC (Relative Oxygen Content). Following the achievable sorption limits were detected via experiments. The KCl containing syngases were analysed by molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Furthermore, an optimised H{sub 2}S-sorbent was developed because the examined sorbents exceeded the sorption limit of 1 ppmv. The calculated sorption limits were compared to the limits

  3. Underground Coal Gasification: Rates of Post Processing Gas Transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Stanczyk, K.; Šolcová, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 12 (2014), s. 1707-1715 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7C12017 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2011-00002 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : underground coal gas ification * gas transport * textural properties Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  4. Desalting a process cooling water using nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radier, R.G.J.; van Oers, C.W.; Steenbergen, A.; Wessling, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    The cooling water system of a chemical plant of Akzo Nobel is a partly open system. The site is located at the North Sea. The air in contact with the cooling water contains seawater droplets dissolving and increasing the chloride concentration. The cooling water contains chromate to protect the

  5. An evaluation of water quality in private drinking water wells near natural gas extraction sites in the Barnett Shale formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Brian E; Hunt, Laura R; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Oka, Hyppolite; Walton, Jayme L; Hopkins, Dan; Osorio, Alexandra; Bjorndal, Bryan; Hu, Qinhong H; Schug, Kevin A

    2013-09-03

    Natural gas has become a leading source of alternative energy with the advent of techniques to economically extract gas reserves from deep shale formations. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale formation of North Texas. We evaluated samples from 100 private drinking water wells using analytical chemistry techniques. Analyses revealed that arsenic, selenium, strontium and total dissolved solids (TDS) exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) in some samples from private water wells located within 3 km of active natural gas wells. Lower levels of arsenic, selenium, strontium, and barium were detected at reference sites outside the Barnett Shale region as well as sites within the Barnett Shale region located more than 3 km from active natural gas wells. Methanol and ethanol were also detected in 29% of samples. Samples exceeding MCL levels were randomly distributed within areas of active natural gas extraction, and the spatial patterns in our data suggest that elevated constituent levels could be due to a variety of factors including mobilization of natural constituents, hydrogeochemical changes from lowering of the water table, or industrial accidents such as faulty gas well casings.

  6. Electro-membrane processes for flue gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, T. F.

    1997-12-31

    Various techniques for NO removal in Membrane Contactor were considered. However the NO absorption in a liquid adsorbent with chemical enhancement and its ease for regeneration, was selected as the most practicable choice. Various different compounds for chemical enhancement were studied and Fe(II)-chelate enhanced adsorbent was selected for further studies. The technical feasibility of Fe(II)-chelate enhanced adsorbent for obtaining greater than 80% NO removal have been successfully established. Even though the membrane area required for greater than 80% NO removal has been found to be about 500 m{sup 2}/MW{sub c} (compared to 50 - 150 m{sup 2}/MW{sub c}, for 95% SO{sub 2} removal, depending on the membrane characteristics), suitable Membrane Contactor design has been proposed for carrying out the process at an acceptable gas side pressure drop. The electro-membrane processes for the regeneration of adsorbents have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical studies have concerned the study of basic functions of both the bipolar membranes and charge laden (anion/cation) membranes. Suitable experimental techniques have been devised for studying of these basic parameters (e.g. charge transport number, salt diffusion through membranes, current-voltage characteristics of bipolar membranes and electrical resistance of charge laden membranes). These parameters have further been utilized in the mechanistic model of combined membranes in an ED cell (electrodialysis). Based on these fundamental studies and analysis of process requirements, suitable configuration of ED cell has been developed and verified by experimental studies. The effect of both the stack design parameters (e.g. number of cells, membrane type and spacer design) and the operational parameters (e.g. temperature, electrolyte concentration, liquid velocity and current density) have been studied for optimization of energy consumption for regeneration of loaded adsorbents. As a result

  7. Process for measuring the helium residual gas pressure and circuit for carrying out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.; Cesnak, L.

    1983-01-01

    In cryotechnic devices, the quality of the thermal insulation can be monitored by checking the pressure of the residual gas. A process is proposed in which a thin super-conducting wire or a superconducting layer acting as vacuum sensor has a heating pulse reaching the critical current applied to it, which produces a local normal conduction zone. The vacuum sensor has a measuring current of constant amount applied to it, which causes a voltage drop on its resistance during the time in which the normal conduction zone exists, the cooling time. The pressure of the residual gas is a function of the integral of the voltage drop and is measured by integrating the voltage during the cooling time. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  9. Development of new process network for gas chromatograph and analyzers connected with SCADA system and Digital Control Computers at Cernavoda NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deneanu, Cornel; Popa Nemoiu, Dragos; Nica, Dana; Bucur, Cosmin

    2007-01-01

    The continuous monitoring of gas mixture concentrations (deuterium/ hydrogen/oxygen/nitrogen) accumulated in 'Moderator Cover Gas', 'Liquid Control Zone' and 'Heat Transport D 2 O Storage Tank Cover Gas', as well as the continuous monitoring of Heavy Water into Light Water concentration in 'Boilers Steam', 'Boilers Blown Down', 'Moderator heat exchangers', and 'Recirculated Water System', sensing any leaks of Cernavoda NPP U1 led to requirement of developing a new process network for gas chromatograph and analyzers connected to the SCADA system and Digital Control Computers of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1. In 2005 it was designed and implemented the process network for gas chromatograph which connected the gas chromatograph equipment to the SCADA system and Digital Control Computers of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1. Later this process network for gas chromatograph has been extended to connect the AE13 and AE14 Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analyzers with either. The Gas Chromatograph equipment measures with best accuracy the mixture gases (deuterium/ hydrogen/oxygen/nitrogen) concentration. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) AE13 and AE14 Analyzers measure the Heavy Water into Light Water concentration in Boilers Steam, Boilers BlownDown, Moderator heat exchangers, and Recirculated Water System, monitoring and signaling any leaks. The Gas Chromatograph equipment and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) AE13 and AE14 Analyzers use the new OPC (Object Link Embedded for Process Control) technologies available in ABB's VistaNet network for interoperability with automation equipment. This new process network has interconnected the ABB chromatograph and Fourier Transform Infrared analyzers with plant Digital Control Computers using new technology. The result was an increased reliability and capability for inspection and improved system safety

  10. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  11. Process for fabrication of dry flue gas gypsum. Verfahren zur Herstellung von trockenem Rauchgasgips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirsching, F.; Hueller, R.; Limmer, B.

    1984-06-20

    According to the invention gypsum from flue gas wet desulfurization is dried without loss of crystallization water by a 1-4% sidestream of the flue gas in a suspended bed dryer and is subsequently separated in a cyclone. The sidestream is removed after the electrostatic precipitator, where the gas temperature is 100-130 degrees, and returned to the main gas stream prior to desulfurization, thus preventing the dehydration of the gypsum and eliminating the energy costs of reheating the gas stream to prevent acid condensation.

  12. Measurement of water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Yu, Kong-Xian; Gong, Yi-Xian

    2018-04-17

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method for quantitatively analyzing water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique. This headspace gas chromatographic technique was based on measuring the water vapor released from a series of wheat flour samples with different contents of water addition. According to the different trends between the vapor and wheat flour phase before and after the water absorption capacity in wheat flour, a turning point (corresponding to water absorption capacity in wheat flour) can be obtained by fitting the data of the water gas chromatography peak area from different wheat flour samples. The data showed that the phase equilibrium in the vial can be achieved in 25 min at desired temperature (35°C). The relative standard deviation of the reaction headspace gas chromatographic technique in water absorption capacity determination was within 3.48%, the relative differences has been determined by comparing the water absorption capacity obtained from this new analytical technique with the data from the reference technique (i.e., the filtration method), which are less than 8.92%. The new headspace gas chromatographic method is automated, accurate and be a reliable tool for quantifying water absorption capacity in wheat flour in both laboratory research and mill applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Water Mock-up for the Sodium Waste Treatment Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ho Yun; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Byung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    It is important to safely treat the waste sodium which was produced from the sodium cooled fast reactors and the sodium facilities. About 1.3 tons of sodium waste has accumulated at KAERI from the sodium experiments which have been carried out since 1990. Also, large scaled sodium experiments are scheduled to verify the design of the sodium cooled fast reactor. As a treatment method for the waste sodium produced at the sodium facility, an investigation of the reaction procedure of the waste sodium with the sodium hydroxide aqueous has been developed. The NOAH process was developed in France for the treatment of waste sodium produced from sodium facilities and reactors. In the NOAH process, a small amount of sodium waste is continuously injected into the upper space which is formed on the free surface of the aqueous and slowly reacted with sodium hydroxide aqueous. Since the density of the sodium is lower than that of the aqueous, the injected sodium waste sometimes accumulates above the free surface of the sodium hydroxide aqueous, and its reaction rate becomes slow or suddenly increases. In the improved process, the sodium was injected into a reaction vessel filled with a sodium hydroxide aqueous through an atomizing nozzle installed on a lower level than that of the aqueous to maintain the reaction uniformly. Fig.1 shows the sodium waste process which was proposed in KAERI. The aqueous is composed of 60% sodium hydroxide, and its temperature is about 60 .deg. C. The process is an exothermic reaction. The hydrogen gas is generated, and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide increases in this process. It needs several systems for the process, i.e. a waste sodium injection, a cooling of the aqueous, hydrogen ventilation, and neutralization with nitric acid. The atomizing nozzle was designed to inject the sodium with the nitrogen gas which supplies a heat to the sodium to prevent its solidification and to uniformly mix the sodium with the aqueous. There are

  14. Numerical modelling of methane oxidation efficiency and coupled water-gas-heat reactive transfer in a sloping landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S; Ng, C W W; Leung, A K; Liu, H W

    2017-10-01

    Microbial aerobic methane oxidation in unsaturated landfill cover involves coupled water, gas and heat reactive transfer. The coupled process is complex and its influence on methane oxidation efficiency is not clear, especially in steep covers where spatial variations of water, gas and heat are significant. In this study, two-dimensional finite element numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the performance of unsaturated sloping cover. The numerical model was calibrated using a set of flume model test data, and was then subsequently used for parametric study. A new method that considers transient changes of methane concentration during the estimation of the methane oxidation efficiency was proposed and compared against existing methods. It was found that a steeper cover had a lower oxidation efficiency due to enhanced downslope water flow, during which desaturation of soil promoted gas transport and hence landfill gas emission. This effect was magnified as the cover angle and landfill gas generation rate at the bottom of the cover increased. Assuming the steady-state methane concentration in a cover would result in a non-conservative overestimation of oxidation efficiency, especially when a steep cover was subjected to rainfall infiltration. By considering the transient methane concentration, the newly-modified method can give a more accurate oxidation efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Process for treating waste water containing hydrazine from power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for treating waste water containing hydrazine from nuclear power stations is proposed, characterized by the fact that the water is taken continuously through a water decomposition cell. If the water does not have sufficient conductivity itself, a substance raising the electrical conductivity is added to the water to be treated. The electrolysis is situated in the waste water tank. (orig./RB) [de

  16. Analysis of Off Gas From Disintegration Process of Graphite Matrix by Electrochemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Chen Jing

    2010-01-01

    Using electrochemical method with salt solutions as electrolyte, some gaseous substances (off gas) would be generated during the disintegration of graphite from high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements. The off gas is determined to be composed of H 2 , O 2 , N 2 , CO 2 and NO x by gas chromatography. Only about 1.5% graphite matrix is oxidized to CO 2 . Compared to the direct burning-graphite method, less off gas,especially CO 2 , is generated in the disintegration process of graphite by electrochemical method and the treatment of off gas becomes much easier. (authors)

  17. The Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost Implications of Municipal Water Supply & Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Winter, Thelma

    All man-made structures and materials have a design life. Across the United States there is a common theme for our water and wastewater treatment facilities and infrastructure. The design life of many of our mid 20 th century water and wastewater infrastructures in the United States have reached or are reaching life expectancy limits (ASCE, 2010). To compound the financial crisis of keeping up with the degradation, meeting and exceeding quality standards has never been more important in order to protect local fresh water supplies. This thesis analyzes the energy consumption of a municipal water and wastewater treatment system from a Lake Erie intake through potable treatment and back through wastewater treatment then discharge. The system boundary for this thesis includes onsite energy consumed by the treatment system and distribution/reclamation system as well as the energy consumed by the manufacturing of treatment chemicals applied during the study periods. By analyzing energy consumption, subsequent implications from greenhouse gas emissions and financial expenditures were quantified. Through the segregation of treatment and distribution processes from non-process energy consumption, such as heating, lighting, and air handling, this study identified that the potable water treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.42E+08 kBtu, spent 5,812,144 for treatment and distribution, and emitted 28,793 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. Likewise, the wastewater treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.45E+08 kBtu, spent 3,331,961 for reclamation and treatment, and emitted 43,780 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. The area with the highest energy usage, financial expenditure, and greenhouse gas emissions for the potable treatment facility and distribution system was from the manufacturing of the treatment chemicals, 1.10E+08 kBtu, 3.7 million, and 17,844 metric tons of CO2 equivalent, respectively. Of the onsite energy (1.4E-03 kWh per gallon

  18. Downstream gas processing opportunities arising from the 1990's quest for a quality environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geren, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last several years the former wart on your favorite daughter's nose (gas liquids processing) has become a most cherished body part, to paraphrase 1991 remarks of a U.S. gas processing leader. The dramatic recent spreads between liquids prices and the cost of feedstock natural gas have provided spectacular performance for processors. However, market prices for liquids will probably track petroleum. One day soon natural gas's inherent value will rise to parity with petroleum on a heating value basis. As petroleum demands will probably be flat in the foreseeable term, and natural gas prices will rise, something must be done to preserve gas processors' margins. Radical change in the formulation of U.S. gasoline presents many opportunities for gas processor to diversify into synthesis of upgraded derivatives of natural gas and liquids, which derivatives have high value-added characteristics. Issues relating to the selection of derivatives, the required technology, and capital project considerations are discussed in this paper

  19. Volume fraction calculation in multiphase system such as oil-water-gas using neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Robson; Brandao, Luis E.B.; Salgado, Cesar Marques; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: robson@ien.gov.br; brandao@ien.gov.br; otero@ien.gov.br; cmnap@ien.gov.br; Schirru, Roberto; Silva, Ademir Xavier da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mails: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br; ademir@con.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    Multi-phase flows are common in diverse industrial sectors and the attainment of the volume fraction of each element that composes the flow system presents difficulties for the engineering process, therefore, to determine them is very important. In this work is presented methodology for determination of volume fractions in annular three-phase flow systems, such as oil-water-gas, based on the use of nuclear techniques and artificial intelligence. Using the principle of the fast-neutron transmission/scattering, come from an isotopic {sup 241}Am-Be source, and two point detectors, is gotten measured that they are influenced by the variations of the volume fractions of each phase present in the flow. An artificial neural network is trained to correlate such measures with the respective volume fractions. In order to get the data for training of the artificial neural network without necessity to carry through experiments, MCNP-X code is used, that simulates computational of the neutrons transport. The methodology is sufficiently advantageous, therefore, allows to develop a measurement system capable to determine the fractions of the phases (oil-water-gas), with proper requirements of each petroliferous installation and with national technology contributing, possibly, with reduction of costs and increase of productivity. (author)

  20. Preliminary study of synthesis gas production from water electrolysis, using the ELECTROFUEL® concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, L.; Gomes, J.; Puna, J.; Rodrigues, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary work on the generation of synthesis gas from water electrolysis using graphite electrodes without the separation of the generated gases. This is an innovative process, that has no similar work been done earlier. Preliminary tests allowed to establish correlations between the applied current to the electrolyser and flow rate and composition of the generated syngas, as well as a characterisation of generated carbon nanoparticles. The obtained syngas can further be used to produce synthetic liquid fuels, for example, methane, methanol or DME (dimethyl ether) in a catalytic reactor, in further stages of a present ongoing project, using the ELECTROFUEL ® concept. The main competitive advantage of this project lies in the built-in of an innovative technology product, from RE (renewable energy) power in remote locations, for example, islands, villages in mountains as an alternative for energy storage for mobility constraints. - Highlights: • Generation of synthesis gas from water electrolysis without separation of gases. • Obtained syngas: 7.7% CO; 10.3% O 2 and 2.0% CO 2 . • Syngas can further be used to produce synthetic liquid fuels

  1. Volume fraction calculation in multiphase system such as oil-water-gas using neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Robson; Brandao, Luis E.B.; Salgado, Cesar Marques; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Silva, Ademir Xavier da

    2007-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are common in diverse industrial sectors and the attainment of the volume fraction of each element that composes the flow system presents difficulties for the engineering process, therefore, to determine them is very important. In this work is presented methodology for determination of volume fractions in annular three-phase flow systems, such as oil-water-gas, based on the use of nuclear techniques and artificial intelligence. Using the principle of the fast-neutron transmission/scattering, come from an isotopic 241 Am-Be source, and two point detectors, is gotten measured that they are influenced by the variations of the volume fractions of each phase present in the flow. An artificial neural network is trained to correlate such measures with the respective volume fractions. In order to get the data for training of the artificial neural network without necessity to carry through experiments, MCNP-X code is used, that simulates computational of the neutrons transport. The methodology is sufficiently advantageous, therefore, allows to develop a measurement system capable to determine the fractions of the phases (oil-water-gas), with proper requirements of each petroliferous installation and with national technology contributing, possibly, with reduction of costs and increase of productivity. (author)

  2. Combined biological treatment of sinter plant waste water, blast furnace gas scrubber water polluted groundwater and coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine van Hoorn [Corus Staal, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Waste water from the Corus coke plant in IJmuiden had been handled by the activated sludge process since start-up in 1972 but in the eighties it was clear that although this removed most phenols, the rest of the COD and thiocyanate must also be removed before discharge. The paper describes the original water treatment process and the higher pressure gas scrubber system for removal of SO{sub 2}, heavy metals and other harmful components. It goes on to describe development of a combined biological treatment system, the heart of which is the so-called Bio 2000. The performance of this new plant is discussed. COD concentrations are very constant but Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) concentrations fluctuate. COD, TKN and heavy metals are in compliance but cyanide and suspended solids are not always so. A method of overcoming this is being sought. This paper was presented at a COMA meeting in March 2005 held in Scunthorpe, UK. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Electrolytic process for upgrading heavy water (Preprint No. PD-16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammohan, K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1989-04-01

    In the reactor system the heavy water gets depleted in concentration due to leakages, intermixing and vapour collection in boiler vault system etc. Electrolysis of water was used as a secondary plant to enrich the dilute heavy water produced in the primery plant by hydrogen-sulfide-water exchange process. The studies made in the development of this process for the upgrading of downgra ded heavy water by setting up a full size Electrolyser Test Assembly are discussed a nd complete design of a heavy water upgrading plant based on electrolytic process for MAPS and NAPP is described. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs

  4. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune N.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2 concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than interfaces with the opposite layering.

  5. Natural gas processing optimization in Espirito Santo plant; Sistema de otimizacao aplicado ao processamento de gas natural no Espirito Santo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Carlos Henrique de Oliveira; Costa, Fernando Lourenco Pinho da; Mazzini, Filipe Ferreira; Campos, Flavia Schittine [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Fabricio Carlos; Hamacher, Silvio [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work introduces the MODEP system, which was developed by PETROBRAS in association with PUC-Rio. The system objective is to support the gas processing and flow planning for the Espirito Santo PETROBRAS. The MODEP core is a non linear optimization model that allows the user to optimize the production of gas as well as to optimize the net present value. In addition, the system offers to the user a comprehensive asset of the gas network since its production fields until the products selling points. The development of this system was motivated by the sharp increase of the Espirito Santo gas production capacity as well as the increase in the number of its processing units. (author)

  6. Treatment of waters before use. Processes and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchet, P.

    2006-01-01

    Some industrial processes require a water without any particulate in suspension and stable with respect to various aspects: no post-precipitations, no interference with storage and distribution equipments (corrosion or fouling), no development of bacterial, algal or other type of fauna (no chemical nutrients) etc. The water preparation process used will be different depending on the origin of the water (surface or underground). This article describes, first, the different type of treatments depending on the origin of the water and on the quality requested (clear and stable water, drinkable water, specific complementary processes, different processing files). Then, in a second part, the application of these processes to some industries are given (beverage, food, textile, paper, steel-making, aerospace and automotive, petroleum, power plants, ultra-pure waters) and in particular the preparation of demineralized water for nuclear power plants is described. (J.S.)

  7. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  8. Hybrid membrane processes for water reuse

    OpenAIRE

    Pidou, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Water recycling is now widely accepted as a sustainable option to respond to the general increase of the fresh water demand, water shortages and for environment protection. Because greywater represents up to 70% of domestic wastewater volume but contains only 30% of the organic fraction and from 9 to 20% of the nutrients (Kujawa-Roeleveld and Zeeman, 2006), it is seen as one of the most appropriate sources to be treated and reuse. A broad range of technologies has been used for...

  9. Process for the extraction of tritium from heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombra, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is achieved by a process for the extraction of tritium from a liquid heavy water stream comprising: contacting the heavy water with a countercurrent gaseous deuterium stream in a column packed with a water-repellent catalyst such that tritium is transferred by isotopic exchange from the liquid heavy water stream to the gaseous deuterium stream

  10. Electricity storage by gas pumping. An introduction to thermodynamic storage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruer, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    To date, Pumped Hydro Storage (PHS) is practically the only technology used to store large quantities of electricity. There are however other ways to achieve the same goal. There are not yet well known, because the interest for large scale storage is quite new A complete family of storage technologies can be defined as 'Thermodynamic Storage Systems'. Their only common factor is that a gas is pumped and expanded in the process. If the gas is air taken from the atmosphere and discharged to it, the system is said 'an open system'. This is already developed in the form of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Different embodiments are possible, following the way the heat gene - rated during the compression stage is conserved. The compressed air is generally stored in underground caverns created in deep salt formations. 2 installations are presently operating and many projects are envisaged. if the gas circulates in closed loop within the plant, the system is said 'a closed system' In this case, the energy is stored as heat and/or cold at different temperature levels. A great variety of technologies can be imagined and are under development, using different gases (e.g. argon, CO 2 ) and different temperature ranges. PHS and CAES require specific sites for water reservoirs or underground caverns. The dosed systems can be installed basically anywhere. (author)

  11. Process using sorbents for the removal of SOx from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnavaia, T.J.; Amareskera, J.; Polansky, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing the SO x components from a flue gas stream containing oxygen, sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide from the combustion of coal from a coal-fired boiler which comprises combusting the coal in the boiler to provide the flue gas stream and contacting the the gas stream with a heated sorbent composition at 400 degrees to 1000 degrees C wherein the the sorbent before being heated is selected from the group consisting of a layered double hydroxide composition of formula: [M 1-x II M x III (OH) 2 ](A n- ) x/n · yH 2 O wherein M II is a divalent metal cation and M III is a trivalent metal cation selected from the group consisting of Group IIA. IIB and IIIA metals as the cation which form metal oxides and which are capable of reacting with SO 2 to form metal sulfites and SO 3 to form metal sulfates, A is an interlayer anion of charge n- which comprises at least one metal atoms selected from the group consisting of main group metals and transition metals which provide oxidation of sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide in an amount sufficient that the layered double hydroxide structure promotes the oxidation of the sulfur dioxide to the sulfur trioxide at the combustion conditions within the coal-fired boiler, wherein y is moles of water

  12. Flow structure of conical distributed multiple gas jets injected into a water chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Yu, Yonggang [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Based on an underwater gun firing project, a mock bullet with several holes on the head was designed and experimented to observe the combustion gas injected into a cylindrical water chamber through this mock bullet. The combustion gas jets contain one vertical central jet and 4 to 8 slant lateral jets. A high speed camera system was used to record the expansion of gas jets in the experimental study. In numerical simulations, the Euler two-fluid model and volume of fluid method were adopted to describe the gas-liquid flow. The results show the backflow zone in lateral jet is the main factor influencing the gas-liquid turbulent mixing in downstream. On cross sections, the gas volume fraction increased with time but the growth rate decreased. With a change of nozzle structure, the gas fraction was more affected than the shock structure.

  13. Process for producing synthetic ammonia gas. Verfahren zur Erzeugung von Ammoniak-Synthesegas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meckel, J F; Messerschmidt, D; Wagener, D

    1984-01-12

    The invention refers to a process for producing synthetic ammonia gas from gases containing hydrocarbons, which is reformed catalytically and autothermally with a synthesis gas containing oxygen and then subjected to conversion to synthesis gas containing carbon dioxide and hydrogen. In order to simplify the plant required for such a process, the invention provides that part of the gas main flow is subjected to a multistage alternating pressure absorption plant (PSA plant) in a bypass of the gas main flow and the separated hydrogen is returned to the remaining gas main flow, in order to set the required H/sub 2/N/sub 2/ ratio and that the fission gas is subject to carbon dioxide washing and methanizing after conversion. This process therefore does not need a pipe splitting furnace and enrichment of the air with oxygen.

  14. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, H Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N

    2010-05-04

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface temperature of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model predictions were largely confirmed by data on 202 species in five taxa--insects, birds, bird eggs, mammals, and plants--spanning nine orders of magnitude in rate of gas exchange. Discrepancies between model predictions and data seemed to arise from biologically interesting violations of model assumptions, which emphasizes how poorly we understand gas exchange in some taxa. The universal model provides a unified conceptual framework for analyzing exchange-associated water losses across taxa with radically different metabolic and exchange systems.

  15. Applying ACF to desulfurization process from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yi; Zhang Zhigang; Tang Qiang; Cao Zidong

    2004-01-01

    Inasmuch as the status of environmental pollution caused by SO 2 is more and more serious and the policy of environmental protection is executed more and more strictly, desulfurization from flue gas (FGD) is introduced to a wide-spread field of national economy. By a comparison with lime-limestone method, the application of adsorption method in FGD is more effective in desulfurization and more adapted to the situation of our country in respect of its more valuable byproduct. However, the technique of adsorption method is limited by the large amount of adsorbent used. In this paper, activated carbon fiber (ACF) is proposed as a new type of adsorbent to apply in FGD. A series of experiments have been made in order to compare the performances between ACF and granular activated carbon (GAC) which has been mostly used. Experiments show that under the same working conditions ACF's adsorption capacity is 16.6 times as high as that of GAC, mass loss rate is 1/12 of GAC's, desorption efficiency of ACF can reach 99.9%. The theory of micropore adsorption dynamics is adopted to analyze the characteristics of both adsorbents. It is indicated that adsorbability and perfectibility of desorption are tightly related to the distribution of pores and the surface micromechanism of adsorbent surface. The accessibility of pores for specified adsorptive and the effects of capillary condensation are crucial factors to influence the process of FGD. According to the research of different adsorbents, conclusion can be drawn that ACF is a kind of good material with a strong selectivity for SO 2 . Compared with the traditional methods of FGD, the use of ACF can greatly economize the consumption of adsorbent and obviously reduce the introduction of new adsorbent, and at the same time keep down the equipment investment and operating cost. (authors)

  16. Process for the treatment of salt water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, R J

    1966-06-12

    A procedure is described for the treatment of salty or brackish water for the production of steam, which is directly utilized afterward, either in a condensed form as sweet water or deoxidized for injection into oil formations for raising the temperature thereof and other uses. The water-purification treatment is continuous, and is of the type in which the salty or brackish water is passed in direct heat exchange relationship with the steam produced for preheating the water up to a temperature where some of the dissolved ions of calcium and magnesium are precipitated in the form of insoluble salts. In the passage of the preheated water being purified, a zone is created for the completion of the reaction. A part of the water is retained in this reaction zone while the other part is being passed in indirect heat exchange relationship with a heating means, for converting this part of the water into steam. All of the steam obtained in the latter described heat exchange is utilized in the water purification, and/or added to the produced steam, as first noted.

  17. Pd based ultrathin membranes for the tritiated water gas shift reaction in the ITER breeder recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosti, S.; Bettinali, L.; Violante, V.; Basile, A.; Chiappetta, M.; Criscuoli, A.; Drioli, E.; Rizzelo, C.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model of a catalytic membrane reactor (CMR) for the water gas shift reaction has been carried out. Based on the model, a new closed loop process for the tritium removal system for the ITER test module of helium cooled pebble bed blanket concept has been studied. A CMR is the main equipment of the proposed process. The main advantages of the closed loop process are related to the absence of secondary wastes, low tritium inventories, moderate operating temperatures and pressures, low dilution of the stream to be processed by isotopic separation. As permeating membranes in the CMR ultra-thin metallic membranes of Pd and PdAg (50-70 μm thick) have been studied. A ceramic porous tube, containing the catalyst in the lumen, has been put in the metallic tube to obtain the CMR for the water gas shifting. Experimental tests, carried out both on ultra-thin membranes and CMRs for the water gas shift reaction, confirmed the behavior studied by the theoretical model and showed a long live of the membrane. (authors)

  18. Experiment and analysis of basic phenomena of gas catching by liquid surface. Observation by visualizing vortex structure and gas catching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamemoto, Takashi; Nishiyama, Tadao

    1995-01-01

    Since gravity, viscous force, surface tension and so on are related simultaneously to the inertia force of flow, in gas catching phenomena, it is often difficult to grasp exactly its similarity. At the time of designing actual equipment, careful model test is required, and the validity of the evaluation by model test for applying it to actual machines sometimes becomes a problem. In this research, for the purpose of elucidating the essential mechanism of the gas-catching phenomena by vortices, and obtaining the knowledge useful for the probability of the method of evaluating the limit of gas catching, the knowledge obtained so far on the similarity law and model testing method related to the air catching by vortices was put in order, and vortex structure and basic gas-catching process were observed by water flow visualizing experiment, thus the noteworthy flow characteristics for clarifying the essential mechanism of the phenomena were obtained. The main knowledges on the air catching by vortices obtained so far, the experiment of visualizing vortices using water flow and the experimental results are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Leaf water potential, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence in acariquara seedlings (Minquartia guianensis Aubl.) under water stress and recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Liberato, Maria Astrid Rocha; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; Chevreuil, Larissa Ramos; Nina Junior, Adamir da Rocha; Fernandes, Andreia Varmes; Santos Junior, Ulysses Moreira dos

    2006-01-01

    The physiological performance of acariquara (Minquartia guianensis) seedlings submitted to water deficit and the recovery of physiological parameters during rehydration were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. The analyzed parameters were: leaf water potential, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence. After thirty-five days, non-irrigated plants exhibited a leaf water potential 70 % lower compared to control plants (irrigated daily) and the stomatal conductance reached values close t...

  20. Peach Water Relations, Gas Exchange, Growth and Shoot Mortality under Water Deficit in Semi-Arid Weather Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmati, Mitra; Davarynejad, Gholam Hossein; G?nard, Michel; Bannayan, Mohammad; Azizi, Majid; Vercambre, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of peach tree (Prunus persica L.) to three water stress levels from mid-pit hardening until harvest was assessed. Seasonal patterns of shoot and fruit growth, gas exchange (leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration) as well as carbon (C) storage/mobilization were evaluated in relation to plant water status. A simple C balance model was also developed to investigate sink-source relationship in relation to plant water status at the tree level. The...

  1. Nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in buffered peptone water using a pilot-plant scale supercritical carbon dioxide system with gas-liquid porous metal contractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) system, with a gas-liquid CO2 contactor, for reducing Escherichia coli K12 in diluted buffered peptone water. 0.1% (w/v) buffered peptone water inoculated with E. coli K12 was processed using the SCCO2 system at CO2 con...

  2. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  3. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  4. Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, Henry W.; Granite, Evan J.; Freeman, Mark C.; Hargis, Richard A.; O'Dowd, William J.

    2003-02-18

    A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

  5. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  6. Raman spectroscopy measurement of CH4 gas and CH4 dissolved in water for laser remote sensing in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Fujita, Masayuki

    2018-04-01

    We examined the applicability of Raman spectroscopy as a laser remote sensing tool for monitoring CH4 in water. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for measurements of CO2 gas in water. In this paper, considering the spectral transmittance of water, third harmonics of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm (UV region) was used for detection of CH4 Raman signals. The Raman signal at 2892 cm-1 from CH4 dissolved in water was detected at a tail of water Raman signal.

  7. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    OpenAIRE

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2009-01-01

    New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment....

  8. Organic and inorganic composition and microbiology of produced waters from Pennsylvania shale gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulically fractured shales are becoming an increasingly important source of natural gas production in the United States. This process has been known to create up to 420 gallons of produced water (PW) per day, but the volume varies depending on the formation, and the characteristics of individual hydraulic fracture. PW from hydraulic fracturing of shales are comprised of injected fracturing fluids and natural formation waters in proportions that change over time. Across the state of Pennsylvania, shale gas production is booming; therefore, it is important to assess the variability in PW chemistry and microbiology across this geographical span. We quantified the inorganic and organic chemical composition and microbial communities in PW samples from 13 shale gas wells in north central Pennsylvania. Microbial abundance was generally low (66–9400 cells/mL). Non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) was high (7–31 mg/L) relative to typical shallow groundwater, and the presence of organic acid anions (e.g., acetate, formate, and pyruvate) indicated microbial activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in four samples (∼1 to 11.7 μg/L): benzene and toluene in the Burket sample, toluene in two Marcellus samples, and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in one Marcellus sample. VOCs can be either naturally occurring or from industrial activity, making the source of VOCs unclear. Despite the addition of biocides during hydraulic fracturing, H2S-producing, fermenting, and methanogenic bacteria were cultured from PW samples. The presence of culturable bacteria was not associated with salinity or location; although organic compound concentrations and time in production were correlated with microbial activity. Interestingly, we found that unlike the inorganic chemistry, PW organic chemistry and microbial viability were highly variable across the 13 wells sampled, which can have important implications for the reuse and handling of these fluids

  9. Improvements in or relating to process for the production of fuel gas from a carbonaceous solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-12-03

    A process was designed for the generation of fuel gas from a solid carbonaceous fuel containing volatilizable constituents, which comprises admixing the solid carbonaceous fuel in particle form with sufficient water to form a fluid suspension, passing the suspension through a heating zone at an elevated temperature such that substantially all of the water is vaporized, thereby forming a dispersion of coal in steam and causing the dispersion to attain a velocity of at least 60 ft. per second to shatter the particles of coal by collision, passing the resulting dispersion into a fluidized bed of solid carbonaceous material in a methanization zone into contact with carbon monoxide and hydrogen at a temperature within the range of from 900/sup 0/ to 1,800/sup 0/F whereby carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to methane and volatilizable constituents of the solid carbonaceous material are distilled therefrom, withdrawing carbonaceous material from the methanization zone and passing it into contact with oxygen and steam in dilute phase in a gasification zone maintained at a temperature within the range of 2,000/sup 0/ to about 3,000/sup 0/F, passing the resulting gases comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen from the gasification zone into the methanization zone as the source of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and discharging the gaseous products of the methanization zone as the raw-product fuel gas.

  10. Techno-economic evaluation for the heat integration of vaporisation cold energy in natural gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koku, Oludolapo; Perry, Simon; Kim, Jin-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of thermal integration modelling framework for the utilisation of LNG cold energy. • Feasibility study for various design options for the integration of low-temperature cold energy. • Provision of a design approach for achieving efficient use of cold energy in LNG terminals. • Understanding of techno-economic impacts associated with the thermal integration of LNG cold energy. - Abstract: This paper addresses a conceptual study investigating the techno-economic feasibility for the thermal Integration of LNG cold vaporisation energy in power generation applications. In conventional regasification systems, this valuable LNG cold energy is often being wasted to ambient heat sources, representing a thermodynamic inefficient process with a significant thermal impact on the local environment. A combined facility consisting of a non-integrated Combined Cycle Power Plant (CCPP) and an LNG receiving terminal employing traditional Open Rack Vaporisers (ORV) technology, has been modelled, as a base case. Retrofit strategies for the integration of LNG cold energy have been investigated, and their impacts on power production and system efficiency are systematically compared. Retrofit design options considered in this work include the use of a propane Rankine cycle coupled with the direct expansion of natural gas, the integration of a closed-loop water cycle or open-loop water circuit with a steam Rankine cycle, and the facilitation of integrated air cooling for a gas turbine

  11. ENHANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN SUBCRITICAL WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2000-07-01

    This project involved designing and performing preliminary electrochemical experiments in subcritical water. An electrochemical cell with substantially better performance characteristics than presently available was designed, built, and tested successfully. The electrochemical conductivity of subcritical water increased substantially with temperature, e.g., conductivities increased by a factor of 120 when the temperature was increased from 25 to 250 C. Cyclic voltammograms obtained with platinum and nickel demonstrated that the voltage required to produce hydrogen and oxygen from water can be dropped by a factor of three in subcritical water compared to the voltages required at ambient temperatures. However, no enhancement in the degradation of 1,2-dichlorobenzene and the polychlorinated biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl was observed with applied potential in subcritical water.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  13. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  14. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D.; Call, Douglas F.; Logan, Bruce. E.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Advanced electrolytic cascade process for tritium recovery from irradiated heavy water moderator (Preprint No. PD-15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragunathan, P.; Mitra, S.K.; Jain, D.K.; Nayar, M.G.; Ramani, M.P.S.

    1989-04-01

    The paper briefly describes a design study of an electrolytic cascade process plant for enrichment and recovery of tritium from irradiated heavy water moderators from Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Reactors. In direct multistage electrolysis process, tritiated heavy water from the reactor units is fed to the electrolytic cell modules arranged in the form of a cascade where it is enriched and decomposed into O 2 gas stream and D 2 /DT gas stream. The direct electrolysis of tritiated heavy water allows tritium to be concentrated in the aqueous phase. Several stages are used to achieve the necessary enrichment. The cascade plant incorporates the advanced electrolyser technology developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (Bombay) using porous nickel electrodes, capable o f high current density operation at reduced energy consumption for electrolysis. (author). 3 tabs

  17. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold.

  18. Investigation of the gas formation in dissolution process of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinfen; Liao Yuanzhong; Chen Yongqing; Sun Shuyun; Fan Yincheng

    1987-12-01

    The gas formation in dissolution process of two kinds of nuclear fuels was studied. The results shows that the maximum volume flow released from dissolution system is composed of two parts. One of them is air remained in dissolver and pushed out by acid vapor. The other is produced in dissolution reaction. The procedure of calculating the gas amount produced in dissolution process has been given. It is based on variation of components of dissolution solution. The gas amount produced in dissolution process of spent UO 2 fuel elements was calculated. The condenser system and loading volume of disposal system of tail gas of dissolution of spent fuel were discussed

  19. Water Supply Treatment Sustainability of Semambu Water Supply Treatment Process - Water Footprint Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Edriyana A.; Malek, Marlinda Abdul; Moni, Syazwan N.; Hadi, Iqmal H.; Zulkifli, Nabil F.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the assessment by using Water Footprint (WF) approach was conducted to assess water consumption within the water supply treatment process (WSTP) services of Semambu Water Treatment Plant (WTP). Identification of the type of WF at each stage of WSTP was carried out and later the WF accounting for the period 2010 – 2016 was calculated. Several factors that might influence the accounting such as population, and land use. The increasing value of total WF per year was due to the increasing water demand from population and land use activities. However, the pattern of rainfall intensity from the monsoonal changes was not majorly affected the total amount of WF per year. As a conclusion, if the value of WF per year keeps increasing due to unregulated development in addition to the occurrences of climate changing, the intake river water will be insufficient and may lead to water scarcity. The findings in this study suggest actions to reduce the WF will likely have a great impact on freshwater resources availability and sustainability.

  20. Treatment of waste using a hybrid gas- water stabilized torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Van Oost, G.; Hrabovský, Milan; Kopecký, Vladimír; Konrád, Miloš; Hlína, Michal; Kavka, Tetyana; Beeckman, E.; Verstraeten, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2005), s. 7-12. ISBN 4-9900642-4-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0669 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal plasma * pyrolysis * waste treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  1. Consideration of heat transfer performance of helium-gas/water coolers in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1986-10-01

    The helium engineering loop (HENDEL) has four helium-gas/water coolers, where the cooling water flows in the tubes and the helium gas flows on the shell side. Their cooling performance depends on mainly the heat transfer of helium gas on the shell side. This report describes the operational data of the coolers and the consideration of the heat transfer performance which is important for the design of coolers. It becomes clear that Donohue's equation is close to the operational data and conservative for the segmental baffle type cooler and preduction by Fishenden-Saunders or Zukauskas' equation is conservation for the step-up baffle type cooler. (author)

  2. The evolution of gasification processes and reactors and the utilization of the coal gas. A proposition for the implementation of the gasification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasculete, E.; Iorgulescu, S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermochemical treatment of coal by gasification, considered as a non-polluting technology to turn the coal highly-profitably is one of the alternative ways to produce gas with a high effective caloric capacity. Due to its advantages, the gasification has made through the last few decades significant advances from the point of view of the process efficiency (chemical, thermal), of motor outputs (in m 3 producer gas / m 2 reactor cross section x hour), of the solutions of supplying energy to support the endothermic reactions implied by the process, and especially of the reactors. Reactors have been developed from gas generators. Starting from gas generators various advanced reactors (of 1 st to 3 rd generation) have been developed to produce air gas, water gas or mixed gas. Applications of the producer gas were developed using it either as fuel or as synthesis gas in chemical industry or else as a substitute to the natural gas in combined cycle gas turbines where the gasification plant was integrated. In Romania there are projects in the field of coal gasification, namely at ICPET-RESEARCH, that can offer advanced technologies. One of these projects deals with the construction of the first demonstrative gasification plant based on a highly efficient process and equipped with a 10 G cal/h reactor. (author). 1 tab., 12 refs

  3. Solar-assisted gas-energy water-heating feasibility for apartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of residential energy use, solar-energy technology for buildings, and the requirements for implementing technology in the housing industry led to a project to develop a solar water heater for apartments. A design study for a specific apartment was used to establish a solar water-heater cost model which is based on plumbing contractor bids and manufacturer estimates. The cost model was used to size the system to minimize the annualized cost of hot water. The annualized cost of solar-assisted gas-energy water heating is found to be less expensive than electric water heating but more expensive than gas water heating. The feasibility of a natural gas utility supplying the auxiliary fuel is evaluated. It is estimated that gas-utilizing companies will find it profitable to offer solar water heating as part of a total energy service option or on a lease basis when the price of new base-load supplies of natural gas reaches $2.50-$3.00 per million Btu.

  4. Natural Gas Consumption of Emerging Economies in the Industrialization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas has become more and more important in the world energy market with the change of energy consumption structure and consumption subjects. This paper applies the panel smooth transition regression (PSTR model to study the nonlinear relationship between natural gas consumption and economic variables of emerging economies, and the empirical results show that: (1 There is a non-linear relationship among natural gas consumption, GDP per capita, industrialization and urbanization rate; (2 The optimal PSTR model is a two-regime model by using the lagged industrialization as a transition variable, and the impact of GDP per capita and of industrialization on natural gas consumption shows incomplete symmetry in low and high regime, respectively; (3 The result of time-varying elasticity analysis indicates that natural gas consumption is inelastic to GDP per capita, but elastic to both industrialization and urbanization. The elasticity of GDP per capita generally decrease with fluctuation, the elasticity of industrialization tends to rise, and the elasticity of urbanization is linear at high level; (4 Regional difference shows that there are 10 emerging economies are in first regime (below industrialization of 43.2%, and the remaining 6 are in second regime. This provides reference for countries in different transformation periods to make economic policies adapting to energy saving, energy structure optimization and other sustainable development strategies.

  5. Measurement of fugitive emissions from gas processing plants in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a new gas visualization camera created to detect leaks. An outline of the device's projected entry into the oil and gas industry was provided, and included: a demonstration of Differential Absorption Light Detection and Ranging (DIAL) and leak cameras to measure and reduce fugitive emissions; a comparison of DIAL measured emissions with estimated emissions; and a review of methods to measure particulate emissions. In addition, a background of gas leak visualisation technology was presented along with an an overview of DIAL and its results from sour gas plants. The results of a survey conducted in 2003 were presented, including leaks identified and repaired as well as a follow up leak survey. An analysis of pre and post-repair hydrocarbon emissions from the Deepcut area revealed a 60 per cent reduction with savings of $140,000 as well as additional savings from reduced carbon emissions. A similar survey conducted in another plant measured emissions from condensate tanks before and after cooler installation as well as from surrounding well sites, quantifying an 80 per cent reduction in methane emissions. Tasks identified for future research concerned particulate emissions and the development of Lidar methods which can currently identify particulates, but are not yet able to quantify them. Other tasks included a complete DIAL data workup and reporting; the quantification of both methane and carbon emissions reduction at a sour gas plant; a comparison of measured emissions with methods that estimate fugitives; and a complete review of particulate measurements. tabs, figs.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Nonstationary Separation Processes in Gas Centrifuge Cascade for Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Nonstationary Separation Processes in Gas Centrifuge Cascade for Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov Alexey; Ushakov Anton; Sovach Victor

    2016-01-01

    This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge casca...

  8. Mathematical model of nonstationary hydraulic processes in gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov, Aleksey Alekseevich; Ushakov, Anton; Sovach, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The article presents results of development of a mathematical model of nonstationary hydraulic processes in gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of silicon isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary hydraulic processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation...

  9. Origin of salinity in produced waters from the Palm Valley gas field, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, Anita S.; Whitford, David J.; Berry, Martin D.; Barclay, Stuart A.; Giblin, Angela M.

    2005-01-01

    The chemical composition and evolution of produced waters associated with gas production in the Palm Valley gas field, Northern Territory, has important implications for issues such as gas reserve calculations, reservoir management and saline water disposal. The occurrence of saline formation water in the Palm Valley field has been the subject of considerable debate. There were no occurrences of mobile water early in the development of the field and only after gas production had reduced the reservoir pressure, was saline formation water produced. Initially this was in small quantities but has increased dramatically with time, particularly after the initiation of compression in November 1996. The produced waters range from highly saline (up to 300,000 mg/L TDS), with unusual enrichments in Ca, Ba and Sr, to low salinity fluids that may represent condensate waters. The Sr isotopic compositions of the waters ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7041-0.7172) are also variable but do not correlate closely with major and trace element abundances. Although the extreme salinity suggests possible involvement of evaporite deposits lower in the stratigraphic sequence, the Sr isotopic composition of the high salinity waters suggests a more complex evolutionary history. The formation waters are chemically and isotopically heterogeneous and are not well mixed. The high salinity brines have Sr isotopic compositions and other geochemical characteristics more consistent with long-term residence within the reservoir rocks than with present-day derivation from a more distal pool of brines associated with evaporites. If the high salinity brines entered the reservoir during the Devonian uplift and were displaced by the reservoir gas into a stagnant pool, which has remained near the reservoir for the last 300-400 Ma, then the size of the brine pool is limited. At a minimum, it might be equivalent to the volume displaced by the reservoired gas

  10. Evaluation of RSG-GAS purification system and pool warm water layer supplier performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudiyono; Suhadi; Diah-Erlina-Lestari

    2005-01-01

    Function of RSG-GAS purification system and warm water supplier (KBE 02) are to pick up dissolve activation result and another dirts of warm water layer. To keep quality of water at the decided level. The system is equipped by heater to supply warm water layer on the reactor pool surface the distribution is to reduce radiation level in the operation hall area a speciality on the reactor pool surface. Line KBE 02 tomord beam tube headitty system supplies water necessary to be shielding to beam tube in use off time. Of the RSG-GAS purification system and pool warm water layer performance date can be shown north of water is always in good condition. To require the dechded requirement. Resin live time is two years and then months

  11. Arsenic in industrial waste water from copper production technological process

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Jovanović; Milana Popović

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of arsenic in industrial waste water is of a great importance for environment. Discharge of untreated waste water from a copper production process results in serious pollution of surface water, which directly affects flora and fauna, as well as humans. There is a need for efficient and environmentally acceptable treament of waste waters containing heavy metals and arsenic. The paper presents an analyisis of the waste water from The Copper Smelter which is discharged into the Bor...

  12. Effect of biochar on soil structural characteristics: water retention and gas transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...... characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C......-gas diffusivity on intact 100cm3 soil samples (5 replicates in each plot). We found that biochar application significantly decreased soil bulk density, hereby creating higher porosity. At the same soil-water matric potential, all the soil-gas phase parameters (air-filled porosity, air permeability and gas...

  13. A Systematic Procedure to Describe Shale Gas Permeability Evolution during the Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, B.; Tsau, J. S.; Barati, R.

    2017-12-01

    Gas flow behavior in shales is complex due to the multi-physics nature of the process. Pore size reduces as the in-situ stress increases during the production process, which will reduce intrinsic permeability of the porous media. Slip flow/pore diffusion enhances gas apparent permeability, especially under low reservoir pressures. Adsorption not only increases original gas in place but also influences gas flow behavior because of the adsorption layer. Surface diffusion between free gas and adsorption phase enhances gas permeability. Pore size reduction and the adsorption layer both have complex impacts on gas apparent permeability and non-Darcy flow might be a major component in nanopores. Previously published literature is generally incomplete in terms of coupling of all these four physics with fluid flow during gas production. This work proposes a methodology to simultaneously take them into account to describe a permeability evolution process. Our results show that to fully describe shale gas permeability evolution during gas production, three sets of experimental data are needed initially: 1) intrinsic permeability under different in-situ stress, 2) adsorption isotherm under reservoir conditions and 3) surface diffusivity measurement by the pulse-decay method. Geomechanical effects, slip flow/pore diffusion, adsorption layer and surface diffusion all play roles affecting gas permeability. Neglecting any of them might lead to misleading results. The increasing in-situ stress during shale gas production is unfavorable to shale gas flow process. Slip flow/pore diffusion is important for gas permeability under low pressures in the tight porous media. They might overwhelm the geomechanical effect and enhance gas permeability at low pressures. Adsorption layer reduces the gas permeability by reducing the effective pore size, but the effect is limited. Surface diffusion increases gas permeability more under lower pressures. The total gas apparent permeability might

  14. Enhancement of ultraviolet water disinfection process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grabi-1

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... disinfected water distribution systems, including. Legionella .... soft agar, mixed, incubated at room temperature for 2 min and poured onto the ... The determination of a log increase methodology was employed to quantify the ...

  15. Water Content Effect on Oxides Yield in Gas and Liquid Phase Using DBD Arrays in Mist Spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingyan; Zhu Changping; He Xiang; Yin Cheng; Fei Juntao; Wang Yuan; Jiang Yongfeng; Chen Longwei; Gao Yuan; Han Qingbang

    2016-01-01

    Electric discharge in and in contact with water can accompany ultraviolet (UV) radiation and electron impact, which can generate a large number of active species such as hydroxyl radicals (OH), oxygen radical (O), ozone (O 3 ) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In this paper, a nonthermal plasma processing system was established by means of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) arrays in water mist spray. The relationship between droplet size and water content was examined, and the effects of the concentrations of oxides in both treated water and gas were investigated under different water content and discharge time. The relative intensity of UV spectra from DBD in water mist was a function of water content. The concentrations of both O 3 and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in DBD room decreased with increasing water content. Moreover, the concentrations of H 2 O 2 , O 3 and nitrogen oxides (NO x ) in treated water decreased with increasing water content, and all the ones enhanced after discharge. The experimental results were further analyzed by chemical reaction equations and commented by physical principles as much as possible. At last, the water containing phenol was tested in this system for the concentration from 100 mg/L to 9.8 mg/L in a period of 35 min. (paper)

  16. Studies of soil and ecohydrological processes in oil-gas production regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyreva, E. Ya.; Khodyrev, Yu. P.

    2009-04-01

    For a better understanding and describing of the functional interactions between processes in soil and drinking, underground and stratum waters in oil-gas production regions we used laboratory and field monitoring methods of studies. The control of ecological situation dynamics in oil-gas production regions proposes a presence of primary data about parameter-indicators, which characterize a state of the object under investigation. One of these parameters is the concentration of heavy metal salts in drinking and stratum waters. Isolation of some compounds, which are extracted as impurities of oil and water during recovery of hydrocarbons from productive horizons, would enhance profitableness of recovery. Because accompanying impurities are a mixture of different salts and complexes, the methods of multielement analysis give the most objective evaluation of total content of some elements by search and prospecting. The developed method of laser mass-spectrometric analysis of oil and drinking, underground and industrial waters allows to investigate the samples on all elements of the periodical system simultaneously with limit sensitivity 0.1 mkg/l. The preparation of the oil and water probes was carried out by sublimation of highly volatile fractions in vacuum at 100 0C. The samples of drinking and underground waters, oils and industrial waters from wells of oil field Romashkin (Tatarstan) were chosen as the object for the research. In respect to possible metal extraction scandium is of most interest in inspected area because it's very high cost and availability of water-soluble pattern, most probably chloride. Its concentration in one well was 1 mg/l in water and 0.01 mg/l in oil. According to the received data of laser mass-spectrometric analysis, industrial waters on the activity investigated territory joint-stock company "Tatneft" contain 220-330 kg / ton of salts of metals that does by their potential source of alternative raw material for the chemical industry

  17. Barriers Keep Drops Of Water Out Of Infrared Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sean K.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared-sensor cells used for measuring partial pressures of CO(2) and other breathable gases modified to prevent entry of liquid water into sensory optical paths of cells. Hydrophobic membrane prevents drops of water entrained in flow from entering optical path from lamp to infrared detectors.

  18. Experimental substantiation of combined methods for designing processes for the commercial preparation of gas at gas condensate fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, G R; Karlinskii, E D; Posypkina, T V

    1977-04-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using two analytical methods for studying vapor--liquid equilibrium of hydrocarbon mixtures that are used in designing the separation of natural gas and the stabilization of condensate--the Chao and Sider method, which uses computations by equilibrium constants. A combined computational method is proposed for describing a unified process of natural gas separation and condensate stabilization. The method of preparing the original data for the computation of the separation and stabilization processes can be significantly simplified. 10 references, 1 table.