WorldWideScience

Sample records for water flow origin

  1. Water origin and flow pathways investigated by tracers in a small Dolomitic catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Daniele; Zuecco, Giulia; Cavalli, Marco; Trevisani, Sebastiano; Crema, Stefano; Pianezzola, Luisa; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Marchi, Lorenzo; Borga, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Understanding runoff generation and water origin in mountain headwater catchments is often hampered by the superimposition of topographic, geomorphologic and hydrogeologic factors. Particularly, the complexity of catchments in Dolomitic regions is enhanced by karst processes that create preferential flow paths and make even more challenging to follow the water from its sources to the outlet. Environmental tracers, such as stable isotopes of water (18O and 2H) and electrical conductivity (EC), can help to unravel such a complexity. In this work, isotopic and EC measurements were used to i) identify the main end-members that contribute to streamflow, ii) quantify the role of snowmelt in spring water and surface runoff, and iii) assess the hydrological connection between runoff from springs and ephemeral water courses in rocky channels in the upper part, and surface and subsurface runoff in the lower part of a small Dolomitic catchment. The experimental activities were carried out in the 1.9 km2 Vauz Creek catchment, Dolomites, Central-Eastern Italian Alps. The elevation range is 1835-3152 m a.s.l.. Dolomite rocks prevail in the upper part of the catchment (above 2200 m a.s.l.), which is mostly non-vegetated. The lower sector, where mudstone, sandstone and marls outcrop, is covered by Alpine grassland and sparse trees. We took water samples for isotopic analyses roughly monthly from 2010 to 2014 in the lower part and from June to October 2011-2013 in the upper part of the catchment. We sampled precipitation (by rainfall collectors), snow (by snow corers), snowmelt (by snow lysimeters or by dripping snow patches), soil water (by suction cups) and, manually, stream water, spring water and groundwater in piezometric wells at different locations. Isotopic analyses were conducted by laser spectroscopy. EC was measured in the field with a portable meter. Results show a high variability in the tracer signature among the different sampled waters, reflecting the complex

  2. CFD simulations of the single-phase and two-phase coolant flow of water inside the original and modified CANDU 37-element bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, F.; Hadaller, G.I.; Fortman, R.A. [Stern Laboratories, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Single-phase (inlet temperature of 180° C, outlet pressure of 9 MPa, total power of 2 MW and flow rate of 13.5 Kg/s), and two-phase (inlet temperature of 265° C, outlet pressure of 10 MPa, total power of 7.126 MW and flow rate of 19 Kg/s) water flows inside a CANDU thirty seven element fuel string are simulated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with parallel processing and results are presented in this paper. The analyses have been performed for the original and modified (11.5 mm center element diameter) designs with skewed cosine axial heat flux distribution and 5.1% diametral creep of the pressure tube. The CFD results are in good agreement with the expected temperature and velocity cross-sectional distributions. The effect of the pressure tube creep on the flow bypass is detected, and the CHF improvement in the core region of the modified design is confirmed. The two-phase flow model reasonably predicted the void distribution and the role of interfacial drag on increasing the pressure drop. In all CFD models, the appendages were shown to enhance the production of cross flows and their corresponding flow mixing and asymmetry. (author)

  3. Distribution, Origin, and Realtions to Flow of Salty Ground Water Along the Western Margin of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure in Eastern Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, R.; Bruce, S.

    2002-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay impact structure closely coincides with parts of some aquifers in eastern Virginia that contain saltwater as much as 30 miles landward of the coast. The impact structure has thereby been inferred to play some role in controlling the presence of this "inland saltwater wedge", which formed under unstressed conditions prior to present-day ground-water withdrawals. That the impact severely disrupted the previously stratified sediments casts doubt on conceptualizations of a regionally contiguous, vertically layered system of aquifers and confining units. In addition, large and increasing ground-water withdrawals have resulted in continuing water-level declines and altered flow directions that create the potential for saltwater intrusion. Hence, the origin and emplacement of the saltwater must be known to predict its reaction to stresses being placed upon the flow system. Specific conductances and concentrations of chloride in ground water along the western margin of the impact structure reflect a transitional interface between freshwater to the west and seawater to the east that coincides aerially with the margin of the impact structure. Ratios of bromide to chloride and chlorine-36 to total chloride, and of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, indicate chloride to have originated primarily from mixing of freshwater and seawater across the interface. In addition, deep ground water east of the interface having specific conductances which exceed that of seawater likely resulted from partial evaporation of seawater, either (1) in restricted coastal environments under arid conditions, (2) by rapid vaporization caused by the impact event, and (or) (3) by residual heat and associated hydrothermal activity following the impact. Mixing of freshwater and seawater has been theorized to take place in a "differential flushing" manner that left residual seawater to form the saltwater wedge. Seawater emplaced during inundation of the land surface persisted around

  4. Formation of gullies on Mars: link to recent climate history and insolation microenvironments implicate surface water flow origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W; Marchant, David R; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A

    2008-09-09

    Features seen in portions of a typical midlatitude Martian impact crater show that gully formation follows a geologically recent period of midlatitude glaciation. Geological evidence indicates that, in the relatively recent past, sufficient snow and ice accumulated on the pole-facing crater wall to cause glacial flow and filling of the crater floor with debris-covered glaciers. As glaciation waned, debris-covered glaciers ceased flowing, accumulation zones lost ice, and newly exposed wall alcoves continued as the location for limited snow/frost deposition, entrapment, and preservation. Analysis of the insolation geometry of this pole-facing crater wall, and similar occurrences in other craters at these latitudes on Mars, shows that they are uniquely favored for accumulation of snow and ice, and a relatively more rapid exposure to warmer summer temperatures. We show that, after the last glaciation, melting of residual snow and ice in alcoves could have formed the fluvial channels and sedimentary fans of the gullies. Recent modeling shows that top-down melting can occur in these microenvironments under conditions similar to those currently observed on Mars, if small amounts of snow or frost accumulate in alcoves and channels. Accumulation and melting is even more favored in the somewhat wetter, relatively recent geological past of Mars, after the period of active glaciation.

  5. Geochemistry of formation waters from the Wolfcamp and “Cline” shales: Insights into brine origin, reservoir connectivity, and fluid flow in the Permian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Reyes, Francisco R.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.; Lin, Ma; Ianno, Adam J.; Westphal, Tiffani M.; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most important oil producing provinces in the United States, information on basinal hydrogeology and fluid flow in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico is lacking. The source and geochemistry of brines from the basin were investigated (Ordovician- to Guadalupian-age reservoirs) by combining previously published data from conventional reservoirs with geochemical results for 39 new produced water samples, with a focus on those from shales. Salinity of the Ca–Cl-type brines in the basin generally increases with depth reaching a maximum in Devonian (median = 154 g/L) reservoirs, followed by decreases in salinity in the Silurian (median = 77 g/L) and Ordovician (median = 70 g/L) reservoirs. Isotopic data for B, O, H, and Sr and ion chemistry indicate three major types of water. Lower salinity fluids (100 g/L), isotopically heavy (O and H) water in Leonardian [Permian] to Pennsylvanian reservoirs (2–3.2 km depth) is evaporated, Late Permian seawater. Water from the Permian Wolfcamp and Pennsylvanian “Cline” shales, which are isotopically similar but lower in salinity and enriched in alkalis, appear to have developed their composition due to post-illitization diffusion into the shales. Samples from the “Cline” shale are further enriched with NH4, Br, I and isotopically light B, sourced from the breakdown of marine kerogen in the unit. Lower salinity waters (3 km depth), which plot near the modern local meteoric water line, are distinct from the water in overlying reservoirs. We propose that these deep meteoric waters are part of a newly identified hydrogeologic unit: the Deep Basin Meteoric Aquifer System. Chemical, isotopic, and pressure data suggest that despite over-pressuring in the Wolfcamp shale, there is little potential for vertical fluid migration to the surface environment via natural conduits.

  6. Origin and residence time of water in the Lima Aquifer

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    The 8 million inhabitants of the coast Lima City are supplied with water from Rimac and Chillons rivers and water wells in the Lima aquifer. Historics of Rimac River flow and static level of water level in wells are correlated in order to calculate residence time of water since the aquifer is recharged by Rimac River until water reaches a well located 12 km farther, in Miraflores district near sea. Relative abundances of 2H and 18O are used to identify origins of waters from those wells. 3H and 14C contents, respectively, are used to estimate ages of waters.

  7. Water flow through temperate glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, A.G.; Walder, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding water movement through a glacier is fundamental to several critical issues in glaciology, including glacier dynamics, glacier-induced floods, and the prediction of runoff from glacierized drainage basins. to this end we have synthesized a conceptual model os water movement through a temperate glacier from the surface to the outlet stream. Processes that regulate the rate and distribution of water input at the glacier surface and that regulate water movement from the surface to the bed play important but commonly neglected roles in glacier hydrology. Where a glacier is covered by a layer of porous, permeable firn (the accumulation zone), the flux of water to the glacier interior varies slowly because the firn temporarily stores water and thereby smooths out variations in the supply rate. In the firn-free ablation zone, in contrast, the flux of water into the glacier depends directly on the rate of surface melt or rainfall and therefore varies greatly in time. Water moves from the surface to the bed through an upward branching arborescent network consisting of both steeply inclined conduits, formed by the enlargement of intergranular veins, and gently inclined conduits, sprqwned by water flow along the bottoms of near-surface fractures (crevasses). Englacial drainage conduits deliver water to the glacier bed at a linited number of points, probably a long distance downglacier of where water enters the glacier. Englacial conduits supplied from the accumulation zone are quasi steady state features that convey the slowly varying water flux delivered via the firn. their size adjusts so that they are usually full of water and flow is pressurized. In contrast, water flow in englacial conduits supplied from the ablation area is pressurized only near times of peak daily flow or during rainstorms; flow is otherwise in an open-channel configuration. The subglacial drainage system typically consists of several elements that are distinct both morpphologically and

  8. Analysis of the origin of periodic oscillatory flow in the continuous casting mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-young; Kim, Yong-tae; Yi, Kyung-woo

    2015-03-01

    It is very important to understand flow patterns within the continuous casting mold because they have a significant impact on product quality. Water model experiment and particle image velocimetry were conducted to identify the fluid flow pattern in the steel slab continuous casting mold. The fluid flow pattern in the mold is not steady but instead an oscillatory flow with a specific oscillation frequencies. Many studies have been reported about oscillatory flow within the mold. However, these studies do not provide a clear explanation of physical origin of oscillatory flow. We identified the physical origins of various specific oscillation frequencies, and confirmed through experimentation and simulation that each frequency is related to the cross flow and injection stream oscillation. Moreover, the degree of oscillation at each frequency appears differently depending on the location within the mold, and is shown to have a effect near the mold wall. These results provide a better understanding of complex oscillatory flow patterns within the mold.

  9. Solar wind origin of terrestrial water

    CERN Document Server

    Merkl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the Earth water reserves during the evolution of the planet is one of the big miracles in geophysics. Common explanations are storage of water in the Earth mantle at a time when the crust had not yet formed and depositing of water by comets during the time of late heavy bombardement. Both explanations have different problems - especially when comparing with the evolution of Mars and Venus. Here we discuss the possible role of hydrogen collected from the solar wind by the early Earth magnetosphere. While the water production by solar wind capture is very small today it may have been significant during the first billion years after planetary formation because solar wind was much stronger at that time and Earth magnetospheric configuration may have been different. We estimate that the contribution of solar wind hydrogen to the Earth water reserves can be up to 10% when we assume a that the Earth dipole acted as a collector and early solar wind was 1000 times stronger than today. We can not even exc...

  10. Nonrainfall water origins and formation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseke, Kudzai Farai; Wang, Lixin; Seely, Mary K

    2017-03-01

    Dryland ecosystems cover 40% of the total land surface on Earth and are defined broadly as zones where precipitation is considerably less than the potential evapotranspiration. Nonrainfall waters (for example, fog and dew) are the least-studied and least-characterized components of the hydrological cycle, although they supply critical amounts of water for dryland ecosystems. The sources of nonrainfall waters are largely unknown for most systems. In addition, most field and modeling studies tend to consider all nonrainfall inputs as a single category because of technical constraints, which hinders prediction of dryland responses to future warming conditions. This study uses multiple stable isotopes ((2)H, (18)O, and (17)O) to show that fog and dew have multiple origins and that groundwater in drylands can be recycled via evapotranspiration and redistributed to the upper soil profile as nonrainfall water. Surprisingly, the non-ocean-derived (locally generated) fog accounts for more than half of the total fog events, suggesting a potential shift from advection-dominated fog to radiation-dominated fog in the fog zone of the Namib Desert. This shift will have implications on the flora and fauna distribution in this fog-dependent system. We also demonstrate that fog and dew can be differentiated on the basis of the dominant fractionation (equilibrium and kinetic) processes during their formation using the (17)O-(18)O relationship. Our results are of great significance in an era of global climate change where the importance of nonrainfall water increases because rainfall is predicted to decline in many dryland ecosystems.

  11. The origin of inner Solar System water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Conel M O'D

    2017-05-28

    Of the potential volatile sources for the terrestrial planets, the CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites are closest to the planets' bulk H and N isotopic compositions. For the Earth, the addition of approximately 2-4 wt% of CI/CM material to a volatile-depleted proto-Earth can explain the abundances of many of the most volatile elements, although some solar-like material is also required. Two dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation predict that the carbonaceous chondrites formed either in the asteroid belt ('classical' model) or in the outer Solar System (5-15 AU in the Grand Tack model). To test these models, at present the H isotopes of water are the most promising indicators of formation location because they should have become increasingly D-rich with distance from the Sun. The estimated initial H isotopic compositions of water accreted by the CI, CM, CR and Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrites were much more D-poor than measured outer Solar System objects. A similar pattern is seen for N isotopes. The D-poor compositions reflect incomplete re-equilibration with H2 in the inner Solar System, which is also consistent with the O isotopes of chondritic water. On balance, it seems that the carbonaceous chondrites and their water did not form very far out in the disc, almost certainly not beyond the orbit of Saturn when its moons formed (approx. 3-7 AU in the Grand Tack model) and possibly close to where they are found today.This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Nonrainfall water origins and formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseke, Kudzai Farai; Wang, Lixin; Seely, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Dryland ecosystems cover 40% of the total land surface on Earth and are defined broadly as zones where precipitation is considerably less than the potential evapotranspiration. Nonrainfall waters (for example, fog and dew) are the least-studied and least-characterized components of the hydrological cycle, although they supply critical amounts of water for dryland ecosystems. The sources of nonrainfall waters are largely unknown for most systems. In addition, most field and modeling studies tend to consider all nonrainfall inputs as a single category because of technical constraints, which hinders prediction of dryland responses to future warming conditions. This study uses multiple stable isotopes (2H, 18O, and 17O) to show that fog and dew have multiple origins and that groundwater in drylands can be recycled via evapotranspiration and redistributed to the upper soil profile as nonrainfall water. Surprisingly, the non–ocean-derived (locally generated) fog accounts for more than half of the total fog events, suggesting a potential shift from advection-dominated fog to radiation-dominated fog in the fog zone of the Namib Desert. This shift will have implications on the flora and fauna distribution in this fog-dependent system. We also demonstrate that fog and dew can be differentiated on the basis of the dominant fractionation (equilibrium and kinetic) processes during their formation using the 17O-18O relationship. Our results are of great significance in an era of global climate change where the importance of nonrainfall water increases because rainfall is predicted to decline in many dryland ecosystems.

  13. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  14. Fluid dynamics: Water flows out of touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces reduce the frictional drag between water and solid materials, but this effect is often temporary. The realization of sustained drag reduction has applications for water vehicles and pipeline flows.

  15. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  16. Nanedi Vallis: Sustained Water FLow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This picture of a canyon on the Martian surface was obtained a few minutes after 10 PM PST, January 8, 1998 by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), during the 87th orbit around Mars of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It shows the canyon of Nanedi Vallis, one of the Martian valley systems cutting through cratered plains in the Xanthe Terra region of Mars. The picture covers an area 9.8 km by 18.5 km (6.1 mi by 11.5 mi), and features as small as 12 m (39 ft) can be seen. The canyon is about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) wide. Rocky outcrops are found along the upper canyon walls; weathered debris is found on the lower canyon slopes and along the canyon floor. The origin of this canyon is enigmatic: some features, such as terraces within the canyon (as seen near the top of the frame) and the small 200 m (660 ft) wide channel (also seen near the top of the frame) suggest continual fluid flow and downcutting. Other features, such as the lack of a contributing pattern of smaller channels on the surface surrounding the canyon, box-headed tributaries, and the size and tightness of the apparent meanders (as seen, for example, in the Viking image 897A32, left), suggest formation by collapse. It is likely that both continual flow and collapse have been responsible for the canyon as it now appears. Further observations, especially in areas west of the present image, will be used to help separate the relative effects of these and other potential formation and modification processes.Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  17. Ground-water flow related to streamflow and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voast, W. A.; Novitzki, R.P.

    1968-01-01

    A ground-water flow system in southwestern Minnesota illustrates water movement between geologic units and between the land surface and the subsurface. The flow patterns indicate numerous zones of ground-water recharge and discharge controlled by topography, varying thicknesses of geologic units, variation in permeabilities, and the configuration of the basement rock surface. Variations in streamflow along a reach of the Yellow Medicine River agree with the subsurface flow system. Increases and decreases in runoff per square mile correspond, apparently, to ground-water discharge and recharge zones. Ground-water quality variations between calcium sulfate waters typical of the Quaternary drift and sodium chloride waters typical of the Cretaceous rocks are caused by mixing of the two water types. The zones of mixing are in agreement with ground-water flow patterns along the hydrologic section.

  18. Morphometric methods for simulation of water flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booltink, H.W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Water flow in structured soils is strongly governed by the occurence of macropores. In this study emphasis was given to combined research of morphology of water- conducting macropores and soil physical measurements on bypass flow. Main research objectives were to: (i) develop and improve soil physic

  19. Ground Water Flow No Longer A Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jay H.; Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1976-01-01

    Examined are the physical characteristics of ground water movement. Some potential pollution problems are identified. Models are used to explain mathematical and hydraulic principles of flow toward a pumping well and an effluent stream, flow around and through lenticular beds, and effects of pumping on the water table. (Author/MR)

  20. Protecting environmental flows through enhanced water licensing and water markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Erfani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To enable economically efficient future adaptation to water scarcity some countries are revising water management institutions such as water rights or licensing systems to more effectively protect ecosystems and their services. Allocating more flow to the environment though can mean less abstraction for economic production, or the inability to accommodate new entrants (diverters. Modern licensing arrangements should simultaneously enhance environmental flows and protect water abstractors who depend on water. Making new licensing regimes compatible with tradable water rights is an important component of water allocation reform. Regulated water markets can help decrease the societal cost of water scarcity whilst enforcing environmental and/or social protections. In this article we simulate water markets under a regime of fixed volumetric water abstraction licenses with fixed minimum flows or under a scalable water license regime (using water "shares" with dynamic environmental minimum flows. Shares allow adapting allocations to available water and dynamic environmental minimum flows can vary as a function of ecological requirements. We investigate how a short-term spot market manifests within each licensing regime. We use a river-basin-scale hydro-economic agent model that represents individual abstractors and can simulate a spot market under both licensing regimes. We apply this model to the Great Ouse river basin in Eastern England with public water supply, agricultural, energy and industrial water using agents. Results show the proposed shares with dynamic environmental flow licensing system protects river flows more effectively than the current static minimum flow requirements during a dry historical year, but that the total opportunity cost to water abstractors of the environmental gains is a 10 to 15% loss in economic benefits.

  1. Drag Reduction in Oil-water Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Edomwonyi-Otu, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid flows occur in many chemical and process industries including the petroleum industry where crude oil and its derivatives are transported over long distances often in mixtures with water. Depending on flow conditions and pipe geometry different flow patterns can appear ranging from fully separated to dispersed ones. The addition of small amounts of some polymeric materials to one of the phases has been found to change the flow patterns and their boundaries and reduce the friction...

  2. Three Principles of Water Flow in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, H.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of water flow in soils is crucial to understanding terrestrial hydrological cycle, surface energy balance, biogeochemical dynamics, ecosystem services, contaminant transport, and many other Critical Zone processes. However, due to the complex and dynamic nature of non-uniform flow, reconstruction and prediction of water flow in natural soils remain challenging. This study synthesizes three principles of water flow in soils that can improve modeling water flow in soils of various complexity. The first principle, known as the Darcy's law, came to light in the 19th century and suggested a linear relationship between water flux density and hydraulic gradient, which was modified by Buckingham for unsaturated soils. Combining mass balance and the Buckingham-Darcy's law, L.A. Richards quantitatively described soil water change with space and time, i.e., Richards equation. The second principle was proposed by L.A. Richards in the 20th century, which described the minimum pressure potential needed to overcome surface tension of fluid and initiate water flow through soil-air interface. This study extends this principle to encompass soil hydrologic phenomena related to varied interfaces and microscopic features and provides a more cohesive explanation of hysteresis, hydrophobicity, and threshold behavior when water moves through layered soils. The third principle is emerging in the 21st century, which highlights the complex and evolving flow networks embedded in heterogeneous soils. This principle is summarized as: Water moves non-uniformly in natural soils with a dual-flow regime, i.e., it follows the least-resistant or preferred paths when "pushed" (e.g., by storms) or "attracted" (e.g., by plants) or "restricted" (e.g., by bedrock), but moves diffusively into the matrix when "relaxed" (e.g., at rest) or "touched" (e.g., adsorption). The first principle is a macroscopic view of steady-state water flow, the second principle is a microscopic view of interface

  3. The importance of base flow in sustaining surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Buto, Susan G.; Susong, David D.; Rumsey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado River has been identified as the most overallocated river in the world. Considering predicted future imbalances between water supply and demand and the growing recognition that base flow (a proxy for groundwater discharge to streams) is critical for sustaining flow in streams and rivers, there is a need to develop methods to better quantify present-day base flow across large regions. We adapted and applied the spatially referenced regression on watershed attributes (SPARROW) water quality model to assess the spatial distribution of base flow, the fraction of streamflow supported by base flow, and estimates of and potential processes contributing to the amount of base flow that is lost during in-stream transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). On average, 56% of the streamflow in the UCRB originated as base flow, and precipitation was identified as the dominant driver of spatial variability in base flow at the scale of the UCRB, with the majority of base flow discharge to streams occurring in upper elevation watersheds. The model estimates an average of 1.8 × 1010 m3/yr of base flow in the UCRB; greater than 80% of which is lost during in-stream transport to the Lower Colorado River Basin via processes including evapotranspiration and water diversion for irrigation. Our results indicate that surface waters in the Colorado River Basin are dependent on base flow, and that management approaches that consider groundwater and surface water as a joint resource will be needed to effectively manage current and future water resources in the Basin.

  4. Origin of uncontrolled water emissions in Alicante: use of discriminant analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchón Payá, Servando; Blas Bravo, Isabel de; Nueda Roldán, María José; García Andreu, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to predict the origin of uncontrolled water flows. For this purpose, we analysed a total of 52 elements using ICP techniques on 72 water samples in all: 40 of them from leaks in the drinking water supply network and the remaining 32 from groundwater outcrops. The study focused on the cases registered within the Alicante town limits (Spain). The use of multivariate statistical classification tools such as discriminant analysis made it possible not only to reduce the ...

  5. Considerations concerning the origin of the Estoril (Portugal thermal water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahir, M.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the urban area of Estoril, a Portuguese tourist village 20 km westward from Lisbon, hot mineral waters (thermal waters spout out from natural springs which have been known since the 19th century. The thermal waters are of the sodium chloride type, with total dissolved solids and temperatures higher than the ones of the regional waters. Isotopic data are consistent with a meteoric origin for both the regional and thermal waters of the Estoril area: δ180 (‰, -4.16 to -3.52 and δ2H (‰, -25.5 to -18.7. The thermal water composition can be derived from the regional water composition assuming the dissolution of evaporite minerals, cation exchange and precipitation of calcite. The thermal water flow system has probably the recharge area somewhere in between Estoril and the Sintra mountain. The elevation difference between the recharge area and the sea provides the driving force for groundwater movement to the Estoril area where the upward movement of the mineralised and warm water is controlled by an impermeable barrier of dykes and open fractures in the pre-existing rocks.En la zona urbana de Estoril surgen aguas termales calientes de fuentes naturales conocidas desde el siglo XIXL. as aguas termales son del tipo cloruro sódico, y tienen una cantidad total de sólidos disueltos y una temperatura mayores que la habitual en las aguas regionales. Los datos isotópicos sugieren un origen meteórico tanto para las aguas regionales como para las termales, ya que los valores δ180 O están comprendidos entre -4.16 y -3.52 (%O y los δ2H entre -25.5 y -18.7 (%o. La composición de las aguas termales puede deducirse de la composición de las aguas regionales, teniendo en cuenta la disolución de minerales evaporíticos, el intercambio de cationes y la precipitación de calcita. La zona de recarga del sistema de flujo acuático se localiza probablemente entre Estoril y las montañas de Sintra. La diferencia de cota topográfica entre la zona de

  6. Origin of life and living matter in hot mineral water

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatov, Ignat; Mosin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In this review the composition of water and isotopic structure of water during a process of origin of life is submitted. The data obtained testify that life maintenance depends on physical-chemical properties of water and external factors – temperature and рН. Hot mineral alkaline water, which interacts with CaCO 3 is closest to these conditions. Next in line with regard to quality is sea and mountain water.

  7. ORIGIN OF LIFE AND LIVING MATTER IN HOT MINERAL WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatov, Ignat; Mosin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In this review the composition of water and isotopic structure of water during a process of origin of life is submitted. The data obtained testify that life maintenance depends on physical-chemical properties of water and external factors – temperature and рН. Hot mineral alkaline water, which interacts with CaCO 3 is closest to these conditions. Next in line with regard to quality is sea and mountain water.

  8. Water flow at all scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Continuous water fl ow is a unique feature of streams and distinguishes them from all other ecosystems. The main fl ow is always downstream but it varies in time and space and can be diffi cult to measure and describe. The interest of hydrologists, geologists, biologists and farmers in water fl ow......, and its physical impact, depends on whether the main focus is on the entire stream system, the adjacent fi elds, the individual reaches or the habitats of different species. It is important to learn how to manage fl ow at all scales, in order to understand the ecology of streams and the biology...

  9. Water Ingestion Into Axial Flow Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    AFAPL-TR-76-77 WATER INGESTION INTO AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS PURDUE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONA UTICS S WEST LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 47907...CIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TITL _07" 0 EREO Final i-7 0 Water Ingestion Into Axial Flow Compressorse 1 Auq 75 -: 31 Au0 a6 114o’ H-WPAFB-T-76-l:P ."CO TACT...necessary and Idenify by block number) Water ingestion , turbomachinery, and jet engines. 20 ABSTRACT (Contlinue on tov.ras side Hi necessary and Identify

  10. Structure of water for origin of life and living matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatov, Ignat; Mosin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    This review defines structure of water for origin of life and living matter. Structure is a way of distribution of atoms making the molecule and molecules in space. Features of a physical structure of a molecule of water and short-lived hydrogen bonds caused by electrostatic forces and donor-acceptor interactions between the neighboring atoms of hydrogen and oxygen in molecules of water create favorable opportunities for formation in water special nano-structures associates (clusters) having ...

  11. Nitrogen transformations in wetlands: Effects of water flow patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidsson, T.

    1997-11-01

    In this thesis, I have studied nitrogen turnover processes in water meadows. A water meadow is a wetland where water infiltrates through the soil of a grassland field. It is hypothesized that infiltration of water through the soil matrix promotes nutrient transformations compared to surface flow of water, by increasing the contact between water, nutrients, soil organic matter and bacteria. I have studied how the balance between nitrogen removal (denitrification, assimilative uptake, adsorption) and release (mineralization, desorption) processes are affected by water flow characteristics. Mass balance studies and direct denitrification measurements at two field sites showed that, although denitrification was high, net nitrogen removal in the water meadows was poor. This was due to release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the soils. In laboratory studies, using {sup 15}N isotope techniques, I have shown that nitrogen turnover is considerably affected by hydrological conditions and by soil type. Infiltration increased virtually all the nitrogen processes, due to deeper penetration of nitrate and oxygen, and extended zones of turnover processes. On the contrary, soils and sediments with surface water flow, diffusion is the main transfer mechanism. The relation between release and removal processes sometimes resulted in shifts towards net nitrogen production. This occurred in infiltration treatments when ammonium efflux was high in relation to denitrification. It was concluded that ammonium and DON was of soil origin and hence not a product of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Both denitrification potential and mineralization rates were higher in peaty than in sandy soil. Vertical or horizontal subsurface flow is substantial in many wetland types, such as riparian zones, tidal salt marshes, fens, root-zone systems and water meadows. Moreover, any environment where aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems meet, and where water level fluctuates

  12. A Compound model for the origin of Earth's water

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, K de Souza; Izidoro, A; Haghighipour, N

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which, local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water-delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different w...

  13. Origins for the estimations of water requirements in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, A P

    2012-12-01

    Water homeostasis generally occurs without conscious effort; however, estimating requirements can be necessary in settings such as health care. This review investigates the derivation of equations for estimating water requirements. Published literature was reviewed for water estimation equations and original papers sought. Equation origins were difficult to ascertain and original references were often not cited. One equation (% of body weight) was based on just two human subjects and another equation (ml water/kcal) was reported for mammals and not specifically for humans. Other findings include that some equations: for children were subsequently applied to adults; had undergone modifications without explicit explanation; had adjusted for the water from metabolism or food; and had undergone conversion to simplify application. The primary sources for equations are rarely mentioned or, when located, lack details conventionally considered important. The sources of water requirement equations are rarely made explicit and historical studies do not satisfy more rigorous modern scientific method. Equations are often applied without appreciating their derivation, or adjusting for the water from food or metabolism as acknowledged by original authors. Water requirement equations should be used as a guide only while employing additional means (such as monitoring short-term weight changes, physical or biochemical parameters and urine output volumes) to ensure the adequacy of water provision in clinical or health-care settings.

  14. Water slip flow in superhydrophobic microtubes within laminar flow region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijia Yu; Xinghua Liu; Guozhu Kuang

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces and the studies on water flow characteristics therein are of great significance to many industrial areas as wel as to science and technology development. Experiments were car-ried out to investigate slip characteristics of water flowing in circular superhydrophobic microtubes within lam-inar flow region. The superhydrophobic microtubes of stainless steel were fabricated with chemical etching–fluorination treatment. An experimental setup was designed to measure the pressure drop as function of water flow rate. For comparison, superhydrophilic tubes were also tested. Poiseuille number Po was found to be smaller for the superhydrophobic microtubes than that for superhydrophilic ones. The pressure drop reduc-tion ranges from 8%to 31%. It decreases with increasing Reynolds number when Re b 900, owing to the transition from Cassie state to Wenzel state. However, it is almost unchanged with further increasing Re after Re N 900. The slip length in superhydrophobic microtubes also exhibits a Reynolds number dependence similarly to the pressure drop reduction. The relation between slip length and Darcy friction factor is theoretically analyzed with consideration of surface roughness effect, which was testified with the experimental results.

  15. Hydrologic response of catchments to precipitation: Quantification of mechanical carriers and origins of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.-J.; Sudicky, E. A.; Brookfield, A. E.; Jones, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Precipitation-induced overland and groundwater flow and mixing processes are quantified to analyze the temporal (event and pre-event water) and spatial (groundwater discharge and overland runoff) origins of water entering a stream. Using a distributed-parameter control volume finite-element simulator that can simultaneously solve the fully coupled partial differential equations describing 2-D Manning and 3-D Darcian flow and advective-dispersive transport, mechanical flow (driven by hydraulic potential) and tracer-based hydrograph separation (driven by dispersive mixing as well as mechanical flow) are simulated in response to precipitation events in two cross sections oriented parallel and perpendicular to a stream. The results indicate that as precipitation becomes more intense, the subsurface mechanical flow contributions tend to become less significant relative to the total pre-event stream discharge. Hydrodynamic mixing can play an important role in enhancing pre-event tracer signals in the stream. This implies that temporally tagged chemical signals introduced into surface-subsurface flow systems from precipitation may not be strong enough to detect the changes in the subsurface flow system. It is concluded that diffusive/dispersive mixing, capillary fringe groundwater ridging, and macropore flow can influence the temporal sources of water in the stream, but any sole mechanism may not fully explain the strong pre-event water discharge. Further investigations of the influence of heterogeneity, residence time, geomorphology, and root zone processes are required to confirm the conclusions of this study.

  16. Water-in-Water Droplets by Passive Microfluidic Flow Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-04-05

    We present a simple microfluidic system that generates water-in-water, aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets, by passive flow focusing. ATPS droplet formation is achieved by applying weak hydrostatic pressures, with liquid-filled pipette tips as fluid columns at the inlets, to introduce low speed flows to the flow focusing junction. To control the size of the droplets, we systematically vary the interfacial tension and viscosity of the ATPS fluids and adjust the fluid column height at the fluid inlets. The size of the droplets scales with a power law of the ratio of viscous stresses in the two ATPS phases. Overall, we find a drop size coefficient of variation (CV; i.e., polydispersity) of about 10%. We also find that when drops form very close to the flow focusing junction, the drops have a CV of less than 1%. Our droplet generation method is easily scalable: we demonstrate a parallel system that generates droplets simultaneously and improves the droplet production rate by up to one order of magnitude. Finally, we show the potential application of our system for encapsulating cells in water-in-water emulsions by encapsulating microparticles and cells. To the best of our knowledge, our microfluidic technique is the first that forms low interfacial tension ATPS droplets without applying external perturbations. We anticipate that this simple approach will find utility in drug and cell delivery applications because of the all-biocompatible nature of the water-in-water ATPS environment.

  17. Origins of Water Molecules in the Photosystem II Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Ikeda, Takuya; Saito, Keisuke; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2017-06-20

    The cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) crystal structure includes more than 1300 water molecules in each monomer unit; however, their precise roles in water oxidation are unclear. To understand the origins of water molecules in the PSII crystal structure, the accessibility of bulk water molecules to channel inner spaces in PSII was investigated using the water-removed PSII structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The inner space of the channel that proceeds toward the D1-Glu65/D2-Glu312 pair (E65/E312 channel) was entirely filled with water molecules from the bulk region. In the same channel, a diamond-shaped cluster of water molecules formed near redox-active TyrZ in MD simulations. Reorientation of the D2-Leu352 side chain resulted in formation of a hexagonal water network at the Cl(-)2 binding site. Water molecules could not enter the main region of the O4-water chain, which proceeds from the O4 site of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. However, in the O4-water chain, the two water binding sites that are most distant from the protein bulk surface were occupied by water molecules that approached along the E65/E312 channel, one of which formed an H-bond with the O4 site. These findings provide key insights into the significance of the channel ends, which may utilize water molecules during the PSII photocycle.

  18. Responses of prawn to water flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vascotto, G.L.; Nilas, P.U.

    1987-05-28

    An aquarium study to determine the responses of postlarval macrobrachium rosenbergii to varying water changes was carried out. Six week old postlarvae were raised in glass aquaria receiving 0, 1.15, 7.2 and 14.4 water changes per day over a 12 week period. The treatments had significant influences on survival, biomass, and average size of the animals. Maximum survival and highest biomass were found in the 1.15 water turnover treatment; however, this treatment also produced the smallest average size animals. Early high mortalities were attributed to poor growing conditions in the high and low flow treatments, while later mortality appeared to be biomass dependent.

  19. Explosive Origins of Welded Block and Ash Flow Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Michol, K.; Russell, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 2360 years B. P. eruption of Mount Meager, British Columbia, Canada, produced a succession of rarely- observed, welded block and ash flow deposits and non-welded equivalents, the Pebble Creek Formation. The welded block and ash flow deposits result from accumulation in a narrow, confined river valley; the accumulation was sufficiently rapid to keep the deposits above their glass transition temperature thereby allowing the succession to weld as a single cooling unit. The average integrated strain for vertical sections of the deposit is 31% implying > 50 m shortening of the thickest deposit (from 162 m to the current 112 m). Observations made in the field were supplemented by textural studies with the SEM and microscope, before being quantified by image analysis software. These data were then added to with measurements of connected and isolated porosity from the He-pycnometer at UBC. Only through the integration of these related data sets were we able to explore two significant findings: (1) Unconsolidated deposits have an average matrix porosity of ~41% and clasts have an average porosity of ~32%. Isolated porosity is pervasive (< 8%) in juvenile clasts, but is near absent in samples of matrix (< 1%). Welding and compaction cause a reduction in both connected and isolated porosity, where, equivalent amounts of strain (~38%) are recorded in matrix and clasts. Thus, both matrix and clasts are fully coupled during the welding and compaction process; in contrast, reports from pumiceous ignimbrites suggest that pumice clasts deform faster than the corresponding matrix. We present a series of strain evolution pathways that predict the theoretical welding trajectories for different pyroclastic deposits through porosity space. In this conceptual environment, coupled clast-matrix welding plots along the 1:1 diagonal. (2) The nature and distribution of isolated porosity in the juvenile clasts of rhyodacite (< 8%) suggests an explosive (rather than effusive) origin for

  20. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  1. A modelling approach to determine the origin of urban ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowsdale, Sam A; Lerner, David N

    2007-04-01

    A simple modelling approach was developed to link patterns of urban land-use with ground water flow and chemistry in three dimensions and was applied to characterize the origin of recharge in the aquifer beneath the old industrial city of Nottingham, UK. The approach involved dividing land uses into types, and times into periods, and assigning the recharge from each an individual tracer-solute with a unit concentration. The computer code MT3DMS was used to track the multiple tracer-solutes in transient, three-dimensional simulations of the important urban aquifer. A depth-specific hydrochemical dataset collected in parallel supported the model predictions. At depth under the industrial area studied, a large component of ground water originated of older agricultural origin, with relatively low nitrate concentrations. Shallower ground water originated mainly from residential and industrial areas, with higher nitrate concentrations probably arising from leaking sewers and contaminated land. The results highlighted the spectrum of ground water from different origins that amalgamate even at short well screens in a non-pumped borehole and remind us that the non-point-source pollution of ground water from anthropogenic activities will involve more years of slow degradation of quality.

  2. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 4}He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  3. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 4}He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  4. Stability of people exposed to water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez-Gomariz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our cities are formed by several elements which are exposed to floods of a magnitude according to the importance of the rainfall event and the design of the urban drainage system. The most important components in the cities are the pedestrians who develop various activities during rain events. Focusing on pedestrians, the research on their stability when they are exposed to water flows provides the necessary knowledge to understand and manage the associated hazard for them. In this research, several experiments with humans were carried out in order to determine the stability limits to pedestrians crossing through a water flow in a real scale platform. The results obtained and by comparing those with human stability criteria proposed by other authors and guidelines provide a more restrictive criterion.

  5. The origin of elevated water levels in emplacement boreholes, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, G.G.; Brikowski, T.H.

    1993-12-01

    The origin of elevated water levels in emplacement boreholes at Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, is uncertain. If the water is from naturally perched aquifers, then presumed ``above water table`` weapons tests may directly impact the groundwater quality. The purpose of this study is to determine the probable source of the elevated water in boreholes by comparing modeled seepage of infiltrated drilling fluids, and the seepage from a simulated naturally perched aquifer with the observed water level history. In the model, large volumes of water are infiltrated, yet return flow of fluids back into the hole stops within three days after the end of drilling and is insufficient to produce observed standing water. Return flow is limited for two reasons: (1) the volume of the saturated rock next to the borehole is small; (2) pressure head gradient direct unsaturated flow away from the borehole. Simulation of seepage from a naturally perched aquifer readily reproduces the observed water levels.

  6. Water in the Earth's Interior: Distribution and Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Schönbächler, Maria; Busemann, Henner; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    was still on-going. Dynamic models of planet formation provide additional evidence for water delivery to the Earth during the same period by water-rich planetesimals originating from the asteroid belt and possibly beyond. This early delivered water may have been partly lost during giant impacts, including the Moon forming event: magma oceans can form in their aftermath, degas and be followed by atmospheric loss. More water may have been delivered and/or lost after core formation during late accretion of extraterrestrial material ("late-veneer"). Stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and some noble gases in Earth's materials show similar compositions to those in carbonaceous chondrites, implying a common origin for their water, and only allowing for minor water inputs from comets.

  7. Effects of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress: A case study of grain in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shikun; Wang, Yubao; Engel, Bernie A; Wu, Pute

    2016-04-15

    Scarcity of water resources is one of the major challenges in the world, particularly for the main water consumer, agriculture. Virtual water flow (VWF) promotes water redistribution geographically and provides a new solution for resolving regional water shortage and improving water use efficiency in the world. Virtual water transfer among regions will have a significant influence on the water systems in both grain export and import regions. In order to assess the impacts of VWF related grain transfer on regional water resources conditions, the study takes mainland China as study area for a comprehensive evaluation of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress. Results show that Northeast China and Huang-Huai-Hai region are the major grain production regions as well as the major virtual water export regions. National water savings related to grain VWF was about 58Gm(3), with 48Gm(3) blue water and 10Gm(3) green water. VWF changes the original water distribution and has a significant effect on water resources in both virtual water import and export regions. Grain VWF significantly increased water stress in grain export regions and alleviated water stress in grain import regions. Water stress index (WSI) of Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia has been increased by 138% and 129% due to grain export. Stress from water shortages is generally severe in export regions, and issues with the sustainability of grain production and VWF pattern are worthy of further exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Structure of Water Chestnut Beetle: Providing Evidence for Origin of Water Chestnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jing; Lu, Ming-Xing; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Water chestnut beetle (Galerucella birmanica Jacoby) is a pest of the water chestnut (Trapa natans L.). To analyze the phylogeny and biogeography of the beetle and provide evidence for the origin of T. natans in China, we conducted this by using three mitochondrial genes (COI, COII and Cytb) and nuclear ITS2 ribosomal DNA of G. birmanica. As for mtDNA genes, the beetle could be subdivided into three groups: northeastern China (NEC), central-northern-southern China (CC-NC-SC) and southwestern China (SWC) based on SAMOVA, phylogenetic analyses and haplotype networks. But for ITS2, no obvious lineages were obtained but individuals which were from NEC region clustered into one clade, which might be due to sequence conservation of ITS2. Significant genetic variation was observed among the three groups with infrequent gene flow between groups, which may have been restricted due to natural barriers and events in the Late Pleistocene. Based on our analyses of genetic variation in the CC-NC-SC geographical region, the star-like haplotype networks, approximate Bayesian computation, niche modelling and phylogeographic variation of the beetle, we concluded that the beetle population has been lasting in the lower, central reaches of the Yangtze River Basin with its host plant, water chestnut, which is consistent with archaeological records. Moreover, we speculate that the CC-NC-SC population of G. birmanica may have undergone a period of expansion coincident with domestication of the water chestnut approximately 113,900–126,500 years ago. PMID:27459279

  9. On the origin of streaks in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Fabian; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    The paper substantiates the notion that selective amplification and direct resonance, based on linear theory, does not provide a selection mechanism for the well-defined streak spacing of about 100 wall units observed in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows. For the direct resonance theory, it is shown that the streaks are created by the nonlinear self-interaction of the vertical velocity rather than that of the directly forced vertical vorticity. It is proposed that the selection mechanism must be inherently nonlinear and correspond to a self-sustaining process. For the case of plane Poiseuille flow the 100-wall-unit criterion corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of 1250, based on the centerline velocity and the channel half-width, which is close to the usually quoted value of about 1000. In plane Couette flow, it corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of 625, based on the half-velocity difference and the half-width.

  10. Origin of Permeability and Structure of Flows in Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreuzy, J.; Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Erhel, J.; Le Goc, R.; Maillot, J.; Meheust, Y.; Pichot, G.; Poirriez, B.

    2013-12-01

    After more than three decades of research, flows in fractured media have been shown to result from multi-scale geological structures. Flows result non-exclusively from the damage zone of the large faults, from the percolation within denser networks of smaller fractures, from the aperture heterogeneity within the fracture planes and from some remaining permeability within the matrix. While the effect of each of these causes has been studied independently, global assessments of the main determinisms is still needed. We propose a general approach to determine the geological structures responsible for flows, their permeability and their organization based on field data and numerical modeling [de Dreuzy et al., 2012b]. Multi-scale synthetic networks are reconstructed from field data and simplified mechanical modeling [Davy et al., 2010]. High-performance numerical methods are developed to comply with the specificities of the geometry and physical properties of the fractured media [Pichot et al., 2010; Pichot et al., 2012]. And, based on a large Monte-Carlo sampling, we determine the key determinisms of fractured permeability and flows (Figure). We illustrate our approach on the respective influence of fracture apertures and fracture correlation patterns at large scale. We show the potential role of fracture intersections, so far overlooked between the fracture and the network scales. We also demonstrate how fracture correlations reduce the bulk fracture permeability. Using this analysis, we highlight the need for more specific in-situ characterization of fracture flow structures. Fracture modeling and characterization are necessary to meet the new requirements of a growing number of applications where fractures appear both as potential advantages to enhance permeability and drawbacks for safety, e.g. in energy storage, stimulated geothermal energy and non-conventional gas productions. References Davy, P., et al. (2010), A likely universal model of fracture scaling and

  11. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  12. Removing the impact of water abstractions on flow duration curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoero, Alessandro; Ganora, Daniele; Galeati, Giorgio; Laio, Francesco; Claps, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    on few easy-access parameters, of correction of the water abstraction impact. The model, based on an exponential form of the river Flow Duration Curve (FDC), allows completely analytical solutions. Hence the method can be applied extensively. This is particularly relevant when working on a general outlook on water resources (regional or basin scale), given the high number of water abstractions that should be considered. The correction method developed is based on only two hard data that can be easily found: i) the design maximum discharge of the water intake and ii) the days of exercise, between a year. Following the same correction hypothesis also the abstracted discharge statistics have been reconstructed analytically and combined with the statistics of the receiving reach, that can be different from the original one. This information can be useful when we are assessing water availability in a river network interconnected by derivation channels. The goodness of the correction method proposed is proven by the application to a case study in North-West Italy, along a second order tributary of the Po River. Flow values recorded at the river gauge station were affected, significantly, by the presence of a 5 MW hydropower plant. Knowing the amount of water abstracted daily by the power plant we are able to reconstruct, empirically, the natural discharge on the river and compare its main statistics with the ones computed analytically using the proposed correction model. An extremely low difference between empirical and analytical reconstructed mean discharge and L-moment of variation was founded. Also, the importance of the day of exercise information was highlighted. The correction proposed in this work is able to give a correct indication of the non-impacted natural streamflows characteristics, especially in alpine regions where water abstraction impact is a main issue.

  13. Flow Diode and Method for Controlling Fluid Flow Origin of the Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flow diode configured to permit fluid flow in a first direction while preventing fluid flow in a second direction opposite the first direction is disclosed. The flow diode prevents fluid flow without use of mechanical closures or moving parts. The flow diode utilizes a bypass flowline whereby all fluid flow in the second direction moves into the bypass flowline having a plurality of tortuous portions providing high fluidic resistance. The portions decrease in diameter such that debris in the fluid is trapped. As fluid only travels in one direction through the portions, the debris remains trapped in the portions.

  14. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...

  15. Water Modeling of Optimizing Tundish Flow Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-gang; YAN Hui-cheng; LIU Liu; WANG Xin-hua

    2007-01-01

    In the water modeling experiments, three cases were considered, i.e. , a bare tundish, a tundish equipped with a turbulence inhibitor, and a rectangular tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor. Comparing the RTD curves, inclusion separation, and the result of the streamline experiment, it can be found that the tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor has a great effect on the flow field and the inclusion separation when compared with the sole use or no use of the turbulent inhibitor or weirs (dams). In addition, the enlargement of the distance between the weir and dam will result in a better effect when the tundish equipped with weirs (dam) and a turbulence inhibitor was used.

  16. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  17. On the origin of impinging tones at low supersonic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Impinging compressible jets may cause deafness and material fatigue due to immensely loud tonal noise. It is generally accepted that a feedback mechanism similar to the screech feedback loop is responsible for impinging tones. The close of the loop remained unclear. One hypothesis hold up in the literature explains the emanated sound with the direct interaction of vortices and the wall. Other explanations name the standoff shock oscillations as the origin of the tones. Using direct numerical simulations (DNS) we were able to identify the source mechanism for under-expanded impinging jets with a nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) of 2.15 and a plate distance of 5 diameters. We found two different types of interactions between vortices and shocks to be responsible for the generation of the impinging tones. They are not related to screech.

  18. Observations give us CLUES to Cosmic Flows' origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny; Courtois, H.; Gottloeber, S.; Hoffman, Y.; Pomarede, D.; Tully, R. B.; Flows, Cosmic; CLUES

    2014-01-01

    In an era where the wealth of telescope-data and the development of computer superclusters keep increasing, the knowledge of Large Scale Structures' formation and evolution constitutes a tremendous challenge. Within this context the project Cosmic Flows has recently produced a catalog of peculiar velocities up to 150 Mpc. These velocities, obtained from direct distance measurements, are ideal markers of the underlying gravitational potential. They form a fantastic input to perform constrained simulations of the Local Universe within the CLUES project. A new method has recently been elaborated to achieve these simulations which prove to be excellent replicas of our neighborhood. The Wiener-Filter, the Reverse Zel'dovich Approximation and the Constrained Realization techniques are combined to build Initial Conditions. The resulting second generation of constrained simulations presents us the formidable history of the Great Attractor's and nearby supercluster's formation.

  19. Cometary origin of carbon and water on the terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    An early high-temperature phase of the protosolar accretion disk is implied by at least three different telltales in chondrites and confirmed by peculiarities in the dust grains of Comet Halley. The existence of this high-temperature phase implies a large accretion rate hence a massive early disk. This clarifies the origin of the Kuiper Belt and of the Oort cloud, those two cometary populations of different symmetry that subsist today. Later, when the dust sedimented and was removed from the thermal equilibrium with the gas phase, a somewhat lower temperature of the disk explains the future planets' densities as well as the location beyond 2.6 AU of the carbonaceous chondrite chemistry. This lower temperature remains however large enough to require an exogenous origin for all carbon and all water now present in the earth. The later orbital diffusion of planetesimals, which is required by protoplanetary growth, is needed to explain the origin of the terrestrial biosphere (atmosphere, oceans, carbonates and organic compounds) by a veneer mostly made of comets.

  20. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  1. Flow and fracture in water-saturated, unconstrained granular beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán eVaras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The injection of gas in a liquid-saturated granular bed gives rise to a wide variety of invasion patterns. Many studies have focused on constrained porous media, in which the grains are fixed in the bed and only the interstitial fluid flows when the gas invades the system. With a free upper boundary, however, the grains can be entrained by the ascending gas or fluid motion, and the competition between the upward motion of grains and sedimentation leads to new patterns. We propose a brief review of the experimental investigation of the dynamics of air rising through a water-saturated, unconstrained granular bed, in both two and three dimensions. After describing the invasion pattern at short and long time, a tentative regime-diagram is proposed. We report original results showing a dependence of the fluidized zone shape, at long times, on the injection flow rate and grain size. A method based on image analysis makes it possible to detect not only the fluidized zone profile in the stationary regime, but also to follow the transient dynamics of its formation. Finally, we describe the degassing dynamics inside the fluidized zone, in the stationary regime. Depending on the experimental conditions, regular bubbling, continuous degassing, intermittent regime or even spontaneous flow-to-fracture transition are observed.

  2. Deep Water Compositions From the Los Angeles Basin and the Origin of Formation Water Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, J.; Giles, G.; Lockman, D.

    2005-12-01

    Deep basin formation waters represent original depositional waters that have been modified by diagenetic processes at elevated temperatures and pressures. In addition, they may be diluted by meteoric incursion from elevated structural blocks along basin flanks. It has long been thought that deep basin formation waters have salinities greater than sea water due to various processes like clay membrane filtration or other types of water-rock interaction. However, our work and similar studies in the San Joaquin basin show that formation waters in deep basins are more likely to become diluted rather than concentrated in the absence of soluble evaporite deposits that might underlie the basin. The idea of increased salinity with depth arose from studies in which the underpinning of the basin consisted of soluble evaporate deposits such as the Texas Gulf Coast, Illinois, Michigan, and some North Sea areas. There are very few deep formation water analyses from the Los Angeles Basin. Furthermore, very few of the current produced waters from any depth can be considered pristine because of the widespread formation water injection programs and commingling of fluids from different levels. Here, we describe the first analyses from a deep, previously untouched part of the basin that is currently being developed in the Inglewood Oil Field. We have analyzed a suite of formation waters from the mid-Miocene marine Sentous sandstone from sub-sea level depths of 2250 m to 2625 m at temperatures of about 110 to 126°C and pressures of about 27 MPa. The original depositional waters in the Sentous Formation were sea water whereas the sampled waters are diluted by about 20% from sea water and some show as much as 50% dilution. Based on comparison of oxygen and deuterium isotopes between the meteoric water trend and these waters, we conclude that the smectite to illite dehydration reaction is the major cause of dilution to the original formation water. Other notable differences include

  3. RE-AERATION LAW OF WATER FLOW OVER SPILLWAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiang-ju; LUO Lin; CHEN Yong-can; ZHAO Wen-qian

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the re-aeration law of water flow over spillway, the transfer process of oxygen in water flow over spillway was studied. The interfacial mass transfer coefficients were obtained by experiments. The flow fields and the turbulence characteristics are simulated by numerical methods. The fractional volume of fluid model (VOF) of the air-water two phase flows was introduced to track the interface. Consequently, the quantitative expression of the interfacial mass transfer coefficients related with velocity and kinetic energy at the free surface was derived and the re-aeration model for the water flow over spillway was established. The examination with the experimental data of different conditions shows the validity of the re-aeration model for the water flow over spillways. This study will be important to evaluate the dissolved oxygen concentration and self-purification ability of rivers.

  4. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Determination of the controlling factors and origins of the bilinear flow from horizontal well transient responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, A.; Azzouguen, A.; Mazouzi, A. [Sonatrach/AMT/DP, Alger (Algeria); Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); Aissaoui, K. [Sonatrach/AMT/PED, Alger (Algeria)

    2002-06-01

    Over the last ten years, the most significant technological advance in the petroleum industry has been the development of horizontal well drilling techniques. At intermediate time, linear flow is the dominant flow in the theory of horizontal wells. The analysis of horizontal well tests is being further complicated by the presence of a bilinear flow regime as intermediate time flow during the horizontal well transient behavior. In this study, the authors demonstrate the occurrence of a bilinear flow in horizontal wells as intermediate time flow regime. They also determine the controlling factors and the origins of the bilinear flow. An analogy is established between a horizontal well and a finite conductivity vertical fracture. An equation is developed using the application of the conventional and Tiab's Direct Synthesis (TDST) methods to determine the reservoir and well characteristics of the Hassi-Messaoud field of Algeria. 20 refs., 6 tabs., 9 figs.

  6. Documentation of finite-difference model for simulation of three-dimensional ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trescott, Peter C.; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    User experience has indicated that the documentation of the model of three-dimensional ground-water flow (Trescott and Larson, 1975) should be expanded. This supplement is intended to fulfill that need. The original report emphasized the theory of the strongly implicit procedure, instructions for using the groundwater-flow model, and practical considerations for application. (See also W76-02962 and W76-13085) (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Onset of submarine debris flow deposition far from original giant landslide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talling, P J; Wynn, R B; Masson, D G; Frenz, M; Cronin, B T; Schiebel, R; Akhmetzhanov, A M; Dallmeier-Tiessen, S; Benetti, S; Weaver, P P E; Georgiopoulou, A; Zühlsdorff, C; Amy, L A

    2007-11-22

    Submarine landslides can generate sediment-laden flows whose scale is impressive. Individual flow deposits have been mapped that extend for 1,500 km offshore from northwest Africa. These are the longest run-out sediment density flow deposits yet documented on Earth. This contribution analyses one of these deposits, which contains ten times the mass of sediment transported annually by all of the world's rivers. Understanding how this type of submarine flow evolves is a significant problem, because they are extremely difficult to monitor directly. Previous work has shown how progressive disintegration of landslide blocks can generate debris flow, the deposit of which extends downslope from the original landslide. We provide evidence that submarine flows can produce giant debris flow deposits that start several hundred kilometres from the original landslide, encased within deposits of a more dilute flow type called turbidity current. Very little sediment was deposited across the intervening large expanse of sea floor, where the flow was locally very erosive. Sediment deposition was finally triggered by a remarkably small but abrupt decrease in sea-floor gradient from 0.05 degrees to 0.01 degrees. This debris flow was probably generated by flow transformation from the decelerating turbidity current. The alternative is that non-channelized debris flow left almost no trace of its passage across one hundred kilometres of flat (0.2 degrees to 0.05 degrees) sea floor. Our work shows that initially well-mixed and highly erosive submarine flows can produce extensive debris flow deposits beyond subtle slope breaks located far out in the deep ocean.

  8. Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Marchant, David R.; Kowalewski, Douglas E.; Head, James W., III

    2010-08-01

    Viscous flow lobes are common throughout the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica. These features have been described as rock glaciers, gelifluction lobes, solifluction lobes, talus mobilized by pore ice and/or segregation ice, and debris-covered glaciers. We investigate the origin, modification, and flow of a 2-km-long lobe (East Stocking Lobe or ESL) along the north wall of central Taylor Valley using field mapping techniques, shallow seismic surveys, time-dependent displacement surveys, and isotopic analyses of buried-ice samples. On the basis of these integrated analyses, we show that the ESL is cored with remnant glacier ice, most probably derived from an advance of nearby Stocking Glacier ˜ 130 kyr BP. Seismic data, coupled with results from ice-flow modeling assuming plastic flow of clean ice, suggest that the buried core of glacier ice is ˜ 14- to 30-m thick. Near its terminus, the ESL flows at a rate of ˜ 2.4 to 6.7 mm a - 1 . The loose drift that caps the buried ice (typically analyses of samples from the upper 30 cm of the ice lie on a slope of ˜ 5.8 (when plotted on a δD vs. δ18O graph), well below the local meteoric water line of 7.75, suggesting modification by freeze/thaw processes and evaporation/sublimation. Measured air and soil temperatures show that intermittent melting is most likely possible during summer months where buried ice is ≤ 35 cm below the ground surface. Morphological comparisons with ice-cored deposits in upland regions of the Dry Valleys, e.g., Mullins and Beacon Valleys (30 km inland and ˜ 500 m higher in elevation), and near the coast (40 km distant and ˜ 500 m lower) reveal marked contrasts in the style of near-surface ice degradation and cryoturbation. From these morphological comparisons, we infer that buried-ice deposits in the stable upland zone have not experienced the relatively warm climate conditions now found at the ESL and at lower elevations in the Dry Valleys region (e.g. sustained summertime

  9. Pumpage for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents ground-water discharged from the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) through pumped wells. Pumping from wells in...

  10. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  11. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  12. Dissecting the variable source area concept - Subsurface flow pathways and water mixing processes in a hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Helen E.; Easton, Zachary M.; Lyon, Steve W.; Todd Walter, M.; Destouni, Georgia; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThis study uses an instrumented (trenched) 0.5 ha hillslope in the southern tier of New York State, USA, to provide new data and insights on how variable source areas and associated flow pathways form and combine to connect rainfall with downstream water flows across a hillslope. Measurements of water fluxes in the trench, upslope water table dynamics, surface and bedrock topography, and isotopic and geochemical tracers have been combined for a four-dimensional (space-time) characterization of subsurface storm flow responses. During events with dry antecedent conditions infiltrating rainwater was found to percolate through a prevailing fragipan layer to deeper soil layers, with much (33-71%) of the total discharge of the hillslope originating from deeper water flow below the fragipan. During storm events with wet antecedent conditions and large rainfall amounts, shallow lateral flow of event and pre-event water above the fragipan occurred and was one magnitude greater than the deeper water flow contribution. Spatial surface and subsurface water quality observations indicate that water from a distance of up to 56 m contributed runoff from the hillslope during storm events. In addition, mobilization of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) with subsurface flow played a greater role than with overland or near-surface flow. During all events TDP loads were highest in the total discharge during peak flows (8-11.5 kg ha -1 d -1), except during the largest storm event, when TDP concentrations were highly diluted. These results have implications for strategies to protect streams and other downstream water recipients from waterborne nutrient and pollutant loading.

  13. Pore Water Pressure Contribution to Debris Flow Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Deangeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Debris flows are very to extremely rapid flows of saturated granular soils. Two main types of debris flow are generally recognized: Open slope debris flows and channelized debris flows. The former is the results of some form of slope failures, the latter can develop along preexisting stream courses by the mobilization of previously deposited debris blanket. The problem to be addressed is the influence of the mode of initiation on the subsequent mechanism of propagation. In particular the role of pore water pressure on debris flow mobility in both types was debated. Approach: Laboratory flume experiments were set up in order to analyze the behavior of debris flows generated by model sand slope failures. Failures were induced in sand slopes by raising the water level by seepage from a drain located at the top end of the flume, and by rainfall supplied by a set of pierced plastic pipes placed above the flume. Video recordings of the tests were performed to analyze debris flow characteristics. Results: In all the tests the sand water mixture flows were unsteady and non uniform and sand deposition along the channel bed was a relevant phenomenon. The flows were characterized by a behavioral stratification of the sand water mixture along the flow depth. Back analyzed pore water pressure were just in excess to the hydrostatic condition. The reliability of the experimental results was checked by comparison with other flume experiment data. Conclusion: Debris flow behavior was influenced by the mode of initiation, the inclination of the channel and grain size of the soils. These factors affected the attained velocities and the pore water pressure values. The mobility of debris flows was not always enhanced by high excess pore water pressure values.

  14. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  15. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  16. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...... calibrated. This calibration is done based on data batches stored at each pump cycle, hence makes the approach a self calibrating system. The approach is tested on a pumping station operating in a real waste water network....

  17. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  18. Hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in Kamas Valley, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, L.E.; Stolp, B.J.; Spangler, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Kamas Valley, Utah, is located about 50 miles east of Salt Lake City and is undergoing residential development. The increasing number of wells and septic systems raised concerns of water managers and prompted this hydrologic study. About 350,000 acre-feet per year of surface water flows through Kamas Valley in the Weber River, Beaver Creek, and Provo River, which originate in the Uinta Mountains east of the study area. The ground-water system in this area consists of water in unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock; water budgets indicate very little interaction between consolidated rock and unconsolidated deposits. Most recharge to consolidated rock occurs at higher altitudes in the mountains and discharges to streams and springs upgradient of Kamas Valley. About 38,000 acre-feet per year of water flows through the unconsolidated deposits in Kamas Valley. Most recharge is from irrigation and seepage from major streams; most discharge is to Beaver Creek in the middle part of the valley. Long-term water-level fluctuations range from about 3 to 17 feet. Seasonal fluctuations exceed 50 feet. Transmissivity varies over four orders of magnitude in both the unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock and is typically 1,000 to 10,000 feet squared per day in unconsolidated deposits and 100 feet squared per day in consolidated rock as determined from specific capacity. Water samples collected from wells, streams, and springs had nitrate plus nitrite concentrations (as N) substantially less than 10 mg/L. Total and fecal coliform bacteria were detected in some surface-water samples and probably originate from livestock. Septic systems do not appear to be degrading water quality. A numerical ground-water flow model developed to test the conceptual understanding of the ground-water system adequately simulates water levels and flow in the unconsolidated deposits. Analyses of model fit and sensitivity were used to refine the conceptual and numerical models.

  19. Numerical investigation of cavitating flow behind the cone of a poppet valve in water hydraulic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高红; 傅新; 杨华勇; TSUKIJITetsuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynarmics(CFD) simulations of cavitating flow throuth water hydraulic poppet valves were performed using advanced RNG κ-epsilon turbulence model. The flow was turbulent, incom-pressible and unsteady, for Reynolds nurnbers greater than 43 000.The working fluid was water, and the structure of the valve was simplified as a two dimensionl axisynmmetric gecomtrical model. Flow Field vlsual-ization was numerically achieved. The effects of inlet velocity, outlet pressure, opening size as wall as popet angle on cavitation intensity in the poppet valve were numerically investigated. Experimentall flow visualization was coonducted to capture cavitation images near the orifice in the poppet valve with 30° poppet angle using high speed video camera.The binary cavitafing flow field distrilxrdon obtalned frcra digital processing of the original cavitation image showed a gtxxt agreement with the ntmaerieal result

  20. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  1. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  2. Horizontal flow barriers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional features simulated as horizontal flow barriers in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  3. Horizontal flow barriers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional features simulated as horizontal flow barriers in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  4. Cometary origin of carbon, nitrogen, and water on the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, two assumptions on the origin of the earth are substantiated: (1) that the earth accreted from fine hot degassed dust particles containing no volatiles; and (2) that, after the accretion was finished, all the volatiles of the biosphere, including the atmosphere and the oceans, were brought to the earth by cometary bombardment. A temperature of more than 1000 K is deduced at the time when the dust that was going to form the earth was separated from the gas phase. This implies grains of anhydrous silicates and of reduced iron, without either water, carbon, or any labile elements, which remained in gas phase; thus, the minor bodies could not produce atmosphere or oceans. The second assumption is based on the evidence that cometary nuclei are formed in the outer space, by accumulation of frosty particles containing large amounts of ice and volatile molecules. It is shown that the icy bodies which hit the earth are more than enough to explain the whole biosphere.

  5. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2014-01-01

    As the water requirement for food production and other human needs grows, quantification of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) is necessary to assess the amount of water needed to sustain freshwater ecosystems. EFRs are the result of the quantification of water necessary to sustain the riverine

  6. High pressure membrane foulants of seawater, brackish water and river water: Origin assessed by sugar and bacteriohopanepolyol signatures

    KAUST Repository

    Mondamert, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the origin of foulant material recovered on membranes used in water treatment. Firstly, sugar signatures were assessed from the monosaccharide composition. As results were not conclusive, a statistical approach using discriminant analysis was applied to the sugar data set in order to predict the origin of the foulant material. Three groups of various origins (algal, microbial, continental dissolved organic matter) were used as sugar references for the prediction. The results of the computation showed that the origin of reverse osmosis (RO) seawater foulant material is influenced by both the location of the water sources and the season. RO brackish water and nanofiltration river water foulant materials had a terrestrial origin. Secondly, bacteriohopanepolyol signatures indicated that RO seawater foulant material had a marine signature, RO brackish water foulant material had both a marine and a terrestrial origin and the nanofiltration river water foulant material contained only a terrestrial signature. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  7. Globalisation of water resources: Global virtual water flows in relation to international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.Y.; Hung, P.Q.

    2005-01-01

    The water that is used in the production process of a commodity is called the ‘virtual water’ contained in the commodity. International trade of commodities brings along international flows of virtual water. The objective of this paper is to quantify the volumes of virtual water flows between nation

  8. The Origin of Ekman Flow in a Cavity Subject to Impulsive Rotational Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jei Yang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study is performed to disclose the origin of Ekman flow on the surfaces of a rotating drum resulting from fluid-structure interaction after an impulsive start of motion (referred to as the spin-up process or an impulsive stop (the spin-down process. Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV is employed to determine instantaneous distribution of both the radial and angular velocity components in the flow field inside the rotating drum. From these results, the secondary flow and the time history of the Ekman boundary layer thickness are determined. The tracer/light sheet method is also engaged to enable real-time visualization of flow patterns. Fluid viscosity, drum size and rotational speed are varied to determine their effects on fluid-structure interactions. Results may be applied to cavity flow in rotating machinery.

  9. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PLANE WATER FLOW AND WATER QUALITY DISTRIBUTION IN BOSTEN LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Min-quan; Zhou Xiao-de; Zheng Bang-min; Min Tao; Zhao Ke-yu

    2003-01-01

    The two-dimensional plane water flow and water quality was developed by using the techniques of coordinate transformation, alternating directions, staggered grid, linear recurrence, and implicit scheme in the study of large water body in lakes. The model was proved to be suitable for treating the irregular boundary and predicting quickly water flow and water quality. The application of the model to the Bosten Lake in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China shows that it is reasonable and practicable.

  10. Radar Based Flow and Water Level Forecasting in Sewer Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Grum, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the first radar based forecast of flow and/or water level in sewer systems in Denmark. The rainfall is successfully forecasted with a lead time of 1-2 hours, and flow/levels are forecasted an additional ½-1½ hours using models describing the behaviour of the sewer system. Both...... radar data and flow/water level model are continuously updated using online rain gauges and online in-sewer measurements, in order to make the best possible predictions. The project show very promising results, and show large potentials, exploiting the existing water infrastructure in future climate...

  11. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  12. The Effects of Heterogeneity in Magma Water Concentration on the Development of Flow Banding and Spherulites in Rhyolitic Lava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, S.; Dyar, D; Marinkovic, N

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the origin of flow-banded rhyolites that consist of compositionally similar darker and lighter flow bands of contrasting texture and color. Infrared radiation was used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from which water concentrations were calculated, and to map variations in water concentrations across zones of spherulites and glass from the 23 million year old Sycamore Canyon lava flow of southern Arizona. Lighter-colored, thicker flow bands consist of gray glass, fine-grained quartz, and large (1.0 to 1.5 mm) spherulites. Darker-colored, thinner flow bands consist of orange glass and smaller (0.1 to 0.2 mm) spherulites. The centers of both large and small spherulites are occupied by either (1) a quartz or sanidine crystal, (2) a granophyric intergrowth, or (3) a vesicle. Mapping of water concentration (dominantly OH- in glass and OH- and H2O in sanidine crystals) illustrates fluctuating water availability during quenching of the host melt. Textures of large spherulites in the lighter (gray) bands in some cases indicate complex quenching histories that suggest that local water concentration controlled the generation of glass versus crystals. Small spherulites in darker (orange) bands have only one generation of radiating crystal growth. Both the glass surrounding spherulites, and the crystals in the spherulites contain more water in the gray flow bands than in the orange flow bands. Flow banding in the Sycamore Canyon lava flow may have originated by the stretching of a magma that contained pre-existing zones (vesicles or proto-vesicles) of contrasting water concentration, as the magma flowed in the conduit and on the surface. Variation in the original water concentration in the alternating layers is interpreted to have resulted in differences in undercooling textures in spherulites in the lighter compared to the darker flow bands.

  13. Multiregional input-output model for the evaluation of Spanish water flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazcarro, Ignacio; Duarte, Rosa; Sánchez Chóliz, Julio

    2013-01-01

    We construct a multiregional input-output model for Spain, in order to evaluate the pressures on the water resources, virtual water flows, and water footprints of the regions, and the water impact of trade relationships within Spain and abroad. The study is framed with those interregional input-output models constructed to study water flows and impacts of regions in China, Australia, Mexico, or the UK. To build our database, we reconcile regional IO tables, national and regional accountancy of Spain, trade and water data. Results show an important imbalance between origin of water resources and final destination, with significant water pressures in the South, Mediterranean, and some central regions. The most populated and dynamic regions of Madrid and Barcelona are important drivers of water consumption in Spain. Main virtual water exporters are the South and Central agrarian regions: Andalusia, Castile-La Mancha, Castile-Leon, Aragon, and Extremadura, while the main virtual water importers are the industrialized regions of Madrid, Basque country, and the Mediterranean coast. The paper shows the different location of direct and indirect consumers of water in Spain and how the economic trade and consumption pattern of certain areas has significant impacts on the availability of water resources in other different and often drier regions.

  14. An electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tinghu; Sabic, Darko

    2013-06-01

    This note describes an electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement. It consists of two pairs of stainless steel electrodes set apart and inserted into a non-conductive flow tube with each pair of electrodes placed diametrically at the opposite sides. The flow sensor is modeled as a typical four-electrode system of which two electrodes are current-carrying and the other two serve as output pick ups. The polarization impedances of the two current carrying electrodes are affected by water flows resulting in changes of differential potential between the two pick-up electrodes which are separated by the same fluid. The interrogation of the two excitation electrodes with dc biased ac signals offers significantly higher sensor sensitivities to flow. The prototype flow sensor constructed for a 20 mm diameter pipeline was able to measure water flow rate as low as tested at 1.06 l h-1 and remained sensitive at a flow rate of 25.18 l h-1 when it was driven with a sinusoidal voltage at 1000 Hz with a peak ac amplitude of 2 V and a dc offset of +8 V. The nonlinear characteristics of the sensor response indicate that the sensor is more sensitive at low flows and will not be able to measure at very high flows. Additional experiments are needed to evaluate the influences of impurities, chemical species, ions constituents, conductivity and temperature over a practical range of residential water conditions, the effects of fluctuating ground signals, measurement uncertainty, power consumption, compensation of effects and practical operations. The flow sensor (principle) presented may be used as (in) a secondary sensor in combination with an existing electronic water meter to extend the low end of measurement range in residential water metering.

  15. Periodic equatorial water flows from a Hamiltonian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia; Martin, Calin Iulian

    2017-04-01

    The main result of this paper is a Hamiltonian formulation of the nonlinear governing equations for geophysical periodic stratified water flows in the equatorial f-plane approximation allowing for piecewise constant vorticity.

  16. Initial Survey Instructions for Spring Water Monitoring : Flow

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for the Spring Water Monitoring - Flow 1.02 survey at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This coop baseline monitoring survey has...

  17. Governing urban water flows in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, L.

    2007-01-01

    China has been witnessing an unprecedented period of continuous high economic growth during the past three decades. But this has been paralleled by severe environmental challenges, of which water problems are of key importance. This thesis addresses the urban water challenges of contemporary China,

  18. Governing urban water flows in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, L.

    2007-01-01

    China has been witnessing an unprecedented period of continuous high economic growth during the past three decades. But this has been paralleled by severe environmental challenges, of which water problems are of key importance. This thesis addresses the urban water challenges of contemporary China,

  19. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water

    OpenAIRE

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J.; ZHANG, JUN

    2012-01-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly view...

  20. Numerical investigation of cavitating flow behind the cone of a poppet valve in water hydraulic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of cavitating flow th rough water hydraulic poppet valves were performed using advanced RNG k-eps ilon turbulence model. The flow was turbulent, incompressible and unsteady, for Reyno lds numbers greater than 43 000. The working fluid was water, and the structure o f the valve was simplified as a two dimensional axisymmetric geometrical model. Flow field visualization was numerically achieved. The effects of inlet velocity , outlet pressure, opening size as well as poppet angle on cavitation intensity in the poppet valve were numerically investigated. Experimental flow visualization was conducted to capture cavitation images near the orifice in the poppet valve with 30° poppet angle using high speed video camera. The binary cavitating flo w field distribution obtained from digital processing of the original cavitation i mage showed a good agreement with the numerical result.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Original Water Saturation and Mobile Water Saturation in Low Permeability Sandstone Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shu-Sheng; YE Li-You; XIONG Wei; GUO He-Kun; HU Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ We use nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)and centrifugation to measure the original water saturation and mobile water saturation of cores from the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas reservoir,and compare the NMR results with the corresponding field data.It is shown that the NMR water saturation after 300 psi centrifugation effectively represents the original water saturation measured by weighing fresh cores.There is a good correlation between mobile water saturation and the water production performance of the corresponding gas wells.The critical mobile water saturation whether reservoir produces water of the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas is 6%.The higher the mobile water saturation,the greater the water production rate of gas well.This indicates that well's water production performance can be forecasted by mobile water saturation of cores.

  2. Design and implementation of CUAHSI WaterML and WaterOneFlow Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.; Maidment, D.

    2007-12-01

    WaterOneFlow is a term for a group of web services created by and for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) community. CUAHSI web services facilitate the retrieval of hydrologic observations information from online data sources using the SOAP protocol. CUAHSI Water Markup Language (below referred to as WaterML) is an XML schema defining the format of messages returned by the WaterOneFlow web services. \

  3. Flow improvers for water injection based on surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskarsson, H.; Uneback, I.; Hellsten, M.

    2006-03-15

    In many cases it is desirable to increase the flow of injection water when an oil well deteriorates. It is very costly in offshore operation to lay down an additional water pipe to the injection site. Flow improvers for the injection water will thus be the most cost-effective way to increase the flow rate. During the last years water-soluble polymers have also been applied for this purpose. These drag-reducing polymers are however only slowly biodegraded which has been an incentive for the development of readily biodegradable surfactants as flow improvers for injection water. A combination of a zwitterionic and an anionic surfactant has been tested in a 5.5 inch, 700 m long flow loop containing sulphate brine with salinity similar to sea water. A drag reduction between 75 and 80% was achieved with 119 ppm in solution of the surfactant blend at an average velocity of 1.9 m/s and between 50 and 55% at 2.9 m/s. The surfactants in this formulation were also found to be readily biodegradable in sea water and low bio accumulating which means they have an improved environmental profile compared to the polymers used today. Due to the self-healing properties of the drag-reducing structures formed by surfactants, these may be added before the pump section - contrary to polymers which are permanently destroyed by high shear forces. (Author)

  4. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    surface water-groundwater model IRENE (Spanoudaki et al., 2009; Spanoudaki, 2010) has been modified in order to simulate surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone. IRENE, in its original form, couples the 3D, non-steady state Navier-Stokes equations, after Reynolds averaging and with the assumption of hydrostatic pressure distribution, to the equations describing 3D saturated groundwater flow of constant density. A semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to solve the surface water flow equations, while a fully implicit finite difference scheme is used for the groundwater equations. Pollution interactions are simulated by coupling the advection-diffusion equation describing the fate and transport of contaminants introduced in a 3D turbulent flow field to the partial differential equation describing the fate and transport of contaminants in 3D transient groundwater flow systems. The model has been further developed to include the effects of density variations on surface water and groundwater flow, while the already built-in solute transport capabilities are used to simulate salinity interactions. Initial results show that IRENE can accurately predict surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in coastal areas. Important research issues that can be investigated using IRENE include: (a) sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and the configuration of the saltwater wedge, (b) the effects of surface water-groundwater interaction on salinity increase of coastal wetlands and (c) the estimation of the location and magnitude of groundwater discharge to coasts. Acknowledgement The work presented in this paper has been funded by the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY), Fellowships of Excellence for Postdoctoral Studies (Siemens Program), 'A simulation-optimization model for assessing the best practices for the protection of surface water and groundwater in the coastal zone', (2013 - 2015). References

  5. Potential structural barriers to ground-water flow, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional geologic structures designated as potential ground-water flow barriers in an approximately 45,000...

  6. Potential structural barriers to ground-water flow, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional geologic structures designated as potential ground-water flow barriers in an approximately 45,000...

  7. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  8. The role of hand calculations in ground water flow modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Most ground water modeling courses focus on the use of computer models and pay little or no attention to traditional analytic solutions to ground water flow problems. This shift in education seems logical. Why waste time to learn about the method of images, or why study analytic solutions to one-dimensional or radial flow problems? Computer models solve much more realistic problems and offer sophisticated graphical output, such as contour plots of potentiometric levels and ground water path lines. However, analytic solutions to elementary ground water flow problems do have something to offer over computer models: insight. For instance, an analytic one-dimensional or radial flow solution, in terms of a mathematical expression, may reveal which parameters affect the success of calibrating a computer model and what to expect when changing parameter values. Similarly, solutions for periodic forcing of one-dimensional or radial flow systems have resulted in a simple decision criterion to assess whether or not transient flow modeling is needed. Basic water balance calculations may offer a useful check on computer-generated capture zones for wellhead protection or aquifer remediation. An easily calculated "characteristic leakage length" provides critical insight into surface water and ground water interactions and flow in multi-aquifer systems. The list goes on. Familiarity with elementary analytic solutions and the capability of performing some simple hand calculations can promote appropriate (computer) modeling techniques, avoids unnecessary complexity, improves reliability, and is likely to save time and money. Training in basic hand calculations should be an important part of the curriculum of ground water modeling courses.

  9. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in Soil Water Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Jacques, D.; Pan, F.; van Genuchten, M.; Cady, R. E.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water flow modeling has multiple applications. This modeling is based on simplifications stemming from both conceptual uncertainty and lack of detailed knowledge about parameters. Modern soil moisture sensors can provide detailed information about changes in soil water content in time and with depth. This information can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. Earlier we demonstrated ensemble simulations of soil water flow by using sets of pedotransfer functions (empirical relationships between soil hydraulic properties and soil basic properties, such as particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon content, etc.). The objective of this work was to apply the data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter to soil water flow modeling, using soil water content monitoring with TDR probes and an ensemble of soil water flow models parameterized with different pedotransfer functions. Experiments were carried out at the Bekkevoort site, Belgium. Sixty time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes with two rods) were installed along the trench in loamy soil at 12 locations with 50-cm horizontal spacing at five depths (15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 cm). Water content and weather parameters were monitored for one year with 15 min frequency. Soil water flow was simulated using the HYDRUS6 software. Mean daily means of water contents at the observation depths were the measurements used in data assimilation. Eighteen pedotransfer functions for water retention and one for hydraulic conductivity were applied to generate ensembles to evaluate the uncertainty in simulation results, whereas the replicated measurements at each of measurement depths were used to characterize the uncertainty in data. Data assimilation appeared to be very efficient. Even assimilating measurements at a single depth provided substantial improvement in simulations at other observation depths. Results on

  10. Computing nonhydrostatic shallow-water flow over steep terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Flood and dambreak hazards are not limited to moderate terrain, yet most shallow-water models assume that flow occurs over gentle slopes. Shallow-water flow over rugged or steep terrain often generates significant nonhydrostatic pressures, violating the assumption of hydrostatic pressure made in most shallow-water codes. In this paper, we adapt a previously published nonhydrostatic granular flow model to simulate shallow-water flow, and we solve conservation equations using a finite volume approach and an Harten, Lax, Van Leer, and Einfeldt approximate Riemann solver that is modified for a sloping bed and transient wetting and drying conditions. To simulate bed friction, we use the law of the wall. We test the model by comparison with an analytical solution and with results of experiments in flumes that have steep (31??) or shallow (0.3??) slopes. The law of the wall provides an accurate prediction of the effect of bed roughness on mean flow velocity over two orders of magnitude of bed roughness. Our nonhydrostatic, law-of-the-wall flow simulation accurately reproduces flume measurements of front propagation speed, flow depth, and bed-shear stress for conditions of large bed roughness. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  11. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  12. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2013-01-01

    With growing water needs for food production, it is necessary to improve the quantification of "Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs)" to secure enough water for the freshwater ecosystems. In this study, five methods for calculating EFRs were compared to 11 case studies of locally-calculated EFRs.

  13. TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF WATER FLOW OF TELEAJEN RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. JIPA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF WATER FLOW OF TELEAJEN RIVER. In the context of climate change at global and regional scale, this study intends to identify the trends in variability of the annual and monthly flow of Teleajen river. The study is based on processing the series of mean, maximum and minimum flows at Cheia and Moara Domnească hydrometric stations (these data were taken from the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology. The period of analysis is 1966-1998, statistical methods beeing mostly used, among which the Mann – Kendall test, that identifies the liniar trend and its statistic significance, comes into focus. The trends in the variability of water annual and monthly flows are highlighted. The results obtained show downward trends for the mean and maximum annual flows, and for the minimum water discharge, a downward trend for Cheia station and an upward trend for Moara Domnească station. Knowing the trends in the variability of the rivers’ flow is important empirically in view of taking adequate administration measures of the water resources and managment measures for the risks lead by extreme hidrologic events (floods, low-water, according to the possible identified changes.

  14. WEAKLY SWIRLING TURBULENT FLOW IN TURBID WATER HYDRAULIC SEPARATION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; QIU Xiu-yun; JIN Sheng; XIAO Jun; GONG Shou-yuan

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the characteristics of weakly swirling turbulent flow field in a Turbid Water Hydraulic Separation Device (TWHSD) through experimental and numerical researches. The flow field was measured by PIV, which provided streamlines, vortex structure, vorticity and velocity distribution in different test planes in the TWHSD. On the basis of the experimental results, the tangential and radial velocity distributions of the swirling flow field were obtained. Meanwhile, the numerical simulations were conducted with the RNG and RSM turbulence models, respectively. According to the experimental and numerical results, the characteristics of the clear water flow field inside the TWHSD were determined. In view of simulation accuracy and time consumption, it is suggested to apply the RNG model instead of the RSM model, which is more time consuming, to make further study on two-phases flow fields in the device.

  15. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadić, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Walther, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow solvers, allowing for investigations into spatiotemporal scales inaccessible to atomistic simulations.

  16. Multiscale simulation of water flow past a C540 fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Jens H.; Praprotnik, Matej; Kotsalis, Evangelos M.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-04-01

    We present a novel, three-dimensional, multiscale algorithm for simulations of water flow past a fullerene. We employ the Schwarz alternating overlapping domain method to couple molecular dynamics (MD) of liquid water around the C540 buckyball with a Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) description for the Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed method links the MD and LB domains using a fully three-dimensional interface and coupling of velocity gradients. The present overlapping domain method implicitly preserves the flux of mass and momentum and bridges flux-based and Schwarz domain decomposition algorithms. We use this method to determine the slip length and hydrodynamic radius for water flow past a buckyball.

  17. Directed weighted network structure analysis of complex impedance measurements for characterizing oil-in-water bubbly flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Dang, Wei-Dong; Xue, Le; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the flow structure underlying the evolution of oil-in-water bubbly flow remains a contemporary challenge of great interests and complexity. In particular, the oil droplets dispersing in a water continuum with diverse size make the study of oil-in-water bubbly flow really difficult. To study this issue, we first design a novel complex impedance sensor and systematically conduct vertical oil-water flow experiments. Based on the multivariate complex impedance measurements, we define modalities associated with the spatial transient flow structures and construct modality transition-based network for each flow condition to study the evolution of flow structures. In order to reveal the unique flow structures underlying the oil-in-water bubbly flow, we filter the inferred modality transition-based network by removing the edges with small weight and resulting isolated nodes. Then, the weighted clustering coefficient entropy and weighted average path length are employed for quantitatively assessing the original network and filtered network. The differences in network measures enable to efficiently characterize the evolution of the oil-in-water bubbly flow structures.

  18. DNS Study for the origin of the flow Randomization in Late Boundary Layer Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Thapa, Manoj; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of the origin and mechanism of randomization in late boundary layer transition over a flat plate without pressure gradient. The flow randomization is a crucial phase before flow transition to the turbulent state. According to existing literatures, the randomization was caused by the big background noises and non-periodic spanwise boundary conditions. It was assumed that the large ring structure is affected by background noises first, and then the change of large ring structure affects the small length scales quickly, which directly leads to randomization and formation of turbulence. However, by careful analysis of our high order DNS results, we believe that the internal instability of multiple ring cycles structure is the main reason. What we observed is that randomization begins when the third cycle overlaps the first and second cycles. A significant asymmetric phenomenon is originated from the second cycle in the middle of both streamwise and spanwise directions. M...

  19. Tritium activity levels in environmental water samples from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M.; Penalver, A.; Aguilar, C. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.borrull@urv.cat

    2007-09-15

    Tritium activity was determined in environmental waters from different areas of Catalonia, using a distillation procedure before liquid scintillation counting. The developed method was validated by analysing two samples from proficiency tests. In most of water samples (from rivers, rain, mineral bottled waters and tap waters) analysed, the activity values were lower or close to the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for our method which has a value of 0.6 Bq/l. However, the Ebro river samples had a mean activity around 3.6{+-}0.6Bq/l. The nuclear power station of Asco, which is located on the banks of this river, can be a source of tritium production and introduction into the environment, so a more exhaustive study of these waters was carried out. Tritium activities in this river were a long way above the normative limit in Spain for waters intended for human consumption, which is 100 Bq/l.

  20. A design methodology for cross flow water turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanette, J.; Imbault, D.; Tourabi, A. [Laboratoire Sols, Solides, Structures - Risques (3S-R) Domaine Universitaire, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-05-15

    This contribution deals with the design of cross flow water turbines. The mechanical stress sustained by the blades depends on the basic geometrical specifications of the cross flow water turbine, its rotational speed, the exact geometry of the blades and the velocity of the upstream water current. During the operation, the blades are submitted to severe cyclic loadings generated by pressure field's variation as function of angular position. This paper proposes a simplified design methodology for structural analysis of cross flow water turbine blades, with quite low computational time. A new trapezoidal-bladed turbine obtained from this method promises to be more efficient than the classical designs. Its most distinctive characteristic is a variable profiled cross-section area, which should significantly reduce the intensity of cyclic loadings in the material and improve the turbine's durability. The advantages of this new geometry will be compared with three other geometries based on NACA0018 hydrofoil. (author)

  1. Study on the water flow in the xylem of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenkui

    2017-05-01

    Water is one of the direct materials of plant photosynthesis, and water through transpiration control plant stomatal opening and closing, which affects the important life activities of plant photosynthesis. Therefore, water transport in plant tissue has been an important topic in the field of plant fluid mechanics. This paper mainly use the method and theory of fluid mechanics to analyses plant xylem water transport mechanism, namely: C - T theory; And based on the knowledge of fluid mechanics, the state of water flow in the xylem is analyzed, and the mass conservation equation, momentum conservation equation, energy conservation equation and so on are obtained.

  2. DETERMINATION OF WATER FLOW CONNECTION IN WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An important factor for selection of main water meters is a precise determination of design flow, value of “nieprzewyższenia”. Presently, technical norms, on which determination of design flow for diameter selection of waterworks selection and consequently water meters selection are based, are no reliable in relation to the actual flow. This gives arguments to ascertain that harmonized standards do not meet Polish conditions and it requires correction. The article presents the method of de...

  3. Chaos in a dynamic model of traffic flows in an origin-destination network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jarrett, David F.

    1998-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamic behavior of road traffic flows in an area represented by an origin-destination (O-D) network. Probably the most widely used model for estimating the distribution of O-D flows is the gravity model, [J. de D. Ortuzar and L. G. Willumsen, Modelling Transport (Wiley, New York, 1990)] which originated from an analogy with Newton's gravitational law. The conventional gravity model, however, is static. The investigation in this paper is based on a dynamic version of the gravity model proposed by Dendrinos and Sonis by modifying the conventional gravity model [D. S. Dendrinos and M. Sonis, Chaos and Social-Spatial Dynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1990)]. The dynamic model describes the variations of O-D flows over discrete-time periods, such as each day, each week, and so on. It is shown that when the dimension of the system is one or two, the O-D flow pattern either approaches an equilibrium or oscillates. When the dimension is higher, the behavior found in the model includes equilibria, oscillations, periodic doubling, and chaos. Chaotic attractors are characterized by (positive) Liapunov exponents and fractal dimensions.

  4. Origins of the k(-2) spectrum in decaying Taylor-Green magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, V; Alexakis, A

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the origins of k(-2) spectrum in a decaying Taylor-Green magnetohydrodynamic flow with zero large scale magnetic flux that was reported by Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. E 81, 016318 (2010)]. So far, a possible candidate for this scaling exponent has been the weak turbulence phenomenology. From our numerical simulations, we observe that current sheets in the magnetic Taylor-Green flow are formed in regions of magnetic discontinuities. Based on this observation and by studying the influence of the current sheets on the energy spectrum, using a filtering technique, we argue that the discontinuities are responsible for the -2 power law scaling of the energy spectra of this flow.

  5. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    percent of the total ground-water flow in the study area. Ground waters in the vicinity of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base can be classified into two compositional groups on the basis of their chemical composition: calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type and sodium chloride-type waters. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type waters are found in the glacial deposits and the Brassfield Limestone, whereas the sodium chloride waters are exclusively associated with the shales. Equilibrium speciation calculations indicate that ground water of the glacial drift aquifer is in equilibrium with calcite, dolomite, and chalcedony, but is undersaturated with respect to gypsum and fluorite. Waters from the shales are slightly supersaturated with respect to calcite, dolomite, and siderite but are undersaturated with respect to chalcedony. Simple-mass balance calculations treating boron as a conservative species indicate that little (< 5 percent) or no recharge from the shales to the glacial drift aquifer takes place. Data on the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen indicate a meteoric origin for all ground water beneath Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, but the data were inconclusive with respect to identification of distinct isotopic differences between water collected from the glacial drift and bedrock aquifers. Tritium concentrations used to distinguish waters having a pre-and post-1953 recharge component indicate that most water entered the glacial drift aquifer after 1953. This finding indicates that recharge from shallow to deep parts (greater than 150 feet) of the aquifer takes place over time intervals of a few years or decades. However, the fact that some deep parts of the glacial aquifer did not contain measurable tritium indicates that ground-water flow from recharge zones to these parts of the aquifer takes decades or longer.

  6. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-mao; ZHONG Hai-quan; LI Ying-chuan; LIU Zhong-neng; WANG Qi

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel apparatus of 18.5 m high and 0.05 m in inner diameter is developed, with the heavy oil from Lukeqin Xinjiang oil field as the test medium, to carry out the orthogonal experiments for the interactions between heavy oil-water and heavy oil-water-gas. With the aid of observation windows, the pressure drop signal can be collected and the general multiple flow patterns of heavy oil-water-gas can be observed, including the bubble, slug, churn and annular ones. Compared with the conventional oil, the bubble flows are identified in three specific flow patterns which are the dispersed bubble (DB), the bubble gas-bubble heavy oil go(B-B), and the bubble gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(B-I). The slug flows are identified in two specific flow patterns which are the intermittent gas-bubble heavy oilgo(I-B)and the intermittent gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(I-I). Compared with the observa- tions in the heavy oil-water experiment, it is found that the conventional models can not accurately predict the pressure gradient. And it is not water but heavy oil and water mixed phase that is in contact with the tube wall. So, based on the principle of the energy con- servation and the kinematic wave theory, a new method is proposed to calculate the frictional pressure gradient. Furthermore, with the new friction gradient calculation method and a due consideration of the flow characteristics of the heavy oil-water-gas high speed flow, a new model is built to predict the heavy oil-water-gas pressure gradient. The predictions are compared with the experiment data and the field data. The accuracy of the predictions shows the rationality and the applicability of the new model.

  7. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain. The...

  8. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain....

  9. Extended Approach to Water Flow Algorithm for Text Line Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darko Brodi(c)

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to the water flow algorithm for text line segmentation.In the basic method the hypothetical water flows under few specified angles which have been defined by water flow angle as parameter.It is applied to the document image frame from left to right and vice versa.As a result,the unwetted and wetted areas are established.Thesc areas separate text from non-text elements in each text line,respectively.Hence,they represent the control areas that are of major importance for text line segmentation.Primarily,an extended approach means extraction of the connected-components by bounding boxes ovcr text.By this way,each connected component is mutually separated.Hence,the water flow angle,which defines the unwetted areas,is determined adaptively.By choosing appropriate water flow angle,the unwetted areas are lengthening which leads to the better text line segmentation.Results of this approach are encouraging due to the text line segmentation improvement which is the most challenging step in document image processing.

  10. Water flow experiments and analyses on the cross-flow type mercury target model with the flow guide plates

    CERN Document Server

    Haga, K; Kaminaga, M; Hino, R

    2001-01-01

    A mercury target is used in the spallation neutron source driven by a high-intensity proton accelerator. In this study, the effectiveness of the cross-flow type mercury target structure was evaluated experimentally and analytically. Prior to the experiment, the mercury flow field and the temperature distribution in the target container were analyzed assuming a proton beam energy and power of 1.5 GeV and 5 MW, respectively, and the feasibility of the cross-flow type target was evaluated. Then the average water flow velocity field in the target mock-up model, which was fabricated from Plexiglass for a water experiment, was measured at room temperature using the PIV technique. Water flow analyses were conducted and the analytical results were compared with the experimental results. The experimental results showed that the cross-flow could be realized in most of the proton beam path area and the analytical result of the water flow velocity field showed good correspondence to the experimental results in the case w...

  11. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hai, Duong Ngoc; Quang Thai, Nguyen; Phuong, Truong Thi

    2017-10-01

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles.

  12. Stability of steam-water countercurrent stratified flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S C

    1985-10-01

    Two flow instabilities which limit the normal condensation processes in countercurrent stratified steam-water flow have been identified experimentally: flooding and condensation-induced waterhammer. In order to initiate condensation-induced waterhammer in nearly horizontal or moderately-inclined steam/subcooled-water flow, two conditions, the appearance of a wavy interface and complete condensation of the incoming steam, are necessary. Analyses of these conditions are performed on a basis of flow stability and heat transfer considerations. Flooding data for several inclinations and channel heights are collected. Effects of condensation, inclination angle and channel height on the flooding characteristics are discussed. An envelope theory for the onset of flooding in inclined stratified flow is developed, which agrees well with the experimental data. Some empirical information on basic flow parameters, such as mean film thickness and interfacial friction factor required for this theory are measured. The previous viewpoints on flooding appear not to conflict with the present experimental data in nearly horizontal flow but the flooding phenomena in nearly vertical flow appear to be more complicated than those described by these viewpoints because of liquid droplet entrainment.

  13. Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of resources dealing with the theme of origins of life, the universe, and traditions. Includes Web sites, videos, books, audio materials, and magazines with appropriate grade levels and/or subject disciplines indicated; professional resources; and learning activities. (LRW)

  14. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  15. Gas-Water Flow Behavior in Water-Bearing Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some tight sandstone gas reservoirs contain mobile water, and the mobile water generally has a significant impact on the gas flowing in tight pores. The flow behavior of gas and water in tight pores is different than in conventional formations, yet there is a lack of adequate models to predict the gas production and describe the gas-water flow behaviors in water-bearing tight gas reservoirs. Based on the experimental results, this paper presents mathematical models to describe flow behaviors of gas and water in tight gas formations; the threshold pressure gradient, stress sensitivity, and relative permeability are all considered in our models. A numerical simulator using these models has been developed to improve the flow simulation accuracy for water-bearing tight gas reservoirs. The results show that the effect of stress sensitivity becomes larger as water saturation increases, leading to a fast decline of gas production; in addition, the nonlinear flow of gas phase is aggravated with the increase of water saturation and the decrease of permeability. The gas recovery decreases when the threshold pressure gradient (TPG and stress sensitivity are taken into account. Therefore, a reasonable drawdown pressure should be set to minimize the damage of nonlinear factors to gas recovery.

  16. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation -- Assessing the potential for active groundwater flow and origin of the brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1997-08-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) contains contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater in the deep system is saline and has been considered to be stagnant in previous studies. This study was designed to address the following questions: is groundwater in the deep system stagnant; is contaminant migration controlled by diffusion only or is advection a viable mechanism; where are the potential outlet points? On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of saline groundwater flow and potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial and temporal temperature variations at depth, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. The observations suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active, freshwater-bearing units. Influx of recent water does occur. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow are likely to be small. The origin of the saline groundwater was assessed by using existing and newly acquired chemical and isotopic data. The proposed model that best fits the data is modification of residual brine from which halite has been precipitated. Other models, such as ultrafiltration and halite dissolution, were also evaluated.

  17. How fast does water flow in carbon nanotubes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannam, Sridhar; Todd, Billy; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    the slip length using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, from which the interfacial friction between water and carbon nanotubes can be found, and also via external field driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). We discuss some of the issues in simulation studies which......The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, we review the existing literature on flow rates of water in carbon nanotubes. Data for the slip length which characterizes the flow rate are scattered over 5 orders of magnitude for nanotubes of diameter 0.81–10 nm. Second, we precisely compute...... and reliably extrapolate the results for the slip length to values of the field corresponding to experimentally accessible pressure gradients. Finally, we comment on several issues concerning water flow rates in carbon nanotubes which may lead to some future research directions in this area....

  18. Analysis on Issues of Variable Flow Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Variable flow water system has played an important role in the field of energy saving with the Electronic Variable Frequency Drive (VFD widely used in practical projects. How to control the frequency converter to work properly is an essential issue which we must first emphatically solve. The control technology of frequency converter is closely related to characteristics of pumps. Based on the mathmatical a model of pumps with or without inverters, the article discusses some issues in detail, such as inverters configuration, flow rate regulation and overload. These are key issues of control technology of variable flow water system. For those multiple-pump water systems, the engineers may select synchronous frequency conversion control technology or Add-Sub pumps control technology to achieve the maximum energy-saving benefits.  

  19. Root water uptake as simulated by three water flow models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigen, de P.; Dam, van J.C.; Javaux, M.; Heinen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine to what extent four root water uptake (RWU) models differed when tested under extreme conditions. Cumulative transpiration patterns were similar, contrary to the spatial extraction patterns. The analysis showed that both soil physical and root physiologica

  20. Water: The Flow of Women's Work. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Amy

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  1. The Origin of Ina: Evidence for Inflated Lava Flows on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, W. B.; Robinson, M. S.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hawke, B. R.; Crumpler, L. S.; Braden, S. E.; Sato, H.

    2012-01-01

    Ina is an enigmatic volcanic feature on the Moon known for its irregularly shaped mounds, the origin of which has been debated since the Apollo Missions. Three main units are observed on the floor of the depression (2.9 km across, lava flows. Comparison of these unusual lunar mounds and possible terrestrial analogs leads us to hypothesize that features in Ina were formed through lava flow inflation processes. While the source of the lava remains unclear, this new model suggests that as the mounds inflated, breakouts along their margins served as sources for surface flows that created the lower morphologic unit. Over time, mass wasting of both morphologic units has exposed fresh surfaces observed in the blocky unit. Ina is different than the terrestrial analogs presented in this study in that the lunar features formed within a depression, no vent sources are observed, and no cracks are observed on the mounds. However, lava flow inflation processes explain many of the morphologic relationships observed in Ina and are proposed to be analogous with inflated lava flows on Earth.

  2. Contrasting origin of two clay-rich debris flows at Cayambe Volcanic Complex, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detienne, M.; Delmelle, P.; Guevara, A.; Samaniego, P.; Opfergelt, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the sedimentological and mineralogical properties of a debris flow deposit west of Cayambe Volcanic Complex, an ice-clad edifice in Ecuador. The deposit exhibits a matrix facies containing up to 16 wt% of clays. However, the stratigraphic relationship of the deposit with respect to the Canguahua Formation, a widespread indurated volcaniclastic material in the Ecuadorian inter-Andean Valley, and the deposit alteration mineralogy differ depending on location. Thus, two different deposits are identified. The Río Granobles debris flow deposit ( 1 km3) is characterised by the alteration mineral assemblage smectite + jarosite, and sulphur isotopic analyses point to a supergene hydrothermal alteration environment. This deposit probably derives from a debris avalanche initiated before 14-21 ka by collapse of a hydrothermally altered rock mass from the volcano summit. In contrast, the alteration mineralogy of the second debris flow deposit, which may itself comprise more than one unit, is dominated by halloysite + smectite and relates to a shallower and more recent (3200 m) volcanic soils. Our study reinforces the significance of hydrothermal alteration in weakening volcano flanks and in favouring rapid transformation of a volcanic debris avalanche into a clay-rich debris flow. It also demonstrates that mineralogical analysis provides crucial information for resolving the origin of a debris flow deposit in volcanic terrains. Finally, we posit that slope instability, promoted by ongoing subglacial hydrothermal alteration, remains a significant hazard at Cayambe Volcanic Complex.

  3. Sap flow index as an indicator of water storage use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhdina Nadezhda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Symmetrical temperature difference also known as the sap flow index (SFI forms the basis of the Heat Field Deformation sap flow measurement and is simultaneously collected whilst measuring the sap flow. SFI can also be measured by any sap flow method applying internal continuous heating through the additional installation of an axial differential thermocouple equidistantly around a heater. In earlier research on apple trees SFI was found to be an informative parameter for tree physiological studies, namely for assessing the contribution of stem water storage to daily transpiration. The studies presented in this work are based on the comparative monitoring of SFI and diameter in stems of different species (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Picea omorika, Pinus sylvestris and tree sizes. The ability of SFI to follow the patterns of daily stem water storage use was empirically confirmed by our data. Additionally, as the HFD multipointsensors can measure sap flow at several stem sapwood depths, their use allowed to analyze the use of stored water in different xylem layers through SFI records. Radial and circumferential monitoring of SFI on large cork oak trees provided insight into the relative magnitude and timing of the contribution of water stored in different sapwood layers or stem sectors to transpiration.

  4. Origin of pore water and salinity in the lacustrine aquitard overlying the regional aquifer of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Adrian; Cherry, John A.; Aravena, Ramon

    1997-10-01

    A series of six ancient connected lakes occupied the broad plain of the closed Basin of Mexico. This study pertains to two of these lakes. 18O, 2H and chemical patterns in the pore water of the broad aquitard formed from sediment in these lakes indicate that the origin of this paleo-lake water was local meteoric water, which entered the ancient lakes as runoff, and groundwater from springs. Evaporation of surface water in the former Chalco Lake caused concentration of dissolved salts and enrichment in the heavy isotopes 18O and 2H. During high water periods, the south easternmost ancient Lake Chalco fed partially evaporated water to the closed Lake Texcoco, the lowest of the lakes, where further evaporation occurred causing higher concentration of salts and enrichment of heavy isotopes. These major ions and stable isotopes follow the evaporation trends characteristic of closed or nearly closed evaporatic basins elsewhere in the world. Paleo-lake evaporation lines in Lakes Chalco and Texcoco originated from the same starting water and developed as a consequence of the topographic position of the former lakes and local climatological conditions. A modern evaporation line developed after the drainage of the lakes, reflecting evaporation of modern infiltrating meteoric water. The presence of brackish pore water in most of the Chalco aquitard, which has a maximum thickness of 300 m, indicates that upward vertical groundwater flow has not been capable of displacing the paleo-lake water. This suggests that vertical advection was not significant throughout the hundreds of thousands of years of existence of the aquitard sediments. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the deeper part of the 18O profile representing the thicker part of the aquitard sediments, 140 m, showed that this profile was developed by molecular diffusion with a small upward advective flux, where apparently the Chalco aquitard always had enriched brackish water overlying the fresh water aquifer.

  5. Experimental investigation on flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ShaoLiang; YUE XiangAn; HOU JiRui

    2007-01-01

    The flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes with diameters ranging from 2 to 30 μm are investigated. The experimental results show that the flow characteristics in microtubes with diameters of 16 μm and larger ones are in agreement with the classical theory. However, as the diameters are decreased to 5 and 2 μm, the nonlinear flow characteristics prevail and the results indicate significant departure of flow characteristics from the predictions of the conventional theory, and the smaller the diameters, the larger the departure. As the Reynolds number increases, the degree of nonlinear flow characteristics decrease gradually and the experimental results are approximately equal to the theoretical expectation. The minimum Reynolds number in this study is only 2.46×10-5.

  6. Ground water recharge and flow characterization using multiple isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ali H; Uliana, Matthew; Wade, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotopes of delta(18)O, delta(2)H, and (13)C, radiogenic isotopes of (14)C and (3)H, and ground water chemical compositions were used to distinguish ground water, recharge areas, and possible recharge processes in an arid zone, fault-bounded alluvial aquifer. Recharge mainly occurs through exposed stream channel beds as opposed to subsurface inflow along mountain fronts. This recharge distribution pattern may also occur in other fault-bounded aquifers, with important implications for conceptualization of ground water flow systems, development of ground water models, and ground water resource management. Ground water along the mountain front near the basin margins contains low delta(18)O, (14)C (percent modern carbon [pmC]), and (3)H (tritium units [TU]), suggesting older recharge. In addition, water levels lie at greater depths, and basin-bounding faults that locally act as a flow barrier may further reduce subsurface inflow into the aquifer along the mountain front. Chemical differences in ground water composition, attributed to varying aquifer mineralogy and recharge processes, further discriminate the basin-margin and the basin-center water. Direct recharge through the indurated sandstones and mudstones in the basin center is minimal. Modern recharge in the aquifer is mainly through the broad, exposed stream channel beds containing coarse sand and gravel where ground water contains higher delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU). Spatial differences in delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU) and occurrences of extensive mudstones in the basin center suggest sluggish ground water movement, including local compartmentalization of the flow system.

  7. DIGITAL IMAGE MEASUREMENT OF BUBBLE MOTION IN AERATED WATER FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Digital image measurement method, as an ex-tension of Particle Image Velocimetry of single-phase flowmeasurement, was investigated for application to air-watertwo-phase flows. The method has strong potential ability inmeasuring bubble geometrical features and moving velocitiesfor complex bubble motion in aerated water flow. Both dilutedand dense bubble rising flows are measured using the digitalimage method. Measured bubble shapes and sizes, and bubblevelocities are affected by threshold selection for binary image.Several algorithms for selecting threshold are compared andmethods for calculating the time-averaged void fraction arediscussed.

  8. Chemistry and origin of deep ground water in crystalline rocks; Kemi och genes av djupa grundvatten i kristallint berg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the interactions between water and crystalline rocks and its consequences for the chemical composition of the water. It also treats how flows of different types of water are modified by the rock, and the possible consequences for the ground water near a nuclear waste repository. The focus of the work is the changes in composition that ground water gets at deep levels in the rock. Data from Finnsjoen and Aespoe in Sweden show higher salinity in deep rock, which has been interpreted as a result of marine inflow of water during glaciation. Data from other, deeper boreholes in Finland, Canada, Russia, England and Sweden show that the increasing salinity is a rule and very high at great depths, higher than marine water can produce. Therefore, the deep waters from Finnsjoen and Aespoe are probably very old, and the high salinity a result from geological processes. Differing cation and isotopic composition than seawater also indicate geologic water. Differing theories on the origin of the ground water should be regarded in the safety analysis for a repository. 36 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  9. Material-property zones used in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Zones in this data set represent spatially contiguous areas that influence ground-water flow in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS), an...

  10. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow...

  11. Material-property zones used in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Zones in this data set represent spatially contiguous areas that influence ground-water flow in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS), an...

  12. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  13. Study of a three-phase flow metering process for oil-water-gas flows; Etude d`un procede de mesure des debits d`un ecoulement triphasique de type eau-huile-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Ch.

    1996-11-01

    We propose a theoretical and experimental study of a three-phase flow metering process for oil-water-gas flows. The selected process is based on a combination of a mixer, a Venturi and ultrasonic methods. To perform an experimental validation of this process an instrumented set-up for three-phase air-oil-water flows has been designed, conceived and adjusted. An original theoretical model have been built to predict three-phase dispersed flows across a contraction. Once validated with two-phase air-water, oil-water and air-oil-water flows data, this model has been used to solve the Venturi metering problems. After a critical review of the available techniques, the ultrasonic propagation velocity has been selected to determine two-phase liquid-liquid flow composition. Two original models have been developed to describe the ultrasonic propagation with the dispersed phase fraction. The comparison with experimental data in oil-water flows show the superiority of one of the two models, the scattering model. For the void fraction determination in air-water flows, the work of Bensler (1990) based on the ultrasonic attenuation measurement has been extended to take into account the multiple scattering effects. Finally these techniques have been combined to determine the different flow rates in air-water, oil-water flows. For two-phase air-water and oil-water flows the problem is solved and the flow rates are measured with a very good accuracy ({+-} 3%). The results quality obtained with three-phase oil-water-gas flows and the secure theoretical bases allowing their interpretation give us the opportunity to strongly recommend the development of an industrial prototype based on the process we studied. (author) 183 refs.

  14. Characteristics of Turbulence-driven Plasma Flow and Origin of Experimental Empirical Scalings of Intrinsic Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-03-20

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/LTe and R/Lne for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge "in phase", and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  15. Control algorithm for multiscale flow simulations of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Kaxiras, E.

    2009-01-01

    . The use of a mass conserving specular wall results in turn to spurious oscillations in the density profile of the atomistic description of water. These oscillations can be eliminated by using an external boundary force that effectively accounts for the virial component of the pressure. In this Rapid......We present a multiscale algorithm to couple atomistic water models with continuum incompressible flow simulations via a Schwarz domain decomposition approach. The coupling introduces an inhomogeneity in the description of the atomistic domain and prevents the use of periodic boundary conditions...... Communication, we extend a control algorithm, previously introduced for monatomic molecules, to the case of atomistic water and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The proposed computational method is validated for the cases of equilibrium and Couette flow of water....

  16. Control algorithm for multiscale flow simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos M.; Walther, Jens H.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-04-01

    We present a multiscale algorithm to couple atomistic water models with continuum incompressible flow simulations via a Schwarz domain decomposition approach. The coupling introduces an inhomogeneity in the description of the atomistic domain and prevents the use of periodic boundary conditions. The use of a mass conserving specular wall results in turn to spurious oscillations in the density profile of the atomistic description of water. These oscillations can be eliminated by using an external boundary force that effectively accounts for the virial component of the pressure. In this Rapid Communication, we extend a control algorithm, previously introduced for monatomic molecules, to the case of atomistic water and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The proposed computational method is validated for the cases of equilibrium and Couette flow of water.

  17. Virtual water trade flows and savings under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Megan; Hussein, Zekarias; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    The international trade of food commodities links water and food systems, with important implications for both water and food security. The embodied water resources associated with food trade are referred to as `virtual water trade'. We present the first study of the impact of climate change on global virtual water trade flows and associated savings for the year 2030. In order to project virtual water trade and savings under climate change, it is essential to obtain projections of both bilateral crop trade and the virtual water content of crops in each country of production. We use the Global Trade Analysis Project model to estimate bilateral crop trade under changes in agricultural productivity for rice, soy, and wheat. We use the H08 global hydrologic model to determine the impact of climatic changes to crop evapotranspiration for rice, soy, and wheat in each country of production. Then, we combine projections of bilateral crop trade with estimates of virtual water content to obtain virtual water trade flows under climate change. We find that the total volume of virtual water trade is likely to go down under climate change, due to decreased crop trade from higher crop prices under scenarios of declining crop yields and due to decreased virtual water content under high agricultural productivity scenarios. However, the staple food trade is projected to save more water across most climate change scenarios, largely because the wheat trade re-organizes into a structure where large volumes of wheat are traded from relatively water-efficient exporters to less efficient importers.

  18. CFD Numerical Simulation of the Complex Turbulent Flow Field in an Axial-Flow Water Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-You Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Further optimal design of an axial-flow water pump calls for a thorough recognition of the characteristics of the complex turbulent flow field in the pump, which is however extremely difficult to be measured using the up-to-date experimental techniques. In this study, a numerical simulation procedure based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD was elaborated in order to obtain the fully three-dimensional unsteady turbulent flow field in an axial-flow water pump. The shear stress transport (SST k-ω model was employed in the CFD calculation to study the unsteady internal flow of the axial-flow pump. Upon the numerical simulation results, the characteristics of the velocity field and pressure field inside the impeller region were discussed in detail. The established model procedure in this study may provide guidance to the numerical simulations of turbomachines during the design phase or the investigation of flow and pressure field characteristics and performance. The presented information can be of reference value in further optimal design of the axial-flow pump.

  19. Water flow and fin shape polymorphism in coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G

    2015-03-01

    Water flow gradients have been linked to phenotypic differences and swimming performance across a variety of fish assemblages. However, the extent to which water motion shapes patterns of phenotypic divergence within species remains unknown. We tested the generality of the functional relationship between swimming morphology and water flow by exploring the extent of fin and body shape polymorphism in 12 widespread species from three families (Acanthuridae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) of pectoral-fin swimming (labriform) fishes living across localized wave exposure gradients. The pectoral fin shape of Labridae and Acanthuridae species was strongly related to wave exposure: individuals with more tapered, higher aspect ratio (AR) fins were found on windward reef crests, whereas individuals with rounder, lower AR fins were found on leeward, sheltered reefs. Three of seven Pomacentridae species showed similar trends, and pectoral fin shape was also strongly related to wave exposure in pomacentrids when fin aspect ratios of three species were compared across flow habitats at very small spatial scales (back lagoon). Unlike fin shape, there were no intraspecific differences in fish body fineless ratio across habitats or depths. Contrary to our predictions, there was no pattern relating species' abundances to polymorphism across habitats (i.e., abundance was not higher at sites where morphology is better adapted to the environment). This suggests that there are behavioral and/or physiological mechanisms enabling some species to persist across flow habitats in the absence of morphological differences. We suggest that functional relationships between swimming morphology and water flow not only structure species assemblages, but are yet another important variable contributing to phenotypic differences within species. The close links between fin shape polymorphism and local water flow conditions appear to be important for understanding species' distributions as well as patterns of

  20. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  1. From offshore to onshore: multiple origins of shallow-water corals from deep-sea ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lindner

    Full Text Available Shallow-water tropical reefs and the deep sea represent the two most diverse marine environments. Understanding the origin and diversification of this biodiversity is a major quest in ecology and evolution. The most prominent and well-supported explanation, articulated since the first explorations of the deep sea, holds that benthic marine fauna originated in shallow, onshore environments, and diversified into deeper waters. In contrast, evidence that groups of marine organisms originated in the deep sea is limited, and the possibility that deep-water taxa have contributed to the formation of shallow-water communities remains untested with phylogenetic methods. Here we show that stylasterid corals (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Stylasteridae--the second most diverse group of hard corals--originated and diversified extensively in the deep sea, and subsequently invaded shallow waters. Our phylogenetic results show that deep-water stylasterid corals have invaded the shallow-water tropics three times, with one additional invasion of the shallow-water temperate zone. Our results also show that anti-predatory innovations arose in the deep sea, but were not involved in the shallow-water invasions. These findings are the first robust evidence that an important group of tropical shallow-water marine animals evolved from deep-water ancestors.

  2. Pedimentation versus debris-flow origin of plateau-side desert terraces in southern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Plateau-side terraces in arid areas around the world are commonly described as pediment remnants, although, in many cases, they may have been formed by debris-flow deposition. Pediments do exist in the area of the Aquarius and Kaiparowits Plateaus of southern Utah; however, many alluvial terraces that were classified by previous workers as pediments are actually formed of thick deposits of sediment released into valleys by episodic landslide events. Although both pediment and debris-flow depositional terraces have smooth, alluvium-covered upper surfaces, the two can be distinguished by the shape of the underlying bedrock surface and the process of formation. The relation of younger terraces to landsliding is clear, because the terrace surfaces are graded to the toes of slide lobes, but the origin of older terraces is less obvious, because older lobes of slide debris have generally been removed by erosion. -from Author

  3. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO2-FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10-2 M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  4. Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia Lavas, Mars: Source Vents, Flow Rates, Edifice Styles and Water Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia regions have been suggested as some of the youngest martian surfaces since the Viking mission, although there was doubt whether the origins were predominantly volcanic or fluvial. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey Missions have shown that the region is certainly young in terms of the topographic preservation and the youthful crater counts (e.g. in the tens to a few hundred million yrs.). Numerous authors have shown that fluvial and volcanic features share common flow paths and vent systems, and that there is evidence for some interaction between the lava flows and underlying volatiles as well as the use by lavas and water of the same vent system. Given the youthful age and possible water-volcanism interaction environment, we'd like constraints on water and volcanic flux rates and interactions. Here, we model ranges of volcanic flow rates where we can well-constrain them, and consider the modest flow rate results results in context with local eruption styles, and track vent locations, edifice volumes, and flow sources and data.

  5. Hydrogel Regulation of Xylem Water Flow: An Alternative Hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Hiemstra, T.; Fanourakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of cations in the xylem sap influences the rate of xylem water flow in angiosperm plants. It has been speculated that this is due to the shrinking and swelling of pectins in the pit membranes. However, there is as yet minimal evidence for the presence of pectin in pit membranes of

  6. Erosional processes in channelized water flows on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    A hypothesis is investigated according to which the Martian outflow channels were formed by high-velocity flows of water or dynamically similar liquid. It is suggested that the outflow channels are largely the result of several interacting erosional mechanisms, including fluvial processes involving ice covers, macroturbulence, streamlining, and cavitation.

  7. Streamline curvature and bed resistance in shallow water flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between streamline curvature and bed resistance in shallow water flow with little side constraint, as derived in 1970 by H.J. Schoemaker, is reconsidered. Schoemaker concluded that the bed resistance causes the curvature of a free streamline to grow exponentially with the distance a

  8. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadic, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.;

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as ...

  9. Soil surfactant stops water repellency and preferential flow paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Wesseling, J.G.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of a soil surfactant on reduction and prevention of water repellency and preferential flow paths in a sandy soil of a golf course fairway, located at Bosch en Duin near Utrecht, the Netherlands. The golf course is constructed on inland dunes composed of fine sand with

  10. Reduction of large-scale numerical ground water flow models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, P.T.M.; Heemink, A.W.; Testroet, C.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical models are often used for simulating ground water flow. Written in state space form, the dimension of these models is of the order of the number of model cells and can be very high (> million). As a result, these models are computationally very demanding, especially if many different scena

  11. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  12. Sources of variation in hydrological classifications: Time scale, flow series origin and classification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Francisco J.; Barquín, José; Álvarez, César

    2016-07-01

    Classification of flow regimes in water management and hydroecological research has grown significantly in recent years. However, depending on available data and the procedures applied, there may be several credible classifications for a specific catchment. In this study, three inductive classifications derived from different initial flow data and one expert-driven classification were defined. The hydrological interpretation, statistical performance and spatial correspondence of these classifications were compared. Daily Gauged Classification (DC) was derived from daily flow data while Monthly Gauged Classification (MC) and Monthly Modeled Classification (MMC) were derived from monthly flow series, using gauged and modeled flow data, respectively. Expert-Driven Classification (EDC) was based on a Spanish nationwide hydrological classification, which is being used in the current River Basin Management Plans. The results showed that MC accounted for much of the critical hydrological information variability comprised within the DC. However, it also presented limitations regarding the inability to represent important hydroecological attributes, especially those related to droughts and high flow events. In addition, DC and MC presented an equivalent performance more than 60% of the time and obtained a mean ARI value of 0.4, indicating a similar classification structure. DC and MC outperformed MMC 100% and more than 50% of the times when they were compared by means of the classification strength and ANOVA, respectively. MMC also showed low correspondence with these classifications (ARI = 0.20). Thus, the use of modeled flow series should be limited to poorly gauged areas. Finally, the significantly reduced performance and the uneven distribution of classes found in EDC questions its application for different management objectives. This study shows that the selection of the most suitable approach according to the available data has significant implications for the

  13. Continuum simulations of water flow in carbon nanotube membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadić, A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P-

    2014-01-01

    We propose the use of the Navier–Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretizations of the Navier–Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulati......We propose the use of the Navier–Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretizations of the Navier–Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from molecular dynamics (MD...... that flows at nanoscale channels can be described by continuum solvers with proper boundary conditions that reflect the molecular interactions of the liquid with the walls of the nanochannel....

  14. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  15. Water fact sheet, history of landslides and debris flows at Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Many landslides and debris flows have originated from Mount Rainier since the retreat of glaciers from Puget Sound about 10,000 years ago. The recurrent instability is due to several factors--height of the steep-sided volcanic cone, frequent volcanic activity, continuous weakening of rock by steam and hot, chemical-laden water, and exposure of unstable areas as the mountains glaciers have receded. The landslide scars and deposits tell a fascinating story of the changing shape of the volcano. Landslides occur when part of the volcano "collapses" or fails and slides away from the rest of the volcano. The failed mass rapidly breaks up into a jumble of disaggregated pieces that flow at high velocity like a fluid. Clay and water in the debris cause further change to a liquid slurry known as a debris flow or mudflow. Volcanic debris flows are also widely known by the Indonesian term "lahar." Although the largest debris flows at Rainier form from landslides, many smaller flows are caused by volcanic eruptions, intense rainfall, and glacial-outburst floods.

  16. The Origin of Long-Range Attraction between Hydrophobes in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Despa, Florin; Berry, R. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    When water-coated hydrophobic surfaces meet, direct contacts form between the surfaces, driving water out. However, long-range attractive forces first bring those surfaces close. This analysis reveals the source and strength of the long-range attraction between water-coated hydrophobic surfaces. The origin is in the polarization field produced by the strong correlation and coupling of the dipoles of the water molecules at the surfaces. We show that this polarization field gives rise to dipole...

  17. Fracture control of ground water flow and water chemistry in a rock aquitard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Timothy T; Anderson, Mary P; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2007-01-01

    There are few studies on the hydrogeology of sedimentary rock aquitards although they are important controls in regional ground water flow systems. We formulate and test a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of ground water flow and hydrochemistry in a fractured sedimentary rock aquitard to show that flow dynamics within the aquitard are more complex than previously believed. Similar conceptual models, based on regional observations and recently emerging principles of mechanical stratigraphy in heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, have previously been applied only to aquifers, but we show that they are potentially applicable to aquitards. The major elements of this conceptual model, which is based on detailed information from two sites in the Maquoketa Formation in southeastern Wisconsin, include orders of magnitude contrast between hydraulic diffusivity (K/S(s)) of fractured zones and relatively intact aquitard rock matrix, laterally extensive bedding-plane fracture zones extending over distances of over 10 km, very low vertical hydraulic conductivity of thick shale-rich intervals of the aquitard, and a vertical hydraulic head profile controlled by a lateral boundary at the aquitard subcrop, where numerous surface water bodies dominate the shallow aquifer system. Results from a 3D numerical flow model based on this conceptual model are consistent with field observations, which did not fit the typical conceptual model of strictly vertical flow through an aquitard. The 3D flow through an aquitard has implications for predicting ground water flow and for planning and protecting water supplies.

  18. Space shuttle orbiter flow visualization study. [water tunnel study of vortex flow during atmospheric entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The vortex flows generated at subsonic speed during the final portion of atmospheric reentry were defined using a 0.01 scale model of the orbiter in a diagnostic water tunnel. Flow visualization photographs were obtained over an angle-of-attack range to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The vortex flow field development, vortex path, and vortex breakdown characteristics were determined as a function of angle-of-attack at zero sideslip. Vortex flows were found to develop on the highly swept glove, on the wing, and on the upper surface of the fuselage. No significant asymmetries were observed at zero sideslip in the water tunnel tests. The sensitivity of the upper surface vortex flow fields to variations in sideslip angle was also studied. The vortex formed on the glove remained very stable in position above the wing up through the 10 deg of sideslip tested. There was a change in the vortex lifts under sideslip due to effective change in leading-edge sweep angles. Asymmetric flow separation occurred on the upper surface of the fuselage at small sideslip angles. The influence of vortex flow fields in sideslip on the lateral/ directional characteristics of the orbiter is discussed.

  19. Characterization of horizontal air–water two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ran; Kim, Seungjin, E-mail: skim@psu.edu

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A visualization study is performed to develop flow regime map in horizontal flow. • Database in horizontal bubbly flow is extended using a local conductivity probe. • Frictional pressure drop analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. • Drift flux analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental studies performed to characterize horizontal air–water two-phase flow in a round pipe with an inner diameter of 3.81 cm. A detailed flow visualization study is performed using a high-speed video camera in a wide range of two-phase flow conditions to verify previous flow regime maps. Two-phase flows are classified into bubbly, plug, slug, stratified, stratified-wavy, and annular flow regimes. While the transition boundaries identified in the present study compare well with the existing ones (Mandhane et al., 1974) in general, some discrepancies are observed for bubbly-to-plug/slug, and plug-to-slug transition boundaries. Based on the new transition boundaries, three additional test conditions are determined in horizontal bubbly flow to extend the database by Talley et al. (2015a). Various local two-phase flow parameters including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble velocity, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are obtained. The effects of increasing gas flow rate on void fraction, bubble Sauter mean diameter, and bubble velocity are discussed. Bubbles begin to coalesce near the gas–liquid layer instead of in the highly packed region when gas flow rate increases. Using all the current experimental data, two-phase frictional pressure loss analysis is performed using the Lockhart–Martinelli method. It is found that the coefficient C = 24 yields the best agreement with the data with the minimum average difference. Moreover, drift flux analysis is performed to predict void-weighted area-averaged bubble velocity and area-averaged void fraction. Based on the current database, functional

  20. Distribution and Origin of Underground Water Chemical Fields in Songliao Continental Oil—Bearing Sedimentary Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼章华; 张秉坚; 等

    1999-01-01

    There are many factors affecting ungerground water chemistry of an oil-bearing sedimentary basin.The properties of underground water show variations in the vertical direction, giving rise to a vertical zonation with respect to underground water chemistry,Five zones could be divided downwards,including 1)The freshening zone due to meteoric water leaching (A):2)the evaporation-concentration zone near the surface(B);3) the freshening zone due to stratum compaction-released water(C1)-infiltration-concentration zone during the mudstone compaction and water releasing(C2);4) the freshening zone for clay mineral dehydration(D);and 5)the seepage-concentration zone(E).The hydrodynamic fields in the Songliao Basin are obviously asymmetrical,with the characteristics of gravity-induced centripetal flow recharged by meteoric water along the edge to the inner part of the basin mainly in its northern and eastern regions,centrifugal flow and crossformational flow in the center of the basin,as well as the cross-formation flow-evaporation discharge area in its southern area.Hydrodynamics controls the planar distribution of underground-water chemical fields;1)the freshening area due to penetrating meteoric water generally at the basin edges;2)the freshening area for mudstone compaction-released water at the center of the basin;3) the cross-formational area as the transitional aqrea;and 4)the concentration area by cross-formational flow and evaporation.The mineralization degree and the concentrations of Na+ and Cl- and their salinity coefficeents tend to increase,while the concentrations of(CO32-+HCO3-) and SO42- and the metamorphism and desulfuration coefficients tend to decrease along the centrifugal flow direction caused by mudstone compaction in the depression area.But all of them tend to increase along the gravity-induced centripetal flow direction.

  1. Stability of shear shallow water flows with free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Chesnokov, Alexander; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Pavlov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Stability of inviscid shear shallow water flows with free surface is studied in the framework of the Benney equations. This is done by investigating the generalized hyperbolicity of the integrodifferential Benney system of equations. It is shown that all shear flows having monotonic convex velocity profiles are stable. The hydrodynamic approximations of the model corresponding to the classes of flows with piecewise linear continuous and discontinuous velocity profiles are derived and studied. It is shown that these approximations possess Hamiltonian structure and a complete system of Riemann invariants, which are found in an explicit form. Sufficient conditions for hyperbolicity of the governing equations for such multilayer flows are formulated. The generalization of the above results to the case of stratified fluid is less obvious, however, it is established that vorticity has a stabilizing effect.

  2. Flow and cavitation characteristics of water hydraulic poppet valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖义德; 刘银水; 黄艳; 李壮云

    2002-01-01

    Two types of poppet valves were tested, one is a poppet with a sharp-edged seats, and the other is that with a chamfered seat. During the tests, the effects of backpressure and poppet lift on flow characteristics were considered. Cavitation inception was detected by the appearance and rapid growth of a particular low frequency component of the outlet pressure fluctuation of valve when cavitation occurs. Experimental results show cavitation, back pressure, valve opening and its geometrical shape have significant effects on the flow characteristics of valve. The flow coefficient of throttle with water used as working medium is 0. 85~0. 95 when there is no cavitation. The pressure drop of flow saturation decreases with the increasing of poppet lift. The sharp-edged throttle has stronger anti-cavitation ability than the chamfered one.

  3. Computational Agents For Flows: Waterballs, Water Paths and Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servat, D.; Leonard, J.; Perrier, E.

    For the past four years, the RIVAGE project has been an ongoing methodological re- search involving both computer scientists from LIP6 and hydrologists from research unit GEODES at IRD around the question of applying DAI and agent-based simula- tion techniques to environmental water flow modeling. It led us to design an agent- based simulation environment which is intended to model coupled runoff dynamics, infiltration and erosion processes, so as to integrate heterogeneous events occuring at different time and space scales. A main feature of this modeling approach is the ability to account for a structured vision of the hydrological network produced during rainfall, much like that of an on field observer : for instance, when water accumulates in topographic depressions, the simulator creates pond objects, and when stable wa- ter paths emerge, water path objects are created. Beside this vision of water flow, the natural environment itself can be given a structured representation of natural objects (e.g. vegetation, infiltration maps, furrow or ditch networks, macropore patterns, etc.) which belong to various information layers. According to the scale of study, these layers may contain different types of geometrical and geographical data. Given that, our long term objective is to simulate the influence of spatial structurations of the environment on water flow dynamics and vice versa.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration of kimberlite by convective flows of external water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, A A; Melnik, O; Porritt, L; Schumacher, J C; Sparks, R S J

    Kimberlite volcanism involves the emplacement of olivine-rich volcaniclastic deposits into volcanic vents or pipes. Kimberlite deposits are typically pervasively serpentinised as a result of the reaction of olivine and water within a temperature range of 130-400 °C or less. We present a model for the influx of ground water into hot kimberlite deposits coupled with progressive cooling and serpentisation. Large-pressure gradients cause influx and heating of water within the pipe with horizontal convergent flow in the host rock and along pipe margins, and upward flow within the pipe centre. Complete serpentisation is predicted for wide ranges of permeability of the host rocks and kimberlite deposits. For typical pipe dimensions, cooling times are centuries to a few millennia. Excess volume of serpentine results in filling of pore spaces, eventually inhibiting fluid flow. Fresh olivine is preserved in lithofacies with initial low porosity, and at the base of the pipe where deeper-level host rocks have low permeability, and the pipe is narrower leading to faster cooling. These predictions are consistent with fresh olivine and serpentine distribution in the Diavik A418 kimberlite pipe, (NWT, Canada) and with features of kimberlites of the Yakutian province in Russia affected by influx of ground water brines. Fast reactions and increases in the volume of solid products compared to the reactants result in self-sealing and low water-rock ratios (estimated at alteration of kimberlites predominantly by interactions with external non-magmatic fluids.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE USEFULNESS OF CONTINUOUS FLOW ANALYSIS FOR THE STUDY OF ANIONIC SURFACTANTS AND NONIONIC SURFACTANTS IN WATER AND SEWAGE SAMPLES

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, continuous flow analyzer has been examined for the usefulness for the determination of anionic surfactants and nonionics in real water and sewage samples. The study used a segmented flow analyzer (SFA) SAN++ (Skalar, Netherlands) with photometric detection. Environmental water and sewage samples of different origin and standard solutions were under test. By appropriate selection of analytical conditions in continuous flow system, it has been possible to obtain satisfactory valu...

  6. 76 FR 79604 - Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF36 Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of... of the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... for the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final...

  7. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  8. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  9. Grass Cover Influences Hydrophysical Parameters and Heterogeneity of Water Flow in a Sandy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. LICHNER; D. J. ELDRIDGE; K. SCHACHT; N. ZHUKOVA; L. HOLKO; M. (S)(I)R; J. PECHO

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation cover has a major effect on water flow in soils.Two sites,separated by distance of about 50 m,were selected to quantify the influence of grass cover on hydrophysical parameters and heterogeneity of water flow in a sandy soil emerging during a heavy rain following a long hot,dry period.A control soil (pure sand) with limited impact of vegetation or organic matter was obtained by sampling at 50 cm depth beneath a glade area,and a grassland soil was covered in a 10 cm thick humic layer and colonised by grasses.The persistence of water repellency was measured using the water drop penetration time test,sorptivity and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a mini disk infiltrometer,and saturated hydraulic conductivity using a double-ring infiltrometer.Dye tracer experiments were used to assess the heterogeneity of water flow,and both the modified method for estimating effective cross section and an original method for assessing the degree of preferential flow were used to quantify this heterogeneity from the images of dyed soil profiles.Most hydrophysical parameters were substantially different between the two surfaces.The grassland soil had an index of water repellency about 10 times that of pure sand and the persistence of water repellency almost 350 times that of pure sand.Water and ethanol sorptivities in the grassland soil were 7% and 43%,respectively,of those of the pure sand.Hydraulic conductivity and saturated hydraulic conductivities in the grassland soil were 5% and 16% of those of the pure sand,respectively.Dye tracer experiments revealed a stable flow with "air-draining" condition in pure sand and well-developed preferential flow in grassland soil,corresponding to individual grass tussocks and small micro-depressions.The grassland soil was substantially more water repellent and had 3 times the degree of preferential flow compared to pure sand.The results of this study reinforce our view that the consequences of any change in climate

  10. The flow of baryons: the origin of metal absorption systems at z > 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, C. G.; Ryan-Weber, E. V.; Cooke, J. D.; Crighton, N. H.; Díaz, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    The chemical enrichment of the Universe refers to the cosmic build-up of chemical elements produced by stars (metals) that disperse them to the interstellar medium during their life and dead. The enriched material can reach intergalactic distances helped by galactic-scale winds and, eventually, can flow back to a galaxy. These metals are crucial ingredients for star formation because they provide a cooling mechanism for the gas. Therefore, understanding the flow of baryons to and from galaxies is fundamental for galaxy formation and evolution. Our work aims at testing the origin of metal absorption systems in the spectra of background quasars, by studying the environment of these absorption systems and the galaxies that produce them. In particular, we search for galaxies near triply-ionized carbon (Civ) systems at redshift . In this contribution, we present recent results that suggest that the mechanisms of dispersal of metals could have been more efficient at than at . We discuss the limitations of the result and present the current status of our search for the origin of Civ absorption systems.

  11. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  12. The physics of confined flow and its application to water leaks, water permeation and water nanoflows: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenwen; Rigozzi, Michelle K; McKenzie, David R

    2016-02-01

    This review assesses the current state of understanding of the calculation of the rate of flow of gases, vapours and liquids confined in channels, in porous media and in permeable materials with an emphasis on the flow of water and its vapour. One motivation is to investigate the relation between the permeation rate of moisture and that of a noncondensable test gas such as helium, another is to assist in unifying theory and experiment across disparate fields. Available theories of single component ideal gas flows in channels of defined geometry (cylindrical, rectangular and elliptical) are described and their predictions compared with measurement over a wide range of conditions defined by the Knudsen number. Theory for two phase flows is assembled in order to understand the behaviour of four standard water leak configurations: vapour, slug, Washburn and liquid flow, distinguished by the number and location of phase boundaries (menisci). Air may or may not be present as a background gas. Slip length is an important parameter that greatly affects leak rates. Measurements of water vapour flows confirm that water vapour shows ideal gas behaviour. Results on carbon nanotubes show that smooth walls may lead to anomalously high slip lengths arising from the properties of 'confined' water. In porous media, behaviour can be matched to the four standard leaks. Traditional membrane permeation models consider that the permeant dissolves, diffuses and evaporates at the outlet side, ideas we align with those from channel flow. Recent results on graphite oxide membranes show examples where helium which does not permeate while at the same time moisture is almost unimpeded, again a result of confined water. We conclude that while there is no a priori relation between a noncondensable gas flow and a moisture flow, measurements using helium will give results within two orders of magnitude of the moisture flow rate, except in the case where there is anomalous slip or confined water

  13. Numerical simulation and analysis of water flow over stepped spillways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN ZhongDong; HU XiaoQing; HUAI WenXin; AMADOR António

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulation of water flow over the stepped spillway is conducted using Mixture multiphase flow model. Different turbulence models are chosen to enclose the controlling equations. The turbulence models investigated are realizable k-ε model, SST k-ω model, v2-f model and LES model. The computational results by the four turbulence models are compared with experimental ones in the following aspects: mean velocity, the spanwise vorticity and the growth of the turbulent boundary layer thickness in the streamwise direction. It is found from the comparison that the realizable k-ε model, in which the rotation tensor is included, shows good performance for simulation of flows involving rotation, boundary layer and recirculation. The realizable k-e model is the most efficient in simulating flow over stepped spillways. Further, the characteristics of water flow on the stepped spillway are studied in terms of the mean velocity profile normal to the pseudo-bottom and the pressure field on the steps based on the simulation results using realizable k-ε model.

  14. Numerical simulation and analysis of water flow over stepped spillways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AMADOR; António

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulation of water flow over the stepped spillway is conducted using Mixture multiphase flow model. Different turbulence models are chosen to enclose the controlling equations. The turbulence models investigated are realizable k-ε model, SST k-ω model, v2-f model and LES model. The computational results by the four turbulence models are compared with experimental ones in the following aspects: mean velocity, the spanwise vorticity and the growth of the turbulent boundary layer thickness in the streamwise direction. It is found from the comparison that the realizable k-ε model, in which the rotation tensor is included, shows good performance for simulation of flows involving rotation, boundary layer and recirculation. The realizable k-ε model is the most efficient in simulating flow over stepped spillways. Further, the characteristics of water flow on the stepped spillway are studied in terms of the mean velocity profile normal to the pseudo-bottom and the pressure field on the steps based on the simulation results using realizable k-ε model.

  15. Formation of telluric planets and the origin of terrestrial water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Sean

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of planet formation have failed to reproduce Mars’ small mass (compared with Earth for 20 years. Here I will present a solution to the Mars problem that invokes large-scale migration of Jupiter and Saturn while they were still embedded in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Jupiter first migrated inward, then “tacked” and migrated back outward when Saturn caught up to it and became trapped in resonance. If this tack occurred when Jupiter was at 1.5 AU then the inner disk of rocky planetesimals and embryos is truncated and the masses and orbits of all four terrestrial planet are quantitatively reproduced. As the giant planets migrate back outward they re-populate the asteroid belt from two different source populations, matching the structure of the current belt. C-type material is also scattered inward to the terrestrial planet-forming zone, delivering about the right amount of water to Earth on 10-50 Myr timescales.

  16. What maintains the waters flowing in our rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Vitor Vieira

    2017-07-01

    This article discusses how new contributions from hydrogeological science in the 20th and 21st centuries have allowed for a better understanding of the processes that affect the maintenance of river flows. Moreover, the way in which this knowledge has been conveyed beyond academia and has been gradually incorporated into public policy for natural resource management is also discussed. This article explains the development of several approaches used to understand the relationships among the management of aquifers, vegetation and river flows, including water balance, aquifer recharge, the piston effect, seasonal effects, and safe and sustainable yields. Additionally, the current challenges regarding the modeling of hydrological processes that integrate groundwater and surface waters are discussed. Examples of studies applied in Brazil that demonstrate these processes and stimulate thought regarding water management strategies are presented. In light of the case studies, it is possible to propose different strategies, each adapted for specific hydrogeological context to maximize aquifer recharge or base flow maintenance. Based on these strategies, the role of infiltration ponds and other artificial recharge techniques is re-evaluated in the context of the mitigation of environmental impacts on the maintenance of river flows. Proposals for the improvement of public policies regarding the payment of related environmental services to stimulate investment in aquifer recharge and the maintenance of base flow, for which the goal is to attain win-win-win situations for the environment, farmers and water users, while preventing land speculation, are discussed. Lastly, a conceptual model for the dissemination of hydrogeological knowledge in public policies is provided, and its challenges and possibilities are discussed.

  17. Local properties of countercurrent stratified steam-water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H J

    1985-10-01

    A study of steam condensation in countercurrent stratified flow of steam and subcooled water has been carried out in a rectangular channel/flat plate geometry over a wide range of inclination angles (4/sup 0/-87/sup 0/) at several aspect ratios. Variables were inlet water and steam flow rates, and inlet water temperature. Local condensation rates and pressure gradients were measured, and local condensation heat transfer coefficients and interfacial shear stress were calculated. Contact probe traverses of the surface waves were made, which allowed a statistical analysis of the wave properties. The local condensation Nusselt number was correlated in terms of local water and steam Reynolds or Froude numbers, as well as the liquid Prandtl number. A turbulence-centered model developed by Theofanous, et al. principally for gas absorption in several geometries, was modified. A correlation for the interfacial shear stress and the pressure gradient agreed with measured values. Mean water layer thicknesses were calculated. Interfacial wave parameters, such as the mean water layer thickness, liquid fraction probability distribution, wave amplitude and wave frequency, are analyzed.

  18. Virtual water flows and Water Balance Impacts of the U.S. Great Lakes Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.; Mubako, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impacts of human water use and trade on water balances, we estimate virtual water flows for counties in the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin. This is a water-rich region, but one where ecohydrological 'hotspots' are created by water scarcity in certain locations (Mubako et al., 2012). Trade shifts water uses from one location to another, causing water scarcity in some locations but mitigating water scarcity in other locations. A database of water withdrawals was assembled to give point-wise withdrawals by location, source, and use category (commercial, thermoelectric power, industrial, agricultural, mining). Point-wise consumptive use is aggregated to the county level, giving direct, virtual water exports by county. A county-level trade database provides import and export data for the various use categories. We link the annual virtual water exported from a county for a given use category to corresponding annual trade exports. Virtual water balances for each county by use category are calculated, and then compared with the renewable annual freshwater supply. Preliminary findings are that overall virtual water balances (imports - exports) are positive for almost all counties, because urban areas import goods and services that are more water intensive than the exported goods and services. However, for some agriculturally-intensive counties, the overall impact of virtual water trade on the water balance is close to zero, and the balance for agricultural sector virtual water trade is negative, reflecting a net impact of economic trade on the water balance in these locations. We also compare the virtual water balance to available water resources, using annual precipitation less evapotranspiration as a crude estimate of net renewable water availability. In some counties virtual water exports approach 30% of the available water resources, indicating the potential for water scarcity, especially from an aquatic ecosystem standpoint.

  19. Uncovering regional disparity of China's water footprint and inter-provincial virtual water flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huijuan; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Minoru; Hao, Dong; Yu, Xiaoman

    2014-12-01

    With rapid economic development in China, water crisis is becoming serious and may impede future sustainable development. The uneven distribution of water resources further aggravates such a problem. Under such a circumstance, the concepts of water footprint and virtual water have been proposed in order to respond water scarcity problems. This paper focuses on studying provincial disparity of China's water footprints and inter-provincial virtual water trade flows by adopting inter-regional input-output (IRIO) method. The results show that fast developing areas with larger economic scales such as Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong, Zhejiang, Shanghai and Xinjiang had the largest water footprints. The most developed and water scarce areas such as Shanghai, Beijing, Tianjin and Shandong intended to import virtual water, a rational choice for mitigating their water crisis. Xinjiang, Jiangsu, Heilongjiang, Inner Mongolia, Guangxi and Hunan, had the largest per GDP water intensities and were the main water import regions. Another key finding is that agriculture water footprint was the main part in water footprint composition and water export trade. On the basis of these findings, policy implications on agriculture geographical dispersion, consumption behavior changes, trade structure adjustment and water use efficiency improvement are further discussed.

  20. Flow enhancement of water flow through silica slit pores with graphene-coated walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip bound-ary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...

  1. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  2. Hyperconcentrated flows as influenced by coupled wind-water processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiongxin

    2005-01-01

    Using data from more than 40 rivers in the middle Yellow River basin, a study has been made of the influence of coupled wind-water processes on hyperconcentrated flows. A simple "vehicle" model has been proposed to describe hyperconcentrated flows. The liquid phase of two-phase flows is a "vehicle", in which coarse sediment particles are carried as solid-phase. The formation and characteristics of hyperconcentrated flows are closely related with the formation and characteristics of this liquid-phase and solid-phase. Surface materials and geomorphic agents of the middle Yellow River basin form some patterns of combination, which have deep influence on the formation and characteristics of liquid- and solid-phases of hyperconcentrated flows. The combination of high percentages of relatively coarse material with low percentages of fine material appears in the area predominated by the wind process, where the supply of relatively coarse sediment is sufficient, but the supply of relatively coarse sediment is not. The combination of low percentages of relatively coarse material with high percentages of fine material appears in the area predominated by the water process, where the supply of fine sediment is sufficient, but the supply of fine sediment is not. In the area predominated by coupled wind-water processes appears the combination of medium percentages of coarse and fine materials, and thus both coarse and fine sediments are in relatively sufficient supply. The manner in which the mean annual sediment concentrations of liquid- and solid-phases vary with total suspended sediment concentration is different. With the increased total suspended sediment concentration, mean annual sediment concentration of liquid-phase increased to a limit and then remained constant; however, mean annual sediment concentrations of solid-phase increased continuously. Thus, the magnitude of total suspended sediment concentration depends on the supply conditions of relatively coarse sediment

  3. Evaluation of heat and water flow in porosity permeable horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Vincenzo; Verdoya, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Several strategies have been developed to explore the circulation of geofluids, which can yield heat transport over large spatial scales. Groundwater flow from recharge areas, where precipitation seeps downwards beneath the ground surface and reaches the saturated zone, to discharge areas, where subsurface water is discharged to streams, lakes, ponds or swamps, forms an additional mechanism of heat transfer to pure conduction, which is generally assumed for the underground thermal regime. In this paper we discuss and apply two different analytical models of heat and water flow, both valid for steady-state thermal conditions and for uniform, isotropic, homogeneous, and saturated porous media. By combining conductive and groundwater advective heat transfer, a first model assumes heat and water flow in vertical direction and neglects thermal gradient along the horizontal. The thermal field is influenced only by the flow of water parallel to the thermal gradient, whereas perpendicular water flow if any has no effect. Because most layers are sloping and because surface topographic relief usually exists across the aquifer, usually isotherms are not horizontal. Hence, we applied a second model for heat and water flow, neither purely horizontal nor purely vertical. In the governing equation of heat conduction-advection we take account of the horizontal flow of heat and water. The flow rate is assumed to be constant and sufficient small that thermal equilibrium is maintained between the water and the rock matrix. Examples of application are given for a set of boreholes drilled for geothermal exploration. Hydrothermal parameters (vertical and horizontal components of the Darcy velocity and the Péclet number) are determined by matching temperature and thermal gradient versus depth data with the two models. Thermal information is completed by a set of thermal conductivity measurements carried out on core samples recovered during drillings. The analysed underground

  4. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  5. International energy trade impacts on water resource crises: an embodied water flows perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. C.; Zhong, R.; Zhao, P.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, Y.; Mao, G. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Water and energy are coupled in intimate ways (Siddiqi and Anadon 2011 Energy Policy 39 4529-40), which is amplified by international energy trade. The study shows that the total volume of energy related international embodied water flows averaged 6298 Mm3 yr-1 from 1992-2010, which represents 10% of the water used for energy production including oil, coal, gas and electricity production. This study calculates embodied water import and export status of 219 countries from 1992 to 2010 and embodied water flow changes of seven regions over time (1992/2000/2010). In addition, the embodied water net export risk-crisis index and net embodied water import benefit index are established. According to the index system, 33 countries export vast amounts of water who have a water shortage, which causes water risk and crisis related to energy trade. While 29 countries abate this risk due to their rich water resource, 45 countries import embodied water linked to energy imports. Based on the different status of countries studied, the countries were classified into six groups with different policy recommendations.

  6. Relating water and air flow characteristics in coarse granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Canga, Eriona; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm

    2013-01-01

    Water pressure drop as a function of velocity controls w 1 ater cleaning biofilter operation 2 cost. At present this relationship in biofilter materials must be determined experimentally as no 3 universal link between pressure drop, velocity and filter material properties have been established. 4...... Pressure drop - velocity in porous media is much simpler and faster to measure for air than for water. 5 For soils and similar materials, observations show a strong connection between pressure drop – 6 velocity relations for air and water, indicating that water pressure drop – velocity may be estimated 7...... from air flow data. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate if this approach is valid 8 also for coarse granular biofilter media which usually consists of much larger particles than soils. In 9 this paper the connection between the pressure drop – velocity relationships for air...

  7. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  8. Ground-water flow and quality near Canon City, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, G.A.; Litke, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Water in aquifers that underlie the Lincoln Park area near Canon City, Colorado, contains measurable concentrations of chemical constituents that are similar to those in raffinate (liquid waste) produced by a nearby uranium ore processing mill. The objective of this study was to expand the existing geohydrologic data base by collecting additional geohydrologic and water quality, in order to refine the description of the geohydrologic and geochemical systems in the study area. Geohydrologic data were collected from nine tests wells drilled in the area between the U.S. Soil Conservation Service dam and Lincoln Park. Lithologic and geophysical logs of these wells indicated that the section of Vermejo Formation penetrated consisted of interbedded sandstone and shale. The sandstone beds had a small porosity and small hydraulic conductivity. Groundwater flow from the U.S. Soil Conservation Service dam to Lincoln Park seemed to be along an alluvium-filled channel in the irregular and relatively undescribed topography of the Vermejo Formation subcrop. North of the De Weese Dye Ditch, the alluvium becomes saturated and groundwater generally flows to the northeast. Water samples from 28 sites were collected and analyzed for major ions and trace elements; selected water samples also were analyzed for stable isotopes; samples were collected from wells near the uranium ore processing mill, from privately owned wells in Lincoln Park, and from the test wells drilled in the intervening area. Results from the quality assurance samples indicate that cross-contamination between samples from different wells was avoided and that the data are reliable. Water in the alluvial aquifer underlying Lincoln Park is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type. Small variations in the composition of water in the alluvial aquifer appears to result from a reaction of water leaking from the De Weese Dye Ditch with alluvial material. Upward leakage from underlying aquifers does not seem to be significant in

  9. Molecules, water, and radiant energy: new clues for the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Gerald H; Figueroa, Xavier; Zhao, Qing

    2009-03-27

    We here examine the putative first step in the origin of life: the coalescence of dispersed molecules into a more condensed, organized state. Fresh evidence implies that the driving energy for this coalescence may come in a manner more direct than previously thought. The sun's radiant energy separates charge in water, and this free charge demonstrably induces condensation. This condensation mechanism puts water as a central protagonist in life rather than as an incidental participant, and thereby helps explain why life requires water.

  10. ABRUPT DEFLECTED SUPERCRITICAL WATER FLOW IN SLOPED CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-kun; NI Han-gen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the bottom slope on abrupt deflected supercritical water flow was experimentally and theoretically studied. Model tests were conducted in a flume of 1.2 m wide and 2.6 m long with sloped bottom at an angle 35.54o, its length of deflector was 0.2 m and the deflection angles were 15o and 30o. An approximate method for calculatjng the shock wave angle and depth ratio of the abrupt deflected supercritical water flow was suggested, and a correction coefficient for the hydrodynamic pressure was introduced to generalize the momentum equation in the direction perpendicular to the shock front. It must be noticed that in the sloped channel the shock wave angle and the depth ratio are no longer constant as those in the horizontal channels, but slowly change along the shock front. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured data.

  11. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  12. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas-Pla, Josep, E-mail: josep.mas@udg.edu [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Font, Eva [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Astui, Oihane [Agencia Catalana de l' Aigua, Barcelona (Spain); Mencio, Anna; Rodriguez-Florit, Agusti [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Folch, Albert [Unitat de Geodinamica Externa i Hidrogeologia Dept. de Geologia, Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona (Spain); Brusi, David [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Perez-Paricio, Alfredo [Agencia Catalana de l' Aigua, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-01

    Stream flow, as a part of a basin hydrological cycle, will be sensible to water scarcity as a result of climate change. Stream vulnerability should then be evaluated as a key component of the basin water budget. Numerical flow modeling has been applied to an alluvial formation in a small mountain basin to evaluate the stream-aquifer relationship under these future scenarios. The Arbucies River basin (116 km{sup 2}) is located in the Catalan Inner Basins (NE Spain) and its lower reach, which is related to an alluvial aquifer, usually becomes dry during the summer period. This study seeks to determine the origin of such discharge losses whether from natural stream leakage and/or induced capture due to groundwater withdrawal. Our goal is also investigating how discharge variations from the basin headwaters, representing potential effects of climate change, may affect stream flow, aquifer recharge, and finally environmental preservation and human supply. A numerical flow model of the alluvial aquifer, based on MODFLOW and especially in the STREAM routine, reproduced the flow system after the usual calibration. Results indicate that, in the average, stream flow provides more than 50% of the water inputs to the alluvial aquifer, being responsible for the amount of stored water resources and for satisfying groundwater exploitation for human needs. Detailed simulations using daily time-steps permit setting threshold values for the stream flow entering at the beginning of the studied area so surface discharge is maintained along the whole watercourse and ecological flow requirements are satisfied as well. The effects of predicted rainfall and temperature variations on the Arbucies River alluvial aquifer water balance are also discussed from the outcomes of the simulations. Finally, model results indicate the relevance of headwater discharge management under future climate scenarios to preserve downstream hydrological processes. They also point out that small mountain basins

  13. Experimental investigation of flow-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Best, James; Sambrook Smith, Gregory; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms are permeable and deformable material whose bulk structure is composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that houses bacterial colonies. The EPS is responsible for the mechanical properties of the biofilm. In this study we investigate the fluid-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow in a closed-loop water channel in the laminar and transitional flow regimes, using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The model streamer is fabricated from acrylamide polymer hydrogel. The purpose for using this material is twofold: 1) its mechanical properties (i.e. elastic modulus) can be tuned by controlling its chemical composition, 2) the hydrogel is transparent with a refractive index (RI) very close to that of water, thus minimizing the optical distortions for flow visualization. The velocity vector fields obtained from PIV measurements are used to investigate the temporal evolution of the flow structure in the vicinity of the streamer, focusing on the vortex shedding mechanism and the resulting oscillations of the streamer.

  14. 77 FR 74449 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Proposed Rule; Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF41 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... regulation the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... Information Does this action apply to me? Citizens concerned with water quality in Florida may be interested...

  15. Continuum Simulations of Water Flow in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Praprotnik, M.

    2014-11-01

    We propose the use of the Navier-Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretisations of the Navier-Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the pressure losses at the CNT entrance as well as the enhancement of the flow rate in the CNT. The flow quantities calculated from the present hybrid approach are in excellent agreement with pure MD results while they are obtained at a fraction of the computational cost. The method enables simulations of system sizes and times well beyond the present capabilities of MD simulations. Our simulations provide an asymptotic flow rate enhancement and indicate that the pressure losses at the CNT ends can be reduced by reducing their curvature. More importantly, our results suggest that flows at nanoscale channels can be described by continuum solvers with proper boundary conditions that reflect the molecular interactions of the liquid with the walls of the nanochannel.

  16. Water flow simulation and analysis in HMA microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new method for reconstructing virtual two-dimensional (2-D microstructure of hot mix asphalt (HMA. Based on the method, the gradation of coarse aggregates and the film thickness of the asphalt binder can be defined by the user. The HMA microstructure then serves as the input to the computational fluid dynamic (CFD software (ANSYS-FLUENT to investigate the water flow pattern through it. It is found that the realistic flow fields can be simulated in the 2-D micro-structure and the flow patterns in some typical air void structures can be identified. These flow patterns can be used to explain the mechanism that could result in moisture damage in HMA pavement. The one-dimensional numerical permeability values are also derived from the flow fields of the 2-D HMA microstructure and compared with the measured values obtained by the Karol-Warner permeameter. Because the interconnected air voids channels in actual HMA samples cannot be fully represented in a 2-D model, some poor agreements need to be improved.

  17. Water flow boiling behaviors in hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chiwoong; Yu, Dongin; Kim, Moohwan [Pohang University of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The wettability is one of issues on two-phase flow in a microchannel. However, previous studies of wettability effect on two-phase flow have conducted only isothermal condition. Moreover, most studies have used conventional micro/mini-tubes due to difficulties of their fabrication. The objective of our study is to understand the wettability effect on flow boiling in a rectangular microchannel. In the first, new micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technique was developed to obtain a single glass rectangular microchannel and localized six micro heaters. A photosensitive glass was used as base material. The photosensitive glass is hydrophilic, so the hydrophobic microchannel was prepared by coating SAM, flow boiling experiments were conducted in hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannels with micro heaters. The experiment range was the mass flux of 25 and 75 kg/m{sup 2}s, the heat flux of 30 - 430 k W/m2 and quality of 0 - 0.3. A working fluid was de-ionized and degassed water. The local heat transfer coefficient was evaluated at the local micro heater section. Also, flow regimes in the microchannel were visualized by using a high-speed camera with a long-distance microscope. Heat transfer was analyzed with visualization results. Heat transfer in the hydrophobic microchannel was enhanced by higher nucleation site density and delayed local dryout. The pressure drop in the hydrophobic microchannel was higher than that in the hydrophilic microchannel. (author)

  18. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N J; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-27

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we find that erosion sculpts pointed and cornerlike features that persist as the solid shrinks. We explain these observations using flow visualization and a fluid mechanical model in which the surface shear stress dictates the rate of material removal. Experiments and simulations show that this interaction ultimately leads to self-similarly receding boundaries and a unique front surface characterized by nearly uniform shear stress. This tendency toward conformity of stress offers a principle for understanding erosion in more complex geometries and flows, such as those present in nature.

  19. Effects of rainfall on water quality in six sequentially disposed fishponds with continuous water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LH. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out during the rainy period in six semi-intensive production fish ponds in which water flowed from one pond to another without undergoing any treatment. Eight sampling sites were assigned at pond outlets during the rainy period (December-February. Lowest and highest physical and chemical parameters of water occurred in pond P1 (a site near the springs and in pond P4 (a critical site that received allochthonous material from the other ponds and also from frog culture ponds, respectively. Pond sequential layout caused concentration of nutrients, chlorophyll-a and conductivity. Seasonal rains increased the water flow in the ponds and, consequently, silted more particles and other dissolved material from one fish pond to another. Silting increased limnological variables from P3 to P6. Although results suggest that during the period under analysis, rainfall affected positively the ponds' water quality and since the analyzed systems have been aligned in a sequential layout with constant water flow from fish ponds and parallel tanks without any previous treatment, care has to be taken so that an increase in rain-induced water flow does not have a contrary effect in the fish ponds investigated.

  20. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT ON TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS OF WATER-GAS IN CAPILLARY TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Flow patterns of liquid-gas two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in both vertical and horizontal capillary tubes having inner diameters of 1.60 mm. The working liquid was the mixture of water and Sodium Dodecyl Benzoyl Sulfate (SDBS). The working gas was Nitrogen. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the vertical capillary tube, flow-pattern transitions occurred at lower flow velocities than those for the water-gas flow in the same tube. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the horizontal capillary tube, surface tension had little effect on the bubbly-intermittent transition and had only slight effect on the plug-slug and slug-annular transitions. However, surface tension had significant effect on the wavy stratified flow regime. The wavy stratified flow regime of water/SDBS mixture-gas flow expanded compared with that of water-gas.

  1. A two-dimensional CA model for traffic flow with car origin and destination

    Science.gov (United States)

    In-nami, Junji; Toyoki, Hiroyasu

    2007-05-01

    Dynamic phase transitions in a two-dimensional traffic flow model defined on a decorated square-lattice are studied numerically. The square-lattice point and the decorated site denote intersections and roads, respectively. In the present model, a car has a finite deterministic path between the origin and the destination, which is assigned to the car from the beginning. In this new model, we found a new phase between the free-flow phase and the frozen-jam phase that is absent from previous models. The new model is characterized by the persistence of a macroscopic cluster. Furthermore, the behavior in this macroscopic cluster phase is classified into three regions characterized by the shape of the cluster. The boundary of the three regions is phenomenologically estimated. When the trip length is short and the car density is high, both ends of the belt-like cluster connect to each other through the periodic boundary with some probability. This type of cluster is classified topologically as a string on a two-dimensional torus.

  2. ORIGIN AND KINEMATICS OF THE ERUPTIVE FLOW FROM XZ TAU REVEALED BY ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Palau, Aina; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Tafoya, Daniel; Loinard, Laurent [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Curiel, Salvador [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-264, 04510 DF, México (Mexico)

    2015-09-20

    We present high angular resolution (∼0.″94) {sup 12}CO(1-0) Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations obtained during the 2014 long baseline campaign from the eruptive bipolar flow from the multiple XZ Tau stellar system discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations reveal, for the first time, the kinematics of the molecular flow. The kinematics of the different ejections close to XZ Tau reveal a rotating and expanding structure with a southeast–northwest velocity gradient. The youngest eruptive bubbles unveiled in the optical HST images are inside of this molecular expanding structure. Additionally, we report a very compact and collimated bipolar outflow emanating from XZ Tau A, which indicates that the eruptive outflow is indeed originating from this object. The mass (3 × 10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙}) and energetics (E{sub kin} = 3 × 10{sup 37} erg) for the collimated outflow are comparable to those found in molecular outflows associated with young brown dwarfs.

  3. Origin and kinematics of the eruptive flow from XZ Tau revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, Luis A; Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Curiel, Salvador; Palau, Aina; Rodriguez, Luis F; Kurtz, Stan E; Tafoya, Daniel; Loinard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We present high angular resolution ($\\sim$0.94$"$) $^{12}$CO(1-0) Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations obtained during the 2014 long baseline campaign from the eruptive bipolar flow from the multiple XZ Tau stellar system discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations reveal, for the first time, the kinematics of the molecular flow. The kinematics of the different ejections close to XZ Tau reveal a rotating and expanding structure with a southeast-northwest velocity gradient. The youngest eruptive bubbles unveiled in the optical HST images are inside of this molecular expanding structure. Additionally, we report a very compact and collimated bipolar outflow emanating from XZ Tau A, which indicates that the eruptive outflow is indeed originating from this object. The mass (3 $\\times$ 10$^{-7}$ $M_\\odot$) and energetics (E$_{kin}$ $=$ 3 $\\times$ 10$^{37}$ ergs) for the collimated outflow are comparable with those found in molecular outflows associated with young b...

  4. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  5. Flow dynamics at the origin of thin clayey sand lacustrine turbidites: Examples from Lake Hazar, Turkey

    KAUST Repository

    Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-18

    Turbidity currents and their deposits can be investigated using several methods, i.e. direct monitoring, physical and numerical modelling, sediment cores and outcrops. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in eleven clusters of closely spaced thin beds. Depositional processes and sources for three of those eleven clusters are studied at three coring sites. Bathymetrical data and seismic reflection profiles are used to understand the specific geomorphology of each site. X-ray, thin sections and CT-scans imagery combined with grain-size, geochemical and mineralogical measurements on the cores allow characterisation of the turbidites. Turbidites included in each cluster were produced by remobilization of surficial slope sediment, a process identified in very few studies worldwide. Three types of turbidites are distinguished and compared with deposits obtained in flume studies published in the literature. Type 1 is made of an ungraded clayey silt layer issued from a cohesive flow. Type 2 is composed of a partially graded clayey sand layer overlain by a mud cap, attributed to a transitional flow. Type 3 corresponds to a graded clayey sand layer overlain by a mud cap issued from a turbulence-dominated flow. While the published experimental studies show that turbulence is damped by cohesion for low clay content, type 3 deposits of this study show evidence for a turbulence dominated mechanism despite their high clay content. This divergence may in part relate to input variables such as water chemistry and clay mineralogy that are not routinely considered in experimental studies. Furthermore, the large sedimentological variety observed in the turbidites from one coring site to another is related to the evolution of a sediment flow within a field scale basin made of a complex physiography that cannot be tackled by flume experiments.

  6. Tomography of ground water flow from self-potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Jardani, A.

    2007-12-01

    An inversion algorithm is developed to interpret self-potential (SP) data in terms of distribution of the seepage velocity of the ground water. The model is based on the proportionality existing between the electrokinetic source current density and the seepage velocity of the water phase. As the inverse problem is underdetermined, we use a Tikhonov regularization method with a smoothness constraint based on the differential Laplacian operator to solve the inverse problem. The regularization parameter is determined by the L-shape method. The recovery of the distribution of the seepage velocity vector of the ground water flow depends on the localization and number of non-polarizing electrodes and information relative to the distribution of the electrical resistivity of the ground. The inversion method is tested on two 2D synthetic cases and on two real SP data. The first field test corresponds to the infiltration of water from a ditch. The second one corresponds to large flow at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in Baja California.

  7. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  8. On spurious water flow during numerical simulation of steam injection into water-saturated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjerg, J; Trötschler, O; Färber, A; Sonnenborg, T O; Jensen, K H

    2004-12-01

    Numerical simulation of steam injection into a water-saturated porous medium may be hindered by unphysical behavior causing the model to slow down. We show how spurious water flow may arise on the boundary between a steam zone and a saturated zone, giving rise to dramatic pressure drops. This is caused by the discretization of the temperature gradient coupled with the direct relation between pressure and temperature in the steam zone. The problem may be a severe limitation to numerical modeling. A solution is presented where the spurious water flow is blocked and this widely enhances the performance of the model. This new method is applied to a previously reported example exhibiting numerical problems. Furthermore, it is applied to the simulation of 2-D sandbox experiments where LNAPL is remediated from a smearing zone by steam injection. These experiments would have been difficult to analyze numerically without the adjustment to prevent spurious flow.

  9. Altitudes of the top of model layers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the altitudes of the tops of 16 model layers simulated in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient flow...

  10. Subregions of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the subregions of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS). Subregions are...

  11. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  12. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  13. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and Assessment...

  14. Numerical study of saturation steam/water mixture flow and flashing initial sub-cooled water flow inside throttling devices

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) approach to model this phenomenon inside throttling devices is proposed. To validate CFD results, different nozzle geometries are analyzed, comparing numerical results with experimental data. Two cases are studied: Case 1: saturation steam/water mixture flow inside 2D convergent-divergent nozzle (inlet, outlet and throat diameter of nozzle are 0.1213m, 0.0452m and 0.0191m respectively). In this benchmark, a range of total inle...

  15. Application of the Conditional Inverse Matrix Theory for Estimation of Origin-Destination Trip Matrices from Link Traffic Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chung-Yung Wang; Jia-Wun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on estimating O-D (origin-destination) trip demand from link traffic flows. Equality relationship among link traffic flow, path flow, and O-D trip matrices are used to establish a linear equation system. Solution characteristics are analyzed based on the relationship between the rank of the link/path incidence matrix and column variables. And under the solution framework of conditional inverse matrices, a column exchange method and a path flow proportion method have been developed. Network testing results verify that the proposed methods yield good results.

  16. Water flow exchange characteristics in coarse granular filter media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    in this study are performed at a concurrent airflow of 0.3 m s−1, water irrigation rates of 1–21 cm h−1 in materials with particle diameters ranging from 2 to 14 mm to represent media and operation conditions relevant for low flow biotrickling filter design. Specific surface area related elution velocity...... distribution was closely related to the filter water content, water irrigation rate, media specific surface area and particle size distribution. A predictive model linking the specific surface area related elution velocity distribution to irrigation rate, specific surface area and particle size distribution......Elution of inhibitory metabolites is a key parameter controlling the efficiency of air cleaning bio- and biotrickling filters. To the authors knowledge no studies have yet considered the relationship between specific surface area related elution velocity and physical media characteristics, which...

  17. Water flow exchange characteristics in coarse granular filter media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    Elution of inhibitory metabolites is a key parameter controlling the efficiency of air cleaning bio- and biotrickling filters. To the authors knowledge no studies have yet considered the relationship between specific surface area related elution velocity and physical media characteristics, which...... in this study are performed at a concurrent airflow of 0.3 m s−1, water irrigation rates of 1–21 cm h−1 in materials with particle diameters ranging from 2 to 14 mm to represent media and operation conditions relevant for low flow biotrickling filter design. Specific surface area related elution velocity...... distribution was closely related to the filter water content, water irrigation rate, media specific surface area and particle size distribution. A predictive model linking the specific surface area related elution velocity distribution to irrigation rate, specific surface area and particle size distribution...

  18. A new capture fraction method to map how pumpage affects surface water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, S.A.; Reeves, H.W.; Dickinson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    All groundwater pumped is balanced by removal of water somewhere, initially from storage in the aquifer and later from capture in the form of increase in recharge and decrease in discharge. Capture that results in a loss of water in streams, rivers, and wetlands now is a concern in many parts of the United States. Hydrologists commonly use analytical and numerical approaches to study temporal variations in sources of water to wells for select points of interest. Much can be learned about coupled surface/groundwater systems, however, by looking at the spatial distribution of theoretical capture for select times of interest. Development of maps of capture requires (1) a reasonably well-constructed transient or steady state model of an aquifer with head-dependent flow boundaries representing surface water features or evapotranspiration and (2) an automated procedure to run the model repeatedly and extract results, each time with a well in a different location. This paper presents new methods for simulating and mapping capture using three-dimensional groundwater flow models and presents examples from Arizona, Oregon, and Michigan. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  19. Reverse capillary flow of condensed water through aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jongju; Jeon, Wonjae; Alam Khan, Fakhre; Lee, Jinkee; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-06-01

    Molecular transport through nanopores has recently received considerable attention as a result of advances in nanofabrication and nanomaterial synthesis technologies. Surprisingly, water transport investigations through carbon nanochannels resulted in two contradicting observations: extremely fast transport or rejection of water molecules. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism of impeded water vapor transport through the interstitial space of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWCNTs)—capillary condensation, agglomeration, reverse capillary flow, and removal by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the nanotubes. The origin of separation comes from the water’s phase change from gas to liquid, followed by reverse capillary flow. First, the saturation water vapor pressure is decreased in a confined space, which is favorable for the phase change of incoming water vapor into liquid drops. Once continuous water meniscus is formed between the nanotubes by the adsoprtion and agglomeration of water molecules, a high reverse Laplace pressure is induced in the mushroom-shaped liquid meniscus at the entry region of the aligned-MWCNTs. The reverse Laplace pressure can be significantly enhanced by decreasing the pore size. Finally, the droplets pushed backward by the reverse Laplace pressure can be removed by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the aligned-MWCNTs. The analytical analysis was also supported by experiments carried out using 4 mm-long aligned-MWCNTs with different intertube distances. The water rejection rate and the separation factor increased as the intertube distance decreased, resulting in 90% and 10, respectively, at an intertube distance of 4 nm. This mechanism and nanotube membrane may be useful for energy-efficient water vapor separation and dehumidification.

  20. Influence of periodic water level increase on flow in Poznań Water Ways System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kałuża

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1968-1972, a project named “Rebuilding of the Poznań Water Ways System” was carried out. Within the scope of the project the Chwaliszewo Meander of the Warta river was cut off and covered. A discussion about reconstruction of Chwaliszewo Meander has been run for many years. The results of hydraulic computations of the influence of a weir on water table distribution in Poznań Water Ways System have been presented in the paper. Two different localizations of the weir were considered. Initial maximum water level of upper side of the weir was calculated. The influence of damming up on water level distribution in the Poznań Water Ways System was analysed. One-dimensional unsteady open channel flow computer systems HEC-RAS and SPRuNeR were used to carry out calculations. Building the weir, regardless of its localization, allows to raise water level in the main channel of the Warta river, increase minimum water depth and point to the architecture and recreation values of the Warta river. It is assumed that damming up is necessary only for flow rate below 100 m3/s in both localizations of the weir. The weir in focus should not create obstacles to the inland navigation and fish migration. To meet these requirements two additional hydraulic constructions must be projected: sluice and fish migration water gate.

  1. Extraterrestrial water of possible Martian origin in SNC meteorites: Constraints from oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Gibson, E. K.; Mayeda, T. K.; Socki, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest that the SNC group of meteorites (Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny) are derived from the planet Mars. Because SNC meteorites have water, they may contain information on the origin and fate of water on the planet Mars. The first measurements are presented of delta O-18 and delta O-17 of water extracted from SNC's. The water analyses are displayed with each meteorite designated. The isotopic composition is shown of the SNC waters relative to the SNC whole rocks and the terrestrial line. The O-17 excess is shown of the SNC water as a function of pyrolysis temperature. And delta O-18 values are displayed of the water as a function of pyrolysis temperature for the four SNC meteorites. The analyses are briefly examined.

  2. Downhole water flow controller for aquifer storage recovery wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyne, R.D.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a downhole flow control device for continuous automatic control of water flowing into or out of wells, aquifers and the like through pipe columns. The upper end of the first tubular member is mounted to the pipe column so as to be in fluid communication therewith. The lower end of the first tubular member is substantially closed. A second tubular member is mounted concentrically within and proximate to the first tubular member and has an open upper end and side walls and a substantially closed lower end. First openings are spaced in vertical relationship to the second openings. Third openings are through the second tubular member. The second tubular member is vertically movable with respect to the first tubular member so as to selectively align the third openings with either of the first and second openings. Biasing means are located between the lower ends of the first and second tubular members for normally urging the second tubular member vertically upward with respect to the first tubular member. The biasing means are yieldable upon the introduction of water into the pump column to permit the second tubular member to be vertically displaced relative to the first tubular member to thereby close the third openings with respect to the first or second openings. The third openings align with one of the first and second openings dependent upon the direction of fluid flow within the pipe column.

  3. Hydro-dynamic damping theory in flowing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Seeley, C.; Coutu, A.; Marmont, H.

    2014-03-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) has a major impact on the dynamic response of the structural components of hydroelectric turbines. On mid-head to high-head Francis runners, the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) phenomenon always has to be considered carefully during the design phase to avoid operational issues later on. The RSI dynamic response amplitudes are driven by three main factors: (1) pressure forcing amplitudes, (2) excitation frequencies in relation to natural frequencies and (3) damping. The prediction of the two first factors has been largely documented in the literature. However, the prediction of fluid damping has received less attention in spite of being critical when the runner is close to resonance. Experimental damping measurements in flowing water on hydrofoils were presented previously. Those results showed that the hydro-dynamic damping increased linearly with the flow. This paper presents development and validation of a mathematical model, based on momentum exchange, to predict damping due to fluid structure interaction in flowing water. The model is implemented as an analytical procedure for simple structures, such as cantilever beams, but is also implemented in more general ways using three different approaches for more complex structures such as runner blades: a finite element procedure, a CFD modal work based approach and a CFD 1DOF approach. The mathematical model and all three implementation approaches are shown to agree well with experimental results.

  4. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  5. Definition of hydraulic stability of KVGM-100 hot-water boiler and minimum water flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. A.; Ozerov, A. N.; Usikov, N. V.; Shkondin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    In domestic power engineering, the methods of quantitative and qualitative-quantitative adjusting the load of the heat supply systems are widely distributed; furthermore, during the greater part of the heating period, the actual discharge of network water is less than estimated values when changing to quantitative adjustment. Hence, the hydraulic circuits of hot-water boilers should ensure the water velocities, minimizing the scale formation and excluding the formation of stagnant zones. The results of the calculations of hot-water KVGM-100 boiler and minimum water flow rate for the basic and peak modes at the fulfillment of condition of the lack of surface boil are presented in the article. The minimal flow rates of water at its underheating to the saturation state and the thermal flows in the furnace chamber were defined. The boiler hydraulic calculation was performed using the "Hydraulic" program, and the analysis of permissible and actual velocities of the water movement in the pipes of the heating surfaces was carried out. Based on the thermal calculations of furnace chamber and thermal- hydraulic calculations of heating surfaces, the following conclusions were drawn: the minimum velocity of water movement (by condition of boiling surface) at lifting movement of environment increases from 0.64 to 0.79 m/s; it increases from 1.14 to 1.38 m/s at down movement of environmental; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the basic mode (by condition of the surface boiling) increased from 887 t/h at the load of 20% up to 1074 t/h at the load of 100%. The minimum flow rate is 1074 t/h at nominal load and is achieved at the pressure at the boiler outlet equal to 1.1 MPa; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the peak mode by condition of surface boiling increases from 1669 t/h at the load of 20% up to 2021 t/h at the load of 100%.

  6. Using fluorescent dissolved organic matter to trace and distinguish the origin of Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Granskog, Mats A.; Bracher, Astrid; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Dodd, Paul A.; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2016-09-01

    Climate change affects the Arctic with regards to permafrost thaw, sea-ice melt, alterations to the freshwater budget and increased export of terrestrial material to the Arctic Ocean. The Fram and Davis Straits represent the major gateways connecting the Arctic and Atlantic. Oceanographic surveys were performed in the Fram and Davis Straits, and on the east Greenland Shelf (EGS), in late summer 2012/2013. Meteoric (fmw), sea-ice melt, Atlantic and Pacific water fractions were determined and the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were characterized. In Fram Strait and EGS, a robust correlation between visible wavelength fluorescence and fmw was apparent, suggesting it as a reliable tracer of polar waters. However, a pattern was observed which linked the organic matter characteristics to the origin of polar waters. At depth in Davis Strait, visible wavelength FDOM was correlated to apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and traced deep-water DOM turnover. In surface waters FDOM characteristics could distinguish between surface waters from eastern (Atlantic + modified polar waters) and western (Canada-basin polar waters) Arctic sectors. The findings highlight the potential of designing in situ multi-channel DOM fluorometers to trace the freshwater origins and decipher water mass mixing dynamics in the region without laborious samples analyses.

  7. A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Souza Torres, K. [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil); Haghighipour, N., E-mail: ocwinter@pq.cnpq.br [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  8. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  9. Modelling of a water plasma flow: I. Basic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KotalIk, Pavel [INP Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-06-21

    One-fluid MHD equations are numerically solved for an axisymmetric flow of thermal water plasma inside and outside a discharge chamber of a plasma torch with water vortex stabilization of electric arc. Comparisons with experimental data and previous calculations are given. For arc currents of 300-600 A, the respective temperatures and velocities in the range 16 700-26 400 K and 2300-6900 m s{sup -1} are obtained at the centre of the nozzle exit. The flow velocity on axis increases by 1-2 km s{sup -1} in the 5 mm long nozzle. Ohmic heating and radiative losses are two competitive processes influencing most the plasma temperature and velocity. The radiative losses represent 39% to 46% of the torch power of 69-174 kW when optical thickness of 3 mm is assumed for the plasma column. In front of the cathode, inside the discharge chamber, a recirculation zone is predicted and discussed. Effects of the temperature dependence of the plasma viscosity and sound velocity and of the optical thickness are examined. It is shown that the results such as waviness of the Mach number isolines are direct consequences of these dependences. Different lengths of 55 and 60 mm of the water vortex stabilized part of the electric arc do not substantially influence the plasma temperature and velocity at the nozzle exit.

  10. Experimental study of critical flow of water at supercritical pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhou CHEN; Chunsheng YANG; Shuming ZHANG; Minfu ZHAO; Kaiwen DU; Xu CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Experimental studies of the critical flow of water were conducted under steady-state conditions with a nozzle 1.41mm in diameter and 4.35 mm in length, covering the inlet pressure range of 22.1-26.8 MPa and inlet temperature range of 38^74°C. The parametric trend of the flow rate was investigated, and the experimental data were compared with the predictions of the homogeneous equilibrium model, the Bernoulli correlation, and the models used in the reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/ MOD3.3. It is concluded that in the near or beyond pseudo-critical region, thermal-dynamic equilibrium is dominant, and at a lower temperature, choking does not occur. The onset of the choking condition is not predicted reasonably by the RELAP5 code.

  11. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge occurs...

  12. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  13. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  14. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge...

  15. Molecules, Water, and Radiant Energy: New Clues for the Origin of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Zhao; Gerald H. Pollack; Xavier Figueroa

    2009-01-01

    We here examine the putative first step in the origin of life: the coalescence of dispersed molecules into a more condensed, organized state. Fresh evidence implies that the driving energy for this coalescence may come in a manner more direct than previously thought. The sun’s radiant energy separates charge in water, and this free charge demonstrably induces condensation. This condensation mechanism puts water as a central protagonist in life rather than as an incidental participant, and the...

  16. An Experimental Study on the Flow Characteristics of OilWater Two-Phase Flow in Horizontal Straight Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文红; 郭烈锦; 吴铁军; 张西民

    2003-01-01

    The flow patterns and their transitions of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes were studied. The experiments were conducted in two kinds of horizontal tubes, made of plexiglas pipe and stainless steel pipe with 40mm ID respectively. No. 46 mechanical oil and tap water were used as working fluids. The superficial velocity ranges of oil and water were: 0.04-1.2m·s-1 and 0.04-2.2 m·s-1, respectively. The flow patterns were identified by visualization and by transient fluctuation signals of differential pressure drop. The flow patterns were defined according to the relative distribution ofoil and water phases in the pipes. Flow pattern maps were obtained for both pipelines. In addition, semi-theoretical transition criteria for the flow patterns were proposed, and the proposed transitional criteria are in reasonable agreement with available data in liquid-liquid systems.

  17. In-Line Oil-Water Separation in Swirling Flow (USB stick)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, J.J.; van Campen, L.J.A.M.; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie; Mudde, R.F.; Johansen, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    An in-line oil-water separator has been designed and is investigated for single- and two-phase flow. Numerical single-phase flow results show an annular reversed flow region. This flow pattern agrees qualitatively with results from measurements. In the two-phase flow simulations two different drag

  18. Analog modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation and ice flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Ravier, Edouard; Mourgues, Régis; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated and overdeepened depressions up to hundreds of kilometers long, several kilometers wide and hundreds of meters deep, found in formerly glaciated areas. These drainage features are interpreted as the result of subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets and constitute a major component of the subglacial drainage system. Although tunnel valleys have been described worldwide in the past decades, their formation is still a matter of debate. Here, we present an innovative experimental approach simulating pressurized water flow in a subglacial environment in order to study the erosional processes occurring at the ice-bed interface. We use a sandbox partially covered by a circular, viscous and transparent lid (silicon putty), simulating an impermeable ice cap. Punctual injection of pressurized water in the substratum at the center of the lid simulates meltwater production beneath the ice cap. Surface images collected by six synchronized cameras allow to monitor the evolution of the experiment through time, using photogrammetry methods and DEM generation. UV markers placed in the silicon are used to follow the silicon flow during the drainage of water at the substratum-lid interface, and give the unique opportunity to simultaneously follow the formation of tunnel valleys and the evolution of ice dynamics. When the water pressure is low, groundwater circulates within the substratum only and no drainage landforms appear at the lid-substratum interface. By contrast, when the water pressure exceeds a threshold that is larger than the sum of glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures, additional water circulation occurs at the lid-substratum interface and drainage landforms develop from the lid margin. These landforms share numerous morphological criteria with tunnel valleys such as undulating longitudinal profiles, U-shaped cross-sectional profiles with flat floors, constant widths and abrupt flanks. Continuous generation of DEMs and flow velocity

  19. Compounding Effects of Agricultural Land Use and Water Use in Free-Flowing Rivers: Confounding Issues for Environmental Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Scott A; Bobbi, Chris J

    2017-03-03

    Defining the ecological impacts of water extraction from free-flowing river systems in altered landscapes is challenging as multiple stressors (e.g., flow regime alteration, increased sedimentation) may have simultaneous effects and attributing causality is problematic. This multiple-stressor context has been acknowledged in environmental flows science, but is often neglected when it comes to examining flow-ecology relationships, and setting and implementing environmental flows. We examined the impacts of land and water use on rivers in the upper Ringarooma River catchment in Tasmania (south-east Australia), which contains intensively irrigated agriculture, to support implementation of a water management plan. Temporal and spatial and trends in river condition were assessed using benthic macroinvertebrates as bioindicators. Relationships between macroinvertebrate community structure and environmental variables were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses, focusing on the impacts of agricultural land use and water use. Structural changes in macroinvertebrate communities in rivers in the catchment indicated temporal and spatial declines in the ecological condition of some stretches of river associated with agricultural land and water use. Moreover, water extraction appeared to exacerbate impairment associated with agricultural land use (e.g., reduced macroinvertebrate density, more flow-avoiding taxa). The findings of our catchment-specific bioassessments will underpin decision-making during the implementation of the Ringarooma water management plan, and highlight the need to consider compounding impacts of land and water use in environmental flows and water planning in agricultural landscapes.

  20. Free jet water flow in Pelton turbines; Freistrahlstroemungen in Peltonturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.; Casey, M.

    2003-07-01

    This short article presents the results of experimental investigations made on the flow processes found in the jets of water in Pelton turbines. The results can be used to improve basic knowledge on the design of nozzles and the interaction between the jet and the cups on the Pelton turbine's wheel and thus help improve the efficiency of Pelton turbine systems. Brief details are given on the experimental arrangement and the measurement methods used, which included a Laser-Doppler-Anemometer system.

  1. 75 FR 45579 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF11 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... 26, 2010, notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), proposing numeric nutrient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life in lakes and flowing waters within the State of Florida. In the January 2010 NPRM...

  2. Analysing the origin of rain- and subsurface water in seasonal wetlands of north-central Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Tetsuya; Kanamori, Hironari; Kambatuku, Jack R.; Kotani, Ayumi; Asai, Kazuyoshi; Mizuochi, Hiroki; Fujioka, Yuichiro; Iijima, Morio

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the origins of rain- and subsurface waters of north-central Namibia’s seasonal wetlands, which are critical to the region’s water and food security. The region includes the southern part of the Cuvelai system seasonal wetlands (CSSWs) of the Cuvelai Basin, a transboundary river basin covering southern Angola and northern Namibia. We analysed stable water isotopes (SWIs) of hydrogen (HDO) and oxygen (H2 18O) in rainwater, surface water and shallow groundwater. Rainwater samples were collected during every rainfall event of the rainy season from October 2013 to April 2014. The isotopic ratios of HDO (δD) and oxygen H2 18O (δ 18O) were analysed in each rainwater sample and then used to derive the annual mean value of (δD, δ 18O) in precipitation weighted by each rainfall volume. Using delta diagrams (plotting δD vs. δ 18O), we showed that the annual mean value was a good indicator for determining the origins of subsurface waters in the CSSWs. To confirm the origins of rainwater and to explain the variations in isotopic ratios, we conducted atmospheric water budget analysis using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) data and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis data. The results showed that around three-fourths of rainwater was derived from recycled water at local–regional scales. Satellite-observed outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and complementary satellite data from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) series implied that the isotopic ratios in rainwater were affected by evaporation of raindrops falling from convective clouds. Consequently, integrated SWI analysis of rain-, surface and subsurface waters, together with the atmospheric water budget analysis, revealed that shallow groundwater of small wetlands in this region was very likely to be recharged from surface waters originating from local rainfall, which was

  3. Origins of Water in the Solar System Leading to Habitable Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.

    2015-08-01

    Life on Earth depends on an aqueous biochemistry, and water is a key component of habitability on Earth and for likely other habitable environments in the solar system. While water is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, and plays a key role in protoplanetary disk chemistry, the inner solar system is relatively dry. We now have evidence for potentially thousands of extrasolar planets, dozens of which may be located in their host star’s habitable zones. Understanding how planets in the habitable zone accrete their water, is key to understanding the likelihood for habitability. Given that many disk models show that Earth formed inside the water-ice snow line of our solar system, understanding how the inner solar system received its water is important for understanding the potential for other planetary systems to host habitable worlds. Boundaries for the timing of the water delivery are constrained by cosmochemistry and geochemistry. Possible scenarios for the delivery of water to the inner solar system include adsorption on dust from protoplanetary disk gas, chemical reactions on the early earth, and delivery from planetesimals forming outside the water-ice snow line. This talk will set the stage for understanding the isotopic and geochemical markers along with the dynamical delivery mechanisms that will help uncover the origins of Earths water. This introduction will provide an overview for understanding the distribution of water in the solar system, in particular for the inner solar system and terrestrial planets—and the details will be developed in the subsequent talks. Additionally information will be presented regarding new inner solar system reservoirs of water that can shed light on origins (the main belt comets), and new research about water in the Earth.

  4. THE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS FOR WATER HEATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Nan Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer and fluid flow are studied for the water heater of RV cars, in which the hot water is heated by the combustion energy of liquefied petroleum gases. Three types of combustion tubes are performed in this investigation, which are circular tube, elliptic tube and elliptic tube with screwed wire inserted. The heat transfer performances of numerical simulation results are compared with those of the experimental works; they are in good trend agreement. The elliptic combustion tube performs better than the circular one, which indicates the average 7% energy saving for the elliptic combustion tube and 12% energy saving for the elliptic combustion tube with screwed wire under static heating.

  5. Flow boiling of water on nanocoated surfaces in a microchannel

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effects of surface wettability on flow boiling of water at atmospheric pressure. The test channel is a single rectangular channel 0.5 mm high, 5 mm wide and 180 mm long. The mass flux was set at 100 kg/m2 s and the base heat flux varied from 30 to 80 kW/m2. Water enters the test channel under subcooled conditions. The samples are silicone oxide (SiOx), titanium (Ti), diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiOC) surfaces with static contact angles of 26{\\deg}, 49{\\deg}, 63{\\deg} and 103{\\deg}, respectively. The results show significant impacts of surface wettability on heat transfer coefficient.

  6. Unsaturated water flow and tracer transport modeling with Alliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Alina, E-mail: alina.constantin@nuclear.ro [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str, No. 1, PO Box 78, Postal Code 115400 Mioveni, Arges County (Romania); Genty, Alain, E-mail: alain.genty@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DM2S/SFME/LSE, Gif-sur-Yvette 91191 cedex (France); Diaconu, Daniela; Bucur, Crina [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str, No. 1, PO Box 78, Postal Code 115400 Mioveni, Arges County (Romania)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of water flow and solute transport at Saligny site, Romania was done. • Computation was based on the available experimental data with Alliances platform. • Very good results were obtained for the saturation profile in steady state. • Close fit to experimental data for saturation profile at 3 m in transient state. • Large dispersivity coefficients were fitted to match tracer experiment. - Abstract: Understanding water flow and solute transport in porous media is of central importance in predicting the radionuclide fate in the geological environment, a topic of interest for the performance and safety assessment studies for nuclear waste disposal. However, it is not easy to predict transport properties in real systems because they are geologically heterogeneous from the pore scale upwards. This paper addresses the simulation of water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone of the Saligny site, the potential location for the Romanian low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. Computation was based on the current available experimental data for this zone and was performed within Alliances, a software platform initially jointly developed by French organizations CEA, ANDRA and EDF. The output of the model developed was compared with the measured values in terms of saturation profile of the soil for water movement, in both steady and transient state. Very good results were obtained for the saturation profile in steady state and a close fit of the simulation over experimental data for the water saturation profile at a depth of 3 m in transient state. In order to obtain information regarding the solute migration in depth and the solute lateral dispersion, a tracer test was launched on site and dispersivity coefficients of the solute were fitted in order to match the experimental concentration determined on samples from different locations of the site. Results much close to the experiment were obtained for a longitudinal

  7. Well-to-Wheels Water Consumption: Tracking the Virtual Flow of Water into Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, D. J.; Elgowainy, A.; Hao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Water and energy resources are fundamental to life on Earth and essential for the production of consumer goods and services in the economy. Energy and water resources are heavily interdependent—energy production consumes water, while water treatment and distribution consume energy. One example of this so-called energy-water nexus is the consumption of water associated with the production of transportation fuels. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can be used to compare the environmental impacts of different transportation fuels on a consistent basis. In this presentation, the expansion of GREET to perform life cycle water accounting or the "virtual flow" of water into transportation and other energy sectors and the associated implications will be discussed. The results indicate that increased usage of alternative fuels may increase freshwater resource consumption. The increased water consumption must be weighed against the benefits of decreased greenhouse gas and fossil energy consumption. Our analysis highlights the importance of regionality, co-product allocation, and consistent system boundaries when comparing the water intensity of alternative transportation fuel production pathways such as ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity with conventional petroleum-based fuels such as diesel and gasoline.

  8. Molecules, Water, and Radiant Energy: New Clues for the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We here examine the putative first step in the origin of life: the coalescence of dispersed molecules into a more condensed, organized state. Fresh evidence implies that the driving energy for this coalescence may come in a manner more direct than previously thought. The sun’s radiant energy separates charge in water, and this free charge demonstrably induces condensation. This condensation mechanism puts water as a central protagonist in life rather than as an incidental participant, and thereby helps explain why life requires water.

  9. Water shortage risk assessment using spatiotemporal flow simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsin-I.; Su, Ming-Daw; Wu, Yii-Chen; Cheng, Ke-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Paddy irrigation practices in Taiwan utilize complicated water conveyance networks which draw streamflows from different tributaries. Characterizing and simulating streamflow series is thus an essential task for irrigation risk assessment and planning mitigation measures. It generally involves modeling the temporal variation and spatial correlation of streamflow data at different sites. Like many other environmental variables, streamflows are asymmetric and non-Gaussian. Such properties exacerbate the difficulties in spatiotemporal modeling of streamflow data. A stochastic spatiotemporal simulation approach capable of generating non-Gaussian ten-day period streamflow data series at different sites is presented in this paper. Historical flow data from different flow stations in southern Taiwan were used to exemplify the application of the proposed model. Simulated realizations of the spatiotemporal anisotropic multivariate Pearson type III distribution were validated by comparing parameters and spatiotemporal correlation characteristics of the simulated data and the observed streamflow data. Risks of irrigation water shortage were estimated and the effect of mitigation measures was assessed using the simulated data.

  10. Bridge Pressure Flow Scour at Clear Water Threshold Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Junke; KERENYI Kornel; PAGAN-ORTIZ Jorge E; FLORA Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Bridge pressure flow scour at clear water threshold condition is studied theoretically and experimentally. The flume experiments reveal that the measured scour profiles under a bridge are more or less 2-dimensional; all the measured scour profiles can be described by two similarity equations, where the horizontal distance is scaled by the deck width while the local scour by the maximum scour depth; the maximum scour position is located just under the bridge about 15% deck width from the downstream deck edge; the scour begins at about one deck width upstream the bridge while the deposition occurs at about 2.5 deck widths downstream the bridge; and the maximum scour depth decreases with increas-ing sediment size, but increases with deck inundation. The theoretical analysis shows that: bridge scour can be divided into three cases, i.e. downstream unsubmerged, partially submerged, and totally submerged. For downstream unsubmerged flows, the maximum bridge scour depth is an open-channel problem where the conventional methods in terms of critical velocity or bed shear stress can be applied; for partially and totally submerged flows, the equilibrium maximum scour depth can be described by a scour and an inundation similarity number, which has been confirmed by experiments with two decks and two sediment sizes. For application, a design and field evaluation procedure with examples is presented, including the maximum scour depth and scour profile.

  11. Unintentional drinking-water contamination events of unknown origin: surrogate for terrorism preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Gary; Leventhal, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Drinking-water is a direct conduit to many human receptors. An intentional attack (e.g. terrorism) on drinking-water systems can shock and disrupt elements of national infrastructures. We report on an unintentional drinking-water contamination event that occurred in Tel Aviv, Israel in July, 2001. Initially of unknown origin, this event involved risk management strategies used by the Ministry of Health for abating a potential public health crisis as might be envisaged of water contamination due to terrorism. In an abrupt event of unknown origin, public health officials need to be responsible for the same level of preparedness and risk communication. This is emphasized by comparison of management strategies between the Tel Aviv event and one of dire consequences that occurred in Camelford, England in 1988. From the onset of the Tel Aviv incident, the public health strategy was to employ the precautionary principle by warning residents of the affected region to not drink tap water, even if boiled. This strategy was in contrast to an earlier crisis that occurred in Camelford, England in 1988. An outcome of this event was heightened awareness that a water crisis can occur in peacetime and not only in association with terrorism. No matter how minor the contamination event or short-term the disruption of delivery of safe drinking-water, psychological, medical and public health impact could be significant.

  12. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow model...

  13. Tangible Landscape: Cognitively Grasping the Flow of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Petrasova, A.; Petras, V.; Mitasova, H.; Meentemeyer, R. K.

    2016-06-01

    Complex spatial forms like topography can be challenging to understand, much less intentionally shape, given the heavy cognitive load of visualizing and manipulating 3D form. Spatiotemporal processes like the flow of water over a landscape are even more challenging to understand and intentionally direct as they are dependent upon their context and require the simulation of forces like gravity and momentum. This cognitive work can be offloaded onto computers through 3D geospatial modeling, analysis, and simulation. Interacting with computers, however, can also be challenging, often requiring training and highly abstract thinking. Tangible computing - an emerging paradigm of human-computer interaction in which data is physically manifested so that users can feel it and directly manipulate it - aims to offload this added cognitive work onto the body. We have designed Tangible Landscape, a tangible interface powered by an open source geographic information system (GRASS GIS), so that users can naturally shape topography and interact with simulated processes with their hands in order to make observations, generate and test hypotheses, and make inferences about scientific phenomena in a rapid, iterative process. Conceptually Tangible Landscape couples a malleable physical model with a digital model of a landscape through a continuous cycle of 3D scanning, geospatial modeling, and projection. We ran a flow modeling experiment to test whether tangible interfaces like this can effectively enhance spatial performance by offloading cognitive processes onto computers and our bodies. We used hydrological simulations and statistics to quantitatively assess spatial performance. We found that Tangible Landscape enhanced 3D spatial performance and helped users understand water flow.

  14. Quantitative imaging of water flow in soil and roots using neutron radiography and deuterated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen

    2013-05-08

    Where and how fast do roots take up water? Despite its importance in plant and soil sciences, there is limited experimental information on the location of water uptake along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The answer to this question requires direct and in-situ measurement of the local flow of water into the roots. The aim of this study was to develop and apply a new method to quantify the local fluxes of water into different segments of the roots of intact plants. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) into the roots of lupines. Lupines were grown in aluminum containers filled with sandy soil. The soil was partitioned into different compartments using 1 cm-thick layers of coarse sand as capillary barriers. These barriers limited the diffusion of D{sub 2}O within the soil compartments. D{sub 2}O was locally injected into the selected soil compartments during the day (transpiring plants) and night (non-transpiring plants). Transport of D{sub 2}O into roots was then monitored by neutron radiography with spatial resolution of 100 μm and time intervals of 10 seconds. Neutron radiographs showed that: i) transport of D{sub 2}O into roots was faster during the day than during the night; 2) D{sub 2}O quickly moved along the roots towards the shoots during the day, while at night this axial transport was negligible. The differences between day and night measurements were explained by convective transport of D{sub 2}O into the roots. To quantify the net flow of water into roots, a simple convection-diffusion model was developed, where the increase rate of D{sub 2}O concentration in roots depended on the convective transport (net root water uptake) and the diffusion of D{sub 2}O into roots. The results showed that water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher in the upper soil layers than in the deeper ones. Along an individual roots, the water uptake rate was higher in the

  15. Monolayers at air-water interfaces: from origins-of-life to nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2011-08-01

    The air-water interface presents several interesting features, namely a) a molecularly flat environment, b) a boundary region between two phases with different dielectric constants, c) permits or promotes dynamic interactions within the interface region, and d) a point of interaction between hydrophobic compounds and aqueous molecules. Accordingly, Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface have several unique characteristics and properties, which require investigation. In this review-type personal account, typical examples of molecular recognition and molecular patterning at air-water interfaces are first introduced, followed by descriptions of specific and unusual properties of monolayers on water. In addition, two examples of our own results concerning Langmuir monolayers are explained. We have selected examples from two apparently unrelated research areas, these being the origin of life and future nanotechnology, in order to emphasize the diverse scientific contribution of research on monolayers at the air-water interface. Copyright © 2011 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Continuous-flow solar UVB disinfection reactor for drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonimpa, Eric Gentil; Vadheim, Bryan; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2012-05-01

    Access to safe, reliable sources of drinking water is a long-standing problem among people in developing countries. Sustainable solutions to these problems often involve point-of-use or community-scale water treatment systems that rely on locally-available resources and expertise. This philosophy was used in the development of a continuous-flow, solar UVB disinfection system. Numerical modeling of solar UVB spectral irradiance was used to define temporal variations in spectral irradiance at several geographically-distinct locations. The results of these simulations indicated that a solar UVB system would benefit from incorporation of a device to amplify ambient UVB fluence rate. A compound parabolic collector (CPC) was selected for this purpose. Design of the CPC was based on numerical simulations that accounted for the shape of the collector and reflectance. Based on these simulations, a prototype CPC was constructed using materials that would be available and inexpensive in many developing countries. A UVB-transparent pipe was positioned in the focal area of the CPC; water was pumped through the pipe to allow exposure of waterborne microbes to germicidal solar UVB radiation. The system was demonstrated to be effective for inactivation of Escherichia coli, and DNA-weighted UV dose was shown to govern reactor performance. The design of the reactor is expected to scale linearly, and improvements in process performance (relative to results from the prototype) can be expected by use of larger CPC geometry, inclusion of better reflective materials, and application in areas with greater ambient solar UV spectral irradiance than the location of the prototype tests. The system is expected to have application for water treatment among communities in (developing) countries in near-equatorial and tropical locations. It may also have application for disaster relief or military field operations, as well as in water treatment in areas of developed countries that receive

  17. Impact melt rocks from the Ries structure, Germany: an origin as impact melt flows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Gordon R.

    2004-10-01

    The production of impact melt rocks and glasses is a characteristic feature of hypervelocity impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. This investigation represents the first detailed study of an unusual series of coherent impact melt rocks intermittently exposed around the periphery of the ~24-km diameter, ~14.5 Ma Ries impact structure, Germany. Optical and analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that the groundmass comprises sanidine, plagioclase, quartz and ilmenite (decreasing order of abundance) with the interstices filled by either fresh or devitrified glassy mesostasis. Primary crystallites display skeletal, dendritic and/or spherulitic textures indicating rapid crystallization from a melt. The mesostasis is characterized by extreme chemical heterogeneity (e.g., FeO and Al 2O 3 contents from ~1 to ~62-80 wt.%). This is likely due to a combination of crystal-liquid fractionation during rapid cooling and crystallization of an originally incompletely homogenized melt. Vapor phase crystallization of sanidine and cristobalite occurred in miarolitic cavities during late-stage cooling of the impact melts. The most likely protolith for the impact melt rocks are granitic rocks present in the crystalline basement target. The high volatile content of the mesostasis suggests that a large volatile component was retained from this protolith. Field observations together with analytical data and micro-textures indicate that the Ries impact melt rocks were molten at the time of, and after, deposition. Field relations with other impactites also suggest that these rocks were emplaced subsequent to the excavation stage of crater formation and that they are not, therefore, ballistic ejecta. Thus, it is proposed that the Ries impact melt rocks were emplaced as ground-hugging impact melt flows that emanated from different regions of the evolving transient cavity during the modification stage of crater formation. This is consistent with, and in fact

  18. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  19. Origins of high pH mineral waters from ultramafic rocks, Central Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Jose M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.marques@ist.ult.pt; Carreira, Paula M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional No 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Rosario [Departamento de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Ed. C6, 3oP, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matias, Maria J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Goff, Fraser E. [Earth and Planetary Sciences Department MSCO3-2040, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-000 (United States); Basto, Maria J.; Graca, Rui C.; Aires-Barros, Luis [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Luis [Junta de Freguesia, Av. da Libertacao, 45-D, 7460-002, Cabeco de Vide (Portugal)

    2008-12-15

    This paper reviews the geochemical, isotopic ({sup 2}H, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C, {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C) and numerical modelling approaches to evaluate possible geological sources of the high pH (11.5)/Na-Cl/Ca-OH mineral waters from the Cabeco de Vide region (Central-Portugal). Water-rock interaction studies have greatly contributed to a conceptual hydrogeological circulation model of the Cabeco de Vide mineral waters, which was corroborated by numerical modelling approaches. The local shallow groundwaters belong to the Mg-HCO{sub 3} type, and are derived by interaction with the local serpentinized rocks. At depth, these type waters evolve into the high pH/Na-Cl/Ca-OH mineral waters of Cabeco de Vide spas, issuing from the intrusive contact between mafic/ultramafic rocks and an older carbonate sequence. The Cabeco de Vide mineral waters are supersaturated with respect to serpentine indicating that they may cause serpentinization. Magnesium silicate phases (brucite and serpentine) seem to control Mg concentrations in Cabeco de Vide mineral waters. Similar {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O suggest a common meteoric origin and that the Mg-HCO{sub 3} type waters have evolved towards Cabeco de Vide mineral waters. The reaction path simulations show that the progressive evolution of the Ca-HCO{sub 3} to Mg-HCO{sub 3} waters can be attributed to the interaction of meteoric waters with serpentinites. The sequential dissolution at CO{sub 2} (g) closed system conditions leads to the precipitation of calcite, magnesite, amorphous silica, chrysotile and brucite, indicating that the waters would be responsible for the serpentinization of fresh ultramafic rocks (dunites) present at depth. The apparent age of Cabeco de Vide mineral waters was determined as 2790 {+-} 40 a BP, on the basis of {sup 14}C and {sup 13}C values, which is in agreement with the {sup 3}H concentrations being below the detection limit.

  20. FLOW PATTERN AND PRESSURE LOSS OF OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE FLOW IN HORIZONTAL STEEL PIPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; YAN Da-fan; ZHAO Jing-mei; AN Wei-jie; YAN Da-chun

    2005-01-01

    Experimental Study on oil-water two-phase flow patterns and pressure loss was conducted on a horizontal steel pipe loop with 26.1mm inner diameter and 30m total length.The working fluids are white oil, diesel oil and tap water.Several instruments, including a new type of liquid-probe are successfully integrated to identify 7 different flow patterns.The characteristics of the flow patterns and the transition process were observed and depicted in this paper.Investigation revealed that the pressure loss was mainly depended on the flow patterns.

  1. An Investigation of the Water Flow Past the Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiworapuek, Weerachai; Champagne, Jean-Yves; El Haj em, Mahmoud; Kittichaikan, Chawalit

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of flow past the butterfly valve using Commercial Fluid Dynamics software FLUENT. In static analysis, the positions of the disk were set to be 0° (completely opened), 30°, 45°, 60° and 75° under 1, 2 and 3 m/s water speed. The angular velocities were set to be 0.039 and 1.57 rad/s under 1 m/s water speed in dynamic analysis. The study focuses on the investigation of the characteristic of loss coefficient and torque behavior of the 150 mm and 300 mm in diameter butterfly valves. From the results obtained, it was found that the loss coefficient and torque increased when the disk angle was increased. By increasing the water speed, the loss coefficient remained constant while the torque increased. In dynamic analysis of both angular speeds, the maximum torque occurred at 70°-80° in closing turn and 100°-110° in opening turn. The experiment was also carried out to verify the numerical results. By comparing between the experimental and numerical results, it was found that the loss coefficients and torques obtained from these methods were similar.

  2. Documentation of the Santa Clara Valley regional ground-water/surface-water flow model, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Li, Zhen; Faunt, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley is a long, narrow trough extending about 35 miles southeast from the southern end of San Francisco Bay where the regional alluvial-aquifer system has been a major source of water. Intensive agricultural and urban development throughout the 20th century and related ground-water development resulted in ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet and land subsidence of as much as 12.7 feet between the early 1900s and the mid-1960s. Since the 1960s, Santa Clara Valley Water District has imported surface water to meet growing demands and reduce dependence on ground-water supplies. This importation of water has resulted in a sustained recovery of the ground-water flow system. To help support effective management of the ground-water resources, a regional ground-water/surface-water flow model was developed. This model simulates the flow of ground water and surface water, changes in ground-water storage, and related effects such as land subsidence. A numerical ground-water/surface-water flow model of the Santa Clara Valley subbasin of the Santa Clara Valley was developed as part of a cooperative investigation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The model better defines the geohydrologic framework of the regional flow system and better delineates the supply and demand components that affect the inflows to and outflows from the regional ground-water flow system. Development of the model includes revisions to the previous ground-water flow model that upgraded the temporal and spatial discretization, added source-specific inflows and outflows, simulated additional flow features such as land subsidence and multi-aquifer wellbore flow, and extended the period of simulation through September 1999. The transient-state model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water data for the period 197099 and to historical subsidence for the period 198399. The regional ground-water flow system consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped

  3. Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sima, Laura C; Kelner-Levine, Evan; Eckelman, Matthew J; McCarty, Kathleen M; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-03-01

    In rapidly growing urban areas of developing countries, infrastructure has not been able to cope with population growth. Informal water businesses fulfill unmet water supply needs, yet little is understood about this sector. This paper presents data gathered from quantitative interviews with informal water business operators (n=260) in Kisumu, Kenya, collected during the dry season. Sales volume, location, resource use, and cost were analyzed by using material flow accounting and spatial analysis tools. Estimates show that over 76% of the city's water is consumed by less than 10% of the population who have water piped into their dwellings. The remainder of the population relies on a combination of water sources, including water purchased directly from kiosks (1.5 million m(3) per day) and delivered by hand-drawn water-carts (0.75 million m(3) per day). Energy audits were performed to compare energy use among various water sources in the city. Water delivery by truck is the highest per cubic meter energy demand (35 MJ/m(3)), while the city's tap water has the highest energy use overall (21,000 MJ/day). We group kiosks by neighborhood and compare sales volume and cost with neighborhood-level population data. Contrary to popular belief, we do not find evidence of price gouging; the lowest prices are charged in the highest-demand low-income area. We also see that the informal sector is sensitive to demand, as the number of private boreholes that serve as community water collection points are much larger where demand is greatest.

  4. Water circulation in non-isothermal droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Simos, T.; Psihoyios, G.; Tsitouras, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapor. An incompressible flow formulation is applied for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow with a warm and a cold wall. Compared

  5. Water circulation in non-isothermal droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Simos, T.; Psihoyios, G.; Tsitouras, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapor. An incompressible flow formulation is applied for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow with a warm and a cold wall. Compared

  6. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  7. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    is nearly the same as the previous conceptual hydrogeologic model definition (Olmsted and others, 1973), except for a minor westward extension from the city of Yuma. Clay B is extended to the southerly international boundary and increased in areal extent by about two-thirds of the original extent (Olmsted and others, 1973). The other hydrogeologic units generally are the same as in the previous conceptual hydrogeologic model. Before development, the Colorado and Gila Rivers were the sources of nearly all the ground water in the Yuma area through direct infiltration of water from river channels and annual overbank flooding. After construction of upstream reservoirs and clearing and irrigation of the floodplains, the rivers now act as drains for the ground water. Ground-water levels in most of the Yuma area are higher now than they were in predevelopment time. A general gradient of ground-water flow toward the natural discharge area south of the Yuma area still exists, but many other changes in flow are evident. Ground water in Yuma Valley once flowed away from the Colorado River, but now has a component of flow towards the river and Mexicali Valley. A ground-water mound has formed under Yuma Mesa from long-term surface-water irrigation; about 600,000 to 800,000 acre-ft of water are stored in the mound. Ground-water withdrawals adjacent to the southerly international boundary have resulted in water-level declines in that area. The reviewed and documented water budget includes the following components: (1) recharge in irrigated areas, (2) evapotranspiration by irrigated crops and phreatophytes, (3) ground-water return flow to the Colorado River, and (4) ground-water withdrawals (including those in Mexicali Valley). Recharge components were calculated by subtracting the amount of water used by crops from the amount of water delivered. Evapotranspiration rates were calculated on the basis of established methods, thus were appropriate for input to the ground-wate

  9. Historical development of crop-related water footprints and inter-regional virtual water flows within China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, La; Mekonnen, Mesfin M.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2015-04-01

    China is facing water-related challenges, including an uneven distribution of water resources, both temporally and spatially, and an increasing competition over the limited water resources among different sectors. This issue has been widely researched and was finally included into the National Plan 2011 (the 2011 No. 1 Document by the State Council of China). However, there is still lack of information on how population growth and rapid urbanization have affected the water resources in China over the last decades. The current study aims at investigating (i) the intra-annual variation of green and blue water footprints (WFs) of crop production in China over the period 1978-2009 at a spatial resolution of 5 by 5 arc-minute; (ii) the yearly virtual water (VW) balances of 31 provinces within China, related water savings for the country, as well as the VW flows among eight economic regions resulting from inter-regional crop trade over the same period; and (iii) the development of the WF related to crop consumption by Chinese consumers. Results show that, over the period 1978-2009, the total WF related to crop production within China increased by only 4%), but regional changes were significant. From the 1980s to the 2000s, the shift of the cropping centre from the South to the North resulted in an increase of about 16% in the blue WF and 19% in the green WF in the North and a reduction of the blue and green WF in the South by 11% and 3%, respectively. China as a whole was a net virtual water importer related to crop trade, thus saving domestic water resources. China's inter-regional crop trade generated a blue water 'loss' annually by transferring crops from provinces with relatively low crop water productivity to provinces with relatively high productivity. Over the decades, the original VW flow from the South coastal region to the Northeast was reversed. Rice was the all-time dominant crop in the inter-regional VW flows (accounting for 34% in 2009), followed by wheat

  10. Using noble-gas and stable-isotope data to determine groundwater origin and flow regimes: Application to the Ceneri Base Tunnel (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Yama; Marzocchi, Roberto; Pera, Sebastian; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf; Kipfer, Rolf; Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    Tunnel drilling provides a unique opportunity to sample and study deep groundwaters that are otherwise difficult to access. Understanding deep groundwater flow is of primary importance in assessing the possible impacts of tunnelling on hydrogeological systems. During this study, water was sampled for noble-gas analysis from tunnel inflows in the AlpTransit Ceneri Base Tunnel (Canton Ticino, southern Switzerland), which passes through an area mainly characterized by metamorphic rocks (gneiss). Furthermore, water was sampled from springs located in the same geological environment. Based on the measurement of noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios, tritium concentrations, the stable isotope composition of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O), and the concentrations of major ions in the water, a conceptual hydrogeological model was established for this case study that allowed the most probable origin of the groundwaters sampled at different locations to be determined. The measured abundances of 3He, 4He, and 20Ne allow the geochemical characterization of old groundwaters strongly enriched in terrigenic helium of crustal origin and the identification of mixing with water that circulates preferentially through cataclastic structures. Noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios as well as tritium are useful proxies for the characterization of faults that may be critical for tunnel drilling because of their active hydrogeological role and their influence on the mechanics of the rocks.

  11. Permanent dissipative structures in water: the matrix of life? Experimental evidences and their quantum origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, V; Germano, R; Napoli, E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a short review of the evidence - both experimental and theoretical - of the formation of dissipative structures in liquid water induced by three kinds of physical perturbations having a low energy content: extremely diluted solution (EDS), iteratively filtered water (IFW), and iteratively nafionated water (INW). Particular attention is devoted to the very recent discovery that such structures are tremendously persistent even in the solid phase: large ponderal quantities of supramolecular aggregates of water (with each nucleus hundreds of nanometers in size) have been observed - at ambient pressure and temperature - using easily-reproducible experimental methods. The nature of these dissipative structures is analyzed and explained in terms of the thermodynamics of far-from-equilibrium systems and irreversible processes, showing their spontaneous quantum origin. Are these kinds of structures the matrix itself of life?.

  12. Water flow algorithm decision support tool for travelling salesman problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Anis Aklima; Othman, Zulaiha Ali; Sarim, Hafiz Mohd

    2016-08-01

    This paper discuss about the role of Decision Support Tool in Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) for helping the researchers who doing research in same area will get the better result from the proposed algorithm. A study has been conducted and Rapid Application Development (RAD) model has been use as a methodology which includes requirement planning, user design, construction and cutover. Water Flow Algorithm (WFA) with initialization technique improvement is used as the proposed algorithm in this study for evaluating effectiveness against TSP cases. For DST evaluation will go through usability testing conducted on system use, quality of information, quality of interface and overall satisfaction. Evaluation is needed for determine whether this tool can assists user in making a decision to solve TSP problems with the proposed algorithm or not. Some statistical result shown the ability of this tool in term of helping researchers to conduct the experiments on the WFA with improvements TSP initialization.

  13. Soil is the origin for the presence of Naegleria fowleri in the thermal recreational waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mirna; Tissot, Océane; Guerlotté, Jérôme; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Talarmin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is found in most geothermal baths of Guadeloupe and has been responsible for the death of a 9-year-old boy who swam in one of these baths in 2008. We wanted to determine the origin for the presence of this amoeba in the water. Water samples were taken at the origin of the geothermal sources and at the arrival in the baths. After filtration, cultures were made and the number of Naegleria present was determined using the most probable number method. Soil samples collected in the proximity of the baths were also tested for the presence of thermophilic amoebae. The species identification was obtained by PCR. During three consecutive months, no Naegleria could be found at the origin of any geothermal source tested. In contrast, N. fowleri was isolated at least once in all baths at the arrival of the water, except one. Thermophilic amoebae could be found in each soil sample, especially near the baths located at a lower altitude, but N. fowleri was only isolated near two baths, which were also the baths most often contaminated with this species. So it appears that the contamination of the water with N. fowleri occurs after emerging from the geothermal source when the water runs over the soil. Therefore, it should be possible to reduce the concentration of N. fowleri in the geothermal baths of Guadeloupe to for example less than 1 N. fowleri/10 L by installing a pipeline between the geothermal sources and the baths and by preventing flooding water from entering the baths after rainfall. By taking these measures, we were able to eliminate N. fowleri from a pool located inside a reeducation clinic.

  14. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Origin of deep lava flows at the base of the Galápagos Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.; Wanless, V. D.; Fornari, D. J.; Soule, S. A.; Jones, M.

    2016-12-01

    Side-scan sonar maps of the seafloor at the leading edge of Galápagos platform indicate regions of highly reflective seafloor that have been interpreted as large individual lava flows up to 30 km in length. However, the source for these long flows and whether they represent a single eruptive event is not known. The inferred proximal and distal ends of two lava flows were sampled using the Ocean Exploration Trust remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules on the R/V Nautilus (research cruise #064) in the summer of 2015. In total, 25 basalt samples were collected and measured for major and trace element contents and radiogenic isotope ratios to determine if these uncharacteristically long lava flows are indeed individual eruptive units. Basaltic samples collected from the eastern and western ends of the long flows have distinct major and trace element contents. The western, downslope ends of both lava flows have similar trace element ratios, with La/Yb ranging from 9.2 to 9.7. By contrast, samples collected from the eastern, upslope end of the flow (closest to the platform) have lower La/Yb ratios from 4.8 to 5.7. Additionally, lavas from the western flow ends have lower MgO concentrations (4.2-5.4 wt%) compared to lavas from eastern flow ends (5.1-10.0 wt%). This is inconsistent with the flows forming from a homogeneous magma and suggests that the long lava flows are comprised of several different flow units. We suggest that the higher trace element ratios observed in samples collected from the western edge of the flows represent lower extents of melting at the leading edge of the Galápagos mantle plume, while the eastern, upslope flows have undergone higher extents of melting similar to those erupted at Fernandina volcano.

  16. Hydrochemical reactions and origin of offshore relatively fresh pore water from core samples in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Hiu Tung; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2016-06-01

    The existence of relatively fresh pore water offshore has been well recognised over the globe but studies on the chemistry of the pore water from offshore geological formations are extremely limited. This study aims to characterize the hydrochemistry of the submarine groundwater body in Hong Kong. It looks into the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water extracted from core samples from an offshore 42.30-m vibrocore in the southwestern Hong Kong waters. A minimum Cl- level of about one-third of that in typical seawater was noted in the terrestrial sediments, suggesting the presence of offshore relatively fresh water. Unexpectedly high NH4+ levels are attributed to organic matter decomposition in the terrestrial sediments. The leaching of shells due to exposure of marine sediments at sea-level low stands raises the Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Base Exchange Indices show weak cation exchange reactions in which Na+ and K+ are released while Mg2+ and Ca2+ are adsorbed. Isotopic compositions of pore water reveal that the low-salinity water is probably the relic water sequestered in fluvial systems during relative sea-level low stands. Cores properly stored in a freezer for a long time has been used to study the pore water chemistry. For the first time, this study introduces an approach to correct the measured data by considering the possible evaporation effect during the transportation and storage of the samples. Corrections for evaporation were applied to the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water measured. It is found that the corrections determined by the Cl- mass balance approach are more reliable. The corrected measurements give more reasonable observations and hence allow sensible conclusions on the hydrochemical reactions and the origin of pore water.

  17. Leak signature space: an original representation for robust leak location in water distribution networks

    OpenAIRE

    Casillas, Myrna V.; Garza-Castañón, Luis E.; Vicenç Puig; Adriana Vargas-Martinez

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an original model-based scheme for leak location using pressure sensors in water distribution networks is introduced. The proposed approach is based on a new representation called the Leak Signature Space (LSS) that associates a specific signature to each leak location being minimally affected by leak magnitude. The LSS considers a linear model approximation of the relation between pressure residuals and leaks that is projected onto a selected hyperplane. This new approach allo...

  18. A penalization method for calculating the flow beneath travelling water waves of large amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Constantin, Adrian; Scherzer, Otmar

    2014-01-01

    A penalization method for a suitable reformulation of the governing equations as a constrained optimization problem provides accurate numerical simulations for large-amplitude travelling water waves in irrotational flows and in flows with constant vorticity.

  19. Water temperature in irrigation return flow from the Upper Snake Rock watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water returning to a river from an irrigated watershed could increase the water temperature in the river. The objective of this study was to compare the temperature of irrigation return flow water with the temperature of the diverted irrigation water. Water temperature was measured weekly in the mai...

  20. Simulation of the Regional Ground-Water-Flow System and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interaction in the Rock River Basin, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, areal ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate the ground-water-flow system and ground-water/surface-water interaction in the Rock River Basin. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Rock River Coalition. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the ground-water-flow system and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate ground-water/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional ground-water-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate ground-water-flow patterns at multiple scales. The ground-water-flow model described in this report simulates the major hydrogeologic features of the modeled area, including bedrock and surficial aquifers, ground-water/surface-water interactions, and ground-water withdrawals from high-capacity wells. The steady-state model treats the ground-water-flow system as a single layer with hydraulic conductivity and base elevation zones that reflect the distribution of lithologic groups above the Precambrian bedrock and a regionally significant confining unit, the Maquoketa Formation. In the eastern part of the Basin where the shale-rich Maquoketa Formation is present, deep ground-water flow in the sandstone aquifer below the Maquoketa Formation was not simulated directly, but flow into this aquifer was incorporated into the GFLOW model from previous work in southeastern Wisconsin. Recharge was constrained primarily by stream base-flow estimates and was applied uniformly within zones guided by regional infiltration estimates for soils. The model includes average ground-water withdrawals from 1997 to 2006 for municipal wells and from 1997 to 2005 for high-capacity irrigation, industrial, and commercial wells. In addition

  1. Patterns of a slow air-water flow in a semispherical container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    This numerical study analyzes the development of eddies in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a sealed semispherical container, driven by a rotating top disk. As the water height, Hw, increases, new flow cells emerge in both water and air. First, an eddy emerges near the axis-bottom int......This numerical study analyzes the development of eddies in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a sealed semispherical container, driven by a rotating top disk. As the water height, Hw, increases, new flow cells emerge in both water and air. First, an eddy emerges near the axis...... on the air flow. In contrast to flows in cylindrical and conical containers, there is no interaction with Moffatt corner vortices here....

  2. Visualization of water flow during filtration using flat filtration materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrůza Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Filtration materials are very important elements of some industrial appliances. Water filtration is a separation of solid materials from fluid. Solid particles are captured on the frontal area of the filtration textile and only liquid passes through it. It is important to know the filtration process in a detailed way to be able to develop filtration materials. Visualization of filtration process enables a better view of the filtration. This method also enables to determine efficiency and homogeneity of filtration using image analysis. For this purpose, a new waterfiltration measuring setup was proposed and constructed. Filtration material is mounted into the optically transparent place in the setup. Laser sheet is directed into this place as in the case of Particle Image Velocimetry measuring method. Monochrome and sensitive camera records the light scattered by seeding particles in water. The seeding particles passing through the filter serve for measuring filtration efficiency, and also for visualization of filtration process. Filtration setup enables to measure also the pressure drop and a flow. The signals are processed by National Instruments compactDAQ system and UMA software. Microfibrous and nanofibrous filtration materials are tested by this measuring method. In the case of nanofibrous filtration, appropriate size of seeding particles is needed to be used to perform a process of filtration.

  3. Separation mechanisms and fluid flow in oil/water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celius, H.K.; Knudsen, B. [IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway); Hafskjold, B.; Hansen, E.W. [Selskapet for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning, Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes work aimed at physical and numerical modeling of separation rates of oil/water systems in order to establish better tools for design and operation of offshore operators. This work aims to integrate the chemical and physical phenomena behind coalescence and settling with those of fluid flow in the system, in order to develop tools for design and operational analysis of separation equipment. The work includes the development of a high pressure, bench-scale test rig to perform separation tests on live oil and water samples, and a rationale in the form of a computer code that can be used to interpret the test results and transform them to a form siutable for operational purposes. This involves a formulation of a mathematical description of the chemical and physical mechanisms behind the emulsification and separation process, and to establish a link to the hydrdynamic properties of the separator vessel. The Emucol computer program is used in the analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  5. Origin and Evolution of Water Oxidation before the Last Common Ancestor of the Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Tanai; Murray, James W; Rutherford, A William

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II, the water oxidizing enzyme, altered the course of evolution by filling the atmosphere with oxygen. Here, we reconstruct the origin and evolution of water oxidation at an unprecedented level of detail by studying the phylogeny of all D1 subunits, the main protein coordinating the water oxidizing cluster (Mn4CaO5) of Photosystem II. We show that D1 exists in several forms making well-defined clades, some of which could have evolved before the origin of water oxidation and presenting many atypical characteristics. The most ancient form is found in the genome of Gloeobacter kilaueensis JS-1 and this has a C-terminus with a higher sequence identity to D2 than to any other D1. Two other groups of early evolving D1 correspond to those expressed under prolonged far-red illumination and in darkness. These atypical D1 forms are characterized by a dramatically different Mn4CaO5 binding site and a Photosystem II containing such a site may assemble an unconventional metal cluster. The first D1 forms with a full set of ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster are grouped with D1 proteins expressed only under low oxygen concentrations and the latest evolving form is the dominant type of D1 found in all cyanobacteria and plastids. In addition, we show that the plastid ancestor had a D1 more similar to those in early branching Synechococcus. We suggest each one of these forms of D1 originated from transitional forms at different stages toward the innovation and optimization of water oxidation before the last common ancestor of all known cyanobacteria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Flow Alteration and Chemical Reduction: Air Stripping to Lessen Subsurface Discharges of Mercury to Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. C.; Bogle, M.; Liang, L.; Miller, C. L.; Peterson, M.; Southworth, G. R.; Spalding, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury concentrations in groundwater, surface water, and biota near an industrial facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee remain high some 50 years after the original major releases from the facility to the environment. Since the mid-1980s, various remedial and abatement actions have been implemented at the facility, including re-routing water flows, armoring contaminated stream banks, relining or cleanout of facility storm drains, and activated charcoal treatment of groundwater and sump discharges. These actions were taken to reduce inorganic mercury inputs from the facility to the stream; a strategy that assumes limiting the inorganic mercury precursor will reduce Hg methylation and its subsequent bioaccumulation. To date, such actions have reduced mercury loading from the site by approximately 90% from levels typical of the mid 1980's, but waterborne mercury at the facility boundary remains roughly 100 times the typical local background concentration and methylmercury accumulation in aquatic biota exceed standards for safe consumption by humans and wildlife. In 2008 and 2009, a series of investigations was initiated to explore innovative approaches to further control mercury concentrations in stream water. Efforts in this study focused on decreasing waterborne inorganic mercury inputs from two sources. The first, a highly localized source, is the discharge point of the enclosed stormdrain network whereas the second is a more diffuse short reach of stream where metallic Hg in streambed sediments generates a continued input of dissolved Hg to the overlying water. Moving a clean water flow management discharge point to a position downstream of the contaminated reach reduced mercury loading from the streambed source by 75% - 100%, likely by minimizing resuspension of Hg-rich fine particulates and changing characteristic hyporheic flow path length and residence time. Mercury in the stormdrain discharge exists as highly reactive dissolved Hg(II) due to residual chlorine in

  7. Calibration of Mineralization Degree for Dynamic Pure-water Measurement in Horizontal Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weihang; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingfu; Liu, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity measurement in the process of calculating water content of oil-water two-phase flow of production profile logging in horizontal wells, a six-group local-conductance probe (SGLCP) is proposed to measure dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow. The structures of conductance sensors which include the SGLCP and ring-shaped conductance probe (RSCP) are analyzed by using the finite-element method (FEM). In the process of simulation, the electric field distribution generated by the SGLCP and RSCP are investigated, and the responses of the measuring electrodes are calculated under the different values of the water resistivity. The static experiments of the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. Results of simulation and experiments demonstrate a nice linearity between the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees. The SGLCP has also a good adaptability to stratified flow, stratified flow with mixing at the interface and dispersion of oil in water and water flow. The validity and feasibility of pure-water electrical conductivity measurement with the designed SGLCP under different mineralization degrees are verified by experimental results.

  8. Water hammer in coarse-grained solid-liquid flows in hydraulic hoisting for ocean mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文亮; 王光谦; 吴保生; 刘少军; 邹伟生

    2002-01-01

    The particles of polymetallic nodules in hydraulic hoisting flows that are used for mining in deep sea are rather coarse, therefore their flow velocity is smaller than that of the surrounding water. The characteristics of solid-liquid flows such as their density, concentration, elastic modulus and resistance were discussed. The wave propagation speed and the continuity and momentum equations of water hammer in coarse-grained solid-liquid flows were theoretically derived, and a water hammer model for such flows was developed.

  9. Non-linear effects on solute transfer between flowing water and a sediment bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2011-11-15

    A previously developed model of periodic pore water flow in space and time, and associated solute transport in a stream bed of fine sand is extended to coarse sand and fine gravel. The pore water flow immediately below the sediment/water interface becomes intermittently a non-Darcy flow. The periodic pressure and velocity fluctuations considered are induced by near-bed coherent turbulent motions in the stream flow; they penetrate from the sediment/water interface into the sediment pore system and are described by a wave number (χ) and a period (T) that are given as functions of the shear velocity (U(∗)) between the flowing water and the sediment bed. The stream bed has a flat surface without bed forms. The flow field in the sediment pore system is described by the continuity equation and a resistance law that includes both viscous (Darcy) and non-linear (inertial) effects. Simulation results show that non-linear (inertial) effects near the sediment/water interface increase flow resistance and reduce mean flow velocities. Compared to pure Darcy flow, non-linear (inertial) effects reduce solute exchange rates between overlying water and the sediment bed but only by a moderate amount (less than 50%). Turbulent coherent flow structures in the stream flow enhance solute transfer in the pore system of a stream bed compared to pure molecular diffusion, but by much less than standing surface waves or bed forms.

  10. The Design of Impact Test-Bed for High-Flow Water Medium Relief Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junliang Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Water medium hydraulic systems are widely used in coal mining machinery. As the power of hydraulic system becomes higher, the flow and pressure of water medium relief valve are also higher, and the flow may reach 2000 L/min. However, there is no relevant test-bed which could provide instantaneous high-pressure and high-flow to support the experiment for high-flow relief valve; consequently, this impact test-bed for high-flow water medium relief valve is designed to satisfy fast loading demand. Through building model, simulation analysis, and construction of an impact test-bed of high-flow water medium relief valve, the dynamic performance of high-flow water medium relief valve is detected. The setting pressure of relief valve, the accumulator volume and the filling fluid pressure, and the damping of cartridge valve can be changed, and the dynamic performance of high-flow water medium relief valve under different impact loads is detected. The results show that the designed impact test-bed of high-flow water medium relief valve could provide required high-pressure and high-flow emulsion for the tested water medium relief valve, and it could control the strength of impact load, which is an energy saving, high efficiency, and low cost method.

  11. Groundwater Flow Systems and Their Response to Climate Change: A Need for a Water-System View Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel J. Carrillo-Rivera

    2012-01-01

    managed leaning on groundwater functioning. There is increasing evidence that climate becoming more variable and key driver of ecosystem health. Even with climate stability, most developing countries will confront serious water problems by the mid-21st century due to an insufficient knowledge of the functioning of their groundwater sources representing ≈ 99% of available water. Conclusion: Many such problems may be adequately controlled when local flows are defined, since changes in climatic condition are more prone to affect local flows rather than intermediate and regional flows. The value of the flow systems arises from the fact that a wide system view analysis allows adequate crossed examination among relevant data from where water management proposals might more adequately represent field conditions. Examples of successful application of the groundwater flow systems in Mexico and Argentina will be presented including: induced fluoride control, subsidence response, desiccation of springs, flooding water origin definition, basement position in flow-system control, inter-basin flow.

  12. Modeling of Possible Conditions for Origin of First Organic Forms in hot Mineral Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The composition of water, its temperature and pH value was analyzed in experiments with modelling of primary hydrosphere and possible conditions for origin of first organic forms in hot mineral water. For this aim the authors performed experiments with hot mineral and seawater from Bulgaria by IR-spectrometry (DNES-method. As model systems were used cactus juice of Echinopsis pachanoi and Mediterranean jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata. It was considered the reactions of condensation and dehydration in alkaline aqueous solutions with рН = 9–10, resulting in synthesis from separate molecules larger organic molecules as polymers and short polipeptides. It was shown that hot alkaline mineral water with temperature from +65 0C to +95 0C and pH value from 9 to 11 is more suitable for the origination of life and living matter than other analyzed water samples. The pH value of seawater on contrary is limited to the range of 7,5 to 8,4 units. Two common local maximums were observed in the IR-spectra of jellyfish and seawater, which were more pronouncedly expressed in IR-spectra of jellyfish.

  13. Logging Effects on Streamflow: Water Yield and Summer Low Flows at Caspar Creek in Northwestern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppeler, Elizabeth T.; Ziemer, Robert R.

    1990-07-01

    Streamflow data for a 21-year period were analyzed to determine the effects of selective tractor harvesting of second-growth Douglas fir and redwood forest on the volume, timing, and duration of low flows and annual water yield in northwestern California. The flow response to logging was highly variable. Some of this variability was correlated with antecedent precipitation conditions. Statistically significant increases in streamflow were detected for both the annual period and the low-flow season. Relative increases in water yield were greater for the summer low-flow period than for annual flows, but these summer flow increases generally disappeared within 5 years.

  14. Analysis of Origin of Multi-Ring Basins by Theory of Deep Water Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Chun; MA Yue-Hua; CHEN Dao-Han; BAO Gang

    2008-01-01

    The tsunami model of the origin of multi-ring basins is analysed with the theory of deep water waves generated by an initial surface deformation,which is set as a parabolic crater.We obtain an approximate formula for calculating the ring radius.The formula applied to some multi-ring basins on the Moon,Mercury and Mars gives almost equidistant spacing of the rings within the main ring (the IV ring); this agrees with the previous conclusion that the IV ring marks the end of the fluidized region.Besides this,the theory of deep water waves does not require similar crustal structure at each basin-impact site on all three planets which is required in the theory of shallow water waves.

  15. Existence for a global pressure formulation of water-gas flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Amaziane

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a model of water-gas flow in porous media with an incompressible water phase and a compressible gas phase. Such models appear in gas migration through engineered and geological barriers for a deep repository for radioactive waste. The main feature of this model is the introduction of a new global pressure and it is fully equivalent to the original equations. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation as a degenerate parabolic system with the global pressure and the saturation potential as the main unknowns. The major difficulties related to this model are in the nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Under some realistic assumptions on the data, including unbounded capillary pressure function and non-homogeneous boundary conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions of the system. Furthermore, it is shown that the weak solution has certain desired properties, such as positivity of the saturation. The result is proved with the help of an appropriate regularization and a time discretization of the coupled system. We use suitable test functions to obtain a priori estimates and a compactness result in order to pass to the limit in nonlinear terms.

  16. EFFECTS OF EXCESS URBAN RUNOFF ON WASTE WATER FLOW IN PÉCS, HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. RONCZYK

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Global warming has been leading to climate change that is predicted to cause an increase in the frequency and intensity of rainfall. Urban areas must be designed to cope with the undesired effect and risks associated with stormwater runoff. Stormwater, entering into the sewerage of Pécs, SW Hungary, exerts an extra load on wastewater and sewage transfer in the underground pipeline system. Based on precipitation and pumping station flow data, we identified a strong correspondence between rainfall and flow behavior in Pécs. We also determined the types of foreign waters entering the sewerage according to their source and origin. Our study also indicates that 32% of the entire land area has a low-degree infrastructure for cutting-edge stormwater drainage and management. The results of the current research aid to evaluate the adequate methodology for risk analysis of each sewage catchment. The spatial analysis of waste water system and its physical and human geographical environment became an effective tool to help the local waterworks (Tettye Forrásház Ltd. to estimate potential hazard level in each sewage catchment and allocate and distribute pumping costs and efforts among the pumping stations during spatiallyheterogeneous torrential rainfall events.

  17. Pore Water Pressure Contribution to Debris Flow Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Deangeli

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Debris flows are very to extremely rapid flows of saturated granular soils. Two main types of debris flow are generally recognized: Open slope debris flows and channelized debris flows. The former is the results of some form of slope failures, the latter can develop along preexisting stream courses by the mobilization of previously deposited debris blanket. The problem to be addressed is the influence of the mode of initiation on the subsequent mechanism of propagation. In ...

  18. Ultrasonic method for measuring water holdup of low velocity and high-water-cut oil-water two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, An; Han, Yun-Feng; Ren, Ying-Yu; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; in, Ning-De

    2016-03-01

    Oil reservoirs with low permeability and porosity that are in the middle and late exploitation periods in China's onshore oil fields are mostly in the high-water-cut production stage. This stage is associated with severely non-uniform local-velocity flow profiles and dispersed-phase concentration (of oil droplets) in oil-water two-phase flow, which makes it difficult to measure water holdup in oil wells. In this study, we use an ultrasonic method based on a transmission-type sensor in oil-water two-phase flow to measure water holdup in low-velocity and high water-cut conditions. First, we optimize the excitation frequency of the ultrasonic sensor by calculating the sensitivity of the ultrasonic field using the finite element method for multiphysics coupling. Then we calculate the change trend of sound pressure level attenuation ratio with the increase in oil holdup to verify the feasibility of the employed diameter for the ultrasonic sensor. Based on the results, we then investigate the effects of oil-droplet diameter and distribution on the ultrasonic field. To further understand the measurement characteristics of the ultrasonic sensor, we perform a flow loop test on vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow and measure the responses of the optimized ultrasonic sensor. The results show that the ultrasonic sensor yields poor resolution for a dispersed oil slug in water flow (D OS/W flow), but the resolution is favorable for dispersed oil in water flow (D O/W flow) and very fine dispersed oil in water flow (VFD O/W flow). This research demonstrates the potential application of a pulsed-transmission ultrasonic method for measuring the fraction of individual components in oil-water two-phase flow with a low mixture velocity and high water cut.

  19. Computational theory of cavitating flows for hydraulic turbomachinery with consideration of influence of water quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Previously it was assumed that the pressure within the cavity or on the cavity surface remained constant and the vapor pressure of clean water at 20°C and 0 m altitude was utilized as the computational boundary for cavitating flows in hydraulic turbomachinery. Cavitation was confused with vaporization, and the effect of water quality on cavitation pressure characteristics was not taken into account. In recent years, lots of experiments of cavitation pressure characteristics of different water qualities including different sand concentrations of sand water and different altitudes of clean water have been performed by the authors, and the important influences of water quality on cavitation pressure characteristic have been validated. Thus the water quality should be involved in the cavitating flows computation. In the present paper, the effect of water quality on the cavitation pressure characteristic is analyzed and the computational method and theory of cavitating flows for hydraulic turbomachinery that considers the influence of water quality are proposed. The theory is suitable for both the potential flow method and the two-phase flow method for cavitating flows simulation. Finally, the validation results for cavitating flows in a hydraulic tur- bine indicate the significant influences of water quality on the cavitating flow performance.

  20. Perfluorinated alkylated acids in groundwater and drinking water: identification, origin and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschauzier, Christian; Raat, Klaasjan J; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; De Voogt, Pim

    2013-08-01

    Human exposure to perfluorinated alkylated acids (PFAA) occurs primarily via the dietary intake and drinking water can contribute significantly to the overall PFAA intake. Drinking water is produced from surface water and groundwater. Waste water treatment plants have been identified as the main source for PFAA in surface waters and corresponding drinking water. However, even though groundwater is an important source for drinking water production, PFAA sources remain largely uncertain. In this paper, we identified different direct and indirect sources of PFAA to groundwater within the catchment area of a public supply well field (PSWF) in The Netherlands. Direct sources were landfill leachate and water draining from a nearby military base/urban area. Indirect sources were infiltrated rainwater. Maximum concentrations encountered in groundwater within the landfill leachate plume were 1.8 μg/L of non branched perfluorooctanoic acid (L-PFOA) and 1.2 μg/L of perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA). Sum concentrations amounted to 4.4 μg/L total PFAA. The maximum concentration of ΣPFAA in the groundwater originating from the military camp was around 17 ng/L. Maximum concentrations measured in the groundwater halfway the landfill and the PWSF (15 years travel distance) were 29 and 160 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. Concentrations in the groundwater pumping wells (travel distance >25 years) were much lower: 0.96 and 3.5 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. The chemical signature of these pumping wells corresponded to the signature encountered in other wells sampled which were fed by water that had not been in contact with potential contaminant sources, suggesting a widespread diffuse contamination from atmospheric deposition.

  1. Influences of friction drag on spontaneous condensation in water vapor supersonic flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to investigate the water vapor spontaneous condensation under supersonic flow conditions. A numerical simulation was performed for the water vapor condensable supersonic flows through Laval nozzles under different flow friction conditions. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model is accurate enough to investigate the supersonic spontaneous condensation flow of water vapor inside Laval nozzles. The influences of flow friction drag on supersonic spontaneous condensation flow of water vapor inside Laval nozzles were investigated. It was found that the flow friction has a direct effect on the spontaneous condensation process and therefore it is important for an accurate friction prediction in designing this kind of Laval nozzles.

  2. Influences of friction drag on spontaneous condensation in water vapor supersonic flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG WenMing; LIU ZhongLiang; LIU HengWei; PANG HuiZhong; BAO LingLing

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to investigate the water vapor spontaneous condensation under supersonic flow conditions. A numerical simulation was performed for the water vapor condensable supersonic flows through Laval nozzles under different flow friction conditions. The comparison be-tween numerical and experimental results shows that the model is accurate enough to investigate the supersonic spontaneous condensation flow of water vapor inside Laval nozzles. The influences of flow friction drag on supersonic spontaneous condensation flow of water vapor inside Laval nozzles were investigated, It was found that the flow friction has a direct effect on the spontaneous condensation process and therefore it is important for an accurate friction prediction in designing this kind of Laval nozzles.

  3. Initial hydraulic heads for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the hydraulic-head values in 16 model layers used to initiate the transient simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  4. Lateral boundary of the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the lateral boundary and model domain of the area simulated by the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional...

  5. Lateral boundary of the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the lateral boundary and model domain of the area simulated by the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional...

  6. Simulation of water flows in multiple columns with small outlets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Kweon; Li, Zi Lu; Jeong, Jong Hyun; Lee, Jun Hee [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    High-pressure die casting such as thixocasting and rheocasting is an effective process in the manufacturing automotive parts. Following the recent trend in the automotive manufacturing technologies, the product design subject to the die casting becomes more and more complex. Simultaneously the injection speed is also designed to be very high to establish a short cycle-time. Thus, the requirement of the die design becomes more demanding than ever before. In some cases the product's shape can have multiple slender manifolds. In such cases, design of the inlet and outlet parts of the die is very important in the whole manufacturing process. The main issues required for the qualified products are to attain gentle and uniform flow of the molten liquid within the passages of the die. To satisfy such issues, the inlet cylinder ('bed cylinder' in this paper) must be as large as possible and simultaneously the outlet opening at the end of each passage must be as small as possible. However these in turn obviously bring additional manufacturing costs caused by re-melting of the bed cylinder and increased power due to the small outlet-openings. The purpose of this paper is to develop effective simulation methods of calculation for fluid flows in multiple columns, which mimic the actual complex design, and to get some useful information which can give some contributions to the die-casting industry. We have used a commercial code CFX in the numerical simulation. The primary parameter involved is the size of the bed cylinder. We will show how the very small opening of the outlet can be treated with the aid of the porous model provided in the code. To check the validity of the numerical results we have also conducted a simple experiment by using water.

  7. Construction of estimated flow- and load-duration curves for Kentucky using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthank, Michael D.; Newson, Jeremy K.; Williamson, Tanja N.; Nelson, Hugh L.

    2012-01-01

    Flow- and load-duration curves were constructed from the model outputs of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) application for streams in Kentucky. The WATER application was designed to access multiple geospatial datasets to generate more than 60 years of statistically based streamflow data for Kentucky. The WATER application enables a user to graphically select a site on a stream and generate an estimated hydrograph and flow-duration curve for the watershed upstream of that point. The flow-duration curves are constructed by calculating the exceedance probability of the modeled daily streamflows. User-defined water-quality criteria and (or) sampling results can be loaded into the WATER application to construct load-duration curves that are based on the modeled streamflow results. Estimates of flow and streamflow statistics were derived from TOPographically Based Hydrological MODEL (TOPMODEL) simulations in the WATER application. A modified TOPMODEL code, SDP-TOPMODEL (Sinkhole Drainage Process-TOPMODEL) was used to simulate daily mean discharges over the period of record for 5 karst and 5 non-karst watersheds in Kentucky in order to verify the calibrated model. A statistical evaluation of the model's verification simulations show that calibration criteria, established by previous WATER application reports, were met thus insuring the model's ability to provide acceptably accurate estimates of discharge at gaged and ungaged sites throughout Kentucky. Flow-duration curves are constructed in the WATER application by calculating the exceedence probability of the modeled daily flow values. The flow-duration intervals are expressed as a percentage, with zero corresponding to the highest stream discharge in the streamflow record. Load-duration curves are constructed by applying the loading equation (Load = Flow*Water-quality criterion) at each flow interval.

  8. Passive sampling of perfluorinated chemicals in water: Flow rate effects on chemical uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M.; Hawker, D.W.; Kennedy, K.; Bentley, C.; Thompson, J.; Booij, K.; Mueller, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    A recently developed modified polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides a means for monitoring perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in water. However, changes in external flow rates may alter POCIS sampling behaviour and consequently affect estimated water concentrations of analytes. In

  9. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PHASE INVERSION IN OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jing; LI Qing-ping; YAO Hai-yuan; YU Da

    2006-01-01

    Experiments of phase inversion characteristics for horizontal oil-water two-phase flow in a stainless steel pipe loop (25.7 mm inner diameter,52 m long) are conducted. A new viewpoint is brought forward about the process of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Using the relations between the total free energies of the pre-inversion and post-inversion dispersions, a model for predicting phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow has been developed that considers the characteristics of pipe flow. This model is compared against other models with relevant data of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Results indicate that this model is better than other models in terms of calculation precision and applicability. The model is useful for guiding the design for optimal performance and safety in the operation of oil-water two-phase pipe flow in oil fields.

  10. Approximate solutions for Forchheimer flow during water injection and water production in an unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the hydraulics around injection and production wells in unconfined aquifers associated with rainwater and reclaimed water aquifer storage schemes is an issue of increasing importance. Much work has been done previously to understand the mathematics associated with Darcy's law in this context. However, groundwater flow velocities around injection and production wells are likely to be sufficiently large such as to induce significant non-Darcy effects. This article presents a mathematical analysis to look at Forchheimer's equation in the context of water injection and water production in unconfined aquifers. Three different approximate solutions are derived using quasi-steady-state assumptions and the method of matched asymptotic expansion. The resulting approximate solutions are shown to be accurate for a wide range of practical scenarios by comparison with a finite difference solution to the full problem of concern. The approximate solutions have led to an improved understanding of the flow dynamics. They can also be used as verification tools for future numerical models in this context.

  11. Assessing microbiological water quality in drinking water distribution systems with disinfectant residual using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Simon; Lipphaus, Patrick; Green, James; Parsons, Simon; Weir, Paul; Juskowiak, Kes; Jefferson, Bruce; Jarvis, Peter; Nocker, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Flow cytometry (FCM) as a diagnostic tool for enumeration and characterization of microorganisms is rapidly gaining popularity and is increasingly applied in the water industry. In this study we applied the method to obtain a better understanding of total and intact cell concentrations in three different drinking water distribution systems (one using chlorine and two using chloramines as secondary disinfectants). Chloramine tended to result in lower proportions of intact cells than chlorine over a wider residual range, in agreement with existing knowledge that chloramine suppresses regrowth more efficiently. For chlorinated systems, free chlorine concentrations above 0.5 mg L(-1) were found to be associated with relatively low proportions of intact cells, whereas lower disinfectant levels could result in substantially higher percentages of intact cells. The threshold for chlorinated systems is in good agreement with guidelines from the World Health Organization. The fact that the vast majority of samples failing the regulatory coliform standard also showed elevated proportions of intact cells suggests that this parameter might be useful for evaluating risk of failure. Another interesting parameter for judging the microbiological status of water, the biological regrowth potential, greatly varied among different finished waters providing potential help for investment decisions. For its measurement, a simple method was introduced that can easily be performed by water utilities with FCM capability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation of ground-water flow in the vicinity of Hyde Park landfill, Niagara Falls, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslia, M.L.; Johnston, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Hyde Park landfill is a 15-acre chemical waste disposal site located north of Niagara Falls, New York. Underlying the site in descending order are: (1) low permeability glacial till, (2) a moderately permeable fractured rock aquifer--the Lockport Dolomite, and (3) a low permeability unit--the Rochester Shale. The site is bounded on three sides by ground-water drains; the Niagara River Gorge, the Niagara Power Project canal, and the power project conduits. A finite element model was used to simulate ground-water flow along an east-west section through the Hyde Park site (from the power project conduits to the Niagara Gorge). Steady-state conditions were simulated with an average annual recharge rate of 5 inches per year. The calibrated model simulated measured water levels within 5 feet in the glacial till and upper unit of the Lockport Dolomite and approximated the configuration of the water table. Based on simulation, ground-water flow near the Hyde Park site can be summarized as follows: 1. Specific discharge (Darcy velocity) ranges from about 0.01 to 0.1 foot per day in the upper unit of the Lockport Dolomite to less than 0.00001 foot per day in the Rochester Shale. Real velocities are highest in the upper unit of the Lockport, ranging from about 1.5 to 4.8 feet per day. 2. A ground-water divide exists east of the landfill, indicating that all ground water originating near or flowing beneath the landfill will flow toward and discharge in the gorge. 3. The zone of highest velocities (and presumably greatest potential for transporting chemical contaminants) includes the upper unit of the Lockport and part of the lower unit of the Lockport Dolomite between the landfill and the gorge. The time required for ground water to move from the landfill to the gorge in the Lockport Dolomite is estimated to be 5 to 7 years.

  13. An estimation model of time-varying origin-destination flows in expressway corridors based on unscented Kalman filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JunWei; LIN BoLiang; SUN ZhiHui; GENG XueFei

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of measurable time series of mainline and ramp flows from traffic counts and the assumption of travel time distributions, this research presents a dynamic system model and its on-line estimation algorithm for recursive estimation of Ume-varying origin-destination (OD) matrices in expressway corridors. The proposed model employs a macro-traffic flow model to estimate travel times of OD flows and uses parameters of the traffic model as state variables, which are added to the constrained function of the system. To improve the model efficiency, we revise the travel time distribution based on the feature of normal distribution. The research employs a newly developed filtering technique, called unscented Kalman filter. The proposed model is evaluated with simulation experiments.Numerical analyses with respect to the sensitivity of the selection of initial parameters on the estimation results indicate that the proposed model is sufficiently reasonable and stable for real-world applications.

  14. An estimation model of time-varying origin-destination flows in expressway corridors based on unscented Kalman filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of measurable time series of mainline and ramp flows from traffic counts and the assumption of travel time distributions, this research presents a dynamic system model and its on-line estimation algorithm for recursive estimation of time-varying origin-destination (OD) matrices in expressway corridors. The proposed model employs a macro-traffic flow model to estimate travel times of OD flows and uses parameters of the traffic model as state variables, which are added to the constrained function of the system. To improve the model efficiency, we revise the travel time distribution based on the feature of normal distribution. The research employs a newly developed filtering technique, called unscented Kalman filter. The proposed model is evaluated with simulation experiments. Numerical analyses with respect to the sensitivity of the selection of initial parameters on the estimation results indicate that the proposed model is sufficiently reasonable and stable for real-world appli-cations.

  15. Volumetric flow rate comparisons for water and product on pasteurization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesser, J E; Stroup, W H; McKinstry, J A

    1994-04-01

    A flow calibration tube system was assembled to determine the volumetric flow rates for water and various dairy products through a holding tube, using three different flow promotion methods. With the homogenizer, the volumetric flow rates of water and reconstituted skim milk were within 1.5% of each other. With the positive displacement pump, the flow rate for reconstituted skim milk increased compared with that for water as the pressure increased or temperature decreased. The largest increase in flow rate was at 310-kPa gauge and 20 degrees C. On a magnetic flow meter system, the volumetric flow rates of water and reconstituted skim milk were within .5% of the flow rate measured from the volume collected in a calibrated tank. The flow rate of whole milk was similar to that of skim milk on the three flow promoters evaluated. Ice milk mix increased the flow rate of the positive displacement pump, but not the homogenizer and magnetic flow meter system.

  16. Nanedi Vallis: Sustained Water Flow? - High Resolution Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This picture of a canyon on the Martian surface was obtained a few minutes after 10 PM PST, January 8, 1998 by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), during the 87th orbit around Mars of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It shows the canyon of Nanedi Vallis, one of the Martian valley systems cutting through cratered plains in the Xanthe Terra region of Mars. The picture covers an area 9.8 km by 18.5 km (6.1 mi by 11.5 mi), and features as small as 12 m (39 ft) can be seen. The canyon is about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) wide. Rocky outcrops are found along the upper canyon walls; weathered debris found on the lower canyon slopes and along the canyon floor. The origin of this canyon is enigmatic: some features, such as terraces within the canyon (as seen near the top of the frame) and the small 200 m (660 ft) wide channel (also seen near the top of the frame) suggest continual fluid flow and downcutting. Other features, such as the lack of a contributing pattern of smaller channels on the surface surrounding the canyon, box-headed tributaries, and the size and tightness of the apparent meanders (as seen, for example, in the Viking image 89A32), suggest formation by collapse. It is likely that both continual flow and collapse have been responsible for the canyon as it now appears. Further observations, especially in areas west of the present image, will be used to help separate the relative effects of these and other potential formation and modification processes.Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  17. Water behavior in a u-shaped flow channel of PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, P.; Zhou, B.; Sobiesiak, A. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering; Liu, Z.S. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to find a practical approach for predicting liquid water distribution in the U-shaped flow channels of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Computational fluid dynamics modeling with the FLUENT software package was used to demonstrate the two-phase flow of the air-water transport process inside the channel. It was noted that no chemical reaction occurs inside the flow channels and the liquid water is formed either on the surfaces of the flow channels or inside the flow channels. The problem can therefore be simplified as a fluid mechanics problem with water sources inside its physical domain or on its boundaries. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) model was used to track dynamic air-water interactions. Three cases with a range of initial water phase distributions corresponding to different fuel cell operating conditions were simulated numerically to gain a better understanding of water behaviour inside the serpentine channel. It was concluded that the bend area in the serpentine flow field affects the fuel cell performance. This is because it influences the flow field which in turn influences the air-water flow and water liquid distribution inside the channel or along the inside channel surfaces. 15 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  18. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Pla, Josep; Font, Eva; Astui, Oihane; Menció, Anna; Rodríguez-Florit, Agustí; Folch, Albert; Brusi, David; Pérez-Paricio, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Stream flow, as a part of a basin hydrological cycle, will be sensible to water scarcity as a result of climate change. Stream vulnerability should then be evaluated as a key component of the basin water budget. Numerical flow modeling has been applied to an alluvial formation in a small mountain basin to evaluate the stream-aquifer relationship under these future scenarios. The Arbúcies River basin (116 km(2)) is located in the Catalan Inner Basins (NE Spain) and its lower reach, which is related to an alluvial aquifer, usually becomes dry during the summer period. This study seeks to determine the origin of such discharge losses whether from natural stream leakage and/or induced capture due to groundwater withdrawal. Our goal is also investigating how discharge variations from the basin headwaters, representing potential effects of climate change, may affect stream flow, aquifer recharge, and finally environmental preservation and human supply. A numerical flow model of the alluvial aquifer, based on MODFLOW and especially in the STREAM routine, reproduced the flow system after the usual calibration. Results indicate that, in the average, stream flow provides more than 50% of the water inputs to the alluvial aquifer, being responsible for the amount of stored water resources and for satisfying groundwater exploitation for human needs. Detailed simulations using daily time-steps permit setting threshold values for the stream flow entering at the beginning of the studied area so surface discharge is maintained along the whole watercourse and ecological flow requirements are satisfied as well. The effects of predicted rainfall and temperature variations on the Arbúcies River alluvial aquifer water balance are also discussed from the outcomes of the simulations. Finally, model results indicate the relevance of headwater discharge management under future climate scenarios to preserve downstream hydrological processes. They also point out that small mountain basins

  19. The origin and significance of secondary flows in the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lawford, P V

    1995-01-01

    This paper comprises a study of the secondary flow patterns that can develop in the human aortic arch. Clinical evidence of these secondary flows has been obtained by Kilner et al. using magnetic resonance velocity mapping techniques. Some of their results are presented for comparison in this paper. Four difference parametric models of the aortic arch have been analysed using computational fluid dynamic techniques. Both steady and transient flow conditions have been considered and two different commercially available software packages were used, namely FIDAP and FLOTRAN. A satisfactory comparison of the theoretical analysis with the results, both in vivo and in vitro, obtained by Kilner et al. for their out-of-plane inlet model was found. The theoretical analysis can now be extended to analyse the effect of different configurations and orientations of artificial aortic valves on the resulting aortic arch flow patterns.

  20. On the origins of vortex shedding in two-dimensional incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    An exegesis of a novel mechanism leading to vortex splitting and subsequent shedding that is valid for two-dimensional incompressible, inviscid or viscous, and external or internal or wall-bounded flows, is detailed in this research. The mechanism, termed the vortex shedding mechanism (VSM) is simple and intuitive, requiring only two coincident conditions in the flow: (1) the existence of a location with zero momentum and (2) the presence of a net force having a positive divergence. Numerical solutions of several model problems illustrate causality of the VSM. Moreover, the VSM criteria is proved to be a necessary and sufficient condition for a vortex splitting event in any two-dimensional, incompressible flow. The VSM is shown to exist in several canonical problems including the external flow past a circular cylinder. Suppression of the von Kármán vortex street is demonstrated for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 400 by mitigating the VSM.

  1. Water flow based geometric active deformable model for road network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leninisha, Shanmugam; Vani, Kaliaperumal

    2015-04-01

    A width and color based geometric active deformable model is proposed for road network extraction from remote sensing images with minimal human interception. Orientation and width of road are computed from a single manual seed point, from which the propagation starts both right and left hand directions of the starting point, which extracts the interconnected road network from the aerial or high spatial resolution satellite image automatically. Here the propagation (like water flow in canal with defined boundary) is restricted with color and width of the road. Road extraction is done for linear, curvilinear (U shape and S shape) roads first, irrespective of width and color. Then, this algorithm is improved to extract road with junctions in a shape of L, T and X along with center line. Roads with small break or disconnected roads are also extracts by a modified version of this same algorithm. This methodology is tested and evaluated with various remote sensing images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and extracting roads accurately with less computation time. However, in complex urban areas, the identification accuracy declines due to the various sizes of obstacles, over bridges, multilane etc.

  2. Virtual water flows related to land use in an intensive agriculture in the Fergana Valley, Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, A.; Schneider, K.; Breuer, L.; Frede, H. G.

    2009-04-01

    Due to low annual precipitation, agricultural production in Uzbekistan is depending on irrigation from the Syrdarya and Amudarya rivers to a great deal. One of the most important cash crops of the country is cotton. Current irrigation management leads to elevated groundwater levels, salinization of soils and to a degradation of soil and water resources. Through export of cotton and other crops, the problems related to water consumption and water management are transported beyond the producing country. The amount of water transported through production and export is referred to as virtual water. To distinguish between productive and unproductive partitioning of water flows, the terms green and blue water have been introduced. Information on virtual water flows due to crop production usually only exist on country level. To reduce uncertainties related to generalization, the effect of land management and environmental factors on the partitioning of water flows needs to be studied on smaller scales. The presented study analyzes water fluxes in an intensively used agricultural area in the Fergana Valley, Uzbekistan. The study aims to a) quantify crop specific water consumption in agricultural production under current management and b) analyze water use efficiency as subject to land use and irrigation management. Based on crop production, irrigation management and environmental conditions in the study area, virtual water flows will be calculated on the level of agricultural collectives (Water Users Associations). In a further step, the partitioning of green and blue water fluxes will be quantified. Alternative scenarios for improved water management will be analyzed in a model study.

  3. Physical and water properties of selected Polish heavy soils of various origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of selected physical, chemical, and water properties of four mineral arable soils characterized with heavy and very heavy texture. Soil samples from genetic horizons of black earths from areas near Kętrzyn, Gniew and Kujawy, and alluvial soils from Żuławy were used. The following properties were determined in the samples of undisturbed and disturbed structure: texture, particle density, bulk density, porosity, natural and hygroscopic moistures, maximal hygroscopic capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, potential of water bonding in soil, total and readily available water, total retention in the horizon of 0–50 cm, drainage porosity, content of organic carbon and total nitrogen Parent rocks of these soils were clays, silts and loams of various origin. High content of clay fraction strongly influenced the values of all the analyzed properties. All the examined soils had high content of organic carbon and total nitrogen and reaction close to neutral or alkaline. High content of mineral and organic colloids and, what follows, beneficial state of top horizons’ structure, determined – apart from heavy texture – low soil bulk density and high porosity. The investigated soils were characterized by high field water capacity and wide scopes of total and readily available water. The saturated hydraulic conductivity was low and characteristic to heavy mineral arable soils. The parameter which influenced the variability of analyzed parameters most was texture.

  4. Source Water Flow Pathways In Forested, Mountain, Headwater Streams: A Link Between Sediment Movement Patterns And Stream Water Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Liu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Three years of continuous and discrete sediment and water quality data, from four forested, mountain, headwater catchments in the Sierra Nevada, is used to identify water sources, determine the importance of sub-surface flow pathways, detect any changes in source waters due to seasonal variation or drought, and link flow pathways with observed patterns of in-channel sediment movement within the study watersheds. Patterns in stream chemistry and turbidity point to infiltration as the dominant flow pathway within these catchments. Data support a flow pathway conceptual model in which precipitation water infiltrates into the shallow or deeper subsurface, increasing the hydraulic head of the water table and pushing pre-event water into the stream ahead of event water. Study catchments contain perennial streams and are characterized by a Mediterranean climate with a distinct wet and dry season. Sites are located in the rain-snow transition zone with snow making up 40 to 60 percent of average annual precipitation. Barring human disturbances such as logging/grazing (compaction) or fire (hydrophobicity), catchment soils have high infiltration capacities. Springs and seeps maintain baseflow during the summer low-flow season, and shifting chemical signals within the streams indicate the increased importance of sub-surface water sources during drought years. End-member mixing analysis was conducted to identify possible water end members. Turbidity hysteresis patterns described by previous studies show in-channel sources are dominant for discharge events year round, and there is no difference in fine sediment delivery to streams with or without a soil protecting layer of snow on the land surface. The dominance of sub-surface water sources and evidence for infiltration flow fits with turbidity data, as little material is reaching the stream due to erosive overland flow. An understanding of flow pathways provides a foundation for sustainable land use management in forested

  5. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  6. Centrifugal Modelling of Transient Water Flow in Earth Embankments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-07

    Redshaw [10] in their recent book and the transient flow net technique described by Cedergren Approximate Solutions The solution of the transient flow...and Foundation Engineering, Paris, Vol. II, pp. 551-554. 3. Cedergren , H.R., Seepage, Drainage, and Flow Nets, 2nd Ed., New York, John Wiley & Sons

  7. A comparison of daily water use estimates derived from constant-heat sap-flow probe values and gravimetric measurements in pot-grown saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.A. McCulloh; K. Winter; F.C. Meinzer; M. Garcia; J. Aranda; Lachenbruch B.

    2007-01-01

    The use of Granier-style heat dissipation sensors to measure sap flow is common in plant physiology, ecology, and hydrology. There has been concern that any change to the original Granier design invalidates the empirical relationship between sap flux density and the temperature difference between the probes. We compared daily water use estimates from gravimetric...

  8. Kinematic models for the opening of the South China Sea: An upwelling divergent flow origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Hu, Jiwei; Yang, Dinghui; Song, Haibin; Wang, Zhenhua

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the kinematics of continent breakup and seafloor spreading in response to the upwelling divergent mantle flow using the optimal nearly-analytical discrete method. Modeling results show that a larger upwelling rate (Vz) in the upwelling divergent flow system favors the earlier development of continent breakup and seafloor spreading and the formation of narrow continental rifted margins and mantle exhumation; while a larger half divergent rate (Vx) favors the diffusive lithospheric thinning and the formation of wide continental rifted margins and mantle exhumation. The upwelling divergent flow-driven continent extension is strongly depth-dependent at the proximal margins, but it behaves approximately in a depth-uniform manner at the distal margins. Application of this model to the South China Sea (SCS) demonstrates that: (1) an upwelling flow operation with Vz = 0.3 cm/yr can explain the pre-spreading continent extension of the SCS between ca. 65 Ma and ca. 33 Ma; (2) the followed upwelling divergent flow with Vx = 2.5 cm/yr and Vz = 0.3 cm/yr can reproduce the seafloor spreading history at ca. 33-16 Ma in the SCS central oceanic basin; and (3) the post-16 Ma thermal cooling since the cessation of the SCS seafloor spreading contributed ∼1.2 km to the present-day bathymetry at the relict spreading ridge. The upwelling divergent flow with a high ratio of Vx/Vz was also likely responsible for the occurrence of the very wide rifted continental margins bounded the SCS. We suggest that an upwelling divergent mantle flow played a leading role in the opening of the SCS.

  9. Movement of coliform bacteria and nutrients in ground water flowing through basalt and sand aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entry, J A; Farmer, N

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale deposition of animal manure can result in contamination of surface and ground water and in potential transfer of disease-causing enteric bacteria to animals or humans. We measured total coliform bacteria (TC), fecal coliform bacteria (FC), NO3, NH4, total P, and PO4 in ground water flowing from basalt and sand aquifers, in wells into basalt and sand aquifers, in irrigation water, and in river water. Samples were collected monthly for 1 yr. Total coliform and FC numbers were always higher in irrigation water than in ground water, indicating that soil and sediment filtered most of these bacteria before they entered the aquifers. Total coliform and FC numbers in ground water were generally higher in the faster flowing basalt aquifer than in the sand aquifer, indicating that the slower flow and finer grain size may filter more TC and FC bacteria from water. At least one coliform bacterium/100 mL of water was found in ground water from both basalt and sand aquifers, indicating that ground water pumped from these aquifers is not necessarily safe for human consumption according to the American Public Health Association and the USEPA. The NO3 concentrations were usually higher in water flowing from the sand aquifer than in water flowing from the basalt aquifer or in perched water tables in the basalt aquifer. The PO4 concentrations were usually higher in water flowing from the basalt aquifer than in water flowing from the sand aquifer. The main concern is fecal contamination of these aquifers and health consequences that may arise from human consumption.

  10. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1997-01-01


    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute

  11. A Device to Emulate Diffusion and Thermal Conductivity Using Water Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2005-01-01

    A device designed to emulate diffusion and thermal conductivity using flowing water is reviewed. Water flowing through a series of cells connected by a small tube in each partition in this plastic model is capable of emulating diffusion and thermal conductivity that occurs in variety of systems described by several mathematical equations.

  12. Oxygen consumption by a sediment bed for stagnant water: comparison to SOD with fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    A model of sedimentary oxygen demand (SOD) for stagnant water in a lake or a reservoir is presented. For the purposes of this paper, stagnant water is defined as the bottom layer of stratified water columns in relatively unproductive systems that are underlain by silt and sand-dominated sediments with low-organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). The modeling results are compared to those with fluid flow to investigate how flow over the sediment surface raises SOD compared to stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and biochemical activity in the sediment. SOD is found to be substantially limited by oxygen transfer in the water column when water is stagnant. When flow over the sediment surface is present, SOD becomes larger than that for stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and the biochemical oxygen uptake rate in the sediment. Flow over the sediment surface causes an insignificant raise in SOD when the biochemical oxygen uptake rate is small. The difference between SOD with fluid flow and SOD for stagnant water becomes significant as the biochemical oxygen uptake rate becomes larger, i.e. SOD is 10-100 times larger when flow over the sediment surface is present.

  13. Field evidence for buoyancy-driven water flow in a Sphagnum dominated peat bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, E.B.; Baaijens, G. J.; van Belle, J.; Rappoldt, C.; Grootjans, A. P.; Smolders, A. J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Nocturnal buoyancy-driven water flow in bogs is proposed as a mechanism to replenish the nutrient availability in the top of the acrotelm. In an earlier paper, we provided evidence for buoyancy-driven water flow on theoretical and experimental grounds. In this paper, field evidence is given for the

  14. Basal interstitial water pressure in laboratory debris flows over a rigid bed in an open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hotta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows under various conditions gives essential information on the flow stress structure. This study measured the basal interstitial water pressure during debris flow routing experiments in a laboratory flume. Because a sensitive pressure gauge is required to measure the interstitial water pressure in shallow laboratory debris flows, a differential gas pressure gauge with an attached diaphragm was used. Although this system required calibration before and after each experiment, it showed a linear behavior and a sufficiently high temporal resolution for measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows. The values of the interstitial water pressure were low. However, an excess of pressure beyond the hydrostatic pressure was observed with increasing sediment particle size. The measured excess pressure corresponded to the theoretical excess interstitial water pressure, derived as a Reynolds stress in the interstitial water of boulder debris flows. Turbulence was thought to induce a strong shear in the interstitial space of sediment particles. The interstitial water pressure in boulder debris flows should be affected by the fine sediment concentration and the phase transition from laminar to turbulent debris flow; this should be the subject of future studies.

  15. Bifurcations of a creeping air–water flow in a conical container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height (Formula presented.) and cone half-angle (Formula presented.) vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur...

  16. Dual isotopic approach for determining groundwater origin and water-rock interactions in over exploited watershed in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Philippe; Pauwels, Hélène; Millot, Romain; Roy, Stéphane; Guerrot, Catherine

    2010-05-01

    isotopes in the return flow. In addition, such evaporation is further affected by land use, rice paddies having the strongest evapotranspiration. Lead concentrations span over one or two orders of magnitude up to approximately 20 ?g. L-1. Pb-isotopes, measured in water by MC-ICPMS using an improved new procedure, fluctuate largely as exemplified by the 206Pb/204Pb ratio, reaching values up to 25. Most of the lead in the groundwaters is of geogenic origin, and through the lead isotopic signature in groundwater we have traced and fingerprinted the processes of water-rock interactions considering the granite matrix. Combining a weathering model and field observations, we have defined a two step weathering process that includes a control on the Pb-isotopes ratios by accessory phases and by the main mineral from the granite in a second step of weathering. For future studies, multi-isotope approach will be necessary for the identification of possible flowpaths, in conjunction with the larger exploitation of the groundwater resources. This is also challenging for generalising the use of isotope tools (such as Nd, Sr, Pb and newly developed isotope systematics like Ca, Si...) in many other catchments that may face structural problems of groundwater overdraft.

  17. VOF modelling of gas–liquid flow in PEM water electrolysis cell micro-channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafmejani, Saeed Sadeghi; Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the gaseliquid flow through an interdigitated anode flow field of a PEM water electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is analysed using a three-dimensional, transient, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. To account for two-phase flow, the volume of fluid (VOF) method in ANSYS Fluent 17...

  18. Computing equations of water hammer in pseudo-homogeneous solid-liquid flow and their verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In engineering practice, single-phase water hammer models are still employed to analyze the water hammer of solid-liquid flow. According to the characteristics of solid-liquid flow, continuity equations and momentum equations of pseudo-homogeneous flows are deduced, and a pseudo-homogeneous water hammer model is thus built and verified with experiment results. The characteristics of solid-liquid flow's viscosity, resistance and wave velocity are considered in the model. Therefore, it has higher precision than a single-phase model.

  19. Pleistocene range shifts, refugia and the origin of widespread species in western Palaearctic water beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vázquez, David; Bilton, David T; Foster, Garth N; Ribera, I

    2017-09-01

    Quaternary glacial cycles drove major shifts in both the extent and location of the geographical ranges of many organisms. During glacial maxima, large areas of central and northern Europe were inhospitable to temperate species, and these areas are generally assumed to have been recolonized during interglacials by range expansions from Mediterranean refugia. An alternative is that this recolonization was from non-Mediterranean refugia, in central Europe or western Asia, but data on the origin of widespread central and north European species remain fragmentary, especially for insects. We studied three widely distributed lineages of freshwater beetles (the Platambus maculatus complex, the Hydraena gracilis complex, and the genus Oreodytes), all restricted to running waters and including both narrowly distributed southern endemics and widespread European species, some with distributions spanning the Palearctic. Our main goal was to determine the role of the Pleistocene glaciations in shaping the diversification and current distribution of these lineages. We sequenced four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes in populations drawn from across the ranges of these taxa, and used Bayesian probabilities and Maximum Likelihood to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships, age and geographical origin. Our results suggest that all extant species in these groups are of Pleistocene origin. In the H. gracilis complex, the widespread European H. gracilis has experienced a rapid, recent range expansion from northern Anatolia, to occupy almost the whole of Europe. However, in the other two groups widespread central and northern European taxa appear to originate from central Asia, rather than the Mediterranean. These widespread species of eastern origin typically have peripherally isolated forms in the southern Mediterranean peninsulas, which may be remnants of earlier expansion-diversification cycles or result from incipient isolation of populations during the most recent Holocene

  20. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  1. Time Irreversibility from Time Series for Analyzing Oil-in-Water Flow Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We first experimentally collect conductance fluctuation signals of oil-in-water two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. Then we detect the flow pattern asymmetry character from the collected signals with multidimensional time irreversibility and multiscale time irreversibility index. Moreover, we propose a novel criterion, that is, AMSI (average of multiscale time irreversibility, to quantitatively investigate the oil-in-water two-phase flow pattern dynamics. The results show that AMSI is sensitive to the flow pattern evolution that can be used to predict the flow pattern transition and bubble coalescence.

  2. Application of enzyme multibiosensor for toxicity analysis of real water samples of different origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldatkin A. P.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The analysis of toxicity of different water samples with the multibiosensor developed earlier. Methods. The potentiometric multibiosensor with several immobilized enzymes as bioselective elements and the matrix of pH-sensitive field effect transistors as transducers of the biochemical signal into the electric one was applied for the analysis. Results. The bioselective elements of the multibiosensor were developed using acetylcholinesterase, butyryl- cholinesterase, urease, glucose oxidase, and three-enzyme system (invertase, mutarotase, glucose oxidase. The measurement of toxic compounds in water samples of different origin was performed using the constructed sensor. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by the conventional methods of toxic agent’s analysis (atomic absorption spectrometry, thin-film chroma- tography, and atomic absorbic analyser of mercury. Conclusion. A strong conformity between the results obtained with the multibiosensor and traditional methods has been shown.

  3. Communication: On the origin of the non-Arrhenius behavior in water reorientation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnemann, Guillaume; Laage, Damien

    2012-07-21

    We combine molecular dynamics simulations and analytic modeling to determine the origin of the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of liquid water's reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics between 235 K and 350 K. We present a quantitative model connecting hydrogen-bond exchange dynamics to local structural fluctuations, measured by the asphericity of Voronoi cells associated with each water molecule. For a fixed local structure the regular Arrhenius behavior is recovered, and the global anomalous temperature dependence is demonstrated to essentially result from a continuous shift in the unimodal structure distribution upon cooling. The non-Arrhenius behavior can thus be explained without invoking an equilibrium between distinct structures. In addition, the large width of the homogeneous structural distribution is shown to cause a growing dynamical heterogeneity and a non-exponential relaxation at low temperature.

  4. Synthesis of niobium pentoxide nanoparticles in single-flow supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Teruaki; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-10-01

    The development of a new synthesis method is still required for very fine oxide nanoparticles. In this study, a single-flow supercritical fluid system has been developed for the synthesis of highly crystalline nanosized oxide particles. Niobium oxide particles were synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment, batch-type supercritical water treatment and subcritical water treatment. Niobium pentoxide nanoparticles synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment at 673 K, 24.5 MPa, and 15 ml min-1 flow rate had a pseudohexagonal structure. The morphology of the nanoparticle was a rod, and it has a smaller particle size and larger crystallite size than those of the oxide particles synthesized by the other methods, because the particle growth and the decomposition of surfactant were rapidly suppressed in the single-flow supercritical water treatment. The nanosized niobium pentoxide is useful as a catalyst in harsh environments and as a precursor powder of lead-free piezoelectric materials.

  5. A water balance model to estimate flow through the Old and Middle River corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Stephen W.; Gross, Edward S.; Hutton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    We applied a water balance model to predict tidally averaged (subtidal) flows through the Old River and Middle River corridor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. We reviewed the dynamics that govern subtidal flows and water levels and adopted a simplified representation. In this water balance approach, we estimated ungaged flows as linear functions of known (or specified) flows. We assumed that subtidal storage within the control volume varies because of fortnightly variation in subtidal water level, Delta inflow, and barometric pressure. The water balance model effectively predicts subtidal flows and approaches the accuracy of a 1–D Delta hydrodynamic model. We explore the potential to improve the approach by representing more complex dynamics and identify possible future improvements.

  6. THE WIND-RESPONSE OF CHIKUGO RIVER ORIGINATED WATER IN ISAHAYA BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyuan; Matsunaga, Nobuhiro

    The wind response of salinity structures in Isahaya Bay was investigated by using the data of wind and salinity measured by the Kyushu Regional Agricultural Administration Office. In Isahaya Bay, the south-southwest wind and north-northeast wind were prevailing in summer season. It is known that the fresh water discharged from Chikugo River is transported along the west coast of the inner area of Ariake Sea and reaches to the mouth of Isahaya Bay. When a large amount of fresh water is discharged from Chikugo River and the northerly wind is blowing for a long period, the strong salinity stratification appears in Isahaya Bay. It is caused by that the northerly wind accelerates the transport of the Chikugo River originated fresh water into Isahaya Bay. After that, the salinity stratification is gone with the blow of southerly wind. The data-analysis reveals that the salinity structure in Isahaya Bay depends strongly on the fresh water from the Chikugo River and the wind blowing over Ariake Sea.

  7. Development of micro-flow hydrothermal monitoring systems and their applications to the origin of life study on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Continuous extensive studies on thermophilic organisms have suggested that life emerged on hydrothermal systems on primitive Earth. Thus, it is well known that hydrothermal reactions are, therefore, very important to study fields deeply related to the origin-of-life study. Furthermore, the importance of hydrothermal and solvothermal systems is now realized in both fundamental and practical areas. Here, our recent investigations are described for the development of real-time and in situ monitoring systems for hydrothermal reactions. The systems were primarily developed for the origin-of-life study, but it was also applicable to fundamental and practical areas. The present techniques are based on the concept that a sample solution is injected to a narrow tubing flow reactor at high temperatures, where the sample is rapidly heated up in a very short time by exposure at to a high-temperature narrow tubing flow reactor with a very short time scale. This enables millisecond to second time-scale monitoring in real time and/or in situ at temperatures of up to 400°C. By using these techniques, a series of studies on the hydrothermal origin-of-life have been successfully carried out.

  8. Guide to the Revised Ground-Water Flow and Heat Transport Simulator: HYDROTHERM - Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kenneth L.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    The HYDROTHERM computer program simulates multi-phase ground-water flow and associated thermal energy transport in three dimensions. It can handle high fluid pressures, up to 1 ? 109 pascals (104 atmospheres), and high temperatures, up to 1,200 degrees Celsius. This report documents the release of Version 3, which includes various additions, modifications, and corrections that have been made to the original simulator. Primary changes to the simulator include: (1) the ability to simulate unconfined ground-water flow, (2) a precipitation-recharge boundary condition, (3) a seepage-surface boundary condition at the land surface, (4) the removal of the limitation that a specified-pressure boundary also have a specified temperature, (5) a new iterative solver for the linear equations based on a generalized minimum-residual method, (6) the ability to use time- or depth-dependent functions for permeability, (7) the conversion of the program code to Fortran 90 to employ dynamic allocation of arrays, and (8) the incorporation of a graphical user interface (GUI) for input and output. The graphical user interface has been developed for defining a simulation, running the HYDROTHERM simulator interactively, and displaying the results. The combination of the graphical user interface and the HYDROTHERM simulator forms the HYDROTHERM INTERACTIVE (HTI) program. HTI can be used for two-dimensional simulations only. New features in Version 3 of the HYDROTHERM simulator have been verified using four test problems. Three problems come from the published literature and one problem was simulated by another partially saturated flow and thermal transport simulator. The test problems include: transient partially saturated vertical infiltration, transient one-dimensional horizontal infiltration, two-dimensional steady-state drainage with a seepage surface, and two-dimensional drainage with coupled heat transport. An example application to a hypothetical stratovolcano system with unconfined

  9. Effects of anthropogenic water regulation and groundwater lateral flow on land processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yujin; Xie, Zhenghui; Yu, Yan; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Linying; Zou, Jing; Qin, Peihua; Jia, Binghao

    2016-09-01

    Both anthropogenic water regulation and groundwater lateral flow essentially affect groundwater table patterns. Their relationship is close because lateral flow recharges the groundwater depletion cone, which is induced by over-exploitation. In this study, schemes describing groundwater lateral flow and human water regulation were developed and incorporated into the Community Land Model 4.5. To investigate the effects of human water regulation and groundwater lateral flow on land processes as well as the relationship between the two processes, three simulations using the model were conducted for the years 2003-2013 over the Heihe River Basin in northwestern China. Simulations showed that groundwater lateral flow driven by changes in water heads can essentially change the groundwater table pattern with the deeper water table appearing in the hillslope regions and shallower water table appearing in valley bottom regions and plains. Over the last decade, anthropogenic groundwater exploitation deepened the water table by approximately 2 m in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin and rapidly reduced the terrestrial water storage, while irrigation increased soil moisture by approximately 0.1 m3 m-3. The water stored in the mainstream of the Heihe River was also reduced by human surface water withdrawal. The latent heat flux was increased by 30 W m-2 over the irrigated region, with an identical decrease in sensible heat flux. The simulated groundwater lateral flow was shown to effectively recharge the groundwater depletion cone caused by over-exploitation. The offset rate is higher in plains than mountainous regions.

  10. On the origin of heterogeneous structure in dense gas-solid flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The formation and evolution of flow structures in dense gas-fluidized beds with ideal collisional particles (elastic and frictionless) are investigated numerically by employing the discrete particle method, with special focus on the effect of gas¿particle interaction. It is clarified that

  11. Water Management for Competing Uses: Environmental Flows in the Transboundary Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Solis, S.; McKinney, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction Due to high water demand, the scarcity of water, and the complexity of water allocation, environmental flows have not been considered as an integral part of the water management in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo transboundary basin. The Big Bend reach is located between the cities of Presidio/Ojinaga to Amistad international reservoir, along the main stream (Fig. 1). Important environmental habitats such as the Big Bend National and State Park in the U.S., the Maderas del Carmen, Cañon de Santa Elena and Ocampo natural reserved areas in Mexico are ecologically threatened because of the lack of environmental water management policies. Several efforts have been undertaken by scientists, government agencies and NGOs to determine the environmental flows for this reach and water management policies that can provide these flows. Objective The objective of this research is to describe a water management policy that can conciliate environmental and human water uses in the Big Bend region. In other words, define a policy that can provide environmental flows without harming water supply for stakeholders or increasing flood risk, within legal and physical constraints of the system. Methodology First, the system was characterized identifying water users, hydraulic infrastructure, and water allocation according to state, federal and international regulations. Second, a hydrograph for environmental flows was proposed that mimics the hydrologic characteristics of the prior dam alteration. Third, a water planning model was constructed to evaluate alternative policies. Fourth, the water management is proposed to provide environmental restoration flows from Luis L. Leon reservoir. This policy considers mechanisms that reduce flooding and drought risks, while meting national and international water regulations. Results Three types of natural flow regimes are considered: (1) median flows aimed to provide the base flow in the region, (2) high flows to provide transversal

  12. Arroyo el Mimbral, Mexico, K/T unit: Origin as debris flow/turbidite, not a tsunami deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohor, Bruce F.; Betterton, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Coarse, spherule-bearing, elastic units have been discovered at 10 marine sites that span the K/T boundary in northeastern Mexico. We examined one of the best exposed sites in Arroyo el Mimbral, northwest of Tampico. The Mimbral outcrop displays a layered elastic unit up to 3 m thick enclosed by marly limestones of the Mendez (Latest Maastrichian) and Velasco (Earliest Danian) Formations. At its thickest point, this channelized elastic unit is comprised of 3 subunits: (1) a basal, poorly-sorted, ungraded calcareous spherule bed 1 m thick containing relict impact glass and shocked mineral grains, (2) a massive set of laminated calcite-cemented sandstones up to 2 m thick with plant debris at its base, (3) capped by a thin (up to 20 cm) set of rippled sandstone layers separated by silty mudstone drapes containing a small (921 pg/g) iridium anomaly. This tripartite elastic unit is conformably overlain by marls of the Velasco Formation. We also visited the La Lajilla site east of Ciudad Victoria; its stratigraphy is similar to Mimbral's, but its elastic beds are thinner and less extensive laterally. The Mimbral elastic unit has been interpreted previously as being deposited by a megawave or tsunami produced by an asteroid impact on nearby Yucatan (Chicxulub crater). However, a presumed 400-m paleodepth of water at the Mimbral site, channeling of the spherule subunit into the underlying Mendez Formation marls, and the overtopping of the basal, spherule-bearing subunit by the laminated sandstone subunit, all suggest a combined debris flow/turbidite origin for this elastic unit similar to that proposed for Upper Pleistocene sand/silt beds occurring elsewhere in the Gulf of Mexico. In this latter model, the sediment source region for the elastic unit is the lower continental shelf and slope escarpment. For the K/T unit at Mimbral, we propose that thick ejecta blanket deposits composed mostly of spherules were rapidly loaded onto the lower shelf and slope from an impact

  13. Study of the opportunities of analytical determination of the origin-destination flows in roundabout intersections based on data provided by fixed observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, E.; Boroiu, A. A.; Rizea, V.; Boroiu, A.

    2016-08-01

    For the purposes of the analysis of road traffic at the level of the area surrounding a roundabout intersection there are times when the flows of Origin-Destination (O-D flows) of the respective intersection are of interest - when it is not possible to improve the level of service of the intersection by means of increasing its capacity, but only by diverting some traffic flows from the respective area. Currently, the determining of these O-D flows is based on video recordings of the intersection traffic, followed by laborious and lengthy analyses of the images obtained. But a prolific way, yet not explored in specialised literature, can be the identification of the analytic relations between O-D flow volumes and the volumes of the intersection traffic flows that can be measured by fixed observers (incoming flows, outgoing flows and conflict flows). As a result, this paper presents the research conducted to identify the possible relationships between these deterministic O-D flows and the flows that can be measured by fixed observers. It was demonstrated that, when performing measuring of the flow of vehicles that turn right with fixed observers, there will be analytical deterministic relationships for the 3-armed intersection with return flows, as well as for the 4-armed intersection without return flows. This means that, for 3-armed intersections with return flows and for 4-armed intersections without return flows, it is possible to fully know the O-D flows based on the flows measured by fixed observers (compulsorily involving right-turn flows), which is an absolutely exciting and unique achievement, as knowing these Origin-Destination flows will allow better regulation of the traffic in the area where the roundabout intersection is, in order to facilitate the upstream diversion of some of O-D flows passing through the roundabout intersection.

  14. Linking water quality and quantity in environmental flow assessment in deteriorated ecosystems: a food web view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Ma, Lekuan; Guo, Wei; Yang, Ying; Guo, Tong; Feng, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Most rivers worldwide are highly regulated by anthropogenic activities through flow regulation and water pollution. Environmental flow regulation is used to reduce the effects of anthropogenic activities on aquatic ecosystems. Formulating flow alteration-ecological response relationships is a key factor in environmental flow assessment. Traditional environmental flow models are characterized by natural relationships between flow regimes and ecosystem factors. However, food webs are often altered from natural states, which disturb environmental flow assessment in such ecosystems. In ecosystems deteriorated by heavy anthropogenic activities, the effects of environmental flow regulation on species are difficult to assess with current modeling approaches. Environmental flow management compels the development of tools that link flow regimes and food webs in an ecosystem. Food web approaches are more suitable for the task because they are more adaptive for disordered multiple species in a food web deteriorated by anthropogenic activities. This paper presents a global method of environmental flow assessment in deteriorated aquatic ecosystems. Linkages between flow regimes and food web dynamics are modeled by incorporating multiple species into an ecosystem to explore ecosystem-based environmental flow management. The approach allows scientists and water resources managers to analyze environmental flows in deteriorated ecosystems in an ecosystem-based way.

  15. Study on oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao-Xuan [Division of Oilfield Surface Engineering, Petroleum Exploration and Production Research Institute, SINOPEC, 31, Xue yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2007-10-15

    The simultaneous flow of oil and water in pipelines is a common occurrence in the petroleum industry. Water fractions in the output stream increase materially during the producing life of a well and many wells exist from which economic production can still persist with water volume fractions in the liquid phase in excess of 90%. The presence of water must be properly accounted for when designing and predicting the flow behavior in both wells and pipelines. This paper is aimed at giving a brief review on the research of oil-water pipe flows in the past decade. The contents are divided into three sections: (1) flow pattern identification and its transition; (2) phase inversion modeling; (3) pressure drop prediction. It is obvious that oil-water flow patterns, phase inversion prediction and pressure drop have played a great role in the design and running of oil-water flow systems. This paper critically reviews research achievement and presents the current trend in order to offer a guide in future research of the oil-water pipe flows. (author)

  16. Continuous-flow water sampler for real-time isotopic water measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.; Dennis, K.

    2013-12-01

    Measuring the stable isotopes of liquid water (δ18O and δD) is a tool familiar to many Earth scientists, but most current techniques require discrete sampling. For example, isotope ratio mass spectrometry requires the collection of aliquots of water that are then converted to CO2, CO or H2 for analysis. Similarly, laser-based techniques, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) convert discrete samples (typically environmental conditions, which if not actively control, lead to sustainable experimental noise and drift. Consequently, our continuous-flow water sample employs active control for all pertinent parameters, significantly increasing its stability and usability. We will present data from controlled laboratory experiments demonstrating sample-to-sample precision and long-term stability. We will also show experimental data that highlights the instrumental sample-to-sample memory, which we have decreased significantly from previous implementations of this technology. Additionally, we will present field results from the Sacramento River, CA. Dansgaard, W. (1964) 'Stable isotopes in precipitation', Tellus, 16(4), p. 436-468. Munksgaard, N.C., Wurster, C.M., Bass, A., Zagorskis, I., and Bird, M.I. (2012) 'First continuous shipboard d18O and dD measurements in seawater by diffusion sampling--cavity ring-down spectrometry', Environmental Chemistry Letters, 10, p.301-307. Munksgaard, N.C., Wurster, C.M., and Bird, M.I., (2011), 'Continuous analysis of δ18O and δD values of water by diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry: a novel sampling device for unattended field monitoring of precipitation, ground and surface waters', Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 25, p. 3706-3712.

  17. The influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, Bernd; Širok, Brane; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    A study of the influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness was performed. A cavitation tunnel with a single hydrofoil was used for the experiments. While the cavitation number andthe mean flow velocity remained constant throughout the tests, the gas content of the water was changed in steps from low (approximately 1%) to high (4 %). The gas content of the water was adjusted with a bubble generator. In addition tests at a constant cavitation...

  18. Assessment of three turbulence model performances in predicting water jet flow plunging into a liquid pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zidouni Kendil Faiza; Bousbia Salah Anis; Mataoui Amina

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of the current study is to numerically investigate, through computational fluid dynamics modeling, a water jet injected vertically downward through a straight circular pipe into a water bath. The study also aims to obtain a better understanding of jet behavior, air entrainment and the dispersion of bubbles in the developing flow region. For these purposes, three dimensional air and water flows were modeled using the volume of fluid technique. The equations in question were fo...

  19. Multiscale simulation of water flow past a C540 fullerene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Praprotnik, Matej; Kotsalis, Evangelos M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel, three-dimensional, multiscale algorithm for simulations of water flow past a fullerene. We employ the Schwarz alternating overlapping domain method to couple molecular dynamics (MD) of liquid water around the C540 buckyball with a Lattice–Boltzmann (LB) description for the Nav...... algorithms. We use this method to determine the slip length and hydrodynamic radius for water flow past a buckyball....

  20. Effect of Flow Rate of Side-Type Orifice Intake on Withdrawn Water Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Xueping Gao; Guangning Li; Yunpeng Han

    2014-01-01

    Side-type orifice intake is a type of selective withdrawal facility used in managing reservoirs to mitigate the negative effects of low-temperature water. Based on the temperature data of a thermal stratified reservoir in China, an experiment was conducted in flume to study the influence of intake flow rate on withdrawn water temperature with different temperature distributions. Results indicated that withdrawn water temperature changed with different flow rates. The temperature change was de...

  1. Study on an Undershot Cross-Flow Water Turbine with Straight Blades

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuyuki Nishi; Terumi Inagaki; Yanrong Li; Kentaro Hatano

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale hydroelectric power generation has recently attracted considerable attention. The authors previously proposed an undershot cross-flow water turbine with a very low head suitable for application to open channels. The water turbine was of a cross-flow type and could be used in open channels with the undershot method, remarkably simplifying its design by eliminating guide vanes and the casing. The water turbine was fitted with curved blades (such as the runners of a typical cross-flo...

  2. Conceptual model for the origin of the Olympus Mons cliffs, Mars: An essential influence of water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio

    2012-08-01

    With a height of 21 km above the mean Martian altitude and a diameter of 600 km, the Olympus Mons of Mars is the highest and one of the largest volcanoes in the Solar System. It is a distinctive shield volcano, formed by stacked sequences of low-viscosity magma. Whereas the central part of the Olympus Mons exhibits slope angles of less than 1-5°, the periphery of the edifice terminates with steep cliffs sloping 12-15° up to 28°. Another remarkable feature is the aureole, a chain of crown-like deposits surrounding the edifice of Olympus Mons from an average distance of 400 km. The aureole deposits, which lack any obvious analogue on the Earth, have been variously interpreted as volcanic products, pyroclastic or ash flows, slow deep-seated deformation, or catastrophic landslides. Numerical simulations and a comparative study of similar volcanic structures on Earth suggest that a volcanic edifice with the characteristics of Olympus Mons cannot be formed without the presence of water at the base. Because of the low cooling rate of lava in sub-aerial conditions, the superposition of purely subaerial lava flows would contribute with gentle slope to the topography. In contrast, the presence of a medium like water increases the convective heat exchange rate by nearly three orders of magnitude, thus stopping the lava flow and causing a slope increase at the borders of the edifice, which subsequently collapses. A model for the evolution of the Olympus Mons is consequently suggested in analogy with the Canary and the Hawaii island on Earth.

  3. Experimental study on improvement effect of guide wall to water flow in bend of spillway chute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Diao, Yanfang; Zhai, Xingtao; Li, Shuning

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve water flow in a bend of a spillway chute using a guide wall, modeling experiments with or without a guide wall under conditions of three different bend axial radii, three chute bottom slopes and three flow rates were carried out in this study. Two indexes were calculated, which are the improved water surface uniformity and the reduced rate of water surface difference in concave and convex banks of the cross-section. The results show that: (1) setting a guide wall in a bend can improve water flow in the bend because it increased the water surface uniformity of the cross-section and reduced the water surface difference in the concave and convex banks; (2) the smaller the bend axial radius, the better the water surface improvement effect will be using a guide wall; (3) the steeper the bottom slope, the more cross-sections with less water surface difference; and (4) flow rates have a great influence on water surface improvement in the bend, and the guide wall can improve water flow obviously when the water depth in the starting section of the bend is lower than the height of the guide wall. This study has important implications in engineering design of guide walls.

  4. Genetic structure and natal origins of immature hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata in Brazilian waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira C Proietti

    Full Text Available Understanding the connections between sea turtle populations is fundamental for their effective conservation. Brazil hosts important hawksbill feeding areas, but few studies have focused on how they connect with nesting populations in the Atlantic. Here, we (1 characterized mitochondrial DNA control region haplotypes of immature hawksbills feeding along the coast of Brazil (five areas ranging from equatorial to temperate latitudes, 157 skin samples, (2 analyzed genetic structure among Atlantic hawksbill feeding populations, and (3 inferred natal origins of hawksbills in Brazilian waters using genetic, oceanographic, and population size information. We report ten haplotypes for the sampled Brazilian sites, most of which were previously observed at other Atlantic feeding grounds and rookeries. Genetic profiles of Brazilian feeding areas were significantly different from those in other regions (Caribbean and Africa, and a significant structure was observed between Brazilian feeding grounds grouped into areas influenced by the South Equatorial/North Brazil Current and those influenced by the Brazil Current. Our genetic analysis estimates that the studied Brazilian feeding aggregations are mostly composed of animals originating from the domestic rookeries Bahia and Pipa, but some contributions from African and Caribbean rookeries were also observed. Oceanographic data corroborated the local origins, but showed higher connection with West Africa and none with the Caribbean. High correlation was observed between origins estimated through genetics/rookery size and oceanographic/rookery size data, demonstrating that ocean currents and population sizes influence haplotype distribution of Brazil's hawksbill populations. The information presented here highlights the importance of national conservation strategies and international cooperation for the recovery of endangered hawksbill turtle populations.

  5. Importance of vegetation, topography and flow paths for water transit times of base flow in alpine headwater catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mueller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mean transit time (MTT of water in a catchment gives information about storage, flow paths, sources of water and thus also about retention and release of solutes in a catchment. To our knowledge there are only a few catchment studies on the influence of vegetation cover changes on base flow MTTs. The main changes in vegetation cover in the Swiss Alps are massive shrub encroachment and forest expansion into formerly open habitats. Four small and relatively steep headwater catchments in the Swiss Alps (Ursern Valley were investigated to relate different vegetation cover to water transit times. Time series of water stable isotopes were used to calculate MTTs. The high temporal variation of the stable isotope signals in precipitation was strongly dampened in stream base flow samples. MTTs of the four catchments were 70 to 102 weeks. The strong dampening of the stable isotope input signal as well as stream water geochemistry points to deeper flow paths and mixing of waters of different ages at the catchments' outlets. MTTs were neither related to topographic indices nor vegetation cover. The major part of the quickly infiltrating precipitation likely percolates through fractured and partially karstified deeper rock zones, which increases the control of bedrock flow paths on MTT. Snow accumulation and the timing of its melt play an important role for stable isotope dynamics during spring and early summer. We conclude that, in mountainous headwater catchments with relatively shallow soil layers, the hydrogeological and geochemical patterns (i.e. geochemistry, porosity and hydraulic conductivity of rocks and snow dynamics influence storage, mixing and release of water in a stronger way than vegetation cover or topography do.

  6. Rerouting of subglacial water flow between neighboring glaciers in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Winnie; Creyts, Timothy T.; Bell, Robin E.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the Greenland ice sheet's subglacial hydrological system show that the connectivity of different regions of the system influences how the glacier velocity responds to variations in surface melting. Here we examine whether subglacial water flow paths can be rerouted beneath three outlet glaciers in the ablation zone of western Greenland. We use Lamont-Doherty and Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of University of Kansas (CReSIS) ice-penetrating radar data to create a new ice thickness map. We then use a simple subglacial water flow model to examine whether flow paths can be rerouted and identify the topographic conditions that are sensitive to subglacial rerouting. By varying water pressures within an observationally constrained range, we show that moderate changes in pressure can cause flow paths to reroute and exchange water from one subglacial catchment to another. Flow across subglacial overdeepenings is particularly sensitive to rerouting. These areas have low hydraulic gradients driving flow, so subtle water pressure variations have a strong influence on water flow direction. Based on correlations between water flow paths and ice velocity changes, we infer that water piracy between neighboring catchments can result in a different spatial pattern of hydrologically induced ice velocity speedup depending on the amount and timing of surface melt. The potential for subglacial water to reroute across different catchments suggests that multiple hydrographs from neighboring glaciers are likely necessary to accurately ascertain melt budgets from proglacial point measurements. The relationship between surface runoff, ice dynamics, and proglacial discharge can be altered by rerouting of subglacial water flow within and across outlet glaciers.

  7. Occurrence and Forms of Water and Ice on the Earth and Beyond, and the Origin(s) of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The natural history of the biogenic elements (H,C,O,N) from their first association within cold molecular clouds to their delivery to the Earth during the late bombardment of the inner solar system, is intimately linked to water ice. The earliest organic compounds are formed in cold interstellar molecular clouds as a result of UV and thermal processing of sub-micrometer ice grains which contain trapped carbon and nitrogen molecules. Structural changes in the water ice host underlie and fundamentally control important macroscopic phenomena such as the outgassing of volatiles, the rates of chemical reactions, and processing and retention of organic compounds. Prebiotic organic material was in all likelihood delivered the early Earth in a pristine state as a consequence of its sequestration within a protective water ice host.

  8. The Molecular Origin of Turbulence in a Flowing Gas According to James Clerk Maxwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graffenried, Albert

    2007-11-01

    James Clerk Maxwell was an eminent physicist who operated out of the University of Edinburgh in the early 1800's. He is internationally famous for his derivation of the laws governing the propagation of electro-magnetic waves. He also derived an equation for the Viscosity of a gas (μ) in terms of its molecular parameters. This derivation established clearly and unequivocably that a real (viscous) flowing gas was a molecular fluid, that is, a flow of molecules which obeys the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Maxwell's derivation of the Viscosity of a gas takes place in a zone of a flowing gas which (1) is remote from any solid surface, and (2) is in a region having a linear velocity-gradient dvx/dy . The derivation which I will present today takes place in a zone of the flowing gas which is (1) immediately adjacent a solid surface, and (2) where the velocity gradient is unknown. My analytical approach, the parameters I use, and the theoretical concepts are all taken from Maxwell's derivation. I have simply re-arranged some of his equations in order to solve the 1-dimensional case of boundary-layer growth over an infinite flat plate, starting with a step-function of flow velocity, namely: vx(y,t) for the initial condition vx(y=0+,t=0+) = U0 ,viz: rectilinear flow as an initial condition. Using Maxwell's approach, we write the equation for Net Stream-Momentum Flux flowing through an element of area, day . This quantity is shown to be the difference between two Convolution integrals which Laplace transform readily into an equation in the s-plane which equation has the same form as a positive-feedback, single closed-loop amplifier gain equation, viz: Output = (input)x(transfer function). The solution in the Real plane shows vx(y,t) equal to the sum of two exponentials. The coefficients of the two exponents, r1 and r2 . are found by using the binomial equation which contains a square-root radical. If the argument under the radical (the radicand) is positive, the two roots are

  9. On the origin of the streak spacing in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the ideas of selective amplification and direct resonance, based on linear theory, can not provide an explanation for the well-defined streak spacing of about 100 wall units (referred to as 100(+) hereafter) in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows. In addition, for the direct resonance theory, the streaks are created by the non-linear self-interaction of the vertical velocity rather than of the directly forced vertical vorticity. In view of the failure of these approaches, it is then proposed that the selection mechanism must be inherently non-linear and correspond to a self-sustaining mechanism. The 100(+) value should thus be considered as a critical Reynolds number for that mechanism. Indeed, in the case of Poiseuille flow, this 100(+) criterion for transition to turbulence corresponds to the usually quoted value of 1000 based on the half-width and the centerline velocity. In Couette flow, it corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of about 400 based on the half width and half velocity difference.

  10. FINE MAGNETIC STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF COUNTER-STREAMING MASS FLOWS IN A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China); Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, P. F. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Su, Jiangtao, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-11-20

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  11. Heat flow and ground water flow in the Great Plains of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosnold, William D.

    1985-12-01

    Regional groundwater flow in deep aquifers adds advective components to the surface heat flow over extensive areas within the Great Plains province. The regional groundwater flow is driven by topographically controlled piezometric surfaces for confined aquifers that recharge either at high elevations on the western edge of the province or from subcrop contacts. The aquifers discharge at lower elevations to the east. The assymetrical geometry for the Denver and Kennedy Basins is such that the surface areas of aquifer recharge are small compared to the areas of discharge. Consequently, positive advective heat flow occurs over most of the province. The advective component of heat flow in the Denver Basin is on the order of 15 mW m -2 along a zone about 50 km wide that parallels the structure contours of the Dakota aquifer on the eastern margin of the Basin. The advective component of heat flow in the Kennedy Basin is on the order of 20 mW m -2 and occurs over an extensive area that coincides with the discharge areas of the Madison (Mississippian) and Dakota (Cretaceous) aquifers. Groundwater flow in Paleozoic and Mesozoic aquifers in the Williston Basin causes thermal anomalies that are seen in geothermal gradient data and in oil well temperature data. The pervasive nature of advective heat flow components in the Great Plains tends to mask the heat flow structure of the crust, and only heat flow data from holes drilled into the crystalline basement can be used for tectonic heat flow studies.

  12. A fully coupled depth-integrated model for surface water and groundwater flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyi; Yuan, Dekui; Lin, Binliang; Teo, Fang-Yenn

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the development of a fully coupled surface water and groundwater flow model. The governing equations of the model are derived based on a control volume approach, with the velocity profiles of the two types of flows being both taken into consideration. The surface water and groundwater flows are both modelled based on the unified equations and the water exchange and interaction between the two types of flows can be taken into account. The model can be used to simulate the surface water and groundwater flows simultaneously with the same numerical scheme without other effort being needed to link them. The model is not only suitable for the porous medium consisting of fine sediments, but also for coarse sediments and crushed rocks by adding a quadratic friction term. Benchmark tests are conducted to validate the model. The model predictions agree well with the data.

  13. Influence of cold-water immersion on limb blood flow after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Chris; Jones, Helen; Low, David A; Green, Daniel J; Howatson, Glyn; Gregson, Warren

    2017-06-01

    This study determined the influence of cold (8°C) and cool (22°C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow following resistance exercise. Twelve males completed 4 sets of 10-repetition maximum squat exercise and were then immersed, semi-reclined, into 8°C or 22°C water for 10-min, or rested in a seated position (control) in a randomized order on different days. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, muscle temperature, thigh and calf skin blood flow and superficial femoral artery blood flow were measured before and after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure). The colder water reduced thigh skin temperature and deep muscle temperature to the greatest extent (P cold and cool water similarly reduce femoral artery and cutaneous blood flow responses but not muscle temperature following resistance exercise.

  14. Influence of aeration and initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-ru WEI; Jun DENG; Bin LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the development of ski-jump energy dissipation for high and large discharge among the hydraulic projects,the effects of characteristics of water flow on energy dissipation are increasingly important.In the present study,the effects of aeration and the initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flow were analyzed,using variance analysis and numerical calculated methods.From the analysis of test data,both of the air concentration and initial water thickness are sensitive factors for the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow along the axial way,and there is no significant interaction effect between the aeration and initial water thickness.Aeration has a more significant effect on the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow.Decreasing the initial water thickness of jet flow can reduce the length of jet core,and make the initial position of axial velocity attenuation closer to the nozzle exit.The numerical calculation results show that aeration can contribute to the enhancement of entrainment ability of jet flow,which may improve the interaction between jet flow and surroundings.For ski-jump energy dissipation among the hydraulic projects,combining aeration with decreasing initial water thickness of jet flow is an effective way to enhance the rate of axial velocity attenuation.

  15. Quantifying water flow and retention in an unsaturated fracture-facial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologically significant flow and storage of water occur in macropores and fractures that are only partially filled. To accommodate such processes in flow models, we propose a three-domain framework. Two of the domains correspond to water flow and water storage in a fracture-facial region, in addition to the third domain of matrix water. The fracture-facial region, typically within a fraction of a millimeter of the fracture wall, includes a flowing phase whose fullness is determined by the availability and flux of preferentially flowing water, and a static storage portion whose fullness is determined by the local matric potential. The flow domain can be modeled with the source-responsive preferential flow model, and the roughness-storage domain can be modeled with capillary relations applied on the fracture-facial area. The matrix domain is treated using traditional unsaturated flow theory. We tested the model with application to the hydrology of the Chalk formation in southern England, coherently linking hydrologic information including recharge estimates, streamflow, water table fluctuation, imaging by electron microscopy, and surface roughness. The quantitative consistency of the three-domain matrix-microcavity-film model with this body of diverse data supports the hypothesized distinctions and active mechanisms of the three domains and establishes the usefulness of this framework.

  16. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Tucci

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

  17. Experimental study of two-phase water flow in vertical thin rectangular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher T.; O'Brien, James E.; Anderson, Elgin A.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental heat transfer study of two-phase water flow in vertical thin rectangular channels with side vents is conducted. A multiple, heated channel configuration with up- and down-flow conditions is investigated. Parallel heated and unheated flow channels test the effects of cross flow on the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and critical heat flux (CHF). The test apparatus provides pressure and substrate temperature data and visual data of the boiling regimes and side-vent flow patterns. The objectives are to determine the two-phase, heat and mass transfer characteristics between adjacent channels as permitted by side-vent cross flow. These data will help develop ONB and CHF correlations for flow geometries typical of plate-type nuclear reactors and heat exchangers. Fundamentally, the data shows how the geometry, flow conditions, and channel configurations affect the heat transfer characteristics of interior channel flows, essential in understanding the ONB and CHF phenomena.

  18. Ground-water flow and quality in Wisconsin's shallow aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The areal concentration distribution of commonmineral constituents and properties of ground water in Wisconsin's shallow aquifer system are described in this report. Maps depicting the water quality and the altitude of the water table are included. The shallow aquifer system in Wisconsin, composed of unconsolidated sand and gravel and shallow bedrock, is the source of most potable ground-water supplies in the State. Most ground water in the shallow aquifer system moves in local flow systems, but it interacts with regional flow systems in some areas.

  19. Statistical equilibria of the coupled barotropic flow and shallow water flow on a rotating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xueru

    The motivation of this research is to build equilibrium statistical models that can apply to explain two enigmatic phenomena in the atmospheres of the solar system's planets: (1) the super-rotation of the atmospheres of slowly-rotating terrestrial planets---namely Venus and Titan, and (2) the persistent anticyclonic large vortex storms on the gas giants, such as the Great Red Spot (GRS) on Jupiter. My thesis is composed of two main parts: the first part focuses on the statistical equilibrium of the coupled barotropic vorticity flow (non-divergent) on a rotating sphere; the other one has to do with the divergent shallow water flow rotating sphere system. The statistical equilibria of these two systems are simulated in a wide range of parameter space by Monte Carlo methods based on recent energy-relative enstrophy theory and extended energy-relative enstrophy theory. These kind of models remove the low temperatures defect in the old classical doubly canonical energy-enstrophy theory which cannot support any phase transitions. The other big difference of our research from previous work is that we work on the coupled fluid-sphere system, which consists of a rotating high density rigid sphere, enveloped by a thin shell of fluid. The sphere is considered to have infinite mass and angular momentum; therefore, it can serve as a reservoir of angular momentum. Unlike the fluid sphere system itself, the coupled fluid sphere system allows for the exchange of angular momentum between the atmosphere and the solid planet. This exchange is the key point in any model that is expected to capture coherent structures such as the super-rotation and GRS-like vortices problems in planetary atmospheres. We discovered that slowly-rotating planets can have super-rotation at high energy state. All known slowly-rotating cases in the solar system---Venus and Titan---have super-rotation. Moreover, we showed that the anticyclonicity in the GRS-like structures is closely associated with the

  20. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  1. The shallow water equations as a hybrid flow model for the numerical and experimental analysis of hydro power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermann, Lars; Seidel, Christian [AG Regenerative Energien, Institut für Statik, TU Braunschweig, Beethovenstrasse 51, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-03-10

    The numerical analysis of hydro power stations is an important method of the hydraulic design and is used for the development and optimisation of hydro power stations in addition to the experiments with the physical submodel of a full model in the hydraulic laboratory. For the numerical analysis, 2D and 3D models are appropriate and commonly used.The 2D models refer mainly to the shallow water equations (SWE), since for this flow model a large experience on a wide field of applications for the flow analysis of numerous problems in hydraulic engineering already exists. Often, the flow model is verified by in situ measurements. In order to consider 3D flow phenomena close to singularities like weirs, hydro power stations etc. the development of a hybrid fluid model is advantageous to improve the quality and significance of the global model. Here, an extended hybrid flow model based on the principle of the SWE is presented. The hybrid flow model directly links the numerical model with the experimental data, which may originate from physical full models, physical submodels and in-situ measurements. Hence a wide field of application of the hybrid model emerges including the improvement of numerical models and the strong coupling of numerical and experimental analysis.

  2. The effects of water flow and temperature on thermal regime around a culvert built on permafrost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loriane Prier; Guy Dor; CR Burn

    2014-01-01

    Temperature and water flow through a culvert beneath the Alaska Highway near Beaver Creek, Yukon, were measured at hourly intervals between June and October 2013. These data were used to simulate the effect of the culvert on the thermal regime of the road embankment and subjacent permafrost. A 2-D thermal model of the embankment and permafrost was developed with TEMP/W and calibrated using field observations. Empirical relations were obtained between water tem-peratures at the entrance to the culvert, flow into the culvert, and water temperatures inside the structure. Water temper-atures at the entrance and inside the culvert had a linear relation, while water temperatures inside the culvert and water flow were associated by a logarithmic relation. A multiple linear regression was used to summarize these relations. From this relationship, changes in the flow rate and water temperatures at the entrance of the culvert were simulated to obtain pre-dicted water temperatures in the culvert. The temperatures in the culvert were used in the thermal model to determine their effects on the ground thermal regime near the culvert. Variation of ±10%in water flow rate had no impact on the thermal regime underneath the culvert. Variation of water temperature at the entrance of the culvert had a noticeable influence on the thermal regime. A final simulation was conducted without insulation beneath the culvert. The thaw depth was 30 cm with insulation, and 120 cm without insulation, illustrating the importance of insulation to the ground thermal regime.

  3. Advances of modeling water flow in variably saturated soils with SWAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.; Groenendijk, P.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Kroes, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP) model simulates transport of water, solutes, and heat in the vadose zone in interaction with vegetation development. Special features of the model are generic crop growth, versatile top boundary conditions, macroporous flow, and interaction of soil water with g

  4. Advances of modeling water flow in variably saturated soils with SWAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.; Groenendijk, P.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Kroes, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP) model simulates transport of water, solutes, and heat in the vadose zone in interaction with vegetation development. Special features of the model are generic crop growth, versatile top boundary conditions, macroporous flow, and interaction of soil water with

  5. Human well-being values of environmental flows enhancing social equity in integrated water resources management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation discusses how the importance of river flow-sustained ecosystems for local communities can be quantified for the purpose of balancing water supply and demand in Integrated Water Resources Management. Due to the development of water resources, for example through the construction of

  6. Porous flow of liquid water in Enceladus rock core driven by heterogeneous tidal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, Gael; Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Cadek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    Surface heat flux estimates in excess of 15 GW (e.g. Howett et al., 2016) raise the question of the origin of Enceladus' heat production. While strong heating by tidal dissipation is probably the only viable source, whether the maximum production occurs in the outer ice shell or, deeper, in the ocean or in the rock core, is however unclear. While the analysis of measurements by the Cassini mission (gravity and topography data, observed libration), seems to favor an extremely thin shell at Enceladus South Pole (a few kms only, cf. Thomas et al., 2016, Cadek et al., 2016), the distribution of heat sources remains a major issue in the light of the evolutionary trend that led to this present-day physical state of the moon.Here, we build up on a recent evaluation of tidal deformation in a porous rock core saturated with liquid water indicating that, owing to its unconsolidated state, plausible core rheologies could lead to significant heat production there (typically 20 GW, Tobie et al., in prep.). We describe porous flow in a 3D spherical model following the work of Travis and Schubert (2015). Compaction of the rock matrix is neglected. Water characteristics (density and viscosity), and the bulk thermal conductivity of the porous core are temperature-dependent and the effect of non-water compounds can be considered. Tidal heating is introduced as a heterogeneous heat source with a pattern inferred from numerical models of the tidal response. Our analysis focuses particularly on the heat flux pattern at the ocean/core interface where water is advected in/out of the porous medium.

  7. Geohydrology, simulation of ground-water flow, and ground-water quality at two landfills, Marion County, Indiana. Water Resources Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duwelius, R.F.; Greeman, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    The report presents the results of a study to provide a quantitative evaluation of the ground-water flow system at the Julietta and Tibbs-Banta landfills and provide a general description of the ground-water quality beneath and near the two landfills. These objectives provide the information necessary to evaluate the effects of the landfills on ground-water quality. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected in 1985 and 1986 at the Julietta and Tibbs-Banta landfills to fulfill the study objectives. Ground-water models were used to investigate the flow systems and estimate the volume of flow at the landfills. The report includes descriptions of the data collection, geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the two landfills, and brief histories of trash and sludge disposal. Ground-water-flow models are described and estimates of the volume of flow are discussed. A description of the quality-assurance plan used in conjunction with the water-quality data collection and analysis is included. Water-quality data are presented with statistical summaries of ground-water quality related to well depth and position in the flow system.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CAVITATION EFFECTS ON FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF SMALL ORIFICES AND VALVES IN WATER HYDRAULICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The flow characteristics and cavitation effects of water passing through small sharp-edged cylindrical orificesand valves of different shapes in water hydraulics are investigated. The test results using orifices with different aspect ra-tios and different diameters show that the flow coefficients in the case of non-cavitating flow are larger than that of row inthe case of cavitation occurrence. The flow coefficients of flow with cavitation initially decrease as Reynolds number in-creases and ultimately tend to be of constant values close to contraction coefficient. Large aspect ratio has an effect ofsuppressing cavitation. The experimental results about disc valves illustrate that the valves with sharp edge at large open-ing are less affected by cavitation than that at small opening. Throttle with triangle notch has better anti-cavitation abilitythan that with square notch. The flowrate of the throttle with square notch is significantly affected by the flow direction orthe flow passage shape.

  9. Numerical simulation of air-water two-phase flow over stepped spillways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Xiangju; CHEN; Yongcan

    2006-01-01

    Stepped spillways for significant energy dissipation along the chute have gained interest and popularity among researchers and dam engineers. Due to the complexity of air-water two-phase flow over stepped spillways, the finite volume computational fluid dynamics module of the FLUENT software was used to simulate the main characteristics of the flow. Adopting the RNG k-ε turbulence model, the mixture flow model for air-water two-phase flow was used to simulate the flow field over stepped spillway with the PISO arithmetic technique. The numerical result successfully reproduced the complex flow over a stepped spillway of an experiment case, including the interaction between entrained air bubbles and cavity recirculation in the skimming flow regime, velocity distribution and the pressure profiles on the step surface as well. The result is helpful for understanding the detailed information about energy dissipation over stepped spillways.

  10. Fire flow water consumption in sprinklered and unsprinklered buildings an assessment of community impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Code Consultants, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Fire Flow Water Consumption in Sprinklered and Unsprinklered Buildings offers a detailed analysis for calculating the fire water demand required in buildings with existing and non-existant sprinkler systems. The installation of automatic sprinkler systems can significantly reduce the amount of water needed during a fire, but it requires water for commissioning, inspection, testing, and maintenance (CITM). This book provides an estimate of fire water used under both fire conditions, including CITM, to allow communities to develop fire water fees for both sprinklered and unsprinklered buildings that are proportional to the anticipated fire water usage. The types of buildings analyzed include residential (family dwellings as well as those up to four stories in height), business, assembly, institutional, mercantile, and storage facilities. Water volume was studied using guidelines from the International Code Council, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Insurance Services Office. Fire Flow Water Cons...

  11. A simple flow-concentration modelling method for integrating water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-07-03

    Jul 3, 2003 ... a useful screening tool for identifying sites where, without reduction of pollution, the water ... or “Q-C” modelling method) developed to inter-relate water quality ..... Pretoria. 7/1-7/33. MALAN HL and DAY JA (2002a) Development of Numerical ... (1996) Trends in New Zealand's national river water quality.

  12. Flow cytometry total cell counts: a field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E.J.; Verberk, J.Q.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    e objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-ye

  13. Flow cytometry total cell counts: a field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E.J.; Verberk, J.Q.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    e objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A

  14. High-Resolution Numerical Model for Shallow Water Flows and Pollutant Diffusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王嘉松; 何友声

    2002-01-01

    A finite-volume high-resolution numerical model for coupling the shallow water flows and pollutant diffusions was presented based on using a hybrid TVD scheme in space discretization and a Runge-Kutta method in time discretization. Numerical simulations for modelling dam- break, enlarging open channel flow and pollutant dispersion were implemented and compared with experimental data or other published computations. The validation of this method shows that it can not only deal with the problem involving discontinuities and unsteady flows, but also solve the general shallow water flows and pollutant diffusions.

  15. Lamella formation and emigration from the water by a laboratory colony of Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY in flow-through system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. A. Dannemann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamella formation and emigration from the water were investigated in juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata reared at two temperatures in aquaria with a constant water flow. Most snails (97.4% reared at the lower temperature (21- C formed lamella at the shell aperture and emigrated from the water, whereas only 10.1% did so at 25- C. Eighty percent of emigrations at 21- C occurred within a period of 15 days, 70-85 days after hatching. A comparison of the studies done so far indicates that the phenomenon may be affected by the ageing of snail colonies kept in the laboratory and their geographic origin, rather than the rearing conditions. This hypothesis, however, requires experimental confirmation.

  16. Energy loss as the origin of an universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Carlota; Pajares, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for $p_{T}$ less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher $p_{T}$, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics.

  17. Energy loss as the origin of a universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Carlota; Pajares, Carlos [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Braun, Mikhail [Saint Petersburg State University, Department of High-Energy Physics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for p{sub T} less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher p{sub T}, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics. (orig.)

  18. Ground water flow in a desert basin: challenges of simulating transport of dissolved chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Charles B; Neville, Christopher J

    2003-01-01

    A large chromium plume that evolved from chromium releases in a valley near the Mojave River was studied to understand the processes controlling fate and migration of chromium in ground water and used as a tracer to study the dynamics of a basin and range ground water system. The valley that was studied is naturally arid with high evapotranspiration such that essentially no precipitation infiltrates to the water table. The dominant natural hydrogeologic processes are recharge to the ground water system from the Mojave River during the infrequent episodes when there is flow in the river, and ground water flow toward a playa lake where the ground water evaporates. Agricultural pumping in the valley from the mid-1930s to the 1970s significantly altered ground water flow conditions by decreasing water levels in the valley by more than 20 m. This pumping declined significantly as a result of dewatering of the aquifer, and water levels have since recovered modestly. The ground water system was modeled using MODFLOW, and chromium transport was simulated using MT3D. Several innovative modifications were made to these modeling programs to simulate important processes in this ground water system. Modifications to MODFLOW include developing a new well package that estimates pumping rates from irrigation wells at each time step based on available drawdown. MT3D was modified to account for mass trapped above the water table when the water table declines beneath nonirrigated areas and to redistribute mass to the system when water levels rise.

  19. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  20. Study on Flow Field Characteristics of Nozzle Water Jet in Hydraulic cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-tao; Deng, Xiao-yu

    2017-08-01

    Based on the theory of hydrodynamics, a mathematical model of nozzle water jet flow field in hydraulic cutting is established. By numerical simulation, the effects of nozzle convergence angle, nozzle outlet diameter and cylindrical section length on water jet flow impact is obtained, and the influence of three factors on the nozzle water jet flow field is analyzed. The optimal nozzle parameters are obtained by simulation as follows: convergence angle is 13 °, cylindrical section length is 8 mm and nozzle outlet diameter is 2 mm. Under this optimal nozzle parameters, hydraulic cutting has the best comprehensive effect.

  1. Computing equations of water hammer in pseudo-homogeneous solid-liquid flow and their verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文亮; 董曾南; 柴宏恩; 韩军

    2000-01-01

    In engineering practice, single-phase water hammer models are still employed to analyze the water hammer of solid-liquid flow. According to the characteristics of solid-liquid flow, continuity equations and momentum equations of pseudo-homogeneous flows are deduced, and a pseudo-homogeneous water hammer model is thus built and verified with experiment results. The characteristics of solid-liquid flow’s viscosity, resistance and wave velocity are considered in the model. Therefore, it has higher precision than a single-phase model.

  2. A Computer Program to Calculate the Supersonic Flow over a Solid Cone in Air or Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    ix air or water. The rain objective is to calculate the ccne semi-vertei angle given prescribed initial ccndi- tions. The program is written in...tc the motion of the metal jet frcm an explczive shaped-charge fired underwater. A tiical result for supersonic flow over a ccne in water is as follcws...the ccne semi-vertex angle is calculated to be 7.23 degrees. Gene rally, pressures invclved in water flow are much larger than for air flow, and the

  3. Quantifying green water flows for improved Integrated Land and Water Resource Management under the National Water Act of South Africa: A review on hydrological research in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmain, C.; Everson, C. S.; Gush, M. B.; Clulow, A. D.

    2009-09-01

    The contribution of hydrological research in South Africa in quantifying green water flows for improved Integrated Land and Water Resources Management is reviewed. Green water refers to water losses from land surfaces through transpiration (seen as a productive use) and evaporation from bare soil (seen as a non-productive use). In contrast, blue water flows refer to streamflow (surface water) and groundwater / aquifer recharge. Over the past 20 years, a number of methods have been used to quantify the green water and blue water flows. These include micrometeorological techniques (e.g. Bowen ratio energy balance, eddy covariance, surface renewal, scintillometry, lysimetry), field scale models (e.g. SWB, SWAP), catchment scale hydrological models (e.g. ACRU, SWAT) and more recently remote sensing based models (e.g. SEBAL, SEBS). The National Water Act of South Africa of 1998 requires that water resources are managed, protected and used (developed, conserved and controlled) in an equitable way which is beneficial to the public. The quantification of green water flows in catchments under different land uses has been pivotal in (a) regulating streamflow reduction activities (e.g. forestry) and the management of alien invasive plants, (b) protecting riparian and wetland areas through the provision of an ecological reserve, (c) assessing and improving the water use efficiency of irrigated pastures, fruit tree orchards and vineyards, (d) quantifying the potential impact of future land uses like bio-fuels (e.g. Jatropha) on water resources, (e) quantifying water losses from open water bodies, and (f) investigating "biological” mitigation measures to reduce the impact of polluted water resources as a result of various industries (e.g. mining). This paper therefore captures the evolution of measurement techniques applied across South Africa, the impact these results have had on water use and water use efficiency and the extent to which it supported the National Water Act of

  4. A water tunnel flow visualization study of the vortex flow structures on the F/A-18 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Ramirez, Edgar J.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex flow structures occurring on the F/A-18 aircraft at high angles of attack were studied. A water tunnel was used to gather flow visualization data on the forebody vortex and the wing leading edge extension vortex. The longitudinal location of breakdown of the leading edge vortex was found to be consistently dependent on the angle of attack. Other parameters such as Reynolds number, model scale, and model fidelity had little influence on the overall behavior of the flow structures studied. The lateral location of the forebody vortex system was greatly influenced by changes in the angle of sideslip. Strong interactions can occur between the leading edge extension vortex and the forebody vortex. Close attention was paid to vortex induced flows on various airframe components of the F/A-18. Reynolds number and angle of attack greatly affected the swirling intensity, and therefore the strength of the studied vortices. Water tunnel results on the F/A-18 correlated well with those obtained in similar studies at both full and sub scale levels. The water tunnel can provide, under certain conditions, good simulations of realistic flows in full scale configurations.

  5. Simulated ground-water flow and water quality of the Mississippi River alluvium near Burlington, Iowa, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    The City of Burlington, Iowa, obtains some of its public water supply by withdrawing ground water from the Mississippi River alluvium, an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Burlington, conducted a hydrologic study of the Mississippi River alluvium near Burlington in 1999 to improve understanding of the flow system, evaluate the effects of hypothetical pumping scenarios on the flow system, and evaluate selected water-quality constituents in parts of the alluvium.

  6. E. coli transport to stream water column from bottom sediments to the stream water column in base flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Stocker, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    E. coli as an indicator bacterium is commonly used to characterize microbiological water quality, to evaluate surface water sources for microbiological impairment, and to assess management practices that lead to the decrease of pathogens and indicator influx in surface water sources for recreation and irrigation. Bottom sediments present a large reservoir of fecal indicator bacteria that are known to be released to water column during high flow events caused by rainstorms and snowmelt. The objective of this work was to see if the influx of E. coli from sediments to water occurs also during base flow periods when groundwater rather than runoff provides the major water input to the stream. The experiment was carried out at the first-order creek in Maryland flowing in the riparian zone in base flow conditions. An inert tracer was released to creek water from the manifold for 5 hours. Streamflow and concentrations of E. coli and tracer were monitored in water 10 m below tracer release location, and at the downstream location at 450 m from the release location. The tracer mass recovered at the downstream location was close to the released tracer mass. We then could directly compare the total numbers of E. coli in volumes of water containing tracer at the upstream (release) location and the downstream location. There was a substantial (3 to 6 times) increase in flow between the upstream and downstream locations as well as the substantial increase in the E. coli total numbers in water (14 to 26 times). The average E. coli influx from the bottom sediment was about 400 cells m-2s-1. Although this value is about 2 to 5 times less than published E. coli release rates during high flow events, it still can substantially change the microbial water quality assessment without any input from animal agriculture or manure application. Interesting research objectives include finding out whether the transport of E. coli from bottom sediment to water column during the base flow periods

  7. Computational Flow Dynamic Simulation of Micro Flow Field Characteristics Drainage Device Used in the Process of Oil-Water Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangya Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous crude oil often contains large amounts of produced water and heavy sediment, which seriously threats the safety of crude oil storage and transportation. Therefore, the proper design of crude oil tank drainage device is prerequisite for efficient purification of aqueous crude oil. In this work, the composition and physicochemical properties of crude oil samples were tested under the actual conditions encountered. Based on these data, an appropriate crude oil tank drainage device was developed using the principle of floating ball and multiphase flow. In addition, the flow field characteristics in the device were simulated and the contours and streamtraces of velocity magnitude at different nine moments were obtained. Meanwhile, the improvement of flow field characteristics after the addition of grids in crude oil tank drainage device was validated. These findings provide insights into the development of effective selection methods and serve as important references for oil-water separation process.

  8. Well logging interpretation of production profile in horizontal oil-water two phase flow pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zheng, Xi-Ke

    2012-03-01

    Due to the complicated distribution of local velocity and local phase hold up along the radial direction of pipe in horizontal oil-water two phase flow, it is difficult to measure the total flow rate and phase volume fraction. In this study, we carried out dynamic experiment in horizontal oil-water two phases flow simulation well by using combination measurement system including turbine flowmeter with petal type concentrating diverter, conductance sensor and flowpassing capacitance sensor. According to the response resolution ability of the conductance and capacitance sensor in different range of total flow rate and water-cut, we use drift flux model and statistical model to predict the partial phase flow rate, respectively. The results indicate that the variable coefficient drift flux model can self-adaptively tone the model parameter according to the oil-water two phase flow characteristic, and the prediction result of partial phase flow rate of oil-water two phase flow is of high accuracy.

  9. Understanding virtual water flows: A multiregion input-output case study of Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, Manfred

    2009-09-01

    This article explains and interprets virtual water flows from the well-established perspective of input-output analysis. Using a case study of the Australian state of Victoria, it demonstrates that input-output analysis can enumerate virtual water flows without systematic and unknown truncation errors, an issue which has been largely absent from the virtual water literature. Whereas a simplified flow analysis from a producer perspective would portray Victoria as a net virtual water importer, enumerating the water embodiments across the full supply chain using input-output analysis shows Victoria as a significant net virtual water exporter. This study has succeeded in informing government policy in Australia, which is an encouraging sign that input-output analysis will be able to contribute much value to other national and international applications.

  10. A COUPLING MODEL OF WATER FLOWS AND GAS FLOWS IN EXHAUSTED GAS BUBBLE ON MISSILE LAUNCHED UNDERWATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gas and water flows during an underwater missile launch are numerically studied. For the gas flow, the explicit difference scheme of Non-oscillation and Non-free-parameter Dissipation (NND) is utilized to solve the Euler equations for compressible fluids in the body-fitted coordinates. For the water flow, the Hess-Smith method is employed to solve the Laplace equation for the velocity potential of irrotational water flows based on the potential theory and the boundary element method. The hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for the free boundary conditions is used to compute the changes of the free surface of the exhausted gas bubble in time stepping. On the free surface of the exhausted gas bubble, the matched conditions of both the normal velocities and pressures are satisfied. From the numerical simulation, it is found that the exhausted gas bubble grows more rapidly in the axial direction than in the radial direction and the bubble will shrink at its "neck" finally. Numerical results of the movement of the shock wave and the distribution of the Mach number and the gas pressure within the bubble were presented, which reveals that at some time, the gas flow in the Laval nozzle is subsonic and the gas pressure in the nozzle is very high. Influences of various initial missile velocities and chamber total pressures and water depths on both the time interval when the gas flow in the nozzle is subsonic and the peak of the gas pressure at the nozzle end were discussed. It was suggested that a reasonable adjustment of the chamber total pressure can improve the performance of the engine during the underwater launch of missiles.

  11. Environmental flow calculation for the maintenance of the water reserve of the Piaxtla River, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe de la Lanza Espino

    2014-03-01

    status to be achieved within the watershed to maintain the integrity of existing ecosystems or when they believe that they are degraded, contributing to the recovery or rehabilitation; and annual percentage rate recommended for environmental protection. Based on this, the purpose of this study was to quantify the river flow of the Piaxtla river, in the state of Sinaloa. The river runoff data bases for 36 and nine years were compared, showed differences mainly between the frequency of maximum runoff and its origin, and indicated that it is advisable to use a data base of more than 20 years. However, results were similar in the final calculation of the environmental or ecological river flows; that is to say, total runoff volume was 62.1% considering 36 years and 57.7% for nine years of information. We conclude that the ecological importance of Piaxtla river was very high and the use of water pressure was low (considering that database runoff only included until 1999 and did not take into account population growth and activities. To determine the final volume reserved for the environment or ecological flow, could be estimated not only with a database of 36 years, but for nine years also confirming that those rivers that have databases of 10 years can the methodology used hydrological indicated by the NMX said. Particularly in this study it was determined that for parameters more detailed as the volume of the base rate of the annual volume, according to the frequency of occurrence, both very dry years, dry, average and wet, and influence of meteorological events that determine periods separate return, it is advisable to use minimum data bases as brand NMX 20 years.

  12. Effects of salinity variations on pore water flow in salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengji; Jin, Guangqiu; Xin, Pei; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Spatial and temporal salinity variations in surface water and pore water commonly exist in salt marshes under the combined influence of tidal inundation, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and inland freshwater input. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to investigate how density gradients associated with salinity variations affect pore water flow in the salt marsh system. The results showed that upward salinity (density) gradients could lead to flow instability and the formation of salt fingers. These fingers, varying in size with the distance from the creek, modified significantly the pore water flow field, especially in the marsh interior. While the flow instability enhanced local salt transport and mixing considerably, the net effect was small, causing only a slight increase in the overall mass exchange across the marsh surface. In contrast, downward salinity gradients exerted less influence on the pore water flow in the marsh soil and slightly weakened the surface water and groundwater exchange across the marsh surface. Numerical simulations revealed similar density effects on pore water flow at the field scale under realistic conditions. These findings have important implications for studies of marsh soil conditions concerning plant growth as well as nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal marine system.

  13. Topology and stability of a water-soybean-oil swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Luis; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reveals and explains the flow topology and instability hidden in an experimental study by Tsai et al. [Tsai et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 031002(R) (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.031002. Water and soybean oil fill a sealed vertical cylindrical container. The rotating top disk induces the meridional circulation and swirl of both fluids. The experiment shows a flattop interface shape and vortex breakdown in the oil flow developing as the rotation strength R eo increases. Our numerical study shows that vortex breakdown occurs in the water flow at R eo=300 and in the oil flow at R eo=941 . As R eo increases, the vortex breakdown cell occupies most of the water domain and approaches the interface at R eo around 600. The rest of the (countercirculating) water separates from the axis as the vortex breakdown cells in the oil and water meet at the interface-axis intersection. This topological transformation of water flow significantly contributes to the development of the flattop shape. It is also shown that the steady axisymmetric flow suffers from shear-layer instability, which emerges in the water domain at R eo=810 .

  14. Flow resistance characteristics of water in narrow annulus during heat exchange

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-cheng; YAN Chang-qi; SUN Zhong-ning; ZHANG Qing-hua

    2003-01-01

    Considering the special resistance characteristics of fluids flowing through ducts with small gaps, experiments are performed to investigate the resistance characteristics of single-phase water, which is forced to flow through vertical annuli. The gap sizes are 0.9, 1.4 and 2.4mm, respectively. The experiments are conducted under condition of 1atm. The water in the annuli is heated by high temperature water reversely flowing through the inner tube and the outer annulus. The results show that the flow pattern begin to change from laminar to turbulent before Reynolds number approaches 2000, the flow resistance in annulus has little relations with the temperature difference and ways of being heated, but mainly depends on the ratio of mass flux to the width of annulus.

  15. A flow channel design procedure for PEM fuel cells with effective water removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianguo; Sabir, Imran; Park, Jaewan

    Proper water management in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to achieve the potential of PEM fuel cells. Membrane electrolyte requires full hydration in order to function as proton conductor, often achieved by fully humidifying the anode and cathode reactant gas streams. On the other hand, water is also produced in the cell due to electrochemical reaction. The combined effect is that liquid water forms in the cell structure and water flooding deteriorates the cell performance significantly. In the present study, a design procedure has been developed for flow channels on bipolar plates that can effectively remove water from the PEM fuel cells. The main design philosophy is based on the determination of an appropriate pressure drop along the flow channel so that all the liquid water in the cell is evaporated and removed from, or carried out of, the cell by the gas stream in the flow channel. At the same time, the gas stream in the flow channel is maintained fully saturated in order to prevent membrane electrolyte dehydration. Sample flow channels have been designed, manufactured and tested for five different cell sizes of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 441 cm 2. Similar cell performance has been measured for these five significantly different cell sizes, indicating that scaling of the PEM fuel cells is possible if liquid water flooding or membrane dehydration can be avoided during the cell operation. It is observed that no liquid water flows out of the cell at the anode and cathode channel exits for the present designed cells during the performance tests, and virtually no liquid water content in the cell structure has been measured by the neutron imaging technique. These measurements indicate that the present design procedure can provide flow channels that can effectively remove water in the PEM fuel cell structure.

  16. A flow channel design procedure for PEM fuel cells with effective water removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xianguo; Sabir, Imran; Park, Jaewan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2007-01-01

    Proper water management in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to achieve the potential of PEM fuel cells. Membrane electrolyte requires full hydration in order to function as proton conductor, often achieved by fully humidifying the anode and cathode reactant gas streams. On the other hand, water is also produced in the cell due to electrochemical reaction. The combined effect is that liquid water forms in the cell structure and water flooding deteriorates the cell performance significantly. In the present study, a design procedure has been developed for flow channels on bipolar plates that can effectively remove water from the PEM fuel cells. The main design philosophy is based on the determination of an appropriate pressure drop along the flow channel so that all the liquid water in the cell is evaporated and removed from, or carried out of, the cell by the gas stream in the flow channel. At the same time, the gas stream in the flow channel is maintained fully saturated in order to prevent membrane electrolyte dehydration. Sample flow channels have been designed, manufactured and tested for five different cell sizes of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 441cm{sup 2}. Similar cell performance has been measured for these five significantly different cell sizes, indicating that scaling of the PEM fuel cells is possible if liquid water flooding or membrane dehydration can be avoided during the cell operation. It is observed that no liquid water flows out of the cell at the anode and cathode channel exits for the present designed cells during the performance tests, and virtually no liquid water content in the cell structure has been measured by the neutron imaging technique. These measurements indicate that the present design procedure can provide flow channels that can effectively remove water in the PEM fuel cell structure. (author)

  17. Flow system boundary by D'Agnese and others (1997) for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the flow-system boundary encompassing the regional ground-water flow model by D'Agnese and others (1997). The boundary encompasses an...

  18. Numerical study of water management in the air flow channel of a PEM fuel cell cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Peng; Lai, Ming-Chia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2007-01-10

    The water management in the air flow channel of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode is numerically investigated using the FLUENT software package. By enabling the volume of fraction (VOF) model, the air-water two-phase flow can be simulated under different operating conditions. The effects of channel surface hydrophilicity, channel geometry, and air inlet velocity on water behavior, water content inside the channel, and two-phase pressure drop are discussed in detail. The results of the quasi-steady-state simulations show that: (1) the hydrophilicity of reactant flow channel surface is critical for water management in order to facilitate water transport along channel surfaces or edges; (2) hydrophilic surfaces also increase pressure drop due to liquid water spreading; (3) a sharp corner channel design could benefit water management because it facilitates water accumulation and provides paths for water transport along channel surface opposite to gas diffusion layer; (4) the two-phase pressure drop inside the air flow channel increases almost linearly with increasing air inlet velocity. (author)

  19. Water Flow in Karst Aquifer Considering Dynamically Variable Saturation Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoqun; Hu, Bill X.

    2017-04-01

    The karst system is generally conceptualized as dual-porosity system, which is characterized by low conductivity and high storage continuum matrix and high conductivity and quick flow conduit networks. And so far, a common numerical model for simulating flow in karst aquifer is MODFLOW2005-CFP, which is released by USGS in 2008. However, the steady-state approach for conduit flow in CFP is physically impractical when simulating very dynamic hydraulics with variable saturation conduit. So, we adopt the method proposed by Reimann et al. (2011) to improve current model, in which Saint-Venant equations are used to model the flow in conduit. Considering the actual background that the conduit is very big and varies along flow path and the Dirichlet boundary varies with rainfall in our study area in Southwest China, we further investigate the influence of conduit diameter and outflow boundary on numerical model. And we also analyze the hydraulic process in multi-precipitation events. We find that the numerical model here corresponds well with CFP for saturated conduit, and it could depict the interaction between matrix and conduit during very dynamic hydraulics pretty well compare with CFP.

  20. Net infiltration of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Recharge in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) was estimated from net infiltration simulated by Hevesi and others (2003) using a...

  1. Subglacial water flow inferred from stream measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Comparisons of water discharge and cation load in each of the two main streams indicate that subglacial hydraulic processes differ between drainage basins. One stream drains from a conduit that is isolated in its lower reach from the surrounding subglacial region and receives water routed englacially from the surface. The upper reach of the conduit also receives water rounted englacially from the surface as well as from a distributed subglacial flow system. The other main stream drains from a conduit coupled to a debris layer beneath the glacier. Observations of the layer in natural ice tunnels indicate that the water may flow within a thin layer of debris. A one-dimensional model of flow through the debris layer can explain both the base-flow and diurnal variations of the second main stream. -from Author

  2. Hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset represents the surface hydrogeology of an approximately 45,000 square-kilometer area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  3. Study area boundary for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) study area which encompasses approximately 100,000-square kilometers in...

  4. Water Level Altitude Contours for the Diamond Valley Flow System, Central Nevada, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were created as part of a hydrologic study to characterize groundwater budgets and water quality in the Diamond Valley Flow System (DVFS), central Nevada....

  5. Simulation of soil water regimes including pedotransfer functions and land-use related preferential flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Backx, M.A.H.M.; Bouma, J.

    2003-01-01

    Differences in land use history among taxonomically identical soils often result in different hydraulic properties, derived from either laboratory measurements or pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Additionally, flow mechanisms in sandy soils may also change through differences in water repellency

  6. Study area boundary for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) study area which encompasses approximately 100,000-square kilometers in...

  7. Macropore-mesopore model of water flow through aggregated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, L.; Appelbaum, H.R.

    1980-12-01

    A combined, one-dimensional, macropore-mesopore, hydrologic model was developed for simulating water flow through soils for analysis of data related to water and chemical flow in soils. Flows within the macroporous system as well as interactive flows between macroporous and mesoporous systems were modeled. Computer subroutines were written and incorporated into the existing one-dimensional Terrestrial Ecosystem Hydrologic Model (TEHM) developed at ORNL. Simulation showed that macropore flow effects are important during heavy precipitation and are more significant in soils of comparatively low hydraulic conductivity (5 to 10 cm/d). Increased drainage and decreased lateral flow result from the addition of the macropore model. The effect was more pronounced in soils of large macroporosity. Preliminary results indicate that the model is insensitive to geometrical properties of macropores.

  8. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  9. Water Pipeline Network Analysis Using Simultaneous Loop Flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... A water pipeline network analysis with a case study of Owerri in Imo ... relatively complex problem, particularly if the ...... [11] Mason, P.R., Patterson, B.A. & Loewenson, R. (1986) “Piped water supply and Intestinal parasitism.

  10. A Model of Debris Flow Forecast Based on the Water-Soil Coupling Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaojie Zhang; Hongjuan Yang; Fangqiang Wei; Yuhong Jiang; Dunlong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Debris flow forecast is an important means of disaster mitigation. However, the accuracy of the statistics-based debris flow forecast is unsatisfied while the mechanism-based forecast is un-available at the watershed scale because most of existing researches on the initiation mechanism of de-bris flow took a single slope as the main object. In order to solve this problem, this paper developed a model of debris flow forecast based on the water-soil coupling mechanism at the watershed scale. In this model, the runoff and the instable soil caused by the rainfall in a watershed is estimated by the distrib-uted hydrological model (GBHM) and an instable identification model of the unsaturated soil. Because the debris flow is a special fluid composed of soil and water and has a bigger density, the density esti-mated by the runoff and instable soil mass in a watershed under the action of a rainfall is employed as a key factor to identify the formation probability of debris flow in the forecast model. The Jiangjia Gulley, a typical debris flow valley with a several debris flow events each year, is selected as a case study wa-tershed to test this forecast model of debris flow. According the observation data of Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research Station, CAS located in Jiangjia Gulley, there were 4 debris flow events in 2006. The test results show that the accuracy of the model is satisfied.

  11. Water flow and hydraulic characteristics of Japanese red pine and oak trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Tadashi

    2001-07-01

    To assess the characteristics of water flow in a tree and the contribution of the stem water storage to transpiration, some field observations were carried out in two natural forests: a Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc.) forest and an oak (Quercus mongolica Fish) forest. Water potentials of leaf, stem, root and soil water, sap flow rate, volumetric water content of the stem and micrometeorological factors were measured during the observation periods. Clear diurnal variations in volumetric water content of a stem were observed. It was confirmed that water storage in the stem contributed to the transpiration process. This contribution appeared when the difference in water potential between the root and stem was more than 0·3 MPa. The stem water storage was extracted by the driving force due to the difference of the response of the root and stem water potential to change in the leaf water potential in daytime. The stem capacitance of 1·44 kg MPa-1 for the Japanese red pine and 0·44 kg MPa-1 for the oak were evaluated from the variation in the water storage in the stem and the difference of water potential between root and stem. Evaluations of the water budget were made for each test stand. The results indicated that the contribution of water storage in the stem to transpiration accounted for 10 to 20% of the daily transpiration.

  12. Pore-water isotopic compositions and unsaturated-zone flow, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, In C.

    2001-04-29

    Isotopic compositions of core-water samples from boreholes USW SD-6 and USW WT-24 indicate that recent water has been introduced at depth. Tritium, carbon, oxygen, and deuterium isotopic compositions all support younger water at depth in the two boreholes. Peaks in tritium concentrations in pore-water samples, indicating younger water than the other samples, observed near the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Tuff and at the bottom of the CHF and the top of the PP in both boreholes SD-6 and WT-24. Larger {sup 14}C activities in two pore-water samples from WT-24 at the bottom of the CHF and the top of the PP indicate younger water than in other samples from WT-24. More positive {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}D values indicate younger water in samples of pore water at the bottom of the CHF in boreholes SD-6 and WT-24. The isotopic compositions indicating younger water at depth in boreholes SD-6 and WT-24 occur at the basal vitrophyre zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff and the bottom of the CHF/upper part of the PP, probably from lateral preferential flow through connected fractures (fast-flow paths). The source of the young water at borehole WT-24 probably was recharge from The Prow to the north, which then flowed laterally southward through the highly fractured TSw. The source of the young water at borehole SD-6 probably was water flow from the Solitario Canyon fault to the west, which then flowed laterally through the TSw and CHF.

  13. The Vertical Structure of Shallow Water Flow in the Surf Zone and Inner Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    E. Richardson, 2008, Field verification of a CFD model for wave transformation and breaking in the surf zone, J. Waterw. Port Coastal Engrg., 134(2...The Vertical Structure of Shallow Water Flow in the Surf Zone and Inner Shelf Dr. Thomas C. Lippmann Center for Coastal...wave- and tidally-driven shallow water flows in the shallow depths of the inner shelf and surf zone. OBJECTIVES 1. Theoretical investigations of

  14. Flow resistance reduction of coal water slurry through gas phase addition

    OpenAIRE

    Robak Jolanta; Ignasiak Karina

    2016-01-01

    One of the main advantages of coal water slurry fuel (CWS) is a physical form that allows, among others, their transfer by pipelines over long distances. For this form of transport actions towards reducing the flow resistance of the transmitted medium are important. One of the treatments leading to reduction in the flow resistance of suspensions is to introduce gas into the stream of flowing slurry. The goal of that action is to either loosen the structure of densely packed grains or increase...

  15. The Origin of the Most Part of Water on the Earth, and the Reason why there is More Water on the Earth than on the other Terrestrial Planets

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The origin of water on the Earth, and the reason why there is more liquid water on the Earth than on the other terrestrial planets of the Solar System is not completely understood. Here we show that these facts are related to a water vapor cloud formed by the vaporization of part of an ice belt that was formed in the beginning of the Solar System.

  16. Fine Magnetic Structure and Origin of Counter-Streaming Mass Flows in a Quiescent Solar Prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Ying D; Chen, P F; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence which was consisted of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine, and counter-streaming mass flows were ubiquitous in the prominence. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connecting to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed and then reformed at a similar height, finally, it started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapsing and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and a vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot was consisted of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and with the both ends connecting to the solar surface, while the v...

  17. Origin of the backstreaming ions in a young Hot Flow Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisberg, O L; Shestakov, A Yu; Golubeva, Y M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze an event in front of the bow shock observed by Cluster spacecraft on 22.02.2006. This event has many attributes of Hot Flow Anomaly at early stage of development including strong upstream beam and disturbed magnetic profile with increased magnetic field at one or two sides as observed by 4 Cluster spacecraft. The angle between the magnetic field vectors at two sides of the current sheet was ~ 10{\\deg}. The minimum magnetic field magnitude within HFA was ~ 1 nT. The shock at two sides of the HFA was quasi-perpendicular. Upstream beam was observed on the leading side of the HFA. Parameters and velocity distributions of solar wind ions and of upstream ions observed on C1 and C3 spacecraft are analyzed separately in order to trace their changes across the event. The goal of this analysis was to get more information about the source of upstream beam. The beam evolved from the start of its observation till the HFA encounter being initially energetic and nearly mono-energetic. Its mean energy continuously...

  18. One-dimensional model for heat transfer to a supercritical water flow in a tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sallevelt, J.L.H.P.; Withag, J.A.M.; Bramer, E.A.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    Heat transfer in water at supercritical pressures has been investigated numerically using a one-dimensional modeling approach. A 1D plug flow model has been developed in order to make fast predictions of the bulk-fluid temperature in a tubular flow. The chosen geometry is a vertical tube with an inn

  19. Viscous-flow calculations for KVLCC2 in deep and shallow water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the SIMMAN 2008 workshop, the capability of CFD tools to predict the flow around manoeuvring ships has been investigated. It was decided to continue this effort but to extend the work to the flow around ships in shallow water. In this paper, CFD calculations for the KLVCC2 are presented. The aim

  20. Viscous-flow calculations for KVLCC2 in deep and shallow water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the SIMMAN 2008 workshop, the capability of CFD tools to predict the flow around manoeuvring ships has been investigated. It was decided to continue this effort but to extend the work to the flow around ships in shallow water. In this paper, CFD calculations for the KLVCC2 are presented. The aim

  1. GROUNDWATER FLOW MODEL CALIBRATION USING WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS AT SHORT INTERVALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater flow models are usually calibrated with respect to water level measurements collected at intervals of several months or even years. Measurements of these kinds are not sensitive to sudden or short stress conditions, such as impact from stormwater drainage flow or flas...

  2. Inequalities in the networks of virtual water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca; Seekell, David

    2012-08-01

    The globalization of water associated with the trade of food commodities [Hoekstra and Chapagain, 2008] has often been acclaimed as a means to save water, mitigate the effect of regional- and local-scale water scarcity, and meet the demand for food in overpopulated and water-poor countries [Allan, 1998]. However, there are negative implications for water use from globalization of trade. For instance, globalization disconnects populations from local sustainable freshwater use [Allan, 1998; D'Odorico et al., 2010]. This distance between societies and the resources on which they rely is a major obstacle to the emergence of behaviors that foster ecosystem stewardship [Chapin et al., 2009] through a responsible management of the environment. The globalization of water is also expected to reduce societal resilience to drought by decreasing the redundancy of freshwater resources, thereby limiting opportunities to meet human needs during periods of crisis [D'Odorico et al., 2010]. Overall, globalization enhances inequalities in the way different societies may have access to freshwater resources [Chapin et al., 2009]. In fact, only a few countries control most of the water that is virtually exchanged—through food trade—in the global market.

  3. Amount of water needed to save 1 m3 of water: life cycle assessment of a flow regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Söchtig, Michael; Weis, Christoph; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Water saving devices in the sanitary equipment, such as flow regulators, are assumed to be environmentally advantageous even though their environmental benefit has never been compared to the environmental burden caused during their production und disposal. Therefore, a life cycle assessment according to ISO 14044 has been conducted to identify and quantify the environmental effects throughout the lifespan of a flow regulator. The analysis comprises the production of materials, manufacturing of components at suppliers, the assembly at NEOPERL®, all transports, savings of water and thermal energy during use as well as waste incineration including energy recovery in the end-of-life stage. Results show that the production of one flow regulator causes 0.12 MJ primary energy demand, a global warming potential of 5.9 g CO2-equivalent, and a water consumption of 30.3 ml. On the other hand, during a use of 10 years, it saves 19,231 MJ primary energy, 1223 kg CO2-equivalent, and avoids a water consumption of 790 l (166,200 l water use). Since local impacts of water consumption are more relevant than volumes, consequences of water consumption have been analyzed using recently developed impact assessment models. Accordingly, the production of a flow regulator causes 8.5 ml freshwater depletion, 1.4 × 10-13 disability adjusted life years, and 4.8 × 10-6 potentially disappeared fractions of species m2 a. Even though avoided environmental impacts resulting from water savings highly depend on the region where the flow regulator is used, the analysis has shown that environmental benefits are at least 15,000 times higher than impacts caused during the production.

  4. Hydrogeologic Setting and Ground-Water Flow in the Leetown Area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; Weary, David J.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2007-01-01

    The Leetown Science Center is a research facility operated by the U.S. Geological Survey that occupies approximately 455-acres near Kearneysville, Jefferson County, West Virginia. Aquatic and fish research conducted at the Center requires adequate supplies of high-quality, cold ground water. Three large springs and three production wells currently (in 2006) supply water to the Center. The recent construction of a second research facility (National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture) operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and co-located on Center property has placed additional demands on available water resources in the area. A three-dimensional steady-state finite-difference ground-water flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the Leetown area and was used to assess the availability of ground water to sustain current and anticipated future demands. The model also was developed to test a conceptual model of ground-water flow in the complex karst aquifer system in the Leetown area. Due to the complexity of the karst aquifer system, a multidisciplinary research study was required to define the hydrogeologic setting. Geologic mapping, surface- and borehole-geophysical surveys, stream base-flow surveys, and aquifer tests were conducted to provide the hydrogeologic data necessary to develop and calibrate the model. It would not have been possible to develop a numerical model of the study area without the intensive data collection and methods developments components of the larger, more comprehensive hydrogeologic investigation. Results of geologic mapping and surface-geophysical surveys verified the presence of several prominent thrust faults and identified additional faults and other complex geologic structures (including overturned anticlines and synclines) in the area. These geologic structures are known to control ground-water flow in the region. Results of this study indicate that cross-strike faults and fracture zones are major

  5. Oil-water two-phase flow measurement with combined ultrasonic transducer and electrical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Yuan, Ye; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Dong, Feng

    2016-12-01

    A combination of ultrasonic transducers operated in continuous mode and a conductance/capacitance sensor (UTCC) is proposed to estimate the individual flow velocities in oil-water two-phase flows. Based on the Doppler effect, the transducers measure the flow velocity and the conductance/capacitance sensor estimates the phase fraction. A set of theoretical correlations based on the boundary layer models of the oil-water two-phase flow was proposed to describe the velocity profile. The models were separately established for the dispersion flow and the separate flow. The superficial flow velocity of each phase is calculated with the velocity measured in the sampling volume of the ultrasonic transducer with the phase fraction through the velocity profile models. The measuring system of the UTCC was designed and experimentally verified on a multiphase flow loop. The results indicate that the proposed system and correlations estimate the overall flow velocity at an uncertainty of U J   =  0.038 m s-1, and the water superficial velocity at U Jw   =  0.026 m s-1, and oil superficial velocity at U Jo   =  0.034 m s-1. The influencing factors of uncertainty were analyzed.

  6. Slug flow transitions in horizontal gas/liquid two-phase flows. Dependence on channel height and system pressure for air/water and steam/water two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-05-01

    The slug flow transitions and related phenomena for horizontal two-phase flows were studied for a better prediction of two-phase flows that typically appear during the reactor loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). For better representation of the flow conditions experimentally, two large-scaled facility: TPTF for high-pressure steam/water two-phase flows and large duct test facility for air/water two-phase flows, were used. The visual observation of the flow using a video-probe was performed in the TPTF experiments for good understanding of the phenomena. The currently-used models and correlations based mostly on the small-scale low-pressure experiments were reviewed and improved based on these experimental results. The modified Taitel-Dukler model for prediction of transition into slug flow from wavy flow and the modified Steen-Wallis correlation for prediction of onset of liquid entrainment from the interfacial waves were obtained. An empirical correlation for the gas-liquid interfacial friction factor was obtained further for prediction of liquid levels at wavy flow. The region of slug flow regime that is generally under influences of the channel height and system pressure was predicted well when these models and correlations were applied together. (author). 90 refs.

  7. Modelling of Urban Water Flow - Coupling Surface and Pipe Flow. The State of The Eureka Projekt Risursim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschulz, K.-P.; Risursim Project Group

    The challenge of serving the cities with efficient drainage networks and waste water systems is increasingly getting larger as the cities grow. Urban flooding, sewer over- flow and rainfall impact are high priority issues in most countries. The German and Norwegian EUREKA-Project RISURSIM (Risk management for urban drainage systems simulation and optimization) headed by ITWM focuses these problems. The overall objective is the development of an integrated planning and man- agement tool to allow cost effective management for urban drainage systems. The project consortium includes applied mathematics and water engineering research in- stitutes, municipal drainage works as well as insurance companies. Focussing on flooding events caused by surcharged sewer systems a dual drainage model has been developed to most accurately describe the hydraulic processes of flooded drainage systems taking in account the possible interactions between surface and surcharged sewer system. This dual drainage simulation model is computing water levels above ground and assessing possible damage costs. Hydraulic models for both, surface runoff and flooded surfaces, and sewer flow have been established. Surface flow is simulated in a 2-dimensional shallow water approach using GIS-based detailed physical surface data. Links to the hydraulic pipe flow model are stablished at all inlets of surface drainage (manholes, street inlets and private drain pipes) to the underground sewer system. These inlets are interpreted as possible sinks or sources in the mathematical model of both, surface and sewer flow simulation. In addition, the interaction between the public sewer system and private drains is taken into account in order to assess flooding of buildings or private ground via house drains. The status of the project is outlined; the structure of the being developed decision support system is presented.

  8. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Water-level changes and directions of ground-water flow in the shallow aquifer, Fallon area, Churchill County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Allander, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Truckee-Carson-Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement Act of 1990 directed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to acquire water rights for wetland areas in the Carson Desert, Nevada. The public is concerned that htis acquisition of water rights and delivery of the water directly to wildlife areas would result in less recharge to the shallow ground water in the Fallon area and cause domestic wells to go dry. In January 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, began a study of the shallow ground-water system in the Fallon area in Churchill County, Nevada. A network of 126 wells in the study area was monitored. Between January and November 1992, water levels in most wells declined, usually less than 2 feet. The maximum measured decline over this period was 2.68 feet in a well near Stillwater Marsh. Between April and July, however, water levels rose in irrigated areas, typically 1 to 2 feet. Newlands Project water deliveries to the study area began soon after the turn of the century. Since then, water levels have risen more than 15 feet across much of the study area. Water lost from unlined irrigtiaon canals caused the stage in Big Soda Lake to rise nearly 60 feet; ground-water levels near the lake have risen 30 to 40 feet. The depth to water in most irrigated areas is now less than 10 feet. The altitude of the water table ranges from 4.025 feet above sea level 11 miles west of Fallon to 3,865 feet in the Stillwater Marsh area. Ground water flows eastward and divides; some flow goes to the northeast toward the Carson Sink and Stillwater areas, and some goes southeastward to Carson Lake.

  10. Investigation on the liquid water droplet instability in a simulated flow channel of PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Hun; Kim, Bok Yung; Kim, Han Sang; Min, Kyoung Doug [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    To investigate the characteristics of water droplets on the gas diffusion layer from both top-view and side-view of the flow channel, a rig test apparatus was designed and fabricated with prism attached plate. This experimental device was used to simulate the growth of a single liquid water droplet and its transport process with various air flow velocity and channel height. Not only dry condition but also fully humidified condition was also simulated by using a water absorbing sponge. The detachment height of the water droplet with dry and wet conditions was measured and analyzed. It was found that the droplet tends towards becoming unstable by decreased channel height, increased flow velocity or making a gas diffusion layer (GDL) dryer. Also, peculiar behavior of the water droplet in the channel was presented like attachment to hydrophilic wall or sudden breaking of droplet in case of fully hydrated condition. The simplified force balance model matches with experimental data as well

  11. EFFECT OF SANTA ROSA LAKE ON GROUND WATER FLOW TO THE PECOS RIVER, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.

    1985-01-01

    In 1980, Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles (11 kilometers) north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the ground water flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow-gaging stations, which are used to administer water rights along the Pecos River. The effect of the lake on streamflow was investigated using a three-dimensional ground water flow model. These simulations indicated that the net change in ground water flow to the river would be almost zero if the lake were maintained at its flood control pool for 90 days.

  12. Water pumping and analysis of flow in burrowing zoobenthos - a short overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2005-01-01

    Burrowing animals maintain contact with the water above the sediment by pumping water through a tube system and therefore measurements of water pumping rate of burrowing animals is of crucial importance for the study of many processes both within and above the sea floor. This review deals...... with the measuring of water pumping and the analysis of flow generated by burrowing deposit- and filter-feeding zoobenthos in order to determine the type of pump and mechanisms involved, flow rate, pump pressure, and pumping power. The practical use of fluid mechanical principles is examined, and it is stressed...... that not only the pump pressure that a burrowing animal can apply is of interest for assessing the energy cost of pumping, but also the distribution of excess pressure along its burrow is of importance for assessing the seepage flow of oxygen-rich water into the sediment surrounding the burrow because...

  13. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Rehfeldt

    2004-10-08

    This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In

  14. Navigating parasite webs and parasite flow: emerging and re-emerging parasitic zoonoses of wildlife origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Lydden

    2005-10-01

    Wildlife are now recognised as an important source of emerging human pathogens, including parasites. This paper discusses the linkages between wildlife, people, zoonotic parasites and the ecosystems in which they co-exist, revisits definitions for 'emerging' and 're-emerging', and lists zoonotic parasites that can be acquired from wildlife including, for some, estimates of the associated global human health burdens. The paper also introduces the concepts of 'parasite webs' and 'parasite flow', provides a context for parasites, relative to other infectious agents, as causes of emerging human disease, and discusses drivers of disease emergence and re-emergence, especially changes in biodiversity and climate. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Caribbean and the southern United States, Baylisascaris procyonis in California and Georgia, Plasmodium knowlesi in Sarawak, Malaysia, Human African Trypanosomiasis, Sarcoptes scabiei in carnivores, and Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Toxoplasma in marine ecosystems are presented as examples of wildlife-derived zoonotic parasites of particular recent interest. An ecological approach to disease is promoted, as is a need for an increased profile for this approach in undergraduate and graduate education in the health sciences. Synergy among scientists and disciplines is identified as critical for the study of parasites and parasitic disease in wildlife populations. Recent advances in techniques for the investigation of parasite fauna of wildlife are presented and monitoring and surveillance systems for wildlife disease are discussed. Some of the limitations inherent in predictions for the emergence and re-emergence of infection and disease associated with zoonotic parasites of wildlife are identified. The importance of public awareness and public education in the prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic infection and disease are emphasised. Finally, some thoughts for the future are presented.

  15. Origin of the backstreaming ions in a young Hot Flow Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Shuvalov, S. D.; Shestakov, A. Yu.; Golubeva, Y. M.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze an event in front of the bow shock observed by Cluster spacecraft on 22.02.2006. This event has many attributes of Hot Flow Anomaly at early stage of development including strong upstream beam and disturbed magnetic profile with increased magnetic field at one or two sides as observed by 4 Cluster spacecraft. The angle between the magnetic field vectors at two sides of the current sheet was ~10°. The minimum magnetic field magnitude within HFA was ~1 nT. The shock at two sides of the HFA was quasi-perpendicular. Upstream beam was observed on the leading side of the HFA. Parameters and velocity distributions of solar wind ions and of upstream ions observed on C1 and C3 spacecraft are analyzed separately in order to trace their changes across the event. The goal of this analysis was to get more information about the source of upstream beam. The beam evolved from the start of its observation till the HFA encounter being initially energetic and nearly mono-energetic. Its mean energy continuously decreased and energy spectrum widened as HFA approached spacecraft. First observation of particular energy that diminished with approaching the HFA varied linearly with gyro-radius of ions. The energy spectra of integrated beam (for all observation) and the energy spectrum of the beam observed just in front of HFA are very similar to the magnetosheath ion energy spectrum observed after bow shock crossing at ~1 h after observation of the HFA. Lowest energies in the beam were observed within HFA only. Highest density and pressure of upstream beam are found in the current sheet itself. We suggest that the upstream beam is the result of the magnetosheath ions leakage through the region of HFA crossing with the bow shock front.

  16. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation in the study of water-soluble macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yohannes, Gebrenegus

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) was constructed, and its applicability to industrial, biochemical, and pharmaceutical applications was studied. The effect of several parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, temperature and the reactants mixing ratios on the particle sizes, molar masses, and the formation of aggregates of macromolecules was determined by AsFlFFF. In the case of industrial application AsFlFFF proved to be a valuable tool in the characterization of the hydrod...

  17. Virtual water flows in the international trade of agricultural products of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jinhe; Tang, Guorong; Chen, Min; Wang, Lachun

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and population, water scarcity and poor water quality caused by water pollution have become increasingly severe in China. Virtual water trade is a useful tool to alleviate water shortage. This paper focuses on a comprehensive study of China's international virtual water flows from agricultural products trade and completes a diachronic analysis from 2001 to 2013. The results show that China was in trade surplus in relation to the virtual water trade of agricultural products. The exported virtual water amounted to 29.94billionm(3)/yr. while 155.55billionm(3)/yr. was embedded in imported products. The trend that China exported virtual water per year was on the decline while the imported was on a rising trend. Virtual water trade of China was highly concentrated. Not all of the exported products had comparative advantages in virtual water content. Imported products were excessively concentrated on water intensive agricultural products such as soya beans, cotton, and palm oil. The exported virtual water mainly flowed to the Republic of Korea, Hong Kong of China and Japan, while the imported mainly flowed from the United States of America, Brazil and Argentina. From the ethical point of view, the trade partners were classified into four types in terms of "net import" and "water abundance": mutual benefit countries, such as Australia and Canada; unilateral benefit countries, such as Mongolia and Norway; supported countries, such as Egypt and Singapore; and double pressure countries, such as India and Pakistan. Virtual water strategy refers to water resources, agricultural products and human beings. The findings are beneficial for innovating water resources management system, adjusting trade structure, ensuring food security in China, and promoting the construction of national ecological security system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Global-scale analysis of river flow alterations due to water withdrawals and reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    Global-scale information on natural river flows and anthropogenic river flow alterations is required to identify areas where aqueous ecosystems are expected to be strongly degraded. Such information can support the identification of environmental flow guidelines and a sustainable water management that balances the water demands of humans and ecosystems. This study presents the first global assessment of the anthropogenic alteration of river flow regimes, in particular of flow variability, by water withdrawals and dams/reservoirs. Six ecologically relevant flow indicators were quantified using an improved version of the global water model WaterGAP. WaterGAP simulated, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree, river discharge as affected by human water withdrawals and dams around the year 2000, as well as naturalized discharge without this type of human interference. Compared to naturalized conditions, long-term average global discharge into oceans and internal sinks has decreased by 2.7% due to water withdrawals, and by 0.8% due to dams. Mainly due to irrigation, long-term average river discharge and statistical low flow Q90 (monthly river discharge that is exceeded in 9 out of 10 months) have decreased by more than 10% on one sixth and one quarter of the global land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland), respectively. Q90 has increased significantly on only 5% of the land area, downstream of reservoirs. Due to both water withdrawals and reservoirs, seasonal flow amplitude has decreased significantly on one sixth of the land area, while interannual variability has increased on one quarter of the land area mainly due to irrigation. It has decreased on only 8% of the land area, in areas downstream of reservoirs where consumptive water use is low. The impact of reservoirs is likely underestimated by our study as small reservoirs are not taken into account. Areas most affected by anthropogenic river flow alterations are the Western and Central USA, Mexico, the

  19. Global-scale analysis of river flow alterations due to water withdrawals and reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Global-scale information on natural river flows and anthropogenic river flow alterations is required to identify areas where aqueous ecosystems are expected to be strongly degraded. Such information can support the identification of environmental flow guidelines and a sustainable water management that balances the water demands of humans and ecosystems. This study presents the first global assessment of the anthropogenic alteration of river flow regimes, in particular of flow variability, by water withdrawals and dams/reservoirs. Six ecologically relevant flow indicators were quantified using an improved version of the global water model WaterGAP. WaterGAP simulated, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree, river discharge as affected by human water withdrawals and dams around the year 2000, as well as naturalized discharge without this type of human interference. Compared to naturalized conditions, long-term average global discharge into oceans and internal sinks has decreased by 2.7% due to water withdrawals, and by 0.8% due to dams. Mainly due to irrigation, long-term average river discharge and statistical low flow Q90 (monthly river discharge that is exceeded in 9 out of 10 months have decreased by more than 10% on one sixth and one quarter of the global land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland, respectively. Q90 has increased significantly on only 5% of the land area, downstream of reservoirs. Due to both water withdrawals and reservoirs, seasonal flow amplitude has decreased significantly on one sixth of the land area, while interannual variability has increased on one quarter of the land area mainly due to irrigation. It has decreased on only 8% of the land area, in areas downstream of reservoirs where consumptive water use is low. The impact of reservoirs is likely underestimated by our study as small reservoirs are not taken into account. Areas most affected by anthropogenic river flow

  20. two - dimensional mathematical model of water flow in open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1996-09-01

    Sep 1, 1996 ... simplification of the system of the governing shallow water equations ... For optional design of the ... models. One of the facilities for preliminary appraisal of the ... distribution. ..... indicated for the individual methods, located ...

  1. Early Regimes of Water Capillary Flow in Slit Silica Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens Honore; Mejia, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the initial stages of spontaneous imbibitionof water in slit silica nanochannels surrounded by air. An analysis is performed for the effects of nanoscopicconfinement, initial conditions of liquid uptake and air pressurization...

  2. Modelling flow dynamics in water distribution networks using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    Keywords: Artificial neural network; Leakage detection technique; Water distribution; Leakages ... Leakage is a function of pipe age, pipe material type, pressure, soil type as well as pipe .... In order to train a neural network to perform some.

  3. Analysis of Water Flow Pressure on Bridge Piers considering the Impact Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of water current impact and fluid-structure interaction on the bridge piers, the mechanism of water flow impact on the bridge pier is firstly studied. Then a finite element model of a bridge pier is established including the effects of water flow impact as well as the water circumferential motion around the pier. Comparative study is conducted between the results of water impact effect, fluid-structure coupling effect, theoretical analysis, and also the results derived using the formulas specified in the design codes home and abroad. The results show that the water flow force calculated using the formulas provided by the codes should be multiplied by an impact amplifier to account for the effect of flood impact on the bridge pier. When the flood flows around the pier, the fluid-structure coupling effect on the bridge pier can be neglected. The method specified in the China guidelines of General Code for Design of Highway Bridges and Culverts tends to provide a larger result of the water flow force.

  4. Numerical simulation of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Michelly Martuchele; Ramirez, Ramiro Gustavo [Federal University of Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)], E-mail: ramirez@unifei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The numerical simulation of two phase flow through the CFD techniques have become of great interest due to the complexity of this type of flow. The present work aims to simulate the oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes for stratification analysis of the mixture. In numerical simulations, incompressible flow, isothermal, steady state and laminar flow were considered. Numerical analysis of flow stratification was carried out for horizontal straight and curved pipe. FLUENT was the commercial software employed in the simulation. Three-dimensional mesh generated by ICEM-CFD program was used for numerical simulation. The numerical analysis flow pattern was carried out employing the Eulerian model, considering the drag and lift interphase forces. The simulation results for the horizontal straight pipe were qualitatively validated with experimental data obtained in the Laboratory of Phase Separation of UNIFEI. (author)

  5. Fragmented Flows: Water Supply in Los Angeles County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincetl, Stephanie; Porse, Erik; Cheng, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    In the Los Angeles metropolitan region, nearly 100 public and private entities are formally involved in the management and distribution of potable water—a legacy rooted in fragmented urban growth in the area and late 19th century convictions about local control of services. Yet, while policy debates focus on new forms of infrastructure, restructured pricing mechanisms, and other technical fixes, the complex institutional architecture of the present system has received little attention. In this paper, we trace the development of this system, describe its interconnections and disjunctures, and demonstrate the invisibility of water infrastructure in LA in multiple ways—through mapping, statistical analysis, and historical texts. Perverse blessings of past water abundance led to a complex, but less than resilient, system with users accustomed to cheap, easily accessible water. We describe the lack of transparency and accountability in the current system, as well as its shortcomings in building needed new infrastructure and instituting new water rate structures. Adapting to increasing water scarcity and likely droughts must include addressing the architecture of water management.

  6. Origin of alkali rocks in the light of data on the fluid mantle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushev, V.G.; Mironov, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The hypotheses on the alkali-basic melts as formed through partial fusion of either the hydroxyl-containing alkali peridotite (or pyroxenite), or the phlogopite- or amphibole-enriched rocks in the mantle turn out most relevant as for the alkali rock peculiarities. Still, the hypotheses do not explain the appearance of alkalies and water involved in fusion. It is supposed that the alkalies-enriched rocks result from the dynamometamorphic segregation of the mantle fluid (CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/, CO), which reacts with the mantle rocks (magnetite+olivine+pyroxene) with subsequent release of H/sub 2/O and liberation of K and Na from the gaseous phase and pyroxenes lattice. The start of fusion is induced by sharp decrease of pressure and heat incoming along the deep dislocation zones in the mantle. Once produced, the alkali melt evolved through differetiation or interaction with enclosing rocks. This method provides interpretation of most petrological and geochemical peculiarities of different series of alkali rocks. 65 references.

  7. Investigating hydraulic connections and the origin of water in a mine tunnel using stable isotopes and hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Day, Katherine; Poeter, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Turquoise Lake is a water-supply reservoir located north of the historic Sugarloaf Mining district near Leadville, Colorado, USA. Elevated water levels in the reservoir may increase flow of low-quality water from abandoned mine tunnels in the Sugarloaf District and degrade water quality downstream. The objective of this study was to understand the sources of water to Dinero mine drainage tunnel and evaluate whether or not there was a direct hydrologic connection between Dinero mine tunnel and Turquoise Lake from late 2002 to early 2008. This study utilized hydrograph data from nearby draining mine tunnels and the lake, and stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) data from the lake, nearby draining mine tunnels, imported water, and springs to characterize water sources in the study area. Hydrograph results indicate that flow from the Dinero mine tunnel decreased 26% (2006) and 10% (2007) when lake elevation (above mean sea level) decreased below approximately 3004 m (approximately 9855 feet). Results of isotope analysis delineated two meteoric water lines in the study area. One line characterizes surface water and water imported to the study area from the western side of the Continental Divide. The other line characterizes groundwater including draining mine tunnels, springs, and seeps. Isotope mixing calculations indicate that water from Turquoise Lake or seasonal groundwater recharge from snowmelt represents approximately 10% or less of the water in Dinero mine tunnel. However, most of the water in Dinero mine tunnel is from deep groundwater having minimal isotopic variation. The asymmetric shape of the Dinero mine tunnel hydrograph may indicate that a limited mine pool exists behind a collapse in the tunnel and attenutates seasonal recharge. Alternatively, a conceptual model is presented (and supported with MODFLOW simulations) that is consistent with current and previous data collected in the study area, and illustrates how fluctuating lake levels change the local water

  8. Preferential flow, connectivity and the principle of "minimum time to equilibrium": a new perspective on environmental water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, E.; Blume, T.; Bloeschl, G.

    2008-12-01

    Preferential/rapid flow and transport is known as one key process in soil hydrology for more than 20 years. It seems to be rather the rule, than the exception. It occurs in soils, in surface rills and river networks. If connective preferential are present at any scale, they crucially control water flow and solute transport. Why? Is there an underlying principle? If energy is conserved a system follows Fermat's principle of minimum action i.e. it follows the trajectory that minimise the integral of the total energy/ La Grangian over time. Hydrological systems are, however, non-conservative as surface and subsurface water flows dissipate energy. From thermodynamics it is well known that natural processes minimize the free energy of the system. For hydrological systems we suggest, therefore, that flow in a catchment arranges in such a way that time to a minimum of free energy becomes minimal for a given rainfall input (disturbance) and under given constraints. Free energy in a soil is determined by potential energy and capillary energy. The pore size distribution of the soil, soil structures, depth to groundwater and most important vegetation make up the constraints. The pore size distribution determines whether potential energy or capillarity dominates the free energy of the soil system. The first term is minimal when the pore space is completely de-saturated the latter becomes minimal at soil saturation. Hence, the soil determines a) the amount of excess (gravity) water that has to be exported from the soil to reach a minimum state of free energy and b) whether redistribution or groundwater recharge is more efficient to reach that equilibrium. On the other hand, the pore size distribution of the soil and the connectivity of preferential pathways (root channels, worm holes and cracks) determine flow velocities and the redistribution of water within the pore space. As water flow and ground water recharge are fast in sandy soils and capillary energy is of minor

  9. Origin of enhanced visible light driven water splitting by (Rh, Sb)-SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Brindaban; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2015-06-21

    A systematic calculation, using hybrid density functional theory, has been carried out to investigate the origin of the enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of Rh-doped SrTiO3 with codoping of Sb. In the case of Rh-doped SrTiO3, partially unoccupied states are introduced above the valence band, thus lowering the hole oxidation at the valence band (VB) drastically, which explains the poor oxygen evolution activity of Rh-doped SrTiO3. We show that the partially occupied t2g subset of the Rh 4d orbital is completely filled in the presence of Sb due to the transfer of the extra electron to the Rh center. As a result, acceptor states are completely passivated in the case of (Rh, Sb)-codoped SrTiO3 and a continuous band structure with reduced band gap is formed, which is responsible for the observed enhanced photocatalytic activity of (Rh, Sb)-codoped SrTiO3. We have shown that the relative positions of the band edges of (Rh, Sb)-codoped SrTiO3 with respect to the water redox levels are in favor of the spontaneous release of both hydrogen and oxygen during water splitting, which is consistent with the experimental observation. We have also studied the effect of codoping in different proportions (1 : 2 and 2 : 1) of Rh and Sb. Although 1 : 2 (Rh, Sb)-codoping leads to the formation of a clean band structure with the reduction of the band gap by a larger extent, it shows lower photo-conversion efficiency due to its charge non-compensated nature. In addition, the presence of acceptor states above the VB limits the oxygen evolution efficiency of 2 : 1 (Rh, Sb)-codoped SrTiO3. Thus, the present approach successfully reproduces the experimental features of the Rh-monodoped as well as (Rh, Sb)-codoped SrTiO3 and also explains their origin.

  10. OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE FLOW INSIDE T-JUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-yang; WU Ying-xiang; ZHENG Zhi-chu; GUO Jun; ZHANG Jun; TANG Chi

    2008-01-01

    The oil / water two-phase flow inside T-junctions was numerically simulated with a 3-D two-fluid model, and the turbulence was described using the mixture model. Some experiments of oil / water flow inside a single T-junction were conducted in the laboratory. The results show that the separating performance of T-junction largely depends on the inlet volumetric fraction and flow patterns. A reasonable agreement is reached between the numerical simulation and the experiments for both the oil fraction distribution and the separation efficiency.

  11. Large eddy simulation of water flow over series of dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulation was used to investigate the spatial development of open channel flow over a series of dunes. The three-dimensional filtered Navier-Stokes (N-S equations were numerically solved with the fractional-step method in sigma coordinates. The subgrid-scale turbulent stress was modeled with a dynamic coherent eddy viscosity model proposed by the authors. The computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The mean velocity and the turbulent Reynolds stress affected by a series of dune-shaped structures were compared and analyzed. The variation of turbulence statistics along the flow direction affected by the wavy bottom roughness has been studied. The turbulent boundary layer in a complex geographic environment can be simulated well with the proposed large eddy simulation (LES model.

  12. Global-scale analysis of river flow alterations due to water withdrawals and reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Global-scale information on natural river flows and anthropogenic river flow alterations is required to identify areas where aqueous ecosystems are expected to be strongly degraded. Such information can support the identification of environmental flow guidelines and a sustainable water management that balances the water demands of humans and ecosystems. This study presents the first global assessment of the anthropogenic alteration of river flow regimes by water withdrawals and dams, focusing in particular on the change of flow variability. Six ecologically relevant flow indicators were quantified using an improved version of the global water model WaterGAP. WaterGAP simulated, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree, river discharge as affected by human water withdrawals and dams, as well as naturalized discharge without this type of human interference. Mainly due to irrigation, long-term average river discharge and statistical low flow Q90 (monthly river discharge that is exceeded in 9 out of 10 months have decreased by more than 10% on one sixth and one quarter of the global land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland, respectively. Q90 has increased significantly on only 5% of the land area, downstream of reservoirs. Due to both water withdrawals and dams, seasonal flow amplitude has decreased significantly on one sixth of the land area, while interannual variability has increased on one quarter of the land area main