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Sample records for water droplet size

  1. Dynamical property of water droplets of different sizes adsorbed onto a poly(methyl methacrylate) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Jay; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2010-01-05

    A molecular dynamics approach has been employed to study the dynamical behavior of a water droplet adsorbed on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface. Several sizes of water droplets are considered in order to understand the size influence of the droplet on the dynamical properties of water molecules on the PMMA substrate. The local density profile of water molecules in the droplet upon impact with the PMMA surface is calculated, and the result shows an increase in water penetration with a decrease in the size of the droplet. By examining the velocity field, the regular motion of the water droplet is found both during the equilibrium process and after the droplet reaches the equilibrium state. The dynamical behavior of water molecule is studied by the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) in different regions for different sizes of water droplets. The result shows that VACFs in different regions are significantly influenced for the droplet with 500 water molecules than for that with 2000 water molecules. Calculations in different regions are made for the vibrational spectrum of the oxygen atom, as well as for hydrogen bond dynamics, the lifetime, and the relaxation time of the hydrogen bond. The changes in the hydrogen bond dynamics are consistent with the change in the distribution of the hydrogen bond angle. We conclude that the dynamical properties of the water molecule are significantly affected by the region relative to the surface but only weakly influenced by the size of the droplet.

  2. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is one of the most significant hazards to aircraft. A sizing supercooled liquid water content (SSLWC) sonde is being developed to meet a directly related need...

  3. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-04

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  4. Microorganism viability influences internal phase droplet size changes during storage in water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderGheynst, Jean S; Guo, Hong-Yun; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Scher, Herbert

    2013-10-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions provide an alternative for long-term stabilization of microorganisms. Maintaining physical stability of the emulsion and cell viability is critical for large-scale application. Water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions were prepared with the biolarvacide Lagenidium giganteum and the green alga Chlorella vulgaris. Physical stability was measured via light scattering measurements of the internal phase droplets and cell viability was measured by plating and enumerating colony forming units. Emulsions were demonstrated to stabilize L. giganteum and C. vulgaris for more than 4 months without refrigeration. Introducing nutrients into the internal phase of W/O emulsions without cells had no significant effect on changes in aqueous phase droplet size dynamics. Internal phase droplet size changes that occurred over time were greater in the presence of cells. Increases in droplet size were correlated with cell death indicating measurement of internal phase droplet size changes may be an approach for monitoring declines in cell viability during storage.

  5. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

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    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  6. Angular diagram of broadband emission of millimeter-sized water droplets exposed to gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geints, Yurii E; Zemlyanov, Alexander A; Kabanov, Andrey M; Bykova, Elena E; Apeksimov, Dmitrii V; Bukin, Oleg A; Sokolova, Ekaterina B; Golik, Sergey S; Ilyin, Aleksey A

    2011-09-20

    We report on the experiments on the interaction of gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses with suspended millimeter-sized water droplets. The transparent droplets experienced laser-induced breakdown and explosive boiling up and emitted a broadband radiation. This radiation covers the spectral range from 450 to 1100 nm and consists of the spectrum of laser pulse scattered and transformed by the droplet due to self-phase modulation and plasma emission produced in water during photoionization. The droplet emission spectrum showed remarkable broadening at all viewing angles and is maximal in the direction of the laser exit from the droplet. The enlargement of the droplet results in additional spectral spreading of the emitted radiation. The depth and amount of laser pulse spectral self-transformations upon propagation through the water droplet are simulated by means of numerical calculations.

  7. Ternary water in oil microemulsions made of cationic surfactants, water, and aromatic solvents. 2. Droplet sizes and interactions and exchange of material between droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jada, A.; Lang, J.; Zana, R. (CNRS-ULP, Strasbourg (France)); Makhloufi, R.; Hirsch, E.; Candau, S.J. (Laboratoire de Spectrometrie et d' Imagerie Ultrasonores, Strasbourg (France))

    1990-01-11

    Ternary water in oil microemulsions made of cationic surfactants, water, and aromatic solvents have been investigated by means of time-resolved fluorescence quenching, quasi-elastic light scattering, and electrical conductivity in order to determine the surfactant aggregation number N per water droplet, the rate constant k{sub e} for the exchange of material between droplets through collisions with temporary merging, the droplet diffusion coefficient D, and the coefficient of interaction between droplets {alpha} and to study the occurrence of electrical percolation as a function of the surfactant chain length, head-group size, and water content of system (expressed as the molar concentration ratio {omega} = (water)/(surfactant)). Most measurements were performed with chlorobenzene as solvent. In one instance, chlorobenzene was substituted by benzene in order to investigate the effect of the nature of the solvent. For a given surfactant, N and k{sub e} increased with {omega} and upon substituting chlorobenzene by benzene. Also, at a given {omega}, N and k{sub e} increased when the surfactant chain length was decreased. The increases of k{sub e} were always extremely large. The droplet hydrodynamic radii from quasi-elastic light scattering were found to agree with the droplet sizes calculated with the N values from fluorescence quenching. The droplet interaction coefficient {alpha} became more negative as the surfactant chain length decreased, indicating increasingly attractive interdroplet interactions. Finally, electrical percolation was found to occur in all systems where interdroplet interactions were sufficiently attractive. The percolation threshold {omega}-values increased with surfactant chain length.

  8. EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT, TEMPERATURE AND AVERAGE DROPLET SIZE ON THE SETTLING VELOCITY OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWater-in-oil (W/O emulsions are complex mixtures generally found in crude oil production in reservoirs and processing equipment. Sedimentation studies of water-oil emulsions enable the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior concerning separation of this system composed of two immiscible liquids. Gravitational settling was evaluated in this article for a model emulsion system consisting of water and a Brazilian crude oil diluted in a clear mineral oil as organic phase. The effects of water content and temperature were considered in the study of sedimentation velocity of water-oil emulsions. Water contents between 10% and 50 % and temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC were evaluated, and a Richardson-Zaki type correlation was obtained to calculate settling velocities as a function of the process variables investigated. Water contents and average droplet sizes were monitored at different levels in the settling equipment, thus enabling identification of the effect of these variables on the phenomena of sedimentation and coalescence of the emulsions studied. The results showed that the emulsion stability during sedimentation was governed by the emulsion water content, which yielded high settling velocities at low water contents, even when very small droplets were present. A quantitative analysis of the combined effects of drop size and droplet concentration supports the conclusion that a stronger effect is produced by the higher concentration of particles, compared with the relatively smaller effect of increasing the size of the droplets.

  9. Spectroscopy of growing and evaporating water droplets: exploring the variation in equilibrium droplet size with relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchem, Laura; Buajarern, Jariya; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Ward, Andrew D; Gilham, Richard J J; Johnston, Roy L; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-07-06

    We demonstrate that the thermodynamic properties of a single liquid aerosol droplet can be explored through the combination of a single-beam gradient force optical trap with Raman spectroscopy. A single aqueous droplet, 2-6 microm in radius, can be trapped in air indefinitely and the response of the particle to variations in relative humidity investigated. The Raman spectrum provides a unique fingerprint of droplet composition, temperature, and size. Spontaneous Raman scattering is shown to be consistent with that from a bulk phase sample, with the shape of the OH stretching band dependent on the concentration of sodium chloride in the aqueous phase and on the polarization of the scattered light. Stimulated Raman scattering at wavelengths commensurate with whispering gallery modes is demonstrated to provide a method for determining the size of the trapped droplet with nanometer precision and with a time resolution of 1 s. The polarization dependence of the stimulated scatter is consistent with the dependence observed for the spontaneous scatter from the droplet. By characterizing the spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering from the droplet, we demonstrate that it is possible to measure the equilibrium size and composition of an aqueous droplet with variation in relative humidity. For this benchmark study we investigate the variation in equilibrium size with relative humidity for a simple binary sodium chloride/aqueous aerosol, a typical representative inorganic/aqueous aerosol that has been studied extensively in the literature. The measured equilibrium sizes are shown to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of Köhler theory. We suggest that this approach could provide an important new strategy for characterizing the thermodynamic properties and kinetics of transformation of aerosol particles.

  10. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010 using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC. An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  11. Dynamics of a Water Droplet over a Sessile Oil Droplet: Compound Droplets Satisfying a Neumann Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, R; Dhiman, S; Sen, A K; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-06-13

    We report the dynamics of compound droplets with a denser liquid (water) droplet over a less dense sessile droplet (mineral oil) that satisfies the Neumann condition. For a fixed size of an oil droplet, depending on the size of the water droplet, either it attains the axisymmetric position or tends to migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. For a water droplet-to-oil droplet at volume ratio V w /V o ≥ 0.05, stable axisymmetric configuration is achieved; for V w /V o droplet is observed. The stability and migration of water droplets of size above and below critical size, respectively, are explained using the force balance at the three-phase contact line and film tension. The larger and smaller droplets that initially attain the axisymmetric position or some radial position, respectively, evaporate continuously and thus migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. The radial location and migration of the water droplets of different initial sizes with respect to time are studied. Experiments with water droplets on a flat oil-air interface did not show migration, which signified the role of the curved oil-air interface for droplet migration. Finally, coalescence of water droplets of size above the critical size at the axisymmetric position is demonstrated. Our compound droplet studies could be beneficial for applications involving droplet transport where contamination due to direct contact and pinning of droplets on solid surfaces is of concern. Migration and coalescence of water droplets on curved oil-air interfaces could open new frontiers in chemical and biological applications including multiphase processing and biological interaction of cells and atmospheric chemistry.

  12. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton

    2016-01-01

    for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial...... simulations to determine the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the droplet....

  13. Effects of Water Hardness on Spray Droplet Size Under Aerial Application Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    a significant impact of the efficacy of some crop protection materials and has shown conflicting influence on spray droplet size. The objectives of...Poland: Research Institute of Pomology and Floriculture . Roggenbuck, F. C., R. F. Burow, and D. Penner. 1994. Relationship of leaf position to

  14. Water droplets also swim!

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  15. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Naz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm, these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  16. Mean droplet size and local velocity in horizontal isothermal free jets of air and water, respectively, viscous liquid in quiescent ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Rabadi, S.; Friedel, L. [Fluid Mechanics Institute, Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Al Salaymeh, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Jordan (Jordan)

    2007-01-15

    Measurements using two-dimensional Phase Doppler Anemometry as well as high speed cinematography in free jets at several nozzle exit pressures and mass flow rates, show that the Sauter mean droplet diameter decreases with increasing air and liquid-phase mass flow ratio due to the increase of the air stream impact on the liquid phase. This leads to substantial liquid fragmentation, respectively primary droplet breakup, and hence, satellite droplet formation with small sizes. This trend is also significant in the case of a liquid viscosity higher than that of water. The increased liquid viscosity stabilizes the droplet formation and breakup by reducing the rate of surface perturbations and consequently droplet distortions, ultimately also leading, in total, to the formation of smaller droplets. The droplet velocity decreases with the nozzle downstream distance, basically due to the continual air entrainment and due to the collisions between the droplets. The droplet collisions may induce further liquid fragmentation and, hence, formation of a number of relatively smaller droplets respectively secondary breakup, or may induce agglomeration to comparatively larger liquid fragments that may rain out of the free jet. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jh; Oyarzua, Elton; Rojano, Andres

    2016-11-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial thermal gradient and CNT chirality. We find that the droplet motion in the armchair CNTs exhibits two clearly delimited stages, a regime wherein the droplet is accelerated and subsequently, a regime wherein the droplet moves with constant velocity. Inside the zig zag CNTs, the droplet accelerates during a very short time and then it moves with constant velocity. We compute the net force during the droplet acceleration and find a correlation between the droplet acceleration and the magnitude of the thermal gradient without any dependence on the droplet size. Moreover, we conduct velocity constrained MD simulations to determine the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the droplet. We acknowledge partial funding from FONDECYT through the Project No. 11130559 and from VRID Universidad de Concepcion.

  18. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0°, 10°, and 45°), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47° contact angle and non-wetting = 93° contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of ~3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45° tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  19. Injection of micron size droplets into vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Caroline; Poulose, John; Ogawa, Daisuke; Goeckner, Matthew; Overzet, Lawrence

    2013-09-01

    Previous experiments using direct liquid injection into plasma for film deposition produced films that had unwanted voids. We believe that the uneven deposition of polymer film is due to injected liquids not completely evaporating into the plasma and landing on the surface of the substrate instead. To address this issue, we chose to improve upon the previous film deposition chamber setup by modifying the injector to decrease the injected liquid droplet sizes. The literature presents multiple theories on liquid breakup into air and resultant droplet sizes but to the best of our knowledge, there is not much research on droplet breakup dynamics or resultant droplet sizes when liquid is injected into low pressure (poster, we will describe previous work done, experimental setup along with experimental data on droplet sizes produced by orifices of various sizes when liquid is injected into low pressure. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy under grant No. DE-SC0001355.

  20. Superheated Water Atomization: Some New Aspects of Control and Determining Disperse Characteristics of Atomization Plume in Micron and Submicron Ranges of Droplet Size*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalkind, V. I.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Nizovskiy, V. L.; Nizovskiy, L. V.; Schigel, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    New experimental data on superheated water atomization is presented. It is shown that in contrast to the case of short cylindrical nozzles, which provide bimodal water-droplet sprays, the application of divergent nozzles makes it possible to obtain one-modal water atomization with droplets of about micron diameter being obtained. This fact is due to changes in the mechanism of superheated water jet fragmentation and it is very important for engineering applications. A modified experimental technique for processing integral monochromatic scattering indicatrix was developed and tested. In addition, a new calculation code was worked out for calculating atomized water drop-size distribution (on the basis of Mi theory) in micron and submicron ranges.

  1. Water-in-Water Droplets by Passive Microfluidic Flow Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-04-05

    We present a simple microfluidic system that generates water-in-water, aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets, by passive flow focusing. ATPS droplet formation is achieved by applying weak hydrostatic pressures, with liquid-filled pipette tips as fluid columns at the inlets, to introduce low speed flows to the flow focusing junction. To control the size of the droplets, we systematically vary the interfacial tension and viscosity of the ATPS fluids and adjust the fluid column height at the fluid inlets. The size of the droplets scales with a power law of the ratio of viscous stresses in the two ATPS phases. Overall, we find a drop size coefficient of variation (CV; i.e., polydispersity) of about 10%. We also find that when drops form very close to the flow focusing junction, the drops have a CV of less than 1%. Our droplet generation method is easily scalable: we demonstrate a parallel system that generates droplets simultaneously and improves the droplet production rate by up to one order of magnitude. Finally, we show the potential application of our system for encapsulating cells in water-in-water emulsions by encapsulating microparticles and cells. To the best of our knowledge, our microfluidic technique is the first that forms low interfacial tension ATPS droplets without applying external perturbations. We anticipate that this simple approach will find utility in drug and cell delivery applications because of the all-biocompatible nature of the water-in-water ATPS environment.

  2. Tunneling of micron-sized droplets through soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ildoo; Wu, X L

    2010-08-01

    When a micron-sized water droplet impacts on a freely suspended soap film with speed v(i), there exists a critical impact velocity of penetration v(C). Droplets with v(i)film after impacts, whereas droplets with v(i)>v(C) tunnel through it. In all cases, the film remains intact despite the fact that the droplet radius (R_{0}=26 μm) is much greater than the film thickness (0film is required for penetration. Quantitatively, we found that this deformation energy corresponds to the creation of ∼14 times of the cross-sectional area of the droplet (14πR(0)(2)) or a critical Weber number We(C)}(≡2ρ(w) v(C0)(2) R(0)/σ)≃44 , where ρ(w) and σ are, respectively, the density and the surface tension of water.

  3. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  4. Cloud water composition during HCCT-2010: Scavenging efficiencies, solute concentrations, and droplet size dependence of inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pinxteren, Dominik; Wadinga Fomba, Khanneh; Mertes, Stephan; Müller, Konrad; Spindler, Gerald; Schneider, Johannes; Lee, Taehyoung; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    differences and limitations of the approaches (such as outgassing of dissolved gases during residual particle sampling). Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) of aerosol constituents were 0.56-0.94, 0.79-0.99, 0.71-98, and 0.67-0.92 for SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and DOC respectively when calculated as event means with in-cloud data only. SEs estimated using data from an upwind site were substantially different in many cases, revealing the impact of gas-phase uptake (for volatile constituents) and mass losses across Mt. Schmücke likely due to physical processes such as droplet scavenging by trees and/or entrainment. Drop size-resolved cloud water concentrations of major ions SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ revealed two main profiles: decreasing concentrations with increasing droplet size and "U" shapes. In contrast, profiles of typical coarse particle mode minor ions were often increasing with increasing drop size, highlighting the importance of a species' particle concentration size distribution for the development of size-resolved solute concentration patterns. Concentration differences between droplet size classes were typically three-stage collector and somewhat more pronounced from the five-stage collector, while they were much larger for minor ions. Due to a better separation of droplet populations, the five-stage collector was capable of resolving some features of solute size dependencies not seen in the three-stage data, especially sharp concentration increases (up to a factor of 5-10) in the smallest droplets for many solutes.

  5. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  6. Electrostatic Method to Measure the Size of the Sprayed Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuna-Broniowski, M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper is presented the new method the measurement of the main parameters the atomised stream of liquid. This method base on the measurement of the electric charge carried by water drops charged by high voltage. The electrostatic sensor to measure of the droplets size, is associated with precision mechanic system scanning the sprayed surface. The amplified and conditioned signals from electrostatic sensor are send to the computer system equipped in virtual instrument to analyse the size and spatial distribution of droplets. The virtual instrument control also the scanning system.

  7. Size dependent droplet actuation in digital microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2009-05-01

    Digital microfluidic systems (DMFS) manipulate liquid droplets with volumes in submicroliter range in two dimensional arrays of cells. Among possible droplet actuation mechanisms, Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation has been found to be most feasible and advantageous because of low power consumption, ease of signal generation and basic device fabrication. In EWOD based DMFS, droplets are actuated by applying an electric field and thus increasing the wettability on one side of the droplet. In this paper, we show that the EWOD actuation of a droplet can be modeled as a closed loop system having unity feedback of position. Electrode, dielectric and droplet are modeled as a capacitor with variable area as the droplet, considered as a conductor, moves over the dielectric layer. The EWOD force depends on the rate of change of droplet area over the actuated electrode, which in turn depends on the direction of motion and the position of the droplet between the actuated and previous electrode. Thus, EWOD actuation intrinsically utilizes the droplet position to generate sufficient force to accelerate the droplet. When the droplet approaches the final position, the magnitude of force reduces automatically so the droplet decelerates. In case the droplet has sufficient momentum to exceed the final position, the EWOD force, according to the model, will act on the opposite side of the droplet in order to bring it back to the desired position. The dynamic response has been characterized using the proposed model for different droplet sizes, actuation voltages, dielectric thicknesses and electrode sizes.

  8. Effect of droplet size on the droplet behavior on the heterogeneous surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Yeon; Son, Sung Wan; Ha, ManYeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Gap [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The characteristics of a three-dimensional hemispherical droplet on a heterogeneous surface were studied using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The hydrophilic surface has a hydrophobic part at the center. The hemispherical droplets are located at the center of the heterogeneous surface. According to the contact angles of hydrophilic and hydrophobic bottom surfaces, the droplet either separates or reaches a new equilibrium state. The separation time varies according to the change in droplet size, and it affects the status of droplet separation. The droplet separation behavior was investigated by analyzing the velocity vector around the phase boundary line. The shape and separation time of a droplet are determined by the contact angle of each surface. The speed of droplet separation increases as the difference in contact angle increases between the hydrophobic surface and hydrophilic surface. The separation status and the separation time of a droplet are also determined by the change of the droplet size. As the size of the droplet decreases, the effect of surface tension decreases, and the separation time of the droplet also decreases. On the other hand, as the droplet becomes larger, the effect of surface tension increases and the time required for the droplet to separate also increases.

  9. Optofluidics based lab-on-chip device for in situ measurement of mean droplet size and droplet size distribution of an emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivhare, P. K.; Prabhakar, A.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    There is an urgent need for a cost-effective, precise, and portable device for rapid and in situ measurement of the critical properties of an emulsion. Here, we report the development of such an optofluidic device for the measurement of mean droplet size ({{d}\\text{Mean}} ) and droplet size distribution (DSD) of a water-in-oil emulsion. We formulated and detected water-in-oil droplets of much smaller dimensions (15 μ \\text{m} ) compared to the detection of larger droplets or plugs (100 μ \\text{m} to 300 μ \\text{m} ) reported in the literature, employing a cost effective and portable in-house built optical detection system. Use of the device for the measurement of the frequency of droplets from an on-chip droplet generator is demonstrated and validated using microscopy with excellent accuracy (2%). In addition, we provide some insight into the relatively high uncertainty in the collected signal in case of smaller droplets. The droplet size {{d}\\text{D}} is characterized in terms of forward scatter signal {{v}\\text{FSC}} and residence time τ . We further argue that normalized residence time τ of droplets in the detection zone which correlates linearly with droplet size {{d}\\text{D}} is a better parameter to measure droplet size {{d}\\text{D}} , compared to the forward scatter signal {{v}\\text{FSC}} which correlates nonlinearly with {{d}\\text{D}} . Finally, the device is used to count the number of droplets of different size to predict {{d}\\text{Mean}} and DSD of emulsions. The results were compared with that obtained from traditional microscopy and a very good match (10-13%) was found, in contrast to previously reported non-portable off-chip methods that are 20-44% accurate. Thus, the reported device possesses high potential for accurate measurement of {{d}\\text{Mean}} and DSD of emulsions in practical applications.

  10. Evaluation of droplet size distributions using univariate and multivariate approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauno, M.H.; Larsen, C.C.; Vilhelmsen, T.

    2013-01-01

    of the distribution. The current study was aiming to compare univariate and multivariate approach in evaluating droplet size distributions. As a model system, the atomization of a coating solution from a two-fluid nozzle was investigated. The effect of three process parameters (concentration of ethyl cellulose...... in ethanol, atomizing air pressure, and flow rate of coating solution) on the droplet size and droplet size distribution using a full mixed factorial design was used. The droplet size produced by a two-fluid nozzle was measured by laser diffraction and reported as volume based size distribution......Pharmaceutically relevant material characteristics are often analyzed based on univariate descriptors instead of utilizing the whole information available in the full distribution. One example is droplet size distribution, which is often described by the median droplet size and the width...

  11. Critical size ratio for coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Liang, Qianqing; Jiang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Lan, Zhong; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces has been relatively well-established over the years. Most of the related studies are only considering the coalescence process of equal-sized water droplets. However, the coalescence of droplets with different sizes is actually more frequently encountered and the effect of the size ratio on droplet jumping is very crucial to the hydrodynamics of this process. In this work, the effect of the initial droplet size ratio on coalescence-induced jumping of two water droplets is investigated experimentally and numerically. For the previously reported jumping droplet sizes (˜1-100 μm), it is found that the critical droplet size ratio below which the jumping does not occur is about 0.56. The results agree well with the experimental data as the size ratios of observed jumping events collapse into the predicted jumping regime. These findings will gain insights into droplet jumping which has great potential in a number of industrial processes.

  12. Droplet phase characteristics in liquid-dominated steam--water nozzle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alger, T.W.

    1978-08-09

    An experimental study was undertaken to determine the droplet size distribution, the droplet spatial distribution and the mean droplet velocity in low-quality, steam-water flow from a rectangular cross-section, converging-diverging nozzle. A unique forward light scattering technique was developed for droplet size distribution measurements. Droplet spatial variations were investigated using light transmission measurements, and droplet velocities were measured with a laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system incorporating a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. Nozzle throat radius of curvature and height were varied to investigte their effects on droplet size. Droplet size distribution measurements yielded a nominal Sauter mean droplet diameter of 1.7 ..mu..m and a nominal mass-mean droplet diameter of 2.4 ..mu..m. Neither the throat radius of curvature nor the throat height were found to have a significant effect upon the nozzle exit droplet size. The light transmission and LDV measurement results confirmed both the droplet size measurements and demonstrated high spatial uniformity of the droplet phase within the nozzle jet flow. One-dimensional numerical calculations indicated that both the dynamic breakup (thermal equilibrium based on a critical Weber number of 6.0) and the boiling breakup (thermal nonequilibrium based on average droplet temperature) models predicted droplet diameters on the order of 7.5 ..mu..m, which are approximately equal to the maximum stable droplet diameters within the nozzle jet flow.

  13. Broadband emission spectrum dynamics of large water droplets exposed to intense ultrashort laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geints, Yuri E; Kabanov, Andrey M; Matvienko, Gennadii G; Oshlakov, Victor K; Zemlyanov, Alexander A; Golik, Sergey S; Bukin, Oleg A

    2010-08-15

    We report on experiments on the interaction of a gigawatt femtosecond laser pulse train with hanging isolated millimeter-sized water droplets. A transparent droplet experienced explosive boiling-up and emitted light in the visible spectrum as a result of laser-induced plasma formed inside the droplet volume. The droplet emission spectra showed remarkable broadening, depending on the laser power. The role of pulse self-phase modulation in measured spectral broadening when the pulse propagates through the droplet is discussed.

  14. Doping of Green Fluorescent Protein into Superfluid Helium Droplets: Size and Velocity of Doped Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Maha; Zhang, Jie; Oswalt, Andrew; Porter, Joseph J; Mehl, Ryan A; Kong, Wei

    2017-09-14

    We report doping of green fluorescent protein from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. From analyses of the time profiles of the doped droplets, we identify two distinct groups of droplets. The faster group has a smaller average size, on the order of 10(6) helium atoms/droplet, and the slower group is much larger, by at least an order of magnitude. The relative populations of these two groups depend on the temperature of the droplet source: from 11 to 5 K, the signal intensity of the slower droplet group gradually increases, from near the detection limit to comparable to that of the faster group. We postulate that the smaller droplets are formed via condensation of gaseous helium upon expansion from the pulsed valve, while the larger droplets develop from fragmentation of ejected liquid helium. Our results on the size and velocity of the condensation peak at higher source temperatures (>7 K) agree with previous reports, but those at lower temperatures (<7 K) seem to be off. We attribute this discrepancy to the masking effect of the exceedingly large droplets from the fragmentation peak in previous measurements of droplet sizes. Within the temperature range of our investigation, although the expansion condition changes from subcritical to supercritical, there is no abrupt change in either the velocity distribution or the size distribution of the condensation peak, and the most salient effect is in the increasing intensity of the fragmentation peak. The absolute doping efficiency, as expressed by the ratio of ion-doped droplets over the total number of ions from the ESI source, is on the order of 10(-4), while only hundreds of doped ions have been detected. Further improvements in the ESI source are key to extending the technology for future experiments. On the other hand, the separation of the two groups of droplets in velocity is beneficial for size selection of only the smaller droplets for future experiments of electron

  15. Spheroid droplets evaporation of water solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Misyura S. Y.; Morozov V.S.

    2017-01-01

    Droplet film boiling on a horizontal heating surface was studied experimentally. The heat transfer coefficient of droplet water solution in the spheroidal state decreases with a rise of wall overheating and spheroid diameter. Evaporation of small spheroid (diameter d 20 mm). At the evaporation of large spheroids a spheroid shape changes in time that significantly affect coefficients of generalizing curves that use dimensionless numbers.

  16. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  17. How water droplets evaporate on a superhydrophobic substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Nair, Hrudya; van Houselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Evaporation of water droplets on a superhydrophobic substrate, on which the contact line is pinned, is investigated. While previous studies mainly focused on droplets with contact angles smaller than $90^\\circ$, here we analyze almost the full range of possible contact angles (10$^\\circ$-150$^\\circ$). The greater contact angles and pinned contact lines can be achieved by the use of superhydrophobic Carbon Nanofiber substrates. The time-evolutions of the contact angle and the droplet mass are examined. The experimental data is in good quantitative agreement with the model presented by Popov (Physical Review E 71, 2005), demonstrating that the evaporation process is quasi-static, diffusion-driven, and that thermal effects play no role. Furthermore, we show that the experimental data for the evolution of both the contact angle and the droplet mass can be collapsed onto one respective universal curve for all droplet sizes and initial contact angles.

  18. Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which should show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.

  19. Secondary atomization of single coal-water fuel droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, G.R.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1989-03-01

    The evaporative behavior of single, well characterized droplets of a lignite coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) and a carbon black in water slurry was studied as a function of heating rate and droplet composition. Induced droplet heating rates were varied from 0 to 10{sup 5} K/s. Droplets studied were between 97 and 170 {mu}m in diameter, with compositions ranging from 25 to 60% solids by weight. The effect of a commercially available surfactant additive package on droplet evaporation rate, explosive boiling energy requirements, and agglomerate formation was assessed. Surfactant concentrations were varied from none to 2 and 4% by weight solution (1.7 and 3.6% by weight of active species on a dry coal basis). The experimental system incorporated an electrodynamic balance to hold single, free droplets, a counterpropagating pulsed laser heating arrangement, and both video and high speed cinematographic recording systems. Data were obtained for ambient droplet evaporation by monitoring the temporal size, weight, and solids concentration changes. 49 refs., 31 figs.

  20. An Instrument Employing a Coronal Discharge for the Determination of Droplet-Size Distribution in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Levine, Joseph; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.

    1951-01-01

    A flight instrument that uses electric means for measuring the droplet-size distribution in above-freezing clouds has been devised and given preliminary evaluation in flight. An electric charge is placed on the droplets and they are separated aerodynamically according to their mass. Because the charge placed on the droplets is a. function of the droplet size, the size spectrum can 'be determined by measurement of the charge deposited on cylinders of several different sizes placed to intercept the charged droplets. An expression for the rate of charge acquisition by a water droplet in a field of coronal discharge is derived. The results obtained in flight with an instrument based on the method described indicate that continuous records of droplet-size spectrum variations in clouds can be obtained. The experimental instrument was used to evaluate the method and was not refined to the extent necessary for obtaining conclusive meteorological data. The desirable features of an instrument based on the method described are (i) The instrument can be used in clouds with temperatures above freezing; (2) the size and the shape of the cylinders do not change during the exposure time; (3) the readings are instantaneous and continuous; (4) the available sensitivity permits the study of variations in cloud structures of less than 200 feet in extent.

  1. Improving droplet sizing methodology for spray dynamics investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Jie Woo; Vikram Garaniya; Rouzbeh Abbassi

    2016-01-01

    Spray modelling is one of the most useful techniques to characterize engine performance, efficiency and emissions. The size of droplets is one of the key variables that govern the efficiency of combustion of the liquid fuel. This study aims to develop an interactive tool using MATLAB codes that identifies the droplets and their sizes from the image taken with the long distance microscope in the spray chamber setup. In this developed method, firstly the background of the image was removed and ...

  2. Droplet coalescence on water repellant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youngsuk; Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Choongyeop; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-01-07

    We report our hydrodynamic and energy analyses of droplet coalescence on water repellent surfaces including hydrophobic, superhydrophobic and oil-infused superhydrophobic surfaces. The receding contact angle has significant effects on the contact line dynamics since the contact line dissipation was more significant during the receding mode than advancing. The contact line dynamics is modeled by the damped harmonic oscillation equation, which shows that the damping ratio and angular frequency of merged droplets decrease as the receding contact angle increases. The fast contact line relaxation and the resulting decrease in base area during coalescence were crucial to enhance the mobility of coalescing sessile droplets by releasing more surface energy with reducing dissipation loss. The superhydrophobic surface converts ∼42% of the released surface energy to the kinetic energy via coalescence before the merged droplet jumps away from the surface, while oil-infused superhydrophobic and hydrophobic surfaces convert ∼30% and ∼22%, respectively, for the corresponding time. This work clarifies the mechanisms of the contact line relaxation and energy conversion during the droplet coalescence on water repellent surfaces, and helps develop water repellent condensers.

  3. Microfluidic generation of droplet interface bilayer networks incorporating real-time size sorting in linear and non-linear configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, P.; Law, R. V.; Brooks, N.; Seddon, J. M.; Ces, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel droplet based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized droplet interface bilayers is reported. A microfluidic platform was designed, which allows the generation and packing of picoliter lipid coated water droplets. Droplets were generated by hydrodynamic focusing coupled with selective transport along grooves according to their size. A trapping structure at the end of the groove and a fine control of the flow pressures allowed for the droplets to be successfully trapped and aligned on demand. This technology facilitates the fine control of droplet size production as well as the generation of extended networks from a variety of lipids including 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in linear and non-linear configurations, which is vital to the application of Droplet Interface Bilayers to biological network construction on-chip. PMID:25538807

  4. A microfluidic platform for size-dependent generation of droplet interface bilayer networks on rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, P.; Elani, Y.; Law, R. V.; Brooks, N. J.; Seddon, J. M.; Ces, O.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are emerging as a cornerstone technology for the bottom up construction of cell-like and tissue-like structures and bio-devices. They are an exciting and versatile model-membrane platform, seeing increasing use in the disciplines of synthetic biology, chemical biology, and membrane biophysics. DIBs are formed when lipid-coated water-in-oil droplets are brought together—oil is excluded from the interface, resulting in a bilayer. Perhaps the greatest feature of the DIB platform is the ability to generate bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together, which can in turn be used in applications ranging from tissue mimics, multicellular models, and bio-devices. For such applications, the construction and release of DIB networks of defined size and composition on-demand is crucial. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized DIB networks (300–1500 pl droplets) on-chip. We do this by employing a droplet-on-rails strategy where droplets are guided down designated paths of a chip with the aid of microfabricated grooves or “rails,” and droplets of set sizes are selectively directed to specific rails using auxiliary flows. In this way we can uniquely produce parallel bilayer networks of defined sizes. By trapping several droplets in a rail, extended DIB networks containing up to 20 sequential bilayers could be constructed. The trapped DIB arrays can be composed of different lipid types and can be released on-demand and regenerated within seconds. We show that chemical signals can be propagated across the bio-network by transplanting enzymatic reaction cascades for inter-droplet communication. PMID:26759638

  5. Edge effects on water droplet condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Marie-Gabrielle; Mongruel, Anne; Royon, Laurent; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of geometrical or thermal discontinuities on the growth of water droplets condensing on a cooled substrate. Edges, corners, and cooled and noncooled boundaries can have a strong effect on the vapor concentration profile and mass diffusion around the drops. In comparison to growth in a pattern where droplets have to compete to catch vapor, which results in a linear water concentration profile directed perpendicularly to the substrate, droplets near discontinuities can get more vapor (outer edges, corners), resulting in faster growth or less vapor (inner edges), giving lower growth. When the cooling heat flux limits growth instead of mass diffusion (substrate with low thermal conductivity, strong heat exchange with air), edge effects can be canceled. In certain cases, growth enhancement can reach nearly 500% on edges or corners.

  6. Chemical composition and droplet size distribution of cloud at the summit of Mount Tai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of 39 cloud samples and droplet size distributions in 24 cloud events were investigated at the summit of Mt. Tai from July to October 2014. Inorganic ions, organic acids, metals, HCHO, H2O2, sulfur(IV, organic carbon, and elemental carbon as well as pH and electrical conductivity were analyzed. The acidity of the cloud water significantly decreased from a reported value of pH 3.86 during 2007–2008 (Guo et al., 2012 to pH 5.87 in the present study. The concentrations of nitrate and ammonium were both increased since 2007–2008, but the overcompensation of ammonium led to an increase in the mean pH value. The microphysical properties showed that cloud droplets were smaller than 26.0 µm and most were in the range of 6.0–9.0 µm at Mt. Tai. The maximum droplet number concentration (Nd was associated with a droplet size of 7.0 µm. High liquid water content (LWC values could facilitate the formation of larger cloud droplets and broadened the droplet size distribution. Cloud droplets exhibited a strong interaction with atmospheric aerosols. Higher PM2. 5 levels resulted in higher concentrations of water-soluble ions and smaller sizes with increased numbers of cloud droplets. The lower pH values were likely to occur at higher PM2. 5 concentrations. Clouds were an important sink for soluble materials in the atmosphere. The dilution effect of cloud water should be considered when estimating concentrations of soluble components in the cloud phase.

  7. Median ellipse parameterization for robust measurement of fuel droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Hoxie, Alison

    2016-02-01

    The combustion properties of blended fuel combinations can be characterized by performing single droplet fuel combustion experiments. These combustion experiments are visualized using high speed image acquisition. Once the high speed images are obtained, the burn rate and other characteristics of combustion, such as the occurrence of microexplosions, can be characterized. Currently these quantities are either measured manually or are measured using automated software. However, the current software packages used for this task are limited in that they can only measure droplets that are elliptical in shape and manual corrections often have to be made to avoid significant errors in the measurement. An automated droplet tracking algorithm is presented that can automatically track droplet size without manual intervention due to its robustness to the presence of missing or extra edges in the images. In addition, the proposed method can track shapes more general than ellipses, which is required in order to track the droplet during microexplosions. The proposed algorithm starts by fitting ellipses to numerous five point subsets from the droplet edge data. The closed contour is parameterized by determining the median perimeter of the set of ellipses. The resulting curve is not an ellipse, allowing arbitrary closed contours to be parameterized. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the performance of existing algorithms are compared to a ground truth segmentation of the fuel droplet images. This comparison demonstrates that the median ellipse parameterization algorithm has improved performance for both area quantification and edge deviation.

  8. Size control of giant unilamellar vesicles prepared from inverted emulsion droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toyota, Taro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-06-15

    The production of giant lipid vesicles with controlled size and structure will be an important technology in the design of quantitative biological assays in cell-mimetic microcompartments. For establishing size control of giant vesicles, we investigated the vesicle formation process, in which inverted emulsion droplets are transformed into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) when they pass through an oil/water interface. The relationship between the size of the template emulsion and the converted GUVs was studied using inverted emulsion droplets with a narrow size distribution, which were prepared by microfluidics. We successfully found an appropriate centrifugal acceleration condition to obtain GUVs that had a desired size and narrow-enough size distribution with an improved yield so that emulsion droplets can become the template for GUVs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving droplet sizing methodology for spray dynamics investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Jie Woo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spray modelling is one of the most useful techniques to characterize engine performance, efficiency and emissions. The size of droplets is one of the key variables that govern the efficiency of combustion of the liquid fuel. This study aims to develop an interactive tool using MATLAB codes that identifies the droplets and their sizes from the image taken with the long distance microscope in the spray chamber setup. In this developed method, firstly the background of the image was removed and then image processing techniques, dilation and erosion, were applied to the image file to refine the image files. Subsequently, circle detection method based on the Hough Transform algorithm with the function of imfindcircles was implemented. This function of the program allows the user to identify size droplets from the image files. A statistical study was conducted with the results automated from the MATLAB program using a different set of threshold values of black and white contrast. The results showed an optimal range for the threshold (black and white values between 40 and 70. This optimal threshold range was established based on consideration of the correct and incorrect identification of the droplets. The results indicated that the program has the ability to identify the droplet providing size and numbers. The MATLAB program was developed using MATLAB compiler and can be used at different workstations.

  10. 3D Velocimetry and droplet sizing in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michałek, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube (RHVT) is a device currently used to generate local cooling. In general, the fluid that is injected into the RHVT is a single-phase gas. In this study, however, we have added a dispersed phase (water droplets) to the gas (nitrogen). By means of phase Doppler particle analysis, three velocity components, their higher order moments, and sizes of droplets were measured, showing high intensity velocity fluctuations in the core region of the main vortex. The frequency spectrum of the velocity is presented and reveals that wobbling of the vortex axis is the cause of the high intensity fluctuations. The wobbling motion reduces the influence of the droplet size on the radial droplet velocity.

  11. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Bradley K; Hoffmann, W Clint

    2016-09-16

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected.

  12. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of spray volume and droplet size are critical to evaluating the movement and transport of applied sprays associated with both crop production and protection practices and vector control applications for public health. Any sampling device used for this purpose will have an efficiency of...

  13. Predicting the size of droplets produced through Laplace pressure induced snap-off

    CERN Document Server

    Barkley, Solomon; Weeks, Eric R; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Laplace pressure driven snap-off is a technique that is used to produce droplets for emulsions and microfluidics purposes. Previous predictions of droplet size have assumed a quasi-equilibrium low flow limit. We present a simple model to predict droplet sizes over a wide range of flow rates, demonstrating a rich landscape of droplet stability depending on droplet size and growth rate. The model accounts for the easily adjusted experimental parameters of geometry, interfacial tension, and the viscosities of both phases.

  14. Oil slicks on water surface: Breakup, coalescence, and droplet formation under breaking waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, Indrajith D; Yapa, Poojitha D

    2017-01-15

    The ability to calculate the oil droplet size distribution (DSD) and its dynamic behavior in the water column is important in oil spill modeling. Breaking waves disperse oil from a surface slick into the water column as droplets of varying sizes. Oil droplets undergo further breakup and coalescence in the water column due to the turbulence. Available models simulate oil DSD based on empirical/equilibrium equations. However, the oil DSD evolution due to subsequent droplet breakup and coalescence in the water column can be best represented by a dynamic population model. This paper develops a phenomenological model to calculate the oil DSD in wave breaking conditions and ocean turbulence and is based on droplet breakup and coalescence. Its results are compared with data from laboratory experiments that include different oil types, different weathering times, and different breaking wave heights. The model comparisons showed a good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Suspension characteristics of water droplet in oil under ultrasonic standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; Cao, Juhang; Ren, Jing; Yan, Haipeng; He, Limin

    2017-11-01

    The suspension characteristics of water droplet in oil were investigated under ultrasonic standing waves with high-speed photography in this paper. Firstly, the suspension position of droplet was predicted by theoretical derivation. The motion trajectory of droplet was captured and a kinetic analysis was applied to characterize the suspension position of droplet. The effects of droplet size, acoustic pressure, frequency, as well as density ratio of water and oil on the suspension position of droplet were analyzed in details. It was proved that the droplet size had little effect on the suspension position at different frequencies. The suspension zone approached minimum at 39.4kHz, and the suspension position of droplet was insensitive to acoustic pressure amplitude and density ratio at this frequency. These would be advantageous to maintain the stability of droplet banding and shorten the width of banding. In addition, it was proved that the suspension position of droplet is approximately linear with the density ratio at different frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. LES of certain droplet size effects in fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    This thesis belongs to the field of mechanical engineering, more precisely to computational fluid dynamics and fuel injection modelling. This type of problems have been extensively studied because of their practical importance, for example, in combustion processes of automotive industry. Novel challenges are reduction of exhaust gas emissions in the present diesel fuel-based and also in bio diesel-based concepts. The problem studied in this work is of generic nature and it can be related to many real world problems. A model problem of droplet-laden jet is studied to emulate a fuel spray. The most essential parameter that is studied is fuel droplet size. More precisely, the ratio of droplet timescale and fluid timescale i.e. the Stokes number. Mathematically, the studied system can be formulated in terms of the Navier-Stokes equation with a spray momentum source term at low Mach number regime. A feature characteristic to this study is to use large scale computer simulation to simulate the system. For adequate modelling, this work makes use of a method called Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to simulate the motion of the turbulent gas and Lagrangian Particle Tracking (LPT) to simulate the motion of the droplets. The main computational tool used in this work is the OpenFOAM software. In fact, the present work is one of the first computational studies on LES/LPT diesel spray modeling in which droplet-level phenomena are discussed in light of the global behavior of the spray jet in an extensive manner. In view of the literature on this topic the results of the work seem to be realistic. The dependence of spray shape on droplet size (Stokes number) is studied and differences between the shapes are consistently explained. It is noted that mixing inside the spray depends significantly on the fuel droplet size. Quantitative and statistical analysis methods are developed in order to explain the connection between spray shape and mixing. The presented analysis explains the results

  17. Transport of Colloid-Size Oil Droplets in Saturated and Unsaturated Sand Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, N.; Travis, M.; Gross, A.

    2011-12-01

    Oil in wastewater poses significant treatment and subsequent environmental challenges. Accumulation of oils in soil leads to hydrophobicity, and the transport of colloidal-sized oil droplets may facilitate the co-transport of oil soluble contaminants such as pesticides or pharmaceutical materials. In order to determine transport characteristics of colloidal-sized, edible oil droplets, short-pulse column breakthrough experiments were conducted. Oil droplets (mean diameter 0.7 μm, ζ-potential -34±1, density 0.92 g cm-3) were injected simultaneously with latex microspheres (0.02, 0.2 and 1.0 μm, ζ-potentials -16±1, -30±2, and -49±1, respectively, density 1.055 g cm-3) and bromide in saturated and unsaturated quartz sand (ζ-potential -63±2 mV). Breakthrough of oil droplets was consistently detected first and recovery of oil droplets from the column was 20% greater than similarly sized microspheres in the saturated column, and 16% greater in high (0.18±0.01) volumetric water content (VWC) unsaturated columns. Higher variability was observed in the lower VWC (0.14±0.01) column experiments, and oil droplet recovery was just slightly greater than similarly sized microspheres and statistically higher only compared to the 0.02 μm microspheres. The research demonstrated that oil droplets are able to be transported as colloids in both saturated and unsaturated porous media. An important finding was that transport of oil droplets exceeded that of microspheres within the same size range and similar electrostatic properties. Classical filtration theory indicates that oil droplets in the diameter range of about 0.5 to 2 μm will exhibit reduced deposition due to buoyancy. However, current improvements to the theory do not accommodate prediction of buoyant particle transport and the theory needs review. High recovery of oil droplets in unsaturated porous media is a novel finding. As expected, straining appeared to be an important removal mechanism in unsaturated

  18. A droplet size dependent multiphase mixture model for two phase flow in PEMFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guangli; Yamazaki, Yohtaro [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Abudula, Abuliti [New Energy Technology Research Division, Aomori Industrial Research Center, Aomori (Japan)

    2009-10-20

    A droplet size dependent multiphase mixture model is developed in this paper, and the droplet size in the gas channel can be considered as a parameter in this multiphase mixture model, which includes the effect of gas diffusion layer (GDL) properties and the gas drag function and cannot be considered in the commonly used multiphase mixture model in the references. The three-dimensional two phase and non-isothermal simulation of the PEMFCs with a straight flow field is performed. The effect of droplet size on the liquid remove, the effect of liquid water on the heat transfer and the effect of gas flow pattern on the heat and mass transfer are mainly investigated. The simulation results show that the large droplet is hard to be dragged by the gas, so it produces large water saturation. The results of the heat transfer show that the liquid water hinders the heat transfer in the GDL and catalyst layer, so it produces the large relative high temperature area, and there are large temperature difference and water saturation in the PEMFCs operated with coflow pattern compared with counter flow pattern. (author)

  19. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    for droplet sizing data. WIND TUNNEL FACILITIES Sampler testing was conducted at the USDA‐ARS Aerial Application Technology low‐speed wind tunnel in...studies, adjusted appropriately , if possible, for airspeed spe‐ cific collection efficiencies. With aerial application field trials involving minute...spray collection efficiency of nylon screen. Applied Eng. in Agric . 20(2): 147‐152. Fritz, B. K., and W. C. Hoffmann. 2008a. Collection efficiencies

  20. Surface tension of different sized single-component droplets, according to macroscopic data obtained using the lattice gas model and the critical droplet size during phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependences of the surface tension of spherical single-component droplets are calculated using equations of the lattice gas model for 19 compounds. Parameters of the model are found from experimental data on the surface tension of these compounds for a macroscopic planar surface. The chosen low-molecular compounds satisfy the law of corresponding states. To improve agreement with the experimental data, Lennard-Jones potential parameters are varied within 10% deviations. The surface tensions of different sized equilibrium droplets are calculated at elevated and lowered temperatures. It is found that the surface tension of droplets grows monotonically as the droplet size increases from zero to its bulk value. The droplet size R 0 corresponding to zero surface tension corresponds to the critical size of the emergence of a new phase. The critical droplet sizes in the new phase of the considered compounds are estimated for the first time.

  1. 3D Droplet velocities and sizes in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michalek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a known device that is used to generate spot cooling. In this study, we experimentally investigate the behavior of small water droplets in the vortex tube by means of Phase Doppler Particle Analysis. In an experimental vortex tube, droplets were injected together with a carrier gas to form a fast rotating (up to 80.000 rpm) droplet-gas mixture. Droplet sizes, 3D velocity components, and turbulent properties were measured, showing high intensity isotropic turbulence in the core region. To investigate the cause of the high intensity turbulence, a frequency analysis was applied on the measured velocity. The frequency spectrum of the velocity is presented and indicates that wobbling of the vortex axis is the cause of the high turbulence intensity. It was expected that larger droplets have a higher radial velocity because of the larger centrifugal force. Results show, however, that small and lager droplets behave similar. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

  2. Experimental investigation of evaporation enhancement for water droplet containing solid particles in flaming combustion area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of integral characteristics of extinguishing liquid (water droplet evaporation in flaming combustion area has been held. Optical methods of two-phase and heterogeneous mixtures diagnostics (“Particle Image Velocimetry” and “Interferometric Particle Imaging” have been used for heat and mass transfer process investigation. It was established that small-size solid particles (for example, carbon particles in droplet structure can enhance water evaporation in flame area. It was shown that the rate of evaporation process depends on concentration and sizes of solid particles in a water droplet. The correlations have been determined between the sizes of solid particles and water droplets for maximum efficiency of fire extinguishing. The physical aspects of the problem have been discussed.

  3. Liquid marble and water droplet interactions and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuyuki; Bournival, Ghislain; Wanless, Erica J; Nakayama, Saori; Giakoumatos, Emma C; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Syuji

    2015-10-21

    The interactions between two individual water droplets were investigated in air using a combination of coalescence rig and high speed video camera. This combination allows the visualization of droplet coalescence dynamics with millisecond resolution which provides information on droplet stability. Bare water droplets coalesced rapidly upon contact, while droplet stability was achieved by coating the droplets with polystyrene particles carrying pH-responsive poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] hairs (PDEA-PS particles) to form liquid marbles. The asymmetric interaction of a water droplet (pH 3 or 10) armoured with the PDEA-PS particles (liquid marble) with a bare droplet at pH 3 exhibited intermediate stability with coalescence observed following an induction time. The induction time was longer for the pH 10 liquid marble, where the PDEA-PS particles have a hydrophobic surface, than in the case of a pH 3 liquid marble, where the PDEA-PS particles have a hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, film formation of PDEA-PS particles on the liquid marble surface with toluene vapour confirmed capsule formation which prevented coalescence with the neighbouring water droplet instead wetting the capsule upon contact within 3 milliseconds. This study illuminates the stability of individual particle-stabilized droplets and has potential impact on processes and formulations which involve their interaction.

  4. Lipid digestion, micelle formation and carotenoid bioaccessibility kinetics: Influence of emulsion droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia-Trujillo, L; Verkempinck, S H E; Sun, L; Van Loey, A M; Grauwet, T; Hendrickx, M E

    2017-08-15

    Carotenoid-enriched oil-in-water emulsions with different droplet sizes (small: d43 0.72μm; medium: d43 1.9μm; large: d43 15.1μm) were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The kinetics of lipolysis, micelle formation and carotenoid bioaccessibility were monitored during the intestinal phase. The rates of all three processes increased with decreasing droplet size. The large droplet size emulsion contained undigested oil at the end of digestion, whereas an almost complete hydrolysis was observed for the other two emulsions. The sub-micron emulsion presented a higher conversion of MAGs to FFAs during digestion, which led to a higher concentration of FFAs in the mixed micelles. The incorporation of carotenoids into mixed micelles occurred faster and reached a higher final value for the small droplet size emulsion, leading to final carotenoids bioaccessibility values of around 70%. This work provides valuable information for developing in silico models to simulate the lipid digestibility and carotenoid bioaccessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optical manipulation for studies of collisional dynamics of micron-sized droplets under gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Maksym; Chang, Kelken; Galinskiy, Ivan; Mehlig, Bernhard; Hanstorp, Dag

    2017-01-23

    A new experimental technique for creating and imaging collisions of micron-sized droplets settling under gravity is presented. A pair of glycerol droplets is suspended in air by means of two optical traps. The droplet relative velocities are determined by the droplet sizes. The impact parameter is precisely controlled by positioning the droplets using the two optical traps. The droplets are released by turning off the trapping light using electro-optical modulators. The motion of the sedimenting droplets is then captured by two synchronized high-speed cameras, at a frame rate of up to 63 kHz. The method allows the direct imaging of the collision of droplets without the influence of the optical confinement imposed by the trapping force. The method will facilitate efficient studies of the microphysics of neutral, as well as charged, liquid droplets and their interactions with light, electric field and thermodynamic environment, such as temperature or vapor concentration.

  6. Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel droplet floating in a heated-air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Strizhak, P. A.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel (CWSP) droplet floating in a heated-air flow has been studied experimentally. Rank B2 brown-coal particles with a size of 100 μm, used crankcase Total oil, water, and a plasticizer were used as the main CWSP components. A dedicated quartz-glass chamber has been designed with inlet and outlet elements made as truncated cones connected via a cylindrical ring. The cones were used to shape an oxidizer flow with a temperature of 500-830 K and a flow velocity of 0.5-5.0 m/s. A technique that uses a coordinate-positioning gear, a nichrome thread, and a cutter element has been developed for discharging CWSP droplets into the working zone of the chamber. Droplets with an initial size of 0.4 to 2.0 mm were used. Conditions have been determined for a droplet to float in the oxidizer flow long enough for the sustainable droplet burning to be initiated. Typical stages and integral ignition characteristics have been established. The integral parameters (ignition-delay times) of the examined processes have been compared to the results of experiments with CWSP droplets suspended on the junction of a quick-response thermocouple. It has been shown that floating fuel droplets ignite much quicker than the ones that sit still on the thermocouple due to rotation of an CWSP droplet in the oxidizer flow, more uniform heating of the droplet, and lack of heat drainage towards the droplet center. High-speed video recording of the peculiarities of floatation of a burning fuel droplet makes it possible to complement the existing models of water-coal fuel burning. The results can be used for a more substantiated modeling of furnace CWSP burning with the ANSYS, Fluent, and Sigma-Flow software packages.

  7. Influence of palmitoyl pentapeptide and Ceramide III B on the droplet size of nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondari, Dewi; Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Randy, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    The influence of the Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPp) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm III B) as active ingredients on the droplet size of nano-emulsion was studied using different kinds of oil (avocado oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, mineral oil and squalene). The formation of nano-emulsions were prepared in water mixed non ionic surfactant/oils system using the spontaneous emulsification mechanism. The aqueous solution, which consist of water and Tween® 20 as a hydrophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously. The organic solution, which consist of oil and Span® 80 as a lipophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously in ethanol. Ethanol was used as a water miscible solvent, which can help the formation of nano-emulsion. The oil phase (containing the blend of surfactant Span® 80, ethanol, oil and active ingredient) and the aqueous phase (containing water and Tween® 20) were separately prepared at room temperatures. The oil phase was slowly added into aqueous phase under continuous mechanical agitation (18000 rpm). All samples were subsequently homogenized with Ultra-Turrax for 30 minutes. The characterizations of nano-emulsion were carried out using photo-microscope and particle size analyzer. Addition of active ingredients on the formation of nano-emulsion gave smallest droplet size compared without active ingredients addition on the formation of nano-emulsion. Squalene oil with Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPm) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm IIIB) gave smallest droplet size (184.0 nm) compared without Palmitoyl Pentapeptide and Ceramide IIIB (214.9 nm), however the droplets size of the emulsion prepared by the other oils still in the range of nano-emulsion (below 500 nm). The stability of nano-emulsion was observed using two methods. In one method, the stability of nano-emulsion was observed for three months at temperature of 5°C and 50°C, while in the other method, the stability nano-emulsion was observed by centrifuged at 12000 rpm for 30 minutes. Nanoemulsion with active ingredient

  8. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  9. Fat Emulsion Intragastric Stability and Droplet Size Modulate Gastrointestinal Responses and Subsequent Food Intake in Young Adults1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mahamoud O; Hoad, Caroline L; Wright, Jeff; Singh, Gulzar; Stephenson, Mary C; Cox, Eleanor F; Placidi, Elisa; Pritchard, Susan E; Costigan, Carolyn; Ribeiro, Henelyta; Ciampi, Elisabetta; Nandi, Asish; Hedges, Nick; Sanderson, Paul; Peters, Harry PF; Rayment, Pip; Spiller, Robin C; Gowland, Penny A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intragastric creaming and droplet size of fat emulsions may affect intragastric behavior and gastrointestinal and satiety responses. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that gastrointestinal physiologic responses and satiety will be increased by an increase in intragastric stability and by a decrease in fat droplet size of a fat emulsion. Methods: This was a double-blind, randomized crossover study in 11 healthy persons [8 men and 3 women, aged 24 ± 1 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 24.4 ± 0.9] who consumed meals containing 300-g 20% oil and water emulsion (2220 kJ) with 1) larger, 6-μm mean droplet size (Coarse treatment) expected to cream in the stomach; 2) larger, 6-μm mean droplet size with 0.5% locust bean gum (LBG; Coarse+LBG treatment) to prevent creaming; or 3) smaller, 0.4-μm mean droplet size with LBG (Fine+LBG treatment). The participants were imaged hourly by using MRI and food intake was assessed by using a meal that participants consumed ad libitum. Results: The Coarse+LBG treatment (preventing creaming in the stomach) slowed gastric emptying, resulting in 12% higher gastric volume over time (P emulsion droplet size can influence human gastrointestinal physiology and food intake. PMID:25926408

  10. Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Size from the Research Scanning Polarimeter Data: Validation Using in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, M. D.; Cairns, B.; Sinclair, K.; Wasilewski, A. P.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crosbie, E.; Hair, J. W.; Hu, Y.; Hostetler, C. A.; Stamnes, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present comparisons of cloud droplet size distributions retrieved from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) data with correlative in situ measurements made during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES). This field experiment was based at St. John's airport, Newfoundland, Canada with the latest deployment in May - June 2016. RSP was onboard the NASA C-130 aircraft together with an array of in situ and other remote sensing instrumentation. The RSP is an along-track scanner measuring polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels. Its unique high angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 165 degrees. A parametric fitting algorithm applied to the polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows us to retrieve the droplet size distribution (DSD) itself. The latter is important in the case of clouds with complex structure, which results in multi-modal DSDs. During NAAMES the aircraft performed a number of flight patterns specifically designed for comparison of remote sensing retrievals and in situ measurements. These patterns consisted of two flight segments above the same straight ground track. One of these segments was flown above clouds allowing for remote sensing measurements, while the other was at the cloud top where cloud droplets were sampled. We compare the DSDs retrieved from the RSP data with in situ measurements made by the Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). The comparisons show generally good agreement with deviations explainable by the position of the aircraft within cloud and by presence of additional cloud layers in RSP view that do not contribute to the in situ DSDs. In the

  11. Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Size from the RSP Data: Validation Using in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Sinclair, Kenneth; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; Ziemba, Luke; Crosbie, Ewan; Hair, John; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris; Stamnes, Snorre

    2016-01-01

    We present comparisons of cloud droplet size distributions retrieved from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) data with correlative in situ measurements made during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES). This field experiment was based at St. Johns airport, Newfoundland, Canada with the latest deployment in May - June 2016. RSP was onboard the NASA C-130 aircraft together with an array of in situ and other remote sensing instrumentation. The RSP is an along-track scanner measuring polarized and total reflectances in9 spectral channels. Its unique high angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 165 degrees. A parametric fitting algorithm applied to the polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows us to retrieve the droplet size distribution (DSD) itself. The latter is important in the case of clouds with complex structure, which results in multi-modal DSDs. During NAAMES the aircraft performed a number of flight patterns specifically designed for comparison of remote sensing retrievals and in situ measurements. These patterns consisted of two flight segments above the same straight ground track. One of these segments was flown above clouds allowing for remote sensing measurements, while the other was at the cloud top where cloud droplets were sampled. We compare the DSDs retrieved from the RSP data with in situ measurements made by the Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). The comparisons show generally good agreement with deviations explainable by the position of the aircraft within cloud and by presence of additional cloud layers in RSP view that do not contribute to the in situ DSDs. In the

  12. Interferometric laser imaging for in-flight cloud droplet sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, Christina; Roloff, Christoph; Grassmann, Arne

    2016-12-01

    A non-intrusive particle sizing method with a high spatial distribution is used to estimate cloud droplet spectra during flight test campaigns. The interferometric laser imaging for droplet sizing (ILIDS) method derives particle diameters of transparent spheres by evaluating the out-of-focus image patterns. This sizing approach requires a polarized monochromatic light source, a camera including an objective lens with a slit aperture, a synchronization unit and a processing tool for data evaluation. These components are adapted to a flight test environment to enable the microphysical investigation of different cloud genera. The present work addresses the design and specifications of ILIDS system, flight test preparation and selected results obtained in the lower and middle troposphere. The research platform was a Dornier Do228-101 commuter aircraft at the DLR Flight Operation Center in Braunschweig. It was equipped with the required instrumentation including a high-energy laser as the light source. A comprehensive data set of around 71 800 ILIDS images was acquired over the course of five flights. The data evaluation of the characteristic ILIDS fringe patterns relies, among other things, on a relationship between the fringe spacing and the diameter of the particle. The simplest way to extract this information from a pattern is by fringe counting, which is not viable for such an extensive number of data. A brief contrasting comparison of evaluation methods based on frequency analysis by means of fast Fourier transform and on correlation methods such as minimum quadratic difference is used to encompass the limits and accuracy of the ILIDS method for such applications.

  13. Corona Discharge from Water Droplet on Electrically Stressed Polymer Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Otsubo, Masahisa; Honda, Chikahisa; Tanaka, Shou

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the results of experiments and simulations made to examine the corona discharges from water droplets on a polymer surface exposed to electrical stress. In this study, water droplets with different conductivities and volumes were placed on the surface of plate-shaped high temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (HTV-SR) energized with ac voltage, and the corona discharge phenomena were observed by a high-speed camera with an image intensifier. The electric-field distributions were calculated by the finite element method (FEM). It is demonstrated that the electric field is intensified at the triple junction of the water droplet, air and the insulating material due to the difference in their permittivities, which can ionize the surrounding air and trigger a corona discharge. It can also be confirmed that the contact angle, volume, conductivity and number of water droplets are shown to have a marked effect on the mode of the corona discharge development.

  14. Shrinking, growing, and bursting: microfluidic equilibrium control of water-in-water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-07-05

    We demonstrate the dynamic control of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in shrinking, growing, and dissolving conditions. The ATPS droplets are formed passively in a flow focusing microfluidic channel, where the dextran-rich (DEX) and polyethylene glycol-rich (PEG) solutions are introduced as disperse and continuous phases, respectively. To vary the ATPS equilibrium condition, we infuse into a secondary inlet the PEG phase from a different polymer concentration ATPS. We find that the resulting alteration of the continuous PEG phase can cause droplets to shrink or grow by approximately 45 and 30%, respectively. This volume change is due to water exchange between the disperse DEX and continuous PEG phases, as the system tends towards new equilibria. We also develop a simple model, based on the ATPS binodal curve and tie lines, that predicts the amount of droplet shrinkage or growth, based on the change in the continuous phase PEG concentration. We observe a good agreement between our experimental results and the model. Additionally, we find that when the continuous phase PEG concentration is reduced such that PEG and DEX phases no longer phase separate, the ATPS droplets are dissolved into the continuous phase. We apply this method to controllably release encapsulated microparticles and cells, and we find that their release occurs within 10 seconds. Our approach uses the dynamic equilibrium of ATPS to control droplet size along the microfluidic channel. By modulating the ATPS equilibrium, we are able to shrink, grow, and dissolve ATPS droplets in situ. We anticipate that this approach may find utility in many biomedical settings, for example, in drug and cell delivery and release applications.

  15. Droplet size in flow: Theoretical model and application to polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortelný, Ivan; Jůza, Josef

    2017-05-01

    The paper is focused on prediction of the average droplet radius, R, in flowing polymer blends where the droplet size is determined by dynamic equilibrium between the droplet breakup and coalescence. Expressions for the droplet breakup frequency in systems with low and high contents of the dispersed phase are derived using available theoretical and experimental results for model blends. Dependences of the coalescence probability, Pc, on system parameters, following from recent theories, is considered and approximate equation for Pc in a system with a low polydispersity in the droplet size is proposed. Equations for R in systems with low and high contents of the dispersed phase are derived. Combination of these equations predicts realistic dependence of R on the volume fraction of dispersed droplets, φ. Theoretical prediction of the ratio of R to the critical droplet radius at breakup agrees fairly well with experimental values for steadily mixed polymer blends.

  16. Dynamics of water droplets detached from porous surfaces of relevance to PEM fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakakos, A; Ous, T; Gavaises, M; Nouri, J M; Nikolopoulos, N; Yanagihara, H

    2006-08-15

    The detachment of liquid droplets from porous material surfaces used with proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells under the influence of a cross-flowing air is investigated computationally and experimentally. CCD images taken on a purpose-built transparent fuel cell have revealed that the water produced within the PEM is forming droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. These droplets are swept away if the velocity of the flowing air is above a critical value for a given droplet size. Static and dynamic contact angle measurements for three different carbon gas-diffusion layer materials obtained inside a transparent air-channel test model have been used as input to the numerical model; the latter is based on a Navier-Stokes equations flow solver incorporating the volume of fluid (VOF) two-phase flow methodology. Variable contact angle values around the gas-liquid-solid contact-line as well as their dynamic change during the droplet shape deformation process, have allowed estimation of the adhesion force between the liquid droplet and the solid surface and successful prediction of the separation line at which droplets loose their contact from the solid surface under the influence of the air stream flowing around them. Parametric studies highlight the relevant importance of various factors affecting the detachment of the liquid droplets from the solid surface.

  17. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  18. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  19. Droplet Size Distributions Resulting form Entrainment of Surface Oil Slick by Breaking Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    A spectrum of droplet sizes, ranging from submicron to several millimeters, is generated by breaking waves impinging on an oil slick. Their size distribution is crucial for modeling the fate of oil spill, and understanding the underlying flow physics. Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is used for measuring the droplet size distributions at high resolution (1.1 μm/pixel), and at varying temporal scale, from the initial plunging phase (seconds) to long term (hours). The time-resolved DHM data is acquired simultaneously with high speed visualizations of the breakup and large scale features of the entrainment process. Experimental conditions include: (i) plunging and spilling breakers with wave heights of 28.8, 24.9, 22.28 cm; (ii) crude oil (MC252 surrogate), and oil premixed with dispersants (Corexit-9500A) giving two order of magnitude range of water-oil interfacial tension; (iii) Crude, fish, and motor oils with viscosity of 9.4, 63.1 and 306.5 cst, respectively. Shortly after entrainment of crude oil, the droplet radius distribution is bimodal, with a primary peak in the 0-25 μm range, and a secondary peak at 200-250 μm. Adding dispersants reduces the latter to 150 μm. The drastic reduction in interfacial tension upon introduction of dispersants increases the primary peak, and causes short term micro threading. The Secondary peaks dampen within seconds, as the larger droplets rise, whereas the primary peaks are sustained for longer periods. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  20. Droplet Size and Liquid Water Characteristics of the USAAEFA (CH-47) Helicopter Spray System and Natural Clouds as Sampled by a JUH-1H Helicopter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    637 46A Wes, WOOODNv ARoa AtlIadea C&,fonas 9 Doi lele c’e (23) 79,.190, ye.,.e6 521 CALIBRATION REPORT Date: 1129/I7Q Instrument: AN ASSP-00 Size...8217 0 00 0 0 C, 4D 0 cc0cC ,Q000cc0 0 0c0C0c 00 0C c cac cC cc. c c c c L) ~ q -7777777777 PON pn -I 1 ac- 0 00 I S000 C 0 0 0 C -OC 0 0 00 0 C. 0 J% 0...C C- 0 x C a. CC0 PON In U,0 c ca, IrCC0 " a7 cc I C 000 0 C. O C C 0 Q0Q0 04 C c C9t ’ a00 0 C C C~ i0’ £ C CC . .’ .I %%c L.USC C C7 4zc zC 0 0

  1. Segregation by size difference in binary suspensions of fluid droplets in channel flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Masato; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2013-01-01

    In channel flow of multicomponent suspensions, segregation behavior of suspended components perpendicular to the flow direction is often observed, which is considered to be caused by the differential properties of the lateral migration depending on their shape, size, flexibility, and other characteristics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of size differences between suspended components on the segregation behavior, by a two-dimensional numerical simulation for binary dispersed suspensions of fluid droplets of two different sizes subjected to a plane Poiseuille channel flow. The small and large droplets are assumed to have equal surface tensions and equal viscosity ratios of internal to external fluids. The time evolutions of the lateral positions of large and small droplets relative to the channel centerline were computed by changing the area fraction of the small droplets in a mixture with a constant total area fraction. The large droplets are found to migrate closer to the channel centerline and the small droplets are found to migrate closer to the channel wall compared to the corresponding lateral positions in mono-dispersed suspensions at the same area fractions, although the mean lateral positions of the large and small droplets in mono-dispersed suspension are comparable. This segregation behavior as well as the margination of small droplets are enhanced when the size difference between large and small droplets is increased and the area fraction of large droplets is increased. These results may arise from higher tendencies for the large droplets to approach the channel centerline compared to the small droplets, which consequently expel small droplets from the central region toward the channel walls.

  2. Dynamic effects of bouncing water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-06-17

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications due to their extreme water repellent properties. Superhydrophobic surfaces may be generated by the use of hydrophobic coating, roughness, and air pockets between solid and liquid. Dynamic effects, such as the bouncing of a droplet, can destroy the composite solid-air-liquid interface. The relationship between the impact velocity of a droplet and the geometric parameters affects the transition from the solid-air-liquid interface to the solid-liquid interface. Therefore, it is necessary to study the dynamic effect of droplets under various impact velocities. We studied the dynamic impact behavior of water droplets on micropatterned silicon surfaces with pillars of two different diameters and heights and with varying pitch values. A criterion for the transition from the Cassie and Baxter regime to the Wenzel regime based on the relationship between the impact velocity and the parameter of patterned surfaces is proposed. The trends are explained based on the experimental data and the proposed transition criterion. For comparison, the dynamic impact behavior of water droplets on nanopatterned surfaces was investigated. The wetting behavior under various impact velocities on multiwalled nanotube arrays also was investigated. The physics of wetting phenomena for bouncing water droplet studies here is of fundamental importance in the geometrical design of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  3. Effects of oil and drug concentrations on droplets size of palm oil esters (POEs) nanoemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakeena, M H F; Elrashid, S M; Munavvar, A S; Azmin, M N

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the present work is to study the effects of oil and drug concentrations on droplets size of a nanoemulsion. Newly introduced oil, palm oil esters (POEs) by Universiti Putra Malaysia researchers was selected for the oil phase of the nanoemulsion, because the oil was reported to be a good vehicle for pharmaceutical use. Nanoemulsions were prepared with different concentrations of oil and drug and their effects on droplets size were studied by laser scattering spectroscopy (Nanophox). The results of droplets size analysis shows the droplets size increase with increasing concentration of oil and drug concentrations. It can be concluded from this study, that oil and drug concentrations have an effect on the droplets size of POEs nanoemulsion system.

  4. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Erik Anders; Delval, Christophe Eric Ludovic; Freiherr von Und zu Hessberg, P J H

    2009-01-01

    Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under dry conditions freezing 5 was observed to occur below 249...... K, while a freezing threshold of 267 K was observed at high relative humidity. The effect of relative humidity is attributed to an influence on the contact freezing process for the kaolinite-water droplet system, and it is not related to the lifetime of the droplets in the electrodynamic balance....... Freezing probabilities per collision were derived assuming that collisions at the lowest temper10 ature employed had a probability of unity. The data recorded at high humidity should be most relevant to atmospheric conditions, and the results indicate that parameterizations currently used in modelling...

  5. Effects of Homogenous Isotropic Turbulence on the Droplet Size Distribution and Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Rachael; Savas, Ömer

    2017-11-01

    In clouds, the main growth mechanism of droplets with diameters 10-50 μm , known as the size-gap, is collision and coalescence. Atmospheric turbulence is known to increase the droplet growth rate in this range by enhancing the relative velocity between droplets and the formation of droplet clustering, thus increasing the droplet collision rate. The purpose here is to understand further how isotropic, homogeneous turbulence affects the evolution of the droplet size spectrum and the droplet concentration characteristics in the size-gap. Two sets of experiments are conducted in a 40-cm Eaton box, at the center of which homogeneous turbulence is generated. Flow images are taken of aluminum-oxide particles ranging from 0.5-5 μm in various flow conditions using a continuous wave laser sheet. Particle clustering and flow structures are examined for a range of Stokes numbers, where clustering is quantified using the radial distribution function. Secondly, droplets with an average diameter of 10 μm are injected into the turbulence box under various flow conditions. PDA is used to study the development of the droplet size distribution in isotropic, homogeneous turbulence.

  6. Demonstration of droplet size and vaporization rate measurements in the near field of a two-phase jet with droplet lasing spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, P J; Flowers, D; Kennedy, I M

    1998-08-20

    Droplet lasing spectroscopy has been applied to the measurement of droplet size and evaporation rate in a spray. A single droplet, doped with laser dye, was injected along the centerline of a liquid spray. Filters were used to block the strong elastic-scattering signal. The lasing emission from the doped droplet could be detected against the background with mass loadings of liquid in the spray as high as 20%. An analysis of the spectrum of droplet lasing was used to evaluate the droplet diameter. The evaporation rate of the droplet was obtained from consecutive lasing spectra that were obtained from the same droplet. An error analysis of the drop size and drop evaporation measurements was carried out and showed that accurate measurements of evaporation rates were feasible.

  7. Experimental water droplet impingement data on modern aircraft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Breer, Marlin D.; Craig, Neil C.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Preliminary experimental and analytical impingement efficiency data are presented for a NLF(1)-0414F airfoil, s swept MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a swept NACA 0012 wingtip and for a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  8. The Effect of pH and High-Pressure Homogenization on Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Pis Yong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to revisit the effect of high pressure on homogenization and the influence of pH on the emulsion droplet sizes. The high-pressure homogenization (HPH involves two stages of processing, where the first stage involves in blending the coarse emulsion by a blender, and the second stage requires disruption of the coarse emulsion into smaller droplets by a high-pressure homogenizer. The pressure range in this review is in between 10-500 MPa. The homogenised droplet sizes can be reduced by increasing the homogenization recirculation, and there is a threshold point beyond that by applying pressure only, the size cannot be further reduced. Normally, homogenised emulsions are classified by their degree of kinetic stability. Dispersed phase present in the form of droplets while continuous phase also known as suspended droplets. With a proper homogenization recirculation and pressure, a more kinetically stable emulsion can be produced. The side effects of increasing homogenization pressure are that it can cause overprocessing of the emulsion droplets where the droplet sizes become larger rather than the expected smaller size. This can cause kinetic instability in the emulsion. The droplet size is usually measured by dynamic light scattering or by laser light scattering technique. The type of samples used in this reviews are such as chocolate and vanilla based powders; mean droplet sizes samples; basil oil; tomato; lupin protein; oil; skim milk, soymilk; coconut milk; tomato homogenate; corn; egg-yolk, rapeseed and sunflower; Poly(4-vinylpyridine/silica; and Complex 1 until complex 4 approaches from author case study. A relationship is developed between emulsion size and pH. Results clearly show that lower pH offers smaller droplet of emulsion and the opposite occurs when the pH is increased.

  9. Computational Analysis of Droplet Mass and Size Effect on Mist/Air Impingement Cooling Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impingement cooling has been widely employed to cool gas turbine hot components such as combustor liners, combustor transition pieces, turbine vanes, and blades. A promising technology is proposed to enhance impingement cooling with water droplets injection. However, previous studies were conducted on blade shower head film cooling, and less attention was given to the transition piece cooling. As a continuous effort to develop a realistic mist impingement cooling scheme, this paper focuses on simulating mist impingement cooling under typical gas turbine operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in a double chamber model. Furthermore, the paper presents the effect of cooling effectiveness by changing the mass and size of the droplets. Based on the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results of these experiments prove that the mass of 3E – 3 kg/s droplets with diameters of 5–35 μm could enhance 90% cooling effectiveness and reduce 122 K of wall temperature. The results of this paper can provide guidance for corresponding experiments and serve as the qualification reference for future more complicated studies with convex surface cooling.

  10. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  11. Towards droplet size-aware biochemical application compilation for AM-EWOD biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Alistar, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    , but as discrete droplets on an array of electrodes. Microfluidic operations, such as transport, mixing, split, are performed on this array by routing the corresponding droplets on a series of electrodes. Several approaches have been proposed for the compilation of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting...... from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. To simplify the compilation problem, researchers have assumed an abstract droplet size of one electrode. However......, the droplet size abstraction is not realistic and it impacts negatively the execution of the biochemical application, leading in most cases to its failure. Hence the existing compilation approaches have to be revisited to consider the size of the droplets. In this paper we take the first step towards...

  12. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-04

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  13. Water droplet condensation and evaporation in turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in the turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapour. We adopt an Euler–Lagrangian formulation based on conservation laws for the mass, momentum and energy of the continuous phase and on empirical

  14. Partitioned EDGE devices for high throughput production of monodisperse emulsion droplets with two distinct sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, S.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel microfluidic EDGE (Edge based Droplet GEneration) device with regularly spaced micron-sized partitions, which is aimed at upscaling of o/w emulsion preparation. By this means, remarkably higher pressure stability was obtained, and two orders of magnitude higher droplet formation

  15. The influence of initial atomized droplet size on residual particle size from pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Poonam; Stein, Stephen W; Myrdal, Paul B

    2013-10-15

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used for the treatment of diseases of the lung, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mass median aerodynamic diameter of the residual particles (MMADR) delivered from a pMDI plays a key role in determining the amount and location of drug deposition in the lung and thereby the efficacy of the inhaler. The mass median diameter of the initial droplets (MMDI), upon atomization of a formulation, is a significant factor influencing the final particle size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent that MMDI and initial droplet geometric standard deviation (GSD) influence the residual aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSDR) of solution and suspension formulations. From 48 solution pMDI configurations with varying ethanol concentrations, valve sizes and actuator orifice diameters, it was experimentally found that the effective MMDI ranged from 7.8 to 13.3 μm. Subsequently, computational methods were utilized to determine the influence of MMDI on MMADR, by modulating the MMDI for solution and suspension pMDIs. For solution HFA-134a formulations of 0.5% drug in 10% ethanol, varying the MMDI from 7.5 to 13.5 μm increased the MMADR from 1.4 to 2.5 μm. For a suspension formulation with a representative particle size distribution of micronized drug (MMAD=2.5 μm, GSD=1.8), the same increase in MMDI resulted in an increase in the MMADR from 2.7 to only 3.3 μm. Hence, the same increase in MMDI resulted in a 79% increase in MMADR for the solution formulation compared to only a 22% increase for the suspension formulation. Similar trends were obtained for a range of drug concentrations and input micronized drug sizes. Thus, APSDR is more sensitive to changes in MMDI for solution formulations than suspension formulations; however, there are situations in which hypothetically small micronized drug in suspension (e.g. 500 nm MMAD) could resemble trends observed for solution formulations

  16. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and applications to aircraft ice prevention. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized simulation of the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which preheat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, was investigated. Theoretical and experimental work performed to create a physically realistic simulation is described. The behavior of the absorption cross section for melting ice particles was measured by a resonant cavity technique and found to agree with theoretical predictions. Values of the dielectric parameters of supercooled water were measured by a similar technique at lambda = 2.82 cm down to -17 C. The hydrodynamic behavior of accelerated water droplets was studied photograhically in a wind tunnel. Droplets were found to initially deform as oblate spheroids and to eventually become unstable and break up in Bessel function modes for large values of acceleration or droplet size. This confirms the theory as to the maximum stable droplet size in the atmosphere. A computer code which predicts droplet trajectories in an arbitrary flow field was written and confirmed experimentally. The results were consolidated into a simulation to study the heating by electromagnetic fields of droplets impinging onto an object such as an airfoil. It was determined that there is sufficient time to heat droplets prior to impact for typical parameter values. Design curves for such a system are presented.

  17. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  18. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  19. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-09-10

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  20. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, Youngpak

    2015-09-01

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  1. Continuous Growth of Droplet Size Variance due to Condensation in Turbulent Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardina, Gaetano; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2015-10-30

    We use a stochastic model and direct numerical simulation to study the impact of turbulence on cloud droplet growth by condensation. We show that the variance of the droplet size distribution increases in time as t^{1/2}, with growth rate proportional to the large-to-small turbulent scale separation and to the turbulence integral scales but independent of the mean turbulent dissipation. Direct numerical simulations confirm this result and produce realistically broad droplet size spectra over time intervals of 20 min, comparable with the time of rain formation.

  2. Effects of Spray Mixtures on Droplet Size Under Aerial Application Conditions and Implications on Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Applied Engineering in Agriculture Vol. 26(1): 21‐29 2010 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 0883-8542 21 EFFECTS OF...trends in effects of droplet size from changes in airspeed, active ingredients can have a significant effect on the atomization of spray solutions...Keywords. Aerial application, Glyphosate , Spray adjuvant, Droplet size, Spray drift, AGDISP. pray drift, which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

  3. Classification of spray nozzles based on droplet size distributions and wind tunnel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schamphelerie, M; Spanoghe, P; Nuyttens, D; Baetens, K; Cornelis, W; Gabriels, D; Van der Meeren, P

    2006-01-01

    Droplet size distribution of a pesticide spray is recognised as a main factor affecting spray drift. As a first approximation, nozzles can be classified based on their droplet size spectrum. However, the risk of drift for a given droplet size distribution is also a function of spray structure, droplet velocities and entrained air conditions. Wind tunnel tests to determine actual drift potentials of the different nozzles have been proposed as a method of adding an indication of the risk of spray drift to the existing classification based on droplet size distributions (Miller et al, 1995). In this research wind tunnel tests were performed in the wind tunnel of the International Centre for Eremology (I.C.E.), Ghent University, to determine the drift potential of different types and sizes of nozzles at various spray pressures. Flat Fan (F) nozzles Hardi ISO 110 02, 110 03, 110 04, 110 06; Low-Drift (LD) nozzles Hardi ISO 110 02, 110 03, 110 04 and Injet Air Inclusion (AI) nozzles Hardi ISO 110 02, 110 03, 110 04 were tested at a spray pressures of 2, 3 and 4 bar. The droplet size spectra of the F and the LD nozzles were measured with a Malvern Mastersizer at spray pressures 2 bar, 3 bar and 4 bar. The Malvern spectra were used to calculate the Volume Median Diameters (VMD) of the sprays.

  4. Redistribution of charged aluminum nanoparticles on oil droplets in water in response to applied electrical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengqi; Li, Dongqing, E-mail: dongqing@mme.uwaterloo.ca [University of Waterloo, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Janus droplets with two opposite faces of different physical or chemical properties have great potentials in many fields. This paper reports a new method for making Janus droplets by covering one side of the droplet with charged nanoparticles in an externally applied DC electric field. In this paper, aluminum oxide nanoparticles on micro-sized and macro-sized oil droplets were studied. In order to control the surface area covered by the nanoparticles on the oil droplets, the effects of the concentration of nanoparticle suspension, the droplet size as well as the strength of electric field on the final accumulation area of the nanoparticles are studied.Graphical abstract.

  5. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  6. Cryogen spray cooling: Effects of droplet size and spray density on heat removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkula, B M; Torres, J H; Tunnell, J W; Anvari, B

    2001-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to reduce or eliminate non-specific injury to the epidermis during laser treatment of various dermatological disorders. In previous CSC investigations, fuel injectors have been used to deliver the cryogen onto the skin surface. The objective of this study was to examine cryogen atomization and heat removal characteristics of various cryogen delivery devices. Various cryogen delivery device types including fuel injectors, atomizers, and a device currently used in clinical settings were investigated. Cryogen mass was measured at the delivery device output orifice. Cryogen droplet size profiling for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated by optically imaging the droplets in flight. Heat removal for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated over a range of spraying distances by temperature measurements in an skin phantom used in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction model. A substantial range of mass outputs were measured for the cryogen delivery devices while heat removal varied by less than a factor of two. Droplet profiling demonstrated differences in droplet size and spray density. Results of this study show that variation in heat removal by different cryogen delivery devices is modest despite the relatively large difference in cryogen mass output and droplet size. A non-linear relationship between heat removal by various devices and droplet size and spray density was observed. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Temperature-induced Coalescence of Droplets Manipulated by Optical Trapping in an Oil-in-Water Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunobu, Manami; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Takeyasu, Nobuyuki; Kaneta, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Coalescence of oil droplets in an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion was achieved with heating and optical trapping. Three types of O/W emulsions were prepared by adding a mixture of butanol and n-decane to an aqueous solution containing a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), or a neutral hydrophilic polymer (polyethylene glycol, PEG) as an emulsifier. Two oil droplets in the emulsions were randomly trapped in a square capillary tube by two laser beams in order to induce coalescence. Coalescence of the droplets could not be achieved at room temperature (25°C) regardless of the type of emulsifier. Conversely, the droplets prepared with PEG coalesced at a temperature higher than 30°C, although the droplets with ionic surfactants CTAB and SDS did not coalesce even at the elevated temperature due to their electrostatic repulsion. The size of the resultant coalesced droplet was consistent with that calculated from the size of the two droplets of oil, which indicated successful coalescence of the two droplets. We also found that the time required for the coalescence could be correlated with the temperature using an Arrhenius plot.

  8. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-01-01

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet–height and diameter– and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials. PMID:26354891

  9. An emulsion-based droplet hydrothermal synthesis method for the production of uniform sized zeolite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Churl Hee

    2014-05-15

    A droplet based new hydrothermal synthesis method for nano-zeolite synthesis in bulk amount with uniform size, shape and morphology is presented. The proposed process addresses the limitation and shortcomings of droplet based microfluidic reactors and conventional hydrothermal methods. The process has been designed on the concept of mixing two immiscible solutions at high speed which then produces nano/submicron size droplets. Confinement within the droplet provides uniform heat transfer, enhanced mass transfer to growing crystal, chaotic advection within droplet facilitate rapid mixing, prevent the contact between growing crystals etc. Fine-tuned nano-cubic LTA zeolite crystals of size ∼100 nm with uniform morphology and size distribution were prepared. Just within 4h of reaction time (aging+crystallization) well shaped cubic crystals with high crystallinity and size uniformity can be synthesized by the proposed synthesis process. Diffraction and electron microscopic studies reveal the high phase purity and size uniformity of as-synthesized LTA zeolite particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Does the homogeneous ice nucleation initiate at the surface or in the volume of super-cooled water droplets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, S.; Möhler, O.; Wagner, R.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2009-04-01

    The nucleation of ice in super-cooled water droplets affects many atmospheric processes as the initiation of precipitation and radiative transfer. Water droplets are freezing due to the formation of a critical germ initiating the freezing of the whole droplet. The common quantity to describe the creation of ice is the nucleation rate J, defined as the product of the number of critical germs and the rate at which additional molecules are incorporated into a critical germ. Nucleation of ice in a super-cooled liquid is a stochastic process and depends strongly on temperature. Recently there was a discussion whether the germs of the new phase are formed preferentially near the surface or in the interior of the droplet. Experiments at the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe were performed to assess this question. We produced clouds of super-cooled water droplets and deduced the ice nucleation rate J from simultaneously measurements of the number density and size distribution of liquid droplets, the number density of ice particles, and the temperature in the range between -36 and -37 °C. With different number densities of seed aerosol particles (sulphuric acid aerosol) we were able to vary the size of the nucleating water droplets between 4 µm and 9 µm diameter. The comparison of the results - by assumption of a volume dependent process - showed very good agreement both with data from literature gained from considerably larger droplets and with classical nucleation theory. The nucleation rates disagree from each other when converting them to surface-proportional values. This contradicts the hypothesis that a critical germ is formed preferentially near the surface of a super-cooled liquid droplet.

  11. In situ imaging of nano-droplet condensation and coalescence on thin water films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Zahava

    2014-04-01

    Two related aspects of nano-droplet condensation and droplets coalescence are studied for droplets on self-supported thin water films. The experiments are conducted in the environmental scanning electron microscope using wet scanning transmission electron microscopy. Favorable condensation sites are examined and in-situ position-controlled condensation experiments are conducted. The interaction among condensed multi-droplets as well as between a single droplet and the underneath nano-thick water film are dynamically examined with 10nm lateral resolution. The droplet round shape is reshaped to flat-like facets in-between droplets of 30-230 nm separation. Dynamic imaging of a few minutes duration shows a delayed coalescence effect, being explained by increased droplet-droplet electrostatic interaction relative to van der Waals interaction.

  12. Suspension of Water Droplets on Individual Pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tóth, T.; Ferraro, D.; Chiarello, E.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of extensive experimental and numerical studies on the suspension of water drops deposited on cylindrical pillars having circular and square cross sections and different wettabilities. In the case of circular pillars, the drop contact line is pinned to the whole edge contour until...

  13. Effect of oil droplet size on activation energy for coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Yayoi; Katsuki, Kazutaka; Matsuno, Ryuichi; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The activation energy of a reasonable order of magnitude was estimated for the coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion by formulating the balance of forces acting on a droplet that crosses over the potential barrier to coalesce with another droplet by the DLVO theory and Stokes' law. An emulsion with smaller oil droplets was shown to be more stable.

  14. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting......, as compared to the pristine nanotube case, attributed to the surface dipole moment that changes the orientation of the interfacial water. We demonstrate that the nature of the impurity is important as here hydrogen induces the formation of an extended hydrogen bond network between the water molecules...

  15. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  16. A scattering methodology for droplet sizing of e-cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Pascal; Cosandey, Stéphane; Goujon-Ginglinger, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the droplet size distribution of inhalable aerosols is important to predict aerosol deposition yield at various respiratory tract locations in human. Optical methodologies are usually preferred over the multi-stage cascade impactor for high-throughput measurements of aerosol particle/droplet size distributions. Evaluate the Laser Aerosol Spectrometer technology based on Polystyrene Sphere Latex (PSL) calibration curve applied for the experimental determination of droplet size distributions in the diameter range typical of commercial e-cigarette aerosols (147-1361 nm). This calibration procedure was tested for a TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS) operating at a wavelength of 633 nm and assessed against model di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacat (DEHS) droplets and e-cigarette aerosols. The PSL size response was measured, and intra- and between-day standard deviations calculated. DEHS droplet sizes were underestimated by 15-20% by the LAS when the PSL calibration curve was used; however, the intra- and between-day relative standard deviations were cigarette aerosols ranged from 130-191 nm to 225-293 nm, respectively, similar to published values. The LAS instrument can be used to measure e-cigarette aerosol droplet size distributions with a bias underestimating the expected value by 15-20% when using a precise PSL calibration curve. Controlled variability of DEHS size measurements can be achieved with the LAS system; however, this method can only be applied to test aerosols having a refractive index close to that of PSL particles used for calibration.

  17. The effect of surface temperature on dynamics of water droplet in minichannel with gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isachenko Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiments have been carried out to study dynamics of liquid droplets, blown by the gas flow in a mini-channel. The mean velocity at which the droplet motion over the substrate starts was determined depending on the surface temperature at different droplet volumes. The shadow method was the main method of measurement. The advancing and receding contact angles were measured depending on the gas flow rate. The friction force was determined using the advancing and receding contact angles and droplet size. A motion of a droplet was also observed from the top. The local velocity and acceleration of droplet were calculated.

  18. Characterizations of particle size distribution of the droplets exhaled by sneeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z Y; Weng, W G; Huang, Q Y

    2013-11-06

    This work focuses on the size distribution of sneeze droplets exhaled immediately at mouth. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the experiment and 44 sneezes were measured by using a laser particle size analyser. Two types of distributions are observed: unimodal and bimodal. For each sneeze, the droplets exhaled at different time in the sneeze duration have the same distribution characteristics with good time stability. The volume-based size distributions of sneeze droplets can be represented by a lognormal distribution function, and the relationship between the distribution parameters and the physiological characteristics of the subjects are studied by using linear regression analysis. The geometric mean of the droplet size of all the subjects is 360.1 µm for unimodal distribution and 74.4 µm for bimodal distribution with geometric standard deviations of 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. For the two peaks of the bimodal distribution, the geometric mean (the geometric standard deviation) is 386.2 µm (1.8) for peak 1 and 72.0 µm (1.5) for peak 2. The influences of the measurement method, the limitations of the instrument, the evaporation effects of the droplets, the differences of biological dynamic mechanism and characteristics between sneeze and other respiratory activities are also discussed.

  19. The regulation of lipid droplet size and phospholipid composition by stearoyl-CoA desaturase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Xun; Li, Juan; Zou, Xiaoju

    2013-01-01

    desaturase mutants, independently, and in combination with mutants disrupted in conserved lipid metabolic pathways. C. elegans with impaired SCD activity displayed both reduced fat stores and decreased lipid droplet size. Mutants in the daf-2 (insulin-like growth factor receptor), rsks-1 (homolog of p70S6......-2;fat-6;fat-7 triple mutants, which had increased de novo fatty acid synthesis and wild type levels of fat stores. Notably, stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity is required for the formation of large-sized lipid droplets in all mutant backgrounds, as well as for normal ratios of phosphatidylcholine (PC......Fatty acid desaturation regulates membrane function and fat storage in animals. To determine the contribution of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity on fat storage and development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed the lipid composition and lipid droplet size in the fat-6;fat-7...

  20. Size sorting of floating spheres based on Marangoni forces in evaporating droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendarto, Erwin; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-07-01

    The high throughput size sorting of particles in liquid suspensions is of interest for a variety of microanalytical and micromanufacturing applications. Hollow glass cenospheres of various diameters ranging from 5 to 200 µm are sorted according to size by evaporation of isopropyl alcohol droplets on an unpatterned glass substrate. By raising the temperature of the glass substrate, a stable Marangoni convection is developed inside the droplet. At a substrate temperature of 55 °C, more of the larger spheres (150-200 µm) are deposited near the droplet center, but smaller spheres 150 µm diameter outnumber those with <50 µm diameter by 6×. The deposited spheres remain attached to the substrate surface when dry. The self-assembled nature of this drying pattern results in size sorting.

  1. A detection of the coarse water droplets in steam turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Ondřej

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a novel method for the detection of coarse water droplets in a low pressure part of steam turbines. The photogrammetry method has been applied for the measurement of coarse droplets in the low-pressure part of a steam turbine. A new probe based on this measurement technique was developed and tested in the laboratory and in a steam turbine in the Počerady power-plant. The probe was equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation. The paper contains results from laboratory tests and the first preliminary measurements in a steam turbine. Possible applications of this method have been examined.

  2. Correlation between shape, evaporation mode and mobility of small water droplets on nanorough fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C S; Winzer, B; Peukert, W

    2014-03-01

    The dynamic wetting behaviour and the mobility of droplets on fibres is a very important factor in coating processes, textile fabrication, in self-cleaning processes and in the filtration of fluids. In principal, filter regeneration depends on the mobility of the droplets on the fibre surface. Mobile droplets tend to coalesce which greatly simplifies their removal from the filter. In this contribution mobility analyses of water droplets on monofilaments in air are performed. Studies of droplet evaporation on pure PET fibres and on nanorough fibres coated with SiO2 nanoparticles of diameters between 6 nm and 50 nm in a hydrophilic binder system were done. We show that the mobility of water droplets correlates with the droplet conformation which in turn is determined by the droplet-fibre interface. We demonstrate that fibre coatings can be used to tailor the conformation and mobility of water droplets. The smaller the nanoparticle diameters in the coating are, the smaller are the contact angles between water droplets and fibre and the better is the mobility of the droplets on the fibre. Our results allow a fast optimization of the fibre surface properties which are directly influencing the contact angle, the mobility and the coalescence of water droplets and thus filter regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Water Droplet Impingement on Simulated Glaze, Mixed, and Rime Ice Accretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Rachman, Arief; Wong, See-Cheuk; Yeong, Hsiung-Wei; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for a 36-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil with and without simulated ice using a dye-tracer method. The simulated ice shapes were defined with the NASA Glenn LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program and including one rime, four mixed and five glaze ice shapes. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 20, 52, 111, 154, and 236 micron. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the rime and mixed shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drops sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove or shadow regions of ice shapes.

  4. [Effects of polyacrylamide on settling and separation of oil droplets in polymer flooding produced water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shubo; Zhou, Fusheng; Chen, Zhongxi; Xia, Fujun; Yu, Gang; Jiang, Zhanpeng

    2002-03-01

    The research found anion polyacrylamide (HPAM) had positive and negative effects on oil-water separation. Polymer made oily wastewater's viscosity increase and reduce rising velocity, and polymer can also increase intensity of water films between oil droplets and lengthen coalescence time of oil droplets. Those were not in favor of settling and separation for oil droplets. The positive effects on separation were that polyacrylamide had flocculating activity and made small droplets contact each other and combine into big droplets. When polymer's molecular weight was 2.72 x 10(6), and concentration was less than 800 mg/L, polymer was in favor of oil droplets settling and separation. The prime reason for oily wastewater of polymer flooding difficult to dispose was that initial median diameters of oil droplets were small. The transverse flow oil separator can intensify oil droplets combination and shorten rising time. The locale experiments showed the separator was suitable for dealing with oily wastewater of polymer flooding.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Droplets On Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Wetting is essential and ubiquitous in a variety of natural and technological processes. Silicon dioxides-water systems are abundant in nature and play fundamental roles in a vast variety of novel science and engineering activities such as silicon based devices, nanoscale lab on a chip systems...... and DNA microarrays technologies.Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water, at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle computations...... of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems. For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence of air. Hence...

  6. Enhancement of carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots using excipient emulsions: influence of particle size of digestible lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruojie; Zhang, Zipei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Guodong; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of initial lipid droplet size on the ability of excipient emulsions to increase carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots was investigated using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Corn oil-in-water excipient emulsions were fabricated with different surface-weighted mean droplet diameters: d32 = 0.17 μm (fine), 0.46 μm (medium), and, 10 μm (large). Bulk oil containing a similar quantity of lipids as the emulsions was used as a control. The excipient emulsions and control were mixed with pureed carrots, and then passed through a simulated GIT (mouth, stomach, and small intestine), and changes in particle size, charge, microstructure, lipid digestion, and carotenoid bioaccessibility were measured. Carotenoid bioaccessibility significantly increased with decreasing lipid droplet size in the excipient emulsions, which was attributed to the rapid formation of mixed micelles that could solubilize the carotenoids in the intestinal fluids. These results have important implications for designing excipient foods, such as dressings, dips, creams, and sauces, to increase the bioavailability of health-promoting nutraceuticals in foods.

  7. Spray droplet size, drift potential, and risks to nontarget organisms from aerially applied glyphosate for coca control in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Andrew J; Solomon, Keith R; Marshall, E J P

    2009-01-01

    A wind tunnel atomization study was conducted to measure the emission droplet size spectra for water and Glyphos (a glyphosate formulation sold in Colombia) + Cosmo-flux sprays for aerial application to control coca and poppy crops in Colombia. The droplet size spectra were measured in a wind tunnel for an Accu-Flo nozzle (with 16 size 0.085 [2.16 mm] orifices), under appropriate simulated aircraft speeds (up to 333 km/h), using a laser diffraction instrument covering a dynamic size range for droplets of 0.5 to 3,500 microm. The spray drift potential of the glyphosate was modeled using the AGDISP spray application and drift model, using input parameters representative of those occurring in Colombia for typical aerial application operations. The droplet size spectra for tank mixes containing glyphosate and Cosmo-Flux were considerably finer than water and became finer with higher aircraft speeds. The tank mix with 44% glyphosate had a D(v0.5) of 128 microm, while the value at the 4.9% glyphosate rate was 140 microm. These are classified as very fine to fine sprays. Despite being relatively fine, modeling showed that the droplets would not evaporate as rapidly as most similarly sized agricultural sprays because the nonvolatile proportion of the tank mix (active and inert adjuvant ingredients) was large. Thus, longer range drift is small and most drift that does occur will deposit relatively close to the application area. Drift will only occur downwind and, with winds of velocity less than the modeled maximum of 9 km/h, the drift distance would be substantially reduced. Spray drift potential might be additionally reduced through various practices such as the selection of nozzles, tank mix adjuvants, aircraft speeds, and spray pressures that would produce coarser sprays. Species sensitivity distributions to glyphosate were constructed for plants and amphibians. Based on modeled drift and 5th centile concentrations, appropriate no-spray buffer zones (distance from the

  8. Charge induced stability of water droplets in subsaturated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Nielsen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric liquid and solid water particles are stabilized if they are coated with either negative or positive electric charge. The surface charge causes an increase of the partial pressure of water vapour close to the surface of each particle, effectively allowing the particles to remain in their condensed phase even if the environmental relative humidity drops below unity. The theory, briefly presented in this paper, predicts a zero parameter relation between surface charge density and water vapour pressure. This relation was tested in a series of Electrodynamic Balance experiments. The measurements were performed by stabilizing charged droplets of pure water near an ice-surface. We observed a divergence in radius as the temperature approached the freezing point from below. We find that the measurements confirm the theory within the experimental uncertainty. In some cases this generally overlooked effect may have impact on cloud processes and on results produced by Electrodynamic Balance experiments.

  9. Modeling of finite-size droplets and particles in multiphase flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Khare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional point-particle approach for treating the dispersed phase in a continuous flowfield is extended by taking into account the effect of finite particle size, using a Gaussian interpolation from Lagrangian points to the Eulerian field. The inter-phase exchange terms in the conservation equations are distributed over the volume encompassing the particle size, as opposed to the Dirac delta function generally used in the point-particle approach. The proposed approach is benchmarked against three different flow configurations in a numerical framework based on large eddy simulation (LES turbulence closure. First, the flow over a circular cylinder is simulated for a Reynolds number of 3900 at 1 atm pressure. Results show good agreement with experimental data for the mean streamwise velocity and the vortex shedding frequency in the wake region. The calculated flowfield exhibits correct physics, which the conventional point-particle approach fails to capture. The second case deals with diesel jet injection in quiescent environment over a pressure range of 1.1–5.0 MPa. The calculated jet penetration depth closely matches measurements. It decreases with increasing chamber pressure, due to enhanced drag force in a denser fluid environment. Finally, water and acetone jet injection normal to air crossflow is studied at 1 atm. The calculated jet penetration and Sauter mean diameter of liquid droplets compare very well with measurements.

  10. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-06

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. A new alternative to cosmetics preservation and the effect of the particle size of the emulsion droplets on preservation efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B; Yu, M; Zhang, W; Wang, F

    2016-10-01

    This study describes a new alternative combination preservative containing caprylyl glycol, phenethyl alcohol and glyceryl caprylate and investigates the effects of the particle size of the emulsion droplet on the anti-microbial activity of the said blend in the formulation. The anti-microbial activity of the ingredients and the blend were determined via MIC, MBC, MFC and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) determination using the broth microdilution method. The blend inhibited the micro-organism contamination of the oil-in-water emulsion, and its performance was affected by the particle size of the emulsion droplet, as shown by the in vitro microbial challenge test. Results show that the MIC/MBC/MFC values of the blend were lower than those of any of the ingredients used alone. Any two of the ingredients presented no antagonistic activities against all the tested micro-organisms, and synergism or additive effects were also observed. The challenge test also showed that the action of the blend against bacteria and yeast was only 0.3% and 0.2%, respectively, and mould was completely inhibited at 1.4%, meeting the requirements of the PCPC and European Pharmacopoeia. The results showed that anti-microbial activity was gradually enhanced when the particle size of the emulsion droplets increased significantly in the range of 100-900 nm. A positive correlation was found between anti-microbial activity and particle size. The synergistic performance of caprylyl glycol, phenethyl alcohol and glyceryl caprylate and the anti-microbial activity of their blend suggest that their combination is effective and exhibits broad-spectrum anti-microbial activity. Furthermore, the results show a positive correlation between the anti-microbial activity of the preservative and the particle size of the emulsion droplets in the range of 100-900 nm, when the same concentration of the blend is used in the same formulation. The particle size of the emulsion droplets is demonstrated to be

  12. Numerical simulations and measurements of a droplet size distribution in a turbulent vortex street

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Schmeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A turbulent vortex street in an air flow interacting with a disperse droplet population is investigated in a wind tunnel. Non-intrusive measurement techniques are used to obtain data for the air velocity and the droplet velocity. The process is modeled with a population balance system consisting of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a population balance equation for the droplet size distribution. Numerical simulations are performed that rely on a variational multiscale method for turbulent flows, a direct discretization of the differential operator of the population balance equation, and a modern technique for the evaluation of the coalescence integrals. After having calibrated two unknown model parameters, a very good agreement of the experimental and numerical results can be observed.

  13. 3D Velocimetry and droplet sizing in the Ranque–Hilsch vortex tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J.C.H.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Michalek, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    The Ranque–Hilsch vortex tube (RHVT) is a device currently used to generate local cooling. In general, the fluid that is injected into the RHVT is a single-phase gas. In this study, however, we have added a dispersed phase (water droplets) to the gas (nitrogen). By means of phase Doppler particle

  14. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  15. Droplet Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  16. Water droplet erosion of stainless steel steam turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirols, H. S.; Kevorkov, D.; Uihlein, A.; Medraj, M.

    2017-08-01

    Steam turbine blades are highly subjected to water droplet erosion (WDE) caused by high energy impingement of liquid water droplets. However, most of the published research on this wear phenomenon is performed on laboratory test rigs, instead of addressing WDE of actual steam turbine blades. In this work, the progression of erosion on the surface of ex-service low pressure steam turbine blades was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The erosion appearance and mechanisms are compared with laboratory test rig results that are carried out using a rotating disk rig according to ASTM G73 standard. Initial and advanced erosion stages could be observed on the steam turbine blades. Similar to the WDE rig coupons, initial pits and cracks were preceded by blade surface roughening through the formation of asperities and depressions. In addition, it was also observed that the twist angle of the turbine blade around its diagonal, is an important parameter that influences its WDE. Twist angle has an effect on: impact angle, erosion appearance, impact speed, and the affected area. Furthermore, according to the current experimental results, multi-ray rig erosion test results are considered the closest simulation to the actual ex-service blade in terms of damage appearance.

  17. The offset droplet: a new methodology for studying the solid/water interface using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, S. G.; Tripathi, A. M.; Strashnov, I.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Walton, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    The routine study of the solid-water interface by XPS is potentially revolutionary as this development opens up whole new areas of study for photoelectron spectroscopy. To date this has been realised by only a few groups worldwide and current techniques have significant restrictions on the type of samples which can be studied. Here we present a novel and uniquely flexible approach to the problem. By introducing a thin capillary into the NAP-XPS, a small droplet can be injected onto the sample surface, offset from the analysis area by several mm. By careful control of the droplet size a water layer of controllable thickness can be established in the analysis area—continuous with the bulk droplet. We present results from the solid-water interface on a vacuum prepared TiO2(110) single crystal and demonstrate that the solid/liquid interface is addressable.

  18. Organized Assemblies of Colloids Formed at the Poles of Micrometer-Sized Droplets of Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the formation of organized assemblies of 1 μm-in-diameter colloids (polystyrene (PS)) at the poles of water-dispersed droplets (diameters 7 - 20 μm) of nematic liquid crystal (LC). For 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl droplets decorated with two to five PS colloids, we found 32 distinct arrangements of the colloids to form at the boojums of bipolar droplet configurations. Significantly, all but one of these configurations (a ring comprised of five PS colloids) could be mapped onto a local (non-close packed) hexagonal lattice. To provide insight into the origin of the hexagonal lattice, we investigated planar aqueous—LC interfaces, and found that organized assemblies of PS colloids did not form at these interfaces. Experiments involving the addition of salts revealed that a repulsive interaction of electrostatic origin prevented formation of assemblies at planar interfaces, and that regions of high splay near the poles of the LC droplets generated cohesive interactions between colloids that could overcome the repulsion. Support for this interpretation was obtained from a model that included (i) a long-range attraction between adsorbed colloids and the boojum due to the increasing rate of strain (splay) of LC near the boojum (splay attraction), (ii) an attractive inter-colloid interaction that reflects the quadrupolar symmetry of the strain in the LC around the colloids, and (iii) electrostatic repulsion between colloids. The model predicts that electrostatic repulsion between colloids can lead to a ∼1,000 kBT energy barrier at planar interfaces of LC films, and that the repulsive interaction can be overcome by splay attraction of the colloids to the boojums of the LC droplets. Overall, the results reported in this paper advance our understanding of the directed assembly of colloids at interfaces of LC droplets. PMID:25284139

  19. Mechanism of Supercooled Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras-Alba, Belen; Palacios, Jose; Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on supercooled droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The results are compared to prior room temperature droplet deformation results to explore the effects of droplet supercooling. The experiments were conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) at The Pennsylvania State University. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotor blades mounted onto the hub in the AERTS chamber was moved at speeds ranging between 50 and 80 m/sec. The temperature of the chamber was set at -20°C. A monotonic droplet generator was used to produce droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The supercooled state of the droplets was determined by measurement of the temperature of the drops at various locations below the droplet generator exit. A temperature prediction code was also used to estimate the temperature of the droplets based on vertical velocity and the distance traveled by droplets from the droplet generator to the airfoil stagnation line. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging provided droplet deformation information as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. It was demonstrated that to compare the effects of water supercooling on droplet deformation, the ratio of the slip velocity and the initial droplet velocity must be equal. A case with equal slip velocity to initial velocity ratios was selected for room temperature and supercooled droplet conditions. The airfoil velocity was 60 m/s and the slip velocity for both sets of data was 40 m/s. In these cases, the deformation of the weakly supercooled and warm droplets did not present different trends. The similar behavior for both environmental conditions indicates that water

  20. A threshold-based approach to calorimetry in helium droplets: measurement of binding energies of water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William K; Harruff-Miller, Barbara A; Gord, Michael A; Gord, Joseph R; Guliants, Elena A; Bunker, Christopher E

    2012-07-01

    Helium droplet beam methods have emerged as a versatile technique that can be used to assemble a wide variety of atomic and molecular clusters. We have developed a method to measure the binding energies of clusters assembled in helium droplets by determining the minimum droplet sizes required to assemble and detect selected clusters in the spectrum of the doped droplet beam. The differences in the droplet sizes required between the various multimers are then used to estimate the incremental binding energies. We have applied this method to measure the binding energies of cyclic water clusters from the dimer to the tetramer. We obtain measured values of D(0) that are in agreement with theoretical estimates to within ∼20%. Our results suggest that this threshold-based approach should be generally applicable using either mass spectrometry or optical spectroscopy techniques for detection, provided that the clusters selected for study are at least as strongly bound as those of water, and that a peak in the overall spectrum of the beam corresponding only to the cluster chosen (at least in the vicinity of the threshold) can be located.

  1. Equilibrium between a Droplet and Surrounding Vapor: A Discussion of Finite Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, Andreas; Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2018-01-10

    In a theoretical description of homogeneous nucleation one frequently assumes an "equilibrium" coexistence of a liquid droplet with surrounding vapor of a density exceeding that of a saturated vapor at bulk vapor-liquid two-phase coexistence. Thereby one ignores the caveat that in the thermodynamic limit, for which the vapor would be called supersaturated, such states will at best be metastable with finite lifetime, and thus not be well-defined within equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast, in a system of finite volume stable equilibrium coexistence of droplet and supersaturated vapor at constant total density is perfectly possible, and numerical analysis of equilibrium free energies of finite systems allows to obtain physically relevant results. In particular, such an analysis can be used to derive the dependence of the droplet surface tension γ(R) on the droplet radius R by computer simulations. Unfortunately, however, the precision of the results produced by this approach turns out to be seriously affected by a hitherto unexplained spurious dependence of γ(R) on the total volume V of the simulation box. These finite size effects are studied here for the standard Ising/lattice gas model in d = 2 dimensions and an Ising model on the face-centered cubic lattice with 3-spin interaction, lacking symmetry between vapor and liquid phases. There also the analogous case of bubbles surrounded by undersaturated liquid is treated. It is argued that (at least a large part of) the finite size effects result from the translation entropy of the droplet or bubble in the system. This effect has been shown earlier to occur also for planar interfaces for simulations in the slab geometry. Consequences for the estimation of the Tolman length are briefly discussed. In particular, we find clear evidence that in d = 2 the leading correction of the curvature-dependent interface tension is a logarithmic term, compatible with theoretical expectations, and we show that then the

  2. Simple model for laser-produced, mass-limited water-droplet plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garloff, Kurt; van den Donker, Michiel; van der Mullen, Joost; van Goor, Fred; Brummans, Ralph; Jonkers, Jeroen

    2002-09-01

    Plasmas, produced by a neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser pulse focused on a small water droplet and used for the generation of extreme ultraviolet light, can be described by a relatively simple model due to the fact that thermodynamic equilibrium can be assumed for the most important phase. Only three time-dependent variables--radius, expansion speed, and internal energy--are needed to describe the physics of the plasma. Nevertheless, it predicts quantities such as the size and the spectrum rather well. It is expected that the theory and the model presented here can also be applied to other laser-produced plasmas.

  3. Deformation and fracture of emulsion-filled gels: Effect of gelling agent concentration and oil droplet size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Velde, van de F.; Aken, van G.A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the ratio between the modulus of the oil droplets and that of the gel matrix (varied by changing gelling agent concentration and oil droplet size) on the large deformation properties of gelatine, ¿-carrageenan and whey protein isolate (WPI) gels was studied at different compression

  4. Ignition of the Soaring Droplet Sets of Waste-Derived Coal-Water Slurry With Petrochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the ignition of droplet sets of waste-derived coal-water slurry with petrochemicals for the case of their soaring inside special combustion chamber. The fuel composition consists of filter cake of bituminous coal type G, waste turbine oil, water and plasticizer. Features of the ignition process were emphasized for groups of three soaring droplets in comparison with single droplet ignition. The ignition delay times were registered for particles that were deformed or segregated due to the interaction of initial fuel droplets with walls of the combustion chamber.

  5. Initial Droplet Size Impacts pH-Induced Structural Changes in Phase-Separated Polymer Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkaew, Chutima; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of pH change on the morphology of whey protein isolate (WPI)-pectin dispersions obtained from phase-separated systems after mild shear was studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mixing speed on the initial particle size of biopolymer complexes and their structure morphology after sequentially changing the pH. Therefore, solutions of WPI and pectin were combined at pH 6.1, allowed to phase separate and were then mildly homogenized at 50, 100, and 150 rpm, respectively, to form a dispersion containing differently sized WPI droplets in a surrounding pectin-rich phase. Each dispersion was then subjected to a pH change, such as 6.1 to 5.2 and 3.2, by slowly adding hydrochloric acid. The systems morphology, size, appearance, rheology, and storage stability was then characterized by optical microscopy, static light scattering, visual inspections, and steady shear rheometry to gain insights into the structural rearrangements. Results indicated substantial changes in the structure of the dispersion when the pH was changed. Formation of core-shell structures from the WPI droplets was observed at an intermediate pH. There, initial droplet size was found to affect structures formed, that is, core-shell type particles would only form if droplets were large (>1.5 μm) prior to pH change. Insights gained may be of importance to food manufacturers intending to create new structures from mixtures of proteins and carbohydrates. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Wetting and motion behaviors of water droplet on graphene under thermal-electric coupling field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Dong, Xin; Ye, Hong-Fei; Cheng, Guang-Gui; Ding, Jian-Ning; Ling, Zhi-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Wetting dynamics and motion behaviors of a water droplet on graphene are characterized under the electric-thermal coupling field using classical molecular dynamics simulation method. The water droplet on graphene can be driven by the temperature gradient, while the moving direction is dependent on the electric field intensity. Concretely, the water droplet on graphene moves from the low temperature region to the high temperature region for the relatively weak electric field intensity. The motion acceleration increases with the electric field intensity on graphene, whereas the moving direction switches when the electric field intensity increases up to a threshold. The essence is the change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic for the water droplet on graphene at a threshold of the electric field intensity. Moreover, the driven force of the water droplet caused by the overall oscillation of graphene has important influence on the motion behaviors. The results are helpful to control the wettability of graphene and further develop the graphene-based fluidic nanodevices.

  7. Quantification of unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zheyan; Hu, Hui

    2009-05-01

    We report progress made in our recent effort to develop and implement a novel, lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry (MTT) technique to quantify unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets pertinent to wind turbine icing phenomena. The lifetime-based MTT technique was used to achieve temporally and spatially resolved temperature distribution measurements within small, convectively cooled water droplets to quantify unsteady heat transfer within the small water droplets in the course of convective cooling process. The transient behavior of phase changing process within small icing water droplets was also revealed clearly by using the MTT technique. Such measurements are highly desirable to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about important microphysical phenomena pertinent to ice formation and accreting process as water droplets impinging onto wind turbine blades.

  8. The impact of fluctuations and correlations in droplet growth by collision-coalescence revisited - Part 1: Numerical calculation of post-gel droplet size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Lester; Raga, Graciela B.

    2017-06-01

    The impact of stochastic fluctuations in cloud droplet growth is a matter of broad interest, since stochastic effects are one of the possible explanations of how cloud droplets cross the size gap and form the raindrop embryos that trigger warm rain development in cumulus clouds. Most theoretical studies on this topic rely on the use of the kinetic collection equation, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. However, the kinetic collection equation is a deterministic equation with no stochastic fluctuations. Moreover, the traditional calculations using the kinetic collection equation are not valid when the system undergoes a transition from a continuous distribution to a distribution plus a runaway raindrop embryo (known as the sol-gel transition). On the other hand, the stochastic simulation algorithm, although intrinsically stochastic, fails to adequately reproduce the large end of the droplet size distribution due to the huge number of realizations required. Therefore, the full stochastic description of cloud droplet growth must be obtained from the solution of the master equation for stochastic coalescence. In this study the master equation is used to calculate the evolution of the droplet size distribution after the sol-gel transition. These calculations show that after the formation of the raindrop embryo, the expected droplet mass distribution strongly differs from the results obtained with the kinetic collection equation. Furthermore, the low-mass bins and bins from the gel fraction are strongly anticorrelated in the vicinity of the critical time, this being one of the possible explanations for the differences between the kinetic and stochastic approaches after the sol-gel transition. Calculations performed within the stochastic framework provide insight into the inability of explicit microphysics cloud models to explain the droplet spectral broadening observed in small, warm clouds.

  9. The impact of fluctuations and correlations in droplet growth by collision–coalescence revisited – Part 1: Numerical calculation of post-gel droplet size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of stochastic fluctuations in cloud droplet growth is a matter of broad interest, since stochastic effects are one of the possible explanations of how cloud droplets cross the size gap and form the raindrop embryos that trigger warm rain development in cumulus clouds. Most theoretical studies on this topic rely on the use of the kinetic collection equation, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. However, the kinetic collection equation is a deterministic equation with no stochastic fluctuations. Moreover, the traditional calculations using the kinetic collection equation are not valid when the system undergoes a transition from a continuous distribution to a distribution plus a runaway raindrop embryo (known as the sol–gel transition. On the other hand, the stochastic simulation algorithm, although intrinsically stochastic, fails to adequately reproduce the large end of the droplet size distribution due to the huge number of realizations required. Therefore, the full stochastic description of cloud droplet growth must be obtained from the solution of the master equation for stochastic coalescence. In this study the master equation is used to calculate the evolution of the droplet size distribution after the sol–gel transition. These calculations show that after the formation of the raindrop embryo, the expected droplet mass distribution strongly differs from the results obtained with the kinetic collection equation. Furthermore, the low-mass bins and bins from the gel fraction are strongly anticorrelated in the vicinity of the critical time, this being one of the possible explanations for the differences between the kinetic and stochastic approaches after the sol–gel transition. Calculations performed within the stochastic framework provide insight into the inability of explicit microphysics cloud models to explain the droplet spectral broadening observed in small, warm clouds.

  10. Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Prodip K.

    2011-01-01

    A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on th...

  11. Sensitivity of cloud albedo to aerosol concentration and spectral dispersion of cloud droplet size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorga, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: giorga@gw-chimie.math.unibuc.ro; Stefan, S. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-07-15

    Both the enhancement of the aerosol number concentration and the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution (spectral dispersion) on a regional scale can modify the cloud reflectivity. This work is focused on the role that pre-cloud aerosol plays in cloud reflectivity. Log-normal aerosol size distributions were used to describe two aerosol types: marine and rural. The number of aerosols that activate to droplets was obtained based on Abdul-Razzak and Ghan's (2000) activation parameterization. The cloud albedo taking into account the spectral dispersion effect in the parameterization of cloud effective radius and in the scattering asymmetry factor has been estimated. Two different scaling factors to account for dispersion were used. The sensitivity of cloud albedo to spectral dispersion-cloud droplet number concentration relationship in connection to the changes in liquid water content (LWC), and the cloud droplet effective radius has been also investigated. We obtained higher values of effective radius when dispersion is taken into account, with respect to the base case (without considering dispersion). The inferred absolute differences in effective radius values between calculations with each of the scaling factors are below 0.8 {mu}m as LWC ranges between 0.1 and 1.0 g m-3. The optical depth decreased by up to 14% (marine), and up to 29% (continental) when dispersion is considered in both effective radius and asymmetry factor ({beta}LDR scaling factor). Correspondingly, the relative change in cloud albedo is up to 6% (marine) and up to 11% (continental) clouds. For continental clouds, the calculated effective radius when dispersion is considered fits well within the measured range of effective radius in SCAR-B project. The calculated cloud albedo when dispersion is considered shows better agreement with the estimated cloud albedo from measured effective radius in SCAR-B project than the cloud albedo calculated without dispersion. In cleaner

  12. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chen [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: hongliu@sjtu.edu.cn [J. C. Wu Center of Aerodynamics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  13. Origin of buckling phenomenon during drying of micrometer-sized colloidal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, J; Sen, D; Mazumder, S; Bhattacharya, S; Frielinghaus, H; Goerigk, G

    2011-07-05

    The origin of the buckling of micrometer-sized colloidal droplets during evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) has been elucidated using electron microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. Doughnut-like assembled grains with varying aspect ratios are formed during EISA at different physicochemical conditions. It has been revealed that this phenomenon is better explained by an existing hypothesis based on the formation of a viscoelastic shell of nanoparticles during drying than by other existing hypotheses based on the inertial instability of the initial droplets and hydrodynamic instability due to thermocapillary forces. This conclusion was further supported by the arrest of buckling through modification of the colloidal interaction in the initial dispersion. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  15. Water droplet deformation under the motion in gas area with subsonic velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuibin Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation of water droplet deformation (characteristic dimensions 3 ÷ 6 mm when moving through the gas area (air with 1÷ 5 m/s velocities was carried out. The high-speed (delay time between the frames is less than 100 ns tools of cross-correlation videorecording were used. A cyclic change nature of the droplet shapes (from close to spherical to conditionally ellipsoidal was found. The characteristic times of “deformation cycles” and the maximal deviations of droplet dimensions relative to initial dimensions were determined. The influence of droplet velocities and its dimensions on the deformation characteristics was determined.

  16. ABC Triblock Copolymer Worms: Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation as Pickering Emulsifiers for Millimeter-Sized Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mable, C J; Thompson, K L; Derry, M J; Mykhaylyk, O O; Binks, B P; Armes, S P

    2016-10-25

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) is used to prepare linear poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) [PGMA-PHPMA-PBzMA] triblock copolymer nano-objects in the form of a concentrated aqueous dispersion via a three-step synthesis based on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. First, GMA is polymerized via RAFT solution polymerization in ethanol, then HPMA is polymerized via RAFT aqueous solution polymerization, and finally BzMA is polymerized via "seeded" RAFT aqueous emulsion polymerization. For certain block compositions, highly anisotropic worm-like particles are obtained, which are characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The design rules for accessing higher order morphologies (i.e., worms or vesicles) are briefly explored. Surprisingly, vesicular morphologies cannot be accessed by targeting longer PBzMA blocks-instead, only spherical nanoparticles are formed. SAXS is used to rationalize these counterintuitive observations, which are best explained by considering subtle changes in the relative enthalpic incompatibilities between the three blocks during the growth of the PBzMA block. Finally, the PGMA-PHPMA-PBzMA worms are evaluated as Pickering emulsifiers for the stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions. Millimeter-sized oil droplets can be obtained using low-shear homogenization (hand-shaking) in the presence of 20 vol % n-dodecane. In contrast, control experiments performed using PGMA-PHPMA diblock copolymer worms indicate that these more delicate nanostructures do not survive even these mild conditions.

  17. Precious Droplets: The Value of Water. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kristi Rennebohm

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  18. The effect of dispersed Petrobaltic oil droplet size on photosynthetically active radiation in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haule, Kamila; Freda, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Oil pollution in seawater, primarily visible on sea surface, becomes dispersed as an effect of wave mixing as well as chemical dispersant treatment, and forms spherical oil droplets. In this study, we examined the influence of oil droplet size of highly dispersed Petrobaltic crude on the underwater visible light flux and the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater, including absorption, scattering, backscattering and attenuation coefficients. On the basis of measured data and Mie theory, we calculated the IOPs of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil in constant concentration, but different log-normal size distributions. We also performed a radiative transfer analysis, in order to evaluate the influence on the downwelling irradiance Ed, remote sensing reflectance Rrs and diffuse reflectance R, using in situ data from the Baltic Sea. We found that during dispersion, there occurs a boundary size distribution characterized by a peak diameter d0  = 0.3 μm causing a maximum E d increase of 40% within 0.5-m depth, and the maximum Ed decrease of 100% at depths below 5 m. Moreover, we showed that the impact of size distribution on the "blue to green" ratios of Rrs and R varies from 24% increase to 27% decrease at the same crude oil concentration.

  19. Statistical analysis of E-jet print parameter effects on Ag-nanoparticle ink droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, M.-M.; Khorramdel, B.; Dastpak, A.; Mäntysalo, M.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have studied the print parameter effects on electrohydrodynamic inkjet (E-jet) resolution using statistical analysis. In order to make the E-jet manufacturing process feasible, the effect of printing parameters on the ejected droplet size must be modelled and optimized. To this end, there exist two approaches: parameter effects can be modelled using theoretical calculations or they can be generated directly from empirical data using statistical analysis. The first option has been explored by multiple research groups, whereas the latter has received less interest. In this article, the effect of printing parameters on the width of AC-pulsed E-jet deposited Ag-nanoparticle ink droplets are investigated using design of experiments (DoE) approach and statistical analysis. As a result, a statistical model for deposited droplet width is generated using four print parameters (print height, bias voltage, peak voltage and frequency) as predictors. The model can predict 94.24% of the measured width variation with a standard deviation of 1.05 µm.

  20. Oil biodegradation. Water droplets in oil are microhabitats for microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U; von Netzer, Frederick; Stumpp, Christine; Lueders, Tillmann; Himmelberg, Anne M; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipp; Harir, Mourad; Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-08-08

    Anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons, typically occurring at the oil-water transition zone, influences the quality of oil reservoirs. In Pitch Lake, Trinidad and Tobago--the world's largest asphalt lake--we found that microorganisms are metabolically active in minuscule water droplets (1 to 3 microliters) entrapped in oil. Pyrotag sequencing of individual droplet microbiomes revealed complex methanogenic microbial communities actively degrading the oil into a diverse range of metabolites, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. High salinity and water-stable isotopes of the droplets indicate a deep subsurface origin. The 13.5% water content and the large surface area of the droplets represent an underestimated potential for biodegradation of oil away from the oil-water transition zone. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Lipid droplet size and location in human skeletal muscle fibers are associated with insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Christensen, Anders E; Nellemann, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) in the subsarcolemmal space is associated with insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. We aimed to investigate how the size, number and location of LDs are associated with insulin sensitivity and muscle fiber types...... that only the diameter (and not the number) of individual subsarcolemmal LDs was negatively associated with insulin sensitivity (R2 = 0.20, P = 0.03, n = 29). Despite 34% (P = 0.004) fewer LDs, the diameter of individual subsarcolemmal LDs was 20% (P = 0.0004) larger in type 2 fibers than in type 1 fibers....... Furthermore, aerobic training decreased the size of subsarcolemmal LDs in the type 2fibers, and ESA treatment lowered the number of both intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal LDs in the type 1fibers. In conclusion, the size of individual subsarcolemmal LDs may be involved in the mechanism by which LDs...

  2. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  3. Motion of water droplets in the counter flow of high-temperature combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental studies of the deceleration, reversal, and entrainment of water droplets sprayed in counter current flow to a rising stream of high-temperature (1100 K) combustion gases. The initial droplets velocities 0.5-2.5 m/s, radii 10-230 μm, relative volume concentrations 0.2·10-4-1.8·10-4 (m3 of water)/(m3 of gas) vary in the ranges corresponding to promising high-temperature (over 1000 K) gas-vapor-droplet applications (for example, polydisperse fire extinguishing using water mist, fog, or appropriate water vapor-droplet veils, thermal or flame treatment of liquids in the flow of combustion products or high-temperature air; creating coolants based on flue gas, vapor and water droplets; unfreezing of granular media and processing of the drossed surfaces of thermal-power equipment; ignition of liquid and slurry fuel droplets). A hardware-software cross-correlation complex, high-speed (up to 105 fps) video recording tools, panoramic optical techniques (Particle Image Velocimetry, Particle Tracking Velocimetry, Interferometric Particle Imagine, Shadow Photography), and the Tema Automotive software with the function of continuous monitoring have been applied to examine the characteristics of the processes under study. The scale of the influence of initial droplets concentration in the gas flow on the conditions and features of their entrainment by high-temperature gases has been specified. The dependencies Red = f(Reg) and Red' = f(Reg) have been obtained to predict the characteristics of the deceleration of droplets by gases at different droplets concentrations.

  4. Motion of water droplets in the counter flow of high-temperature combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental studies of the deceleration, reversal, and entrainment of water droplets sprayed in counter current flow to a rising stream of high-temperature (1100 K) combustion gases. The initial droplets velocities 0.5-2.5 m/s, radii 10-230 μm, relative volume concentrations 0.2·10-4-1.8·10-4 (m3 of water)/(m3 of gas) vary in the ranges corresponding to promising high-temperature (over 1000 K) gas-vapor-droplet applications (for example, polydisperse fire extinguishing using water mist, fog, or appropriate water vapor-droplet veils, thermal or flame treatment of liquids in the flow of combustion products or high-temperature air; creating coolants based on flue gas, vapor and water droplets; unfreezing of granular media and processing of the drossed surfaces of thermal-power equipment; ignition of liquid and slurry fuel droplets). A hardware-software cross-correlation complex, high-speed (up to 105 fps) video recording tools, panoramic optical techniques (Particle Image Velocimetry, Particle Tracking Velocimetry, Interferometric Particle Imagine, Shadow Photography), and the Tema Automotive software with the function of continuous monitoring have been applied to examine the characteristics of the processes under study. The scale of the influence of initial droplets concentration in the gas flow on the conditions and features of their entrainment by high-temperature gases has been specified. The dependencies Red = f(Reg) and Red' = f(Reg) have been obtained to predict the characteristics of the deceleration of droplets by gases at different droplets concentrations.

  5. Design of negative refractive index metamaterial with water droplets using 3D-printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoyang; Yang, Helin; Huang, Xiaojun; Yu, Zetai

    2017-11-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate a negative refractive index (NRI) behavior in combined water droplets and photosensitive resin materials operating in the microwave regime. The NRI is achieved over a very wide frequency range in 10.27-15 GHz with bandwidth of 4.63 GHz. The simulated results approximately agree with the experimental results. The negative index band can be controlled by water droplet radius. The proposed metamaterial production process is simple and may have potential applications in broadband tunable devices.

  6. Interfacial structure and wetting properties of water droplets on graphene under a static electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongru; Zhang, Leining; Li, Xiongying; Li, Yifan; Wu, Weikang; Li, Hui

    2015-09-28

    The behavior of water droplets located on graphene in the presence of various external electric fields (E-fields) is investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the effect of E-field on mass density distribution, water polarization as well as hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) to gain insight into the wetting properties of water droplets on graphene and their interfacial structure under uniform E-fields. The MD simulation results reveal that the equilibrium water droplets present a hemispherical, a conical and an ordered cylindrical shape with the increase of external E-field intensity. Accompanied by the shape variation of water droplets, the dipole orientation of water molecules experiences a remarkable change from a disordered state to an ordered state because of the polarization of water molecules induced by static E-field. The distinct two peaks in mass density and H-bond distribution profiles demonstrate that water has a layering structure in the interfacial region, which sensitively depends on the strong E-field (>0.8 V nm(-1)). In addition, when the external E-field is parallel to the substrate, the E-field would make the contact angle of the water droplets become small and increase its wettability. Our findings provide the possibility to control the structure and wetting properties of water on graphene by tuning the direction and intensity of external E-field which is of importance for relevant industrial processes on the solid surface.

  7. Thermally induced gelling of oil-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets: the impact of interfacial crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivilliers, Florence; Laurichesse, Eric; Saadaoui, Hassan; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2008-12-02

    We produced triglyceride-in-water emulsions comprising partially crystallized droplets, stabilized by a mixture of protein and low molecular weight surfactant. The emulsions were emulsified in the melted state of the oil phase and stored at low temperature (4 degrees C) right after fabrication to induce oil crystallization. The systems were then warmed to room temperature for a short period of time and cooled again to 4 degrees C. Owing to this treatment referred to as temperature cycling or "tempering", the initially fluid emulsions turned into hard gels. We followed the bulk rheological properties of the materials during and after tempering. The storage modulus, G', exhibited a dramatic increase when tempering was applied. We showed that the systems evolved following two distinct regimes that depend on the average droplet size and on the surfactant-to-protein molar ratio. Gelling may involve partial coalescence of the droplets, i.e., film rupturing with no further shape relaxation because of the solid nature of the droplets. Alternatively, gelling may occur without film rupturing, and is reminiscent of a jamming transition induced by surface roughness. We discussed the origin of these two mechanisms in terms of the properties (size and protuberance) of the interfacial oil crystals.

  8. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  9. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hunt, Patricia A. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ford, Ian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  10. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  11. Spatiotemporal infrared measurement of interface temperatures during water droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity experimental characterization of sessile droplet evaporation is required to understand the interdependent physical mechanisms that drive the evaporation. In particular, cooling of the interface due to release of the latent heat of evaporation, which is not accounted for in simplified vapor-diffusion-based models of droplet evaporation, may significantly suppress the evaporation rate on nonwetting substrates, which support tall droplet shapes. This suppression is counteracted by convective mass transfer from the droplet to the air. While prior numerical modeling studies have identified the importance of these mechanisms, there is no direct experimental evidence of their influence on the interfacial temperature distribution. Infrared thermography is used here to simultaneously measure the droplet volume, contact angle, and spatially resolved interface temperatures for water droplets on a nonwetting substrate. The technique is calibrated and validated to quantify the temperature measurement accuracy; a correction is employed to account for reflections from the surroundings when imaging the evaporating droplets. Spatiotemporally resolved interface temperature data, obtained via infrared thermography measurements, allow for an improved prediction of the evaporation rate and can be utilized to monitor temperature-controlled processes in droplets for various lab-on-a-chip applications.

  12. Self-Propulsion of Pure Water Droplets by Spontaneous Marangoni-Stress-Driven Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izri, Ziane; van der Linden, Marjolein N.; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    We report spontaneous motion in a fully biocompatible system consisting of pure water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium of squalane and monoolein. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. The strong advection and weak diffusion conditions allow for the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion in a system of isotropic particles at sufficiently large Péclet number according to a straightforward generalization of a recently proposed mechanism [S. Michelin, E. Lauga, and D. Bartolo, Phys. Fluids 25, 061701 (2013); S. Michelin and E. Lauga, J. Fluid Mech. 747, 572 (2014)]. Experiments with a highly concentrated solution of salt instead of water, and tetradecane instead of squalane, confirm the above mechanism. The present swimming droplets are able to carry external bodies such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells.

  13. Direct measurements of the axial displacement and evolving size of optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, K. J.; Reid, J. P.; Hanford, K. L.; Hudson, A. J.; Mitchem, L.

    2007-08-01

    The axial displacement of optically tweezed liquid aerosol droplets has been studied directly through the application of side imaging at 90° to the trapping laser beam. In conjunction with imaging in the plane of the optical trap and cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS), the optical forces experienced by a trapped aerosol have been interrogated. By varying the power of the trapping laser and observing changes in the axial position of a trapped particle it has been possible to examine the fine balance between the gradient and scattering forces, a key parameter in optical manipulation. Clear differences observed in sizing trapped particles from bright field microscopy and CERS have been reconciled. As a consequence, a novel technique for probing the evolving size of a single aerosol particle is proposed.

  14. A thermomechanical model for the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet cooled by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivochkin, Yu P.; Monastyrskiy, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    A thermo mechanical aspect of the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet, solidified as it falls into cold water, is considered in the presented model. The formation of a solid phase in the form of continuous, fluid-tight and relatively rigid casting skin results in a pressure decrease inside the droplet due to the difference between liquid and solid metal density. Because of the high compression modulus of the melt, the pressure in the droplet becomes negative when the thickness of the solid skin achieves several microns. The tensile stress in the melt results in the deformation of the casting skin or the melt’s continuity violation in the form of a shrinkage pore. The rupture of the deformed solid crust results in the penetration of steam jets into the liquid part of the drop. Due to the difference in pressure in the surrounding steam and in the droplet, the casting skin is crushed and the melt is blown out. Both scenarios contribute to the hydrodynamic destruction of the droplet. The suggested thermo mechanical model gives a qualitative explanation for experimental data. In the experimental part of the work, droplets of molten Sn were solidified in water. The solidified pieces of the droplets usually include deformed, thin-walled shells and dispersed particles. On a qualitative level the composition and shape of the solid fragments can be explained within the bounds of the suggested thermo mechanical model.

  15. Water droplets as template for next-generation self-assembled poly-(etheretherketone) with cardo membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliuzza, Annarosa; Aceto, Marianna Carmela; Macedonio, Francesca; Drioli, Enrico

    2008-08-28

    Next generation PEEK-WC membranes have been fabricated by using an innovative self-assembly technique. Patterned architectures have been achieved via a solvent-reduced and water-assisted process, resulting in honeycomb packed geometry. The membranes exhibit monodisperse pores with size and shape comparable to those left by templating water droplets. Influencing factors for the formation of self-assembled poly-(etheretherketone) with Cardo [PEEK-WC] membranes have been evaluated, identifying the critical parameters for nucleation, growth, and propagation of the droplet-mobile arrays through the overall films. Structure-transport relationships have been discussed according to the results achieved from the implementation of membrane distillation processes, yielding indication about the suitability of self-assembled PEEK-WC films to work as interfaces in contactor operations.

  16. Holographic interferometry of oil films and droplets in water with a single-beam mirror-type scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtarev, Nickolai; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Gallegos, Sonia C

    2011-03-01

    Application of single-beam reflective laser optical interferometry for oil films and droplets in water detection and characterization is discussed. Oil films can be detected by the appearance of characteristic interference patterns. Analytical expressions describing intensity distribution in these interference patterns allow determination of oil film thickness, size of oil droplets, and distance to the oil film from the observation plane. Results from these analyses indicate that oil spill aging and breakup can be monitored in real time by analyzing time-dependent holographic fringe patterns. Interferometric methods of oil spill detection and characterization can be automated using digital holography with three-dimensional reconstruction of the time-changing oil spill topography. In this effort, the interferometric methods were applied to samples from Chevron oil and British Petroleum MC252 oil obtained during the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. A Conserved Role for Atlastin GTPases in Regulating Lipid Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W. Klemm

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are the major fat storage organelles in eukaryotic cells, but how their size is regulated is unknown. Using genetic screens in C. elegans for LD morphology defects in intestinal cells, we found that mutations in atlastin, a GTPase required for homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, cause not only ER morphology defects, but also a reduction in LD size. Similar results were obtained after depletion of atlastin or expression of a dominant-negative mutant, whereas overexpression of atlastin had the opposite effect. Atlastin depletion in Drosophila fat bodies also reduced LD size and decreased triglycerides in whole animals, sensitizing them to starvation. In mammalian cells, co-overexpression of atlastin-1 and REEP1, a paralog of the ER tubule-shaping protein DP1/REEP5, generates large LDs. The effect of atlastin-1 on LD size correlates with its activity to promote membrane fusion in vitro. Our results indicate that atlastin-mediated fusion of ER membranes is important for LD size regulation.

  18. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Water-Droplet Formation and Ejection Process Using Hollow Microneedle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Norihisa; Oka, Ryotaro; Sakai, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nagai, Moeto; Mineta, Takashi; Makino, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of liquid delivery using fabricated hollow silicon dioxide microneedles of approximately 2 µm in diameter. As a fundamental study, the water-droplet formation and ejection process was examined via dynamic observations during water ejection tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The experimental results indicated that fluid flow in a microneedle follows the Hagen-Poiseuille law, i.e., the flow rate is approximately directly proportional to the fourth power of the inner diameter. Moreover, the ejection pressure and maximum droplet curvature obtained using the proposed microfluid ejection model were in good agreement with the experimental results. The resulting ejection pressure is equal to the theoretical pressure difference of a spherical droplet, which is determined using the Young-Laplace equation. The maximum curvature of a droplet formed at the tip of a microneedle can be estimated on the basis of the contact angle theory expressed by the Young equation.

  19. Dynamics of water droplet impact and spread on soybean leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybeans are often sprayed to prevent significant yield loss from damage by insect pests and plant diseases. Understanding interactions of spray droplet reactions on soybean plant surfaces can lead to development of improved application strategies to enhance efficacy of pesticides. In this research,...

  20. Nanoparticles of varying hydrophobicity at the emulsion droplet-water interface: adsorption and coalescence stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Prestidge, Clive A

    2004-09-14

    The coalescence stability of poly(dimethylsiloxane) emulsion droplets in the presence of silica nanoparticles ( approximately 50 nm) of varying contact angles has been investigated. Nanoparticle adsorption isotherms were determined by depletion from solution. The coalescence kinetics (determined under coagulation conditions at high salt concentration) and the physical structure of coalesced droplets were determined from optical microscopy. Fully hydrated silica nanoparticles adsorb with low affinity, reaching a maximum surface coverage that corresponds to a close packed monolayer, based on the effective particle radius and controlled by the salt concentration. Adsorbed layers of hydrophilic nanoparticles introduce a barrier to coalescence of approximately 1 kT, only slightly reduce the coalescence kinetics, and form kinetically unstable networks at high salt concentrations. Chemically hydrophobized silica nanoparticles, over a wide range of contact angles (25 to >90 degrees ), adsorb at the droplet interface with high affinity and to coverages equivalent to close-packed multilayers. Adsorption isotherms are independent of the contact angle, suggesting that hydrophobic attraction overcomes electrostatic repulsion in all cases. The highly structured and rigid adsorbed layers significantly reduce coalescence kinetics: at or above monolayer surface coverage, stable flocculated networks of droplets form and, regardless of their wettability, particles are not detached from the interface during coalescence. At sub-monolayer nanoparticle coverages, limited coalescence is observed and interfacial saturation restricts the droplet size increase. When the nanoparticle interfacial coverage is >0.7 and droplets, whereas mixtures of hydrophobized and hydrophilic nanoparticles do not effectively stabilize emulsion droplets.

  1. Wettability of water droplet on misoriented graphene bilayer sructure: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingchang Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphene continues to attract growing attention with its exceptional physical and mechanical properties, and more than one layer graphene structure with an orientation mismatch is often involved in practice. Using molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we report the wettability of water droplet on a misoriented graphene bilayer structure. The contact angle of water droplet will change with the interlayer orientation of bilayer graphene structure, and reaches a maximum of 97.97 ± 1.15° at orientation mismatch of 40°. Comprehensive understanding on density profile and hydrogen bonding of water molecules and water-carbon interactive energy is explored to reveal the molecular mechanism.

  2. Continuum Modeling of a Water Droplet sitting on a Vibrating Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Yao, Chun-Wei

    2017-11-01

    Because of the complex, multiscale nature, modeling of droplet-surface interaction remains a challenge. To understand the underlying mechanisms is important for application design. The interactions among liquid-gas-solid molecules dominate the contact line dynamics, and determines the stationary and dynamic contact angles. We propose a novel numerical method to handle the droplet on a superhydrophobic surface, and validate our model with experiments on a 3mm water droplet sitting on a vibrating surface. Different cases have been investigated for validating our methods and understanding of the vibration mechanism of droplet shedding. Although the vibration-induced wetting transition was investigated in recent studies, the vibration mechanism of droplet shedding has not yet been fully understood. This research quantitatively considers the effect of vibration on droplet shedding under various vibration resonance conditions, providing a possible way to effectively shed droplet off surfaces in condensation applications. The authors thank the Center for Advances in Port Management at LU for funding and HPC support.

  3. Top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up in terms of relative droplet size and drying force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Top-spray fluid bed coating scale-up experiments have been performed in three scales in order to test the validity of two parameters as possible scaling parameters: The drying force and the relative droplet size. The aim was to be able to reproduce the degree of agglomeration as well as the mecha......Top-spray fluid bed coating scale-up experiments have been performed in three scales in order to test the validity of two parameters as possible scaling parameters: The drying force and the relative droplet size. The aim was to be able to reproduce the degree of agglomeration as well...... as binder. Coating experiments were repeated for various drying force and relative droplet size values in three top-spray fluid bed scales being a small-scale (Type: GEA Aeromatic-Fielder Strea-1), medium-scale (Type: Niro MP-1) and large-scale (Type: GEA MP-2/3). The tendency of agglomeration was assessed...... in terms of particle size fractions larger than 425 mu m determined by sieve analysis. Results indicated that the particle size distribution may be reproduced across scale with statistical valid precision by keeping the drying force and the relative droplet size constant across scale. It is also shown...

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of Oil Slicks from Deep Water Blowouts: Effects of Droplet Buoyancy and Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Deep water blowouts generate plumes of oil droplets that rise through, and interact with various layers of the ocean. When plumes reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), the interactions among oil droplet plume, Ekman Spiral and Langmuir turbulence strongly affect the final rates of dilution and bio-degradation. The present study aims at developing a large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for the study of the physical distribution and dispersion of oil droplets under the action of physical oceanographic processes in the OML. In the current LES approach, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated using a hybrid pseudo-spectral and finite-difference scheme; the oil field is described by an Eulerian concentration field and it is simulated using a bounded finite-volume scheme. Fluid accelerations induced by buoyancy of the oil plume are included, and a number of subgrid-scale models for the flow solver are implemented and tested. The LES capability is then applied to the simulation of oil plume dispersion in the OML. Graphical visualization of the LES results shows surface oil slick distribution consistent with the satellite and aerial images of surface oil slicks reported in the literature. Different combinations of Lamgmuir turbulence and droplet size lead to different oil slick patterns at the surface and significantly impact oil concentration. Possible effects for bio-degradation are also discussed. Funding from the GoMRI RFP-II is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Laser trapping and picosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of water droplets in air: cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission of Ru(bpy)(3)Cl(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, Shoji; Suzuki, Yuya; Kitamura, Noboru

    2010-09-07

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were observed in the emission spectrum of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) in a single laser-trapped water droplet levitated in air. The emission decay profiles of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) in the water droplets comprised fast and slow decay components. The emission lifetime of the slow decay component was independent of the diameter of the droplet, and corresponded to the value in a bulk aqueous solution. On the other hand, the emission lifetime of the fast decay component decreased with decreasing the droplet diameter, which could be ascribed to the cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission. The decrease in the emission lifetime of the fast decay component as a function of the droplet diameter was explained on the basis of cavity quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects. It was shown that the mode characteristic of WGM resonances and the enhancement factor of the radiative rate of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) were controlled by the size of the water droplet.

  6. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  7. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 μm and the step size was 0.3 μm. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size

  8. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; van der Geld, C. W. M.; Geurts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

  9. A zero-gravity demonstration of the collision and coalescence of water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Vaughan, O. H.; Smith, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanics of the collision and coalescence of liquid droplets is one of the main research areas in the fields of nuclear physics, astrophysics, meteorology and fluid mechanics. The crew members on the Skylab 3 and 4 missions were requested to perform demonstrations of the collision and coalescence of water droplets under the low gravity environment at orbital altitude. In Skylab 4 two water droplets with equal volumes, 30 cu cm each, were used. A dark colored droplet (contaminated with grape drink) moving with a velocity of 3.14 cm/sec collided with a stationary pink colored droplet (contaminated with strawberry drink) and coalescence occurred. Theoretical models are proposed to study the various stages of the collision-coalescence processes. Special considerations are concentrated in the investigation of the bounce-coalescence and coalescence-instability processes. The surface tension of the coalesced droplets was calculated to be 52 dynes/cm in perfect agreement with laboratory measurements made after the flight using a reproduction of the liquids.

  10. Cloud optical thickness and liquid water path – does the k coefficient vary with droplet concentration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Geoffroy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud radiative transfer calculations in general circulation models involve a link between cloud microphysical and optical properties. Indeed, the liquid water content expresses as a function of the mean volume droplet radius, while the light extinction is a function of their mean surface radius. There is a small difference between these two parameters because of the droplet spectrum width. This issue has been addressed by introducing an empirical multiplying correction factor to the droplet concentration. Analysis of in situ sampled data, however, revealed that the correction factor decreases when the concentration increases, hence partially mitigating the aerosol indirect effect. Five field experiments are reanalyzed here, in which standard and upgraded versions of the droplet spectrometer were used to document shallow cumulus and stratocumulus topped boundary layers. They suggest that the standard probe noticeably underestimates the correction factor compared to the upgraded versions. The analysis is further refined to demonstrate that the value of the correction factor derived by averaging values calculated locally along the flight path overestimates the value derived from liquid water path and optical thickness of a cloudy column, and that there is no detectable relationship between the correction factor and the droplet concentration. It is also shown that the droplet concentration dilution by entrainment-mixing after CCN activation is significantly stronger in shallow cumuli than in stratocumulus layers. These various effects are finally combined to produce the today best estimate of the correction factor to use in general circulation models.

  11. Physics of puffing and microexplosion of emulsion fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, J.; Xia, J.; Ganippa, L. C.; Megaritis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The physics of water-in-oil emulsion droplet microexplosion/puffing has been investigated using high-fidelity interface-capturing simulation. Varying the dispersed-phase (water) sub-droplet size/location and the initiation location of explosive boiling (bubble formation), the droplet breakup processes have been well revealed. The bubble growth leads to local and partial breakup of the parent oil droplet, i.e., puffing. The water sub-droplet size and location determine the after-puffing dynamics. The boiling surface of the water sub-droplet is unstable and evolves further. Finally, the sub-droplet is wrapped by boiled water vapor and detaches itself from the parent oil droplet. When the water sub-droplet is small, the detachment is quick, and the oil droplet breakup is limited. When it is large and initially located toward the parent droplet center, the droplet breakup is more extensive. For microexplosion triggered by the simultaneous growth of multiple separate bubbles, each explosion is local and independent initially, but their mutual interactions occur at a later stage. The degree of breakup can be larger due to interactions among multiple explosions. These findings suggest that controlling microexplosion/puffing is possible in a fuel spray, if the emulsion-fuel blend and the ambient flow conditions such as heating are properly designed. The current study also gives us an insight into modeling the puffing and microexplosion of emulsion droplets and sprays.

  12. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  13. Water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic SiO2 nanocomposite films during icing/deicing cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Guobiene, A.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, V.; Grigaliunas, V.; Narmontas, P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic (water contact angle value of 162 ± 1°) SiO2 nanocomposite films subjected to repetitive icing/deicing treatments, changes in SiO2 nanocomposite film surface morphology and their non-wetting characteristics. During the experiment,

  14. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  15. Introducing a new formula based on an artificial neural network for prediction of droplet size in venturi scrubbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sharifi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size is a fundamental parameter for Venturi scrubber performance. For many years, the correlations proposed by Nukiyama and Tanasawa (1938 and Boll et al. (1974 were used for calculating mean droplet size in Venturi scrubbers with limited operating parameters. This study proposes an alternative approach on the basis of artificial neural networks (ANNs to determine the mean droplet size in Venturi scrubbers, in a wide range of operating parameters. Experimental data were used to design the ANNs. A neural network was trained based on the liquid to gas ratio (L/G and throat gas velocity (Vgth, as input parameters, and the Sauter mean diameter (D32 as the desired parameter. The back-propagation learning algorithms were used in the network and the best approach was found. A new formula for the prediction of D32 using the weights of the network was then generated. This formula predicts mean droplet size in Venturi scrubbers more accurately than the correlations of Boll et al. (1974 and Nukiyama and Tanasawa (1938. The Average Absolute Percent Deviation (AAPD of our formula and the Boll et al. and Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlations for the full ranges of experimental data are 26.04%, 40.19% and 32.99%, respectively.

  16. Going beyond the standard line tension: Size-dependent contact angles of water nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Matej

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the contact angle on the size of a nanoscopic droplet residing on a flat substrate is traditionally ascribed solely to line tension. Other contributions, stemming from the droplet geometry dependence of the surface tension and line tension, are typically ignored. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of water droplets of cylindrical morphology on surfaces of a wide range of polarities. In the cylindrical geometry, where the line tension is not operative directly, we find significant contact angle dependence on the droplet size. The effect is most pronounced on hydrophilic surfaces, with the contact angle increase of up to 1 0 ° with a decreasing droplet size. On hydrophobic surfaces, the trend is reversed and considerably weaker. Our analysis suggests that these effects can be attributed to the Tolman correction due to the curved water-vapor interface and to a generalized line tension that possesses a contact angle dependence. The latter is operative also in the cylindrical geometry and yields a comparable contribution to the contact angle as the line tension itself in case of spherical droplets.

  17. Interfacial behavior of water droplet on micro-nano structured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ho Jae; Yu, Dong In; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ho Sun [Division of Mechanical System Engineering, Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Recently, surfaces with micro and nano structures are the focus of various research and engineering fields to enhance wetting characteristics of the surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces with hierarchical structures are generally characterized by the interfacial behavior of water droplets. In this study, the interfacial behavior of water droplets is experimentally investigated considering the scale of structures. Using the dry etching and conventional lithography method, quantitative hierarchical structured surfaces are developed. The behavior of the liquid-vapor interface on the test sections is visualized using an automatic goniometer and a high-speed camera. On the basis of the visualized data, the interfacial behavior of water droplets is intensively investigated according to surface geometrical characteristics.

  18. Size and Velocity Distributions of Particles and Droplets in Spray Combustion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    optimal value. the quality of reconstruction of particle size distribution degrades.The values of Omsa were set at 1°. 30 and 100. In the present case m.x...diffraction particle size measurements on 45 pm poly- styrene latex spheres in a water flow cell. The ensemble scattering method assumed that the...form it is possible in theory to determine the range of the diffraction signature given by Eqs. 5 refractive indez along with the size distribution and

  19. Water droplet spreading on a soluble polymer: what happens close to the contact line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talini, Laurence; Dupas, Julien; Verneuil, Emilie; Lequeux, Francois; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the spreading of a water droplet on a water soluble substrate. Numerous coupled transfer processes are involved in such a situation, leading to complex wetting dynamics. In particular, previous studies have shown the major role of water evaporation from the droplet associated with water uptake by the substrate. However, the processes at stake close to the contact line, where the substrate properties set the wetting angle, have not been understood. We present an experimental study of the phenomena occurring within distances ranging from 10 to 1000 μm from the contact line of a water droplet spreading on a food polymer layer. We have evidenced a wrinkling pattern inside the droplet close to the contact line, and suggest it results from the swelling of the constrained polymer layer before it dissolves. In addition, using an optical method based on the analysis of Newton's rings, we have measured the hydration profile of the substrate ahead the contact line. We show that the profiles can be understood as a result of the evaporation/water uptake process through air combined with direct water diffusion in the substrate from the liquid wedge.

  20. Experimental Research of Mutual Influence of Several Consecutive Water Droplets on Regularities of their Evaporation through High-temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonov Dmitrii V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of the main integral characteristic of several water droplets at their evaporation through high-temperature gases (1100K was carried out. Features of water droplet movement in a high-temperature gas stream are established. Characteristics of droplet movement at a variety of their initial parameters in a wide range was established by high-speed video registration preservers «Phantom» and software packages «Tema Automotive» and «Phantom Camera Control». The main integral characteristics of several water droplets in the different distance between them were installed.

  1. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  2. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein and its associated factors (TAFs together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  3. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Kei

    2017-11-01

    In this work shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface is numerically studied. The numerical simulation is carried out utilizing two phase full Eulerian approach based on high resolution finite volume method, which allows for shock wave propagation in multiphase flow. To study the shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface, an immersed boundary method is used as wall boundary treatment. The maximum impact pressure is computed as a function of surface roughness, and show that the maximum impact pressure increases with increasing relative roughness.

  4. Evaporation of Water Droplets on “Lock-and-Key” Structures with Nanoscale Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been investiga......Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been...

  5. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is a significant aviation hazard, and icing conditions continue to be difficult to precisely forecast or locate in real time. An in-situ sensor, which can be...

  6. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Third quarterly technical report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-01

    Laminar and turbulent columns of liquids issuing from capillary tubes were studied in order to determine the effects of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and to establish the influence of liquid turbulence on droplet size distributions after breakup. Two capillary tubes were chosen with diameters D{sub 1}=3.0mm and D{sub 2}=1.2mm; jet Reynolds numbers were 1000--30000, and 400--7200. For water injection into stagnant air, stability curve is bounded by a laminar portion, where a jet radius and {delta}{sub o} initial disturbance amplitude, and a fully developed turbulent portion characterized by high initial disturbance amplitude (ln(a/{delta}{sub o,T}) {approximately} 4.85). In the transition region, ln(a/{delta}{sub o}) is not single valued; it decreases with increasing Reynolds number. In absence of aerodynamic effects, turbulent jets are as stable as laminar jets. For this breakup mode turbulence propagates initial disturbances with amplitudes orders of magnitude larger than laminar jets ({delta}{sub o,T}=28{times}10{sup 6} {delta}{sub o,L}). Growth rates of initial disturbances are same for both laminar and turbulent columns with theoretical Weber values. Droplet size distribution is bi-modal; the number ratio of large (> D/2), to small (< D/2) droplets is 3 and independent of Reynolds number. For laminar flow optimum wavelength ({lambda}{sub opt}) corresponding to fastest growing disturbance is equal to 4.45D, exactly the theoretical Weber value. For turbulent flow conditions, the turbulent column segments. Typically, segments with lengths of one to several wavelengths, detach from the liquid jet. The long ligaments contract under the action of surface tension, resulting in droplet sizes larger than predicted by Rayleigh and Weber. For turbulent flow conditions, {lambda}{sub opt} = 9.2D, about 2 times the optimum Weber wavelength.

  7. Dancing Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on corona treated glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on clean glass surfaces. These droplets exhibit a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction or repulsion, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors, and propose a detailed model for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: passively sort droplets by surface tension, spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, and cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  8. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals at Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The single scattering albedo omega(sub O lambda) in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength lambda and droplet size r. This note shows that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega(sub O lambda)(r)/omega(sub O lambda)(r (sub O)) of two single scattering albedo spectra is a linear function of omega(sub O lambda)(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo spectrum omega(sub O lambda)(r) via one known spectrum omega(sub O lambda)(r (sub O)). We provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. Similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo spectra of non-spherical ice crystals.

  9. Examining the Roles of Emulsion Droplet Size and Surfactant in the Interfacial Instability-Based Fabrication Process of Micellar Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuxiang; Mei, Ling; Han, Ning; Ding, Xinyi; Yu, Caihao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ruan, Gang

    2017-06-01

    The interfacial instability process is an emerging general method to fabricate nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles (also called micellar nanocrystals) for biological detection, imaging, and therapy. The present work utilized fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots or QDs) as the model nanocrystals to investigate the interfacial instability-based fabrication process of nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles. Our experimental results suggest intricate and intertwined roles of the emulsion droplet size and the surfactant poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) used in the fabrication process of QD-encapsulated poly (styrene-b-ethylene glycol) (PS-PEG) micelles. When no PVA is used, no emulsion droplet and thus no micelle is successfully formed; Emulsion droplets with large sizes ( 25 μm) result in two types of QD-encapsulated micelles, one of which is colloidally stable QD-encapsulated PS-PEG micelles while the other of which is colloidally unstable QD-encapsulated PVA micelles; In contrast, emulsion droplets with small sizes ( 3 μm or smaller) result in only colloidally stable QD-encapsulated PS-PEG micelles. The results obtained in this work not only help to optimize the quality of nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles prepared by the interfacial instability method for biological applications but also offer helpful new knowledge on the interfacial instability process in particular and self-assembly in general.

  10. Microfluidic generation of aqueous two-phase-system (ATPS) droplets by oil-droplet choppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunmei; Zhu, Pingan; Tian, Ye; Tang, Xin; Shi, Rui; Wang, Liqiu

    2017-09-26

    Existing approaches for droplet generation with an ultra-low interfacial tension using aqueous two-phase systems, ATPS, are either constricted by a narrow range of flow conditions using passive methods or subjected to complex chip fabrication with the integration of external components using active actuation. To address these issues, we present a simple approach to produce uniform ATPS droplets facilitated by oil-droplet choppers in microfluidics. Our solution counts on the synchronized formation of high-interfacial-tension oil-in-water and low-interfacial-tension water-in-water droplets, where the ATPS interface is distorted by oil droplets and decays into water-in-water droplets. In the synchronization regime, the size and generation frequency of ATPS droplets can be controlled independently by tuning the flow rates of the dispersed aqueous and oil phases, respectively. Our method demonstrates high uniformity of droplets (coefficient of variation between 0.75% and 2.45%), a wide range of available droplet size (droplet radius from 5 μm to 180 μm), and a maximum generation frequency of about 2.1 kHz that is nearly two orders of magnitude faster than that in existing methods. We develop theoretical models to precisely predict the minimum and maximum frequencies of droplet generation and the droplet size. The produced ATPS droplets and oil choppers are separated in the channel using density difference. Our method would boost emulsion-based biological applications such as cell encapsulation, biomolecule delivery, bioreactors, and biomaterials synthesis with ATPS droplets.

  11. Single Mobile Micro Droplet-Particle Pairs Spatially Captured by Macro Host Droplets on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Watson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this preliminary study, we demonstrate how small single water droplets can be spatially captured on the surface of individual micron sized hydrophobic coated particles (C18 which adhere to the surface of a nonmobile larger host water droplet resting on a superhydrophobic surface. The formation of the larger droplet, particle adhesion to that droplet, and smaller droplet formation on the particle all take place spontaneously from condensation conditions. These micro droplet-particle pairs are confined to the surface (liquid-air interface of the larger host droplet; however, they are free to engage with external forces to promote mobility. This response may find applications for particle pair transport on liquid surfaces. We also demonstrate that droplets can be captured or removed from the larger droplet surface via a self-propulsion mechanism.

  12. Droplet diameter and size distribution of JP-4 fuel injected into a subsonic airstream. Final report, 22 Oct-12 Dec 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasson, R.A. Jr.; Darlington, C.R.; Billingsley, J.C.

    1975-04-01

    A test program was conducted to determine the size and distribution of JP-4 fuel droplets when fuel was dispersed at a constant fuel nozzle exit velocity into a subsonic airstream. Testing was conducted at free-stream flight velocities ranging from 200 to 400 knots at altitudes ranging from 12,000 to 25,000 feet with flow rates of approximately 13, 75, and 290 lbm/min. Holograms of the fuel droplets were taken 18 feet downstream of the fuel nozzle exit plane. Representative histograms of fuel droplet size distribution and average fuel droplet diameter are presented. Average fuel droplet diameter was not significantly affected by any of the test variables. All arithmetic average fuel droplet diameter data were within a 19- to 36-micrometer band. (GRA)

  13. Emulsion droplet spreading at air/water interfaces: mechanisms and relevance to the whipping of cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords:emulsion, spreading coefficient, surface tension, emulsifier, whipped cream, dairy foam, partial coalescence In this thesis, the interaction between emulsion droplets and expanding air/water interfaces was investigated. The

  14. Simple model for laser-produced, mass-limited water-droplet plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garloff, Kurt; van den Donker, Michiel; van der Mullen, Joost; van Goor, F.A.; Brummans, Ralph; Jonkers, Jeroen

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, produced by a neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser pulse focused on a small water droplet and used for the generation of extreme ultraviolet light, can be described by a relatively simple model due to the fact that thermodynamic equilibrium can be assumed for the most important

  15. Monitoring the buckling threshold of drying colloidal droplets using water-ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, G; Tsapis, N

    2008-10-01

    We visualize the drying of droplets of colloids suspended in a mixture of two miscible solvents, namely water and ethanol. After a period of isotropic shrinkage, droplets suddenly buckle like elastic shells. For a fixed colloid solid fraction, the buckling threshold evolves as a function of ethanol content, due to changes of the solvent mixture physical properties, such as viscosity and evaporation rate. A simplified model predicting the qualitative behavior of the buckling threshold as a function of the initial ethanol mass fraction has been developed that fits well experimental results.

  16. Femtosecond vibrational dynamics in water nano-droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Gheorghe Dan

    2008-01-01

    Water is probably the most researched substance on Earth. The interest in water, and redominantly in liquid water, is due to its importance on both macro- and microscopic scales. Although people have been trying to understand water for centuries, this ubiquitous liquid is still surrounded by mystery

  17. Water-oil core-shell droplets for electrowetting-based digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Daniel; Malic, Lidija; Normandin, François; Tabrizian, Maryam; Veres, Teodor

    2008-08-01

    Digital microfluidics based on electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) has recently emerged as one of the most promising technologies to realize integrated and highly flexible lab-on-a-chip systems. In such EWOD-based digital microfluidic devices, the aqueous droplets have traditionally been manipulated either directly in air or in an immiscible fluid such as silicone oil. However, both transporting mediums have important limitations and neither offers the flexibility required to fulfil the needs of several applications. In this paper, we report on an alternative mode of operation for EWOD-based devices in which droplets enclosed in a thin layer of oil are manipulated in air. We demonstrate the possibility to perform on-chip the fundamental fluidic operations by using such water-oil core-shell droplets and compare systematically the results with the traditional approach where the aqueous droplets are manipulated directly in air or oil. We show that the core-shell configuration combines several advantages of both the air and oil mediums. In particular, this configuration not only reduces the operation voltage of EWOD-based devices but also leads to higher transport velocities when compared with the manipulation of droplets directly in air or oil.

  18. Study of conversion of ammonia from urea water solution droplets using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothis, K.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the numerical analysis of the spray behaviour of urea water solution (UWS) droplets used in Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process. The study uses the ANSYS-Fluent-14 as a basic framework for numerical simulations. The evaporation modelling is based on multi-component droplet evaporation approach along with the consideration of Stefan flow. The urea decomposition treated as direct thermolysis approach, where the modelling is based on the single kinetic rate approach by the proper fitting of pre-exponent. This developed model was used for spray simulation of UWS droplet evaporation to determine the urea to ammonia conversion efficiency. The obtained spray simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. The comparison shows the pre-exponent developed in the study is suitable for direct thermolysis approach to get promising results in determining the ammonia conversion efficiency.

  19. Thermal management of metallic surfaces: evaporation of sessile water droplets on polished and patterned stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiec, T.; Tsareva, S.; Andrieux, A.; Bortolini, G. A.; Bolzan, P. H.; Castanet, G.; Gradeck, M.; Marcos, G.

    2017-10-01

    This communication focus on the evaporation of sessile water droplets on different states of austenitic stainless steel surfaces: mirror polished, mirror polished and aged and patterned by sputtering. The evolution of the contact angle and of the droplet diameter is presented as a function of time at room temperature. For all the surface states, a constant diameter regime (CCR) is observed. An important aging effect on the contact angle is measured on polished surfaces due to atmospheric contamination. The experimental observations are compared to a quasi-static evaporation model assuming spherical caps. The evolution of the droplet volume as a function of time is almost linear with the evaporation time for all the observed surfaces. This is in accordance with the model prediction for the CCR mode for small initial contact angles. In our experiments, the evaporation time is found to be linearly dependent on the initial contact angle. This dependence is not correctly described by the evaporation model

  20. Water droplet bouncing--a definition for superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Colin R; Parkin, Ivan P

    2011-11-28

    The ability of water to bounce on a surface provides an indication of many of the surface's properties. The technique described in this article uses water bouncing to determine the hydrophobicity of a surface, with a relationship established between water contact angle and number of bounces, which is dependent on the surfaces microstructure.

  1. Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 regulates lipid droplet size and mitochondrial activity in murine subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Fan; Cai, Yin; Cai, Yu; Wang, Yu; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether genetic ablation of prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4) affects white adipose tissue (WAT) remodeling mediated by β3-adrenergic stimulation. The selective β3-adrenergic agonist, CL316243 (1 mg/kg/d, i.p.) caused a greater increase in metabolic rate in EP4-knockout mice. CL316243 fragmented the unilocular lipid droplet into multilocular lipid vacuoles and increased mitochondrial biogenesis and its activity. These changes were amplified in mice with EP4 deficiency and were selectively seen in subcutaneous WAT. The expression of fat-specific protein (FSP)-27, a protein that promotes fusion of triglycerides and formation of unilocular lipid droplets were diminished, whereas the expression of phosphorylated AMPK, the upstream regulator of FSP27, was enhanced in EP4-deficient mice. The present study showed that EP4 acts as a negative regulator of WAT remodeling, it tightly coordinates rates of triglyceride storage in lipid droplets and mitochondrial respiratory function in subcutaneous white adipocytes through the phosphorylated AMPK-FSP27 signaling axis. Thus, deletion of EP4 increases mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity in WAT, and fat mass loss ensues in mice.-Ying, F., Cai, Y., Cai, Y., Wang, Y., Tang, E. H. C. Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 regulates lipid droplet size and mitochondrial activity in murine subcutaneous white adipose tissue. © FASEB.

  2. Dancing Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Cira, Nate J

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on clean glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on high energy surfaces. In this fluid dynamics video we show a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors including a mechanism for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface, and passively sort droplets by surface tension. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  3. Correlation of Emulsion Structure with Cellular Uptake Behavior of Encapsulated Bioactive Nutrients: Influence of Droplet Size and Interfacial Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Kelly, Alan L; Maguire, Pierce; Zhang, Hongzhou; Stanton, Catherine; Miao, Song

    2016-11-16

    In this study, an in vitro Caco-2 cell culture assay was employed to evaluate the correlation between emulsion structure and cellular uptake of encapsulated β-carotene. After 4 h of incubation, an emulsion stabilized with whey protein isolate showed the highest intracellular accumulation of β-carotene (1.06 μg), followed by that stabilized with sodium caseinate (0.60 μg) and Tween 80 (0.20 μg), which are 13-, 7.5-, and 2.5-fold higher than that of free β-carotene (0.08 μg), respectively. Emulsions with small droplet size (239 ± 5 nm) showed a higher cellular uptake of β-carotene (1.56 μg) than emulsiond with large droplet size (489 ± 9 nm) (0.93 μg) (p emulsion significantly improved the cellular uptake of β-carotene and thus potentially its bioavailability; uptake was closely correlated with the interfacial composition and droplet size of emulsions. The findings support the potential for achieving optimal controlled and targeted delivery of bioactive nutrients by structuring emulsions.

  4. Electric effect during the fast dendritic freezing of supercooled water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerecker, Sigurd; Buttersack, Tillmann

    2014-11-26

    An electrical phenomenon consisting of two alternating voltage peaks of up to 6 V amplitude was observed during the rapid dendritic freezing phase of supercooled water droplets in the millimeter size range with supercoolings ΔT in the range of 5 to 20 K. For correlation of the dendritic freezing front with the electric potential, a fast recording oscilloscope was combined with a high-speed camera operating at up to 5000 frames per second. The strength of the effect is roughly proportional to the supercooling and dendritic freezing speed. Furthermore, during the subsequent second freezing phase, which is much slower than the dendritic, a qualitatively different electric potential evolution of similar magnitude has been found which resembles the well-investigated Workman-Reynolds freezing potential (WRFP). The experiments show clear evidence that the first rapid dendritic freezing stage significantly influences direction and amount of the electric potential during the second slow freezing stage. Compared to the WRFP, which takes place for much smaller supercoolings of ΔT ≪ 5 K, the evolution of the presented dendritic freezing potential occurs about 10(4) times faster, is about 10 times smaller in view of the maximum voltage, and shows similar break off concentrations but remarkably does not vanish at low foreign ion concentrations. This phenomenon has direct relevance to atmospheric freezing processes of the Earth, other planets, and satellites.

  5. Wettability and impact dynamics of water droplets on rice ( Oryza sativa L.) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dae Hee; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the wettability and impact dynamics of water droplets on rice leaves at various leaf inclination angles and orientations. Contact angle, contact angle hysteresis (CAH), and roll-off angle ( α roll) of water droplets were measured quantitatively. Results showed that droplet motion exhibited less resistance along the longitudinal direction. Impact dynamic parameters, such as impact behaviors, maximum spreading factor, contact distance, and contact time were also investigated. Three different impact behaviors were categorized based on the normal component of Weber number irrespective of the inclination angle of the rice leaf. The asymmetric impact behavior induced by the tangential Weber number was also identified. Variation in the maximum spreading factor according to the normal Weber number was measured and compared with theoretical value obtained according to scaling law to show the wettability of the rice leaves. The contact distance of the impacting droplets depended on the inclination angle of the leaves. Along the longitudinal direction of rice leaves, contact distance was farther than that along the transverse direction. This result is consistent with the smaller values of CAH and α roll along the longitudinal direction.

  6. Heterogeneous uptake of 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol on liquid water and 1-octanol droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongquan; Demerjian, Kenneth L; Williams, Leah R; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kolb, Charles E; Davidovits, Paul

    2006-06-01

    The heterogeneous uptake of the 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol, F(CF2)8CH2CH2OH, on liquid water surfaces over the temperature range 256-273 K and on 1-octanol surfaces over the temperature range 264-295 K has been investigated with a droplet train flow reactor. The uptake coefficient on water droplets is zero within the error of the measurement (+/-0.01) and is independent of droplet temperature. In contrast, significant uptake onto 1-octanol is observed. Measured uptake coefficients for 1-octanol showed a negative temperature dependence, varying from 0.034 +/- 0.005 (1sigma) at 295 K to 0.103 +/- 0.009 at 264 K. The measured uptake coefficients on 1-octanol were independent of gas-liquid contact time, for typical contact times varying between 3 and 15 ms, and independent of the 8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol gas-phase concentration, indicating that the uptake coefficients are equivalent to mass accommodation coefficients. The uptake coefficients on 1-octanol were also independent of relative humidity. These results show that the uptake of FTOHs on or into the aqueous component of cloud/fog droplets or aqueous aerosol particles is not likely to be an important atmospheric sink for these compounds. In these experiments, 1-octanol was used as a model compound for organic-containing atmospheric particles. The larger uptake coefficient measured for 1-octanol surfaces indicates that FTOH partitioning to organic-containing cloud/fog droplets and aerosol particles may be an atmospheric loss mechanism.

  7. Approximate analytical descriptions of the stationary single-vortex Marangoni convection inside an evaporating sessile droplet of capillary size

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2013-01-01

    Three versions of an approximate analytical description of the stationary single vortex Marangoni convection in an axially symmetrical sessile drop of capillary size are studied for arbitrary contact angle and compared with the results of numerical simulations. The first approach is heuristic extension of the well-known lubrication approximation. Two other descriptions are developed here and named n\\tau- and rz-description. They are free from most of restrictive assumptions of the lubrication approach. For droplets with large contact angles they result in better accuracy compared to the heuristic extension of the lubrication approach, which still gives reasonable results within the accuracy 10-30 per cent. For droplets with small contact angles all three analytical descriptions well agree with the numerical data.

  8. High-Speed Imaging of a Water Droplet Impacting a Super Cold Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Narimane

    2016-08-01

    Frost formation is of a major research interest as it can affect many industrial processes. Frost appears as a thin deposit of ice crystals when the temperature of the surface is below the freezing point of the liquid. The objective of this research is to study icing with hope to propose new anti-icing and deicing methods. In the beginning of the research, cracking of the ice layer was observed when a deionized water droplet impacts a ?50 oC cooled sphere surface that is in contact with dry ice. To further investigate the cracks occurrence, multiple experiments were conducted. It was observed that the sphere surface temperature and droplet temperature (ranges from 10-80 oC) have no effect on the crack formation. On the other hand, it was observed that formation of a thin layer of frost on the sphere before the drop impact leads the lateral cracking of the ice. Thus, attempts to reproduce the cracks on clean super cold sphere surfaces were made using scratched and sandblasted spheres as well as superhydrophobized and polymer particle coated spheres. Furthermore, innovative methods were tried to initiate the cracks by placing epoxy glue bumps and ice-islands coatings on the surface of the spheres. All of these attempts to reproduce the crack formation without the presence of frost, failed. Nonetheless, the adding of isolated frost on the sphere surfaces always leads to the crack formation. Generally, frost forms on the small spheres faster than it does on the bigger ones. Additionally, the cold water droplet produces thicker water and ice layer compared to a hot water droplet; and the smaller the sphere the larger its water and ice layer thicknesses.

  9. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  10. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  11. Dispersed droplet dynamics during produced water treatment in oil industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    For Lagrangian particle tracking applied to swirling flow produced water treatment the influence of the history force is investigated. In the expression for the history force an existing Reynolds number dependent kernel is adapted and validated for a range of experimental data for settling spheres.

  12. Surfactat’s Impact on the Evaporation Intensity and a Vapor Embryos Generation Kinetics within the Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M. P.; Terekhov, V. I.; Shishkin, N. E.

    2017-09-01

    The research of water-surfactant droplets evaporation was provided. The sodium dodecylsulfate was taken as a surfactant (SAS). The initial SAS mass contain was ~ 0,15%. Water and water-surfactant solution droplets were evaporated under the dry air flow blowing at temperatures T0 ~ (20 ÷ 90)0C and air linear velocity VO ~ 2 ÷ 5 m/s. The droplet initial diameter (d0) was equal to ~ 2 mm, Reynolds number was within the interval of Re = 500 ÷ 2000. The droplet evaporation rate and their surface temperature were measured by an Infrared Microscope. The measurements display that the temperature heterogeneity on the droplet surface is initiated by the vapor fluctuating bursts at the local centers. A surfactant admixture into the base liquid (water) has a considerable impact on the vapor centre generation kinetics as well as on the time behavior of the droplets evaporating surfaces. The environmental conditions have the weak impact on the vapor formation, but the inner conditions, i.e. droplet’s temperature and pressure in it and physical properties of the base liquid have the considerable impact on the vapor generation kinetics. A surfactant adding makes surface tension higher. That depresses a heat-mass transfer and rises an average temperature of droplets.

  13. HVOF and HVAF Coatings of Agglomerated Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Powders for Water Droplet Erosion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasi, F.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Dolatabadi, A.; Medraj, M.; Moreau, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water droplet erosion (WDE) is a phenomenon caused by impingement of water droplets of several hundred microns to a few millimeters diameter at velocities of hundreds of meters per second on the edges and surfaces of the parts used in such services. The solution to this problem is sought especially for the moving compressor blades in gas turbines and those operating at the low-pressure end of steam turbines. Thermal-sprayed tungsten carbide-based coatings have been the focus of many studies and are industrially accepted for a multitude of wear and erosion resistance applications. In the present work, the microstructure, phase analysis and mechanical properties (micro-hardness and fracture toughness) of WC-Co coatings are studied in relation with their influence on the WDE resistance of such coatings. The coatings are deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes. The agglomerated tungsten carbide-cobalt powders were in either sintered or non-sintered conditions. The WDE tests were performed using 0.4 mm water droplets at 300 m/s impact velocity. The study shows promising results for this cermet as WDE-resistant coating when the coating can reach its optimum quality using the right thermal spray process and parameters.

  14. Relation between electrical percolation and rate constant for exchange of material between droplets in water in oil microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jada, A.; Lang, J.; Zana, R. (Institut Charles Sadron, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-01-12

    The rate constant k{sub e} associated with the exchange of material upon collisions between droplets in ternary water in oil microemulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants has been determined by a time-resolved fluorescence method. The electrical conductivity of the same systems has been investigated. It appears that percolative conduction occurs only in systems where k{sub e} is larger than (1-2) {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. This result supports the hypothesis that above percolation threshold the conductivity is mainly due to the motion of counterions through water channels or fusion between droplets in droplet clusters.

  15. Development of Directly Suspended Droplet Micro Extraction Method for Extraction of Organochlorine Pesticides in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kamal Rajabi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient directly suspended droplet micro extraction in conjunction with gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD has been developed for extraction and determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs from water samples. In this technique a micro drop of 1-dodecanol is delivered to the surface of an aqueous sample while being agitated by a stirring bar in the bulk of solution. Factors relevant to the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. The optimized extraction conditions were extraction solvent: 1-dodecanol; extraction temperature: 60◦C; NaCl concentration: 0.5M; solvent extraction volume: 10 µL; stirring rate: 800rpm and the extraction time: 20 min. The detection limits of the method were in the range of 0.066–1.85 ngL−1, relation standard deviation (n=5 range were 0.102 - 0.964. A good linearity (r 2 ≥0.995 and a relatively broad dynamic linear range (25–2600ng.L−1 were obtained and recoveries of method were in the range of 90.729% - 102.343%. Finally, the proposedmethod was successfully utilized for pre concentration and determination of OCPs in different real samples.We successfully developed a method based on the DSDME technique combined with capillary GC-ECD for the analysis of OCPs in the water samples and compared with the conventional sample preparation method such as LPME. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso

  16. Surface-induced orientational order in stretched nanoscale-sized polymer dispersed liquid-crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amimori, Ichiro; Eakin, James N; Qi, Jun; Skacej, Gregor; Zumer, Slobodan; Crawford, Gregory P

    2005-03-01

    We investigate orientational ordering in stretched polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) droplets using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance, in the nematic and isotropic phases. In the latter case, we estimate the surface order parameter S(0) and the thickness of the interfacial layer from the temperature-independent surface ordering model for an elliptical cavity with a varying aspect ratio. A simple phenomenological model well describes the quadrupole splitting frequency of NMR spectra in the isotropic phase. The strain dependence of S(0) suggests that stretching-induced changes in the orientation of polymer chains in the PDLC matrix noticeably affect liquid-crystal surface anchoring. Experimental results are supported by simulated NMR spectra obtained as output from Monte Carlo simulations of paranematic ordering in ellipsoidal droplets based on the Lebwohl-Lasher lattice model.

  17. Oxidation of SO2 and formation of water droplets under irradiation of 20MeV protons in N2/H2O/SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, Shigeo; Nakai, Yoichi; Funada, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    droplets contributes to the formation of the droplets. The charged droplet volume detected per unit time is proportional to the SO2 consumption, which indicates that a constant amount of sulfur atoms is contained in a unit volume of droplet, regardless of different droplet-size distributions depending...

  18. A Further Indication of the Self-Ordering Capacity of Water Via the Droplet Evaporation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jerman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The droplet evaporation method (DEM is increasingly used for assessing various characteristics of water. In our research we tried to use DEM to detect a possible self-ordering capability of (spring water that would be similar to the already found and described autothixotropic phenomenon, namely increasing order of non-distilled water subject to aging. The output of DEM is a droplet remnant pattern (DRP. For analysis of DRP images we used a specially developed computer program that does the frequency distribution analysis of certain parameters of the images. The results of experiments demonstrated statistically significant differences in both aging of water as well as in the glass exposed surface/volume ratio of the aged water. The most important result supporting the self-ordering character of water was found in an increasing dependence between two analyzed parameters: distance and frequency, at the peak frequency. As the result concerns mostly aging and shows increasing order it further corroborates other findings concerning increasing order by aging. Such further confirmation of self-ordering capacity of water is not important only for physical chemistry, but also for biology.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-Based Droplet Size Estimates in Emulsification Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Janssen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While academic literature shows steady progress in combining multi-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD and population balance modelling (PBM of emulsification processes, the computational burden of this approach is still too large for routine use in industry. The challenge, thus, is to link a sufficiently detailed flow analysis to the droplet behavior in a way that is both physically relevant and computationally manageable. In this research article we propose the use of single-phase CFD to map out the local maximum stable droplet diameter within a given device, based on well-known academic droplet break-up studies in quasi-steady 2D linear flows. The results of the latter are represented by analytical correlations for the critical capillary number, which are valid across a wide viscosity ratio range. Additionally, we suggest a parameter to assess how good the assumption of quasi-steady 2D flow is locally. The approach is demonstrated for a common lab-scale rotor-stator device (Ultra-Turrax, IKA-Werke GmbH, Staufen, Germany. It is found to provide useful insights with minimal additional user coding and little increase in computational effort compared to the single-phase CFD simulations of the flow field, as such. Some suggestions for further development are briefly discussed.

  20. Experimental, water droplet impingement data on two-dimensional airfoils, axisymmetric inlet and Boeing 737-300 engine inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Elangovan, E.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate particle trajectory codes, used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. A body whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and then exposed to an air stream containing a dyed-water spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips, by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Impingement efficiency data obtained for a NACA 65(2)015 airfoil section, a supercritical airfoil section, and Being 737-300 and axisymmetric inlet models are presented in this paper.

  1. Cloud-enabled microscopy and droplet microfluidic platform for specific detection of Escherichia coli in water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Golberg

    Full Text Available We report an all-in-one platform - ScanDrop - for the rapid and specific capture, detection, and identification of bacteria in drinking water. The ScanDrop platform integrates droplet microfluidics, a portable imaging system, and cloud-based control software and data storage. The cloud-based control software and data storage enables robotic image acquisition, remote image processing, and rapid data sharing. These features form a "cloud" network for water quality monitoring. We have demonstrated the capability of ScanDrop to perform water quality monitoring via the detection of an indicator coliform bacterium, Escherichia coli, in drinking water contaminated with feces. Magnetic beads conjugated with antibodies to E. coli antigen were used to selectively capture and isolate specific bacteria from water samples. The bead-captured bacteria were co-encapsulated in pico-liter droplets with fluorescently-labeled anti-E. coli antibodies, and imaged with an automated custom designed fluorescence microscope. The entire water quality diagnostic process required 8 hours from sample collection to online-accessible results compared with 2-4 days for other currently available standard detection methods.

  2. Studies on remote sensing method of particle size and water density distribution in mists and clouds using laser radar techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H.; Kobayasi, T.; Inaba, H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of remote measurement of the particle size and density distribution of water droplets was developed. In this method, the size of droplets is measured from the Mie scattering parameter which is defined as the total-to-backscattering ratio of the laser beam. The water density distribution is obtained by a combination of the Mie scattering parameter and the extinction coefficient of the laser beam. This method was examined experimentally for the mist generated by an ultrasonic mist generator and applied to clouds containing rain and snow. Compared with the conventional sampling method, the present method has advantages of remote measurement capability and improvement in accuracy.

  3. Evaporation of liquid droplets of nano- and micro-meter size as a function of molecular mass and intermolecular interactions: experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Jakubczyk, Daniel

    2017-09-13

    Transport of heat to the surface of a liquid is a limiting step in the evaporation of liquids into an inert gas. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a two component Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid revealed two modes of energy transport from a vapour to an interface of an evaporating droplet of liquid. Heat is transported according to the equation of temperature diffusion, far from the droplet of radius R. The heat flux, in this region, is proportional to temperature gradient and heat conductivity in the vapour. However at some distance from the interface, Aλ, (where λ is the mean free path in the gas), the temperature has a discontinuity and heat is transported ballistically i.e. by direct individual collisions of gas molecules with the interface. This ballistic transport reduces the heat flux (and consequently the mass flux) by the factor R/(R + Aλ) in comparison to the flux obtained from temperature diffusion. Thus it slows down the evaporation of droplets of sizes R ∼ Aλ and smaller (practically for sizes from 103 nm down to 1 nm). We analyzed parameter A as a function of interactions between molecules and their masses. The rescaled parameter, A(kBTb/ε11)1/2, is a linear function of the ratio of the molecular mass of the liquid molecules to the molecular mass of the gas molecules, m1/m2 (for a series of chemically similar compounds). Here ε11 is the interaction parameter between molecules in the liquid (proportional to the enthalpy of evaporation) and Tb is the temperature of the gas in the bulk. We tested the predictions of MD simulations in experiments performed on droplets of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol. They were suspended in an electrodynamic trap and evaporated into dry nitrogen gas. A changes from ∼1 (for ethylene glycol) to approximately 10 (for tetraethylene glycol) and has the same dependence on molecular parameters as obtained for the LJ fluid in MD simulations. The value of x = A(kBTb/ε11

  4. Dynamics of surface tension driven mixing of an alcohol droplet with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, Raj; Pant, Anurag; Puthenveettil, Baburaj

    2016-11-01

    We study the flow induced by the surface tension driven spreading of an ethanol droplet of radius rd on the surface of a 5mm water layer, visualizing the flow using aluminium flakes on the surface of the water layer with backlighting and high speed imaging. The concentration of tracer aluminium particles was found to have no effect on the scaling law for spreading.The drop,when brought in contact with the water surface causes a local depression in surface tension ,resulting in a thin circular region to expand radially outwards.We observe that the dimensionless radius of the expanding front (r* =r/rd) scales with the dimensionless time (t* = μ rd/ Δγ) , as r* t*1/4,where μ is the viscosity of water and Δγ is the surface tension difference between water and the ethanol droplet.A scaling analysis taking the viscous and the marangoni forces into account explains the observed scaling law.Our observations differ from that in the case of continuous alcohol supply where the observed scaling law is r* t*1/2. The expanding front radius reaches a maximum value and then decreases with time.

  5. Behaviour of Water Droplets Under the Influence of a Uniform Electric Field in Nanocomposite Samples of Epoxy Resin/TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Α. Bairaktari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper nanocomposite samples of epoxy resin and TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated with water droplets on their surface. A uniform electric field was applied and the behaviour of the water droplets was observed. Parameters that were studied were the water conductivity, the droplet volume, the number of droplets and the droplet positioning with respect to (w.r.t. the electrodes. All above mentioned parameters influence the flashover voltage of the samples. It is to be noted that – at least in some cases – the water droplet positioning w.r.t. the electrodes was more important in determining the flashover voltage than the droplet volume.

  6. Enhancement of lycopene bioaccessibility from tomato juice using excipient emulsions: Influence of lipid droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia-Trujillo, L; McClements, D J

    2016-11-01

    The use of excipient emulsions to increase the bioaccessibility of lycopene in tomato juice was studied by simulating gastrointestinal conditions. The influence of droplet diameter (d=0.17 or 19μm) and thermal treatment (90°C, 10min) on lycopene bioaccessibility was evaluated. Lycopene bioaccessibility was relatively low (processing did not appreciably disrupt tomato cells, and therefore only led to a slight increase in lycopene bioaccessibility. Overall, this study shows that excipient emulsions may increase the bioaccessibility of carotenoids in tomato juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Fast Algorithm to Simulate Droplet Motions in Oil/Water Two Phase Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-09

    To improve the research methods in petroleum industry, we develop a fast algorithm to simulate droplet motions in oil and water two phase flow, using phase field model to describe the phase distribution in the flow process. An efficient partial difference equation solver—Shift-Matrix method is applied here, to speed up the calculation coding in high-level language, i.e. Matlab and R. An analytical solution of order parameter is derived, to define the initial condition of phase distribution. The upwind scheme is applied in our algorithm, to make it energy decay stable, which results in the fast speed of calculation. To make it more clear and understandable, we provide the specific code for forming the coefficient matrix used in Shift-Matrix Method. Our algorithm is compared with other methods in different scales, including Front Tracking and VOSET method in macroscopic and LBM method using RK model in mesoscopic scale. In addition, we compare the result of droplet motion under gravity using our algorithm with the empirical formula common used in industry. The result proves the high efficiency and robustness of our algorithm and it’s then used to simulate the motions of multiple droplets under gravity and cross-direction forces, which is more practical in industry and can be extended to wider application.

  8. Lipid Droplets Characterization in Adipocyte Differentiated 3T3-L1 Cells: Size and Optical Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzatti, V.; Boschi, F.; Pedrotti, M.; Zoico, E.; Sbarbati, A.; Zamboni, M.

    2013-01-01

    The 3T3-L1 cell line, derived from 3T3 cells, is widely used in biological research on adipose tissue. 3T3-L1 cells have a fibroblast-like morphology, but, under appropriate conditions, they differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype. During the differentiation process, 3T3-L1 cells increase the synthesis of triglycerides and acquire the behavior of adipose cells. In particular, triglycerides accumulate in lipid droplets (LDs) embedded in the cytoplasm. The number and the size distribution of the LDs is often correlated with obesity and many other pathologies linked with fat accumulation. The integrated optical density (IOD) of the LDs is related with the amount of triglycerides in the droplets. The aim of this study is the attempt to characterize the size distribution and the IOD of the LDs in 3T3-L1 differentiated cells. The cells were differentiated into adipocytes for 5 days with a standard procedure, stained with Oil Red O and observed with an optical microscope. The diameter, area, optical density of the LDs were measured. We found an asymmetry of the kernel density distribution of the maximum Feret’s diameter of the LDs with a tail due to very large LDs. More information regarding the birth of the LDs could help in finding the best mathematical model in order to analyze fat accumulation in adipocytes. PMID:24085273

  9. Continuous and scalable production of well-controlled noble-metal nanocrystals in milliliter-sized droplet reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Niu, Guangda; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Tong, Limin; Wang, Liduo; Kim, Moon J; Xia, Younan

    2014-11-12

    Noble-metal nanocrystals are essential to applications in a variety of areas, including catalysis, electronics, and photonics. Despite the large number of reports, there still exists a gap between academic studies and industrial applications due to the lack of ability to produce the nanocrystals in large quantities while still maintaining the good uniformity and precise controls. Because the nucleation and growth of colloidal nanocrystals are highly sensitive to experimental conditions, it is impractical to scale up their production by simply increasing the reaction volume. Here we report a new and practical approach based on milliliter-sized droplet reactors to the scalable production of nanocrystals. The droplets of 0.25 mL in volume were produced as a continuous flow in a fluidic device assembled from commercially available components. As a proof of concept, we have synthesized Pd, Au, and Pd-M (M = Au, Pt, and Ag) nanocrystals with controlled sizes, shapes, compositions, and structures on a scale of 1-10 g per hour (e.g., 3.6 g per hour for Pd cubes of 10 nm in edge length).

  10. An operational calculus framework to characterize droplet size populations from turbulent breakup by a small number of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Rafael; Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso M, E-mail: amgc@us.e [Departamento de IngenierIa Aeroespacial y Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, e-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-05-07

    A systematic operational calculus framework that characterizes droplet/bubble size distributions resulting from turbulent breakup of an immiscible fluid into a carrier one is presented. The proposed formulation is derived from dynamical arguments; a finite-difference formulation of the integro-differential continuous coagulation and fragmentation equation is shown to exhibit the same structure as a discrete sequence of Mellin convolutions between the probability distribution of the evolving dispersed phase and a generic kernel. This kernel may have its physical correspondence with the probability distribution resulting from a single breakup event, e.g. a liquid ligament breakup in a ligament-mediated spray formation. The number of convolution steps in the sequence can be reduced to a single parameter. As an illustration, this procedure is applied to the exponential and the gamma distributions, obtaining as a result the Frechet distribution earlier used by Rosin and Rammler (1934 Kolloid-Zeitschrift 67 16-26), and by Nukiyama and Tanasawa (1939 Trans. Soc. Mech. Eng. Japan 5 62-7). Thus, the framework introduced in this work provides a physical foundation for the success of the Frechet distribution in accurately fitting experimentally measured droplet size distributions in sprays and emulsions.

  11. A multi-module microfluidic platform for continuous pre-concentration of water-soluble ions and separation of oil droplets from oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions using a DC-biased AC electrokinetic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhiman; Phan, Dinh-Tuan; Zhao, Yugang; Kang, Yuejun; Chan, Vincent; Yang, Chun

    2017-03-01

    A novel continuous flow microfluidic platform specifically designed for environmental monitoring of O/W emulsions during an aftermath of oil spills is reported herein. Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which are toxic are readily released from crude oil to the surrounding water phase through the smaller oil droplets with enhanced surface area. Hence, a multi-module microfluidic device is fabricated to form ion enrichment zones in the water phase of O/W emulsions for the ease of detection and to separate micron-sized oil droplets from the O/W emulsions. Fluorescein ions in the water phase are used to simulate the presence of these toxic ions in the O/W emulsion. A DC-biased AC electric field is employed in both modules. In the first module, a nanoporous Nafion membrane is used for activating the concentration polarization effect on the fluorescein ions, resulting in the formation of stable ion enrichment zones in the water phase of the emulsion. A 35.6% amplification of the fluorescent signal is achieved in the ion enrichment zone; corresponding to 100% enrichment of the fluorescent dye concentration. In this module, the main inlet is split into two channels by using a Y-junction so that there are two outlets for the oil droplets. The second module located downstream of the first module consists of two oil droplet entrapment zones at two outlets. By switching on the appropriate electrodes, either one of the two oil droplet entrapment zones can be activated and the droplets can be blocked in the corresponding outlet. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Charged slurry droplet research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. J.

    1989-02-01

    Rayleigh Bursting, wherein critically charged droplets explosively expel a number of micron sized sibling droplets, enhances atomization and combustion of all liquid fuels. Droplet surface charge is retained during evaporation, permitting multiple Rayleigh Bursts to occur. Moreover, the charge is available for the deagglomeration of residual particulate flocs from slurry droplet evaporation. To fill gaps in our knowledge of these processes, an experimental program involving the use of a charged droplet levitator and a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, High Speed Electrometer (QMS/HSE) has been undertaken to observe the disruption and to measure quantitatively the debris. A charged droplet levitator based on a new video frame grabber technology to image transient events, is described. Sibling droplet size is ten microns or less and is close to, if not coincident with, the predicted phase transition in droplet charging level. The research effort has focused on the exploration of this transition and its implications.

  13. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Doughramaji, Nicole; Betz, Amy Rachel; Derby, Melanie M.

    2017-03-01

    Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz). Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1-2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3-4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter) were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2) were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  14. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz. Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1–2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3–4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2 were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  15. Octagon to Square Wetting Area Transition of Water-Ethanol Droplets on a Micropyramid Substrate by Increasing Ethanol Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huicheng; Chong, Karen Siew-Ling; Ong, Kian-Soo; Duan, Fei

    2017-02-07

    The wettability and evaporation of water-ethanol binary droplets on the substrate with micropyramid cavities are studied by controlling the initial ethanol concentrations. The droplets form octagonal initial wetting areas on the substrate. As the ethanol concentration increases, the side ratio of the initial wetting octagon increases from 1.5 at 0% ethanol concentration to 3.5 at 30% ethanol concentration. The increasing side ratio indicates that the wetting area transforms from an octagon to a square if we consider the octagon to be a square with its four corners cut. The droplets experience a pinning-depinning transition during evaporation. The pure water sessile droplet evaporation demonstrates three stages from the constant contact line (CCL) stage, and then the constant contact angle (CCA) stage, to the mixed stage. An additional mixed stage is found between the CCL and CCA stages in the evaporation of water-ethanol binary droplets due to the anisotropic depinning along the two different axes of symmetry of the octagonal wetting area. Droplet depinning occurs earlier on the patterned surface as the ethanol concentration increases.

  16. Electrohydrodynamic behavior of water droplets on a horizontal super hydrophobic surface and its self-cleaning application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Wei, Yuan; Huang, Zhengyong; Wang, Feipeng; Yan, Xinzhu; Wu, Zhuolin

    2017-05-01

    Moisture is a significant factor that affects the insulation performance of outdoor high-voltage insulators in power systems. Accumulation of water droplets on insulators causes severe problems such as flashover of insulators and power outage. In this study, we develop a method to fabricate a micro/nano hierarchical super hydrophobic surface. The as-prepared super hydrophobic surface exhibits a water contact angle (WCA) of 160.4 ± 2°, slide angle (SA) less than 1° and surface free energy (SFE) of 5.99 mJ/m2. We investigated the electrohydropdynamic behavior of water droplet on a horizontal super hydrophobic surface compared with hydrophobic RTV silicone rubber surface which was widely used as anti-pollution coating or shed material of composite insulator. Results show that water droplet tended to a self-propelled motion on the super hydrophobic surface while it tended to elongate and break up on the RTV surface. The micro/nano hierarchical surface structure and chemical components with low surface free energy of the super hydrophobic surface jointly contributed to the reduction of skin fraction drag and subsequently made it possible for the motion of water droplet driven by electric field. Furthermore, the self-propelled motion of water droplets could also sweep away contaminations along its moving trace, which provides super hydrophobic surface a promising anti-pollution prospect in power systems.

  17. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  18. Mechanical Characterization of Ultralow Interfacial Tension Oil-in-Water Droplets by Thermal Capillary Wave Analysis in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Guido; Saito, Yuki; Tyler, Arwen I I; Ward, Andrew D; Bain, Colin D; Ces, Oscar

    2016-04-19

    Measurements of the ultralow interfacial tension and surfactant film bending rigidity for micron-sized heptane droplets in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate-NaCl aqueous solutions were performed in a microfluidic device through the analysis of thermally driven droplet interface fluctuations. The Fourier spectrum of the stochastic droplet interface displacement was measured through bright-field video microscopy and a contour analysis technique. The droplet interfacial tension, together with the surfactant film bending rigidity, was obtained by fitting the experimental results to the prediction of a capillary wave model. Compared to existing methods for ultralow interfacial tension measurements, this contactless, nondestructive, all-optical approach has several advantages, such as fast measurement, easy implementation, cost-effectiveness, reduced amount of liquids, and integration into lab-on-a-chip devices.

  19. Riboflavin-induced oxidation in fish oil-in-water emulsions: Impact of particle size and optical transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-12-15

    The influence of particle size and optical properties on the stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions to riboflavin-induced oxidation by blending different combinations of small (d=44nm) and large (d=216nm) lipid droplets was examined. Emulsion turbidity increased with increasing mean droplet diameter due to greater light scattering by larger particles. The influence of droplet size on the stability of the emulsions to riboflavin-induced lipid oxidation during storage at 20 or 37°C was measured. At 37°C, the rate of lipid hydroperoxide formation increased with decreasing droplet diameter, but there were no significant differences in propanal concentrations. At 20°C, both peroxide and propanal values indicated that the rate of oxidation increased with decreasing droplet size. These data show that riboflavin was more effective at promoting oxidation in nanoemulsions containing small droplets because light was able to penetrate more easily and generate reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Water droplet impingement on airfoils and aircraft engine inlets for icing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Elangovan, R.; Freund, George A., Jr.; Breer, Marlin D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper includes the results of a significant research program for verification of computer trajectory codes used in aircraft icing analysis. Experimental water droplet impingement data have been obtained in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel for a wide range of aircraft geometries and test conditions. The body whose impingement characteristics are required is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper and then exposed to an airstream containing a dyed-water spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips with an automated reflectometer. Impingement characteristics for all test geometries have also been calculated using two recently developed trajectory computer codes. Good agreement is obtained with experimental data. The experimental and analytical data show that maximum impingement efficiency and impingement limits increase with mean volumetric diameter for all geometries tested. For all inlet geometries tested, as the inlet mass flow is reduced, the maximum impingement efficiency is reduced and the location of the maximum impingement shifts toward the inlet inner cowl.

  1. Effect of Electrolytes on the Decomposition of Dye by Pulsed Discharge in Air Spraying Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Taisuke; Yokoyama, Yuzo; Minamitani, Yasushi

    Effect of electrolytes on the decolorization of indigo carmine and on the production of H2O2 by pulsed discharge in air spraying water droplets was performed in sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate solutions. Peak voltage of the discharge decreased with increasing solution conductivity, but peak current and discharge energy increased. Decolorization rate and decolorization efficiency of indigo carmine and the yield of H2O2 decreased with increasing chloride and sulfate ion concentrations. It was found that the decolorization of indigo carmine and the production of H2O2 are affected by the ion concentration even in the case of discharge in air spraying water droplets. However it was less effective than that of discharge in water. Chloride ion was more effective than sulfate ion regarding the decrease of decolorization rate and the production of H2O2. Decolorization rate of indigo carmine was strongly related to the production of H2O2. These results also indicated that decolorization of indigo carmine depends on the production of hydroxyl radical.

  2. Kinetics of Crystallization in n-Hexadecane and Cocoa Butter Oil-in-Water Emulsions Accounting for Droplet Collision-Mediated Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle; Povey; Smith

    2000-12-15

    Droplet collision is shown to be important in the propagation of nucleation through supercooled oil-in-water emulsions by the use of a novel membrane technique. On the other hand, nucleation mediated by Tween 20 micelles is shown to be of relatively much less importance in both n-hexadecane and cocoa butter oil-in-water emulsions. The droplet collision phenomenon probably occurs via a surfactant bridge between the colliding droplets. When this process is taken into account we show that the Turnbull model for crystal nucleation kinetics explains very well nucleation in cocoa butter oil-in-water emulsions by seed crystals. On the basis of this model we characterized the seed crystals in cocoa butter via isothermal crystallization studies at 14.2, 15.0, 15.5, and 15.8 degrees C. We suggest that there are few seed crystals whose size exceeds 0.28 µm at 80 degrees C. In our cocoa butter samples there were between 10(16) and 10(17) seed crystals m(-3) whose average size we inferred to be less than 0.09 µm. A value of 0.133 mJ m(-2) is obtained for the Gibbs free energy of the nucleating surface in our West African cocoa butter samples. There is evidence that the alpha-polymorph of POS comprises the nucleating layer in the seed crystal. There is no evidence that surfactant influences the primary nucleation of oil crystals. However, the surfactant has a big effect on the kinetics of the secondary nucleation process, mediated by droplet collision. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  4. Effect of Aluminum Substrate Surface Modification on Wettability and Freezing Delay of Water Droplet at Subzero Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Afshari, Alireza; Thormann, Esben

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the freezing delay of a water droplet on precooled substrates of an aluminum alloy that is commonly used for heat-exchanger fins. The surfaces of the substrates were modified to obtain surfaces with different hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and different surface ...... chemistry plays a significant role in the kinetics of the ice formation process when a water droplet is placed on a precooled substrate.......In this study, we have investigated the freezing delay of a water droplet on precooled substrates of an aluminum alloy that is commonly used for heat-exchanger fins. The surfaces of the substrates were modified to obtain surfaces with different hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and different surface...... chemistry but without significantly modifying the surface topography. The freezing delays and water contact angles were measured as a function of the substrate temperature and the results were compared to the predictions of the heterogeneous ice nucleation theory. Although the trends for each sample...

  5. Anomalous behaviour of droplet coalescence in a two-dimensional complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay

    2017-11-01

    Coalescence of myristic acid droplets on water surface is found to exhibit anomalous behaviour such as simultaneous increase of mean droplet size and droplet number with time at low surface pressure. The existing theories and models can describe droplet evolution at high surface pressure but fail to explain this anomaly at low surface pressure. We propose a more general model for coalescence that reproduces the anomaly at low surface pressure and agrees with other models at high surface pressure. Our model considers microscopic resolution, nucleation of droplets and desorption of droplets in addition to pure coalescence and can be applied to a wide variety of systems.

  6. Probing chemical transformation in picolitre volume aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloserdov, Anatolij; Day, Calum P. F.; Rosario, Gabriela L.; Horrocks, Benjamin R.; Carruthers, Antonia E.

    2017-08-01

    We have demonstrated chemical transformation in single microscopic-sized aerosol droplets localised in optical tweezers. Droplets in situ are measured during chemical transformation processes of solvent exchange and solute transformation through an ion exchange reaction. Solvent exchange between deionised water and heavy water in aerosol droplets is monitored through observation of the OH and OD Raman stretches. A change in solute chemistry of aerosol is achieved through droplet coalescence events between calcium chloride and sodium carbonate to promote ion exchange. The transformation forming meta-stable and stable states of CaCO3 is observed and analysed using Gaussian peak decomposition to reveal polymorphs.

  7. Statistical characteristics of evaporating-freezing process of water droplet during quick depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wang-Fang; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Kai

    2013-07-01

    This work investigates experimentally flashing evaporation process of water droplets released into vacuum, particularly on the quantitative characteristics of the process, in order to reveal the influences of the randomicity of the sub-process of nucleation and non-condensable air dissolved inside the liquid. It's clearly shown that nucleation time is a random variable. That may be caused by the following facts that nucleation for ice in high-supercooled water exhibits a strong randomicity and that there exists strong perturbation during quick depressurization. Freezing temperature of liquid droplet is approximately constant after recalescence, which may be determined by the vapor partial pressure at the terminal state. Freezing time is independent of nucleation time, but exhibits an obvious dependence on terminal pressure and drop diameter. Supercooling corresponding to the nucleation is independent of terminal pressure. The averaged values of supercooling at three different terminal pressures of 450, 600 and 1000 Pa are the same, namely 10 K. Furthermore, the influences of non-condensable gases on the process are analyzed and discussed in detail based on the experimental observations.

  8. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  9. Self-arraying of charged levitating droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Nussbaumer, Jérémie; Masse, Alain; Jeandey, Christian; Grateau, Henri; Pham, Pascale; Reyne, Gilbert; Haguet, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic levitation of water droplets in air is a promising phenomenon to achieve contactless manipulation of chemical or biochemical samples. This noncontact handling technique prevents contaminations of samples as well as provides measurements of interaction forces between levitating reactors. Under a nonuniform magnetic field, diamagnetic bodies such as water droplets experience a repulsive force which may lead to diamagnetic levitation of a single or few micro-objects. The levitation of several repulsively charged picoliter droplets was successfully performed in a ~1 mm(2) adjustable flat magnetic well provided by a centimeter-sized cylindrical permanent magnet structure. Each droplet position results from the balance between the centripetal diamagnetic force and the repulsive Coulombian forces. Levitating water droplets self-organize into satellite patterns or thin clouds, according to their charge and size. Small triangular lattices of identical droplets reproduce magneto-Wigner crystals. Repulsive forces and inner charges can be measured in the piconewton and the femtocoulomb ranges, respectively. Evolution of interaction forces is accurately followed up over time during droplet evaporation.

  10. Small Levitating Ordered Droplet Clusters: Stability, Symmetry, and Voronoi Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorets, Alexander A; Frenkel, Mark; Bormashenko, Edward; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2017-11-16

    A method to generate levitating monodisperse microdroplet clusters with an arbitrary number of identical droplets is presented. Clusters with 1-28 droplets levitate over a locally heated water layer in an ascending vapor-air jet. Due to the attraction to the center of the heated area combined with aerodynamic repulsion between the droplets, the clusters form structures that are quite diverse and different from densest packing of hard spheres. The clusters self-organize into stable and reproducible configurations dependent on the number of droplets while independent of the droplets' size. The central parts of larger clusters reproduce the shape of smaller clusters. The ability to synthesize stable clusters with a given number of droplets is important for tracing droplets, which is crucial for potential applications such as microreactors and for chemical analysis of small volumes of liquid.

  11. Controlling the Size of Two-Dimensional Polymer Platelets for Water-in-Water Emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of biorelevant applications, particularly in pharmaceutical formulations and the food and cosmetic industries, require the stabilization of two water-soluble blended components which would otherwise form incompatible biphasic mixtures. Such water-in-water emulsions can be achieved using Pickering stabilization, where two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are particularly effective due to their high surface area. However, control over the shape and size of the 2D nanomaterials is challenging, where it has not yet been possible to examine chemically identical nanostructures with the same thickness but different surface areas to probe the size-effect on emulsion stabilization ability. Hence, the rationale design and realization of the full potential of Pickering water-in-water emulsion stabilization have not yet been achieved. Herein, we report for the first time 2D poly­(lactide platelets with tunable sizes (with varying coronal chemistry and of uniform shape using a crystallization-driven self-assembly methodology. We have used this series of nanostructures to explore the effect of 2D platelet size and chemistry on the stabilization of a water-in-water emulsion of a poly­(ethylene glycol (PEG/dextran mixture. We have demonstrated that cationic, zwitterionic, and neutral large platelets (ca. 3.7 × 106 nm2 all attain smaller droplet sizes and more stable emulsions than their respective smaller platelets (ca. 1.2 × 105 nm2. This series of 2D platelets of controlled dimensions provides an excellent exemplar system for the investigation of the effect of just the surface area on the potential effectiveness in a particular application.

  12. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Taguchi, Sadayoshi

    2013-10-11

    A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O2 for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (psize via decreased glucose uptake and lipogenic protein expression and increased basal lipolysis. Such an hypoxia-induced decrease in lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against lipid-associated metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arabidopsis lipid droplet-associated protein (LDAP)–interacting protein (LDIP) influences lipid droplet size and neutral lipid homeostasis in both leaves and seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all types of plant cells where they are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum and function as a repository for neutral lipids, as well as serving in lipid remodelling and signalling. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation and functioning of pl...

  14. Nebivolol induces, via β3 adrenergic receptor, lipolysis, uncoupling protein 1, and reduction of lipid droplet size in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, Marica; Pocognoli, Antonella; D'Anzeo, Marco; Siquini, Walter; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    Most β-blockers may induce weight gain, dysglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Nebivolol is a third-generation β1-blocker with vasodilating properties mediated by β3 adrenergic receptors (β3AR). We investigated whether nebivolol is able to induce β3AR-mediated lipolysis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), and size-reduction in human adipocytes. Human visceral (n = 28) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (n = 26) samples were used to obtain differentiated subcutaneous and visceral preadipocytes. Adipocytes were used to verify the effects of nebivolol onlipolysis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and other genes of the thermogenic program. Lipolysis was induced by isoproterenol and specific β3AR agonist, as expected,and also by nebivolol at 100 nmol/l and by its L-enantiomer at 10 nmol/l (P adipocytes. Interestingly, in human adipocytes, nebivolol activated UCP1, PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and cytochrome c (CYCS) gene expression in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Using propranolol (β1 and β2 antagonist) together with nebivolol we showed that the induction of these genes was still present suggesting again β3AR activation. Moreover, nebivolol significantly reduced the diameter of lipid droplets in cultured adipocytes. In summary, nebivolol, through β3AR, is able to induce lipolysis and promote thermogenic and mitochondrial genes. The induction of lipolysis and the thermogenic program could explain the reduction of lipid droplets size. In conclusion, the lower dysmetabolic effects of nebivolol in humans may depend on its β3 agonist activity and the consequent induction of thermogenic program in human adipocytes.

  15. Catalysis in the oil droplet/water interface for aromatic claisen rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiying; Zhang, Jingping

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of the aromatic Claisen rearrangement of 1-(4-chloronaphthyl) 1,1-dimethylallyl ether (Re) under neat conditions and "on water" were investigated. The aromatic Claisen rearrangement usually involves the [3,3]-intramolecular shift followed by a proton transfer. The intermolecular proton transfer is the rate-limiting step under neat conditions with DeltaDeltaE(b) and DeltaDeltaG(++) values of 25.7 and 29.8 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level, respectively. The on water condition was simply modeled by a combination of the "oil" droplet/water interface and neat condition inside the oil droplet. The MD simulation was used to obtain the most reliable interaction position between Re and solvent water, which was further used as a starting material for the water-catalyst mechanism to model the surface reaction. We found that the chairlike [3,3]-intramolecular shift became the rate-limiting step for the water-catalyst mechanism, with lower DeltaDeltaE(b) (16.3 kcal/mol) and DeltaDeltaG(++) (25.2 kcal/mol) values compared with those under neat condition. Their DeltaDeltaE(b) and DeltaDeltaG(++) values changed to be 22.0 and 24.9 kcal/mol, respectively, after considering the bulk water effect by QM/MM calculation. Hence, these calculated energy results strongly suggested that the on water reaction should be faster than the one under neat conditions. This can be explained by the following three key factors: (1) the interaction between the species and water clusters in the transition states, especially for the proton transfer process, is stronger than in other states, which was revealed by the binding energy calculation; (2) the two-water cluster enhanced the charge separation in the reaction center of the [3,3]-intramolecular shift, increasing the stability of the corresponding transition state; and (3) the donor-acceptor NBO results suggested that the hydrogen-bonded two-water cluster accelerated the proton transfer process by serving as a proton bridge.

  16. Microfluidic mixing through electrowetting-induced droplet oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Baret, J.-C.; Steinhauser, D.

    2006-01-01

    We used electrowetting to trigger self-excited oscillations of millimeter-sized sessile droplets of water-glycerol mixtures in a viscosity range from 1 to 65 mPa s. During the oscillations the contact angle of the droplets varied periodically between [approximate]130° and 80° with a frequency

  17. Interfacial Adsorption of Neutral and Ionic Solutes in a Water Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Patrick K; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2018-01-05

    Direct (solute-water) and indirect (water-water) contributions to adsorption at an air-water interface are identified using the Widom potential distribution theorem and quantified using molecular dynamics simulations of a liquid water droplet containing either neopentane or iodide-like solutes with charges of 0 or ±1. The results are used to quantitatively compare direct and indirect energetic and entropic contributions to adsorption, as well as to critically test surface capillary wave, linear response (LR), and mean field (MF) predictions. The negative signs of the total adsorption energies and entropies of both the anionic and cationic solutes are found to result from indirect adsorption induced changes in water-water interactions, rather than from surface capillary wave perturbations, which are found to be asymmetric with respect to solute charge. The LR and MF approximations both accurately describe the adsorption of neutral (hydrophobic) solutes, while for ionic solutes the MF approximation is entirely inappropriate and LR predictions are qualitatively (but not quantitatively) accurate.

  18. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  19. Synthesis of Phase-shift Nanoemulsions with Narrow Size Distributions for Acoustic Droplet Vaporization and Bubble-enhanced Ultrasound-mediated Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Peng; Burgess, Mark T.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is used clinically to thermally ablate tumors. To enhance localized heating and improve thermal ablation in tumors, lipid-coated perfluorocarbon droplets have been developed which can be vaporized by HIFU. The vasculature in many tumors is abnormally leaky due to their rapid growth, and nanoparticles are able to penetrate the fenestrations and passively accumulate within tumors. Thus, controlling the size of the droplets can result in better accumulation within tumors. In this report, the preparation of stable droplets in a phase-shift nanoemulsion (PSNE) with a narrow size distribution is described. PSNE were synthesized by sonicating a lipid solution in the presence of liquid perfluorocarbon. A narrow size distribution was obtained by extruding the PSNE multiple times using filters with pore sizes of 100 or 200 nm. The size distribution was measured over a 7-day period using dynamic light scattering. Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing PSNE were prepared for in vitro experiments. PSNE droplets in the hydrogels were vaporized with ultrasound and the resulting bubbles enhanced localized heating. Vaporized PSNE enables more rapid heating and also reduces the ultrasound intensity needed for thermal ablation. Thus, PSNE is expected to enhance thermal ablation in tumors, potentially improving therapeutic outcomes of HIFU-mediated thermal ablation treatments. PMID:23007836

  20. A study of the evaporation of heterogeneous water droplets under active heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim; Legros, Jean Claude; Strizhak, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Using high-speed video registration tools with a sample rate of 102-104 frames per second (fps), we studied the patterns in the evaporation of water droplets containing 1 and 2 mm individual metallic inclusions in a high-temperature gas environment. The materials of choice for the inclusions were steels (AISI 1080 carbon steel and AISI type 316L stainless steel) and pure nickel. We established the lifetimes τh of the liquid droplets under study with a controlled increase in the gas environment temperature up to 900 K. We also considered the physical aspects behind the τh distribution in the experiments conducted and specified the conditions for more effective cooling of metallic inclusions. Following the experimental research findings, a method was devised for effective reactor vessel cooling to avoid a meltdown at a nuclear power plant. The optimization of heat and mass transfer modes was performed within the framework of the strategic plan for the development of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University as one of the world-leading universities.

  1. Molecular simulations of droplet coalescence in oil/water/surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekvig, Live; Frenkel, Daan

    2007-10-07

    We report a molecular simulation study of the mechanism by which droplets covered with a surfactant monolayer coalesce. We study a model system where the rate-limiting step in coalescence is the rupture of the surfactant film. Our simulations allow us to focus on the stages at the core of the coalescence process: the initial rupture of the two surfactant monolayers, the rearrangement of the surfactant molecules to form a channel connecting the two droplets, and the expansion of the radius of the resulting channel. For our numerical study, we made use of the dissipative particle dynamics method. We used a coarse-grained description of the oil, water, and surfactant molecules. The rupture of the surfactant film is a rare event on the molecular time scale. To enhance the sampling of the rupture of the surfactant film, we used forward flux sampling (FFS). FFS not only allows us to estimate coalescence rates, it also provides insight into the molecular structure and free energy of the "transition" state. For an oil-water-oil film without surfactant, the rupture rate decreases exponentially with increasing film thickness. The critical state is different in thin and thick films: Thin films break following a large enough thickness fluctuation. Thicker films break only after a sufficiently large hole fluctuation-they can heal. Next, we designed surfactant molecules with positive, zero, and negative natural curvatures. For a water film between two surfactant-covered oil droplets, the rupture rate is highest when the surfactant has a negative natural curvature, lowest when it has zero natural curvature, and lying in between when it has a positive natural curvature. This nonmonotonic variation with curvature stems from two effects: First, the surfactants with a large absolute value of the natural curvature have lower interfacial tension and bending rigidity. This promotes the interfacial fluctuations required to nucleate a channel. Second, the sign of the natural curvature

  2. to medium-sized water distribution systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Framework for optimizing chlorine dose in small- to medium-sized water distribution systems: A case of a residential neighbourhood in Lahore, Pakistan. ... The bulk decay coefficient (Kb) was determined in the laboratory, whereas the wall decay coefficient (Kw) was estimated by calibrating the simulation results with the ...

  3. Measurement and Modeling of High Energy Laser (HEL)-Droplet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    use of laser weapons is their dependence on favorable atmospheric conditions [3]. In the maritime environment, high water vapor concentrations place...to thermal gradients and atmospheric turbulence, which induce fluctuations (scintillation) in the transmitted laser intensity [4]. Liquid water...droplet about 1 mm in size. The majority of experiments will be conducted on droplets of distilled water, though some testing will be done on droplets

  4. Electro-suppression of water nano-droplets' solidification in no man's land: Electromagnetic fields' entropic trapping of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Prithwish K.; Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding water solidification, especially in "No Man's Land" (NML) (150 K ice-crystallite formation is inevitably present electromagnetic fields' role. Here, we employ non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of aggressively quenched supercooled water nano-droplets in the gas phase under NML conditions, in externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields, elucidating significant differences between effects of static and oscillating fields: although static fields induce "electro-freezing," e/m fields exhibit the contrary - solidification inhibition. This anti-freeze action extends not only to crystal-ice formation but also restricts amorphisation, i.e., suppression of low-density amorphous ice which forms otherwise in zero-field NML environments. E/m-field applications maintain water in the deeply supercooled state in an "entropic trap," which is ripe for industrial impacts in cryo-freezing, etc.

  5. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the error analysis of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of the Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed a new method on how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we summarized corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We showed that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the new stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient wind speeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. Consequently, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the

  6. Low temperature combustion of organic coal-water fuel droplets containing petrochemicals while soaring in a combustion chamber model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the integral characteristics (minimum temperature, ignition delay times of stable combustion initiation of organic coal-water fuel droplets (initial radius is 0.3-1.5 mm in the oxidizer flow (the temperature and velocity varied in ranges 500-900 K, 0.5-3 m/s. The main components of organic coal-water fuel were: brown coal particles, filter-cakes obtained in coal processing, waste engine, and turbine oils. The different modes of soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel have been established. The conditions have been set under which it is possible to implement the sustainable soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel droplets. We have compared the ignition characteristics with those defined in the traditional approach (based on placing the droplets on a low-inertia thermocouple junction into the combustion chamber. The paper shows the scale of the influence of heat sink over the thermocouple junction on ignition inertia. An original technique for releasing organic coal-water fuel droplets to the combustion chamber was proposed and tested. The limitations of this technique and the prospects of experimental results for the optimization of energy equipment operation were also formulated.

  7. Electric field mediated spraying of miniaturized droplets inside microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timung, Seim; Chaudhuri, Joydip; Borthakur, Manash Pratim; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Biswas, Gautam; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2017-06-01

    We report a facile and noninvasive way to disintegrate a microdroplet into a string of further miniaturized ones under the influence of an external electrohydrodynamic field inside a microchannel. The deformation and breakup of the droplet was engendered by the Maxwell's stress originating from the accumulation of induced and free charges at the oil-water interface. While at smaller field intensities, for example less than 1 MV/m, the droplet deformed into a plug, at relatively higher field intensities, e.g. ∼1.16 MV/m, a pair of droplets having opposite surface charge was formed. The charged droplets showed an interesting periodic bridging and breakup during their translation motion across the channel. For even higher field intensities, for example more than 1.2 MV/m, the entire droplet underwent dielectrophoresis toward one of the electrodes before experiencing a strong attractive force from the other electrode to deform into a shape of a Taylor cone. With progress in time, mimicking the electrospraying phenomenon, the cone tip periodically ejected a string of miniaturized water droplets to form a microemulsion inside the channel. The frequency and size of the droplet ejection could be tuned by varying the applied field intensity. A water droplet of ∼214 μm diameter could continuously eject droplets of size ∼10 μm or even smaller to form a microemulsion inside the channel. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi, E-mail: thashimo@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Iwanaka, Nobumasa [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Higashida, Kazuhiko [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Faculty of Sport Science, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 (Japan); Taguchi, Sadayoshi [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Long-term hypoxia decreased the size of LDs and lipid storage in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Long-term hypoxia increased basal lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased lipid-associated proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased basal glucose uptake and lipogenic proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia-mediated lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against obesity. -- Abstract: Background: A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Methods: Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O{sub 2} for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). Results: HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (p < 0.01). As estimated by glycerol release, isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly lowered by hypoxia, whereas the release of free fatty acids under the basal condition was prominently enhanced with HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Lipolysis-associated proteins, such as perilipin 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged, whereas adipose triglyceride lipase and its activator protein CGI-58 were decreased with HL in comparison to NC. Interestingly, such lipogenic proteins as fatty acid synthase, lipin-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were decreased. Furthermore, the uptake of glucose, the major precursor of 3-glycerol phosphate for triglyceride synthesis, was significantly reduced in HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: We conclude that hypoxia has a direct impact on reducing the triglyceride content and lipid droplet size via

  9. Impacts of cloud water droplets on the OH production rate from peroxide photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Costa, M T C; Anglada, J M; Francisco, J S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2017-12-06

    Understanding the difference between observed and modeled concentrations of HOx radicals in the troposphere is a current major issue in atmospheric chemistry. It is widely believed that existing atmospheric models miss a source of such radicals and several potential new sources have been proposed. In recent years, interest has increased on the role played by cloud droplets and organic aerosols. Computer modeling of ozone photolysis, for instance, has shown that atmospheric aqueous interfaces accelerate the associated OH production rate by as much as 3-4 orders of magnitude. Since methylhydroperoxide is a main source and sink of HOx radicals, especially at low NOx concentrations, it is fundamental to assess what is the influence of clouds on its chemistry and photochemistry. In this study, computer simulations for the photolysis of methylhydroperoxide at the air-water interface have been carried out showing that the OH production rate is severely enhanced, reaching a comparable level to ozone photolysis.

  10. Droplet model of plasma resonances in medium-size metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iachello, F.; Lipparini, E. (Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo (Italy)); Ventura, A. (Comitato Nazionale per l' Energia Nucleare e le Energie Alternative, I-40138 Bologna (Italy))

    1992-02-15

    We study photon absorption and scattering by medium-size {ital N}=8--20 sodium clusters, making use of the interacting boson model to describe the coupling of plasma resonances to surface oscillations and deformations of a dropletlike structure. With reasonable assumptions on the nature of the plasma resonances and their couplings, we obtain an excellent description of the experimental photoabsorption data.

  11. Droplet model of plasma resonances in medium-size metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachello, F.; Lipparini, E.; Ventura, A.

    1992-02-01

    We study photon absorption and scattering by medium-size N=8-20 sodium clusters, making use of the interacting boson model to describe the coupling of plasma resonances to surface oscillations and deformations of a dropletlike structure. With reasonable assumptions on the nature of the plasma resonances and their couplings, we obtain an excellent description of the experimental photoabsorption data.

  12. Experimental validation of a local dehumidification system based on cold water droplets and air-to-air heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Hammink, H.A.J.; Hendriksen, L.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive humidity is a problem in Dutch growing circumstances. A traditional solution is heating and natural ventilation. To save energy a number of energy efficient dehumidification methods are developed, like mechanical ventilation with dry outside air or a curtain of cold water droplets. In this

  13. Observation of a water droplet motion by using an oxide nanowire transistor covered by a nanofiber mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghun; Han, Junebeom; Yeo, Chang Su; Lim, Taekyung; Park, Sangyoon; Ju, Sanghyun

    2016-12-16

    The motion, in particular the flow speed and dropping height, of a water droplet was observed using a tin oxide (SnO2) nanowire transistor with a polyurethane (PU) nanofiber mesh as a selective filter. The changes in the SnO2 nanowire transistor characteristics, particularly the threshold voltage and on-current, were due to the adsorbed water molecules that acted as electron donors on the surface of the oxide nanowire semiconducting channel. The role of the PU nanofiber mesh, allowing the passage of water vapor while blocking liquid water, was to restrict the direct contact between the water droplet and the oxide nanowire semiconducting channel and electrodes, which could cause abnormal transistor characteristics. The selective filtering properties of the PU nanofiber mesh could be controlled by changing the number of PU layers.

  14. All-optically controllable random laser based on a dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal with nano-sized droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-R; Lin, S-H; Guo, C-H; Chang, S-H; Mo, T-S; Chu, S-C

    2010-02-01

    This study elucidates for the first time an all-optically controllable random laser in a dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (DDPDLC) with nano-sized LC droplets. Experimental results demonstrate that the lasing intensity of the random laser can be controlled to decrease by increasing irradiation time/intensity of one green beam, and increase by increasing the irradiation time of one red beam. The all-optical controllability of the random laser is attributed to the green (red)-beaminduced isothermal nematic-->isotropic (isotropic-->nematic) phase transition in LC droplets by trans-->cis (cis-->trans back) isomerization of azo dyes. This isomerization may decrease (increase) the difference between the refractive indices of the LC droplets and the polymer, thereby increasing (decreasing) the diffusion constant (or transport mean free path), subsequently decreasing the scattering strength and, thus, random lasing intensity.

  15. Produção e utilização de gotas com diâmetro uniforme The generation and use of uniformly sized droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermes Geraldo Corrêa

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A execução da pesquisa com freqüência requer o desenvolvimento de aparelhagem específica. Para estudo dos parâmetros das populações de gotas produzidas por pulverizadores é necessário conhecer o fator de espalhamento de diversas formulações sobre superfícies de amostragem (papel kromekote, melamina (fórmica, vidro etc.. Essa determinação requer aparelhagem geradora de gotas com diâmetro uniforme. Com este objetivo principal, realizou-se o presente trabalho. Além de sua utilização para investigar o comportamento físico da pulverização, o aparelho poderá ter outras aplicações no campo da biologia, como a distribuição uniforme de esporos em dose determinada sobre superfícies vegetais, permitindo, também, observações sobre o efeito tóxico de determinadas doses de defensivos sobre vegetais e animais. O aparelho produziu gotas com diâmetro que, em média, apresentaram coeficiente de variação de 2,36%. o fator de espalhamento para solução aquosa de rodamina a 0,2% sobre papel kromekote apresentou a variação de 1,32 a 1,71 quando se usaram, respectivamente, gotas entre 98 e 325 micra. Para Malathion a 96% de principio ativo, sobre papel kromekote, as gotículas apresentaram fatores de espalhamento variando de 4,09 a 5,18 quando se utilizaram gotas entre 80 e 217 micra. A melamina branca (fórmica apresentou menores variações nesse fator quando lhe foi aplicado o Malathion.This paper deals with the construction and use of a spinning disc atomizer that produces uniformly sized droplets. The device has a special use in the determination of the spread factor on several sampling surfaces (Kromekote paper, glass, plastic etc.. Furthermore, it permits the study of spraying performance, the inoculation of known spore doses of fungi and observations about toxical effects of pesticides on vegetables and animals. The apparatus showed a narrow droplet size spectrum, with a coefficient of variation about 2.36%. The spread

  16. Dancing Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Cira, Nate J.; Prakash, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on clean glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on high energy surfaces. In this fluid dynamics video we show a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors including a mechanism for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated...

  17. Effect of Oxygen Gas on the Decomposition of Dye by Pulsed Discharge in Water Droplet Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Taisuke; Yokoyama, Yuzo; Nakamura, Akira; Minamitani, Yasushi

    Effect of O2 on the decolorization of indigo carmine and on the production of dissolved species such as NO2-, NO3-, O3 and H2O2 in the treatment water by pulsed discharge in water droplet spray was investigated by controlling the O2/N2 ratios as carrier gases in the reactor. The decolorization rate gradually increased with rise in O2 ratio, which reached a constant value in the range of 50% to 90% O2 ratio and decreased in pure O2. The maximum value was about 2 times as high as that of 20% O2 ratio. The decolorization efficiency was not affected by gas flow rate in the range of 4 L/min to 50 L/min. NO2- in the treatment water was only detected in pure N2, but NO3- was produced in O2/N2. NO2- added to the treatment water was not oxidized in pure N2, but was perfectly converted to NO3- in O2/N2. These results implied that hydroxyl radical produced in gas phase does not directly contribute to the oxidation of substances in water. O3 concentration gradually increased with rise in O2 ratio, whereas H2O2 concentration decreased. In the range of 50 to 80% O2 ratio, O3 and H2O2 concentrations were approximately constant value, similar to the trend of decolorization rate. Moreover rate constants on various gas mixing ratio of O2/N2 were determined from the kinetics study. These results suggested that hydroxyl radical produced in the treatment water by the chain reactions of O3 and hydroperoxy radical (HO2·) plays an important role of the decomposition of molecules in water.

  18. Immersion freezing of water and aqueous ammonium sulphate droplets initiated by Humic Like Substances as a function of water activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Y. J.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-02-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH4)2SO4 droplets containing Leonardite (LEO) and Pahokee peat (PP) serving as surrogates for Humic Like Substances (HULIS) has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85-1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5-15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw, Δaw, by 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6 ± 2.5)×104 and (5.4 ± 1.4)×104 cm-2 s-1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by Δaw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and IN surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (α(T)-model) to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, α(T)-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for entire population (single-α model) is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of α-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Thus, from fitting frozen fractions only, the underlying ice nucleation mechanism and nature of

  19. How coalescing droplets jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications.

  20. Temperature distribution of a water droplet moving on a heated super-hydrophobic surface under the icing condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masafumi; Sumino, Yutaka; Morita, Katsuaki

    2017-11-01

    In the aviation industry, ice accretion on the airfoil has been a hazardous issue since it greatly declines the aerodynamic performance. Electric heaters and bleed air, which utilizes a part of gas emissions from engines, are used to prevent the icing. Nowadays, a new de-icing system combining electric heaters and super hydrophobic coatings have been developed to reduce the energy consumption. In the system, the heating temperature and the coating area need to be adjusted. Otherwise, the heater excessively consumes energy when it is set too high and when the coating area is not properly located, water droplets which are once dissolved possibly adhere again to the rear part of the airfoil as runback ice In order to deal with these problems, the physical phenomena of water droplets on the hydrophobic surface demand to be figured out. However, not many investigations focused on the behavior of droplets under the icing condition have been conducted. In this research, the temperature profiling of the rolling droplet on a heated super-hydrophobic surface is experimentally observed by the dual luminescent imaging.

  1. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2017-11-21

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  2. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2017-11-21

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  3. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  4. High-efficiency single cell encapsulation and size selective capture of cells in picoliter droplets based on hydrodynamic micro-vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakshakurup, Gopakumar; Lee, Abraham P

    2017-11-15

    Single cell analysis has emerged as a paradigm shift in cell biology to understand the heterogeneity of individual cells in a clone for pathological interrogation. Microfluidic droplet technology is a compelling platform to perform single cell analysis by encapsulating single cells inside picoliter-nanoliter (pL-nL) volume droplets. However, one of the primary challenges for droplet based single cell assays is single cell encapsulation in droplets, currently achieved either randomly, dictated by Poisson statistics, or by hydrodynamic techniques. In this paper, we present an interfacial hydrodynamic technique which initially traps the cells in micro-vortices, and later releases them one-to-one into the droplets, controlled by the width of the outer streamline that separates the vortex from the flow through the streaming passage adjacent to the aqueous-oil interface (dgap). One-to-one encapsulation is achieved at a dgap equal to the radius of the cell, whereas complete trapping of the cells is realized at a dgap smaller than the radius of the cell. The unique feature of this technique is that it can perform 1. high efficiency single cell encapsulations and 2. size-selective capturing of cells, at low cell loading densities. Here we demonstrate these two capabilities with a 50% single cell encapsulation efficiency and size selective separation of platelets, RBCs and WBCs from a 10× diluted blood sample (WBC capture efficiency at 70%). The results suggest a passive, hydrodynamic micro-vortex based technique capable of performing high-efficiency single cell encapsulation for cell based assays.

  5. Experimental Water Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils, Simulated Ice Shapes, an Engine Inlet and a Finite Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Breer, M.; Craig, N.; Liu, X.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Experimental impingement efficiency data represented for a NLF (1)-0414 airfoil, a swept MS (1)-0317 airfoil, a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model, two simulated ice shapes and a swept NACA 0012 wingtip. Analytical impingement efficiency data are also presented for the NLF (1)-0414 airfoil and the Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  6. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douberly, Gary E.; Miller, Roger E.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2017-03-08

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic “3+1” clusters, which are ~5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  7. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douberly, Gary E; Miller, Roger E; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2017-03-22

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic "3 + 1" clusters, which are ∼5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  8. Evaporation of water droplets on Pt-surface in presence of external electric field—A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Abhiram; Biswas, Gautam; De, Sudipta

    2015-09-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet on a hot solid substrate is an important problem in fluid mechanics. It is relevant to theoretical issues in heat transfer as well as several practical applications. This study investigates the spreading and evaporation of a nanoscale water droplet on a solid platinum surface. The major objective was to analyze the effect of an external electric field on these phenomena. Varying the intensity and direction of the external electric field, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to understand these phenomena at a molecular level. The results reveal that a horizontal electric field assists in droplet spreading, whereas a vertical electric field enhances the rate of evaporation for a certain range of field intensities. It also shows that the substrate temperature plays an important role in such processes. It is seen that the effect of an external electric field on droplet evaporation becomes significant at an intermediate range of surface temperatures and this effect is not clearly visible for either very high or very low range of surface temperatures.

  9. Unidirectional Fast Growth and Forced Jumping of Stretched Droplets on Nanostructured Microporous Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aili, Abulimiti; Li, Hongxia; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-08-24

    Superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have demonstrated outstanding capability in energy and water applications by promoting dropwise condensation, where fast droplet growth and efficient condensate removal are two key parameters. However, these parameters remain contradictory. Although efficient droplet removal is easily obtained through coalescence jumping on uniform superhydrophobic surfaces, simultaneously achieving fast droplet growth is still challenging. Also, on such surfaces droplets can grow to larger sizes without restriction if there is no coalescence. In this work, we show that superhydrophobic nanostructured microporous surfaces can manipulate the droplet growth and jumping. Microporous surface morphology effectively enhances the growth of droplets in pores owing to large solid-liquid contact area. At low supersaturations, the upward growth rate (1-1.5 μm/s) of these droplets in pores is observed to be around 15-25 times that of the droplets outside the pores. Meanwhile, their top curvature radius increases relatively slowly (∼0.25 μm/s) due to pore confinement, which results in a highly stretched droplet surface. We also observed forced jumping of stretched droplets in pores either through coalescence with spherical droplets outside pores or through self-pulling without coalescence. Both experimental observation and theoretical modeling reveal that excess surface free energy stored in the stretched droplet surface and micropore confinement are responsible for this pore-scale-forced jumping. These findings reveal the insightful physics of stretched droplet dynamics and offer guidelines for the design and fabrication of novel super-repellent surfaces with microporous morphology.

  10. Influence of droplet charge on the chemical stability of citral in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Jun; Decker, Eric Andrew; Henson, Lulu; Popplewell, L Michael; McClements, David Julian

    2010-08-01

    The chemical stability of citral, a flavor component widely used in beverage, food, and fragrance products, in oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by surfactants with different charge characteristics was investigated. Emulsions were prepared using cationic (lauryl alginate, LAE), non-ionic (polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether, Brij 35), and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactants at pH 3.5. The citral concentration decreased over time in all the emulsions, but the rate of decrease depended on surfactant type. After 7 d storage, the citral concentrations remaining in the emulsions were around 60% for LAE- or Brij 35-stabilized emulsions and 10% for SDS-stabilized emulsions. An increase in the local proton (H(+)) concentration around negatively charged droplet surfaces may account for the more rapid citral degradation observed in SDS-stabilized emulsions. A strong metal ion chelator (EDTA), which has previously been shown to be effective at increasing the oxidative stability of labile components, had no effect on citral stability in LAE- or Brij 35-stabilized emulsions, but it slightly decreased the initial rate of citral degradation in SDS-stabilized emulsions. These results suggest the surfactant type used to prepare emulsions should be controlled to improve the chemical stability of citral in emulsion systems.

  11. Bioaccessibility and Cellular Uptake of β-Carotene Encapsulated in Model O/W Emulsions: Influence of Initial Droplet Size and Emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial emulsion structure (droplet size and emulsifier on the properties of β-carotene-loaded emulsions and the bioavailability of β-carotene after passing through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT digestion were investigated. Exposure to GIT significantly changed the droplet size, surface charge and composition of all emulsions, and these changes were dependent on their initial droplet size and the emulsifiers used. Whey protein isolate (WPI-stabilized emulsion showed the highest β-carotene bioaccessibility, while sodium caseinate (SCN-stabilized emulsion showed the highest cellular uptake of β-carotene. The bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated β-carotene based on the results of bioaccessibility and cellular uptake showed the same order with the results of cellular uptake being SCN > TW80 > WPI. An inconsistency between the results of bioaccessibility and bioavailability was observed, indicating that the cellular uptake assay is necessary for a reliable evaluation of the bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated compounds. The findings in this study contribute to a better understanding of the correlation between emulsion structure and the digestive fate of emulsion-encapsulated nutrients, which make it possible to achieve controlled or potential targeted delivery of nutrients by designing the structure of emulsion-based carriers.

  12. Aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes of cloud droplet formation: influence of particle number, size and hygroscopicity on the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Reutter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets under pyro-convective conditions using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral microphysics and with the κ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN activity of aerosol particles. Assuming a typical biomass burning aerosol size distribution (accumulation mode centred at 120 nm, we have calculated initial cloud droplet number concentrations (NCD for a wide range of updraft velocities (w=0.25–20 m s−1 and aerosol particle number concentrations (NCN=200–105 cm−3 at the cloud base. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration (w/NCN, we found three distinctly different regimes of CCN activation and cloud droplet formation:

    (1 An aerosol-limited regime that is characterized by high w/NCN ratios (>≈10−3 m s−1 cm3, high maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax>≈0.5%, and high activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCN/NCN>≈90%. In this regime NCD is directly proportional to NCN and practically independent of w.

    (2 An updraft-limited regime that is characterized by low w/NCN ratios (<≈10−4 m s−1 cm3, low maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax<≈0.2%, and low activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCD/NCN<≈20%. In this regime NCD is directly proportional to w and practically independent of NCN.

    (3 An aerosol- and updraft-sensitive regime (transitional regime, which is characterized by parameter values in between

  13. Skylab fluid mechanics simulations: Oscillation, rotation, collision and coalescence of water droplets under low-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab 4 crew members performed a series of demonstrations showing the oscillations, rotations, as well as collision coalescence of water droplets which simulate various physical models of fluids under low gravity environment. The results from Skylab demonstrations provide information and illustrate the potential of an orbiting space-oriented research laboratory for the study of more sophisticated fluid mechanic experiments. Experiments and results are discussed.

  14. Ordered packing of emulsion droplets toward the preparation of adjustable photomasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Hyeon; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Sim, Jae Young; Jeong, Woong Chan; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-05-20

    Monodisperse emulsion droplets with a high volume fraction form crystalline phases that can potentially serve as adjustable photomasks in photolithography. Such photomasks were prepared using a microfluidic device in which a flow-focusing junction, side channels, and a reservoir were connected in series. Transparent oil droplets were generated in a dye-containing continuous water phase at the flow-focusing junction. The droplets were then concentrated through the selective removal of the continuous phase using the side channels. This process led to the formation of a regular array of droplets in the reservoir with a configuration that depended on the relative height of the reservoir to the droplet diameter. The configurations could be selected among a single-layered hexagonal array, a bilayered square array, and a bilayered hexagonal array. The droplet arrays were used as a photomask to create hexagonal or square arrays of microdots. The transmittance profile of the ultraviolet (UV) light from each droplet was parabolic, which enabled the dot size to be tuned by controlling the UV irradiation time. This mask effect is otherwise difficult to achieve using conventional photomasks. The dot size and array periodicity could be adjusted by the in-situ control of the droplet size at the flow-focusing droplet maker. The combination of droplet size adjustments and the UV irradiation time provided independent control over the dot size and array periodicity to enable the preparation of a series of hexagonal microarrays with a wide spectrum of array parameters using a single microfluidic device.

  15. Charging and Release Mechanisms of Flexible Macromolecules in Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Myong In; Consta, Styliani

    2017-08-01

    We study systematically the charging and release mechanisms of a flexible macromolecule, modeled by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in a droplet by using molecular dynamics simulations. We compare how PEG is solvated and charged by sodium Na+ ions in a droplet of water (H2O), acetonitrile (MeCN), and their mixtures. Initially, we examine the location and the conformation of the macromolecule in a droplet bearing no net charge. It is revealed that the presence of charge carriers do not affect the location of PEG in aqueous and MeCN droplets compared with that in the neutral droplets, but the location of the macromolecule and the droplet size do affect the PEG conformation. PEG is charged on the surface of a sodiated aqueous droplet that is found close to the Rayleigh limit. Its charging is coupled to the extrusion mechanism, where PEG segments leave the droplet once they coordinate a Na+ ion or in a correlated motion with Na+ ions. In contrast, as PEG resides in the interior of a MeCN droplet, it is sodiated inside the droplet. The compact macro-ion transitions through partially unwound states to an extended conformation, a process occurring during the final stage of desolvation and in the presence of only a handful of MeCN molecules. For charged H2O/MeCN droplets, the sodiation of PEG is determined by the H2O component, reflecting its slower evaporation and preference over MeCN for solvating Na+ ions. We use the simulation data to construct an analytical model that suggests that the droplet surface electric field may play a role in the macro-ion-droplet interactions that lead to the extrusion of the macro-ion. This study provides the first evidence of the effect of the surface electric field by using atomistic simulations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of local pressures and interfacial tensions of SDS micelles and dodecane droplets in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabata, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-06-14

    To obtain the radial (normal) and lateral (transverse) components of the local pressure tensor, PN(R) and PT(R), respectively, and the interfacial tension of micelles, molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed for spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. The local pressure tensor was calculated as a function of radial distance R using the Irving-Kirkwood formula. Similar MD calculations were also carried out for an n-dodecane droplet in water to compare the differences in the local pressure and interfacial tension values with those of the micelles. The calculated interfacial tensions were 20 ± 5 and 44 ± 10 mN/m for the SDS micelles and dodecane droplets, respectively. The excess free energies due to the interfacial tension were 340 and 1331 kJ/mol for the SDS micelle and dodecane droplet, respectively. The micelles are stabilized by 991 kJ/mol by covering their hydrophobic cores with hydrophilic groups. The dodecane droplet has a large interfacial tension caused by the zero or positive values of PN(R) - PT(R) at all values of R. In contrast, the small interfacial tension in the SDS micelles comes from the negative PN(R) - PT(R) values over a wide range of R. The pressure difference between the inside and outside of the oil droplet and its interfacial tension well satisfies the Laplace equation. However, the hydrophobic core of the SDS micelle is quite different from the liquid alkane, and the SDS micelles do not follow Laplace's picture. Decomposing the interfacial tension into contributions from various interactions, it is found that those between charged and polar groups dominate the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles. The positive electrostatic potential (1.3 V) on the micelle surface and the negative potential (-0.15 V) on the oil droplet contribute to the interfacial tensions by 19 and 0.5 mN/m, respectively. Thus, the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles is produced by electrostatic interactions, in contrast to the dodecane

  17. Gelatin-Based Nanocomplex-Stabilized Pickering Emulsions: Regulating Droplet Size and Wettability through Assembly with Glucomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weiping; Zhu, Jieyu; Jiang, Yike; Shao, Ping; Li, Bin; Huang, Qingrong

    2017-02-22

    Particle size and surface wettability play leading roles in the distribution of particles on the oil-water interface and the stability of emulsions. This work utilized nanocomplexes assembled from gelatin and tannic acid to stabilize Pickering emulsions. The sizes and surface wettability of particles were further regulated by using a polysaccharide. The sizes of nanocomplexes ranged from 205.8 to 422.2 nm and increased with the addition of polysaccharide. Their contact angles decreased from 84.1° to 59.3°, revealing their hydrophilic nature. Results of fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy indicated that nanocomplexes were located at the oil-water interface. Interfacial shear and dilatational rheological data revealed a fast and irreversible adsorption behavior, which differed from rearrangement of gelatin molecules at the oil-water interface. The minimal concentration of nanocomplexes required to stabilize emulsions was 0.1 wt %. Our results demonstrated that protein-polyphenol-polysaccharide nanocomplexes had the potential to be applied to form stable surfactant-free food emulsions for the delivery of nutraceuticals.

  18. Size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon in ambient aerosols and its size-resolved thermal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian Zhen; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Hongyi; Lau, Alexis K. H.

    Aerosol mass size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were studied at a coastal site in Hong Kong. Eleven sets of 72-h samples were collected using an eight-stage impactor sampler over three seasons in 2000-2001. Regardless of air mass origins being mainly marine or continental, WSOC exhibited bimodal size distributions with a dominant fine mode and a minor coarse mode in the size range of >0.43 μm. The two modes had a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 0.7±0.1 and 4.0±0.3 μm, respectively. The fine WSOC accounted for the major proportion of the total WSOC, ranging from two-thirds to four-fifths. The WSOC mixtures were resolved into 3-5 peaks under controlled progressive heating and combustion conditions. A positive matrix factorization analysis deconvoluted the WSOC mixtures into three component groups of different thermal behaviors. The three groups of WSOC species were postulated to be low, medium, and high molecular weight (MW) polar compounds on the basis of their thermal evolution features. On average, they accounted for 21%, 39%, and 40% of fine WSOC (2.1 μm) was largely made of the low MW polar compound group. The low MW group had a bimodal distribution with a dominant coarse mode, likely associated with sea salt aerosols. The medium and the high MW groups had a single mode distribution in the droplet mode, both with an average MMAD of 0.7±0.1 μm. Their droplet mode presence indicated that they were associated with cloud-processed particles. There is evidence to suggest that the high MW group was likely secondary in origin, formed during cloud processing.

  19. Airspeed and orifice size affect spray droplet spectra from an aerial electrostatic nozzle for rotary-wing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aerial electrostatic spraying system patented by the USDA-ARS is a unique aerial application system which inductively charges spray droplets for the purpose of increasing deposition and efficacy. While this system has many potential benefits, no published data exits which describe how changes i...

  20. Insights into the Impact of Surface Hydrophobicity on Droplet Coalescence and Jumping Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxia; Yang, Weilin; Aili, Abulimiti; Zhang, TieJun

    2017-08-29

    Droplet coalescence jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces attracts much research attention owing to its capability in enhancing condensation for energy and water applications. In this work, we reveal the impact of the finite surface adhesion to explain velocity discrepancies observed in recent droplet jumping studies, particularly when droplet sizes are a few micrometers (1-10 μm). Surface adhesion, which is usually neglected, can significantly affect both droplet coalescence and departure dynamics. It causes oscillations on velocity and contact area in the droplet coalescence process, as observed numerically and experimentally. Comparing the increasing rate of jumping velocity with contact angle for three different droplet sizes, we show that smaller droplets exhibit higher sensitivity to the change of surface hydrophobicity. We also specify the range of surface superhydrophobicity where the jumping velocity monotonically decreases (θ ≳ 170°), increases (θ ≲ 160°), or changes non-monotonically in transition (160° ≲ θ ≲170°) with droplet size. As a result, there exists a broad jumping velocity range for micrometer-sized droplets on a superhydrophobic surface with a slight contact angle variation. This work offers an extended understanding of the droplet coalescence and jumping dynamics to resolve the discrepancies in recent experimental observations.

  1. A water-soluble extract from Grifola frondosa, maitake mushroom, decreases lipid droplets in brown adipocyte tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Katsuhiko; Nagasawa, Yumi; Ohtsuru, Masaru

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the effect of a water-soluble extract from Grifola frondosa, the maitake mushroom, on lipid droplets in brown adipocyte tissue (BAT) cells. This water-soluble extract inhibits the conversion of pre white adipocyte tissue (WAT) cells but does not inhibit that of pre BAT cells. It reduces the amount of accumulated triglycerides (TG) in BAT cells. The glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activities of BAT cells decreased, but the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels increased. These results suggest that maitake extract inhibits TG accumulation-related energy metabolism.

  2. Ignition of a Droplet of Composite Liquid Fuel in a Vortex Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Vershinina, K. Yu; Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study results of a droplet ignition and combustion were obtained for coal-water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP) prepared from coal processing waste, low-grade coal and waste petroleum products. A comparative analysis of process characteristics were carried out in different conditions of fuel droplet interaction with heated air flow: droplet soars in air flow in a vortex combustion chamber, droplet soars in ascending air flow in a cone-shaped combustion chamber, and droplet is placed in a thermocouple junction and motionless in air flow. The size (initial radii) of CWSP droplet was varied in the range of 0.5–1.5 mm. The ignition delay time of fuel was determined by the intensity of the visible glow in the vicinity of the droplet during CWSP combustion. It was established (under similar conditions) that ignition delay time of CWSP droplets in the combustion chamber is lower in 2–3.5 times than similar characteristic in conditions of motionless droplet placed in a thermocouple junction. The average value of ignition delay time of CWSP droplet is 3–12 s in conditions of oxidizer temperature is 600–850 K. Obtained experimental results were explained by the influence of heat and mass transfer processes in the droplet vicinity on ignition characteristics in different conditions of CWSP droplet interaction with heated air flow. Experimental results are of interest for the development of combustion technology of promising fuel for thermal power engineering.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Water Droplet Impingement on Airfoils, Finite Wings, and an S-duct Engine Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Yeong, Hsiung Wei; Bidwell, Colin S.; Breer, Martin D.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Validation of trajectory computer codes, for icing analysis, requires experimental water droplet impingement data for a wide range of aircraft geometries as well as flow and icing conditions. This report presents improved experimental and data reduction methods for obtaining water droplet impingement data and provides a comprehensive water droplet impingement database for a range of test geometries including an MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a GLC-305 airfoil, an NACA 65(sub 2)-415 airfoil, a commercial transport tail section, a 36-inch chord natural laminar flow NLF(1)-0414 airfoil, a 48-inch NLF(1)-0414 section with a 25 percent chord simple flap, a state-of-the-art three-element high lift system, a NACA 64A008 finite span swept business jet tail, a full-scale business jet horizontal tail section, a 25 percent-scale business jet empennage, and an S-duct turboprop engine inlet. The experimental results were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for spray clouds with median volumetric diameter (MVD) of 11, 11.5, 21, 92, and 94 microns and for a range of angles of attack. The majority of the impingement experiments were conducted at an air speed of 175 mph corresponding to a Reynolds number of approximately 1.6 million per foot. The maximum difference of repeated tests from the average ranged from 0.24 to 12 percent for most of the experimental results presented. This represents a significant improvement in test repeatability compared to previous experimental studies. The increase in test repeatability was attributed to improvements made to the experimental and data reduction methods. Computations performed with the LEWICE-2D and LEWICE-3D computer codes for all test configurations are presented in this report. For the test cases involving median volumetric diameters of 11 and 21 microns, the correlation between the analytical and experimental impingement efficiency distributions was good. For the median volumetric diameters of 92 and 94-micron cases, however

  4. Simulations of droplet coalescence in simple shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardt, Orest; Derksen, J J; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2013-05-28

    Simulating droplet coalescence is challenging because small-scale (tens of nanometers) phenomena determine the behavior of much larger (micrometer- to millimeter-scale) droplets. In general, liquid droplets colliding in a liquid medium coalesce when the capillary number is less than a critical value. We present simulations of droplet collisions and coalescence in simple shear flow using the free-energy binary-liquid lattice Boltzmann method. In previous simulations of low-speed collisions, droplets coalesced at unrealistically high capillary numbers. Simulations of noncoalescing droplets have not been reported, and therefore, the critical capillary number for simulated collisions was unknown. By simulating droplets with radii up to 100 lattice nodes, we determine the critical capillary number for coalescence and quantify the effects of several numerical and geometric parameters. The simulations were performed with a well-resolved interface, a Reynolds number of one, and capillary numbers from 0.01 to 0.2. The ratio of the droplet radius and interface thickness has the greatest effect on the critical capillary number. As in experiments, the critical capillary number decreases with increasing droplet size. A second numerical parameter, the interface diffusivity (Péclet number) also influences the conditions for coalescence: coalescence occurs at higher capillary numbers with lower Péclet numbers (higher diffusivity). The effects of the vertical offset between the droplets and the confinement of the droplets were also studied. Physically reasonable results were obtained and provide insight into the conditions for coalescence. Simulations that match the conditions of experiments reported in the literature remain computationally impractical. However, the scale of the simulations is now sufficiently large that a comparison with experiments involving smaller droplets (≈10 μm) and lower viscosities (≈10(-6) m(2)/s, the viscosity of water) may be possible

  5. Predictive Determination of the Integral Characteristics of Evaporation of Water Droplets in Gas Media with a Varying Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysokomornaya, O. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of using three heat-transfer models based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) has been analyzed with account taken of the relevant endothermic phase transformations to predict the integral characteristics of evaporation of liquid droplets (with the example of water) in gas media with a varying temperature. The existing formulations with "diffusive" and "kinetic" approximations to the description of the process of evaporation have been considered, and a new model has been developed according to approximations obtained from the results of conducted experiments (with the use of high-speed cameras and cross-correlation software and hardware systems). Two integral characteristics of the process of evaporation were monitored: the mass rate of vaporization and the lifetime (time of complete evaporation) of a droplet. A comparison of simulation results and experimental data allowed us to draw the conclusion on the expediency of use of ODE-based "diffusive" and "phase-transition" models in a limited temperature range (to 600 K). At high gas temperatures (particularly, higher than 1000 K), a satisfactory correlation with experimental data can be provided by a model that takes account of the substantially nonlinear dependence of the vaporization rate on temperature, the formation of a buffer (steam) layer between the droplet and the gas medium, and the basic mechanisms of heat transfer in the liquid and in the gas medium.

  6. Hands-off preparation of monodisperse emulsion droplets using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip for droplet digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hironari; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Arichika; Nakashoji, Yuta; Okura, Naoaki; Nakamoto, Norimitsu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2015-04-21

    A fully autonomous method of creating highly monodispersed emulsion droplets with a low sample dead volume was realized using a degassed poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chip possessing a simple T-junction channel geometry with two inlet reservoirs for oil and water to be loaded and one outlet reservoir for the collection of generated droplets. Autonomous transport of oil and water phases in the channel was executed by permeation of air confined inside the outlet reservoir into the degassed PDMS. The only operation required for droplet creation was simple pipetting of oil and aqueous solutions into the inlet reservoirs. Long-lasting fluid transport in the current system enabled us to create ca. 51,000 monodispersed droplets (with a coefficient of variation of multiple time-course measurements, the reproducibility in the current method of droplet preparation was confirmed, with tunable droplet sizes achieved simply by changing the cross-sectional dimensions of the microchannel. Furthermore, it was verified that the resultant droplets could serve as microreactors for digital polymerase chain reactions. This hands-free technique for preparing monodispersed droplets in a very facile and inexpensive fashion is intended for, but not limited to, bioanalytical applications and is also applicable to material syntheses.

  7. Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Departure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Kyung; Cha, Hyeongyun; Birbarah, Patrick; Chavan, Shreyas; Zhong, Chen; Xu, Yuehan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-12-15

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years because of its ability to shed water droplets at length scales 3 decades smaller than the capillary length (∼1 mm) via coalescence-induced droplet jumping. Jumping-droplet condensation has been demonstrated to enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning efficiency and is governed by the theoretical inertial-capillary scaled jumping speed (U). When two droplets coalesce, the experimentally measured jumping speed (Uexp) is fundamentally limited by the internal fluid dynamics during the coalescence process (Uexp 2) coalescence as an avenue to break the two-droplet speed limit. Using side-view and top-view high-speed imaging to study more than 1000 jumping events on a copper oxide nanostructured superhydrophobic surface, we verify that droplet jumping occurs as a result of three fundamentally different mechanisms: (1) coalescence between two droplets, (2) coalescence among more than two droplets (multidroplet), and (3) coalescence between one or more droplets on the surface and a returning droplet that has already departed (multihop). We measured droplet-jumping speeds for a wide range of droplet radii (5-50 μm) and demonstrated that while the two-droplet capillary-to-inertial energy conversion mechanism is not identical to that of multidroplet jumping, speeds above the theoretical two-droplet limit (>0.23U) can be achieved. However, we discovered that multihop coalescence resulted in drastically reduced jumping speeds (≪0.23U) due to adverse momentum contributions from returning droplets. To quantify the impact of enhanced jumping speed on heat-transfer performance, we developed a condensation critical heat flux model to show that modest jumping speed enhancements of 50% using multidroplet jumping can enhance performance by up to 40%. Our results provide a starting point for the design of enhanced-performance jumping-droplet surfaces for industrial

  8. Detection of Oil in Water Column, Final Report: Detection Prototype Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    however, PSDs seemed to shift to larger droplets over time, which may be an indication of droplet coalescence over time and/or droplets scavenging... droplet size and density of the entrained oil. Both systems demonstrated the qualitative ability to detect and/or map oil suspended in the water...the oil plume, however, was not possible due to difficulties with correlating and validating the submerged plumes’ specific droplet size and

  9. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    of a technology with living properties. Otto Butschli first described the system in 1898, when he used alkaline water droplets in olive oil to initiate a saponification reaction. This simple recipe produced structures that moved and exhibited characteristics that resembled, at least superficially, the amoeba. We......Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... to the oil phase), qualify this system as an example of living technology. The analysis of the Butschli droplets suggests that a set of conditions may precede the emergence of lifelike characteristics and exemplifies the richness of this rudimentary chemical system, not only for artificial life...

  10. A passive microfluidic system based on step emulsification allows the generation of libraries of nanoliter-sized droplets from microliter droplets of varying and known concentrations of a sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, W; Kaminski, T S; Garstecki, P

    2017-03-29

    We present a novel geometry of microfluidic channels that allows us to passively generate monodisperse emulsions of hundreds of droplets smaller than 1 nL from collections of larger (ca. 0.4 μL) mother droplets. We introduce a new microfluidic module for the generation of droplets via passive break-up at a step. The module alleviates a common problem in step emulsification with efficient removal of the droplets from the vicinity of the step. In our solution, the droplets are pushed away from the step by a continuous liquid that bypasses the mother droplets via specially engineered bypasses that lead to the step around the main channel. We show that the bypasses tighten the distribution of volume of daughter droplets and eliminate subpopulations of daughter droplets. Clearing away the just produced droplets from the vicinity of the step provides for similar conditions of break-up for every subsequent droplet and, consequently, leads to superior monodispersity of the generated emulsions. Importantly, this function is realized autonomously (passively) in a protocol in which only a sequence of large mother droplets is forced through the module. Our system features the advantage of step emulsification systems in that the volumes of the generated droplets depend very weakly on the rate of flow through the module - an increase in the flow rate by 300% causes only a slight increase of the average diameter of generated droplets by less than 5%. We combined our geometry with a simple T-junction and a simple trap-based microdroplet dilutor to produce a collection of libraries of droplets of gradually changing and known concentrations of a sample. The microfluidic system can be operated with only two syringe pumps set at constant rates of flow during the experiment.

  11. Metal Emulsion Behavior of Droplets with Various Sizes in the Na2B4O7/Sn Alloy System by Bottom Bubbling Gas and its Comparison with the Chloride/Sn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Kim, Sun-joong; Gao, Xu; Ueda, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2017-10-01

    Mass transfer is the rate-controlling step of chemical reactions in steelmaking process. The passage of gas bubbles through the interface between the liquid iron and slag phases generates a metal emulsion. This increases the interface area between the two phases and improves the chemical reaction efficiency, e.g., of decarburization and desulfurization. In this study, a Sn alloy and sodium tetraborate were used to simulate molten steel and slag owing to their similar physical properties with actual molten steel/slag system. Molten slag from different depths was sampled during bubbling at various gas flow rates. Metal droplets were separated from the slag phase by dissolution in a solvent mixture of water and glycerin. The number and diameter of metal droplets with diameters in the range of 0.1 to 1 mm were measured. 5 to 50 metal droplets were observed in 1 g of the slag phase during bubbling. The total number and mass of the droplets increased with increasing gas flow rate. The droplet formation rate was estimated. Compared with the results of our previous study on droplets with diameter in the range of 2 to 100 μm, it was the large droplets that contributed the most to the total mass of the metal emulsion despite their number being smaller. The effect of the viscosity of the upper phase was studied and compared with results obtained with the Sn/chloride system. The metal droplet formation rate decreased with increasing viscosity of the upper phase.

  12. Difference in growth and coalescing patterns of droplets on bi-philic surfaces with varying spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Martand Mayukh; Koppu, Sudheer; Kadlaskar, Shantanu Shrikant; Pillutla, Venkata; Abhijeet; Choi, Wonjae

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the condensation and subsequent motion of water droplets on bi-philic surfaces, surfaces that are patterned with regions of different wettability. Bi-philic surfaces can enhance the water collection efficiency: droplets condensing on hydrophobic regions wick into hydrophilic drain channels when droplets grow to a certain size, renewing the condensation on the dry hydrophobic region. The onset of drain phenomenon can be triggered by multiple events with distinct nature ranging from gravity, direct contact between a droplet and a drain channel, to a mutual coalescence between droplets. This paper focuses on the effect of the length scale of hydrophobic regions on the dynamics of mutual coalescence between droplets and subsequent drainage. The main hypothesis was that, when the drop size is sufficient, the kinetic energy associated with a coalescence of droplets may cause dynamic advancing of a newly formed drop, leading to further coalescence with nearby droplets and ultimately to a chain reaction. We fabricate bi-philic surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes, and the result confirms that coalescing droplets, when the length scale of droplets increases beyond 0.2mm, indeed display dynamic expansion and chain reaction. Multiple droplets can thus migrate to hydrophilic drain simultaneously even when the initial motion of the droplets was not triggered by the direct contact between the droplet and the hydrophilic drain. Efficiency of drain due to mutual coalescence of droplets varies depending on the length scale of bi-philic patterns, and the drain phenomenon reaches its peak when the width of hydrophobic stripes is between 800μm and 1mm. The Ohnesorge number of droplets draining on noted surfaces is between 0.0042 and 0.0037 respectively. The observed length scale of bi-philic patterns matches that on the Stenocara beetle's fog harvesting back surface. This match between length scales suggests that the surface of the insect is optimized

  13. Waterborne, all-polymeric, colloidal ‘raspberry’ particles with controllable hydrophobicity and water droplet adhesion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telford, Andrew M. [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Easton, Christopher D. [CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, Clayton South, VIC 3169 (Australia); Hawkett, Brian S. [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Neto, Chiara, E-mail: Chiara.neto@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-03-31

    We present a superhydrophobic coating made from waterborne, all-polymeric ‘raspberry’ particles, composed of a micrometric spherical core decorated with a corona of nanometric spherical particles. As-cast particles produced hydrophobic coatings that were highly adhesive to almost-spherical droplets of water, resembling the properties of some types of rose petals. The coatings could be made slippery to spherical water droplets, like the lotus leaf, by surface activation with air plasma followed by reaction with an alkyl-trichlorosilane. The silanisation of films of latex particles was investigated on two model surfaces (a flat polystyrene film and a monolayer of polystyrene waterborne microparticles) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements, and applied to our recently-developed ‘raspberry’ particles to produce a superhydrophobic coating. - Highlights: • We have prepared superhydrophobic films using all-polymeric ‘raspberry’ particles. • We have prepared both ‘rose petal’ and ‘lotus leaf’ surfaces. • We have investigated the silanisation of complex latex particles.

  14. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the “explosive” destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to “explosive” destruction obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  15. Investigation of W/O microemulsion droplets by contrast variation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic and static light scattering experiments have been performed at various molar ratios () of water to AOT and temperatures on water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions dispersed in n-heptane, n-octane, and n-nonane. Size and shape fluctuations of microemulsion droplets are determined with very high precision because ...

  16. Coalescence of repelling colloidal droplets: a route to monodisperse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Botet, Robert; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-05-14

    Populations of droplets or particles dispersed in a liquid may evolve through Brownian collisions, aggregation, and coalescence. We have found a set of conditions under which these populations evolve spontaneously toward a narrow size distribution. The experimental system consists of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanodroplets dispersed in a solvent (acetone) + nonsolvent (water) mixture. These droplets carry electrical charges, located on the ionic end groups of the macromolecules. We used time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering to determine their size distribution. We find that the droplets grow through coalescence events: the average radius (R) increases logarithmically with elapsed time while the relative width σR/(R) of the distribution decreases as the inverse square root of (R). We interpret this evolution as resulting from coalescence events that are hindered by ionic repulsions between droplets. We generalize this evolution through a simulation of the Smoluchowski kinetic equation, with a kernel that takes into account the interactions between droplets. In the case of vanishing or attractive interactions, all droplet encounters lead to coalescence. The corresponding kernel leads to the well-known "self-preserving" particle distribution of the coalescence process, where σR/(R) increases to a plateau value. However, for droplets that interact through long-range ionic repulsions, "large + small" droplet encounters are more successful at coalescence than "large + large" encounters. We show that the corresponding kernel leads to a particular scaling of the droplet-size distribution-known as the "second-scaling law" in the theory of critical phenomena, where σR/(R) decreases as 1/√(R) and becomes independent of the initial distribution. We argue that this scaling explains the narrow size distributions of colloidal dispersions that have been synthesized through aggregation processes.

  17. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  18. Influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism in system “water droplet-high-temperature gases” on integral characteristics of liquid evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mathematical (system of differential equations in private derivatives models of heat and mass transfer were developed to investigate the evaporation processes of water droplets and emulsions on its base moving in high-temperature (more than 1000 K gas flow. The model takes into account a conductive and radiative heat transfer in water droplet and also a convective, conductive and radiative heat exchange with high-temperature gas area. Water vapors characteristic temperature and concentration in small wall-adjacent area and trace of the droplet, numerical values of evaporation velocities at different surface temperature, the characteristic time of complete droplet evaporation were determined. Experiments for confidence estimation of calculated integral characteristics of processes under investigation - mass liquid evaporation velocities were conducted with use of cross-correlation recording video equipment. Their satisfactory fit (deviations of experimental and theoretical velocities were less than 15% was obtained. The influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism on characteristics of endothermal phase transformations in a wide temperature variation range was established by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with known theoretical data for “diffusion” mechanisms of water droplets and other liquids evaporation in gas.

  19. Single droplet experimentation on spray drying:evaporation of sessile droplets deposited on a flat surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Boom, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Individually dispensed droplets were dried on a flat surface to mimic the drying of single droplets during spray drying. A robust dispensing process is presented that generates small droplets (dp>150 µm). A predictive model based on Bernoulli’s law accurately describes droplet size with

  20. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, Johan T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2017-06-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which drastically changes the outcome of a droplet-droplet collision. However, the effect of viscosity on the droplet collision regime boundaries demarcating coalescence and reflexive and stretching separation is still not entirely understood and a general model for collision outcome boundaries is not available. In this work, the effect of viscosity on the droplet-droplet collision outcome is studied using direct numerical simulations employing the volume of fluid method. The role of viscous energy dissipation is analysed in collisions of droplets with different sizes and different physical properties. From the simulations results, a general phenomenological model depending on the capillary number (Ca, accounting for viscosity), the impact parameter (B), the Weber number (We), and the size ratio (Δ) is proposed.

  1. Dependence of the Internal Structure on Water/Particle Volume Ratio in an Amphiphilic Janus Particle-Water-Oil Ternary System: From Micelle-like Clusters to Emulsions of Spherical Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Tomohiro G; Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-31

    Amphiphilic Janus particles (AJP), composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic hemispheres, are one of the simplest anisotropic colloids, and they exhibit higher surface activities than particles with homogeneous surface properties. Consequently, a ternary system of AJP, water, and oil can form extremely stable Pickering emulsions, with internal structures that depend on the Janus structure of the particles and the system composition. However, the detail of these structures has not been fully explored, especially for the composition range where the amount of the minority liquid phase and AJP are comparable, where one would expect the Janus characteristics to be directly reflected. In this study, we varied the volume ratio of the particles and the minority liquid phase, water, by 2 orders of magnitude around the comparable composition range, and observed the resultant structures at the resolution of the individual particle dimensions by optical microscopy. When the volume ratio of water is smaller than that of the Janus particles, capillary interactions between the hydrophilic hemispheres of the particles induce micelle-like clusters in which the hydrophilic sides of the particles face inward. With increasing water content, these clusters grow into a rodlike morphology. When the water volume exceeds that of the particles, the structure transforms into an emulsion state composed of spherical droplets, colloidosomes, because of the surface activity of particles at the liquid-liquid interface. Thus, we found that a change in volume fraction alters the mechanism of structure formation in the ternary system, and large resulting morphological changes in the self-assembled structures reflect the anisotropy of the particles. The self-assembly shows essential commonalities with that in microemulsions of surfactant molecules, however the AJP system is stabilized only kinetically. Analysis of the dependence of the emulsion droplet size on composition shows that almost all the

  2. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R.; Hiremath, Kirankumar R.; Sharma, Manvendra

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  3. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R., E-mail: pchakraborty@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Hiremath, Kirankumar R., E-mail: k.r.hiremath@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Sharma, Manvendra, E-mail: PG201283003@iitj.ac.in [Defence Laboratory Jodhpur, Defence Research & Development Organisation, 342011 (India)

    2017-02-05

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  4. Rainbows, water droplets, and seeing--slow motion analysis of experiments in atmospheric optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many physics processes underlying phenomena in atmospheric optics happen on a rather short time scale such that neither the human eye nor video cameras are able to analyze the details. We report applications of high-speed imaging of laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics with subsequent slow motion analysis. The potential to study respective transient effects is investigated in general and for a few phenomena in detail, in particular for rainbow scattering due to single oscillating droplets during free fall, and for light propagation effects through atmospheric paths with turbulences, leading, e.g., to scintillation of stars or shimmering of mirage images.

  5. Coalescence of fog droplets: Differential fog water deposition on wet and dry forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, C.; Barrero, J.

    2010-07-01

    samples more efficient on capturing fog water. Same behaviour was observed from exposed cylinders, although magnitude was not similar between samples and cylinders, being the cylinders more efficient. Besides tendencies on fog interception were positively associated to the intensity and duration of the fog events, results also indicated that this differential efficiency on capturing the small drops by the wet and dry canopy seems to be related to the coalescence principle, or the interactions of drops, where the coalescence depends on the size of the drops and the humidity state of the interacting surface where the drops merge. The differences on fog interception efficiency is discussed from the physical principles of coalescence of drops impacting wet (drop - drop) and dry surfaces (drop - air).

  6. Estimativa da deposição de agrotóxicos por análise de gotas Estimates of pesticide deposition by droplet size analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldemir Chaim

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available As quantificações dos agrotóxicos que atingem os alvos são feitas com metodologias onerosas ou sofisticadas. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar dois métodos para quantificar as deposições de agrotóxicos: um, por análise de gotas, e o outro, por análise química de traçador. As gotas de uma calda cúprica foram amostradas com papel sensível a água, lâmina de microscópio recoberta com óxido de magnésio e cartões de papel-filtro. No método de análise de gotas, o volume depositado em determinada área foi calculado considerando-se os diâmetros das manchas ou impressões, fatores de espalhamento e densidade de deposição. No outro método, o volume depositado foi obtido mediante análise de resíduo do traçador encontrado nos alvos e pela concentração da calda da pulverização. Não houve diferenças estatísticas entre os volumes estimados pelos dois métodos.The available methodologies for analysing the pesticide reaching the target are sophisticated or expensive. The objective of this work was to compare two methods to quantify the pesticide deposition. One of them by droplets analysis and the other by chemical tracer analysis. The droplets of a fungicide spray were sampled using water sensitive papers, slides with oxide magnesium and cards of filter paper. In the droplet analysis method, the volume of spray deposited on a delimited area was estimated considering the diameters of stains or craters, spread factors and droplet density. In the chemical tracer analysis method the volume was calculated by the residue deposited on sampling target and spray concentration. There were no statistic differences in the volumes estimated by the two methods.

  7. Discrete electric field mediated droplet splitting in microchannels: Fission, Cascade, and Rayleigh modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Joydip; Timung, Seim; Dandamudi, Chola Bhargava; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations supplemented by experiments together uncovered that strategic integration of discrete electric fields in a non-invasive manner could substantially miniaturize the droplets into smaller parts in a pressure driven oil-water flow inside microchannels. The Maxwell's stress generated from the electric field at the oil-water interface could deform, stretch, neck, pin, and disintegrate a droplet into many miniaturized daughter droplets, which eventually ushered a one-step method to form water-in-oil microemulsion employing microchannels. The interplay between electrostatic, inertial, capillary, and viscous forces led to various pathways of droplet breaking, namely, fission, cascade, or Rayleigh modes. While a localized electric field in the fission mode could split a droplet into a number of daughter droplets of smaller size, the cascade or the Rayleigh mode led to the formation of an array of miniaturized droplets when multiple electrodes generating different field intensities were ingeniously assembled around the microchannel. The droplets size and frequency could be tuned by varying the field intensity, channel diameter, electrode locations, interfacial tension, and flow ratio. The proposed methodology shows a simple methodology to transform a microdroplet into an array of miniaturized ones inside a straight microchannel for enhanced mass, energy, and momentum transfer, and higher throughput. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Oil droplets as light absorbents in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otremba, Zbigniew

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents spectra of light absorption coefficient of oil-in-water emulsion, derived using the Mie theory. In order to achieve that concentration of oil, degree of oil dispersion in seawater as well as spectra of light absorption coefficient and refractive index of chosen oils must be known. A significant role of the size distribution of oil droplets has been revealed: light absorption coefficient of emulsion increases with the rate of dispersion.

  9. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  10. Direct transition of potential of water droplets to electric energy using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Zheng, Kai-Hong; Liu, Zheng; Hu, Li-Jun; Sun, Lian-Feng

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we report that an electromotive force (EMF) can be induced in a rope of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) when water droplets fall on this rope. The magnitude of this EMF depends sensitively on the slant angle of the SWNTs. Most interestingly, both the magnitude and the direction of the induced EFM can be modulated by applying a current to the SWNTs. The concepts of electrical slip and no-slip are proposed and can be quantitatively described by “electrical slip resistance". This kind of generator does not need any magnet, rotor, etc and shows quite a different operating mechanism and design compared with a conventional large scale hydroelectric power generator.

  11. Size distributions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions of water-soluble organic carbon in an urban atmosphere in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nijing; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2017-10-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is a significant part of ambient aerosol and plays an active role in contributing to aerosol's effect on visibility degradation and radiation budget through its interactions with atmospheric water. Size-segregated aerosol samples in the range of 0.056-18 μm were collected using a ten-stage impactor sampler at an urban site in Hong Kong over one-year period. The WSOC samples were separated into hydrophilic (termed WSOC_h) and hydrophobic fractions (i.e., the humic-like substances (HULIS) fraction) through solid-phase extraction procedure. Carbon in HULIS accounted for 40 ± 14% of WSOC. The size distribution of HULIS was consistently characterized in all seasons with a dominant droplet mode (46-71%) and minor condensation (9.0-18%) and coarse modes (20-35%). The droplet mode had a mass median aerodynamic diameter in the range of 0.7-0.8 μm. This size mode showed the largest seasonal variation in abundance, lowest in the summer (0.41 μg/m3) and highest in the winter (3.3 μg/m3). WSOC_h also had a dominant droplet mode, but was more evenly distributed among different size modes. Inter-species correlations within the same size mode suggest that the condensation-mode HULIS was partly associated with combustion sources and the droplet-mode was strongly associated with secondary sulfate formation and biomass burning particle aging processes. There is evidence to suggest that the coarse-mode HULIS largely originated from coagulation of condensation-mode HULIS with coarse soil/sea salt particles. The formation process and possible sources of WSOC_h was more complicated and multiple than HULIS and need further investigation. Our measurements indicate that WSOC components contributed a dominant fraction of water-soluble aerosol mass in particles smaller than 0.32 μm while roughly 20-30% in the larger particles.

  12. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixed parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the “super-adiabatic” growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision–coalescence in warm clouds.

  13. Dual-Functional Superhydrophobic Textiles with Asymmetric Roll-Down/Pinned States for Water Droplet Transportation and Oil-Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojing; Li, Hongqiang; Lai, Xuejun; Zhang, Lin; Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua; He, Jie; Zeng, Xingrong

    2018-01-31

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable adhesion from lotus-leaf to rose-petal states have generated much attention for their potential applications in self-cleaning, anti-icing, oil-water separation, microdroplet transportation, and microfluidic devices. Herein we report a facile magnetic-field-manipulation strategy to fabricate dual-functional superhydrophobic textiles with asymmetric roll-down/pinned states on the two surfaces of the textile simultaneously. Upon exposure to a static magnetic field, fluoroalkylsilane-modified iron oxide (F-Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) moved along the magnetic field to construct discrepant hierarchical structures and roughnesses on the two sides of the textile. The positive surface (closer to the magnet, or P-surface) showed a water contact angle up to 165°, and the opposite surface (or O-surface) had a water contact angle of 152.5°. The P-surface where water droplets easily slid off with a sliding angle of 7.5° appeared in the "roll-down" state as Cassie mode, while the O-surface was in the "pinned" state as Wenzel mode, where water droplets firmly adhered even at vertical (90°) and inverted (180°) angles. The surface morphology and wetting mode were adjustable by varying the ratios of F-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and PDMS. By taking advantage of the asymmetric adhesion behaviors, the as-fabricated superhydrophobic textile was successfully applied in no-loss microdroplet transportation and oil-water separation. Our method is simple and cost-effective. The fabricated textile has the characteristics of superhydrophobicity, magnetic responsiveness, excellent chemical stability, adjustable surface morphology, and controllable adhesion. Our findings conceivably stand out as a new tool to fabricate functional superhydrophobic materials with asymmetric surface properties for various potential applications.

  14. Nano-size confinement effect on phase transition of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aqueous droplets reveal the vital role of solution non-ideality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the fundamental role of interaction between water molecular and nanoparticles in new-particle formation, particle initial growth by condensation and coagulation, and thereby visibility degradation, cloud formation, radiative forcing is of great significance in the atmospheric researches. But current knowledge about fundamental physical, chemical properties of nanoparticles is still very limited. Here we measured the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric relevant nanoparticles, such as (NH4)2SO4 and NaCl in the dry size range from 100 nm down to 4-6 nm using a hygroscopic tandem nano-differential mobility analyzer (nano-HTDMA). The diameter growth factors of AS and NaCl decrease with decreasing dry mobility diameter and both show a prompt deliquescence in the range of 100 - 6 nm, which are in a good agreement with Biskos et al. (2006a, 2006b). However, no significant nano-size effect on the deliquescence point of ammonium sulfate observed down to 6 nm, which is consistent with Biskos et al. (2006a). The observed hygroscopic growth of AS and NaCl can be well explained by the concentration dependent water activity and surface tensions retrieved from Differential Köhler analysis (DKA) (Cheng et al. 2015). Our study on the different nano-size confinement effect on phase transition of NaCl and AS aqueous droplets provides further insight on the vital role of the non-ideality of solution properties. references: 1. Biskos, G., et al., Prompt deliquescence and efflorescence of aerosol nanoparticles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2006. 6: p. 4633-4642. 2. Biskos, G., et al., Nanosize effect on the hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol particles. Geophysical Research Letters, 2006. 33(7). 3. Cheng, Y., et al., Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nat Commun, 2015. 6: p. 5923.

  15. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  16. Adhesion of water droplets by low voltage electrowetting on a superhydrophobic surface of a 3C-SiC nanorod network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Afzal; Sohail, Shiraz; Jacob, Chacko

    2015-12-01

    Adhesion state of a liquid droplet on the superhydrophobic surfaces can be tuned by electrowetting and can be exploited for various applications in microfluidics, lab on chip and biotechnology, etc. Silicon carbide (SiC) can be used for these kinds of studies due to its high chemical and mechanical stability in harsh environment conditions. In this work, a low dc voltage irreversible electrowetting using a deionized water droplet on superhydrophobic hierarchical Au/Pd nanostructures coated 3C-SiC nanorod surface is demonstrated. Strong adhesion of the water droplet to the surface was achieved by changing its adhesion state from low to high and then very high by electrowetting, thereby changing the contact angle from 160° to 75°. The first irreversible transition of water droplet from Cassie regime to Wenzel regime occurred at 16 V due to the drastic increase of the work of adhesion which was found to be 10 times that of the initial value. Finally, the work of adhesion was increased about 20 times its initial value by increasing the applied voltage up to 24 V.

  17. Development of a Digital Image Projection (DIP) Technique to Quantify Wind Driven Water Droplet/Rivulet Flows over a NACA 0012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Zhang, Kai

    2013-11-01

    A digital image projection (DIP) technique is developed to achieve non-intrusive thickness measurements of wind-driven water droplet/rivulet flows. The DIP technique is based on the principle of structured light triangulation in a similar manner as a stereo vision system but replacing one of the cameras for stereo imaging with a digital projector. A grid pattern of known characteristics is projected onto a test object (i.e., the droplet/rivulet over the test plate). Due to 3D shape profile of the test object, the projected grid pattern is deformed seen from a perspective different from the projection axis. By comparing the distorted image over the test object and a reference image, the 3D profile of the test object with respect to the reference plane (i.e., the thickness distribution of the droplet/rivulet flow) can be retrieved quantitatively and instantaneously. The DIP system is used to quantify the dynamic shape change and stumbling runback motion of the wind-driven water droplet/rivulet flows over a NACA0012 airfoil. Such information is highly desirable to elucidate the underlying physics to improve our understanding about the surface water transport process pertinent to ice formation and accretion over aircraft wings in atmospheric icing conditions. The research work is funded by NSF and NASA.

  18. Eulerian simulation of interacting PWR sprays: influence of droplet collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foissac, A.; Malet, J. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Saclay (France); Mimouni, S. [Electricite de France, Chatou (France); Ruyer, P. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Saclay (France); Feuillebois, F. [Laboratoire d' Informatique pour la Mecanique et les Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Orsay (France); Simonin, O. [Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2011-07-01

    A numerical simulation of the interaction between two real Pressurized Water Reactor containment sprays is performed with a new model implemented into the Eulerian CFD code NEPTUNE{sub C}FD. The water droplet polydispersion in size has been treated with a sectional approach. The influence of collisions between droplets is taken into account with a statistical approach based on the various outcomes of binary collision. Experiments were performed on a new facility, and data obtained are compared with this two-fluid simulation. The results show a good agreement. (author)

  19. Fluid mechanics calculations in physics of droplets – IV: Head-on and off-center numerical collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the finite volume method is employed to simulate the coalescence collision between water drops immersed in a continuous phase (n-heptane. For that purpose, it is chosen a range of values for the velocity of collisions for the finite volume calculations may yield different possible outcomes of the collision process. It can be seen for head-on collisions that when the velocity of collision is 0.2 m/s and 3.5 m/s, the little drop induces the formation of a hole in the bigger drop, until the surface tension forces to restore the circular form of the resulting drop. For a velocity of collision of 16.0 m/s, the little drop deforms the bigger one, and the system is converted into a thin ligament with the evolution of the dynamics. In this case, a little mass of n-heptane is trapped between the two drops, but at the end of the dynamics it drains to the continuous phase. For off-center collisions, two different values for the velocity of collisions were chosen, and the drops exhibit a lot of waves on the droplets’ surface. The streamlines are calculated for the process of coalescence of drops. These streamlines allow the understanding of the dynamics of the droplets immersed on the n-heptane phase. The effect of the interfacial tension it is showed due to the oscillations that the droplet exhibits. When the coalescence has begun, the streamlines form circular patterns at the zone of contact between the drops which explain the increment of the thickness of the bridge structure of the fluid between the two drops. At the end of the dynamics, when the velocity is of 0.2 m/s, the bigger drop reaches a circular form approximately, but when the velocity is of 3.5 m/s the drop reaches an elongated form.

  20. Droplet sampling of an oil-based and two water-based antievaporant ultra-low volume insecticide formulations using Teflon- and magnesium oxide-coated slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskopoulou, Alexandra; Latham, Mark D; Pereira, Roberto M; Koehler, Philip G

    2013-06-01

    We estimated the diameters below which 50% and 90% of the volume of droplets exist (Dv50 and Dv90, respectively) of 1 oil-based (Permanone 30-30) and 2 water-based (AquaReslin, Aqua-K-Othrine) antievaporant aerosols (with the Film Forming Aqueous Spray Technology [FFAST]) using Teflon- and magnesium oxide (MgO)-coated slides and determined whether the aging of the droplets on the slides (up to 60 min) exhibited any significant effect on Dv50 and Dv90 calculations. There were no significant differences in either Dv50 or Dv90 estimates on MgO-coated slides at 0 min and 60 min for all 3 products tested. On Teflon-coated slides, the only product that showed significant difference between 0 min and 60 min in both Dv50 and Dv90 estimates was Aqua-K-Othrine, perhaps due to a difference in formulation components. Specifically, both values corresponding to Dv50 and Dv90 at 60 min decreased by approximately 50% when compared to the values at 0 min. For the other 2 products, AquaReslin and Permanone, aging of droplets on Teflon up to 60 min did not have any significant effect on Dv50 and Dv90 values. To further investigate the behavior of Aqua-K-Othrine droplets on Teflon-coated slides we observed the droplets immediately after spraying and at 10-min intervals under different conditions of temperature and humidity. The majority of the shrinkage occurred within the 1st 10 min after impaction on the slides under all conditions tested. So in most field situations where slides are read several hours or days after collection, this shrinkage would not be observed. The MgO-coated slides should be the preferred field method for sampling droplets of Aqua-K-Othirne with the FFAST antievaporant technology.

  1. Simultaneous visualization of oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets in serpentine fuel cell during power generation for understanding reaction distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanohashi, Kazuhiro; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Ueda, Toshihide; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the reaction distributions inside a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is essential for the higher performance and durability. We have developed a new see-through cell and visualized the distributions of oxygen partial pressure and current density inside a running PEFC at the temperature of 40 and 80 °C and the relative humidity of 53%. The oxygen utilization was changed from 0% to 80% by changing the current density. At higher oxygen utilizations, the current density was higher and therefore the water generation. Generated water droplets in the flow channel were also visualized, allowing for the simultaneous visualization of the distribution of the oxygen partial pressure, current density, and water droplets. By combining the observations of all three parameters, the reactions inside a membrane-electrode assembly were discussed.

  2. Comparison of drop size and velocity measurements by a laser precipitation meter and low-speed photography for an agriculture sprinkler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinetic energy of water droplets has a substantial effect on development of a soil surface seal and infiltration rate of bare soil. Methods for measuring sprinkler droplet size and velocity needed to calculate droplet kinetic energy have been developed and tested over the past 50 years, each with ad...

  3. Size-Controlled Water-Soluble Ag Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez-Vera, J. M.; Galvez, N.; Sanchez, P; A. J. Mota; Trasobares Llorente, Susana; Hernandez, J.C.; Calvino Gámez, José Juan

    2007-01-01

    Ag nanoparticles of two different sizes (1 and 4 nm) were prepared within an apoferritin cavity by using an Ag+-loaded apoferritin as a nanoconfined environment for their construction. The initial amount of Ag' ions injected in the apoferritin cavity dictates the size of the final Ag particles. The protein shell prevents bulk aggregation of the metal particles, which renders them water soluble and extremely stable.

  4. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Micron-sized liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets are currently being investigated as activatable agents for medical imaging and cancer therapy. After injection into the bloodstream, superheated PFC droplets can be vaporized to a gas phase for ultrasound imaging, or for cancer therapy via targeted drug delivery and vessel occlusion. Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV). In order to facilitate ODV of PFC droplets which have negligible absorption in the infrared spectrum, optical absorbing nanoparticles were incorporated into the droplet. In this study, micron-sized PFC droplets loaded with silica-coated lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were evaluated using a 1064 nm laser and ultra-high frequency photoacoustic ultrasound (at 200 and 375 MHz). The photoacoustic response was proportional to nanoparticle loading and successful optical droplet vaporization of individual PFC droplets was confirmed using photoacoustic, acoustic, and optical measurements. A minimum laser fluence of 1.4 J/cm(2) was required to vaporize the droplets. The vaporization of PFC droplets via laser irradiation can lead to the activation of PFC agents in tissues previously not accessible using standard ultrasound-based techniques.

  5. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior.

  6. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Cole

    Full Text Available High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above, the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above, the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  7. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Krystal; Roessler, Christian G; Mulé, Elizabeth A; Benson-Xu, Emma J; Mullen, Jeffrey D; Le, Benjamin A; Tieman, Alanna M; Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above), the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above), the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  8. The analysis of size-segregated cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC data and its implications for cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paramonov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambient aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei and hygroscopic properties were measured with a size-segregated CCNC (cloud condensation nuclei counter in a boreal environment of southern Finland at the SMEAR (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II station. The instrumental setup operated at five levels of supersaturation S covering a range from 0.1–1% and measured particles with a size range of 20–300 nm; a total of 29 non-consecutive months of data are presented. The median critical diameter Dc ranged from 150 nm at S of 0.1% to 46 nm at S of 1.0%. The median aerosol hygroscopicity parameter κ ranged from 0.41 at S of 0.1% to 0.14 at S of 1.0%, indicating that ambient aerosol in Hyytiälä is less hygroscopic than the global continental or European continental averages. It is, however, more hygroscopic than the ambient aerosol in an Amazon rainforest, a European high Alpine site or a forested mountainous site. A fairly low hygroscopicity in Hyytiälä is likely a result of a large organic fraction present in the aerosol mass comparative to other locations within Europe. A considerable difference in particle hygroscopicity was found between particles smaller and larger than ~100 nm in diameter, possibly pointing out to the effect of cloud processing increasing κ of particles > 100 nm in diameter. The hygroscopicity of the smaller, ~50 nm particles did not change seasonally, whereas particles with a diameter of ~150 nm showed a decreased hygroscopicity in the summer, likely resulting from the increased VOC emissions of the surrounding boreal forest and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. For the most part, no diurnal patterns of aerosol hygroscopic properties were found. Exceptions to this were the weak diurnal patterns of small, ~50 nm particles in the spring and summer, when a peak in hygroscopicity around noon was observed. No difference in CCN activation and hygroscopic properties was found on days with or

  9. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater.

  10. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Dongwei

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  11. Analysis of Completely Prevaporized Spray Flames with Water/Octane Core/Shell Structured Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yao Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies on laminar flame propagation in off-stoichiometric dilute sprays of monodispersed inert or fuel drops had been investigated by large activation energy asymptotics. The present study extends previous theoretical model to consider water/octane core/shell structured drops instead of single-phase drops. The core/shell structured drops are composed of core fluid (water encased by a layer of shell fluid (n-octane. In this study, we only deal with the case that core/shell structured drops are vaporized completely just at flame location. Namely, the discussions of this paper are restricted to the completely prevaporized mode. By varying parameters of core water radius, core-to-shell ratio, the amount of liquid loading, and the stoichiometric ratio (lean or rich burning, we examine the gasification of core water and shell fuel of core/shell structured drops upstream of the bulk flame and its relation to the internal heat transfer. The effects of drop radius, core-to-shell ratio, liquid loading, and overall heat loss or gain on flame propagation flux are reported and discussed.

  12. Sophisticated compound droplets on fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Droplets on fibers are part of our everyday lives. Indeed, many phenomena involve drops and fibers such as the formation of dew droplets on a spiderweb, the trapping of water droplets on cactus spines or the dyeing of cotton or wool fibers. Therefore, this topic has been widely studied in the recent years and it appears that droplets on fibers can be the starting point for an open digital microfluidics. We study the behavior of soapy water droplets on a fiber array. When a droplet slides along a vertical fiber and encounters a horizontal fiber, it can either stick there or continue its way. In the latter case, the droplet releases a tiny residue. We study the volume of these residues depending on the geometry of the node. By using this technique, a large number of small droplets can be trapped at the nodes of a fiber array. These residues can be encapsulated and collected by an oil droplet in order to create a multicompound droplet. Moreover, by using optical fibers, we can provoke and detect the fluorescence of the inner droplets. Fibers provide therefore an original way to study compound droplets and multiple reactions. F. Weyer is financially supported by an FNRS grant. This work is also supported by the FRFC 2.4504.12.

  13. Validation of CTF Droplet Entrainment and Annular/Mist Closure Models using Riso Steam/Water Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report summarizes the work done to validate the droplet entrainment and de-entrainment models as well as two-phase closure models in the CTF code by comparison with experimental data obtained at Riso National Laboratory. The Riso data included a series of over 250 steam/water experiments that were performed in both tube and annulus geometries over a range of various pressures and outlet qualities. Experimental conditions were set so that the majority of cases were in the annular/mist ow regime. Measurements included liquid lm ow rate, droplet ow rate, lm thickness, and two-phase pressure drop. CTF was used to model 180 of the tubular geometry cases, matching experimental geometry, outlet pressure, and outlet ow quality to experimental values. CTF results were compared to the experimental data at the outlet of the test section in terms of vapor and entrained liquid ow fractions, pressure drop per unit length, and liquid lm thickness. The entire process of generating CTF input decks, running cases, extracting data, and generating comparison plots was scripted using Python and Matplotlib for a completely automated validation process. All test cases and scripting tools have been committed to the COBRA-TF master repository and selected cases have been added to the continuous testing system to serve as regression tests. The dierences between the CTF- and experimentally-calculated ow fraction values were con- sistent with previous calculations by Wurtz, who applied the same entrainment correlation to the same data. It has been found that CTF's entrainment/de-entrainment predictive capability in the annular/mist ow regime for this particular facility is comparable to the licensed industry code, COBRAG. While lm and droplet predictions are generally good, it has been found that accuracy is diminished at lower ow qualities. This nding is consistent with the noted deciencies in the Wurtz entrainment model employed by CTF. The CTF predicted two-phase pressure drop in

  14. Arabidopsis lipid drop-associated protein (LDAP) - interacting protein (LDIP) influences lipid droplet size and neutral lipid homeostasis in both leaves and seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyc, Michal; Cai, Yingqi; Gidda, Satinder K; Yurchenko, Olga; Park, Sunjung; Kretzschmar, Franziska K; Ischebeck, Till; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H; Chapman, Kent D; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T

    2017-10-30

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all types of plant cells; they are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum and function as a repository for neutral lipids, as well as serving in lipid remodelling and signalling. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation, steady-state maintenance and turnover of plant LDs, particularly in non-seed tissues, are relatively unknown. Previously, we showed that the LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) are a family of plant-specific, LD surface-associated coat proteins that are required for proper biogenesis of LDs and neutral lipid homeostasis in vegetative tissues. Here, we screened a yeast two-hybrid library using the Arabidopsis LDAP3 isoform as 'bait' in an effort to identify other novel LD protein constituents. One of the candidate LDAP3-interacting proteins was Arabidopsis At5g16550, which is a plant-specific protein of unknown function that we termed LDIP (LDAP-interacting protein). Using a combination of biochemical and cellular approaches, we show that LDIP targets specifically to the LD surface, contains a discrete amphipathic α-helical targeting sequence, and participates in both homotypic and heterotypic associations with itself and LDAP3, respectively. Analysis of LDIP T-DNA knockdown and knockout mutants showed a decrease in LD abundance and an increase in variability of LD size in leaves, with concomitant increases in total neutral lipid content. Similar phenotypes were observed in plant seeds, which showed enlarged LDs and increases in total amounts of seed oil. Collectively, these data identify LDIP as a new player in LD biology that modulates both LD size and cellular neutral lipid homeostasis in both leaves and seeds. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development of a model for spray evaporation based on droplet analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Q.

    2016-08-20

    Extreme flash evaporation occurs when superheated liquid is sprayed into a low pressure zone. This method has high potential to improve the performance of thermally-driven desalination plants. To enable a more in-depth understanding on flash evaporation of a superheated feed water spray, a theoretical model has been developed with key considerations given to droplet motion and droplet size distribution. The model has been validated against 14 experimental data sets from literature sources to within 12% discrepancy. This model is capable of accurately predicting the water productivity and thermal efficiency of existing spray evaporator under specific operating conditions. Employing this model, the effect of several design parameters on system performance was investigated. Key results revealed that smaller droplet enabled faster evaporation process while higher initial droplet velocity promoted water productivity. Thermal utilization marginally changes with the degree of superheat, which renders a quick design calculation of the brine temperature without the need for iterations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Size-selecting effect of water on fluorescent silicon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torricelli, G; Akraiam, A; Von Haeften, K, E-mail: kvh6@le.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-05

    Silicon clusters were produced by gas aggregation in vacuum and co-deposited with water vapour onto a cold target where the water vapour froze. Melting of the ice yielded fluorescent silicon nanoparticles suspended in water which were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PL spectrum showed a prominent band at 420 nm and other, less intense bands at shorter wavelengths. No fluorescence was observed below 275 nm. The shortest wavelength observed was related to a silicon cluster diameter of 0.9 nm using a simple particle-in-a-box model. Drops of the suspension were also deposited on freshly cleaved HOPG and investigated by AFM. The images showed single and agglomerated clusters with heights of typically 0.6 up to 2 nm. The sizes displayed by our measurements are not correlated to the average sizes that result from gas aggregation, indicating a size-selecting effect of the water suspension. The cluster-cluster interaction in water is governed by repulsion due to thermal energy and attraction due to van der Waals forces. For very small clusters repulsion dominates; at 3 nm diameter the two forces are balanced. We identify this stable phase of small clusters as the origin of exceptionally stable fluorescence.

  17. Bacterial encountering with oil droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian; Molaei, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Encountering of microorganisms with rising oil droplets in aqueous environments is the first and one of the critical steps in the biodegradation of crude oil. Several factors such as droplet sizes, rising velocity, surfactant, and motility of bacteria are expected to affect the encounter rate. We establish well controlled microfluidic devices by applying layer-by-layer technique that allows us to produce horizontal micro droplets with different sizes. The encounter rates of passive particles, motile and non-motile bacteria with these droplets are measured by high speed microscopy. The effects of mobility and motility of these particles on encounter rates are assessed quantitatively. Meanwhile, we visualize reorientation of the particle due to flow filed around the oil droplet. Results show that the motile bacteria have higher probabilities to interact with an oil droplet compare to the passive particles. Ongoing analyses focus on the effect of shear rates, angular dispersion, curvatures of streamlines, and the swimming velocity of bacteria. The ratios of the encounter area to the entire droplet surface at various flow regimes will also been measured. GoMRI.

  18. Solar absorption by Mie resonances in cloud droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Charles S. Zender; Talamantes, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that resonant absorption of sunlight by cloud droplets may constitute a significant and unaccounted-for solar energy sink in the atmosphere. We spectrally resolve, for the first time, all solar absorption, including sharp resonances, in typical liquid water clouds. Resolving all sharp resonances requires a resolution in size parameter χ=2π r/λ (r—droplet radius, λ—incident wavelength) of about 10-7. The canonical integration resolution Δχ≈10-1 produces absor...

  19. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms.

  20. Oxidation of biogenic and water-soluble compounds in aqueous and organic aerosol droplets by ozone: a kinetic and product analysis approach using laser Raman tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Martin D; Thompson, Katherine C; Ward, Andrew D; Pfrang, Christian; Hughes, Brian R

    2008-01-01

    The results of an experimental study into the oxidative degradation of proxies for atmospheric aerosol are presented. We demonstrate that the laser Raman tweezers method can be used successfully to obtain uptake coefficients for gaseous oxidants on individual aqueous and organic droplets, whilst the size and composition of the droplets is simultaneously followed. A laser tweezers system was used to trap individual droplets containing an unsaturated organic compound in either an aqueous or organic (alkane) solvent. The droplet was exposed to gas-phase ozone and the reaction kinetics and products followed using Raman spectroscopy. The reactions of three different organic compounds with ozone were studied: fumarate anions, benzoate anions and alpha-pinene. The fumarate and benzoate anions in aqueous solution were used to represent components of humic-like substances, HULIS; alpha-pinene in an alkane solvent was studied as a proxy for biogenic aerosol. The kinetic analysis shows that for these systems the diffusive transport and mass accommodation of ozone is relatively fast, and that liquid-phase diffusion and reaction are the rate determining steps. Uptake coefficients, gamma, were found to be (1.1 +/- 0.7) x 10(-5), (1.5 +/- 0.7) x 10(-5) and (3.0-7.5) x 10(-3) for the reactions of ozone with the fumarate, benzoate and alpha-pinene containing droplets, respectively. Liquid-phase bimolecular rate coefficients for reactions of dissolved ozone molecules with fumarate, benzoate and alpha-pinene were also obtained: kfumarate = (2.7 +/- 2) x 10(5), kbenzoate = (3.5 +/- 3) x 10(5) and kalpha-pinene = (1-3) x 10(7) dm3 mol(-1) s(-1). The droplet size was found to remain stable over the course of the oxidation process for the HULIS-proxies and for the oxidation of alpha-pinene in pentadecane. The study of the alpha-pinene/ozone system is the first using organic seed particles to show that the hygroscopicity of the particle does not increase dramatically over the course of

  1. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  2. A dual-core double emulsion platform for osmolarity-controlled microreactor triggered by coalescence of encapsulated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuewei; Hou, Likai; Ren, Yukun; Deng, Xiaokang; Lang, Qi; Jia, Yankai; Hu, Qingming; Tao, Ye; Liu, Jiangwei; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has provided a means to generate multi-core double emulsions, which are versatile platforms for microreactors in materials science, synthetic biology, and chemical engineering. To provide new opportunities for double emulsion platforms, here, we report a glass capillary microfluidic approach to first fabricate osmolarity-responsive Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W) double emulsion containing two different inner droplets/cores and to then trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets precisely. To achieve this, we independently control the swelling speed and size of each droplet in the dual-core double emulsion by controlling the osmotic pressure between the inner droplets and the collection solutions. When the inner two droplets in one W/O/W double emulsion swell to the same size and reach the instability of the oil film interface between the inner droplets, core-coalescence happens and this coalescence process can be controlled precisely. This microfluidic methodology enables the generation of highly monodisperse dual-core double emulsions and the osmolarity-controlled swelling behavior provides new stimuli to trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets. Such swelling-caused core-coalescence behavior in dual-core double emulsion establishes a novel microreactor for nanoliter-scale reactions, which can protect reaction materials and products from being contaminated or released.

  3. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.asinari@polito.it

    2016-04-29

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid–liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid–liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics. - Highlights: • Properties of the water hydration layer are investigated. • New relation between extension of solid size and hydration layer established. • Possible impact on rational design of nanosuspensions.

  4. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion I. Experiments for derivation of droplet atomisation correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-04-11

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future.

  5. Ultrahigh throughput microfluidic platform for in-air production of microscale droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirandazi, Pooyan; Healy, John; Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    2017-11-01

    In-air droplet formation inside microfluidic networks is an alternative technique to the conventional in-liquid systems for creating uniform, microscale droplets. Recent works have highlighted and quantified the use of a gaseous continuous phase for controlled generation of droplets in the Dripping regime in planar structures. Here we demonstrate a new class of non-planar droplet-based systems which rely on controlled breakup of a liquid microjet within a high speed flow of air inside a confined microfluidic flow-focusing PDMS channel. We investigate the physics of confined gas-liquid flows and the effect of geometry on the behavior of a liquid water jet in a gaseous flow. Droplet breakup in the Jetting regime is studied both numerically and experimentally and the results are compared. We show droplet production capability at rates higher than 100 KHz with droplets ranging from 15-30 μm in diameter and a polydispersity index of less than 15%. This work represents an important investigation into the Jetting regime in confined microchannels. The ability to control jet behavior, generation rate, and droplet size in gas-liquid microflows will further expand the potential applications of this system for high throughput operations in material synthesis and biochemical analysis. We acknowledge funding support from NSF CAREER Award Grant CBET-1522841.

  6. Droplet Deformation Prediction with the Droplet Deormation and Break Up Model (DDB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  7. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  8. Combustion dynamics of low vapour pressure nanofuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Khushboo; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-07-01

    Multiscale combustion dynamics, shape oscillations, secondary atomization, and precipitate formation have been elucidated for low vapour pressure nanofuel [n-dodecane seeded with alumina nanoparticles (NPs)] droplets. Dilute nanoparticle loading rates (0.1%-1%) have been considered. Contrary to our previous studies of ethanol-water blend (high vapour pressure fuel), pure dodecane droplets do not exhibit internal boiling after ignition. However, variation in surface tension due to temperature causes shape deformations for pure dodecane droplets. In the case of nanofuels, intense heat release from the enveloping flame leads to the formation of micron-size aggregates (of alumina NPS) which serve as nucleation sites promoting heterogeneous boiling. Three boiling regimes (A, B, and C) have been identified with varying bubble dynamics. We have deciphered key mechanisms responsible for the growth, transport, and rupture of the bubbles. Bubble rupture causes ejections of liquid droplets termed as secondary atomization. Ejection of small bubbles (mode 1) resembles the classical vapour bubble collapse mechanism near a flat free surface. However, large bubbles induce severe shape deformations as well as bulk oscillations. Rupture of large bubbles results in high speed liquid jet formation which undergoes Rayleigh-Plateau tip break-up. Both modes contribute towards direct fuel transfer from the droplet surface to flame envelope bypassing diffusion limitations. Combustion lifetime of nanofuel droplets consequently has two stages: stage I (where bubble dynamics are dominant) and stage II (formation of gelatinous mass due to continuous fuel depletion; NP agglomeration). In the present work, variation of flame dynamics and spatio-temporal heat release (HR) have been analysed using high speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. Fluctuations in droplet shape and flame heat release are found to be well correlated. Droplet flame is bifurcated in two zones (I and II). Flame response is

  9. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  10. Study of the Internal Flow and Evaporation Characteristic Inside a Water Droplet on a Vertical Vibrating Hydrophobic Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Seok; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Thermal Marangoni flow has been observed inside droplets on heated surfaces, finally resulting in a coffee stain effect. This study aims to visualize and control the thermal Marangoni flow by employing periodic vertical vibration. The variations in the contact angle and internal volume of the droplet as it evaporates is observed by using a combination of continuous light and a still camera. With regard to the internal velocity, the particle image velocimetry system is applied to visualize the internal thermal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the internal temperature gradient and surface tension on the surface of a droplet, the theoretical model based on the conduction and convection theory of heat transfer is applied. Thus, the internal velocity increases with an increase in plate temperature. The flow directions of the Marangoni and gravitational flows are opposite, and hence, it may be possible to control the coffee stain effect.

  11. A flow-free droplet-based device for high throughput polymorphic crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Mo; Zhang, Dapeng; Chen, Wang; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2015-06-21

    Crystallization is one of the most crucial steps in the process of pharmaceutical formulation. In recent years, emulsion-based platforms have been developed and broadly adopted to generate high quality products. However, these conventional approaches such as stirring are still limited in several aspects, e.g., unstable crystallization conditions and broad size distribution; besides, only simple crystal forms can be produced. In this paper, we present a new flow-free droplet-based formation process for producing highly controlled crystallization with two examples: (1) NaCl crystallization reveals the ability to package saturated solution into nanoliter droplets, and (2) glycine crystallization demonstrates the ability to produce polymorphic crystallization forms by controlling the droplet size and temperature. In our process, the saturated solution automatically fills the microwell array powered by degassed bulk PDMS. A critical oil covering step is then introduced to isolate the saturated solution and control the water dissolution rate. Utilizing surface tension, the solution is uniformly packaged in the form of thousands of isolating droplets at the bottom of each microwell of 50-300 μm diameter. After water dissolution, individual crystal structures are automatically formed inside the microwell array. This approach facilitates the study of different glycine growth processes: α-form generated inside the droplets and γ-form generated at the edge of the droplets. With precise temperature control over nanoliter-sized droplets, the growth of ellipsoidal crystalline agglomerates of glycine was achieved for the first time. Optical and SEM images illustrate that the ellipsoidal agglomerates consist of 2-5 μm glycine clusters with inner spiral structures of ~35 μm screw pitch. Lastly, the size distribution of spherical crystalline agglomerates (SAs) produced from microwells of different sizes was measured to have a coefficient variation (CV) of less than 5%, showing

  12. Immersion Freezing of Water and Aqueous Ammonium Sulfate Droplets Initiated by Humic-Like Substances as a Function of Water Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH4)2SO4 droplets containing leonardite (LEO) and pahokee peat (PP) serving as surrogates for humic-like substances (HULIS) has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere; however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85 to 1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5-15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw and Δaw by 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6×2.5)x104 and (5.4×1.4)x104 cm-2 s-1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by Δaw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and ice nuclei (IN) surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (α(T)-model) to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, α(T)-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free-fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for the entire population (single-α model) is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of α-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Furthermore, when using a single parameterization of α-PDF or active sites

  13. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  14. Sintering of polydisperse viscous droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-03-01

    Sintering—or coalescence—of compacts of viscous droplets is driven by the interfacial tension between the droplets and the interstitial gas phase. The process, which occurs in a range of industrial and natural settings, such as the manufacture of ceramics and the welding of volcanic ash, causes the compact to densify, to become stronger, and to become less permeable. We investigate the role of droplet polydispersivity in sintering dynamics by conducting experiments in which populations of glass spheres with different size distributions are heated to temperatures above the glass transition interval. We quantify the progress of sintering by tracking changes in porosity with time. The sintering dynamics is modeled by treating the system as a random distribution of interstitial gas bubbles shrinking under the action of interfacial tension only. We identify the scaling between the polydispersivity of the initial droplets and the dynamics of bulk densification. The framework that we develop allows the sintering dynamics of arbitrary polydisperse populations of droplets to be predicted if the initial droplet (or particle) size distribution is known.

  15. Non-equilibrium solidification of undercooled droplets during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equilibrium solidification of ... A mathematical model, based on classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation and volume separation of nucleants among droplets size distribution, is described to predict undercooling of droplets. Newtonian heat flow ...

  16. Droplet Microfluidics for the Production of Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics technology is recently a highly interesting platform in material fabrication. Droplets can precisely monitor and control entire material fabrication processes and are superior to conventional bulk techniques. Droplet production is controlled by regulating the channel geometry and flow rates of each fluid. The micro-scale size of droplets results in rapid heat and mass-transfer rates. When used as templates, droplets can be used to develop reproducible and scalable microparticles with tailored sizes, shapes and morphologies, which are difficult to obtain using traditional bulk methods. This technology can revolutionize material processing and application platforms. Generally, microparticle preparation methods involve three steps: (1 the formation of micro-droplets using a microfluidics generator; (2 shaping the droplets in micro-channels; and (3 solidifying the droplets to form microparticles. This review discusses the production of microparticles produced by droplet microfluidics according to their morphological categories, which generally determine their physicochemical properties and applications.

  17. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  18. Indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents by salting-out effect for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshfar, Ali; Khezeli, Tahere

    2014-12-01

    A simple and low-cost method that indirectly suspended droplet microextraction of water-miscible organic solvents (ISDME) by salting-out effect before high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different samples. The ISDME is a combination of salting-out extraction of water-miscible organic solvent and directly suspended droplet microextraction (DSDME). Ninety-five microliters water-miscible organic solvent (1-propanol) was added to a 500-µL sample. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. To produce a steady vortex at the top of the solution, the sample was agitated at 700 rpm using a magnetic stirrer. By the addition of ammonium sulfate (saturated solution) to the homogeneous solution, 1-propanol was separated and collected at the bottom of the steady vortex. Finally, 20 µL 1-propanol was injected into HPLC-UV. The effects of important parameters such as water-miscible organic solvent (type and volume), type of salt, and extraction time were evaluated. Under optimum conditions, the method has a good linear calibration range (0.1 µg/L-300 µg/L), coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.998), low limits of detection (between 0.02 µg/L and 0.27 µg/L), and acceptable recovery (>85.0%). © 2014 SETAC.

  19. Splash Dynamics of Falling Surfactant-Laden Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur; Buitrago, Lewis; Pereyra, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Splashing dynamics is a common issue in oil and gas separation technology. In this study, droplet impact of various surfactant concentrations onto solid and liquid surfaces is studied experimentally using a high-speed imaging analysis. Although this area has been widely studied in the past, there is still not a good understanding of the role of surfactant over droplet impact and characterization of resulting splash dynamics. The experiments are conducted using tap water laden with anionic surfactant. The effects of system parameters on a single droplet impingement such as surfactant concentration (no surfactant, below, at and above critical micelle concentration), parent drop diameter (2-5mm), impact velocity and type of impact surface (thin and deep pool) are investigated. Image analysis technique is shown to be an effective technique for identification of coalescence to splashing transition. In addition, daughter droplets size distributions are analyzed qualitatively in the events of splashing. As expected, it is observed that the formation of secondary droplets is affected by the surfactant concentration. A summary of findings will be discussed.

  20. The dynamics of droplets in moist Rayleigh-Benard turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; van der Voort, Dennis; Kinney, Greg; Cantrell, Will; Shaw, Raymond

    2017-11-01

    Clouds are an intricate part of the climate, and strongly influence atmospheric dynamics and radiative balances. While properties such as cloud albedo and precipitation rate are large scale effects, these properties are determined by dynamics on the microscale, such droplet sizes, liquid water content, etc. The growth of droplets from condensation is dependent on a multitude of parameters, such as aerosol concentration (nucleation sites) and turbulence (scalar fluctuations and coalescence). However, the precise mechanism behind droplet growth and clustering in a cloud environment is still unclear. In this investigation we use a facility called the Pi Chamber to generate a (miniature) cloud in a laboratory setting with known boundary conditions, such as aerosol concentration, temperature, and humidity. Through the use of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) on the droplets generated in the cloud, we can investigate the dynamics of these cloud droplets in the convective (Rayleigh-Benard) turbulence generated through an induced temperature gradient. We show the influence of the temperature gradient and Froude number (gravity forces) on the changing turbulence anisotropy, large scale circulation, and small-scale dissipation rates. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1623429.

  1. DETERMINATION OF ECONOMIC SIZES FOR RC CYLINDRICAL WATER STORAGE TANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneş KOZLUCA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Water storage tanks are built in different shapes and sizes according to needs. Designs of water storage tanks with low costs are quite important for the national economy. Cylindrical and sphere tanks are the most economic types of tanks in terms of material cost. In this study several cylindrical tank designs are made. Then most economic tank radius – tank height ratio is searched by simply changing thickness, height and the radius of the tank considered. Storage capacity of these cylindrical tanks are all the same. All these reinforced tanks have cylindrical reinforced concrete walls fixed at the bottom and free top edge without roof. It is thought that tanks constructed with this optimal ratio will be beneficial.

  2. Segregation in dissolving binary-component sessile droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, E.; Rump, M.; Lyu, Pengyu; Kooij, Ernst S.; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    The dissolution of a single droplet, containing a mixture of oils, in water is experimentally studied. The oils in the droplet varied in terms of their solubility in water and their hydrophobicity. We demonstrate that the polarity of the droplet constituents strongly influences the dissolution

  3. Wind tunnel measurements of the preferential concentration of inertial droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateson, Colin P.; Aliseda, Alberto [University of Washington, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 4000 15th Ave NE, Box 352600, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We describe an experimental setup aimed at studying turbulent-induced droplet collisions in a laboratory setting. Our goal is to reproduce conditions relevant to warm-rain formation in clouds. In these conditions, the trajectories of small inertial droplets are strongly influenced by the background air turbulence, and collisions can potentially explain the droplet growth rates and spectrum broadening observed in this type of clouds. Warm-rain formation is currently under strong scrutiny because it is an important source of uncertainty in atmospheric models. A grid at the entrance of a horizontal wind tunnel produces homogeneous isotropic turbulence at a Re{sub {lambda}} in the range of 400-500. Water droplets are injected from the nodes of the turbulence-inducing grid at a volume fraction ({phi}) of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} and with sizes of 10-200 {mu}m. A complex manifold-injection system was developed to obtain uniform water droplet seeding, in terms of both water content and size distribution. We characterize the resulting droplet-laden turbulent flow, and the statistics of droplet pairs are measured and analyzed. We found that the radial distribution function (RDF), a measure of preferential concentration of droplets that plays a key role in collision kernel models, has a large peak at distances below the Kolmogorov microscale of the turbulence. At very long separations, comparable with the integral length scale of the turbulence, these RDFs show a slow decay to the average probability given by the mean droplet number density. Consistent with this result, conditional analysis shows an increased local concentration of droplets within the inertial length scale ({approx} 10-100 Kolmogorov lengths). These results are in good agreement with previous experiments that found clustering of inertial droplets with St {approx} 1 at scales on the order of 10{eta}. Ultimately, our results support the hypothesis that turbulence-induced preferential concentration and enhanced

  4. Interfacial phenomena in droplet evaporation and nanoparticle-cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohua

    2005-11-01

    The factors affecting droplet evaporation are discussed. It is found that the droplet morphology at a specific temperature is controlled by the physical properties of the liquid itself, such as the molecular weight, density, diffusion coefficient in air, and heat of vaporization. Two processes are included in droplet evaporation: (1) diffusion of liquid molecules into the air (diffusion part) and (2) flow of the liquid molecules from inside the droplet to the free outer shell liquid layer within the liquid-vapor interface (energy part). The diffusion part remains steady during drying and was not sensitive to the variation of temperature. The energy part, however, was an active factor and determined the differences in drop evaporation behaviors. A model is developed to measure the solubility parameters of the solvents via droplet evaporation. Droplets were deposited on Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) covered silicon surfaces and the contact angle and overall drop morphology are observed using a KSV contact angle goniometer as a function of time. OTS is considered a non-absorbing surface for the solvents examined and does not affect the accuracy of the measured results. This method allows determination of the attraction forces between solvent molecules in the condensed phases. The solubility parameter values of droplets containing pure water, methanol, ethanol and butanol are measured. The test results are independent of the droplet size. The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA is studied. Simultaneously, the DNA re-distribution and adsorption kinetics are measured by confocal microscopy. The DNA droplets are stained with ethidium bromide solution and deposited on OTS covered silicon surfaces. The results showed that the drying behavior depended on the DNA concentration. During drying, DNA relocation inside of the drop affects the internal forces of the liquid. A ring is formed at the air/solid/liquid interface. The absorbed amount of DNA was obtained by

  5. Habitats for Shaped Droplets in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R.; Hanczyc, M. M.; Smoukov, S. K.

    2017-11-01

    Cooled oil droplets are flat and polygonal, like some Archaea and Bacteria. Shaped droplet protocells would constrain habitats for the origin of life to those where oil/water emulsions can form, remain, concentrate, and undergo temperature cycling.

  6. The dynamics of milk droplet-droplet collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Kooiman, Roeland F.; Padding, Johan T.; Buist, Kay A.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which in turn depends on the outcome of a collision between droplets. The high total solids (TS) content and the presence of milk proteins cause a relatively high viscosity of the fed milk concentrates, which is expected to largely influence the collision outcomes of drops inside the spray. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict and control the outcomes of binary droplet collisions. Only a few studies report on droplet collisions of high viscous liquids and no work is available on droplet collisions of milk concentrates. The current study therefore aims to obtain insight into the effect of viscosity on the outcome of binary collisions between droplets of milk concentrates. To cover a wide range of viscosity values, three milk concentrates (20, 30 and 46% TS content) are investigated. An experimental set-up is used to generate two colliding droplet streams with consistent droplet size and spacing. A high-speed camera is used to record the trajectories of the droplets. The recordings are processed by Droplet Image Analysis in MATLAB to determine the relative velocities and the impact geometries for each individual collision. The collision outcomes are presented in a regime map dependent on the dimensionless impact parameter and Weber ( We) number. The Ohnesorge ( Oh) number is introduced to describe the effect of viscosity from one liquid to another and is maintained constant for each regime map by using a constant droplet diameter ( d ˜ 700 μ m). In this work, a phenomenological model is proposed to describe the boundaries demarcating the coalescence-separation regimes. The collision dynamics and outcome of milk concentrates are compared with aqueous glycerol

  7. Liquid-in-gas droplet microfluidics; experimental characterization of droplet morphology, generation frequency, and monodispersity in a flow-focusing microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirandazi, Pooyan; Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic techniques for production of uniform droplets usually rely on the use of two immiscible liquids (e.g. water-in-oil emulsions). It has been shown recently that a continuous gas flow instead of a second liquid carrier can be used as an alternative approach in droplet microfluidics. In this work we experimentally investigate the generation of liquid water droplets within air in flow-focusing configurations. Over a wide range of flow conditions we identify six distinct flow regimes inside the microchannel: Co-flowing, Threading, Plugging, Dripping, Multi-Satellite Formation, and Jetting. Flow regimes and their transitions are plotted and characterized based on the Weber number (We) of the system. We further investigate the impact of liquid microchannel size on the flow maps. Generation frequency, morphology, and monodispersity of the droplets are characterized in more detail in the Dripping regime. Generation frequency can be related to the product of the liquid and gas flow rates. However, droplet morphology (length and width) is more dependent on the gas flow rate. We demonstrate the production of monodisperse droplets (d lab-on-a-chip systems for a variety of applications in biochemical research and material synthesis.

  8. A Fractal Model for the Maximum Droplet Diameter in Gas-Liquid Mist Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hua Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution characteristics of liquid droplet size are described using the fractal theory for liquid droplet size distribution in gas-liquid mist flow. Thereby, the fractal expression of the maximum droplet diameter is derived. The fractal model for maximum droplet diameter is obtained based on the internal relationship between maximum droplet diameter and the droplet fractal dimension, which is obtained by analyzing the balance between total droplet surface energy and total gas turbulent kinetic energy. Fractal model predictions of maximum droplet diameter agree with the experimental data. Maximum droplet diameter and droplet fractal dimension are both found to be related to the superficial velocity of gas and liquid. Maximum droplet diameter decreases with an increase in gas superficial velocity but increases with an increase in liquid superficial velocity. Droplet fractal dimension increases with an increase in gas superficial velocity but decreases with an increase in liquid superficial velocity. These are all consistent with the physical facts.

  9. Self-propelled oil droplets consuming "fuel" surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyota, Taro; Maru, Naoto; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2009-01-01

    A micrometer-sized oil droplet of 4-octylaniline containing 5 mol % of an amphiphilic catalyst exhibited a self-propelled motion, producing tiny oil droplets, in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic precursor of 4-octylaniline. The tiny droplets on the surface of the self-propelled droplet were...... conveyed to the posterior surface and released to the aqueous solution. Thus the persistent movement becomes possible in this chemical system, because the processing of chemical energy to mechanical movement proceeds by consuming exogenous fuel, not consuming the oil droplet itself. The mechanism...... of the unidirectional motion is hypothesized in terms of an asymmetric interfacial tension around the surface of the oil droplet....

  10. A Linear Relationship between Crystal Size and Fragment Binding Time Observed Crystallographically: Implications for Fragment Library Screening Using Acoustic Droplet Ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Krystal; Roessler, Christian G.; Mulé, Elizabeth A.; Benson-Xu, Emma J.; Mullen, Jeffrey D.; Le, Benjamin A.; Tieman, Alanna M.; Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handl...

  11. A Microfluidic Method to Assess Emulsion Stability in Crude-Oil/Water Separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The control of emulsion stability and droplet size is of crucial importance for oil production, especially for the processes of crude/oil water separation and cleanup of produced water. To recover pure oil and water, coalescence between droplets needs to take place, the extent of which will depend

  12. Nano-sized water-in-oil-in-water emulsion enhances intestinal absorption of calcein, a high solubility and low permeability compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kenjiro; Takarada, Nobuo; Takada, Kanji

    2010-02-01

    Our goal was to develop safe and stable multilayer emulsions capable of enhancing intestinal absorption of biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class III drugs. First, w/o emulsions were prepared using calcein as a model BCS class III compound and condensed ricinoleic acid tetraglycerin ester as a hydrophobic emulsifier. Then water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsions were prepared with shirasu porous glass (SPG) membranes. Particle size analyses and calcein leakage from oil droplets in w/o/w emulsions led us to select stearic acid hexaglycerin esters (HS-11) and Gelucire 44/14 as hydrophilic emulsifiers. Analyses of the absorption-enhancing effects of w/o/w emulsions on intestinal calcein absorption in rats showed that calcein bioavailability after intraduodenal (i.d.) administration of HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) w/o/w emulsions prepared with 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs was significantly higher than that of the calcein control. However, serum calcein concentration vs. time profiles after i.d. administration of w/o/w emulsions prepared with 1.1-microm and 30-microm pore-sized SPGs and an emulsion prepared with a calcein-containing outer water phase were comparable to control profiles. These results suggested that HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+PVA are safe outer water phase additives and that 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs are important for preparing w/o/w emulsions that enhanced intestinal calcein absorption. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Multiple Condensate Droplets on Hierarchical Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Patel, Ravi S; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2016-01-04

    Coalescence-induced jumping of condensate droplets from a superhydrophobic surface with hierarchical micro/nanoscale roughness is quantitatively characterized. Experimental observations show that the condensate droplet jumping is induced by coalescence of multiple droplets of different sizes, and that the coalesced droplet trajectories typically deviate from the surface normal. A depth-from-defocus image processing technique is developed to track the out-of-plane displacement of the jumping droplets, so as to accurately measure the droplet size and velocity. The results demonstrate that the highest jumping velocity is achieved when two droplets coalesce. The jumping velocity decreases gradually with an increase in the number of coalescing droplets, despite the greater potential surface energy released upon coalescence. A general theoretical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, surface adhesion, line tension, the initial droplet wetting states, and the number and sizes of the coalescing droplets is developed to explain the trends of droplet jumping velocity observed in the experiments.

  14. Microfluidic actuation of insulating liquid droplets in a parallel-plate device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Jones, T. B.

    2011-06-01

    In droplet-based microfluidics, the simultaneous movement and manipulation of dielectric and aqueous droplets on a single platform is important. The actuation forces on both dielectric and aqueous droplets can be calculated with an electromechanical model using an equivalent RC circuit. This model predicts that dielectric droplet actuation can be made compatible with electrowetting-based water droplet manipulation if the oil droplet is immersed in water. Operations such as transporting, splitting, merging, and dispensing of dielectric droplets at voltages less than 100 V are demonstrated in a parallel-plate structure. Such capability opens the way to fully automated assembly line formation of single-emulsion droplets.

  15. Non-equilibrium solidification of undercooled droplets during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Thermal history of droplets associated with gas atomization of melt has been investigated. A mathematical model, based on classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation and volume separation of nucleants among droplets size distribution, is described to predict undercooling of droplets. Newtonian heat flow.

  16. Effect of confinement on droplet coalescence in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongju; Cardinaels, Ruth; Moldenaers, Paula

    2009-11-17

    The effect of confinement on the coalescence of Newtonian (polydimethylsiloxane) droplets in a Newtonian (polyisobutylene) matrix is investigated experimentally. A counter rotating parallel plate device, equipped with a microscopy setup, is used to visualize two interacting droplets during shear flow. The ratio of droplet-to-matrix viscosity is kept constant at 1.1. Droplet collisions are studied for a range of droplet sizes, both in bulk conditions and for gap spacings that are comparable to the droplet size. As a result, we present the first quantitative experimental data set for the coalescence of two equal-sized droplets in a pure shear flow with varying degrees of confinement. Compared to bulk conditions, for droplets smaller than roughly 0.2 times the gap spacing, a slight degree of confinement only decreases the orientation angle at which the droplets coalesce whereas the critical conditions for coalescence remain unaltered. For more confined conditions, the critical capillary number up to which coalescence can occur, increases. Therefore, confinement clearly promotes coalescence. In addition, the droplet trajectories, the time-dependent orientation angle of the droplet pair, and the droplet deformation prior to the coalescence event are systematically studied, and a comparison between the confined and the unconfined situation is provided. It is shown that the presence of two parallel walls can induce changes in the flow field around the droplet pair, which cause an increase of the interaction time between the droplets. Moreover, for sufficiently confined droplets, the additional force originating from the presence of the walls becomes comparable to the hydrodynamic force on the droplet pair, thus influencing the drainage of the matrix film between the droplet surfaces.

  17. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  18. Dynamics and structure of water-bitumen mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Greenfield, Michael L.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Systems of Cooee bitumen and water up to 4% mass are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The cohesive energy density of the system is shown to decrease with an increasing water content. This decrease is due mainly to an increase in the interaction energy which is not high enough...... to counterbalance the increase in volume due to the addition of water. It is not due to a decrease of interaction energy between the slightly polar asphaltene molecules. The water molecules tend to form a droplet in bitumen. The size and the distribution of sizes of the droplets are quantified, with multiple...... droplets being more stable at the highest temperature simulated. The droplet is mainly located close to the saturates molecules in bitumen. Finally, it is shown that the water dynamics is much slower in bitumen than in pure water because it is governed by the diffusion of the droplet and not of the single...

  19. Droplet polydispersity and shape fluctuations in AOT [bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt] microemulsions studied by contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arleth, L.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Microemulsions consisting of AOT water, and decane or iso-octane are studied in the region of the phase diagram where surfactant covered water droplets are formed. The polydispersity and shape fluctuations of the microemulsion droplets are determined and compared in the two different alkane types....... A polydispersity index (sigma /R Of the Gaussian size distribution) of 16% and an average axis ratio of the droplets of 1.56 is found in the AOT/D2O/decane microemulsion. In the AOT/D2O/iso-octane system the polydispersity index is also 16% while the axis ratio is 1.72. The bending elastic constant kappa...

  20. Chemical composition of polluted mist droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Manabu; Kamijo, Kosuke; Nanzai, Ben; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2017-12-01

    Mist events occur frequently worldwide, but the chemical characteristics of the mist droplets has never been investigated because of very low liquid water contents of them. We estimated the concentrations of the mist water, the average concentration of the mist droplets, via the determination of water-soluble components of the coarse aerosol and the observation of the imprints of the droplets on a MgO-coated glass slide. The pH of the mist water was estimated from the equilibrium calculation with the data of the Gran plot of the solution of the dissolved coarse particles, the inorganic ion concentrations of aerosol larger than 10 μm, and the estimated volume of mist water. The mist water was measured as about 1 eq/L total concentration for typical inorganic ions and about pH 4.5 in Yokohama. Such highly concentrated mist droplets may have intense environmental effects.

  1. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively...... that the transport characteristic of droplets due to coughing is highly influenced by their size. Although the effects of gravity or inertia on small droplets (transport, droplets of > 40 μm are significantly affected by gravity and soon fall...

  2. Optovibrometry: tracking changes in the surface tension and viscosity of multicomponent droplets in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Victoria C; Sharp, James S

    2016-10-26

    An instrument was developed for measuring real time changes in the surface tension and viscosity of multicomponent droplets of miscible liquids and other soft materials. Droplets containing glycerol and water were supported on superamphiphobic surfaces and vibrated by applying a short mechanical impulse. Laser light was refracted through the droplets and allowed to fall on the surface of a photodiode. Time dependent variations in the intensity measured by the photodiode during vibration were used to monitor the decay of the droplet oscillations. The frequencies and spectral widths of the droplet vibrational resonances were then obtained from Fourier transforms of these time dependent intensity signals. A recently developed model of viscoelastic droplet vibration was used along with these values and measurements of the drop dimensions to extract the surface tension and viscosity of the drops as they evaporated. Collection of data was automated and values of frequency, spectral width, drop size, surface tension and viscosity were obtained with a time resolution of three seconds over a period of thirty minutes. The values of surface tension and viscosity obtained were shown to be in good agreement with literature values obtained from bulk glycerol/water solutions; thus validating the technique for wider application to other multicomponent liquids and soft matter systems.

  3. Droplet-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjiv; Srisa-Art, Monpichar; Scott, Steven; Asthana, Amit; Cass, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics or digital microfluidics is a subclass of microfluidic devices, wherein droplets are generated using active or passive methods. The active method for generation of droplets involves the use of an external factor such as an electric field for droplet generation. Two techniques that fall in this category are dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD). In passive methods, the droplet generation depends on the geometry and dimensions of the device. T-junction and flow focusing methods are examples of passive methods used for generation of droplets. In this chapter the methods used for droplet generation, mixing of contents of droplets, and the manipulation of droplets are described in brief. A review of the applications of digital microfluidics with emphasis on the last decade is presented.

  4. One-to-one encapsulation based on alternating droplet generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirama, Hirotada; Torii, Toru

    2015-10-21

    This paper reports the preparation of encapsulated particles as models of cells using an alternating droplet generation encapsulation method in which the number of particles in a droplet is controlled by a microchannel to achieve one-to-one encapsulation. Using a microchannel in which wettability is treated locally, the fluorescent particles used as models of cells were successfully encapsulated in uniform water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion droplets. Furthermore, 20% of the particle-containing droplets contained one particle. Additionally, when a surfactant with the appropriate properties was used, the fluorescent particles within each inner aqueous droplet were enclosed in the merged droplet by spontaneous droplet coalescence. This one-to-one encapsulation method based on alternating droplet generation could be used for a variety of applications, such as high-throughput single-cell assays, gene transfection into cells or one-to-one cell fusion.

  5. Chemically induced coalescence in droplet-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akartuna, Ilke; Aubrecht, Donald M; Kodger, Thomas E; Weitz, David A

    2015-02-21

    We present a new microfluidic method to coalesce pairs of surfactant-stabilized water-in-fluorocarbon oil droplets. We achieve this through the local addition of a poor solvent for the surfactant, perfluorobutanol, which induces cohesion between droplet interfaces causing them to merge. The efficiency of this technique is comparable to existing techniques providing an alternative method to coalesce pairs of droplets.

  6. Stick-Jump Mode in Surface Droplet Dissolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, E.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Zhang, Xuehua; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The analogy between evaporating surface droplets in air to dissolving long-chain alcohol droplets in water is worked out. We show that next to the three known modi for surface droplet evaporation or dissolution (constant contact angle mode, constant contact radius mode, and stickslide mode), a

  7. Monodisperse Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W Double Emulsion Droplets as Uniform Compartments for High-Throughput Analysis via Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the application of monodisperse double emulsion droplets, produced in a single step within partially hydrophilic/partially hydrophobic microfluidic devices, as defined containers for quantitative flow cytometric analysis. Samples with varying fluorophore concentrations were generated, and a clear correlation between dye concentration and fluorescence signals was observed.

  8. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  9. A Comprehensive Model of Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbarah, Patrick; Li, Zhaoer; Pauls, Alexander; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-07-21

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding positively charged water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length and allowing the use of external electric fields to enhance droplet removal and heat transfer, in what has been termed electric-field-enhanced (EFE) jumping-droplet condensation. However, achieving optimal EFE conditions for enhanced heat transfer requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While a comprehensive model has been developed for condensation on micro/nanostructured surfaces, it cannot be applied for EFE condensation due to the dynamic droplet-vapor-electric field interactions. In this work, we developed a comprehensive physical model for EFE condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces by incorporating individual droplet motion, electrode geometry, jumping frequency, field strength, and condensate vapor-flow dynamics. As a first step toward our model, we simulated jumping droplet motion with no external electric field and validated our theoretical droplet trajectories to experimentally obtained trajectories, showing excellent temporal and spatial agreement. We then incorporated the external electric field into our model and considered the effects of jumping droplet size, electrode size and geometry, condensation heat flux, and droplet jumping direction. Our model suggests that smaller jumping droplet sizes and condensation heat fluxes require less work input to be removed by the external fields. Furthermore, the results suggest that EFE electrodes can be optimized such that the work input is minimized depending on the condensation heat flux. To analyze overall efficiency, we defined an incremental coefficient of performance and showed that it is very high (∼10(6)) for EFE condensation. We finally proposed mechanisms

  10. Coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces: Effects of droplet mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserfall, Joram; Figueiredo, Patric; Kneer, Reinhold; Rohlfs, Wilko; Pischke, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    On low-adhesion surfaces, coalescing droplets can spontaneously jump off, known as coalescence-induced droplet jumping. It is observed on a variety of synthetic and natural superhydrophobic surfaces, and gives rise to a range of applications, such as self-cleaning condensers, anti-icing coatings, and thermal diodes. Through three-dimensional simulations, this paper demonstrates the fluid dynamics of droplet jumping upon binary unequal-sized-droplet coalescence. Parametric studies show the influence of droplet mismatch, viscosity, and contact angle on jumping velocities, where liftoff regimes are defined on the basis of Ohnesorge number and droplet size ratio. Because of the strong asymmetric flow behavior, the well-known small conversion efficiency for equal-sized-droplet jumping, where around 6 % of the released surface energy is convertible into translational kinetic energy, is further reduced for unequal-sized-droplet jumping. The findings offer insights into their fluid dynamics and give a starting point for further modeling of dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Studies on the influence of surface morphology of ZnO nail beds on easy roll off of water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutha, S.; Vanithakumari, S. C.; George, R. P.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Raj, Baldev; Ravi, K. R.

    2015-08-01

    A ZnO nanorods based superhydrophobic surface with extremely low roll-off angle is fabricated using a two-step solution based approach-Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD). The grown ZnO nanorods have average diameter of 285 nm with a predominant growth direction of [002]. The static contact angle of ZnO nanorods superhydrophobic surface is 155°, and the dynamic contact angles contact angle hysteresis and roll-off angle is 2° and 1°, respectively. Furthermore, to comprehend the mechanism governing the extremely low roll-off angle of ZnO nanorods based superhydrophobic surface, an analytical model has been developed by incorporating the topographical (diameter, density of nanorods and solid area fraction) and droplet parameters (surface tension, mass and volume). The theoretically calculated roll-off angle closely matches with the experimental results and reported results.

  12. A Planar-Fluorescence Imaging Technique for Studying Droplet-Turbulence Interactions in Vaporizing Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Dom A.; Coy, E.

    1990-01-01

    Droplet turbulence interactions directly affect the vaporization and dispersion of droplets in liquid sprays and therefore play a major role in fuel oxidizer mixing in liquid fueled combustion systems. Proper characterization of droplet turbulence interactions in vaporizing sprays require measurement of droplet size velocity and size temperature correlations. A planar, fluorescence imaging technique is described which is being developed for simultaneously measuring the size, velocity, and temperature of individual droplets in vaporizing sprays. Preliminary droplet size velocity correlation measurements made with this technique are presented. These measurements are also compared to and show very good agreement with measurements made in the same spray using a phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  13. Acoustophoresis in Variously Shaped Liquid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie; 10.1039/c1sm05871a

    2012-01-01

    The ability to precisely trap, transport and manipulate micrometer-sized objects, including biological cells, DNA-coated microspheres and microorganisms, is very important in life science studies and biomedical applications. In this study, acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave field is used for micro-objects manipulation, a technique termed as acoustophoresis. Free surfaces of liquid droplets are used as sound reflectors to confine sound waves inside the droplets. Two techniques were developed for precise control of droplet shapes: edge pinning and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface pinning. For all tested droplet shapes, including circular, annular and rectangular, our experiments show that polymer micro particles can be manipulated by ultrasound and form into a variety of patterns, for example, concentric rings and radial lines in an annular droplet. The complexity of the pattern increases with increasing frequency, and the observations are in line with simulation results. The acoustic mani...

  14. Experimental study of evaporation of distilled water and 10% NaCl and СaCl2 aqueous salt solutions droplets under their free falling on a heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental results of evaporation of distilled water and 10% aqueous salt solutions of NaCl and СaCl2 droplets under their free falling on a heated surface. It is proved that it is more expedient to conduct the experimental research in this field according to classical multifactorial experiment. Laser treatment of surfaces is found to increase the evaporation rate and to biases the point of boiling crisis in the region of lower surface temperatures. In this case, in the conditions of boiling crisis the frequency of contact of a droplet with a heated surface will decrease.

  15. Impact of Droplets on Inclined Flowing Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar K

    2015-01-01

    The impact of droplets on an inclined falling liquid film is studied experimentally using high-speed imaging. The falling film is created on a flat substrate with controllable thicknesses and flow rates. Droplets with different sizes and speeds are used to study the impact process under various Ohnesorge and Weber numbers, and film Reynolds numbers. A number of phenomena associated with droplet impact are identified and analysed, such as bouncing, partial coalescence, total coalescence, and splashing. The effects of droplet size, speed, as well the film flow rate are studied culminating in the generation of an impact regime map. The analysis of the lubrication force acted on the droplet via the gas layer shows that a higher flow rate in the liquid film produces a larger lubrication force, slows down the drainage process, and increases the probability of droplet bouncing. Our results demonstrate that the flowing film has a profound effect on the droplet impact process and associated phenomena, which are marked...

  16. Marangoni spreading due to a localized alcohol supply on a thin water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Sanchez, J.F.; Eddi, A.C.A.; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2015-01-01

    Bringing two miscible fluids into contact naturally generates strong gradients in surface tension. Here, we investigate such a Marangoni-driven flow by continuously supplying isopropyl alcohol (IPA) on a film of water, using micron-sized droplets of IPA-water mixtures. These droplets create a

  17. Critical parameters for the partial coalescence of a droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Gilet, T.; Mulleners, K.; Lecomte, J. P.; Vandewalle, N.; Dorbolo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The partial coalescence of a droplet onto a planar liquid/liquid interface is investigated experimentally by tuning the viscosities of both liquids. The problem mainly depends on four dimensionless parameters: the Bond number (gravity vs. surface tension), the Ohnesorge numbers (viscosity in both fluids vs. surface tension), and the density relative difference. The ratio between the daughter droplet size and the mother droplet size is investigated as a function of these dimensionless numbers....

  18. On-demand Droplet Manipulation via Triboelectrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Vahabi, Hamed; Cackovic, Matthew; Jiang, Rui; Kota, Arun

    2017-11-01

    Controlled manipulation of liquid droplets has attracted tremendous interest across different scientific fields over the past two decades. To date, a variety of external stimuli-mediated methods such as magnetic field, electric field, and light have been developed for manipulating droplets on surfaces. However, these methods usually have drawbacks such as complex fabrication of manipulation platform, low droplet motility, expensive actuation system and lack of precise control. In this work, we demonstrate the controlled manipulation of liquid droplet with both high (e.g., water) and low (e.g., n-hexadecane) dielectric strengths on a smooth, slippery surface via triboelectric effect. Our highly simple, facile and portable methodology enables on-demand, precise manipulation of droplets using solely the electrostatic attraction or repulsion force, which is exerted on the droplet by a simple charged actuator (e.g., Teflon film). We envision that our triboelectric effect enabled droplet manipulation methodology will open a new avenue for droplet based lab-on-a-chip systems, energy harvesting devices and biomedical applications.

  19. Experimental investigation of ice nucleation in water droplets and sulphate particles in the temperature range between -30 C and -65 C; Experimente zur Eisnukleation von Wassertroepfchen und Sulfatpartikeln bei Temperaturen zwischen -65 C und -30 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, S.

    2007-10-15

    High altitude cirrus clouds influence the climate by scattering and absorption of radiation. The cloud and aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe allows generation and observation of ice clouds in laboratory at realistic conditions. Experiments were carried out to investigate the ice formation in clouds of supercooled liquid water droplets and in sulphate aerosols. The homogeneous ice nucleation rate, given as the product of the number of critical ice germs to initiate the freezing and the rate at which additional molecules are incorporated into a critical germ, was measured at typical cloud conditions in the temperature range between -36 C and -37 C for supercooled water droplets with diameters smaller than 10 {mu}m. The comparison of the results shows good agreement both with recent data from literature gained from considerably larger droplets and with classical ice nucleation theory. Thereby, the hypothesis that a critical germ is formed preferentially near the surface of a supercooled droplet could not be confirmed. The ice formation from ammonium sulphate aerosol was examined in the temperature range from -50 C to -65 C. It was shown that ammonium sulphate solution particles, which were produced by neutralization of sulphuric acid solution particles by gaseous ammonia, freeze homogeneously at conditions comparable to sulphuric acid solution particles. If ammonium sulphate particles crystallize they start to form ice at comparatively low supersaturation values (10-20%) by direct deposition of water vapour onto the solid particles. Ammonia, which is highly anthropogenically affected, may influence the properties of upper tropospheric ice clouds. (orig.)

  20. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  1. Microfluidic room temperature ionic liquid droplet generation depending on the hydrophobicity and interfacial tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jung Wook; Chang, Woo-Jin [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee (United States); Choi, Joo Hyung; Koo, Yoon Mo [Department of Biological Engineering, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bum Joon; Lee, Gyu Do; Lee, Sang Woo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    We have characterized micro-droplet generation using water immiscible hexafluorophosphate ([PF{sub 6}])- and bis(trifluoro methylsulfonyl)imide ([Tf{sub 2}N])-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The interfacial tension between total 7 RTILs and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was measured using a tensiometer for the first time. PBS is one of the most commonly used buffer solutions in cell-related researches. The measured interfacial tension ranges from 8.51 to 11.62 and from 9.56 to 13.19 for [Tf{sub 2}N]- and [PF{sub 6}]-based RTILs, respectively. The RTILs micro-droplets were generated in a microfluidic device. The micro-droplet size and generation frequency were determined based on continuous monitoring of light transmittance at the interface in microchannel. The size of RTIL micro-droplets was inversely proportional to the increase of PBS solution flow rate and RTILs hydrophobicity, while droplet generation frequency was proportional to those changes. The measured size of RTILs droplets ranged from 0.6 to 10.5 nl, and from 1.0 to 17.1 nl for [Tf{sub 2}N]- and [PF{sub 6}]-based RTILs, respectively. The measured frequency of generated RTILs droplets ranged from 2.3 to 37.2 droplet/min, and from 2.7 to 17.1 droplet/min for [Tf{sub 2}N]- and [PF{sub 6}]-based RTILs, respectively. The capillary numbers were calculated depending on the RTILs, and ranged from 0.51x10{sup -3} to 1.06x10{sup -3} and from 5.00x10{sup -3} to 8.65x10{sup -3}, for [Tf{sub 2}N]- and [PF{sub 6}]-based RTILs, respectively. The interfacial tension between RTILs and PBS will contribute to developing bioprocesses using immiscible RTILs. Also, the RTILs micro-droplets will enable the high-throughput monitoring of various biological and chemical reactions using RTILs as new reaction media.

  2. Investigation of the effect of coal particle sizes on the interfacial and rheological properties of coal-water slurry fuels: Final report, July 1, 1994-June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kihm, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The scope of the project is two fold: (1) examining particle size effect on interfacial properties of CWS fuels by measuring static and dynamic surface tension properties of specially prepared CWS samples containing different ranges of coal particle sizes, and (2) studying the effect of particle size on CWS atomization characteristics by measuring mean diameters of several different CWS sprays generated by sonic air blasting. The results show that both static and dynamic surface tensions decrease with increasing coal particle size and mean droplet diameter of CW-S sprays also decreases with increasing coal particle size. Based on the experimental evidence we conjecture that three different energies are competing in slurry atomization: (1) the internal capillary holding between particles and water, (2) the interfacial surface tensile energy at the slurry surface contacting air, and (3) the external air blast shear energy acting against the former two energies. The internal capillary holding force decreases with increasing particle size. This force is believed to play a major role in determining the effect of particle size on CWS atomization.

  3. Prediction of soil water retention properties using pore-size distribution and porosity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beckett, Christopher T.S; Augarde, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    .... This paper presents a method that builds on previous techniques by incorporating porosity and particles of different sizes, shapes, and separation distances to predict soil water retention properties...

  4. Effect of ageing of gas diffusion layers on the water distribution in flow field channels of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätzel, Juliane; Markötter, Henning; Arlt, Tobias; Klages, Merle; Haußmann, Jan; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Scholta, Joachim; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the influence of artificial ageing of gas diffusion layers (GDL) on the water distribution and transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) during cell operation. Water droplet size distributions are measured by means of in-operando neutron radiography. We find a strong correlation between droplet size distribution and GDL ageing time: With increasing GDL ageing, water droplet sizes in the flow field channels strongly decrease, indicating an ineffective water transport that leads to a reduced cell performance. This effect can be assigned to water accumulations on the GDL surface that block the gas supply towards the catalyst layer.

  5. Experimental Study of Supercooled Large Droplet Impingement Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Rachman, A.; Wong, S. C.; Hung, K. E.; Vu, G. T.

    2003-01-01

    Typically, ice accretion results from small supercooled droplets (droplets cooled below freezing), usually 5 to 50 microns in diameter, which can freeze upon impact with an aircraft surface. Recently, ice accretions resulting from supercooled large droplet (SLD) conditions have become a safety concern. Current ice accretion codes have been extensively tested for Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 25, Appendix C icing conditions but have not been validated for SLD icing conditions. This report presents experimental methods for investigating large droplet impingement dynamics and for obtaining small and large water droplet impingement data.

  6. An oil droplet that spontaneously climbs up stairs

    OpenAIRE

    Sumino, Yutaka; Magome, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported that an oil droplet on a glass surface moves spontaneously in an oil-water system. This motion of an oil droplet can be understood as the spreading of a reactive droplet, which is induced by the interfacial tension gradient at the glass surface. In this paper, we focus on the spontaneous motion of an oil droplet climbing up stairs. We found that an oil droplet tends to move tip the stairs rather than to step down. We describe some of the mechanisms of this unique behavior.

  7. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  8. Electrowetting Actuation of Polydisperse Nanofluid Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crismar Patacsil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of electrowetting experiments employing droplets formed from aqueous suspensions of Au nanoparticles. A planar electrowetting system, consisting of a Pt wire electrode and a bottom Cu electrode with an insulating silicone layer, is used to observe changes in droplet contact angle when an external electric field is applied. The equilibrium contact angle at 0 V decreases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, dropping from 100.4° for pure deionized water to 94.7° for a 0.5 μM nanofluid. Increasing the nanoparticle content also lowers the required voltage for effective actuation. With actuation at 15 V, contact angle decreases by 9% and 35% for droplets formed from pure water and a 0.5 μM nanoparticle suspension, respectively. Contact angle saturation is observed with nanofluid droplets, with the threshold voltage decreasing as nanoparticle concentration rises. Maximum droplet actuation before contact angle saturation is achieved at only 10 V for a concentration of 0.5 μM. A proposed mechanism for the enhanced electrowetting response of a nanofluid droplet involves a reduction in surface tension of the droplet as nanoparticles accumulate at the liquid-vapor interface.

  9. Superheated droplet detector response to fabrication variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felizardo, M., E-mail: felizardo@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Morlat, T.; Girard, T.A. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Martins, R.C. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Ramos, A.R.; Marques, J.G. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-03-01

    Constructions of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) are easily (and sometimes unavoidably) altered in the fabrication process by small variations in the ingredient concentrations and fractionating of the superheated liquid. The devices have moreover been stored at temperatures below 0 deg. C prior to usage in order to de-sensitize their response during transport. We report studies of the response differences of high concentration SDDs with respect to variations common to their fabrication, to include ageing, concentration, gel stiffness, and droplet size.

  10. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect - a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface - we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces.

  11. Concentration and size of asbestos in water supplies.

    OpenAIRE

    Millette, J R; Clark, P J; Pansing, M F; Twyman, J D

    1980-01-01

    A review of the results of over 1500 asbestos analyses from U.S. water supplies suggests that the majority of water consumers are not exposed to asbestos concentrations in their drinking water over 1 x 10(6) fibers per liter. There are, however, some populations that are exposed to waterborne asbestos concentrations over 10 x 10(6) fibers per liter caused by natural erosion, mine processing wastes, waste pile erosion, corrosion of asbestos cement pipe, or disintegration of asbestos tile roofs...

  12. New Approach to Study the Ignition Processes of Organic Coal-Water Fuels in an Oxidizer Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin T.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To converge the conditions of organic water-coal fuel composition combustion in the typical power equipment we developed a new approach and installed an experimental setup, eliminating the traditional fixing the fuel droplets on the thermocouples or rods. Specialized cone-shaped chamber was used to implement the process of lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets were established. We determined the parameters of the system (droplet size of 0.4-0.6 mm, temperatures 823-903 K and the velocity of the oxidizer flow 1.5-6 m/s at which the droplets were consistently ignited in the process of lingering. Minimum temperatures and ignition delay times of organic water-coal fuel droplets based on brown coal, used motor, turbine, transformer oils, kerosene, gasoline and water were defined.

  13. Temperature-induced droplet coalescence in microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Wong, Teck Neng

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports a technique for temperature-induced merging of droplets in a microchannel. The multiphase system consists of water droplet and oil as the dispersed phase and the carrying continuous phase. A resistive heater provides heating in a rectangular merging chamber. The temperature of the chamber is controlled by the voltage applied to the heater. The merging process of two neighboring droplets was investigated with different applied voltage, flow rate ratio between water and oil and total flowrate. Merging is found to be effective at high flow rate ratio, high temperature, and low total flowrate. The presented technique could be used for merging and mixing in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip platforms.

  14. Simulation of High-Speed Droplet Impact Against Dry Substrates with Partial Velocity Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    High-speed droplet impact can be used to clean substrates such as silicon wafers. Radially spreading shear flow after the impact may allow for mechanically removing contaminant particles at substrate surfaces. Since it is a big challenge to experimentally explore such complicated flow that exhibits contact line motion and water hammer, its flow feature is not well understood. Here, we aim to numerically evaluate shear flow caused by the impact of a spherical water droplet (of submillimeter sizes) at high speed (up to 50 m/s) against a dry rigid wall. We model the flow based on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Stokes' hypothesis and solve them by a high-order-accurate finite volume method equipped with shock and interface capturing. To treat the motion of a contact line between the three phases (the droplet, the rigid wall, and the ambient air) in a robust manner, we permit velocity slip at the wall with Navier's model, for wall slip is known to come into play under steep velocity gradients that can arise from high-speed droplet impact. In our presentation, we will examine radially spreading flow after the droplet impact and the resulting wall shear stress generation from the simulation. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP17J02211.

  15. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 104 ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 105/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies. PMID:26298127

  16. Droplets As Liquid Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čejková, Jitka; Banno, Taisuke; Hanczyc, Martin M; Štěpánek, František

    2017-01-01

    Liquid droplets are very simple objects present in our everyday life. They are extremely important for many natural phenomena as well as for a broad variety of industrial processes. The conventional research areas in which the droplets are studied include physical chemistry, fluid mechanics, chemical engineering, materials science, and micro- and nanotechnology. Typical studies include phenomena such as condensation and droplet formation, evaporation of droplets, or wetting of surfaces. The present article reviews the recent literature that employs droplets as animated soft matter. It is argued that droplets can be considered as liquid robots possessing some characteristics of living systems, and such properties can be applied to unconventional computing through maze solving or operation in logic gates. In particular, the lifelike properties and behavior of liquid robots, namely (i) movement, (ii) self-division, and (iii) group dynamics, will be discussed.

  17. The amazing bouncing droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Terwagne, Denis; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Gilet, Tristan

    2008-01-01

    When a low viscosity oil droplet is laid onto the surface of a high viscosity oil liquid, it stays at rest for a moment before coalescence. The coalescence can be delayed and sometimes inhibited by injecting fresh air under the droplet. This can happen when the surface of the bath oscillates vertically. In this case the droplet basically bounces on the interface [1, 2]. We observe that the conditions for bouncing depends on the frequency, more precisely we observe resonance whe...

  18. Electrically Charged Droplets in Microgravity. Impact and Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenbourger, Martin; Caps, Hervé; Vitry, Youen; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the interaction between electrically charged droplets in microgravity is considered. During the 22 s of microgravity brought by a parabolic flight, water droplets with a radius r ∈ [0.41 - 0.97] mm were released one in front of the other. A high-speed camera allowed studying their interaction in the focal plane. The trajectories of the droplets are well adjusted by a punctual charge model. In some experiments, a physical contact between the charged droplets was observed. These collisions are studied via a phase diagram comparing the droplet Weber number, We, and the collision parameter, χ. By comparing these collisions to experiments involving neutral droplets, we deduce how the collision diagram is affected by electric charges. In particular, we show that the criterion for an impact between two droplets is no more χ < 1.

  19. Stick-jump mode in surface droplet dissolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Erik; Zhang, Xuehua; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The analogy between evaporating surface droplets in air to dissolving long-chain alcohol droplets in water is worked out. We show that next to the three known modi for surface droplet evaporation or dissolution (constant contact angle mode, constant contact radius mode, and stick-slide mode), a fourth mode exists for small droplets on supposedly smooth substrates, namely the stick-jump mode: intermittent contact line pinning causes the droplet to switch between sticking and jumping during the dissolution. We present experimental data and compare them to theory to predict the dissolution time in this stick-jump mode. We also explain why these jumps were easily observed for microscale droplets but not for larger droplets.

  20. Size-Dependent Optical Properties of Dendronized Perylenediimide Nanoparticle Prepared by Laser Ablation in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yasukuni, Ryohei; Sliwa, Michel; Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.; Herrmann, Andreas; Mullen, Klaus; Asahi, Tsuyoshi

    Fluorescent nanoparticles of dendronized perylenediimide (DPDI) were fabricated by laser ablation in water. We succeeded in the preparation of colloidal nanoparticles of different sizes (150-400 nm) and examined their size-dependent optical absorption and fluorescence properties. The size-dependent

  1. Flexible Slippery Surface to Manipulate Droplet Coalescence and Sliding, and Its Practicability in Wind-Resistant Water Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Qian, Baitai; Lai, Chuilin; Wang, Xiaowen; Ma, Kaikai; Guo, Yujuan; Zhu, Xingli; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2017-07-26

    A flexible slippery membrane (FSM) with tunable morphology and high elastic deformability has been developed by infusing perfluoropolyether (PFPE) into a fluorinated-copolymer-modified thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofiberous membrane. To immobilize PFPE in TPU matrix, we synthesized a fluorinated-copolymer poly(DFMA-co-IBOA-co-LMA) with low surface energy, high chemical affinity to PFPE, adequate flexibility, and strong physical adhesion on TPU. Upon external tensile stress, the as-prepared FSM can realize a real-time manipulation of water sliding and coalescence on it. Furthermore, it exhibits the ability to preserve the captured water from being blown away by strong wind, which ensures the water collection efficiency in windy regions.

  2. Surface tension prevails over solute effect in organic-influenced cloud droplet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Zuend, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Sanchez, Kevin J; Roberts, Greg; Ceburnis, Darius; Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Hodas, Natasha; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Seinfeld, John H; O' Dowd, Colin

    2017-06-29

    The spontaneous growth of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) into cloud droplets under supersaturated water vapour conditions is described by classic Köhler theory. This spontaneous activation of CCN depends on the interplay between the Raoult effect, whereby activation potential increases with decreasing water activity or increasing solute concentration, and the Kelvin effect, whereby activation potential decreases with decreasing droplet size or increases with decreasing surface tension, which is sensitive to surfactants. Surface tension lowering caused by organic surfactants, which diminishes the Kelvin effect, is expected to be negated by a concomitant reduction in the Raoult effect, driven by the displacement of surfactant molecules from the droplet bulk to the droplet-vapour interface. Here we present observational and theoretical evidence illustrating that, in ambient air, surface tension lowering can prevail over the reduction in the Raoult effect, leading to substantial increases in cloud droplet concentrations. We suggest that consideration of liquid-liquid phase separation, leading to complete or partial engulfing of a hygroscopic particle core by a hydrophobic organic-rich phase, can explain the lack of concomitant reduction of the Raoult effect, while maintaining substantial lowering of surface tension, even for partial surface coverage. Apart from the importance of particle size and composition in droplet activation, we show by observation and modelling that incorporation of phase-separation effects into activation thermodynamics can lead to a CCN number concentration that is up to ten times what is predicted by climate models, changing the properties of clouds. An adequate representation of the CCN activation process is essential to the prediction of clouds in climate models, and given the effect of clouds on the Earth's energy balance, improved prediction of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions is likely to result in improved assessments of future

  3. Fast and sensitive detection of bacteria from a water droplet by means of electric field effects and micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A surface-based method that can provide early and label-free detection of target microorganisms in water is presented. The method combines three key features, namely, (a accelerated transportation to, and focusing of bacteria on, the detection surface by means of alternating current (AC electrokinetic effects, (b selective capture of the target microorganism using surface-immobilized antibodies, and (c sensitive detection of target bacteria with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The non-uniform electric field is created by an AC signal-driven planar, quadrupolar, gold microelectrode array that is deposited on the detection surface (oxidized silicon wafer. AC electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis combine to produce the desired concentration amplification of bacteria on the capture surface within a few minutes. Bacterial detection is, subsequently, accomplished through Raman spectra acquired at pre-determined locations near the electrodes after sample removal and rinsing of the capture surface. Using this technique, detection of Escherichia coli K12 (target microorganism at concentrations as low as 102 bacteria per mL was reproducibly achieved from 50 μL sample droplets. This method also permits the selective retention of a target microorganism from polymicrobial mixtures, as demonstrated here with the capture of E. coli K12 from their mixtures with Micrococcus luteus.

  4. Controlling the partial coalescence of a droplet on a vertically vibrated bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilet, T; Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S

    2007-09-01

    A method is proposed to stop the cascade of partial coalescences of a droplet laid on a liquid bath. The strategy consists of vibrating the bath in the vertical direction in order to keep small droplets bouncing. Since large droplets are not able to bounce, they partially coalesce until they reach a critical size. The system behaves as a low pass filter: droplets smaller than the critical size are selected. This size has been investigated as a function of the acceleration and the frequency of the bath vibration. Results suggest that the limit size for bouncing is related to the first mode of the droplet deformation.

  5. Engineering of Droplet Manipulation in Tertiary Junction Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0055 Engineering of Droplet Manipulation in Tertiary Junction Microfluidic Channels Shalini Gupta INDIAN INSTITUTE OF...2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 May 2015 to 13 Nov 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineering of Droplet Manipulation in...dispersed phase was increased, the critical droplet size for transition also decreased. This multivariate approach can in future be used to engineer

  6. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  7. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  8. Sprouting Droplets Driven by Physical Effects Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Katherine A; Stoev, Iliya D; French, David J; Abou-Hassan, Ali; Clegg, Paul S

    2017-05-02

    Combining a partially miscible three-liquid system with interfacially trapped silica colloids, we show that small droplets can exhibit dramatic growth phenomena driven by physical effects alone. The mass dense droplets sprout tubes which grow vertically upward in a gravitational field and respond to the presence of other droplets in their path. Two of the liquids in our system are water and toluene. By varying the third liquid, we are able to relate the growth behavior to the details of the underlying three-fluid phase diagram and the changes to the interfacial tension. Additionally, we introduce a pendant drop in the path of our growing drop. We use this to confirm that growth is driven by the partitioning of solvents, that exchange of solvents between droplets is chemically selective, and that the exchange behavior can itself generate further growth phenomena.

  9. Nitrogen uptake by size-fractionated phytoplankton in mangrove waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dham, V.V.; Wafar, M.V.M.; Heredia, A.M.

    and estuarine waters this is an indicator of the ecosystem’s ability to cope with spatially and tempo- rally varying loads of different forms of N, especially as nitrate and ammonium, from fluvial and anthropogenic sources. The preference for either ammonium... temperatures a lack of substrate could lead to a reduction in nitrate uptake. This was, however, not the case here, as shown by the positive relationship be- tween temperature and nitrate concentrations (Fig. 9), a situation that might be due to an increase...

  10. Compound Droplets on Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Ben Said, Marouen; Hötzer, Johannes; Berghoff, Marco; Dreesen, Laurent; Nestler, Britta; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-07-21

    Droplets on fibers have been extensively studied in the recent years. Although the equilibrium shapes of simple droplets on fibers are well established, the situation becomes more complex for compound fluidic systems. Through experimental and numerical investigations, we show herein that compound droplets can be formed on fibers and that they adopt specific geometries. We focus on the various contact lines formed at the meeting of the different phases and we study their equilibrium state. It appears that, depending on the surface tensions, the triple contact lines can remain separate or merge together and form quadruple lines. The nature of the contact lines influences the behavior of the compound droplets on fibers. Indeed, both experimental and numerical results show that, during the detachment process, depending on whether the contact lines are triple or quadruple, the characteristic length is the inner droplet radius or the fiber radius.

  11. A continuous spectral aerosol-droplet microphysics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lebo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional (2-D continuous spectral aerosol-droplet microphysics model is presented and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model for large-eddy simulations (LES of warm clouds. Activation and regeneration of aerosols are treated explicitly in the calculation of condensation/evaporation. The model includes a 2-D spectrum that encompasses wet aerosol particles (i.e., haze droplets, cloud droplets, and drizzle droplets in a continuous and consistent manner and allows for the explicit tracking of aerosol size within cloud droplets due to collision-coalescence. The system of differential equations describing condensation/evaporation (i.e., mass conservation and energy conservation is solved simultaneously within each grid cell. The model is demonstrated by simulating a marine stratocumulus deck for two different aerosol loadings (100 and 500 cm−3, and comparison with the more traditional microphysics modeling approaches (both 1-D bin and bulk schemes is evaluated. The simulations suggest that in a 1-D bin microphysics scheme, without regeneration, too few particles are produced and hence the mode of the droplet size spectrum occurs at a larger size relative to the 2-D bin model results. Moreover, with regeneration, the 1-D scheme produces too many small droplets and thus shifts the mode toward smaller sizes. These large shifts in the droplet size distribution can potentially have significant effects on the efficiency of the collision-coalescence process, fall speeds, and ultimately precipitation.

  12. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  13. Size-resolved aerosol water-soluble ions during the summer and winter seasons in Beijing: Formation mechanisms of secondary inorganic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zirui; Xie, Yuzhu; Hu, Bo; Wen, Tianxue; Xin, Jinyuan; Li, Xingru; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-09-01

    Size-segregated water-soluble ionic species (WSIs) were measured using an Anderson cascade impactor from Jul. to Aug. 2008 and from Dec. 2009 to Feb. 2010 in urban Beijing. The results showed that fine particles (PM2.1, Dp aerosols (SIAs, the sum of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+) accounted for more than 30% of the fine particles, which were greatly elevated during particle pollution events (PM events), thereby leading to an alteration of the size distributions of SO42- and NO3- to nearly single fine-mode distributions peaking at 0.65-2.1 μm. This finding suggests that heterogeneous aqueous reactions were enhanced at high RH values. SIAs also increased during dust events, particularly for coarse mode SO42-, which indicated enhanced heterogeneous reactions on the dust surface. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was used to resolve the bulk mass size distributions into condensation, droplet, and coarse modes, representing the three major sources of the particles. The formation of SO42- was attributed primarily to in-cloud or aerosol droplet processes during summer (45%), and the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust surfaces was an important formation pathway during winter (45%). The formation pathways of NO3- in fine particles were similar to those of SO42-, where over 30% were formed by in-cloud processes. This work provides important field measurement-based evidence for understanding the formation pathway of secondary inorganic aerosols in the megacity of Beijing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tan

    Full Text Available The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

  15. Transmittance of transparent windows with non-absorbing cap-shaped droplets condensed on their backside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Keyong; Huang, Yong; Pruvost, Jeremy; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to quantify systematically the effect of non-absorbing cap-shaped droplets condensed on the backside of transparent windows on their directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance. Condensed water droplets have been blamed to reduce light transfer through windows in greenhouses, solar desalination plants, and photobioreactors. Here, the directional-hemispherical transmittance was predicted by Monte Carlo ray-tracing method. For the first time, both monodisperse and polydisperse droplets were considered, with contact angle between 0 and 180°, arranged either in an ordered hexagonal pattern or randomly distributed on the window backside with projected surface area coverage between 0 and 90%. The directional-hemispherical transmittance was found to be independent of the size and spatial distributions of the droplets. Instead, it depended on (i) the incident angle, (ii) the optical properties of the window and droplets, and on (iii) the droplet contact angle and (iv) projected surface area coverage. In fact, the directional-hemispherical transmittance decreased with increasing incident angle. Four optical regimes were identified in the normal-hemispherical transmittance. It was nearly constant for droplet contact angles either smaller than the critical angle θcr (predicted by Snell's law) for total internal reflection at the droplet/air interface or larger than 180°-θcr. However, between these critical contact angles, the normal-hemispherical transmittance decreased rapidly to reach a minimum at 90° and increased rapidly with increasing contact angles up to 180°-θcr. This was attributed to total internal reflection at the droplet/air interface which led to increasing reflectance. In addition, the normal-hemispherical transmittance increased slightly with increasing projected surface area coverage for contact angle was smaller than θcr. However, it decreased monotonously with increasing droplet projected surface area coverage for contact

  16. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: polydisperse doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Prerna; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick T

    2016-07-28

    Arrested droplet coalescence produces stable anisotropic shapes and is a key mechanism for microstructure development in foods, petroleum and pharmaceutical formulations. Past work has examined the dynamic elastic arrest of coalescing monodisperse droplet doublets and developed a simple model of doublet strain as a function of physical variables. Although the work describes experimental data well, it is limited to describing same-size droplets. A new model incorporating a generalized description of doublet shape is developed to describe polydisperse doublet formation in more realistic emulsion systems. Polydisperse doublets are shown to arrest at lower strains than monodisperse doublets as a result of the smaller contribution of surface area in a given pair. Larger droplet size ratios have lower relative degrees of strain because coalescence is arrested at an earlier stage than in more monodisperse cases. Experimental observations of polydisperse doublet formation indicate that the model under-predicts arrest strains at low solid levels and small droplet sizes. The discrepancy is hypothesized to be the result of nonlinear elastic deformation at high strains.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Enhancing Throughput of Combinatorial Droplet Devices via Droplet Bifurcation, Parallelized Droplet Fusion, and Parallelized Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuangwen Hsieh; Helena C Zec; Polly C Ma; Tushar D Rane; Tza-Huei Wang

    2015-01-01

      Combinatorial droplet microfluidic devices with programmable microfluidic valves have recently emerged as a viable approach for performing multiplexed experiments in microfluidic droplets...

  18. Droplet impact patterns on inclined surfaces with variable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Michael; Neitzel, G. Paul; Smith, Marc K.

    2014-11-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is used in the investigation of a crime scene to infer the impact velocity and size of an impacting droplet and, from these, the droplet's point and cause of origin. The final pattern is the result of complex fluid mechanical processes involved in the impact and spreading of a blood drop on a surface coupled with the wetting properties of the surface itself. Experiments have been designed to study these processes and the resulting patterns for the case of a single Newtonian water droplet impacting a planar, inclined surface with variable roughness and wetting properties. Results for Reynolds numbers in the range of (9,000 - 27,000) and Weber numbers in the range of (300 - 2,600) will be presented. Transient video images and final impact patterns will be analyzed and compared with results from traditional bloodstain pattern-analysis techniques used by the forensics community. In addition, preliminary work with a new Newtonian blood simulant designed to match the viscosity and surface tension of blood will be presented. Supported by the National Institute of Justice.

  19. The WeIzmann Supercooled Droplets Observation on a Microarray (WISDOM and application for ambient dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Reicher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The WeIzmann Supercooled Droplets Observation on Microarray (WISDOM is a new setup for studying ice nucleation in an array of monodisperse droplets for atmospheric implications. WISDOM combines microfluidics techniques for droplets production and a cryo-optic stage for observation and characterization of freezing events of individual droplets. This setup is designed to explore heterogeneous ice nucleation in the immersion freezing mode, down to the homogeneous freezing of water (235 K in various cooling rates (typically 0.1–10 K min−1. It can also be used for studying homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions in colder temperatures. Frozen fraction, ice nucleation active surface site densities and freezing kinetics can be obtained from WISDOM measurements for hundreds of individual droplets in a single freezing experiment. Calibration experiments using eutectic solutions and previously studied materials are described. WISDOM also allows repeatable cycles of cooling and heating for the same array of droplets. This paper describes the WISDOM setup, its temperature calibration, validation experiments and measurement uncertainties. Finally, application of WISDOM to study the ice nucleating particle (INP properties of size-selected ambient Saharan dust particles is presented.

  20. Thermophoretic transport of ionic liquid droplets in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajegowda, Rakesh; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Hartkamp, Remco; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2017-04-01

    Thermal-gradient induced transport of ionic liquid (IL) and water droplets through a carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated in this study using molecular dynamics simulations. Energetic analysis indicates that IL transport through a CNT is driven primarily by the fluid-solid interaction, while fluid-fluid interactions dominate in water-CNT systems. Droplet diffusion analysis via the moment scaling spectrum reveals sub-diffusive motion of the IL droplet, in contrast to the self-diffusive motion of the water droplet. The Soret coefficient and energetic analysis of the systems suggest that the CNT shows more affinity for interaction with IL than with the water droplet. Thermophoretic transport of IL is shown to be feasible, which can create new opportunities in nanofluidic applications.

  1. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  2. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  3. A study of oil droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, T K; Pashley, R M

    2007-12-01

    Oil droplets dispersed in water can be readily studied when they are coated with surfactants, which lower their interfacial tension and enhance their stability. Pure oil droplets are more difficult to study because of their high interfacial tension, which facilitates coalescence and the adsorption of contaminants. In this study, we have characterised the surface charging properties of a water insoluble oil, bromododecane, which has a density close to water. The small density difference allows us to study relatively large drops of this oil and to analyse its coalescence behaviour. The results obtained with this simple, surfactant-free, system suggest that an additional attractive force, such as the long range hydrophobic interaction, might be required to explain oil droplet coalescence behaviour.

  4. Integrated sieving microstructures on microchannels for biological cell trapping and droplet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wanqing; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Xu, Tao; Yang, Mengsu

    2011-10-07

    We have developed a single step microfabrication method to prepare constriction microstructures on a PCB master by controlling the etching time of two microchannels separated by a finite distance that is easily attainable using imagesetters widely available in the printing industry. PDMS replica of the constriction structures present sieving microstructures (microsieves) that could be used for size-dependent trapping of microspheres, biological cells and the formation of water-in-oil droplets.

  5. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, J.T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which

  6. Droplet Demulsification Using Ultralow Voltage-Based Electrocoalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Karthick, S; Jayaprakash, K S; Sen, A K

    2018-01-30

    Demulsification of droplets stabilized with surfactant is very challenging due to their low surface energy. We report ultralow voltage-based electrocoalescence phenomenon for the demulsification of aqueous droplets with an aqueous stream. In the absence of electric field, due to the disjoining pressure resulting from the tail-tail interaction between the surfactant molecules present on the aqueous droplets and interface, coalescence of aqueous droplets with the aqueous stream is prevented. However, above a critical electric field, the electrical stress overcomes the disjoining pressure, thus leading to the droplet coalescence. The influence of surfactant concentration, droplet diameter, and velocity on the electrocoalescence phenomena is studied. The macroscopic contact between the aqueous droplet with the aqueous stream enables droplet coalescence at much lower voltage (10 to 90 V), which is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than voltages used in prior works (1.0 to 3.0 kV). The electrocoalescence phenomena is used for the extraction of microparticles encapsulated in aqueous droplets into the aqueous stream and size-based selective demulsification. A new paradigm of droplet electrocoalescence and content extraction is presented that would find significant applications in chemistry and biology.

  7. Droplet Mobility Manipulation on Porous Media Using Backpressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourdas, N; Pashos, G; Kokkoris, G; Boudouvis, A G; Stathopoulos, V N

    2016-05-31

    Wetting phenomena on hydrophobic surfaces are strongly related to the volume and pressure of gas pockets residing at the solid-liquid interface. In this study, we explore the underlying mechanisms of droplet actuation and mobility manipulation when backpressure is applied through a porous medium under a sessile pinned droplet. Reversible transitions between the initially sticky state and the slippery states are thus incited by modulating the backpressure. The sliding angles of deionized (DI) water and ethanol in DI water droplets of various volumes are presented to quantify the effect of the backpressure on the droplet mobility. For a 50 μL water droplet, the sliding angle decreases from 45 to 0° when the backpressure increases to ca. 0.60 bar. Significantly smaller backpressure levels are required for lower surface energy liquids. We shed light on the droplet actuation and movement mechanisms by means of simulations encompassing the momentum conservation and the continuity equations along with the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field equations in a 2D computational domain. The droplet actuation mechanism entails depinning of the receding contact line and movement by means of forward wave propagation reaching the front of the droplet. Eventually, the droplet skips forward. The contact line depinning is also corroborated by analytical calculations based on the governing vertical force balance, properly modified to incorporate the effect of the backpressure.

  8. Long-resident droplets at the stratocumulus top