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Sample records for water dissolved heavy

  1. A simple and rapid gas chromatographic method for the determination of dissolved deuterium and nitrogen in heavy water coolant of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, B.K.S.

    1976-01-01

    A known volume of a heavy water sample is equilibrated with a known volume of pure helium gas at atmospheric pressure in a sample tube. The dissolved gases evolve into the helium and distribute themselves between the gaseous and liquid phases according to their equilibrium partial pressures. These partial pressures of the gases in the equilibrium gas mixture are determined by analysing it gas-chromatographically. From these analytical data and the absorption coefficients of deuterium and nitrogen, their original concentrations in heavy water are calculated. Corrections for the increase in the total pressure of the gaseous phase owing to evolved gases are calculated and found to be negligible. Air contamination during sampling and analysis can be detected by the presence of the oxygen peak in the chromatogram and corrected for. The calculation is facilitated by programming it on an electronic calculator. The method is much simpler and faster than the vacuum method usually applied for this analysis. One determination can be completed in about an hour. The average deviation and standard deviation have been estimated at 0.19 ml/litre heavy water and 0.25 ml/litre heavy water respectively in deuterium, and 0.36 and 0.68 ml/litre in nitrogen. (author)

  2. Analysis of total and dissolved heavy metals in surface water of a Mexican polluted river by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarazua, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gzo@nuclear.inin.mx; Avila-Perez, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Tejeda, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Barcelo-Quintal, I. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, T. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-11-15

    The present area of study is located in the Upper Course of the Lerma River (UCLR). The Lerma is one of the most important rivers of Mexico, where it drains highly populated and industrialized regions. The aim of the present study is to determine the heavy metal concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb in dissolved and total phases of the UCLR by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF). The surface water samples were collected at 8 sites distributed following the stream flow direction of the river. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in each site in a 1-year period. A sample preparation method was applied in order to obtain the total and dissolved fraction and to destroy the organic matter. The total heavy metal average concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (2566 {mu}g/L) > Mn (300 {mu}g/L) > Cu (66 {mu}g/L) > Cr (21 {mu}g/L) > Pb (15 {mu}g/L). In general, the heavy metal concentrations in water of the UCLR are below the maximum permissible limits.

  3. Analysis of total and dissolved heavy metals in surface water of a Mexican polluted river by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua, G.; Ávila-Pérez, P.; Tejeda, S.; Barcelo-Quintal, I.; Martínez, T.

    2006-11-01

    The present area of study is located in the Upper Course of the Lerma River (UCLR). The Lerma is one of the most important rivers of Mexico, where it drains highly populated and industrialized regions. The aim of the present study is to determine the heavy metal concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb in dissolved and total phases of the UCLR by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF). The surface water samples were collected at 8 sites distributed following the stream flow direction of the river. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in each site in a 1-year period. A sample preparation method was applied in order to obtain the total and dissolved fraction and to destroy the organic matter. The total heavy metal average concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (2566 μg/L) > Mn (300 μg/L) > Cu (66 μg/L) > Cr (21 μg/L) > Pb (15 μg/L). In general, the heavy metal concentrations in water of the UCLR are below the maximum permissible limits.

  4. Analysis of total and dissolved heavy metals in surface water of a Mexican polluted river by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarazua, G.; Avila-Perez, P.; Tejeda, S.; Barcelo-Quintal, I.; Martinez, T.

    2006-01-01

    The present area of study is located in the Upper Course of the Lerma River (UCLR). The Lerma is one of the most important rivers of Mexico, where it drains highly populated and industrialized regions. The aim of the present study is to determine the heavy metal concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb in dissolved and total phases of the UCLR by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF). The surface water samples were collected at 8 sites distributed following the stream flow direction of the river. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in each site in a 1-year period. A sample preparation method was applied in order to obtain the total and dissolved fraction and to destroy the organic matter. The total heavy metal average concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (2566 μg/L) > Mn (300 μg/L) > Cu (66 μg/L) > Cr (21 μg/L) > Pb (15 μg/L). In general, the heavy metal concentrations in water of the UCLR are below the maximum permissible limits

  5. Chemical characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in relation to heavy metal concentrations in soil water from boreal peatlands after clear-cut harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiikkilä, O.; Nieminen, T.; Starr, M.; Ukonmaanaho, L.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal peatlands form an important terrestrial carbon reserve and are a major source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to surface waters, particularly when disturbed through forestry practices such as draining or timber harvesting. Heavy metals show a strong affinity to organic matter and so, along with DOM, heavy metals can be mobilized and transported from the soil to surface waters and sediments where they may become toxic to aquatic organisms and pass up the food chain. The complexation of heavy metals with DOM can be expected to be related and determined by the chemical characteristics of DOM and oxidation/reducing conditions in the peat. We extracted interstitial water from peat samples and determined the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and Al, Cu, Zn and Fe in various fractions of DOM isolated by adsorption properties (XAD-8 fractionation) and molecular-weight (ultrafiltration). The peat samples were taken from 0-30 and 30-50 cm depth in drained peatland catchments two years after whole-tree or stem-only clear-cut harvesting (Scots pine or Norway spruce) had been carried out. The samples from the upper layer had been subject to alternating saturation/aeration conditions while the deeper layer had been continuously under the water table. The fractionation of DOC and DON according to both adsorption properties and molecular-weight fractions clearly differed between the upper and lower peat layers. While the hydrophobic acid fraction contained proportionally more DOC and DON than the hydrophilic acid fraction in the upper peat layer the results were vice versa in the lower peat layer. High-molecular-weight compounds (> 100 kDa) were proportionally more abundant in the upper and low-molecular-weight compounds (< 1 kDa) in the lower peat layer. These differences are assumed to reflect differences in the aerobic/ anaerobic conditions and degree of decomposition between the two layers. The concentrations of Zn, Al

  6. Functionalized paper--A readily accessible adsorbent for removal of dissolved heavy metal salts and nanoparticles from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyono, Daisy; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2016-01-25

    Paper, a readily available renewable resource, comprises of interwoven cellulosic fibers, which can be functionalized to develop interesting low-cost adsorbent material for water purification. In this study, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized paper was used for the removal of hazardous pollutants such as Au and Ag nanoparticles, Cr(VI) anions, Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) cations from spiked water samples. Compared to untreated paper, the PEI-coated paper showed significant improvement in adsorption capacities toward the pollutants investigated in this study. Kinetics, isotherm models, pH, and desorption studies were carried out to study the adsorption mechanism of pollutants on the adsorbent surface. Adsorption of pollutants was better described by pseudo-second order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm model. Maximum adsorption of anionic pollutants was achieved at pH 5 while that of cations was at pH>6. Overall, the PEI-functionalized paper showed interesting Langmuir adsorption capacities for heavy metal ions such as Cr(VI) (68 mg/g), Ni(2+) (208 mg/g), Cd(2+) (370 mg/g), and Cu(2+) (435 mg/g) ions at neutral pH. In addition, the modified paper was also used to remove Ag-citrate (79 mg/g), Ag-PVP (46 mg/g), Au-citrate (30 mg/g), Au-PVP (17 mg/g) nanoparticles from water. Desorption of NPs from the adsorbent was done by washing with 2 M HCl or thiourea solution, while heavy metal ions were desorbed using 1 M NaOH or HNO3 solution. The modified paper retained its extraction efficiencies upon desorption of pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H.

    1997-01-01

    Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides 85 strontium and 197 cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of dissolved oxygen in water and heavy water through the formation of argentocyanide complex from silver sol (Preprint No. CA-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Tarasankar; Das, P.K.; Pal, Anjali

    1989-04-01

    A yellow silver sol is used as the colour reagent for the determination of trace amounts of dissolved oxygen in water by following the oxygen and cyanide-dependent decrease in intensity of the coloured silver sol at 415nm. The method is best suited to the routine determination of DO in industrial and natural waters at concentrations down to 50 pph. This is the first report of the determination of DO in water using a yellow silver sol in an alkaline medium. (author). 32 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Deuterium and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, G.; Ursu, D.; Mihaila, A.; Szentgyorgyi, P.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography on deuterium and heavy water contains 3763 references (1932-1974) from 43 sources of information. An author index and a subject index are given. The latter contains a list of 136 subjects, arranged in 13 main topics: abundance of deuterium , catalysts, catalytic exchange, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, deuterium and heavy water analysis, deuterium and heavy water properties, deuterium and heavy water separation, exchange reactions, general review, heavy water as moderator, isotope effects, synthesis of deuterium compounds

  10. Production of heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Larry S.; Brown, Sam W.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2017-06-06

    Disclosed are methods and apparatuses for producing heavy water. In one embodiment, a catalyst is treated with high purity air or a mixture of gaseous nitrogen and oxygen with gaseous deuterium all together flowing over the catalyst to produce the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, the deuterium is combusted to form the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, gaseous deuterium and gaseous oxygen is flowed into a fuel cell to produce the heavy water. In various embodiments, the deuterium may be produced by a thermal decomposition and distillation process that involves heating solid lithium deuteride to form liquid lithium deuteride and then extracting the gaseous deuterium from the liquid lithium deuteride.

  11. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-05-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of our research and development program on heavy water processes

  12. Heavy water and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.M.

    1980-05-01

    This report begins with a historical sketch of heavy water. The report next assesses the nonproliferation implications of the use of heavy water-moderated power reactors; several different reactor types are discussed, but the focus is on the natural uranium, on-power fueled, pressure tube reactor CANDU. The need for and development of on-power fueling safeguards is discussed. Also considered is the use of heavy water in plutonium production reactors as well as the broader issue of the relative nuclear leverage that suppliers can bring to bear on countries with natural uranium-fueled reactors as compared to those using enriched designs. The final chapter reviews heavy water production methods and analyzes the difficulties involved in implementing these on both a large and a small scale. It concludes with an overview of proprietary and nonproliferation constraints on heavy water technology transfer

  13. Determination of heavy water in heavy water - light water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza M, A.

    1986-01-01

    A description about experimental methodology to determine isotopic composition of heavy water - light water mixtures is presented. The employed methods are Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0 to 100% with intervals of 10% approx., and mass Spectrometry, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0.1 to 1% with intervals of 0.15% approx., by means of an indirect method of Dilution. (Author)

  14. Heavy water at Aswan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    A fertilizer factory is being built by Egyptian Chemical Industries (Kima) at Aswan on the upper Nile; it will produce a mixture of ammonium nitrate and calcium carbonate adjusted to contain 20.5% nitrogen. It is also proposed to construct a heavy water plant to be located at and integrated with the fertilizer factory. At the request of the Government of the United Arab Republic, the International Atomic Energy Agency sent an expert to carry out investigation of the technical, economic and other related aspects of the proposed production of heavy water. A report was submitted to the IAEA Director General. Its main conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) Production of heavy water as a by-product of fertilizer manufacture at Aswan is technically feasible. Separation of deuterium from industrial hydrogen for this purpose could be done either by catalytic exchange or by liquefaction and distillation; the choice should depend on economic considerations. (2) The heavy water produced at Aswan should be competitive in cost with that produced elsewhere; this, however, would depend on whether firm contracts are obtained for the delivery of equipment at guaranteed prices and with guaranteed performance, and whether such prices are in reasonable agreement with preliminary estimates. (3) The future market for heavy water is difficult to predict. For one thing, there is a very large production capacity in the USA, most of which is idle due to lack of demand. Secondly, there is a relatively small production outside the USA that is sold at prices higher than that charged by the US Government. The future of the market is necessarily contingent upon the possibility of future free sale by the US Government. At the end of his report, the expert has also given his comments on possible further assistance to the project by IAEA

  15. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of the Canadian R and D programme on heavy water processes. Six Canadian heavy water plants with a total design capacity of 4000Mg/a are in operation or under construction. All use the Girdler-Sulphide (GS) process, which is based on deuterium exchange between water and hydrogen sulphide. Early operating problems have been overcome and the plants have demonstrated annual capacity factors in excess of 70%, with short-term production rates equal to design rates. Areas for further improvement are: to increase production rates by optimizing the control of foaming to give both higher sieve tray efficiency and higher flow rates, to reduce the incapacity due to deposition of pyrite (FeS 2 ) and sulphur (between 5% and 10%), and to improve process control and optimization of operating conditions by the application of mathematical simulations of the detailed deuterium profile throughout each plant. Other processes being studied, which look potentially attractive are the hydrogen-water exchange and the hydrogen-amine exchange. Even if they become successful competitors to the GS process, the latter is likely to remain the dominant production method for the next 10-20 years. This programme, when related to the long-term electricity demand, indicates that heavy water supply and demand are in reasonable balance and that the Candu programme will not be inhibited because of shortages of this commodity. (author)

  16. Heavy water upgrader of 'Fugen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Sasaki, Shigeo

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power station of the advanced thermal prototype reactor ''Fugen'' has continued the smooth operation since it started the fullscale operation in March, 1979. Fugen is the first heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled reactor in Japan, and its outstanding feature is the use of heavy water as the moderator. The quantity of heavy water retained in Fugen is about 140 m 3 , and the concentration is 99.8 wt.%. This heavy water had been made is USA, and was imported from F.R. of Germany where it had been used. Heavy water is an internationally regulated material, and it is very expensive and hard to purchase. Therefore in order to prevent the deterioration of heavy water and to avoid its loss as far as possible, the management of the quantity and the control of the water quality have been carried out carefully and strictly. The generation of deteriorated heavy water occurs from the exchange of ion exchange resin for poison removal and purification. The heavy water upgrader reconcentrates the deteriorated heavy water of high concentration and returns to the heavy water system, and it was installed for the purpose of reducing the purchase of supplementary heavy water. The outline of the heavy water upgrader, its construction, the performance test and the operation are described. (Kako, I.)

  17. Neutrinos: Heavy water detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The proponents of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) received a welcome Christmas present when William Winegard, Canadian Minister for Science and Technology announced the final details of the funding for this project, totalling 48 million Canadian dollars and including contributions from the US and the UK. The SNO experiment will extend significantly the study of solar neutrinos, using some 1,000 tonnes of heavy water to be installed more than two kilometres below ground in a nickel mine at Sudbury, Ontario

  18. Heavy water upgrading system in the Fugen heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Susaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The heavy water upgrading system, which is installed in the Fugen heavy water reactor (HWR) was designed to reuse degraded heavy water generated from the deuteration-dedeuteration of resin in the ion exchange column of the moderator purification system. The electrolysis method has been applied in this system on the basis of the predicted generation rate and concentration of degraded heavy water. The structural feature of the electrolytic cell is that it consists of dual cylindrical electrodes, instead of a diaphragm as in the case of conventional water electrolysis. 2 refs

  19. Method of operating heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stabilized reactor control, and improve the working rate and the safety of the reactor by removing liquid poison in heavy water while maintaining the power level constant to thereby render the void coefficient of the coolants negative in the low power operation. Method: The operation device for a heavy water moderated reactor comprises a power detector for the reactor, a void coefficient calculator for coolants, control rods inserted into the reactor, a poison regulator for dissolving poisons into or removing them out of heavy water and a device for removing the poisons by the poison regulator device while maintaining the predetermined power level or inserting the control rods by the signals from the power detector and the void coefficient calculator in the high temperature stand-by conditions of the reactor. Then, the heavy water moderated reactor is operated so that liquid poisons in the heavy water are eliminated in the high temperature stand-by condition prior to the start for the power up while maintaining the power level constant and the plurality of control rods are inserted into the reactor core and the void coefficient of the coolants is rendered negative in the low power operation. (Seki, T.)

  20. Heavy Water - Industrial Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1984-01-01

    This monograph devoted to the heavy water production mainly presents the Romanian experience in the field which started in early sixties from the laboratory scale production and reached now the level of large scale industrial production at ROMAG-Drobeta, Romania. The book is structured in eleven chapters entitled: Overview, The main physical properties, Sources, Uses, Separation factor and equilibrium constant, Mathematical modelling of the separation process, Thermodynamical considerations on the isotope separation, Selection criteria for heavy water separation processes, Industrial installations for heavy water production, Prospects, Acknowledgements. 200 Figs., 90 Tabs., 135 Refs

  1. The Canadian heavy water situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.

    The Canadian heavy water industry is analyzed. Supply and demand are predicted through 1985. Pricing is broken down into components. Backup R and D contributes greatly to process improvements. (E.C.B.)

  2. The Canadian heavy water situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.

    1975-08-01

    Existing heavy water plants in Canada are producing at a satisfactory rate and currently planned capacity is in balance with projected needs. By 1980, we shall have Girdler-Sulphide plants installed with a design capacity of almost 600 kg/h. Effort is required to minimize production costs for heavy water and to ensure that costs do not increase faster than the current inflationary trend. (Author)

  3. Sediment, water pollution indicators for heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabaleiro, S.; Horn, A.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of an aquatic system requires consideration of its dynamics: spatial and temporal variations of physical, chemical and biological. Heavy metals have peculiar behavior in the aquatic system and may not be available in the waters, but on sediments.The sub-basin of the Sarandi stream is responsible for the contamination of Pampulha Lake. The Instituto Mineiro das Águas – IGAM - uses tool for monitoring the quality of surface water for developing strategies for conservation, restoration and rational use of water resources. So through the indices: IQA ( Indice de qualidade de águas) Index of water quality, and TC- toxic contamination, reduces conflicts, implements the disciplining of the environmental economy.This study determined the monitoring of sediment and water of Sarandi Stream, so in the samples collected during dry and rainy seasons (2007- 2008) were analyzed heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Co, Ni, Zn, Pb) and physical-chemical factors (conductivity, solids dissolved, temperature, turbidity). This allowed the determination of Hackanson factors of contamination and Muller Index geoaccumulation, indicating very high contamination in sediments regarding the elements Cr, Cu, and Cd, and high contamination for Pb, Zn, and Mn. The comparison with the indices of water quality- IQA (IGAM - 2006, 2007 and 2008), combined with exploratory data analysis and graphs of correlation between the variables indicated favorable conditions for metals contamination on water and sediment for these metals, besides allowing the identification of its source

  4. Heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides an auxiliary contactor column or exchange tower to receive stripped gas and vapour from a stripper. An auxiliary supply of heated feed water is passed in isotope exchanging relation with the gas in the auxiliary contactor to raise the deuterium content of the gas, which then is returned to the main process, at the hot tower or at the feed absorption tower as already described in relation to previous practice. Flow balance between gas and water in the auxiliary contactor is achieved relatively simply by monitoring the deuterium content of the hot water leaving the contactor column, and regulating the supply of hot water, to the contactor column in response thereto. (author)

  5. Improved method of degassing of feed water at Heavy Water Plant, Kota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, G K; Agrawal, A K [Heavy Water Plant, Kota (India)

    1994-06-01

    Heavy Water Plant (Kota) processes 450 MT/hr of feed water as the source of deuterium using water/hydrogen sulphide exchange process for the production of heavy water. Plant design has limited the ingress of dissolved oxygen in feed water to 0.2 ppm. However, even this low limit on dissolved oxygen has been found unacceptable during plant operation as over an operational period of 3-4 years accumulation of sulphur due to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide on exchange tower trays poses major operational problems. This paper discusses the results of nitrogen injection used for reducing the ingress of dissolved oxygen in the feed water system of the plant. (author). 1 fig.

  6. Improved method of degassing of feed water at Heavy Water Plant, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, G.K.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy Water Plant (Kota) processes 450 MT/hr of feed water as the source of deuterium using water/hydrogen sulphide exchange process for the production of heavy water. Plant design has limited the ingress of dissolved oxygen in feed water to 0.2 ppm. However, even this low limit on dissolved oxygen has been found unacceptable during plant operation as over an operational period of 3-4 years accumulation of sulphur due to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide on exchange tower trays poses major operational problems. This paper discusses the results of nitrogen injection used for reducing the ingress of dissolved oxygen in the feed water system of the plant. (author)

  7. Direction of Heavy Water Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    Summary of the activities performed by the Heavy Water Projects Direction of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission from 1950 to 1983. It covers: historical data; industrial plant (based on ammonia-hydrogen isotopic exchange); experimental plant (utilizing hydrogen sulfides-water process); Module-80 plant (2-3 tons per year experimental plant with national technology) and other related tasks on research and development (E.A.C.) [es

  8. Heavy water. A production alternative for Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of heavy water production methods is made. Main facts about isotopic and distillation methods, reforming and coupling to a Hydrogen distillation plant are presented. A feasibility study on heavy water production in Venezuela is suggested

  9. The size distribution of dissolved uranium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, D.K.; Wong, G.T.F.

    1987-01-01

    The size distribution of dissolved uranium in natural waters is poorly known. Some fraction of dissolved uranium is known to associate with organic matter which had a wide range of molecular weights. The presence of inorganic colloidal uranium has not been reported. Ultrafiltration has been used to quantify the size distribution of a number of elements, such as dissolved organic carbon, selenium, and some trace metals, in both the organic and/or the inorganic forms. The authors have applied this technique to dissolved uranium and the data are reported here

  10. Study of the heavy water regeneration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavcic, E.

    1965-11-01

    Experience derived from heavy water reactor operation showed degradation and dilution of heavy water to be inevitable and depends on the type of reactor. Dilution of heavy water during operation of the RA and the RB reactors is shown in this report. Principles and procedures of heavy water regeneration by electrolysis, fractional distillation, cleaning, prevention of tritium contamination are described as well as separation columns

  11. Evaluation of water quality by chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Z.; Tasneem, M.A.; Javed, T.; Butt, S.; Fazil, M.; Ali, M.; Sajjad, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of Chlorophyll and dissolved Oxygen on water quality. Kalar Kahar and Rawal lakes were selected for this research. A Spectrophotometer was used for determination of Chlorophyll a, Chlorophyll b, Chlorophyll c and Pheophytin pigment. Dissolved Oxygen was measured in situ, using dissolved oxygen meter. The gamma O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen, like concentration, is affected primarily by three processes: air water gas exchange, respiration and photosynthesis; gamma O/sup 18/ is analyzed on isotopic ratio mass spectrometer, after extraction of dissolved Oxygen from water samples, followed by purification and conversion into CO/sub 2/. Rawal lake receives most of the water from precipitation during monsoon period and supplemented by light rains in December and January. This water is used throughout the year for drinking purposes in Rawalpindi city. The water samples were collected from 5, 7.5, and 10 meters of depth for seasonal studies of physiochemical and isotopic parameters of water and dissolved Oxygen. Optimum experimental conditions for delta O/sup 18/ analysis of dissolved Oxygen from aqueous samples were determined. Stratification of dissolved Oxygen was observed in Rawal Lake before rainy season in summer. The water quality deteriorates with depth, because the respiration exceeds the photosynthesis and gas exchange. The concentration and delta O/sup 18/ of dissolved Oxygen show no variation with depth in 1998 winter sampling. Kalar Kahar lake gets water from springs, which are recharged by local rains on the nearby mountains. It is a big lake, with shallow and uniform depth of nearly 1.5 meters. A lot of vegetation can be seen on the periphery of the lake. Algae have grown on the floor of the lake Water samples were collected from the corner with large amount of vegetation and from the center of the lake for dissolved Oxygen and Chlorophyll measurements. Chlorophyll result shows that Kalar Kahar Lake falls in Eutrophic category

  12. Thorium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.

    1984-12-01

    Advanced heavy water reactors can provide energy on a global scale beyond the foreseeable future. Their economic and safety features are promising: 1. The theoretical feasibility of the Self Sufficient Equilibrium Thorium (SSET) concept is confirmed by new calculations. Calculations show that the adjuster rod geometry used in natural uranium CANDU reactors is adequate also for SSET if the absorption in the rods is graded. 2. New fuel bundle designs can permit substantially higher power output from a CANDU reactor. The capital cost for fuel, heavy water and mechanical equipment can thereby be greatly reduced. Progress is possible with the traditional fuel material oxide, but the use of thorium metal gives much larger effects. 3. A promising long range possibility is to use pressure tanks instead of pressure tubes. Heat removal from the core is facilitated. Negative temperature and void coefficients provide inherent safety features. Refuelling under power is no longer needed if control by moderator displacement is used. Reduced quality demand on the fuel permits lower fuel costs. The neutron economy is improved by the absence of pressure and clandria tubes and also by the use of radial and axial blankets. A modular seed blanket design can reduce the Pa losses. The experience from construction of tank designs is good e.g. AAgesta, Attucha. It is now also possible to utilize technology from LWR reactors and the implementation of advanced heavy water reactors would thus be easier than HTR or LMFBR systems. (Author)

  13. Fuel and heavy water availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The general guidelines for the Working Group's evaluation of the availability of nuclear fuel and heavy water were set at the Organizing Conference of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE), which was held in Washington, United States of America, 19-21 October 1977. The agreed technical and economic scope for the evaluation was to: (1) Estimate needs for nuclear energy and correlated needs for uranium and heavy water according to different fuel cycle strategies; (2) Review uranium availability with specific regard to: Assessment of resources and production capacities; policies and incentives for encouraging exploration and production including joint ventures; marketing policies and/or guarantees of sales for companies investing in exploration and production; marketing policies and/or guarantees of supply for utilities; technical development of exploration, mining and milling methods; (3) Review heavy water availability; (4) Review thorium availability; (5) Consider special needs of developing countries. The illustrations of availability and requirements developed in this report do provide a useful framework for considering future options and alternatives for the development of nuclear power

  14. The role of dissolved organic matter in adsorbing heavy metals in clay-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey, Y.; Jansen, B.; El-Shater, A.H.; El-Haddad, A.A.; Kalbitz, K.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of tested heavy metals on Egyptian soils was large in all situations tested and follows the order: Cu >> Ni ≈ Zn. Copper was influenced by the timing of dissolved organic matter addition more than Ni and Zn. Specific binding mechanisms (inner-sphere complexes) dominated the affinity of Cu

  15. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The

  16. Topical and working papers on heavy water requirements and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The documents included in this report are: Heavy water requirements and availability; technological infrastructure for heavy water plants; heavy water plant siting; hydrogen and methane availability; economics of heavy water production; monothermal, water fed heavy water process based on the ammonia/hydrogen isotopic exchange; production strategies to meet demand projections; hydrogen availability; deuterium sources; the independent UHDE heavy water process

  17. Role of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and heavy metals in a river-sea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiu, Ruei-Feng [Department of Marine Environment and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chon-Lin, E-mail: linnohc@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Marine Environment and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Asia-Pacific Ocean Research Center, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Different types of DOC polymers forming microgel were compared. • The assembly effectiveness of marine DOC was much higher than riverine DOC. • Types and sources of DOC polymers may control the aquatic microgel abundance. • An alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal is presented. • Ecological risk and fate assessments of pollutants may consider the microgel phase. - Abstract: We use riverine and marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) polymers to examine their aggregation behavior, and to evaluate the roles of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and heavy metals in a river-sea system. Our results indicate that riverine and marine microgels did not exhibit very much difference in size and self-assembly curve; however, the assembly effectiveness ([microgel]/DOC) of marine samples was much higher than riverine. Instead of concentration of DOC, other factors such as types and sources of DOC polymers may control the microgel abundance in aquatic environments. After filtering water samples (microgels removed), the CDOM and selected metals (Cu, Ni, Mn) in the filtrate were quantified. CDOM and metals were concurrently removed to an extent via DOC polymer re-aggregation, which also suggested that the microgels had sequestering capability in CDOM and metals. This finding provides an alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal from the water column. As such the process of re-aggregation into microgels should then be considered besides traditional phase partitioning in the assessment of the ecological risk and fate of hazardous materials.

  18. Role of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and heavy metals in a river-sea system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, Ruei-Feng; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different types of DOC polymers forming microgel were compared. • The assembly effectiveness of marine DOC was much higher than riverine DOC. • Types and sources of DOC polymers may control the aquatic microgel abundance. • An alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal is presented. • Ecological risk and fate assessments of pollutants may consider the microgel phase. - Abstract: We use riverine and marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) polymers to examine their aggregation behavior, and to evaluate the roles of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and heavy metals in a river-sea system. Our results indicate that riverine and marine microgels did not exhibit very much difference in size and self-assembly curve; however, the assembly effectiveness ([microgel]/DOC) of marine samples was much higher than riverine. Instead of concentration of DOC, other factors such as types and sources of DOC polymers may control the microgel abundance in aquatic environments. After filtering water samples (microgels removed), the CDOM and selected metals (Cu, Ni, Mn) in the filtrate were quantified. CDOM and metals were concurrently removed to an extent via DOC polymer re-aggregation, which also suggested that the microgels had sequestering capability in CDOM and metals. This finding provides an alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal from the water column. As such the process of re-aggregation into microgels should then be considered besides traditional phase partitioning in the assessment of the ecological risk and fate of hazardous materials.

  19. Drying of heavy water system and works of charging heavy water in Fugen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Iijima, Setsuo

    1980-01-01

    The advanced thermal reactor ''Fugen'' is the first heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled nuclear reactor for power generation in Japan. It is a large heavy water reactor having about 130 m 3 of heavy water inventory and about 300 m 3 of helium space as the cover gas of the heavy water system. The heavy water required was purchased from FRG, which had been used for the power output test in the KKN, and the quality was 99.82 mol % mean heavy water concentration. The concentration of heavy water for Fugen used for the nuclear design is 99.70 mol%, and it was investigated how heavy water can be charged without lowering the concentration. The matters of investigation include the method of bringing the heavy water and helium system to perfect dryness after washing and light water test, the method of confirming the sufficient dryness to prevent the deterioration, and the method of charging heavy water safely from its containers. On the basis of the results of investigation, the actual works were started. The works of drying the heavy water and helium system by vacuum drying, the works of sampling heavy water and the result of the degree of deterioration, and the works of charging heavy water and the measures to the heavy water remaing in the containers are described. All the works were completed safely and smoothly. (J.P.N.)

  20. Neutron moderation in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, J.T. de.

    1980-03-01

    The calculation of the energetic spectrum of thermic neutrons in heavy water, according to the models of the differential cross section; is presented. Simplifications in the Butler model are suggested for the diminution of computer time. The results obtained are compared with experimental data and with the Brown - St.John model. This calculation has been done in 30 energy groups and within our limit of precision, the results with the models and simplifications present satisfactory values, allowing its inclusion in reactor codes. (Author) [pt

  1. Heavy metal toxicity and bioavailability of dissolved nutrients to a bacterivorous flagellate are linked to suspended particle physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenigk, Jens; Wiedlroither, Anneliese; Pfandl, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Many dissolved substances attach easily to sediment particles. In the presence of suspended sediments bioavailability of dissolved substances is therefore, usually reduced and clays are even applied to 'wash' natural waters upon pollution. In organisms which feed on food organisms in the size range of these suspended sediment particles, however, bioavailability of such substances may even increase. For microorganisms the interaction with dissolved substances and suspended sediment particles so far has hardly been investigated. We specifically tested: (1) the importance of suspended particles as an uptake route for dissolved substances; and (2) the significance of particle surface properties, i.e. surface load and mineralogy. As a model system we used an axenically cultured strain of a widespread and often abundant flagellate ('Spumella-like' flagellate strain JBM10). We tested the toxicity of cadmium (II) and mercury (II) as well as availability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the absence as well as in the presence of different natural clays, i.e. a kaolinite, a montmorillonite, and a mixed clay, and of artificial silicate particles of different surface charge. When applied separately the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury as well as of suspended particles negatively affected the investigated flagellate but nutritive organics supported growth of the investigated flagellate. Toxic stress response comprises behavioral changes including enhanced swimming activity and stress egestion of ingested particles and was generally similar for a variety of different flagellate species. In combination with suspended particles, the respective effect of trace metals and nutritive substances decreased. Regarding the particle quality, cadmium toxicity increased with increasingly negative surface charge, i.e. increasing surface density of silanol groups (Pearson's product moment, P = 0.005). For mercury particle mineralogy still had a significant effect (P < 0

  2. Production of heavy water in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, P.G.; Bimbhat, K.S.; Bhargava, R.K.

    India's first heavy water plant, using electrolysis of water followed by liquid hydrogen distillation, has been operating in association with a fertilizer plant at Nangal since 1962. A dual-temperature process plant at Kota uses heat from the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station. The heavy water plants at Baroda and Tuticorin use ammonia-hydrogen exchange and are integrated with fertilizer ammonia plants. Choice of a particular process for heavy water production depends upon local conditions as well as the extent of the heavy water requirement

  3. Dissolved nitrogen in drinking water resources of farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissolved nitrogen in drinking water resources of farming communities in Ghana. ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology ... Concentrations of these potentially toxic substances were below WHO acceptable limits for surface and groundwaters, indicating these water resources appear safe for drinking ...

  4. Heavy Water Quality Management in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Mun; Kim, Hi Gon; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Ho Young; Hur, Soon Ock; Ahn, Guk Hoon

    2008-12-15

    Heavy water quality management in the reflector tank is a very important element to maintain the good thermal neutron flux and to ensure the performance of reflector cooling system. This report is written to provide a guidance for the future by describing the history of the heavy water quality management during HANARO operation. The heavy water quality in the reflector tank has been managed by measuring the electrical conductivity at the inlet and outlet of the ion exchanger and by measuring pH of the heavy water. In this report, the heavy water quality management activities performed in HANARO from 1996 to 2007 ere described including a basic theory of the heavy water quality management, exchanging history of used resin in the reflector cooling system, measurement data of the pH and the electrical conductivity, and operation history of the reflector cooling system.

  5. Clarification of dissolved irradiated light-water-reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.C.

    1983-02-01

    Bench-scale studies with actual dissolved irradiated light water reactor (LWR) fuels showed that continuous centrifugation is a practical clarification method for reprocessing. Dissolved irradiated LWR fuel was satisfactorily clarified in a bench-scale, continuous-flow bowl centrifuge. The solids separated were successfully reslurried in water. When the reslurried solids were mixed with clarified centrate, the resulting suspension behaved similar to the original dissolver solution during centrifugation. Settling rates for solids in actual irradiated fuel solutions were measured in a bottle centrifuge. The results indicate that dissolver solutions may be clarified under conditions achievable by available plant-scale centrifuge technology. The effective particle diameter of residual solids was calculated to be 0.064 microns for Oconee-1 fuel and 0.138 microns for Dresden-1 fuel. Filtration was shown unsuitable for clarification of LWR fuel solutions. Conventional filtration with filter aid would unacceptably complicate remote canyon operation and maintenance, might introduce dissolved silica from filter aids, and might irreversibly plug the filter with dissolver solids. Inertial filtration exhibited irreversible pluggage with nonradioactive stand-in suspensions under all conditions tested

  6. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  7. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Role of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and heavy metals in a river-sea system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Ruei-Feng; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2017-04-15

    We use riverine and marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) polymers to examine their aggregation behavior, and to evaluate the roles of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and heavy metals in a river-sea system. Our results indicate that riverine and marine microgels did not exhibit very much difference in size and self-assembly curve; however, the assembly effectiveness ([microgel]/DOC) of marine samples was much higher than riverine. Instead of concentration of DOC, other factors such as types and sources of DOC polymers may control the microgel abundance in aquatic environments. After filtering water samples (microgels removed), the CDOM and selected metals (Cu, Ni, Mn) in the filtrate were quantified. CDOM and metals were concurrently removed to an extent via DOC polymer re-aggregation, which also suggested that the microgels had sequestering capability in CDOM and metals. This finding provides an alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal from the water column. As such the process of re-aggregation into microgels should then be considered besides traditional phase partitioning in the assessment of the ecological risk and fate of hazardous materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Heavy water production by alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin; Sandeep, K.C.; Bhanja, Kalyan; Mohan, Sadhana; Sugilal, G.

    2014-01-01

    Several heavy water isotope production processes are reported in literature. Water electrolysis in combination with catalytic exchange CECE process is considered as a futuristic process to increase the throughput and reduce the cryogenic distillation load but the application is limited due to the high cost of electricity. Any improvement in the efficiency of electrolyzers would make this process more attractive. The efficiency of alkaline water electrolysis is governed by various phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization and concentration polarization in the cell. A systematic study on the effect of these factors can lead to methods for improving the efficiency of the electrolyzer. A bipolar and compact type arrangement of the alkaline water electrolyzer leads to increased efficiency and reduced inventory in comparison to uni-polar tank type electrolyzers. The bipolar type arrangement is formed when a number of single cells are stacked together. Although a few experimental studies have been reported in the open literature, CFD simulation of a bipolar compact alkaline water electrolyzer with porous electrodes is not readily available.The principal aim of this study is to simulate the characteristics of a single cell compact electrolyzer unit. The simulation can be used to predict the Voltage-Current Density (V-I) characteristics, which is a measure of the efficiency of the process.The model equations were solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The simulated V-I characteristic is compared with the experimental data

  11. Heavy water lattices: Second panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-09-15

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the laboratories engaged in the field of heavy water lattices throughout the world. The participants presented written contributions and status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of heavy-water reactors. Valuable discussions took place, during which recommendations for future work were formulated. Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Heavy water lattices: Second panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the laboratories engaged in the field of heavy water lattices throughout the world. The participants presented written contributions and status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of heavy-water reactors. Valuable discussions took place, during which recommendations for future work were formulated. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. The Canadian heavy water supply program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; McNally, P.J.

    1976-06-01

    The performance to date of individual Canadian heavy water plants is described in detail as are the current plant construction plans. These data, when related to the long-term electricity demand indicate that heavy water supply and demand are in reasonable balance and that the CANDU program will not be inhibited because of shortages of the commodity. (author)

  14. Dissolved Carbon Dioxide in Tropical East Atlantic Surface Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.C.E.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Jong, E. de

    1999-01-01

    Variability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) is discussed for tropical East Atlantic surface waters in October–November 1993 and May–June 1994. High precipitation associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, river input and equatorial upwelling

  15. Fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the continental shelf waters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) of southwestern Bay of Bengal surface water during southwest monsoon consisted five fluorophores, three humic-like and two protein-like. The humification index (HIX) and humic fluorophores, viz., visible (C), marine (M) and UV (A) humic-likes indicated, better than ...

  16. Method of controlling power of a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To adjust a level of heavy water in a region of reflection body to control power in a heavy water reactor. Structure: The interior of a core tank filled with heavy water is divided by a partition into a core heavy water region and a reflection body region formed by surrounding the core heavy water region, and a level of heavy water within the reflection body region is adjusted to control power. Preferably, it is desirable to communicate the core heavy water region with the reflection body heavy water region at their lower portion, and gas pressure applied to an upper portion within at least one of said regions is adjusted to adjust the level of heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region. Thereby, the heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region may be introduced into the core region, thus requiring no tank which stores heavy water within the reflection body region. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Heavy water leak detection using diffusion sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.L.; Hussain, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the Pressurrised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) detection of the sources of heavy water leaks is importent both for the purpose of radiation hazard control as well as for the reduction of escape/loss of heavy water which, is an expensive nuclear material. This paper describes an application of tritium diffusion sampler for heavy water leak detection. The diffusion sampler comprises an usual tritium counting glass vial with a special orifice. The counting vial has water vapour, deficient in HTO concentration. The HTO present outside diffuses in the vial through the orifice, gets exchanged with water of the wet filter paper kept at the bottom and the moisture in the vial atmosphere which has HTO concentration lower than that outside. This results in continuation of net movement of HTO in the vial. The exchanged tritium is counted in liquid scintillation spectrometer. The method has a sensitivity of 10000 dpm/DAC-h. (author). 2 figs., 2 ta bs

  18. Standards for heavy water concentration determinations in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, M.; Steflea, D.; Pavelescu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a method to prepare heavy water -light water standards within the range 144 ppm - 1%. A formula for computing standards concentration based on initial concentration of D 2 O and distilled water is given

  19. Measurement of concentration of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yuichi; Kondo, Mitsuo; Sakurai, Naoyuki

    1979-01-01

    The concentration of heavy water is measured as one of the technical management in the Fugen plant. The heavy water is used as the moderator in the reactor. The measuring method depends on the theory of light absorption. The light absorption range of heavy water spreads from near infrared to infrared zone. The near infrared absorption was adopted for the purpose, as the absorption is much larger in infrared zone, and the measurement has to be conducted, limiting the apparent absorption. This measuring method is available to determine the concentration of heavy water in the broad range exactly. The preparation of heavy water sample and the measurement of the absorption spectra of near infrared ray are explained, as the experimental procedure. The sample cell was made of quartz, and the spectroscope was the Hitachi 323 type. The resolving power is 100 nm and 27 nm for the wave length of 1000 nm and 2500 nm, respectively. Concerning the measured results, the absorption was recorded in the wave length range from 600 nm to 2600 nm, and for the heavy water concentration range from 0 to 99.77 wt. %. The peaks of absorption were located at the wave length of 1450, 1660, 1920, 1970, 2020 and 2600 nm. The three kinds of fundamental vibration mode of the molecules of both light and heavy water are shown, and the peaks belong to H 2 O, HDO and D 2 O, respectively. The relation between the absorption and the heavy water concentration, and that between the transmissivity and the wave length are shown, when the cell thickness was varied to 5 mm and 20 mm, and the heavy water concentration to 21%, 62% and 99.85%. (Nakai, Y.)

  20. Finishing and upgrading of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention provides a process and apparatus for deuterium enrichment as a final stage in a heavy water plant, for continuous on-line enrichment of the heavy water in moderator and heat transfer systems in heavy water nuclear reactors, and for enrichment of hevy water that has been downgraded with natural water during the course of operating a heavy water nuclear reactor. The method comprises contacting partially-enriched heavy water feed in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas (essentially D 2 ) orginating in an electrolysis cell so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and passing the deuterium-enriched water to the electrolysis cell. The apparatus comprises a catalyst isotope exchange column with hydrogen gas and liquid water passing through in countercurrent isotope exchange, an electrolysis cell, a dehumidifer-scrubber; and means for passing the liquid water enriched in deuterium from the catalyst column through the dehumidifer-scrubber to the electrolysis cell, for passing the hydrogen gas evolved in the cathode side of the cell through the dehumidifier-scrubber to the catalyst column, for passing the hydrogen gas from the catalyst column to an output, for introducing an input water feed to the upper portion of the catalyst column, and for taking a product enriched in deuterium from the system. (LL)

  1. IR analyzer spots heavy water leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    A correlation spectrometer developed by Barringer Research Ltd. (in collaboration with Atomic Energy of Canada and Ontario Hydro) is used to measure HDO concentrations in DTO in the final (distillation) stage of heavy-water production. A unit has been installed at Bruce Heavy Water Plant. Previously, such spectrometers had been installed to detect heavy-water leaks in CANDU reactors. The principle on which the instrument works is explained, with illustrations. It works by comparing the absorption at 2.9 μm, due to HDO, with that at 2.6 μm, due to both HDO and D 2 O. (N.D.H.)

  2. Indian heavy water programme - challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruldoss Kanthiah, W.S.

    2010-01-01

    Discovery of fission of uranium in 1939 opened up hitherto unknown possibilities for utilising the fission energy for use of mankind, mainly for the production of and electrical energy. It was realised that this nuclear energy could be an ideal substitute for the fast depleting fossil fuels which would one day get exhausted. Two main concepts of nuclear power reactor got evolved, one enriched uranium fuelled, ordinary water moderated reactor and another natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated reactor. The concentration of uranium 235 U needed for ordinary water moderated reactors is 3% but the naturally occurring uranium in India contains only 0.7% of 235 U. The reactors utilising natural uranium as fuel require Heavy Water as moderator. The processing of uranium ore to achieve from 0.7% to 3% is highly complex. Recognising the fact that India has limited uranium resources but rich thorium resources, Dr. Bhabha formulated a three stage nuclear power generation programme for our country. The first generation reactors can use natural uranium as fuel with heavy water as moderator. Since the technology to generate such large scale heavy water to match the urgent need for nuclear power generation was not indigenously available, the technology available with Canada and France was utilised for installation of first generation heavy water plants in India. However, the peaceful nuclear experiment conducted by India in 1974 caused resentment among the countries that supplied Heavy Water technology to India and they stopped all technological help and assistance in nuclear field. Thereafter, it was the story of India going alone in heavy water production. That made India meets successfully all challenges on the way to installation, commissioning and sustained operation of all plants. Today we have six operating Heavy Water plants, spread all over the country. We have reached a stage, a change from a situation of crunch to a level of not only self sufficiency but to a

  3. Implicit analysis of the transient water flow with dissolved air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Twyman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The implicit finite-difference method (IFDM for solving a system that transports water with dissolved air using a fixed (or variable rectangular space-time mesh defined by the specified time step method is applied. The air content in the fluid modifies both the wave speed and the Courant number, which makes it inconvenient to apply the traditional Method of Characteristics (MOC and other explicit schemes due to their impossibility to simulate the changes in magnitude, shape and frequency of the pressures train. The conclusion is that the IFDM delivers an accurate and stable solution, with a good adjustment level with respect to a classical case reported in the literature, being a valid alternative for the transient solution in systems that transport water with dissolved air.

  4. The effect of dissolved oxygen on water radiolysis behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakabuskie, P.A.; Joseph, J.M.; Wren, J.C.; Stuart, C.R.

    2012-09-01

    A quantitative understanding of the chemical or redox environments generated in water by ionizing radiation is important for material selection, development of maintenance programs, and safety assessments for water-cooled nuclear power reactors. The highly reactive radicals (·OH, ·H, ·e aq - , ·HO 2 , and ·O 2 - ) and molecular species (H 2 and H 2 O 2 ) generated by water radiolysis can compete in reactions with other dissolved compounds and impose changes to the system chemistry by altering the steady-state concentrations of water radiolysis products, which could impact the degradation of materials in contact with the aqueous phase. Understanding in detail how a given chemical additive changes the long-term radiolysis kinetics can help us to determine what chemistry control steps may be required to return the system to an optimal redox condition, and in turn, enhance the lifetime of reactor components. This study outlines the effect of dissolved oxygen gas, which could be introduced due to air ingress, on long-term water radiolysis behaviour. The effects of solution pH and initial dissolved O 2 concentration on the radiolytic production of molecular H 2 and H 2 O 2 have been investigated by performing experiments with three different O 2 concentrations at pH 6.0 and 10.6 under steady-state radiolysis conditions. The aqueous and gas phase analyses were performed using UV-Vis spectrophotometry and gas-chromatography equipped with electron capture and thermal conductivity detectors. The experimental results were compared with kinetic model calculations of steady-state radiolysis and were found to be in good agreement. The concentrations of water radiolysis products, H 2 O 2 and H 2 , were found to increase in the presence of dissolved oxygen, but the degree of increase was shown to depend on the solution pH. Furthermore, the steady-state concentration of H 2 did not increase as greatly as that of H 2 O 2 at either pH studied. The kinetic analyses have shown

  5. Heavy water physical verification in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.; Schuricht, V.; Beetle, T.; Szabo, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a report on the Agency experience in verifying heavy water inventories in power plants. The safeguards objectives and goals for such activities are defined in the paper. The heavy water is stratified according to the flow within the power plant, including upgraders. A safeguards scheme based on a combination of records auditing, comparing records and reports, and physical verification has been developed. This scheme has elevated the status of heavy water safeguards to a level comparable to nuclear material safeguards in bulk facilities. It leads to attribute and variable verification of the heavy water inventory in the different system components and in the store. The verification methods include volume and weight determination, sampling and analysis, non-destructive assay (NDA), and criticality check. The analysis of the different measurement methods and their limits of accuracy are discussed in the paper

  6. Electromagnetic radiation during electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, E.P.; Yanchuk, O.M.; Reshetnyak, O.V.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions during electrolysis of heavy water on nickel and palladium cathodes was determined for the first time. A sharp jump of the intensity photon flow was observed at a current density of higher than 125 mA/cm 2 . A hypothesis about the relation of the electrochemiluminescence phenomenon during electrolysis of heavy water with the formation of fresh surfaces in consequence of the hydrogenous corrosion of the cathode material is formulated. ((orig.))

  7. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  8. Removal of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Heavy Metals in a River-Sea System: Role of Aquatic Microgel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, R. F.; Lee, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) polymers are complex and poorly understood mixture of organic macromolecules in environment system. Portions of these polymers spontaneously form microgels that play key roles in many biogeochemical reactions, including mediating aggregation processes, element cycling, and pollutant mobility. However, the detailed interaction of microgels-heterogeneous materials in aquatic systems is still lacking. Insight into the interaction between surrounding materials and microgels from different types of aquatic DOC polymers are extremely important, as it is crucial in determining the fate and transport of these materials. Here, we use riverine and marine DOC polymers to examine their aggregation behavior, and to evaluate the roles of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and heavy metals in a river-sea system. Our results indicate that riverine and marine microgels did not exhibit too much difference in size ( 3-5 μm) and self-assembly curve; however, the assembly effectiveness ([microgel]/DOC) of marine samples was much higher than riverine. Instead of concentration of DOC, other factors such as types and sources of DOC polymers may control the microgel abundance in aquatic environments. After filtering water samples (microgels removed), the CDOM and selected metals (Cu, Ni, Mn) in the filtrate were quantified. CDOM and metals were concurrently removed to an extent via DOC polymer re-aggregation, which also suggested that the microgels had the sequestering capability in CDOM and metals. This finding provides an alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal from the water column. As such the process of re-aggregation into microgels should then be considered besides traditional phase partitioning in the assessment of the ecological risk and fate of pollutant.

  9. Change of deuterium volume content in heavy water during carbon dioxide dissolution in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, T.I.; Kapitanov, V.F.; Levchenko, G.V.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon dioxide solution density in heavy water at increased temperature and pressure is measured and the influence of carbon dioxide solubility in heavy water on volumetric content of deuterium in it is determined. Investigations were conducted in the temperature range of 303-473 K and pressure range of 3-20 MPa by the autoclave method. Volumetric content of deuterium in heavy water decreases sufficiently with CO 2 dissolved in it in comparison with pure D 2 O under the similar conditions, and this decrease becomes more sufficient with the pressure increase. With the temperature increase the volumetric content of deuterium both for heavy water and for saturated carbon solution in heavy water decreases

  10. Technical status study of heavy water enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono; Imam Dahroni; Didik Herhady

    2007-01-01

    Technical status study of heavy water enrichment in Indonesia and also in the world has been done. Heavy water enrichment processes have been investigated were water distillation, hydrogen distillation, laser enrichment, electrolysis and isotop exchange. For the isotop exchange, the chemical pair can be used were water-hydrogen sulphite, ammonium-hydrogen, aminomethane-hydrogen, and water-hydrogen. For the isotope exchange, there was carried out by mono thermal or bi thermal. The highest producer of heavy water is Canada, and the other producer is USA, Norwegian and India. The processes be used in the world are isotope exchange Girdler Sulphide (GS), distillation and electrolysis. Research of heavy water carried out in Batan Yogyakarta, has a purpose to know the characteristic of heavy water purification. Several apparatus which has erected were 3 distillation column: Pyrex glass of 2 m tall, stainless steel column of 3 m tall and steel of 6 m tall. Electrolysis apparatus is 50 cell electrolysis and an isotope exchange unit which has catalyst: Ni- Cr 2 O 3 and Pt-Carbon. These apparatus were not ready to operate. (author)

  11. Improvement in fuel utilization in pressurized heavy water reactors due to increased heavy water purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), the reactivity of the reactor and, consequently, the discharge burnup of the fuel depend on the isotopic purity of the heavy water used in the reactor. The optimal purity of heavy water used in PHWRs, in turn, depends on the cost of fabricated uranium fuel and on the incremental cost incurred in improving the heavy water purity. The physics and economics aspects of the desirability of increasing the heavy water purity in PHWRs in India were first examined in 1978. With the cost data available at that time, it was found that improving the heavy water purity from 99.80% to 99.95% was economically attractive. The same problem is reinvestigated with current cost data. Even now, there is sufficient incentive to improve the isotopic purity of heavy water used in PHWRs. Admittedly, the economic advantage that can be derived depends on the cost of the fabricated fuel. Nevertheless, irrespective of the economics, there is also a fairly substantial saving in natural uranium. That the increase in the heavy water purity is to be maintained only in the low-pressure moderator system, and not in the high-pressure coolant system, makes the option of achieving higher fuel burnup with higher heavy water purity feasible

  12. Topical and working papers on heavy water accountability and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following papers: 1) Statement of IAEA concerning safeguarding of heavy water; 2) Preliminary Canadian Comments on IAEA document on heavy water safeguards; 3) Heavy water accountability 03.10.78; 4) Heavy water accountability 05.04.79

  13. Future trends in heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galley, M.R.

    1983-10-01

    World heavy water production has spanned nearly fifty years and, for much of that period, the commodity was often in short supply, but that situation has changed, at least in Canada. There are now adequate reserves of heavy water and sufficient installed production capacity to service Canadian domestic and export demands for the next ten years or beyond. More than 90 percent of the world's inventory of heavy water has been produced by the GS process but this may not be the method that is chosen when the time comes to expand heavy water production again. Other countries, such as India and Argentina, have already chosen ammonia-hydrogen exchange as an alternative technology for part of their domestic production programs. Despite the present surplus of heavy water, research and development of new technologies is very active, particularly in Canada and Japan, because it is recognized that there are still attractive opportunities for future production by processes that are both less expensive and environmentally more acceptable, than either the demonstrated GS process or ammonia-hydrogen alternative. This paper describes the prospects for some of these new processes, contrasts them with the present established methods and assesses the probable impact on the future supply situation

  14. Experimental study on total dissolved gas supersaturation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available More and more high dams have been constructed and operated in China. The total dissolved gas (TDG supersaturation caused by dam discharge leads to gas bubble disease or even death of fish. Through a series of experiments, the conditions and requirements of supersaturated TDG generation were examined in this study. The results show that pressure (water depth, aeration, and bubble dissolution time are required for supersaturated TDG generation, and the air-water contact area and turbulence intensity are the main factors that affect the generation rate of supersaturated TDG. The TDG supersaturation levels can be reduced by discharging water to shallow shoals downstream of the dam or using negative pressure pipelines. Furthermore, the TDG supersaturation levels in stilling basins have no direct relationship with those in reservoirs. These results are of great importance for further research on the prediction of supersaturated TDG generation caused by dam discharge and aquatic protection.

  15. Heavy water cycle in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanis, R.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen atom has two isotopes: deuterium 1 H 2 and tritium 1 H 3 . The deuterium oxide D 2 O is called heavy water due to its density of 1105.2 Kg/m 3 . Another important physical property of the heavy water is the low neutron capture section, suitable to moderate the neutrons into natural uranium fission reactor as CANDU. Due to the fact that into this reactor the fuel is cooled into the pressure tubes surrounded by a moderator, the usage of D 2 O as primary heat transport (PHT) agent is mandatory. Therefore a large amount of heavy water (approx. 500 tons) is used in a CANDU reactor. Being a costly resource - it represents 20% of the initial plant capital cost, D 2 O management is required to preserve it. (author)

  16. Modeling the transport of hydrogen in the primary coolant of pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Jain, A.K.; Dash, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy water (D 2 O) is used in primary heat transport systems of PHWRs. To suppress the radiolysis of heavy water and to control oxygen, hydrogen is added at regular intervals to the primary heat transport system. The added hydrogen finds it way to the heavy water storage tank after passing through the bleed condenser. Owing to the different temperatures and two phase region present in these systems, hydrogen gets redistributed. It is important to know the concentration of dissolved hydrogen in these regions in order to ensure a steady state dissolved hydrogen concentration in the primary system. Different power stations report variations in the frequency and quantity of hydrogen added to achieve the prescribed steady state level. This paper makes an attempt to account for the inventory of hydrogen and model its transport in PHT system. (author)

  17. Tritium separation from heavy water using electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kodaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tritium separation from heavy water by the electrolysis using a solid polymer electrode (SPE) was specified on investigation. The heavy water (∼10 Bq g -1 ) and the light water (∼70 Bq g -1 ) were electrolysed using an electrolysis device (Tripure XZ001, Permelec Electrode Ltd.) with the SPE layer. The cathode was made of stainless steel (SUS314). The electrolysis was carried out at 20 A x 60 min, with the electrolysis temperature at 10, 20, or 30degC, and 15 A x 80 min at 5degC. The produced hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined using a palladium catalyst (ND-101, N.E. Chemcat Ltd.) with nitrogen gas as a carrier. The activities of the water in the cell and of the recombined water were analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The electrolysis potential to keep the current 20 A was 2-3 V. The yields of the recombined water were more than 90%. The apparent separation factors (SF) for the heavy water and the light water were ∼2 and ∼12, respectively. The SF value was in agreement with the results in other work. The factors were changed with the cell temperature. The electrolysis using the SPE is applicable for the tritium separation, and is able to perform the small-scale apparatus at the room temperature. (author)

  18. Relation between the amount of dissolved water and metals dissolved from stainless steel or aluminum plate in safflower oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasago, Masahisa; Takaoka, Kyo

    1986-12-01

    The amount of water dissolved in safflower oil at the frying temperature (180 deg C) was 518 -- 1012 ppM, allowing water to drop continuously (0.035 g/2 min) into the oil for 1 -- 3 h. When the oil was heated with metal plates under the same conditions, the amount of dissolved water in the oil increased more than in the absence of the metal plates. In case of stainless steel, the amount was 1.26 to 1.33 times, and with aluminum plates, 1.06 to 1.13 times the amount without plates. When these metal plates were heated with the oil under the above conditions, the water dissolved the metal of the plates into the oil. In case of stainless steel, iron dissolved from 0.17 to 0.77 ppM, nickel, 0.04 ppM and chromium, from 0.02 to 0.03 ppM. Similarly, the amount of aluminum dissolved from the aluminum plate was from 0.10 to 0.45 ppM.

  19. The relation between the amount of dissolved water and metals dissolved from stainless steel or aluminum plate in safflower oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasago, Masahisa; Takaoka, Kyo

    1986-01-01

    The amount of water dissolved in safflower oil at the frying temperature (180 deg C) was 518 ∼ 1012 ppm, allowing water to drop continuously (0.035 g/2 min) into the oil for 1 ∼ 3 h. When the oil was heated with metal plates under the same conditions, the amount of dissolved water in the oil increased more than in the absence of the metal plates. In case of stainless steel, the amount was 1.26 to 1.33 times, and with aluminum plates, 1.06 to 1.13 times the amount without plates. When these metal plates were heated with the oil under the above conditions, the water dissolved the metal of the plates into the oil. In case of stainless steel, iron dissolved from 0.17 to 0.77 ppm, nickel, 0.04 ppm and chromium, from 0.02 to 0.03 ppm. Similarly, the amount of aluminum dissolved from the aluminum plate was from 0.10 to 0.45 ppm. (author)

  20. Detection of gaseous heavy water leakage points in CANDU 6 pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, T-K.; Jung, S-H.

    1996-01-01

    During reactor operation, the heavy water filled primary coolant system in a CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water (PHWR) may leak through routine operations of the plant via components, mechanical joints, and during inadvertent operations etc. Early detection of leak points is therefore important to maintain plant safety and economy. There are many independent systems to monitor and recover heavy water leakage in a CANDU 6 PHWR. Methodology for early detection based on operating experience from these systems, is investigated in this paper. In addition, the four symptoms of D 2 O leakage, the associated process for clarifying and verifying the leakage, and the probable points of leakage are discussed. (author)

  1. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Jayasree; Vijayan, K.; Kain, Vivekanad; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  2. High conversion heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1989-01-01

    In the present invention, fuel rods using uranium-plutonium oxide mixture fuels are arranged in a square lattice at the same pitch as that in light water cooled reactor and heavy water moderators are used. Accordingly, the volume ratio (Vm/Vf) between the moderator and the fuel can be, for example, of about 2. When heavy water is used for the moderator (coolant), since the moderating effect of heavy water is lower than that of light water, a high conversion ratio of not less than 0.8 can be obtained even if the fuel rod arrangement is equal to that of PWR (Vm/Vf about 2). Accordingly, it is possible to avoid problems caused by dense arrangement of fuel rods as in high conversion rate light water cooled reactors. That is, there are no more troubles in view of thermal hydrodynamic characteristics, re-flooding upon loss of coolant accident, etc., as well as the fuel production cost is not increased. (K.M.)

  3. Production of heavy water by photodesorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwer, T.; Goldstein, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    Research has recently brought attention to the laser as a tool for isotope enrichment. So far the main thrust of this effort has been toward uranium enrichment; however, numerous successes in other areas have been demonstrated. Isotopes of boron, sulfur, chlorine, and carbon have been separated. A new technique is proposed for laser isotope enrichment. The technique, referred to as photodesorption, involves selective isotopic excitation of molecules adsorbed on a surface such that an enrichment results from subsequent physical or chemical events undergone by the excited molecules. The specific processes of concern are the physical photodesorption enrichment of heavy water from light water and tritiated water from heavy water. The ability to work directly with water molecules has significant advantages for a commercial process. A photodesorption enrichment process has been forumulated and some analyses have been performed. This process is described and some preliminary cost estimates are made which assume successful accomplishment of the major R and D objectives of the new process. The results indicate that the process has the promise of a significant reduction in the cost of heavy water and that further study is warranted

  4. Canadian heavy water production - 1970 to 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galley, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    In the last decade, heavy water production in Canada has progressed from the commissioning of a single unit plant in Nova Scotia to a major production industry employing 2200 persons and operating three plants with an aggregate annual production capability in excess of 1800 Mg. The decade opened with an impending crisis in the supply of heavy water due to failure of the first Glace Bay Heavy Water Plant and difficulty in commissioning the second Canadian plant at Port Hawkesbury. Lessons learned at this latter plant were applied to the Bruce plant where the first two units were under construction. When the Bruce units were commissioned in 1973 the rate of approach to design production rates was much improved, renewing confidence in Canada's ability to succeed in large scale heavy water production. In the early 1970's a decision was made to rehabilitate the Glace Bay plant using a novel flowsheet and this rebuilt plant commenced production in 1976. The middle of the decade was marked by two main events: changes in ownership of the operating plants and initiation of a massive construction program to support the forecast of a rapidly expanding CANDU power station construction program. New production units embodying the best features of their predecessors were committed at Bruce by Ontario Hydro and at La Prade, Quebec, by AECL. The high growth rate in electrical demand did not continue and some new plant construction was curtailed. The present installed production capacity will now probably be adequate to meet anticipated demand for the next decade. Canadian plants have now produced more than 7800 Mg of heavy water at a commercially acceptable cost and with a high degree of safety and compliance with appropriate environmental regulations

  5. Process for the extraction of tritium from heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombra, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is achieved by a process for the extraction of tritium from a liquid heavy water stream comprising: contacting the heavy water with a countercurrent gaseous deuterium stream in a column packed with a water-repellent catalyst such that tritium is transferred by isotopic exchange from the liquid heavy water stream to the gaseous deuterium stream

  6. Determination of selected heavy metals in inland fresh water of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agadaga

    Key words: Heavy metals, freshwater, concentrations, quality, variation, distribution. ... prevalence of heavy metals in inland water of lower River. Niger drain are scarce ..... Niger waters at Ajaokuta were found to be low and within guideline.

  7. The heavy water production plant at Arroyito, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecabert, R.

    1984-01-01

    The author describes the construction of an industrial heavy water production plant (Planta Industrial de Agua Pesada, PIAP) in Argentina. The heavy water enrichment is based on a hydrogen/ammonia isotope exchange. (Auth.)

  8. Phytoremediation of water bodies contaminated with radioactive heavy metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhen; Yuan Shichao; Ling Hui; Xie Shuibo

    2012-01-01

    The sources of the radioactive heavy metal in the water bodies were analyzed. The factors that affect phyto remediation of water contaminated with radioactive heavy metal were discussed. The plant species, mechanism and major technology of phyto remediation of water contaminated with radioactive heavy metal were particularly introduced. The prospective study was remarked. (authors)

  9. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  10. Heavy water at Trail, British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E. [Ontario (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Today Canada stands on the threshold of a nuclear renaissance, based on the CANDU reactor family, which depends on heavy water as a moderator and for cooling. Canada has a long history with heavy water, with commercial interests beginning in 1934, a mere two years after its discovery. At one time Canada was the world's largest producer of heavy water. The Second World War stimulated interest in this rather rare substance, such that the worlds largest supply (185 kg) ended up in Canada in 1942 to support nuclear research work at the Montreal Laboratories of the National Research Council. A year later commercial production began at Trail, British Columbia, to support work that later became known as the P-9 project, associated with the Manhattan Project. The Trail plant produced heavy water from 1943 until 1956, when it was shut down. During the war years the project was so secret that Lesslie Thomson, Special Liaison Officer reporting on nuclear matters to C.D. Howe, Minister of Munitions and Supply, was discouraged from visiting Trail operations. Thomson never did visit the Trail facility during the war. In 2005 the remaining large, tall concrete exchange tower was demolished at a cost of about $2.4 million, about the same as it cost to construct the facility about 60 years ago. Thus no physical evidence remains of this historic facility and another important artifact from Canada's nuclear history has disappeared forever. It is planned to place a plaque at the site at some point in the future. (author)

  11. Heavy water at Trail, British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Today Canada stands on the threshold of a nuclear renaissance, based on the CANDU reactor family, which depends on heavy water as a moderator and for cooling. Canada has a long history with heavy water, with commercial interests beginning in 1934, a mere two years after its discovery. At one time Canada was the world's largest producer of heavy water. The Second World War stimulated interest in this rather rare substance, such that the worlds largest supply (185 kg) ended up in Canada in 1942 to support nuclear research work at the Montreal Laboratories of the National Research Council. A year later commercial production began at Trail, British Columbia, to support work that later became known as the P-9 project, associated with the Manhattan Project. The Trail plant produced heavy water from 1943 until 1956, when it was shut down. During the war years the project was so secret that Lesslie Thomson, Special Liaison Officer reporting on nuclear matters to C.D. Howe, Minister of Munitions and Supply, was discouraged from visiting Trail operations. Thomson never did visit the Trail facility during the war. In 2005 the remaining large, tall concrete exchange tower was demolished at a cost of about $2.4 million, about the same as it cost to construct the facility about 60 years ago. Thus no physical evidence remains of this historic facility and another important artifact from Canada's nuclear history has disappeared forever. It is planned to place a plaque at the site at some point in the future. (author)

  12. Laboratory studies of dissolved radiolabelled microcystin-LR in lake water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyenstrand, Per; Rohrlack, Thomas; Beattie, Kenneth A

    2003-01-01

    The fate of dissolved microcystin-LR was studied in laboratory experiments using surface water taken from a eutrophic lake. Based on initial range finding, a concentration of 50 microg l(-1) dissolved 14C-microcystin-LR was selected for subsequent time-course experiments. The first was performed ...... fractions. The study demonstrated that biodegradation of dissolved microcystin-LR occurred in water collected at a lake surface with carbon dioxide as a major end-product....

  13. Molecular Determinants of Dissolved Organic Matter Reactivity in Lake Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Mostovaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lakes in the boreal region have been recognized as the biogeochemical hotspots, yet many questions regarding the regulators of organic matter processing in these systems remain open. Molecular composition can be an important determinant of dissolved organic matter (DOM fate in freshwater systems, but many aspects of this relationship remain unclear due to the complexity of DOM and its interactions in the natural environment. Here, we combine ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS with kinetic modeling of decay of >1,300 individual DOM molecular formulae identified by mass spectrometry, to evaluate the role of specific molecular characteristics in decomposition of lake water DOM. Our data is derived from a 4 months microbial decomposition experiment, carried out on water from three Swedish lakes, with the set-up including natural lake water, as well as the lake water pretreated with UV light. The relative decay rate of every molecular formula was estimated by fitting a single exponential model to the change in FT-ICR-MS signal intensities over decomposition time. We found a continuous range of exponential decay coefficients (kexp within different groups of compounds and show that for highly unsaturated and phenolic compounds the distribution of kexp was shifted toward the lowest values. Contrary to this general trend, plant-derived polyphenols and polycondensed aromatics were on average more reactive than compounds with an intermediate aromaticity. The decay rate of aromatic compounds increased with increasing nominal oxidation state of carbon, and molecular mass in some cases showed an inverse relationship with kexp in the UV-manipulated treatment. Further, we observe an increase in formulae-specific kexp as a result of the UV pretreatment. General trends in reactivity identified among major compound groups emphasize the importance of the intrinsic controllers of lake water DOM decay. However, we additionally indicate that each

  14. Assets optimization at Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiremath, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the world where the fittest can only survive, manufacturing and production enterprises are under intense pressure to achieve maximum efficiency in each and every field related to the ultimate production of plant. The winners will be those that use their assets, i.e men, material, machinery and money most effectively. The objective is to optimize the utilization of all plant assets-from entire process lines to individual pressure vessels, piping, process machinery, and vital machine components. Assets of Heavy Water Plants mainly consist of Civil Structures, Equipment and Systems (Mechanical, Electrical) and Resources like Water, Energy and Environment

  15. Solubilities of boric acid in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Shigetsugu; Aoi, Hideki; Hayashi, Ken-ichi; Katoh, Taizo; Watanabe, Takashi.

    1988-01-01

    A gravimetric analysis using meta-boric acid (HBO 2 or DBO 2 ) as a weighing form has been developed for solubility measurement. The method gave satisfactory results in preliminary measurement of solubilities of boric acid in light water. By using this method, the solubilities of 10 B enriched D 3 BO 3 in heavy water were measured. The results are as follows; 2.67 (7deg C), 3.52 (15deg C), 5.70 (30deg C), 8.87 (50deg C) and 12.92 (70deg C) w/o, respectively. These values are about 10% lower than those in light water. Thermodynamical consideration based on the data shows that boric acid is the water structure breaker. (author)

  16. Heavy water handbook. Evaluation of available thermophysical properties of heavy water (D2O) liquid and vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukovsky, J.; Haack, K.; Wiig, P.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous publications on the thermophysical data of heavy water (D 2 O) have been published since D 2 O became commercially available in the 1930's. Some of these data are in mutual disagreement. This has led to confusion among the scientifical and technical staffs who needed the information on the D 2 O thermophysical data. Correct thermophysical data must be consistent, i.e. their mutual relations must be in accordance to the fundamental thermophysical laws. The work behind this publication has been focussed at collecting all avalilable D 2 O data and checking the data mutually by means of these fundamental thermophysical criteria. Depending on the various production methods, the oxygen content of the D 2 O is enriched more or less in the heavier oxygen isotopes 17 O and 18 O. This, together with the amount of impurities and dissolved gases in the D 2 O samples of the various references, might - to some extent - explain the discrepancies between the data sources. Only a few references contain information on these subjects. The D 2 O data sets which were found to be the most reliable are presented in chapter 9, in tables as well as in diagrams, together with the corresponding H 2 O data for comparison. The diagrams are commented for reliability where it was found necessary. Furthermore, the publication contains short descriptions on the heavy water sources, availability, production processes, economy, material and energy demands for production. A comprehensive list of references is enclosed. (author)

  17. Heavy water handbook. Evaluation of presently available thermophysical properties of heavy water (D2O) liquid and vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukovsky, J.; Haack, K.

    1994-08-01

    Many publication on the thermophysical properties of heavy water (D 2 O) have appeared since D 2 O became commercially available in the 1930's. Some for the data contradict one another and this has led to confusion when information is needed on D 2 O thermophysical data. Correct thermophysical data must be consistent, i.e. their mutual dependence must be consistent with fundamental thermophysical laws. The work behind this publication has focused on collecting all available D 2 O data and checking them against these fundamental thermophysical criteria. Depending on the various production methods for D 2 O, its oxygen content is enriched more or less by the heavier oxygen isotopes 17 O and 18 O. This, together with the amount of impurities and dissolved gases in the D 2 O samples of the various references, might - to some extent - explain the discrepancies found between the data. Only a few references contain information on these subjects. The D 2 O data sets found to be the most reliable are presented in Chapter 9, in tables as well as in diagrams, together with the corresponding H 2 O data for comparison. Comments on the reliability of the diagrams are given where necessary. Furthermore, short descriptions are given of heavy water sources, availability, production processes, economy, material and energy requirements for the production process. Finally a comprehensive list of references and an author index are included. (au)

  18. Power control device for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hidesuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve self controllability of a nuclear power plant, as well as enable continuous power level control by a controlled flow of moderators in void pipes provided in a reactor core. Constitution: Hollow void pipes are provided in a reactor core to which a heavy water recycle loop for power control, a heavy water recycle pump for power control, a heavy water temperature regulator and a heavy water flow rate control valve for power control are connected in series to constitute a heavy water recycle loop for flowing heavy water moderators. The void ratio in each of the void pipes are calculated by a process computer to determine the flow rate and the temperature for the recycled heavy water. Based on the above calculation result, the heavy water temperature regulator is actuated by way of a temperature setter at the heavy water inlet and the heavy water flow rate is controlled by the actuation of the heavy water flow rate control valve. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Moderator clean-up system in a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasada, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the fluctuation of the poison concentration in heavy water moderator due to a heavy water clean-up system. Constitution: To a calandria tank filled with heavy water as poison-containing moderators, are connected both end of a pipeway through which heavy water flows and to which a clean-up device is provided. Strongly basic resin is filled within the clean-up device and a cooler is disposed to a pipeway at the upstream of the clean-up device. In this structure, the temperature of heavy water at the inlet of the clean-up device at a constant level between the temperature at the exit of the cooler and the lowest temperature for the moderator to thereby decrease the fluctuation in the poison concentration in the heavy water moderator due to the heavy water clean-up device. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Ultrasonic relaxation studies associated with n-octylamine-heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kor, S.K.; Singh, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic absorption measurements have been carried out in lyotropic liquid crystalline system n-octylamine/heavy water in the frequency range 5-65 MHz and at temperatures 30 degC and 37 degC at different concentrations of heavy water in octylamine. Velocity has been measured using interferometric technique at 2 MHz at different concentrations of heavy water. Ultrasonic absorption coefficients at different concentrations in the concentration range 0.3-0.9 m.f. heavy water have been found to show a maxima in the absorption curve at critical concentration (∼0.85 m.f. heavy water). This peak has been found to shift towards lower concentrations of heavy water at higher frequencies. Results have been analysed and it has been found that single relaxation process takes place around 30 MHz and this has been attributed to aggregation of octylamine and heavy water molecules. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  1. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.; Sinha, R.K.; Dhawan, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U 233 )O 2 and (Th-Pu)O 2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m 3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m 3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  2. Method of extracting tritium from heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Makoto; Asakura, Yamato; Yusa, Hideo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To extract tritium in heavy water by combining isotope exchange reaction with liquefaction distillation to increase the concentration of recovered tritium, thereby reducing the quantity of radioactive wastes recovered. Constitution: Heavy water containing tritium from a reactor is introduced into a tritium separator through a conduit pipe. On the other hand, a D 2 gas is introduced through the conduit pipe in the lower part of a tritium separator to transfer tritium into D 2 gas by isotope exchange. The D 2 gas containing DT is introduced into a liquefaction distillation tower together with an outlet gas of a converter supplied through a pipeline. The converter is filled with net-like metals of platinum group such as Pt, Ni, Pd and the like, and the D 2 gas affluent in DT, extracted from the distillation tower is converted into D 2 and T 2 . The gas which has been introduced into the liquefaction distillation tower is liquefied. The D 2 gas of low boiling point components reaches the tower top, and the T 2 gas of high boiling point components is concentrated at the tower bottom, and is rendered into tritium water in a recoupler and stored in a water storage apparatus. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Radiation dose due to radon and heavy metal analysis in drinking water samples of Jammu district, J. and K., India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajay Kumar; Kaur, Manpreet; Sharma, Sumit; Mehra, Rohit; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the contaminant drinking water and its impact on human health. The most contaminants of ground water are heavy metals like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, copper, zinc and etc. These heavy metals particularly cause strong toxicity even at low concentration. Heavy metals are considered to be the major pollutants of water sources. Heavy metal toxicity can result in damaged or reduced mental and central nervous function, lower energy levels and damage to blood composition, lungs, kidneys, liver and other vital organs. Physicochemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity and dissolved oxygen were analyzed. For revealing the ground water quality and soil quality in area of Jammu, a total of 40 samples have been collected and analyzed for different kind of heavy metal concentration. These heavy metal concentrations in water samples were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The results were compared with WHO, ED, ICMR and Indian. The trace metal analysis is not on the exceeding side of the permissible limit in all the samples. Along with the heavy metal concentration in water samples and soil samples, the radon concentration also measured by using RAD7. The values of radon concentration in drinking water samples were also compared within the safe limit recommended by different health agencies. (author)

  4. DGT measurement of dissolved aluminum species in waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Bennett, William W.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum is acutely toxic, and elevated concentrations of dissolved Al can have detrimental effects on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Robust analytical methods that can determine environmentally relevant Al fractions accurately and efficiently are required by the environmental monitoring...

  5. Surface tension of normal and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, J.; Rosner, N.; Grigull, V.

    1980-01-01

    A Skeleton Table and simple interpolation equation for the surface tension of light water was developed by the Working Group III of the International Association for the Properties of Steam and is recommended as an International Standard. The Skeleton Table is based on all known measurements of the surface tension and individual data were weighted corresponding to the accuracy of the measurements. The form of the interpolation equation is based on a physical concept. It represents an extension of van der Waals-equation, where the exponent conforms to the 'Scaling Laws'. In addition for application purposes simple relations for the Laplace-coefficient and for the density difference between the liquid and gaseous phases of light water are given. The same form of interpolation equation for the surface tension can be used for heavy water, for which the coefficients are given. However, this equation is based only on a single set of data. (orig.) [de

  6. Neutron disadvantage factors in heavy water and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1966-01-01

    A number od heavy water and light water reactor cells are analyzed in this paper by applying analytical methods of neutron thermalization. Calculations done according to the one-group Amouyal-Benoist method are included in addition. Computer codes for ZUSE Z-23 computer were written by applying both methods. The obtained results of disadvantage factors are then compared to results obtained by one-group P 3 approximation and by multigroup K7-THERMOS code [sr

  7. Electrolytic process for upgrading heavy water (Preprint No. PD-16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammohan, K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1989-04-01

    In the reactor system the heavy water gets depleted in concentration due to leakages, intermixing and vapour collection in boiler vault system etc. Electrolysis of water was used as a secondary plant to enrich the dilute heavy water produced in the primery plant by hydrogen-sulfide-water exchange process. The studies made in the development of this process for the upgrading of downgra ded heavy water by setting up a full size Electrolyser Test Assembly are discussed a nd complete design of a heavy water upgrading plant based on electrolytic process for MAPS and NAPP is described. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs

  8. A study of Cirus heavy water system isotopic purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Shibu; Sahu, A.K.; Unni, V.K.P.; Pant, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Cirus uses heavy water as moderator and helium as cover gas. Approximately one tonne of heavy water was added to the system every year for routine make up. Isotopic purity (IP) of this water used for addition was always higher than that of the system. Though this should increase IP of heavy water in the system, it has remained almost at the same level, over the years. A study was carried out to estimate the extent of improvement in IP of heavy water in the system that should have occurred because of this and other factors in last 30 years. Reasons for non-occurrence of such an improvement were explored. Ion exchange resins used for purification of heavy water and air ingress into helium cover gas system appear to be the principal sources of entry of light water into heavy water system. (author)

  9. Heavy water critical experiments on plutonium lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Shiba, Kiminori

    1975-06-01

    This report is the summary of physics study on plutonium lattice made in Heavy Water Critical Experiment Section of PNC. By using Deuterium Critical Assembly, physics study on plutonium lattice has been carried out since 1972. Experiments on following items were performed in a core having 22.5 cm square lattice pitch. (1) Material buckling (2) Lattice parameters (3) Local power distribution factor (4) Gross flux distribution in two region core (5) Control rod worth. Experimental results were compared with theoretical ones calculated by METHUSELAH II code. It is concluded from this study that calculation by METHUSELAH II code has acceptable accuracy in the prediction on plutonium lattice. (author)

  10. Dissolved oxygen mapping: A powerful tool for site assessments and ground water monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, W.A.; Kimball, G.

    1992-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen concentration profiles often provide an excellent indication of the natural biological activity of microorganisms in ground water. The analysis of dissolved oxygen in ground water also provides a rapid, inexpensive method for determining the areal extent of contaminant plumes containing aerobically degraded compounds such as petroleum hydrocarbons. Indigenous hydrocarbon degrading organisms are present at most petroleum product spills giving this technique an almost universal application for dissolved hydrocarbons in ground water. Data from several sites will be presented to demonstrate the relationship between oxygen and dissolved contaminant concentrations. The inverse relationship between oxygen concentrations and dissolved contaminants can be used in many ways. During the initial site assessment, rapid on-site testing of ground water can provide real time data to direct drilling by identification of potentially contaminated locations. Several analytical techniques are available that allow field analysis to be performed in less than five minutes. Dissolved oxygen testing also provides an inexpensive way to monitor hydrocarbon migration without expensive gas chromatography. Often a plume of oxygen depleted ground water extends farther downgradient than the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. The depletion of oxygen in a well can provide an early warning system that detects upgradient contamination before the well is impacted by detectable levels of contaminants. Another application is the measurement of the natural degradation potential for aerobic remediation. If an aerobic in-situ remediation is used, dissolved oxygen monitoring provides an inexpensive method to monitor the progress of the remediation

  11. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from water using mining and metallurgical by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2012-05-15

    Excess nutrient input to water bodies frequently results in algal blooms and development of oxygen deficient conditions. Mining or metallurgical by-products can potentially be utilised as filtration media within water treatment systems such as constructed wetlands, permeable reactive barriers, or drain liners. These materials may offer a cost-effective solution for the removal of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from natural waters. This study investigated steel-making, alumina refining (red mud and red sand) and heavy mineral processing by-products, as well as the low-cost mineral-based material calcined magnesia, in laboratory column trials. Influent water and column effluents were analysed for pH and flow rate, alkalinity, nutrient species and DOC, and a range of major cations and anions. In general, by-products with high Ca or Mg, and to a lesser extent those with high Fe content, were well-suited to nutrient and DOC removal from water. Of the individual materials examined, the heavy mineral processing residue neutralised used acid (NUA) exhibited the highest sorption capacity for P, and removed the greatest proportions of all N species and DOC from influent water. In general, NUA and mixtures containing NUA, particularly those with calcined magnesia or red mud/red sand were the most effective in removing nutrients and DOC from influent water. Post-treatment effluents from columns containing NUA and NUA/steel-making by-product, NUA/red sand and NUA/calcined magnesia mixtures exhibited large reductions in DOC, P and N concentrations and exhibited a shift in nutrient ratios away from potential N- and Si-limitation and towards potential P-limitation. If employed as part of a large-scale water treatment scheme, use of these mining and metallurgical by-products for nutrient removal could result in reduced algal biomass and improved water quality. Identification and effective implementation of mining by-products or blends thereof in constructed wetlands

  12. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  13. Origin and Evolution of Reactive and Noble Gases Dissolved in Matrix Pore Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Waber, H. N. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Smellie, J. A.T. [Conterra AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    Reactive and noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water of low permeable crystalline bedrock were successfully extracted and characterized for the first time based on drillcore samples from the Olkiluoto investigation site (SW Finland). Interaction between matrix pore water and fracture groundwater occurs predominately by diffusion. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of gases dissolved in fracture groundwater are transmitted and preserved in the pore water. Absolute concentrations, their ratios and the stable carbon isotope signature of hydrocarbon gases dissolved in pore water give valuable indications about the evolution of these gases in the nearby flowing fracture groundwaters. Inert noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water and their isotopes combined with their in situ production and accumulation rates deliver information about the residence time of pore water. (author)

  14. Good practices in heavy water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The value and importance of organizations in the nuclear industry engaged in the collection and analysis of operating experience and best practices has been clearly identified in various IAEA publications and exercises. Both facility safety and operational efficiency can benefit from such information sharing. Such sharing also benefits organizations engaged in the development of new nuclear power plants, as it provides information to assist in optimizing designs to deliver improved safety and power generation performance. In cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd, the IAEA organized the workshop on best practices in Heavy Water Reactor Operation in Toronto, Canada from 16 to 19 September 2008, to assist interested Member States in sharing best practices and to provide a forum for the exchange of information among participating nuclear professionals. This workshop was organized under Technical Cooperation Project INT/4/141, on Status and Prospects of Development for and Applications of Innovative Reactor Concepts for Developing Countries. The workshop participants were experts actively engaged in various aspects of heavy water reactor operation. Participants presented information on activities and practices deemed by them to be best practices in a particular area for consideration by the workshop participants. Presentations by the participants covered a broad range of operational practices, including regulatory aspects, the reduction of occupational dose, performance improvements, and reducing operating and maintenance costs. This publication summarizes the material presented at the workshop, and includes session summaries prepared by the chair of each session and papers submitted by the presenters

  15. The dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality monitoring and assessment in polder ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeningen, R.

    1983-01-01

    This study deals with the use of the dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality assessment in polder ditches. The dynamics of the dissolved oxygen concentration, i.e. the temporal and spatial variations in a few polder ditches under a range of natural, pollution and management

  16. The heavy water accountancy for research reactors in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshijima, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sumitoshi; Nemoto, Denjirou

    1998-11-01

    The three research reactors have been operated by the Department of Research Reactor and used about 41 tons heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector of research reactors. The JRR-2 is a tank type research reactor of 10MW in thermal power and its is used as moderator, coolant and reflector about 16 tons heavy water. The JRR-3M is a light water cooled and moderated pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 20MW and its is used as reflector about 7.3 tons heavy water. In the JRR-4, which is a light water cooled swimming pool type research reactor with the maximum thermal power of 3.5MW, about 1 ton heavy water is used to supply fully thermalized neutrons with a neutron beam experiment of facility. The heavy water was imported from U.S.A., CANADA and Norway. Parts of heavy water is internationally controlled materials, therefore management of heavy water is necessary for materials accountancy. This report described the change of heavy water inventories in each research reactors, law and regulations for accounting of heavy water in JAERI. (author)

  17. Alternate applications of heavy water in biological and technological fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskaran, M.; Prakash, R.

    2005-01-01

    Deuterium and its various compounds like heavy water exhibit distinctly different properties when compared to hydrogen and its compounds. The differences in properties are due to the primary and secondary isotopic effects. Though heavy water has been used solely for nuclear applications so far, its applications in life sciences and high technology areas are fast emerging. Heavy Water Board has taken up development of alternate applications of heavy water. The study taken up has indicated superior thermal stability for oral polio vaccine prepared in heavy water. This study has revealed various opportunities for application of heavy water or deuterium in life sciences and the paper dwells on these possibilities. The higher stability of compounds with deuterium has also brought in its applications in various high technology areas. These are mainly in micro electronics. Use of deuterium in manufacture of high quality optical fibres has already been established. These are also included in the paper. (author)

  18. Heavy metal partitioning of suspended particulate matter-water and sediment-water in the Yangtze Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenghong; Guo, Xiaoyu; Yin, Su; Tian, Chenhao; Li, Yangyang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2017-10-01

    The partitioning of ten heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn) between the water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and sediments in seven channel sections during three hydrologic seasons in the Yangtze Estuary was comprehensively investigated. Special attention was paid to the role of tides, influential factors (concentrations of SPM and dissolved organic carbon, and particle size), and heavy metal speciation. The SPM-water and sediment-water partition coefficients (K p ) of the heavy metals exhibited similar changes along the channel sections, though the former were larger throughout the estuary. Because of the higher salinity, the K p values of most of the metals were higher in the north branch than in the south branch. The K p values of Cd, Co, and As generally decreased from the wet season to the dry season. Both the diagonal line method and paired samples t-test showed that no specific phase transfer of heavy metals existed during the flood and ebb tides, but the sediment-water K p was more concentrated for the diagonal line method, owing to the relatively smaller tidal influences on the sediment. The partition coefficients (especially the K p for SPM-water) had negative correlations with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) but positive correlations were noted with the particle size for most of the heavy metals in sediment. Two types of significant correlations were observed between K p and metal speciation (i.e., exchangeable, carbonate, reducible, organic, and residual fractions), which can be used to identify the dominant phase-partition mechanisms (e.g., adsorption or desorption) of heavy metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gregory M.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic and mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Between one day and 90 days after initial contact, specific conductance in the sample mixtures had a median increase of 306 percent. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of the lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden (a coal, a sandstone, and a shale) probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the over-burden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water.

  20. Identification of dissolved-constituent sources in mine-site ground water using batch mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.M.; Williams, R.S. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Batch-mixing experiments were used to help identify lithologic mineralogic sources of increased concentrations of dissolved solids in water affected by surface coal mining in northwestern Colorado. Ten overburden core samples were analyzed for mineral composition and mixed with distilled water for 90 days until mineral-water equilibrium was reached. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 200 to 8,700 mg/L in water samples extracted from the mixtures after 90 days. Mass-balance simulations were conducted using the geochemical models BALANCE and WATEQF to quantify mineral-water interactions occurring in five selected sample mixtures and in water collected from a spring at a reclaimed mine site. The spring water is affected by mineral-water interactions occurring in all of lithologic units comprising the overburden. Results of the simulations indicate that oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of dolomite, gypsum, and epsomite, and cation-exchange reactions are the primary mineral-water interactions occurring in the overburden. Three lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute most of the dissolved solids to the spring water. Water sample extracts from mixtures using core from these three units accounted for 85 percent of the total dissolved solids in the 10 sample extracts. Other lithologic units in the overburden probably contribute smaller quantities of dissolved solids to the spring water

  1. Modification of water treatment plant at Heavy Water Plant (Kota)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajpati, C.R.; Shrivastava, C.S.; Shrivastava, D.C.; Shrivastava, J.; Vithal, G.K.; Bhowmick, A.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Water Production by GS process viz. H 2 S - H 2 O bi-thermal exchange process requires a huge quantity of demineralized (DM) water as a source of deuterium. Since the deuterium recovery of GS process is only 18-19%, the water treatment plant (WTP) was designed and commissioned at Heavy Water Plant (Kota) to produce demineralized water at the rate of 680 m 3 /hr. The WTP was commissioned in 1980 and till 2005; the plant was producing DM water of required quality. It was having three streams of strong cation resin, atmospheric degasser and strong anion exchange resin with co-current regeneration. In 2001 a new concept of layered bed resin was developed and engineered for water treatment plant. The concept was attractive in terms of saving of chemicals and thus preservation of environment. Being an ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 plant, the modification of WTP was executed in 2005 during major turn around. After modification, a substantial amount of acid and alkali is saved

  2. Numerical analysis and optimisation of heavy water upgrading column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Rama; Ghosh, Brindaban; Bhanja, K.

    2013-01-01

    In the 'Pressurised Heavy Water' type of reactors, heavy water is used both as moderator and coolant. During operation of reactor downgraded heavy water is generated that needs to be upgraded for reuse in the reactor. When the isotopic purity of heavy water becomes less than 99.75%, it is termed as downgraded heavy water. Downgraded heavy water also contains impurity such as corrosion products, dirt, oil etc. Upgradation of downgraded heavy water is normally done in two steps: (i) Purification: In this step downgraded heavy water is first purified to remove corrosion products, dirt, oil, etc. and (ii) Upgradation of heavy water to increase its isotopic purity, this step is carried out by vacuum distillation of downgraded heavy water after purification. This project is aimed at mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of heavy water upgrading column. Modelling and simulation studies of the upgradation column are based on equilibrium stage model to evaluate the effect of feed location, pressure, feed composition, reflux ratio in the packed column for given reboiler and condenser duty of distillation column. State to stage modelling of two-phase two-component flow has constitutes the overall modelling of the column. The governing equations consist of stage-wise species and overall mass continuity and stage-wise energy balance. This results in tridigonal matrix equation for stage liquid fractions for heavy and light water. The stage-wise liquid flow rates and temperatures are governed by stage-wise mass and energy balance. The combined form of the corresponding governing equations, with the incorporation of thermodynamic equation of states, form a system of nonlinear equations. This system have been resolved numerically using modified Newton-Raphson method. A code in the MATLAB platform has been developed by on above numerical procedure. The optimisation of the column operating conditions is to be carried out based on parametric studies and analysis of different

  3. Characterization and treatment options for high TOC heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.; Leilabadi, A.; Rudolph, A.; Williams, D.

    2007-01-01

    High total organic carbon (TOC) and high conductivity contamination in heavy water feed present serious problems for the operation of heavy water upgrader facilities. The authors describe the chemical analysis of a particular batch of contaminated heavy water which had resisted standard clean-up procedures. After chemical characterization, a special clean-up plan was developed and successfully tested in the laboratory, followed by its implementation at site. (author)

  4. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  5. Cost effective water treatment program in Heavy Water Plant (Manuguru)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, C.; Prasada Rao, G.

    2002-01-01

    Water treatment technology is in a state of continuous evolution. The increasing urgency to conserve water and reduce pollution has in recent years produced an enormous demand for new chemical treatment programs and technologies. Heavy water plant (Manuguru) uses water as raw material (about 3000 m 3 /hr) and its treatment and management has benefited the plant in a significant way. It is a fact that if the water treatment is not proper, it can result in deposit formation and corrosion of metals, which can finally leads to production losses. Therefore, before selecting treatment program, complying w.r.t. quality requirements, safety and pollution aspects cost effectiveness shall be examined. The areas where significant benefits are derived, are raw water treatment using polyelectrolyte instead of inorganic coagulant (alum), change over of regenerant of cation exchangers from hydrochloric acid to sulfuric acid and in-house development of cooling water treatment formulation. The advantages and cost effectiveness of these treatments are discussed in detail. Further these treatments has helped the plant in achieving zero discharge and indirectly increased cost reduction of final product (heavy water); the dosage of 3 ppm of polyelectrolyte can replace 90 ppm alum at turbidity level of 300 NTU of raw water which has resulted in cost saving of Rs. 15-20 lakhs in a year beside other advantages; the change over of regenerant from HCl to H 2 SO 4 will result in cost saving of at least Rs.1.4 crore a year besides other advantages; the change over to proprietary formulation to in-house formulation in cooling water treatment has resulted in a saving about Rs.11 lakhs a year. To achieve the above objectives in a sustainable way the performance results are being monitored. (author)

  6. [Effects of two submerged macrophytes on dissolved inorganic nitrogen in overlying water and interstitial water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Yang; Sun, Gong-Xian

    2014-06-01

    Ceratophyllum demersum (C. demersum) and Vallisneria spiralis L. (V. spiralis L.) were studied as model submerged macrophytes. The effects of the submerged macrophytes on the forms and concentration of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in the overlying water and the interstitial water, as well as the diffusion flux of DIN in the water-sediment interface were investigated by batch simulation experiment. The results indicated that the removal effect of DIN in the overlying water was better than that in the interstitial water by submerged macrophytes. The removal efficiency of DIN in the overlying water and the interstitial water followed the order of NO2(-) -N > NH4(+) -N > NO3(-) -N. The removal rate of DIN by C. demersum was higher than that of V. spiralis L. in the overlying water, while the result was converse in the interstitial water. C. demersum and V. spiralis L. decreased the diffusion flux of NH4(+) -N and NO2(-) -N, and increased the diffusion flux of NO3(-) -N significantly. Consequently, NO3(-) -N replaced NH4(+) -N and became the main form of DIN, which diffused from the interstitial water to the overlying water. The impact of the diffusion flux of NO3(-) -N between C. demersum and V. spiralis L. showed no significant difference, and the result was the same for NH4(+) -N. C. demersum and V. spiralis L. increased the width of variation of the three nitrogen forms to total DIN in the overlying water and the interstitial water, the influence on the ratio of DIN by C. demersum was greater than that of V. spiralis L. in the overlying water, while the result was opposite in the interstitial water. In general, C. demersum had more influence in the overlying water, while V. spiralis L. had more influence in the interstitial water, and the influence of DIN diffusion flux was not significant.

  7. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  8. Dynamic modelling of Industrial Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruel, F.E.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of the isotopic enrichment unites of the Industrial Heavy Water Plant, located in Arroyito, Neuquen, Argentina, was modeled and simulated in the present work. Dynamic models of the chemical and isotopic interchange processes existent in the plant, were developed. This served as a base to obtain representative models of the different unit and control systems. The developed models were represented in a modular code for each unit. Each simulator consists of approximately one hundred non-linear-first-order differential equations and some other algebraic equation, which are time resolved by the code. The different simulators allow to change a big number of boundary conditions and the control systems set point for each simulation, so that the program become very versatile. The output of the code allows to see the evolution through time of the variables of interest. An interface which facilitates the use of the first enrichment stage simulator was developed. This interface allows an easy access to generate wished events during the simulation and includes the possibility to plot evolution of the variables involved. The obtained results agree with the expected tendencies. The calculated nominal steady state matches by the manufacturer. The different steady states obtained, agree with previous works. The times and tendencies involved in the transients generated by the program, are in good agreement with the experience obtained at the plant. Based in the obtained results, it is concluded that the characteristic times of the plant are determined by the masses involved in the process. Different characteristics in the system dynamic behavior were generated with the different simulators, and were validated by plant personnel. This work allowed to understand the different process involved in the heavy water manufacture, and to develop a very useful tool for the personnel of the plant. (author). 14 refs., figs., tabs. plant. (author). 14 refs., figs., tabs

  9. Time series models for prediction the total and dissolved heavy metals concentration in road runoff and soil solution of roadside embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljoumani, Basem; Kluge, Björn; sanchez, Josep; Wessolek, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Highways and main roads are potential sources of contamination for the surrounding environment. High traffic rates result in elevated heavy metal concentrations in road runoff, soil and water seepage, which has attracted much attention in the recent past. Prediction of heavy metals transfer near the roadside into deeper soil layers are very important to prevent the groundwater pollution. This study was carried out on data of a number of lysimeters which were installed along the A115 highway (Germany) with a mean daily traffic of 90.000 vehicles per day. Three polyethylene (PE) lysimeters were installed at the A115 highway. They have the following dimensions: length 150 cm, width 100 cm, height 60 cm. The lysimeters were filled with different soil materials, which were recently used for embankment construction in Germany. With the obtained data, we will develop a time series analysis model to predict total and dissolved metal concentration in road runoff and in soil solution of the roadside embankments. The time series consisted of monthly measurements of heavy metals and was transformed to a stationary situation. Subsequently, the transformed data will be used to conduct analyses in the time domain in order to obtain the parameters of a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Four phase approaches for identifying and fitting ARIMA models will be used: identification, parameter estimation, diagnostic checking, and forecasting. An automatic selection criterion, such as the Akaike information criterion, will use to enhance this flexible approach to model building

  10. Characterization of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, 2004-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Spangler, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Naftz, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, have been identified as contributing dissolved solids to Flaming Gorge Reservoir. Concentrations of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, ranged from 35 to 7,410 milligrams per liter. The dissolved-solids load in seeps and drains in the study area that discharge to Flaming Gorge Reservoir ranged from less than 0.1 to 113 tons per day. The most substantial source of dissolved solids discharging from the study area to the reservoir was Birch Spring Draw. The mean daily dissolved-solids load near the mouth of Birch Spring Draw was 65 tons per day.The estimated annual dissolved-solids load imported to the study area by Sheep Creek and Peoples Canals is 1,330 and 13,200 tons, respectively. Daily dissolved-solid loads discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the period July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005, ranged from 72 to 241 tons per day with a mean of 110 tons per day. The estimated annual dissolved-solids load discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the same period was 40,200 tons. Of this 40,200 tons of dissolved solids, about 9,000 tons may be from a regional source that is not associated with agricultural activities. The salt-loading factor is 3,670 milligrams per liter or about 5.0 tons of dissolved solids per acre-foot of deep percolation in Lucerne Valley and 1,620 milligrams per liter or 2.2 tons per acre-foot in South Valley.The variation of δ87Sr with strontium concentration indicates some general patterns that help to define a conceptual model of the processes affecting the concentration of strontium and the δ87Sr isotopic ratio in area waters. As excess irrigation water percolates through soils derived from Mancos Shale, the δ87Sr isotopic ratio (0.21 to 0.69 permil) approaches one that is typical of deep percolation from irrigation on Mancos

  11. Toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs when dissolved in water versus corn oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil was compared among 26 species of birds. Corn oil is not soluble in the water-based matrix that constitutes the albumen of an egg. To determine whether the use of corn oil limited the usefulness of this earlier study, a comparison was made of the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil versus water. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs were injected with methylmercury chloride dissolved in corn oil or water to achieve concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6??g/g mercury in the egg on a wet weight basis. Hatching success at each dose of mercury was compared between the two solvents. For mallards, 16.4% of the eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in water hatched, which was statistically lower than the 37.6% hatch rate of eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in corn oil, but no differences in hatching success were observed between corn oil and water at any of the other doses. With chicken eggs, no significant differences occurred in percentage hatch of eggs between corn oil and water at any of the mercury doses. Methylmercury dissolved in corn oil seems to have a toxicity to avian embryos similar to that of does methylmercury dissolved in water. Consequently, the results from the earlier study that described the toxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil to avian embryos were probably not compromised by the use of corn oil as a solvent. ?? 2011 SETAC.

  12. Measurement and interpretation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Solbau, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodazine-D colorimetric technique was adapted to measure low-level dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water. Prepared samples containing between 0 and 8.0 ??moles L-1 dissolved oxygen in equilibrium with known gas mixtures produced linear spectrophotometric absorbance with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ??moles L-1. Excellent reproducibility was found for solutions ranging in composition from deionized water to sea water with chemical interferences detected only for easily reduced metal species such as ferric ion, cupric ion, and hexavalent chromium. Such effects were correctable based on parallel reaction stoichiometries relative to oxygen. The technique, coupled with a downhole wire line tool, permitted low-level monitoring of dissolved oxygen in wells at the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir in California. Results indicated a close association between low but measurable dissolved oxygen concentrations and mobility of oxidized forms of selenium. -from Authors

  13. Heavy Metals Pollution on Surface Water Sources in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examine the effects of heavy metal pollutants to aquatic ecosystems and the environment by considering the role of urban, municipal, agricultural, industrial and other anthropogenic processes as sources of heavy metal pollution in surface water sources of Kaduna metropolis. Samples of the polluted water were ...

  14. assessment of heavy metals concentration in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    guidelines (WHO 2005). Findings suggest that continues water quality monitoring should be carried out to check the concentration levels of heavy metals in that area, to prevent them from been above the limit of WHO. Keywords: Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometers, Heavy Metals, Water, Kauru Local. Government Area.

  15. Natural uranium lattice in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Y.; Koechlin, J.C.; Moreau, J.; Naudet, R.

    1959-01-01

    A group of Laplacian determinations have been made under critical running conditions in a heavy water pile specially constructed to this end using either complete lattices or samples of lattices employing a two-zone method. The experimental equipment is briefly described: it has been devised to allow rapid modifications of the charge. The methods of measurement employed are also summarily described one operates either by flux charts in the case of lattices which are then used as references, or by progressive replacement of the bars by concentric rings and measurements of the reactivity. In this case, one attempts to obtain the difference between the material laplacian of the central unknown lattice and that of the reference lattice. The method has been specially develop ped to give precision. Results of Laplacian measurements for all these lattice types are presented, allowing the construction of a set of curves as a function of the separation. Various other effects have also been measured: the equivalent reactivity of a mm of water - anisotropy - temperature effect, etc. However in this first attack on the problem, the measurement of a large variety of Laplacian has been carried out, rather than careful measurements in particular cases. It is in this spirit that the interpretation of the results has been made. As a large number of very complex phenomena still escape the possibilities of the calculation, it is considered that a certain number of adjustments are necessary; now these can only give the desired efficiency in forecasting results if they refer to a sufficiently great number of experimental data. It is necessary then to connect the measurements closely on with the other whilst, at the same time, subdividing them according to logically deduced formulae. The principal source of trouble has been that of coherence. The rules governing the calculations employed in the interpretation of the data are given. In the first instance simple formula are used: first of

  16. Survival of tumor-bearing mice exposed to heavy water or heavy water plus methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laissue, J.A.; Buerki, H.; Berchtold, W.

    1982-01-01

    Moderate body deuteration combined with a cytostatic drug [methotrexate (MTX)] significantly increases the survival time of young adult DBA/2 mice bearing transplantable P815. L5178Y, or L1210 tumors. Neoplastic cells were grown in vitro from tumor stock and injected i.p. into mice from two groups, one drinking tap water, and other drinking 30% heavy water in tap water. One-half of the animals in each of these two groups was given a single injection of MTX (4 mg/kg body weight) on 3 consecutive days per week. At death, extension of primary and metastatic tumors was examined and was found to be macro- and microscopically comparable in the corresponding groups. The mean survival time of untreated mice drinking tap water was about 2 weeks following injection of the fast-growing P815, L5178Y, or L1210 (V) tumors and approximately 5 weeks after injection of cells from a slower-growing L1210 subline. Body deuteration alone roughly doubled the survival time solely of mice bearing this L1210 subline. Treatment with MTX approximately doubled the mean survival time of hosts bearing one of the fast-growing tumors. Combined treatment with heavy water and MTX increased the mean survival time of the mice in all groups by 15 to 125% as compared to control values. The reasons for this effect are unknown. However, heavy water has been shown to exert antimitotic activity and to depress the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA of proliferating mammalian cells. The depression of antibody formation following antigenic stimulation and the reduction in numbers of nonneoplastic lymphoid cells of mice following moderate body deuteration may have contributed to the enhancement of MTX activity in addition to other effects of deuterium

  17. Method and apparatus for enrichment or upgrading heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for upgrading and final enrichment of heavy water are described, comprising means for contacting partially enriched heavy water feed in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas (essentially D 2 ) originating in an electrolysis cell so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and means for passing the deuterium enriched water to the electrolysis cell. (author)

  18. Pulsating potentiometric titration technique for assay of dissolved oxygen in water at trace level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, P; Ananthanarayanan, R; Malathi, N; Rajiniganth, M P; Murali, N; Swaminathan, P

    2010-06-11

    A simple but high performance potentiometric titration technique using pulsating sensors has been developed for assay of dissolved oxygen (DO) in water samples down to 10.0 microg L(-1) levels. The technique involves Winkler titration chemistry, commonly used for determination of dissolved oxygen in water at mg L(-1) levels, with modification in methodology for accurate detection of end point even at 10.0 microg L(-1) levels DO present in the sample. An indigenously built sampling cum pretreatment vessel has been deployed for collection and chemical fixing of dissolved oxygen in water samples from flowing water line without exposure to air. A potentiometric titration facility using pulsating sensors developed in-house is used to carry out titration. The power of the titration technique has been realised in estimation of very dilute solution of iodine equivalent to 10 microg L(-1) O(2). Finally, several water samples containing dissolved oxygen from mg L(-1) to microg L(-1) levels were successfully analysed with excellent reproducibility using this new technique. The precision in measurement of DO in water at 10 microg L(-1) O(2) level is 0.14 (n=5), RSD: 1.4%. Probably for the first time a potentiometric titration technique has been successfully deployed for assay of dissolved oxygen in water samples at 10 microg L(-1) levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulsating potentiometric titration technique for assay of dissolved oxygen in water at trace level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, P.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Malathi, N.; Rajiniganth, M.P.; Murali, N.; Swaminathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    A simple but high performance potentiometric titration technique using pulsating sensors has been developed for assay of dissolved oxygen (DO) in water samples down to 10.0 μg L -1 levels. The technique involves Winkler titration chemistry, commonly used for determination of dissolved oxygen in water at mg L -1 levels, with modification in methodology for accurate detection of end point even at 10.0 μg L -1 levels DO present in the sample. An indigenously built sampling cum pretreatment vessel has been deployed for collection and chemical fixing of dissolved oxygen in water samples from flowing water line without exposure to air. A potentiometric titration facility using pulsating sensors developed in-house is used to carry out titration. The power of the titration technique has been realised in estimation of very dilute solution of iodine equivalent to 10 μg L -1 O 2 . Finally, several water samples containing dissolved oxygen from mg L -1 to μg L -1 levels were successfully analysed with excellent reproducibility using this new technique. The precision in measurement of DO in water at 10 μg L -1 O 2 level is 0.14 (n = 5), RSD: 1.4%. Probably for the first time a potentiometric titration technique has been successfully deployed for assay of dissolved oxygen in water samples at 10 μg L -1 levels.

  20. Seismic re-evaluation of Heavy Water Plant, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parulekar, Y.M.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-10-01

    This report deals with seismic re-evaluation of Heavy Water Plant, Kota. Heavy Water Plant, Kota handles considerable amount of H 2 S gas, which is very toxic. During the original design stage as per IS 1893-1966 seismic coefficient for zone-I was zero. Therefore earthquake and its effects were not considered while designing the heavy water plant structures. However as per IS 1893 (1984) the seismic coefficient for zone-I is 0.01 g. Hence seismic re-evaluation of various structures of the heavy water plant is carried out. Analysis of the heavy water plant structures was carried out for self weight, equipment load and earthquake load. Pressure loading was also considered in case of H 2 S storage tanks. Soil structure interaction effect was considered in the analysis. The combined stresses in the structures due to earthquake and dead load were checked with the allowable stresses. (author)

  1. Using Performance Reference Compounds (PRCs) to measure dissolved water concentrations (Cfree) in the water column: Assessing equilibrium models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equilibrium-based passive sampling methods are often used in aquatic environmental monitoring to measure hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and in the subsequent evaluation of their effects on ecological and human health. HOCs freely dissolved in water (Cfree) will partition...

  2. Production of heavy water in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerat, J.M.; Roth, E.

    1964-01-01

    Since 1958, studies relating to heavy water production have covered several processes. Each one has been examined to a greater or lesser degree and attention has finally been concentrated on the isotopic exchanges between hydrogen sulphide and water and between ammonia and synthesis gas, the pilot experiment having shown that hydrogen distillation, although technologically satisfactory, was not competitive. NH 3 synthesis gas exchange process; 1) Research was continued and led to the decision to build a production unit, devoted also to the synthesis of ammonia. The process essentially depends on the source of the synthesis gas; the use of a H 2 O/H 2 exchange, which could make it independent, has in fact been rejected for economic reasons. Amongst the various possible designs for the process, the one temperature system was chosen, in spite of certain technological problems, because of it provides: a high enrichment with a reduced number of contact devices. These have now been perfected after large-scale pilot tests. The original industrial experiment to be set in operation will supply useful information for second generation plants, whether they use the one temperature lay out again or whether they adopt the two temperature system. H 2 S-H 2 O exchange process. The pilot plant, described in 1958, has been used for a systematic study of corrosion. It was possible to proceed to preliminary specifications of plants, with 2 or 3 H 2 S - H 2 O stages exchange for primary enrichment. They final stage beyond a 10 to 20 p.100 D 2 O concentration being carried out by the distillation of water. Various heat exchange systems have been studied in detail and it was concluded that choices, as for instance the one of optimum division of the cascade, were eventually to be made according to the particular economic conditions of creation at the chosen location of the plant. (author) [fr

  3. Heavy water: a distinctive and essential component of CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.I.; van Alstyne, H.M.

    1994-06-01

    The exceptional properties of heavy water as a neutron moderator provide one of the distinctive features of CANDU reactors. Although most of the chemical and physical properties of deuterium and protium (mass 1 hydrogen) are appreciably different, the low terrestrial abundance of deuterium makes the separation of heavy water a relatively costly process, and so of considerable importance to the CANDU system. World heavy-water supplies are currently provided by the Girdler-Sulphide process or processes based on ammonia-hydrogen exchange. Due to cost and hazard considerations, new processes will be required for the production of heavy water in and beyond the next decade. Through AECL's development and refinement of wetproofed catalysts for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between water and hydrogen, a family of new processes is expected to be deployed. Two monothermal processes, CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange, using water-to-hydrogen conversion by electrolysis) and CIRCE (Combined Industrially Reformed hydrogen and Catalytic Exchange, based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons), are furthest advanced. Besides its use for heavy-water production, the CECE process is a highly effective technology for heavy-water upgrading and for tritium separation from heavy (or light) water. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  4. Procedure for operating a heavy water cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.; Kumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactors cooled by heavy water usually have equipment for fuel element exchange during operation, with the primary circuit remaining contained. This fuel element exchange equipment is expensive and complicated in many respects. According to the invention, the heavy water is therefore replaced by light water after a certain time of operation in such way that light water is led in and heavy water is led off. After the replacement, at least a quarter of the fuel elements of the reactor core is exchanged with the reactor pressure vessel being open. Then the light water serving as a shielding is replaced by heavy water, with the reactor pressure vessel being closed. The invention is of interest particularly for high-conversion reactors. (orig.) [de

  5. Removal of emulsified oil in residual waters by means of dissolved air flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverri Londono, Carlos Alberto

    1996-01-01

    In this article is consigned a theoretical and experimental study on the treatment of industrial residual waters with emulsified oil, through the flotation process for dissolved air (FAD), changing some operation parameters and some importance topics, related with the process. The experimental results and the theoretical pattern, show that the removal of oil depends fundamentally on the chemical pretreatment. Efficiencies of removal of oil up of 99% they were obtained, using the dissolved air flotation with the help of coagulants

  6. A new device for continuous monitoring the CO2 dissolved in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, S.; Camarda, M.; Cappuzzo, S.; Giudice, G.; Gurrieri, S.; Longo, M.

    2009-04-01

    The measurements of dissolved CO2 in water are common elements of industrial processes and scientific research. In order to perform gas dissolved measurements is required to separate the dissolved gaseous phase from water. We developed a new device able to separate the gases phase directly in situ and well suitable for continuous measuring the CO2 dissolved in water. The device is made by a probe of a polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) tube connected to an I.R. spectrophotometer (I.R.) and a pump. The PTFE is a polymeric semi-permeable membrane and allows the permeation of gas in the system. Hence, this part of the device is dipped in water in order to equilibrate the probe headspace with the dissolved gases. The partial pressure of the gas i in the headspace at equilibrium (Pi) follows the Henry's law: Pi=Hi•Ci, where Hi is the Henry's constant and Ci is the dissolved concentration of gas i. After the equilibrium is achieved, the partial pressure of CO2 inside the tube is equal to the partial pressure of dissolved CO2. The concentration of CO2 is measured by the I.R. connected to the tube. The gas is moved from the tube headspace to the I.R. by using the pump. In order to test the device and assess the best operating condition, several experimental were performed in laboratory. All the test were executed in a special apparatus where was feasible to create controlled atmospheres. Afterward the device has been placed in a draining tunnel sited in the Mt. Etna Volcano edifice (Italy). The monitored groundwater intercepts the Pernicana Fault, along which degassing phenomena are often observed. The values recorded by the station result in agreement with monthly directly measurements of dissolved CO2 partial pressure.

  7. Dissolved nitrogen in drinking water resources of farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    of the total drinking water needs. Dry season vegetable farmers also prepare their nur- sery beds close to streams and use surface water for irri- gation. The proximity of nurseries to streams results in clearing of stream bank vegetation to accommodate nur- series. Pollution of stream water and depletion of their resources ...

  8. The spatial distribution of dissolved and particulate heavy metals and their response to land-based inputs and tides in a semi-enclosed industrial embayment: Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanbin; Li, Keqiang; Wang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    In order to evaluate heavy metal contamination in surface waters in the Jiaozhou Bay (JZB), a typical semi-enclosed bay in the north of China, and to identify the response of heavy metal distribution to terrigenous sources and tides, the land-based discharge flux of dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd and their particulates, as well as their concentrations, were synchronously surveyed in JZB in flood season and normal season respectively. The survey results showed that the amount of dissolved Cu clearly increased from the estuaries to the offshore waters during the flood season, especially from the Dagu estuary to the mouth of JZB. The same trend was observed for Pb. The isopleths of dissolved Zn during the flood season presented a different pattern in which a clear decrease was observed from the Lianwan, Moshui and Dagu estuaries to the offshore waters. However, the particulate Cu isopleths during the flood season, which had the same pattern as those of particulate Pb, Zn and Cd, showed a clear decrease from the Dagu estuary to the mouth of JZB. The isopleths for dissolved and particulate Cu during the normal season showed a clear decrease from the northeast to the entrance of JZB, and the same trend was observed for Pb, Zn and Cd. Observations based on synchronous investigations of the fluvial fluxes of the selected metals and their average concentrations in JZB showed that these patterns were controlled by the strong external fluvial inputs, especially from the Dagu River. The diurnal change in the Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd concentrations showed a periodicity with a cycle length of approximately 12 h in JZB, which indicates the noticeable impact of the semi-diurnal tide. The weighed average concentration from freshwater inputs calculated for dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd were higher than their average concentrations in JZB. This indicated that JZB had been contaminated with these metals, whose concentrations were also higher than those found in uncontaminated waters.

  9. Dissolved pesticides, dissolved organic carbon, and water-quality characteristics in selected Idaho streams, April--December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Wilson, Emma R.; Battaglin, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from April through December 2010 from four streams in Idaho and analyzed for a suite of pesticides, including fungicides, by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were collected from two agricultural and two nonagricultural (control) streams approximately biweekly from the beginning of the growing season (April) through the end of the calendar year (December). Samples were analyzed for 90 pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-three pesticides, including 8 fungicides, 10 herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 2 pesticide degradates, were detected in 45 water samples. The most frequently detected compounds in the two agricultural streams and their detection frequencies were metolachlor, 96 percent; azoxystrobin, 79 percent; boscalid, 79 percent; atrazine, 46 percent; pendimethalin, 33 percent; and trifluralin, 33 percent. Dissolved-pesticide concentrations ranged from below instrumental limits of detection (0.5-1.0 nanograms per liter) to 771 nanograms per liter (hexazinone). The total number of pesticides detected in any given water sample ranged from 0 to 11. Only three pesticides (atrazine, fipronil, and simazine) were detected in samples from the control streams during the sampling period.

  10. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Olmstead, R.A.; Yu, A.M.; Dastur, A.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  11. A real-time tritium-in-water monitor for measurement of heavy water leak to the secondary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnakaran, M.; Ravetkar, R.M.; Samant, R.K.; Abani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the development and evaluation of on-line, real-time tritium in water monitor for detection and measurement of heavy water leak to the secondary coolant in a Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor. The detector used for this is a plastic scintillator film, made in the form of sponge and housed in a flow cell which is used for measurement of tritium activity present in heavy water. Two photomultiplier tubes are optically coupled on either face of the flow cell detector and measurement is done in coincidence mode. The sample water is continuously passed through the flow cell detector and a continuous measurement of tritium activity is carried out. It is observed that the impurities in the process water sample are gradually trapped in the flow cell, which affects the transparency of the detector with use. This reduces the sensitivity of the system. In addition, chlorine, which is added in the sample water, to arrest the fungus formation, creates chemiluminescence which interfere the measurement. To improve the sample quality as well as to eliminate the chemiluminescence created by chlorine, sample conditioner consisting of polypropylene candle, activated charcoal and glass fibre filter paper is developed. Polypropylene candle traps particulates above 5 μm pore size, activated charcoal absorbs organic compounds, free chlorine, fungus and turbidity and glass fibre filter paper stops submicron size particles. The measurement is also affected by the interference of dissolved argon-41 in the sample water. A bubbler system developed at BARC is used to strip the dissolved Ar-41 present in the sample which enables the system to measure tritium in presence of this interfering radioactive gas. The microprocessor based electronic system, used in the monitor provides the facility for selection of counting time and thereby improving the counting statistics. Alarm circuit is provided to give timely alarm when the tritium activity concentration exceeds the preset level

  12. Chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved sulfate from shallow wells on Vulcano Island, Aeolian Archipelago, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortecci, G.; Dinelli, E.; Boschetti, T. [University of Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Earth and Geological Environmental Sciences; Bolognesi, L. [International Institute for Geothermal Research, Pisa (Italy); Ferrara, G. [University of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2001-02-01

    Twenty-two cold and thermal waters from shallow wells sampled in June 1995 in the Vulcano Porto area, Vulcano Island, were analyzed for major and minor chemical constituents, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes and tritium contents, and sulfur isotopes in the dissolved sulfate. The sulfur isotopic composition of the dissolved sulfate ranges between + 0.6 and + 6.5 per mille (mean + 3.7{+-}1.7 per mille), and is interpreted as deriving mainly from fumarolic SO{sub 2} undergoing oxidation in deep and shallow aquifers, with possible minor contributions from oxidation of H{sub 2}S. Dissolution of secondary anhydrite may have been a minor source of the isotopically heavy aqueous sulfate in the cold groundwaters. The chemical and isotopic features of the waters support previous interpretative hydrologic models of Vulcano Porto, which comprise a number of aquifers fed basically by two major end-members, i.e. meteoric water and crater-type fumarolic inputs, the latter in the form of absorbed emissions or condensate. These data, along with the sulfur isotopes of aqueous sulfate, exclude involvement of seawater in the recharge of the groundwater system of the island. (author)

  13. Dissolved organic nutrients and phytoplankton production in the Mandovi estuary and coastal waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.

    Total organic nitrogen (TON) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in the coastal and estuarine waters of Goa, India varied from 0.6 to 47.1 mu g-at N 1-1 and 0.12 to 3.49 mu g-at P l-1 respectively. The chlorophyll content of these waters...

  14. A Drinking Water Sensor for Lead and Other Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Chi; Li, Zhongrui; Burns, Mark A

    2017-09-05

    Leakage of lead and other heavy metals into drinking water is a significant health risk and one that is not easily detected. We have developed simple sensors containing only platinum electrodes for the detection of heavy metal contamination in drinking water. The two-electrode sensor can identify the existence of a variety of heavy metals in drinking water, and the four-electrode sensor can distinguish lead from other heavy metals in solution. No false-positive response is generated when the sensors are placed in simulated and actual tap water contaminated by heavy metals. Lead detection on the four-electrode sensor is not affected by the presence of common ions in tap water. Experimental results suggest the sensors can be embedded in water service lines for long-time use until lead or other heavy metals are detected. With its low cost (∼$0.10/sensor) and the possibility of long-term operation, the sensors are ideal for heavy metal detection of drinking water.

  15. Heavy water pumps; Pumpe D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V; Nikolic, M

    1963-12-15

    Continuous increase of radiation intensity was observed on all the elements in the heavy water system during first three years of RA reactor operation. The analysis of heavy water has shown the existence of radioactive cobalt. It was found that cobalt comes from stellite, cobalt based alloy which was used for coating of the heavy water pump discs in order to increase resistance to wearing. Cobalt was removed from the surfaces due to friction, and transferred by heavy water into the reactor where it has been irradiated for 29 876 MWh up to 8-15 Ci/g. Radioactive cobalt contaminated all the surfaces of aluminium and stainless steel parts. This report includes detailed description of heavy water pumps repair, exchange of stellite coated parts, decontamination of the heavy water system, distillation of heavy water. [Serbo-Croat] U toku prve tri godine eksploatacije reaktora RA uocen je neprekidni porast intenziteta zracenja na svim elementima u teskovodnom sistemu. Analizom teske vode utvrdjeno je postojanje radioaktivnog kobalta. Ustanovljeno je da kobalt potice od stelita, legure na bazi kobalta kojim su presvuceni rukavci vratila teskovodnih pumpi radi otpornosi na habanje. Kobalt je trenjem skidan sa povrsina, u toku rada prenosen je teskom vodom u reaktor i ozracivan u toku 29 876 MWh do specificne aktivnosti 8-15 Ci/g. Radioaktivni kobalt je kontaminirao sve povrsine od aluminijuma i nerdjajuceg celika. Ovaj izvestaj sadrzi detaljan opis remonta pumpi, zamene delova teskovodnih pumpi novim delovima bez stelitnog sloja, dekontaminacije teskovodnog sistema, destilacije teske vode.

  16. Eventual physiological properties of radon dissolved in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garsou, J.; Lecomte, J.; Lagneaux, D.

    1978-01-01

    Natural radioactivity of spring waters in Spa basin is not correlated with some therapeutic or physiological activity. This statement is based on two arguments. The first one is of biological character, the second one is of epidemiological character. In fact the observations on an all aged human population accidentally submitted to a long ingestion of a radon-rich water at concentrations far higher than those of the spring waters in Spa basin, have been found not to show any physiological or pathological activity. (author)

  17. Urban water pollution by heavy metals and health implication in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of common heavy metals were conducted at Onitsha, Anambra State, the most urbanized city in Southeastern Nigeria. It was discovered that both surface and subsurface water were heavily polluted. Seven (7) heavy metals namely: arsenic (As+2), cadmium (Cd+2), lead (Pb+2), mercury (Hg+2), zinc (Zn+2), copper ...

  18. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector ...

  19. Environmental assessment of ground water pollution by heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the concentrations of heavy metals in well water and bioaccumulation of the most abundant metals in chicken tissues in some areas in the province of Mecca Almokaramah, Saudi Arabia. Among the heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Cr, Mn, Cu Hg, Pb and Ni) studied, ...

  20. Analysis of Heavy Metals in Water and Fish (Tilapia sp.) Samples from Tasik Mutiara, Puchong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismaniza Ismail; Idaliza Mat Saleh

    2012-01-01

    The concentrations of seven heavy metals (Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) were detected in muscle tissues of Tilapia sp. (black tilapia) collected from the lake of Taman Mutiara, Puchong. Samples were collected for several months in the end of 2009 at three sampling points. Heavy metals in fish and water samples were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Only Al, Cu, Fe and Zn were detected in the order Fe > Zn > Al > Cu, whereas concentrations of As, Cd and Pb were below the detection limit. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were low and below the detection limit. The levels of heavy metals in the fish samples can be considered as a serious matter of concern as it may be consumed and it signifies the degradation of lake quality. Generally, the sources of heavy metals in the Tasik Mutiara, Puchong could be attributed to the illegal waste dumping activity and discharge from the nearby sewage treatment plant into the lake which promote eutrophication in the lake. It could also be attributed to the Low Dissolved Oxygen (DO) levels in the lake. (author)

  1. Process for the preparation of ammonia and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A process for the production of ammonia and heavy water comprises the steps of enriching a flow of water with deuterium in a monothermal isotropic process; supplying a first portion of the deuterium-enriched water to a heavy water preparation plant to produce heavy water and hydrogen; storing a second portion of the deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the colder half of a year; electrolytically dissociating the stored deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the wamer half of a year to form hydrogen; storing a portion of the electrolytically-produced hydrogen during said warmer half of a year while supplying the remainder to a synthesis circuit of a synthesizing plant and subsequently supplying the stored hydrogen to the synthesis circuit during said colder half of a year; removing some of the synthesis gas mixture from the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant; burning the removed synthesis gas mixture with air to produce a mixture consisting mainly of water and nitrogen; thereafter condensing and separating the water from the mixture of water and nitrogen; supplying the nitrogen of the mixture of water and nitrogen, the hydrogen from the heavy water preparation plant and the electrolytically-produced hydrogen to the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant to produce ammonia; and collecting deuterium-depleted water resulting from said burning step and feeding the collected deuterium-depleted water into the monothermal process

  2. Overcoming technology - obsolescence: a case study in Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, O.P.; Sonde, R.R.; Wechalekar, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia based Heavy Water Plants in India are set up essentially in conjunction with fertiliser plants for the supply of feed synthesis gas. Earlier ammonia was being produced in fertiliser plants using high-pressure technology which was highly energy intensive. However with fast developments in the field of production of ammonia, fertiliser plants are switching over to low pressure technology. Ammonia based heavy water plants have to operate on pressures corresponding to that of fertiliser plants. Due to low pressures in production of ammonia, heavy water plants would also be required to operate at low pressures than the existing operating pressures. This problem was faced at Heavy Water Plant at Baroda where GSFC supplying synthesis gas switched over to low pressure technology making it imperative on the part of Heavy Water Board to carry out modification to the main plant for continued operation of Heavy Water Plant, Baroda. Anticipating similar problems due to production of ammonia at lower pressures in other fertiliser plants linked to existing Heavy Water Plants, it became necessary for HWB to develop water ammonia front end. The feed in such a case would be water instead of synthesis gas. This would enable HWB to dispense with dependence on fertiliser plants especially if grass-root ammonia based heavy water plants are to be set up. Incorporation of water ammonia front end would enable HWB to de link ammonia based heavy water plants with fertiliser plants. This paper discusses the advantage of de linking heavy water plant respective fertiliser plant by incorporating water ammonia front end and technical issues related to front end technology. A novel concept of ammonia absorption refrigeration (AAR) was considered for the process integration with the front end. The incorporation of AAR with water ammonia front-end configuration utilizes liquid ammonia refrigerant to generate refrigeration without additional energy input which otherwise would have been

  3. Water analysis from wells in Ezeiza and surrounding areas. Dissolved uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santagata, D.M.; Arguelles, Maria G.; Barbaro, Nestor O.

    2006-01-01

    In order to give an answer to the different social sectors, we sampled water from previously existing wells that reaches the Puelche aquifer. The uranium concentration was determined in these samples to obtain a preliminary checkup of water quality situation. For the analysis we considered the samples obtained inside the CAE as well as those sampled in the surrounding areas as Monte Grande, Claypole and Burzaco. The results show a correlation between the amount of dissolved salts and the presence of dissolved uranium. (author) [es

  4. State of dissolved water in triglycerides as determined by Fourier transform infrared and near infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashige, J. (Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Takaoka, K.; Takasago, M.; Taru, Y.; Kobayashi, K. (Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-20

    The states of dissolved water in triglycerides (TG) such as tristearin, triolein, trilinolein and trilinolenin were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy, and compared with those of water itself. In the case of water, its states were considered to be mainly polymer clusters larger than dimer ones at 20{degree}C, and mostly monomer or dimer clusters at 120{degree}C. In TG, the states varied widely from monomer to polymer clusters at 20{degree}C. The distribution ratios of the water clusters observed in TG depended on the kinds of fatty acids of TG, and the water state was noted to change due to the interaction between unsaturated bonds and dissolved water. Although the states of dissolved water in trilinolein were similar to those of original water at 20{degree}C, the ratio of monomer water decreased and polymer clusters bigger than those in original water increased with an increase in number of unsaturated bonds of TG. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of dissolved air flotation and membrane filtration for drinking water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Benschoten, J.; Martin, C.; Schaefer, J.; Xu, L.; Franceschini, S.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale testing was conducted to evaluate the use of dissolved air flotation (DAF) followed by membrane filtration (MF) for drinking water treatment. At the laboratory scale, four water samples of varying water quality were tested. Pilot- scale DAF and MF plants located at the City of Buffalo Water Treatment facility utilized Lake Erie as a raw water source to evaluate this combination of treatment processes. A polyaluminum coagulant was used throughout the study. Study results demonstrated beneficial effects of coagulant addition in extending MF run time. Pilot testing showed additional benefits to using DAF as a pretreatment step to MF. In all testing, MF produced excellent water quality. Particulate matter appeared more important than concentration or type of dissolved organic matter in membrane fouling. (author)

  6. Decontamination of the RA reactor heavy water system, Annex 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, Z.B.; Nikolic, R.M.; Marinkovic, M.D.; Jelic, Lj.M.

    1963-01-01

    Both stainless steel and aluminium parts of the RA reactor heavy water system system were decontaminated as well as the heavy water itself. System was contaminated with 60 Co. Decontamination factor was determined by activity measurements during distillation. Concentration of the corrosion products in the heavy water was measured by spectrochemical analysis, and found to be 0.1 - 1 mg/l. Chemical analyses of the aluminium and stainless steel surfaces showed that cobalt was adsorbed on the aluminium oxide layer. Water solution of 7%H 3 PO 4 + 2% CrO 3 was used for decontamination of the heavy water system and distillation device. This was found to be the most efficient solvent which does not affect stainless steel corrosion. Decontamination factors achieved were from 60 - 100. Decontamination results enabled determining the distribution of cobalt in the system: 10 Ci on the stainless steel parts, 50 Ci in the heavy water; and above 600 Ci on the fuel and experimental channels. Specific activity of 60 Co was calculated to be 15 Ci/g on the reactor channels, 8 Ci/g on the stainless steel parts and 3 Ci/g in the heavy water. Decontamination of the aluminium parts was not done because it was considered it could initiate corrosion. Since the efficiency of distillation is increased it was expected that permanent distillation would remove most of the activity in the reactor channels

  7. Bubble growth as a means to measure dissolved nitrogen concentration in aerated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Keita; Yamashita, Tatsuya

    2017-11-01

    Controlling the amount of dissolved gases in water is important, for example, to food processing; it is essential to quantitatively evaluate dissolved gas concentration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) can be measured by commercial DO meters, but that of dissolved nitrogen (DN) cannot be obtained easily. Here, we propose a means to measure DN concentration based on Epstein-Plesset-type analysis of bubble growth under dissolved gas supersaturation. DO supersaturation in water is produced by oxygen microbubble aeration. The diffusion-driven growth of bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water is first observed. The observed growth is then compared to the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that considers Fick's mass transfer of both DO and DN across bubble interfaces; in this comparison, the unknown DN concentration is treated as a fitting parameter. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest, as expected, that DN can be effectively purged by oxygen microbubble aeration. This study was supported in part by the Mizuho Foundation for the Promotion of Science and by a MEXT Grant-in-Aid for the Program for Leading Graduate Schools.

  8. Adsorption of dissolved uranium from well water. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasper, S.; Oldham, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    This study was undertaken in response to a request from the provincial Ministry of Health, to evaluate several methods for removal of uranium from well water in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia. The naturally occurring uranium levels in some of these wells is above 100 ppb, and as the drinking water standard for uranium is 20 ppb, it has become necessary to develop an efficient, easily operated system to reduce uranium concentration. This study comprises the first step in this process by selecting the most appropriate adsorbent and estimating its efficiency and capacity

  9. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    organic bound carbon equal in size to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Prokaryotes mediate the fate of a large part of marine DOM, which is their principal source of energy and substrate. However, a large fraction is also left behind in the water column persisting for millennia, and prokaryotes may hold...... the key to understanding the mechanisms controlling the cycling of DOM within marine waters. In the thesis presented here, the aim was to investigate the activity and composition of prokaryotes to determine their functional role in DOM utilization. The thesis incorporates a range of study systems...

  10. Alkali metal and ammonium chlorides in water and heavy water (binary systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Adad, R

    1991-01-01

    This volume surveys the data available in the literature for solid-fluid solubility equilibria plus selected solid-liquid-vapour equilibria, for binary systems containing alkali and ammonium chlorides in water or heavy water. Solubilities covered are lithium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, rubidium chloride, caesium chloride and ammonium chloride in water and heavy water.

  11. Determination of heavy metals and genotoxicity of water from an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of heavy metals and genotoxicity of water from an artesian well ... do Amaral, Vanessa Marques de Oliveira Moraes, Luciana Pereira Silva ... environmental interest because it is the most important zinc producer district of Brazil.

  12. Manufacturing opportunities in the Canadian CANDU and heavy water programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reny, J.P.

    The volume of business available to Canadian manufacturers of CANDU power plant and heavy water plant components is analyzed over about the next 10 years. Implications of exported nuclear technology and plants are explored. (E.C.B.)

  13. Simple method of measuring pulmonary extravascular water using heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basset, G; Moreau, F; Scaringella, M; Tistchenko, S; Botter, F; Marsac, J

    1975-11-20

    The field of application of the multiple indicators dilution method in human pathology, already used to study pulmonary edema, can be extended to cover the identification and testing of all conditions leading to increase lung water. To be really practical it must be simple, fast, sensitive, inexpensive and subject to repetition; the use of non-radioactive tracers is implied. Indocyanine Green and heavy water were chosen respectively as vascular and diffusible indicators. Original methods have been developed for the treatment and isotopic analysis of blood: mass spectrometric analysis of aqueous blood extracts after deproteinisation by zinc sulphate then rapid distillation of the supernatant under helium; infrared analysis either of acetone extracts from small blood samples (100..mu..litre) or of blood itself in a continuous measurement. The infrared technique adopted has been used on rats and on men in normal and pathological situations. The results show that the method proposed for the determination of pulmonary extravascular water meets the requirements of clinicians while respecting the patients' safety, and could be generalized to other organs.

  14. Thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water in the liquid state up to 3700C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Neindre, B.; Bury, P.; Tufeu, R.; Vodar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water of 99.75 percent isotopic purity were measured using a coaxial cylinder apparatus, covering room temperature to their critical temperatures, and pressures from 1 to 500 bar for water, and from 1 to 1000 bar for heavy water. Following the behavior of the thermal conductivity coefficient of water, which shows a maximum close to 135 0 C, the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water exhibits a maximum near 95 0 C and near saturation pressures. This maximum is displaced to higher temperatures when the pressure is increased. Under the same temperature and pressure conditions the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water was lower than for water. The pressure effect was similar for water and heavy water. In the temperature range of our experiments, isotherms of thermal conductivity coefficients were almost linear functions of density

  15. The role of dissolved organic substance in radionuclide migration in river water of the Kiev's water reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domin, V.V.; Bondarenko, G.N.; Zheldakov, Yu.A.

    1989-01-01

    The role of organic substance dissolved (DOS) in radionuclide migration in the river water of the Kiev's water reservoir was considered. It was ascertained, that metal complexes with fulvic acids were stable and complexing properties of fulvic acids affected radionuclide migration. When DOS content increased sharply during the freshet period, radionuclide migration also increased. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Reducing dissolved inorganic nitrogen in surface runoff water from sugarcane production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A J; Bartley, R; Armour, J D; Brodie, J E; Thorburn, P J

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) lost from farms, especially as the highly bioavailable dissolved inorganic form, may be damaging Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). As sugarcane is the dominant cropping system in GBR catchments, its N management practises are coming under increasing scrutiny. This study measured dissolved inorganic N lost in surface runoff water and sugarcane productivity over 3 years. The experiment compared the conventional fertiliser N application rate to sugarcane (average 180kg N/ha/year) and a rate based on replacing N exported in the previous crop (average 94kg N/ha/year). Dissolved inorganic N losses in surface water were 72%, 48% and 66% lower in the three monitored years in the reduced N fertiliser treatment. There was no significant difference in sugarcane yield between the two fertiliser N treatments, nor any treatment difference in soil mineral N - both of these results are indicators of the sustainability of the lower fertiliser N applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on the oscillation dissolved behavior of oxysophocarpine in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.X., E-mail: mingtian8001@163.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Baoji University of Arts and Science, Baoji, Shaanxi 721013 (China); Zhao, W.W.; Pu, X.H. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Baoji University of Arts and Science, Baoji, Shaanxi 721013 (China)

    2012-06-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dissolution enthalpies of oxysophocarpine in water was measured using a RD496-2000 Calvet microcalorimeter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results show that the dissolution process possessed an endothermic and exothermic oscillation behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of thermodynamics functions and half-life period were obtained from thermodynamic and kinetic calculations. - Abstract: In this paper, the enthalpies of dissolution of oxysophocarpine in water were measured using a RD496-2000 Calvet microcalorimeter at 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure, showing that the dissolution process was an endothermic and exothermic oscillation behavior. A series of thermodynamics functions and the half-life were obtained by thermodynamic and kinetic methods. The results show that this work not only provide a simple method for the determination of the half-life for a drug but also offer a theoretical reference for the clinical application of resveratrol.

  18. Study on the oscillation dissolved behavior of oxysophocarpine in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.X.; Zhao, W.W.; Pu, X.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The dissolution enthalpies of oxysophocarpine in water was measured using a RD496-2000 Calvet microcalorimeter. ► The results show that the dissolution process possessed an endothermic and exothermic oscillation behavior. ► A series of thermodynamics functions and half-life period were obtained from thermodynamic and kinetic calculations. - Abstract: In this paper, the enthalpies of dissolution of oxysophocarpine in water were measured using a RD496-2000 Calvet microcalorimeter at 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure, showing that the dissolution process was an endothermic and exothermic oscillation behavior. A series of thermodynamics functions and the half-life were obtained by thermodynamic and kinetic methods. The results show that this work not only provide a simple method for the determination of the half-life for a drug but also offer a theoretical reference for the clinical application of resveratrol.

  19. Radiation safety experience in upgrading 2-5% heavy water wastes at Heavy Water Plant, Nangal (Preprint No. SA-7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhukhan, H.K.; Behl, D.; Ramraj; Iyengar, T.S.; Sadarangani, S.H.; Vaze, P.K.; Soman, S.D.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes the radiological safety experience in upgrading 2-5% heavy water wastes at Heavy Water Plant at Nangal at the third stage electrolysers. The feed water concentrations at the third stage electrolyer was determined after a safety analysis study and pilot plant experiment, which gave the optimal concentrations of 1 to 1.5 mCi (3.7 to 5.5 x 10 7 Bq) per litre per minute feed from a submerged SS tank containing 2-5% heavy water wastes. This process not only yielded an efficient recovery of reactor grade heavy water but contained the tritium activity in the third stage electrolysers and in the final product viz., heavy water. The tritium concentrations were continuously monitore d by liquid scintillation counting method at all the three stages of electrolysis plant, the distillation plant, the heavy water filling rooms, the drains, the ambient air, the product fertilizer (calcium ammonia nitrate) and the Sutlej River and found to be well within the safety limits set for general public at large. The HD and D 2 process streams in the palnt were monitored using fill-in type of ionization chambers designed for the purpose, which served a D 2 inventory check as well. There was no internal exposure to any personnel during the entire period of programme. (author). 2 tabs

  20. Effects of dissolved organic matter leaching from macrophyte litter on black water events in shallow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuhong; Song, Na; Jiang, He-Long

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, the black water phenomenon has become an environmental event in eutrophic shallow lakes in China, leading to deterioration of lake ecosystems and potable water crises. Decomposition of macrophyte debris has been verified as a key inducement for black water events. In this study, the effects of the decomposition of dissolved organic matter (Kottelat et al., WASP 187:343-351, 2008) derived from macrophyte leachate on the occurrence of black water events are investigated to clarify the detailed mechanisms involved. Results show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) is composed of a trace of chromophoric DOM and mostly non-chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). DOM decomposition is accompanied by varied concentration of CDOM components, generation of organic particles, and increased microbial concentrations. These processes increase water chroma only during initial 48 h, so the intensified water color cannot be maintained by DOM decomposition alone. During DOM decomposition, microorganisms first consume non-CDOM, increasing the relative CDOM concentration and turning the water color to black (or brown). Simultaneously, tryptophan and aromatic proteins, which are major ingredients of CDOM, enhance UV light absorption, further aggravating the macroscopic phenomenon of black color. Our results show that DOM leached from decayed macrophytes promotes or even triggers the occurrence of black water events and should be taken more seriously in the future.

  1. Tritium concentration in the heavy water upgrading plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, C.; Pop, F.; Titescu, Gh.; Dumitrescu, M.; Ciortea, C.; Stefanescu, I.; Peculea, M.; Pitigoi, Gh.; Trancota, D. . E-mail of corresponding author: croitoru@icsi.ro; Croitoru, C.)

    2005-01-01

    In the course of time heavy water used in CANDU nuclear power plants, as moderator or coolant, degrades, as a result of its impurification with light water and tritium. Concentration diminution below 99.8% mol for moderator and 99.75% mol for coolant causes an inefficient functioning of CANDU reactor. By isotopic distillation, light water is removed. Simultaneously tritium concentration takes place. The heavy water upgrading plant from Cernavoda is an isotopic separation cascade with two stages. The paper presents, for this plant, a theoretical study of the tritium concentration. (author)

  2. Net removal of dissolved organic carbon in the anoxic waters of the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margolin, A.R.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Hansell, D.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the deep Black Sea are ~2.5 times higher than found in the globalocean. The two major external sources of DOC are rivers and the Sea of Marmara, a transit point for waters from theMediterranean Sea. In addition, expansive phytoplankton blooms

  3. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  4. Distribution of dissolved boron in the waters of the Zuari estuary (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajagopal, M.D.; Rajendran, A.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Dissolved boron varies from 0.02 to 5.42mg/kg along the length of the estuary.The data suggest that a considerable portion of boron is removed from the waters by sedimentary uptake during monsoon and postmonsoon seasons. There is also a variation...

  5. Assessment of Water Quality Index and Heavy Metal Contamination in Active and Abandoned Iron Ore Mining Sites in Pahang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madzin Zafira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of heavy metals in water and surface soils of iron ore mining sites were investigated to evaluate on the potential occurrence of heavy metal contamination. Physico-chemical characteristics of the waters were also investigated to determine the current status of water quality index (WQI of the sites. Samples of water and surface soils of active mine (Kuala Lipis and abandoned mine (Bukit Ibam in Pahang were collected at four locations, respectively. The physico-chemical parameters measured for WQI were pH, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, suspended solids (SS, and ammoniacal nitrogen (AN. The water quality parameters were classified according to the Department of Environment (DOE water quality classification. The study revealed that most of the sites in Bukit Ibam and Kuala Lipis were categorized as clean to slightly polluted. On the other hand, heavy metal analysis in water showed that aluminium and manganese level in both sites have exceeded the allowable limits for raw and treated water standards by the Ministry of Health. For heavy metal compositions in soils showed most of the heavy metal concentrations were below the recommended guideline values except for lead, arsenic, zinc and copper.

  6. Risk assessing heavy metals in the groundwater-surface water interface at a contaminated site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigi, Giovanni; McKnight, Ursula S.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    such as surface water and groundwater (EC, 2017). The current study quantified and assessed the contamination of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the shallow aquifer, hyporheic zone, stream water and streambed sediments at Rådvad site, a former metal manufacturing industrial area located in Denmark, investigating...... in the soil). Stream water was sampled in 12 points, while groundwater was sampled in 4 wells close to the stream where the interaction was suspected. Sediments and hyporheic zone were sampled in pair, where upward hydraulic heads have been detected. A drain discharging in the river was also sampled....... Sediments were divided in different layers and both heavy metal total concentration and chemical partitioning were analysed. Redox species and dissolved organic matter were also analysed in the water samples, while fraction of organic carbon was investigated in the extracted sediments. Results showed a high...

  7. Evaluation of dissolved oxygen and organic substances concentrations in water of the nature reserve Alluvium Zitavy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaticka, A.; Noskovic, J.; Babosova, M.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006 concentrations of dissolved oxygen and organic substances were evaluated in water in the Nature Reserve Alluvium Zitavy (indirect method based on their oxidation by K 2 Cr 2 0 7 was used). The results are represented in mg of O 2 · dm -3 . Taking of samples took place in 6 sampling sites in regular month intervals. Based on obtained data and according to the standard STN 75 7221 (Water quality -The classification of the water surface quality) water in individual sampling sites was ranked into the classes of the .water surface quality. From the data it is clear that the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and organic substances in the Nature Reserve Alluvium Zitavy changed in dependence on sampling sites and time. The highest mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen in dependence on sampling time were found out in spring months and the lowest concentrations in summer months. They ranged from 1.6 mg 0 2 · dm -3 (July) to 9.0 mg O 2 · dm -3 (March). Falling dissolved oxygen values can be related to successive increase of water temperature, thus good conditions were created for decomposition of organic matter by microorganisms in water and sediments in which they use dissolved oxygen. In dependence on sampling place the highest mean concentration of dissolved oxygen was in sampling site No. 4 (6.0 mg 0 2 · dm -3 ) which is situated in the narrowest place in the NR. The lowest value was in sampling site No. 2 (3.6 mg 0 2 · dm -3 ) which is a typical wetland ecosystem. High mean values of COD Cr in dependence on sampling time were determined in summer months and low values during winter moths. Dependence of COD Cr values on sampling site was also manifested. The lowest mean value was obtained in sampling site No. 4 (59.5 mg · dm -3 ) and the highest value in sampling site No. 5 (97.1 mg · dm -3 ) which is also a typical wetland. Based on the results and according to the STN 75 7221 we ranked water in all sampling sites into the 5 th class of the water

  8. Possibilities for reorientation the activity of heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, F.; Croitoru, C.; Titescu, Gh.; Stefanescu, I.; Hodor, I.; Cuna, S. . E-mail of corresponding author: pop.floarea@icsi.ro; Pop, F.)

    2005-01-01

    In Romania heavy water is produced by H 2 O-H 2 S chemical exchange (GS process) and by water distillation, simultaneously working two lines. The distillation plants have high separation capacity, a distillation line being able to concentrate water from two GS lines. The paper presents data regarding possibilities to use one distillation line for oxygen 18 production, as pre-concentrates or finite products. Using a simulation program it was calculated oxygen 18 concentration in heavy water produced, maximum 18 O concentration of pre-concentrate obtained on distillation line and the separation cascade dimensions for obtain 95% 18 O, with first and second stage having same dimensions like a distillation plant from Romanian heavy water factory. Oxygen-18 separation factor is much lower than deuterium separation factor. For this reason, oxygen-18 is a very expensive product. (author)

  9. Possibilities for reorientation of activity in Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, F.; Croitoru, C.; Titescu, Gh.; Stefanescu, I.; Hodor, I.; Cuna, S.

    2004-01-01

    In Romania heavy water is produced by H 2 O-H 2 S chemical exchange (GS process) and by water distillation, in two lines working simultaneously. The distillation plants have high separation capacity, a distillation line being able to concentrate water from two GS lines. The paper presents data regarding possibilities to use one distillation line for oxygen - 18 production, as pre-concentrates or finite products. A simulation program was used to calculate the oxygen - 18 concentration in the heavy water produced, maximum 18 O concentration of pre-concentrate obtained on distillation line and the separation cascade sizes to obtain 95% 18 O, with first and second stage having the same sizes like the distillation plant from the Romanian heavy water factory. Oxygen-18 separation factor is much lower than deuterium separation factor. For this reason, oxygen-18 is a very expensive product. (authors)

  10. Chemistry in production of heavy water and industrial solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Industries are the temples of modern science built on the robust foundation of science and technology. The genesis of giant chemical industries is from small laboratories where the scientific thoughts are fused and transformed into innovative technologies Heavy water production is an energy intensive giant chemical industry where various hazardous and flammable chemicals are handled, extreme operating conditions are maintained and various complex chemical reactions are involved. Chemistry is the back bone to all chemical industrial activities and plays a lead role in heavy water production also. Heavy Water Board has now mastered the technology of design, construction, operation and maintenance of Heavy Water plants as well as fine tuning of the process make it more cost effective and environment friendly. Heavy Water Board has ventured into diversified activities intimately connected with our three stages of Nuclear Power Programme. Process development for the production of nuclear grade solvents for the front end and back end of our nuclear fuel cycle is one area where we have made significant contributions. Heavy Water Board has validated, modified and fine-tuned the synthesis routes for TBP, D2EHPA, TOPO, TAPO TIAP, DNPPA, D2EHPA-II, DHOA etc and these solvents were accepted by end users. Exclusive campaigns were carried out in laboratory scale, bench scale and pilot plant scale before scaling up to industrial scale. The process chemistry is understood very well and chemical parameters were monitored in every step of the synthesis. It is a continual improvement cycle where fine tuning is carried out for best quality and yield of product at lowest cost. In this presentation, an attempt is made to highlight the role of chemistry in the production of Heavy Water and industrial solvents

  11. Study of the heavy water regeneration processes; Studija procesa za regeneraciju teske vode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavcic, E [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    Experience derived from heavy water reactor operation showed degradation and dilution of heavy water to be inevitable depends on the type of reactor. Dilution of heavy water during operation of the RA and the RB reactors is shown in this report. Principles and procedures of heavy water regeneration by electrolysis, fractional distillation, cleaning, prevention of tritium contamination are described as well as separation columns.

  12. Heavy water radiolysis and chemistry control of the Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibuki, Y.; Kitabata, T.; Kato, T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer analysis for heavy water radiolysis clarified the mechanism of the heavy water radiolysis rate change with impurities in the heavy water and cover gas, helium. The mechanism is supported by over ten years' operational data of the heavy water radiolysis in the Fugen nuclear power station. (author)

  13. Heavy Metal Levels and Physico-Chemical Quality of Potable Water Supply in Warri, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nduka, K.C.; Orisakwe, E.O.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between man's activities and the environment is gaining world wide attention. Warri an oil producing community in Delta State of Nigeria is faced with environmental oil pollution. Since open and underground water bodies are regarded as final recipients of most environmental pollutants, this study sought to provide data on the levels of the physico-chemical parameters and contaminants in Warri metropolitan water supply. This study investigated the cadmium, lead and chromium using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, physico - chemical properties such as pH, temperature, total suspended solid TSS, total dissolved solid TDS, electrical conductivity EC, biological oxygen demand BOD, dissolved oxygen DO, chemical oxygen demand COD, and total coliform count of potable water sources in Warri. Ekpan River was found to have 1.2 mg/L of cadmium, 1.0mg/L of chromium, 1.20 mg/L of lead and 2.0 mg/L of manganese. The heavy metals levels and the pollution parameters were lowest in the borehole water samples, except pH which is more acidic in borehole water samples and conductivity which is more in well water samples in all the sampling stations. Some of the parameters were above WHO standards

  14. Spatiotemporal characterization of dissolved carbon for inland waters in semi-humid/semiarid region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K. S.; Zang, S. Y.; Zhao, Y.; Du, J.; Li, L.; Zhang, N. N.; Wang, X. D.; Shao, T. T.; Guan, Y.; Liu, L.

    2013-05-01

    Spatiotemporal variations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), inorganic carbon (DIC) in 26 waters across the semi-humid/semi-arid Songnen Plain, China were examined with data collected during 2008-2011. Fresh (n = 14) and brackish (n = 12) waters were grouped according to electrical conductivity (threshold = 1000 μS cm-1). Significant differences in the mean DOC/DIC concentrations were observed between fresh (5.63 mg L-1, 37.39 mg L-1) and brackish waters (15.33 mg L-1, 142.93 mg L-1). Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and DOC concentrations were mainly controlled by climatic-hydrologic conditions. The observation indicated that the outflow conditions in the semi-endorheic region had condensed effects on the dissolved carbon, resulting in close relationships between salinity vs. DOC (R2 = 0.66), and vs. DIC (R2 = 0.94). Independent data set collected in May 2012 also confirmed this finding (DOC: R2 = 0.79), (DIC: R2 = 0.91), highlighting the potential of quantifying DOC/DIC via salinity measurements for waters dispersed in the plain. Indices based on CDOM absorption spectra, e.g. DOC specific CDOM absorption (SUVA254), absorption ratio a250 : a365 (E250:365) and spectral slope ratio (Sr, S275-295/S350-400), were applied to characterize DOM composition and quality. Our results indicate high molecular weight CDOM fractions are more abundant in fresh waters than brackish waters.

  15. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Holbrook, R.; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. -- Highlights: •Total titanium concentrations in unfiltered swimming pool water ranged between 21 and 60 μg/L. •Evaporation of the swimming pool water is suspected of causing a temporal increase in [Ti]. •The vast majority of Ti is found in the dissolved phase (<1 kD). •Swimming pools are not a significant Ti source for human exposure via ingestion. -- In children's swimming pool water, the majority of titanium is found in the dissolved phase

  16. Analysis of Dissolved Organic Nutrients in the Interstitial Water of Natural Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Eda, Shima; Kiriyama, Chiho; Asada, Tomoya; Morisaki, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    In biofilms, the matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) retains water in the interstitial region of the EPS. This interstitial water is the ambient environment for microorganisms in the biofilms. The nutrient condition in the interstitial water may affect microbial activity in the biofilms. In the present study, we measured the concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients, i.e., saccharides and proteins, contained in the interstitial water of biofilms formed on the stones. We also analyzed the molecular weight distribution, chemical species, and availability to bacteria of some saccharides in the interstitial water. Colorimetric assays showed that the concentrations of saccharides and proteins in the biofilm interstitial water were significantly higher (ca. 750 times) than those in the surrounding lake waters (p Chromatographic analyses demonstrated that the saccharides in the interstitial waters were mainly of low molecular-weight saccharides such as glucose and maltose, while proteins in the interstitial water were high molecular-weight proteins (over 7000 Da). Bacterial growth and production of EPS occurred simultaneously with the decrease in the low molecular-weight saccharide concentrations when a small portion of biofilm suspension was inoculated to the collected interstitial water, suggesting that the dissolved saccharides in the interstitial water support bacterial growth and formation of biofilms.

  17. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of heavy metals in water in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia: From source to consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Baydaa; Abdullah, Md. Pauzi; Tahrim, Nurfaizah Abu

    2018-04-01

    Drinking water should be free from harmful levels of impurities, such as heavy metals. The aim of this study is to investigate the heavy metals concentrations in a water reticulation system of Negeri Sembilan. 25 stations were selected along Sungai Linggi (upstream of intake point) and through there reticulation system of Sungai Linggi Water Treatment Plant encompassing raw water through to the last point of use. Sampling activities were carried out in June and July 2016. The samples taken were analysed for heavymetals using an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES). In addition other water quality parameters were measured in situ (pH, water temperature, conductivity and dissolved oxygen) and analysed in the laboratory (BOD, COD, TSS, NH3-N, TOC and residual chlorine). The results showed a high level of Ca in the distribution system, while in the treatment plant it was normal, as well as Fe is decreased. Meanwhile Mn is decreased after treatment processes. The concentrations of DO and temperature in the tap water exceeded the standard concentrations.

  19. Heavy Metal Analysis of Cauvery River Water Around Krs Dam, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mahadev

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Water quality is an index of health and is one of the areas of major concern to environmentalists, since Industrialization, urbanization and modern agriculture practices have a direct impact on the water resources. Hence, the study of the reservoirs and river water quality monitoring is most essential aspect of sustainable development and river conservation. The Upstream and KRS reservoir both are the important sources of potable water supply for the Mysore city. The study area were selected the Upstream and KRS reservoir of Mysore District of Karnataka, India. In this paper an attempt has been made to evaluate water quality parameter and heavy metal of upstream and KRS Dam during 2008. Ecological parameters like Dissolved Oxygen, Chemical Oxygen Demand, Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Chemical parameters like Total Hardness, Total Alkalinity, Chloride, Nitrate, Phosphate and physical parameters like Temperature, pH, Turbidity and heavy metals were analyzed and the results were compared with standard permissible limits, WHO and they were studied to ascertain the drinking water quality. Results revealed that in three rivers of upstream (Hemavathi, Cauvery and Laxmanatheertha carried high loads of Arsenic, Iron, Nickel in Upstream. In other word, Arsenic is a dominant risk to more than the maximum permissible standard of water quality and is a risk factor in this river

  20. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  1. Impacts of a heavy storm of rain upon dissolved and particulate organic C, N and P in the main river of a vegetation-rich basin area in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fusheng; Yuasa, Akira; Muraki, Yuzo; Matsui, Yoshihiko

    2005-06-01

    The impacts of a heavy storm of rain upon the dissolved and particulate organic matter (OM), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the main river of the vegetation-rich Nagara River basin were investigated using water samples collected along the river line during a critical typhoon-induced heavy rain storm event. Besides, based on a high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) system, the variance of dissolved OM (DOM) in its molecular weight (MW) characteristics was also assessed. From the MW standpoint, DOM components merged into the river along the river line resembled those present in its headwater. The MW range changed only slightly from 1010 to 5900 at the upstream (US), to 1130-5900 and 1200-5900 Da at the midstream (MS) and downstream (DS), respectively, while the corresponding weight-averaged MW (M(w)) decreased from 3669 to 3330 and 2962 Da. The heavy storm of rain enhanced the content of DOM; however, apart from a small larger-MW fraction (about 5900-6800 Da), the newly emerged DOM constituents exhibited an MW range similar to those existed before the storm. Due also to the storm of rain, total P and N (TP and TN) changed markedly in the ranges of 6.6-11.9, 8.3-40.6 and 48.4-231.3 microg/l for TP, and 145.4-296.0, 502.2-1168.7 and 1342.7-1927.3 microg/l for TN at the US, MS and DS, respectively. The larger values of TP and TN generally appeared for samples at elevated river water levels. The enhanced presence of P was found largely attributed to its particulate form; while, for N, the contribution from its dissolved form was significant. The newly emerged suspended particles via the storm-water contained lower content of OM, N and P, and a general decreasing trend of the particulate OM, N and P along the river line was also confirmed. The C/N ratio in the dissolved form varied in 0.7-6.7 and decreased downstream, while, that in the particulate form 2.3-17.3. Suspended particles that emerged in the river water during the storm exhibited larger C

  2. Assessment of heavy metals concentration in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of all the metals were considerably found to be below the limit permitted by WHO's drinking water guidelines (WHO 2005). Findings suggest that continues water quality monitoring should be carried out to check the concentration levels of heavy metals in that area, to prevent them from been above the limit ...

  3. Heavy metal contamination in stream water and sediments of gold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the seasonal variation in heavy metal contamination of stream water and sediments in the gold mining area of Atakunmosa West local Government, Osun State, Nigeria. Twelve villages of prominence in illegal gold mining were selected for the study covering dry and wet seasons of 2012. Stream water ...

  4. Heavy metals concentrations in water bodies around aquamarine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water samples from three streams in the mining area of Eggon Hill were analysed. The Physicochemical values obtained were compared with WHO permissible standards in drinking water. Except for Cu and Zn with levels within permissible limits, other heavy metals determined were found to have levels above the WHO ...

  5. Concentration of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water from Urban Areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    drinking water treatment practices in the areas, which in turn have important human health implications. This study, therefore, recommends the government and other responsible authorities to take appropriate corrective measures. Key words: Drinking water quality, Heavy metals, Maximum admissible limit, World health.

  6. Removal of Dissolved Salts and Particulate Contaminants from Seawater: Village Marine Tec., Expeditionary Unit Water Purifier, Generation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EUWP was developed to treat challenging water sources with variable turbidity, chemical contamination, and very high total dissolved solids (TDS), including seawater, during emergency situations when other water treatment facilities are incapacitated. The EUWP components incl...

  7. Water and dissolved gas geochemistry of the monomictic Paterno sinkhole (central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Nocentini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the chemical and isotope features of water and dissolved gases from lake Paterno (max. depth 54 m, a sinkhole located in the NE sector of the S. Vittorino plain (Rieti, Central Italy, where evidences of past and present hydrothermal activity exists. In winter (February 2011 lake Paterno waters were almost completely mixed, whereas in summer time (July 2011 thermal and chemical stratifications established. During the stratification period, water and dissolved gas chemistry along the vertical water column were mainly controlled by biological processes, such as methanogenesis, sulfate-reduction, calcite precipitation, denitrification, and NH4 and H2 production. Reducing conditions at the interface between the bottom sediments and the anoxic waters are responsible for the relatively high concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe and manganese (Mn, likely present in their reduced oxidation state. Minerogenic and biogenic products were recognized at the lake bottom even during the winter sampling. At relatively shallow depth the distribution of CH4 and CO2 was controlled by methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthesis, respectively. The carbon isotope signature of CO2 indicates a significant contribution of deep-originated inorganic CO2 that is related to the hydrothermal system feeding the CO2-rich mineralized springs discharging in the surrounding areas of lake Paterno. The seasonal lake stratification likely controls the vertical and horizontal distribution of fish populations in the different periods of the year.

  8. A review of the UKAEA interest in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symes, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The chapter commences with a brief account of the history of heavy water production and then begins the story of the British use of this moderator in power reactors. This is equated with the introduction and development of the tube reactor as a distinct and important form of reactor construction in contrast with the perhaps better known vessel design that has tended to dominate reactor engineering to date. The account thus includes a succession of reactor designs including the gas and steam cooled heavy water systems in addition to the steam-generating heavy water reactor. The SGHWR was demonstrated by the construction of a substantial prototype, which continues in operation as a flexible and reliable electricity-generating plant. It was also, for a time, identified as the system to be used for Britain's third reactor programme. Today the successful Canadian CANDU power reactors represent the only penetration of heavy water reactor technology into large scale electricity generation. The range of research and experimental reactors using heavy water in their cores is reviewed. (author)

  9. Removal of dissolved heavy metals from pre-settled stormwater runoff by iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J.; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    (Pb=20, Cu=40, Zn=110, and Cr=15 ppb). Column experiments were conducted to test the influence of the infiltration rate (1 or 3 m/h) and the type of iron(hydr)oxide mineral (amorphous ferrihydrite and goethite coated sand). The results show that at least 90% of lead, copper and zinc can be removed......Sorption to iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) is a promosing technology for removal of the dissolved heavy metal fraction in stormwater runoff. The development of a new technology is necessary since studies of stormwater runoff from traffic areas indicate that an oil separator and detention pond may...... by IOCS after 480 pore volumes. Control columns with uncoated filter sand show that lead, copper and zinc were removed with >95%, 35% and 5%, respectively. The removal of the negative metaloxy-ion, CrO4-3 was insignificant in both IOCS and sand columns at pH=7.7. Destruction of the columns after...

  10. Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanoscale Sciences Dept.; Brady, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Energy Program; Krumhansl, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geosciences Dept.; Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Physical Chemical and Nano Sciences Center

    2017-01-01

    Fresh water scarcity is going to be a global great challenge in the near future because of the increasing population. Our water resources are limited and, hence, water treatment and recycling methods are the only alternatives for fresh water procurement in the upcoming decades. Water treatment and recycling methods serve to remove harmful or problematic constituents from ground, surface and waste waters prior to its consumption, industrial supply, or other uses. Scale formation in industrial and domestic installations is still an important problem during water treatment. In water treatment, silica scaling is a real and constant concern for plant operations. The focus of this study is on the viability of using a combination of catechol and active carbon to remove dissolved silica from concentrated cooling tower water (CCTW). Various analytical methods, such as ICP-MS and UV-vis, were used to understand the structure-property relationship between the material and the silica removal results. UV-Vis indicates that catechol can react with silica ions and form a silica-catecholate complex. The speciation calculation of catechol and silica shows that catechol and silica bind in the pH range of 8 – 10; there is no evidence of linkage between them in neutral and acidic pHs. The silica removal results indicate that using ~4g/L of catechol and 10g/L active carbon removes up to 50% of the dissolved silica from the CCTW.

  11. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Heavy Metal Water Pollution in Transitional China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixuan Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available China’s socioeconomic transitions have dramatically accelerated its economic growth in last three decades, but also companioned with continuous environmental degradation. This study will advance the knowledge of heavy metal water pollution in China from a spatial–temporal perspective. Specifically, this study addressed the following: (1 spatial patterns of heavy metal water pollution levels were analyzed using data of prefecture-level cities from 2004 to 2011; and (2 spatial statistical methods were used to examine the underlying socioeconomic and physical factors behind water pollution including socioeconomic transitions (industrialization, urbanization, globalization and economic development, and environmental characteristic (natural resources, hydrology and vegetation coverage. The results show that only Cr pollution levels increased over the years. The individual pollution levels of the other four heavy metals, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb, declined. High heavy metal water pollution levels are closely associated with both anthropogenic activities and physical environments, in particular abundant mineral resources and industrialization prosperity. On the other hand, economic development and urbanization play important roles in controlling water pollution problems. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and strategies for protecting water sources and controlling water pollution; thus improving the quality of living environments.

  12. Raman spectroscopy measurement of CH4 gas and CH4 dissolved in water for laser remote sensing in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Fujita, Masayuki

    2018-04-01

    We examined the applicability of Raman spectroscopy as a laser remote sensing tool for monitoring CH4 in water. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for measurements of CO2 gas in water. In this paper, considering the spectral transmittance of water, third harmonics of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm (UV region) was used for detection of CH4 Raman signals. The Raman signal at 2892 cm-1 from CH4 dissolved in water was detected at a tail of water Raman signal.

  13. Monitoring of heavy/toxic metals and halides in surface/ground water (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viqar-un-Nisa; Ahmed, R.; Husain, M.

    1999-01-01

    Water is essential for maintaining physical and social life. Human and animal consumption is perhaps the most evident essential use of water. Water quality and quantity have become critical issues, affecting all life. The importance of water in our lives, combined with the threats, make water resources use a global problem. Among the different pollutants toxic metals, metalloids and halides have special significance. Industrial effluents and municipal wastewater are normally drained into water streams, rivers and other reservoirs thus polluting these significantly. Quality of our water resources especially is an issue, which continues to arouse the attention of concerned scientists, legislators and the general public. Among various pollutant chemicals, the heavy metals and metalloids are present at trace levels in various compartments of the environment. Some metals become toxic even at trace levels because of the important features that distinguishes metals from other pollutants is that they are not biodegradable. The halides like Cl, Br, and I from different sources can enter easily into water systems and then they make their way directly into the human body. The intake of toxic as wells as essential elements through water and other food items like vegetables, milk wheat flour etc. is significant. The abundance or deficiency of these meals as well as halides results in abnormal metabolic functions. Due to excessive demand for trace analysis in water and other materials a variety of techniques and instrumentation has been developed. Determination of heavy metals ions is of the highest interest in environmental analysis. Among the food materials water is most important because of their large consumption by man. Also toxic metals in water may be in dissolved ionic form, which directly go into human metabolism and start their toxic action. Presence of even small amounts of toxic metals in drinking water can produce serious health hazards. (author)

  14. Control systems for the dissolved oxygen concentration in condensate- and feed-water systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikajiri, Motohiko; Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To surely prevent the generation of corrosion products and contaminations in the systems thereby decreasing the exposure dose to operators in BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: Dissolved oxygen concentration in condensates is measured by a dissolved oxygen concentration meter disposed to the pipeway down stream of the condensator and the measured value is sent to an injection amount control mechanism for heater drain water. The control mechanism controls the injection amount from the injection mechanism that injection heater drain water from a feed-water heater to the liquid phase in the hot wall of the condensator. Thus, heater drawin water at high dissolved oxygen is injected to the condensates in the condensator which is de-airated and reduced with dissolved oxygen concentration, to maintain the dissolved oxygen concentration at a predetermined level, whereby stable oxide films are formed to the inner surface of the pipeways to prevent the generation of corrosion products such as rusts. (Furukawa, Y.)

  15. The Bare Critical Assembly of Natural Uranium and Heavy Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, D [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1958-07-01

    The first reactor built in Yugoslavia was the bare zero energy heavy water and natural uranium assembly at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade. The reactor went critical on April 29, 1958. The possession of four tons of natural uranium metal and the temporary availability of seven tons of heavy water encouraged the staff of the Institute to build a critical assembly. A critical assembly was chosen, rather than high flux reactor, because the heavy water was available only temporarily. Besides, a 10 MW, enriched uranium, research reactor is being built at the same Institute and should be ready for operation late this year. It was supposed that the zero energy reactor would provide experience in carrying out critical experiments, operational experience with nuclear reactors, and the possibility for an extensive program in reactor physics. (author)

  16. Consequences of potential accidents in heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, C.; Lazar, R.E.; Preda, I.A.; Dumitrescu, M.

    2002-01-01

    Heavy water plants achieve the primary isotopic concentration by H 2 O-H 2 S chemical exchange. In these plants are stored large quantities of hydrogen sulphide (high toxic, corrosive, flammable and explosive) maintained in process at relative high temperatures and pressures. It is required an assessment of risks associated with the potential accidents. The paper presents adopted model for quantitative consequences assessment in heavy water plants. Following five basic steps are used to identify the risks involved in plants operation: hazard identification, accident sequences development, H 2 S emissions calculus, dispersion analyses and consequences determination. A brief description of each step and some information from risk assessment for our heavy water pilot plant are provided. Accident magnitude, atmospheric conditions and population density in studied area were accounted for consequences calculus. (author)

  17. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Hannah M.; Shiller, Alan M., E-mail: alan.shiller@usm.edu

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • A method for determining low nanomolar dissolved CH{sub 4} was developed. • The methane detection utilizes cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). • Use of CRDS requires less time, materials and labor than typical of GC analysis. • Relative standard deviations of ∼4% were achieved at low nM CH{sub 4}. • Applications to seawater and river water are presented. - Abstract: Methane (CH{sub 4}) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument’s pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method.

  18. Using fluorescent dissolved organic matter to trace and distinguish the origin of Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves-Araujo, Rafael; Granskog, Mats A.; Bracher, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    were performed in the Fram and Davis Straits, and on the east Greenland Shelf (EGS), in late summer 2012/2013. Meteoric (f(mw)), sea-ice melt, Atlantic and Pacific water fractions were determined and the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were characterized. In Fram Strait...... and EGS, a robust correlation between visible wavelength fluorescence and f(mw) was apparent, suggesting it as a reliable tracer of polar waters. However, a pattern was observed which linked the organic matter characteristics to the origin of polar waters. At depth in Davis Strait, visible wavelength FDOM...

  19. Absorption of dissolved hydrogen from lithiated water during accelerated corrosion of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolescu, A.V.; Mayer, P.; Rasile, E.M.; Mummenhoff, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was carried out to determine the extent of dissolved hydrogen absorption from lithiated water by zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy during corrosion. The material was exposed at 340 0 C to 1 M LiOH aqueous solution containing 0 to approximately 70 cm 3 /L of dissolved hydrogen. Results indicate that dissolved hydrogen has no effect on the corrosion rate or on the amount of hydrogen absorbed by the material

  20. Factors influencing the dissolved iron input by river water to the open ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krachler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of natural metal chelators on the bio-available iron input to the ocean by river water was studied. Ferrous and ferric ions present as suspended colloidal particles maintaining the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater at the continental boundary. However, we might argue that different iron-binding colloids become sequentially destabilized in meeting progressively increasing salinities. By use of a 59Fe tracer method, the partitioning of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured with high accuracy in mixtures of natural river water with artificial sea water. The results show a characteristic sequence of sedimentation. Various colloids of different stability are removed from a water of increasing salinity, such as it is the case in the transition from a river water to the open sea. However, the iron transport capacities of the investigated river waters differed greatly. A mountainous river in the Austrian Alps would add only about 5% of its dissolved Fe load, that is about 2.0 µg L-1 Fe, to coastal waters. A small tributary draining a sphagnum peat-bog, which acts as a source of refractory low-molecular-weight fulvic acids to the river water, would add approximately 20% of its original Fe load, that is up to 480 µg L-1 Fe to the ocean's bio-available iron pool. This points to a natural mechanism of ocean iron fertilization by terrigenous fulvic-iron complexes originating from weathering processes occurring in the soils upstream.

  1. Factors influencing the dissolved iron input by river water to the open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, R.; Jirsa, F.; Ayromlou, S.

    2005-05-01

    The influence of natural metal chelators on the bio-available iron input to the ocean by river water was studied. Ferrous and ferric ions present as suspended colloidal particles maintaining the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater at the continental boundary. However, we might argue that different iron-binding colloids become sequentially destabilized in meeting progressively increasing salinities. By use of a 59Fe tracer method, the partitioning of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured with high accuracy in mixtures of natural river water with artificial sea water. The results show a characteristic sequence of sedimentation. Various colloids of different stability are removed from a water of increasing salinity, such as it is the case in the transition from a river water to the open sea. However, the iron transport capacities of the investigated river waters differed greatly. A mountainous river in the Austrian Alps would add only about 5% of its dissolved Fe load, that is about 2.0 µg L-1 Fe, to coastal waters. A small tributary draining a sphagnum peat-bog, which acts as a source of refractory low-molecular-weight fulvic acids to the river water, would add approximately 20% of its original Fe load, that is up to 480 µg L-1 Fe to the ocean's bio-available iron pool. This points to a natural mechanism of ocean iron fertilization by terrigenous fulvic-iron complexes originating from weathering processes occurring in the soils upstream.

  2. Canned motor pumps at Heavy Water Project, Baroda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, R.K.; Waishampayan, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Pumps to be used in heavy water plants must be reliable and should require negligible maintenance, because most of them are totally unapproachable under normal circumstances. Canned motor pumps fulfil these requirements. Their design features are described briefly. The details of: (1) the pumps in the isotopic exchange tower and (2) pumps for liquid ammonia and catalyst are given. Problems faced during commissioning of such pumps in Baroda Heavy Water Project were bulging of rotors of tower pumps, bulging of stators, jamming and failure of bearings. Solution of these problems is described. (M.G.B.)

  3. The future 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor has been developed. The design is based on the twin 540 MWe reactors at Tarapur of which the first unit has been made critical in less than 5 years from construction commencement. In the 700 MWe design boiling of the coolant, to a limited extent, has been allowed near the channel exit. While making the plant layout more compact, emphasis has been on constructability. Saving in capital cost of about 15%, over the present units, is expected. The paper describes salient design features of 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

  4. Energy conservation and management strategies in Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    In the competitive industrial environment it is essential that cost of the product is kept at the minimum possible. Energy conservation is an important aspect in achieving this as energy is one of the key recourses for growth and survival of industry. The process of heavy water production being very complex and energy intensive, Heavy Water board has given a focussed attention for initiating various measures for reducing the specific energy consumption in all the plants. The initiative resulted in substantial reduction in specific energy consumption and brought in savings in cost. The cumulative reduction of specific energy consumption has been over 30% over the last seven years and the total savings for the last three years on account of the same has been about Rs. 190 crore. The paper describes the strategies adopted in the heavy water plants for effecting the above achievements. The paper covers the details of some of the energy saving schemes carried out at different heavy water plants through case studies. The case studies of schemes implemented at HWPs are general in nature and is applicable for any other industry. The case studies cover the modifications with re-optimisation of the process parameters, improvements effected in utility units like refrigeration and cooling water systems, improvements in captive power plant cycle and improved recycle scheme for water leading to reduced consumptions. The paper also mentions the innovative ammonia absorption refrigeration with improved coefficient of performance and HWB's efforts in development of the system as an integrated unit of the ammonia water deuterium exchange process for heavy water production. HWB also has taken up R and D on various other schemes for improvements in energy consumption for future activities covering utilisation of low grade energy for generation of refrigeration. (author)

  5. Heavy metal contamination of stream water and sediment in the Taejon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Woong [Paichai University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Koo [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-31

    Associated with the rapid pace of overpopulation and industrialization is the increase of municipal and industrial wastewater and heavy metal contamination from these point sources have received much attention in the Taejon area. To reduce the environmental problems, 21 stream sediments from Gap-chun, Yudeung-chun, Yusung-chun and Keum river have been analyzed for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. The results show that heavy metal concentrations are high in sediments from the Sintanjin and Taehwa Industrial Complex area with particular reference to 1388 {mu}g/g Cu in the stream sediment of Yusung-chun. When the geochemical map drawn from the Kriging technique of these data are compared with the industrialization and urbanization index map, high concentrations of heavy metals are found in stream sediments in industrialized areas resulting from the accumulation of heavy metals from the polluting factories. Concentrations of Cu in sediments from the Taehwa Industrial Complex area and those of Zn in sediments from the Sintanjin Complex area higher than EPA standard in the U.S.A and may be the potential sources of pollution in Keum river with possible implications to human health. For the speciation of Cu, Pb and Zn, the high proportions of exchangeable phase of Cu and Zn in stream sediments indicate that the metals originate not from parent materials but from wastewater and exist as the adsorbed phase on the surface of sediments. These metals are easily dissolved into the water by the reaction and relative amounts of easily dissolved phase of metals are in the order of Cu = Zn > Pb. (author). 17 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  6. First principles study of dissolved oxygen water adsorption on Fe (001 surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong ZHANG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanism of dissolved oxygen content on the surface corrosion behavior of Fe-based heat transfer, the first principle is used to study the adsorption of O2 monomolecular, H2O monolayer and dissolved oxygen system on Fe-based heat transfer surface. The GGA/PBE approximation is used to calculate the adsorption energy, state density and population change during the adsorption process. Calculations prove that when the dissolved oxygen is adsorbed on the Fe-based surface, the water molecule tends to adsorb at the top sites, and the oxygen molecule tends to adsorb at Griffiths. When the H2O molecule adsorbs and interacts on the Fe (001 surface, the charge distribution of the interfacial double electric layer changes to cause the Fe atoms to lose electrons, resulting in the change of the surface potential. When the O2 molecule adsorbs on the Fe (001 crystal surfaces, the electrons on the Fe (001 surface are lost and the surface potential increases. O2 molecule and the surface of the Fe atoms are prone to electron transfer, in which O atom's 2p orbit for the adsorption of O2 molecule on Fe (001 crystal surface play a major role. With the increase of the proportion of O2 molecule in the dissolved oxygen water, the absolute value of the adsorption energy increases, and the interaction of the Fe-based heat transfer surface is stronger. This study explores the influence law of different dissolved oxygen on the Fe base heat exchange surface corrosion, and the base metal corrosion mechanism for experimental study provides a theoretical reference.

  7. Oxidation by UV and ozone of organic contaminants dissolved in deionized and raw mains water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Organic contaminants dissolved in deionized pretreated and raw mains water were reacted with ultraviolet light and ozone. Ozone first was used for partial oxidation followed by ozone combined with ultraviolet radiation to produce total oxidation. The reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) level and direct oxidation of halogenated compounds were measured throughout the treatment process. The rate of TOC reduction was compared for ozone injected upstream and inside the reactor

  8. Sediment-water interactions affecting dissolved-mercury distributions in Camp Far West Reservoir, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Stewart, A. Robin; Fend, Steven V.; Parcheso, Francis; Moon, Gerald E.; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    2003-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted in April and November 2002 to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micrometer filtered) mercury species (total and methylated forms) between the bottom sediment and water column at three sampling locations within Camp Far West Reservoir, California: one near the Bear River inlet to the reservoir, a second at a mid-reservoir site of comparable depth to the inlet site, and the third at the deepest position in the reservoir near the dam (herein referred to as the inlet, midreservoir and near-dam sites, respectively; Background, Fig. 1). Because of interest in the effects of historic hydraulic mining and ore processing in the Sierra Nevada foothills just upstream of the reservoir, dissolved-mercury species and predominant ligands that often control the mercury speciation (represented by dissolved organic carbon, and sulfides) were the solutes of primary interest. Benthic flux, sometimes referred to as internal recycling, represents the transport of dissolved chemical species between the water column and the underlying sediment. Because of the affinity of mercury to adsorb onto particle surfaces and to form insoluble precipitates (particularly with sulfides), the mass transport of mercury in mining-affected watersheds is typically particle dominated. As these enriched particles accumulate at depositional sites such as reservoirs, benthic processes facilitate the repartitioning, transformation, and transport of mercury in dissolved, biologically reactive forms (dissolved methylmercury being the most bioavailable for trophic transfer). These are the forms of mercury examined in this study. In contrast to typical scientific manuscripts, this report is formatted in a pyramid-like structure to serve the needs of diverse groups who may be interested in reviewing or acquiring information at various levels of technical detail (Appendix 1). The report enables quick transitions between the initial

  9. Light and heavy water replacing system in reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to determine the strength of a reactor container while neglecting the outer atmospheric pressure upon evacuation, by evacuating the gap between the reactor container and a biological thermal shield, as well as the container simultaneously upon light water - heavy water replacement. Method: Upon replacing light water with heavy water by vacuum evaporation system in a nuclear reactor having a biological thermal shield surrounding the reactor container incorporating therein a reactor core by way of a heat expansion absorbing gap, the reactor container and the havy water recycling system, as well as the inside of heat expansion absorbing gap are evacuated simultaneously. This enables to neglect the outer atmospheric outer pressure upon evacuation in the determination of the container strength, and the thickness of the container can be decreased by so much as the external pressure neglected. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Characterization by fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in rural drinking water storage tanks in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faissal; Ouazzani, Naaila; Mandi, Laila; Assaad, Aziz; Pontvianne, Steve; Poirot, Hélène; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2018-04-01

    Water storage tanks, fed directly from the river through opened channels, are particular systems used for water supply in rural areas in Morocco. The stored water is used as drinking water by the surrounding population without any treatment. UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence) have been tested as rapid methods to assess the quality of the water stored in the reservoirs as well as along the river feeding them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS50), collected with a difference of 50 nm between excitation and emission wavelengths, revealed a high tryptophan-like fluorescence, indicative of a pollution induced by untreated domestic and/or farm wastewater. The best correlations were obtained between the total SFS50 fluorescence and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and biological oxygen demand, showing that the contribution of humic-like fluorescent substances cannot be neglected to rapidly assess reservoir water quality in terms of DOC by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  11. Distributions and characteristics of dissolved organic matter in temperate coastal waters (Southern North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübben, Andrea; Dellwig, Olaf; Koch, Sandra; Beck, Melanie; Badewien, Thomas H.; Fischer, Sibylle; Reuter, Rainer

    2009-04-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was studied in the East-Frisian Wadden Sea (Southern North Sea) during several cruises between 2002 and 2005. The spatial distribution of CDOM in the German Bight shows a strong gradient towards the coast. Tidal and seasonal variations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) identify freshwater discharge via flood-gates at the coastline and pore water efflux from tidal flat sediments as the most important CDOM sources within the backbarrier area of the Island of Spiekeroog. However, the amount and pattern of CDOM and DOC is strongly affected by various parameters, e.g. changes in the amount of terrestrial run-off, precipitation, evaporation, biological activity and photooxidation. A decoupling of CDOM and DOC, especially during periods of pronounced biological activity (algae blooms and microbial activity), is observed in spring and especially in summer. Mixing of the endmembers freshwater, pore water, and open sea water results in the formation of a coastal transition zone. Whilst an almost conservative behaviour during mixing is observed in winter, summer data point towards non-conservative mixing.

  12. Role of natural dissolved organic compounds in determining the concentrations of americium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Orlandini, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of 241 Am, both in solution and bound to suspended particulate matter, have been measured in several North American lakes. Dissolved concentrations vary from 0.4 μBq/L to 85 μBq/L. The 241 Am in these lakes originated solely from global fallout and hence entered all lakes in the same physiocochemical form. The observed differences in solubility behavior must, therefore, be attributable to chemical and/or hydrological differences among the lakes. Concentrations of dissolved 241 Am are highly correlated with the corresponding concentrations of /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV), suggesting that a common factor is responsible for maintaining both in solution. The K/sub D/ values for 241 Am and /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV) are highly correlated with the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the waters, suggesting that the common factor is the formation of soluble complexes with natural DOC for both elements. This hypothesis was tested in a series of laboratory experiments in which the DOC from several of the lakes was isolated by ultrafiltration. Plots of K/sub D/, as a function of DOC concentration, show K/sub D/ to be very high (approx.10 6 ) at low DOC concentrations. Above critical concentrations (a few mg/L DOC) the K/sub D/ values begin a progressive decrease with increasing DOC. We conclude that in most surface waters, the dissolved 241 Am concentration is regulated by an adsorption/desorption equilibrium with the sediments (and suspended solids) and the value of K/sub D/ that characterizes this equilibrium is largely determined by the concentration of natural DOC in the water. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Spatiotemporal characterization of dissolved carbon for inland waters in semi-humid/semi-arid region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Song

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal variations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and inorganic carbon (DIC in 26 waters across the semi-humid/semi-arid Songnen Plain, China, were examined with data collected during 2008–2011. Fresh (n = 14 and brackish (n = 12 waters were grouped according to electrical conductivity (threshold = 1000 μS cm−1 Significant differences in the average DOC and DIC concentrations were observed between the fresh (5.63 mg L−1, 37.39 mg L−1 and the brackish waters (15.33 mg L−1, 142.93 mg L−1. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM and DOC concentrations were mainly controlled by climatic–hydrologic conditions. The investigation indicated that the outflow conditions in the semi-arid region had condensed effects on the dissolved carbon, resulting in close relationships between salinity vs. DOC (R2 = 0.66, and salinity vs. DIC (R2 = 0.94. An independent data set collected in May 2012 also confirmed this finding (DOC: R2 = 0.79, DIC: R2 = 0.91, highlighting the potential of quantifying DOC and DIC via salinity measurements for waters dispersed in the plain. Indices based on the CDOM absorption spectra (e.g., the DOC-specific CDOM absorption (SUVA254, absorption ratio a250 : a365 (E250 : E365 and the spectral slope ratio (Sr, S275−295/S350−400 were applied to characterize CDOM composition and quality. Our results indicate that high molecular weight CDOM fractions are more abundant in the fresh waters than the brackish waters.

  14. Spatiotemporal characterization of dissolved carbon for inland waters in semi-humid/semi-arid region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K. S.; Zang, S. Y.; Zhao, Y.; Li, L.; Du, J.; Zhang, N. N.; Wang, X. D.; Shao, T. T.; Guan, Y.; Liu, L.

    2013-10-01

    Spatiotemporal variations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic carbon (DIC) in 26 waters across the semi-humid/semi-arid Songnen Plain, China, were examined with data collected during 2008-2011. Fresh (n = 14) and brackish (n = 12) waters were grouped according to electrical conductivity (threshold = 1000 μS cm-1) Significant differences in the average DOC and DIC concentrations were observed between the fresh (5.63 mg L-1, 37.39 mg L-1) and the brackish waters (15.33 mg L-1, 142.93 mg L-1). Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and DOC concentrations were mainly controlled by climatic-hydrologic conditions. The investigation indicated that the outflow conditions in the semi-arid region had condensed effects on the dissolved carbon, resulting in close relationships between salinity vs. DOC (R2 = 0.66), and salinity vs. DIC (R2 = 0.94). An independent data set collected in May 2012 also confirmed this finding (DOC: R2 = 0.79, DIC: R2 = 0.91), highlighting the potential of quantifying DOC and DIC via salinity measurements for waters dispersed in the plain. Indices based on the CDOM absorption spectra (e.g., the DOC-specific CDOM absorption (SUVA254), absorption ratio a250 : a365 (E250 : E365) and the spectral slope ratio (Sr, S275-295/S350-400) were applied to characterize CDOM composition and quality. Our results indicate that high molecular weight CDOM fractions are more abundant in the fresh waters than the brackish waters.

  15. Safety system in a heavy water detritiation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balteanu, O.; Stefan, I.; Retevoi, C.

    2003-01-01

    In a CANDU 6 type reactor a quantity of 55·10 15 Bq/year of tritium is generated, 95% being in the D 2 O moderator which can achieve a radioactivity of 2.5-3.5·10 12 Bq/kg. Tritium in heavy water contributes with 30-50% to the doses received by operation personnel and up to 20% to the radioactivity released in the environment. The large quantity of heavy water used in this type of reactors (500 tones) make storage very difficult, especially for environment. The extraction of tritium from tritiated heavy water of CANDU reactors solve the following problems: the radiation level in the operation area, the costs of maintenance and repair reduction due to reduction of personnel protection measures, the increase of NPP utilisation factor by shutdown time reduction for maintenance and repair, use the extracted tritium for fusion reactors and not for the last, lower costs and risk for storage heavy water waste. Heavy water detritiation methods, which currently are used in the industrial or experimental plant, are based on catalytic isotope exchange or electrolysis followed cryogenic distillation or permeation. The technology developed at Institute of Cryogenics and Isotope Separation is based upon catalytic exchange between tritiated water and deuterium, followed by cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes. The nature of the fluids that are processed in detritiation requires the operation of the plant in safety conditions. The paper presents the safety system solution chose in order to solve this task, as well as a simulation of an incident and safety system response. The application software is using LabView platform that is specialised on control and factory automation applications. (author)

  16. Possibility of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, B.; Mihajlovic, A.; Drobnjak, Dj.

    1965-01-01

    The review of metal uranium properties including irradiation in the reactor core lead to the following conclusions. Using metal uranium in the heavy water reactors would be favourable from economic point of view for ita high density, i.e. high conversion factor and low cost of fuel elements fabrication. Most important constraint is swelling during burnup and corrosion

  17. Heavy water. An original project in the Argentine Patagonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde Bidabehere, Luis F.

    2000-01-01

    The history of the heavy water production plant built in Arroyito, in the Argentine province of Neuquen is related. Details are given on the development of the project and on the operation of the plant. The possible complementary production of ammonia and fertilizers is analyzed

  18. Valuation of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant and of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    The author describes the Nuclear Power Plant characteristics, the building work, the heavy water valuation criteria and the reasons why he considers that any capital good can be valuated by means of cash-flow. The value of replacement of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant is of U$S 1.593.538.000 (authors) [es

  19. Embalse nuclear power plant and heavy water valuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    The author describes the nuclear power plant characteristics, the building work, the heavy water valuation criteria and the reasons why he considers that any capital good can be valued by the cash-flow method. The Embalse nuclear power plant replacement value is of U$S 1.593.538.000. (author) [es

  20. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in water, sediment and fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Hnay

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... these pollutants is the chemical substances that stay longer and become toxic in water columns. Within them, heavy metals have positive effects on the vital activities of several organisms and impairment in food chain by affecting biological activities of the living organisms in ecosystem (Gundogu and Erden ...

  1. levels of heavy metals in gubi dam water bauchi, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    copper and lead were always highest in the suspended materials which indicate the dominant role played by ... essential. However, at high concentrations, these trace metals become toxic (Nurnberg, 1982). Heavy metals in .... mobilization of cobalt minerals into the dam. .... Interaction between sediments and fresh water ...

  2. Selected bibliography on deuterium isotope effects and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Donde, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in using deuterium and heavy water not only in nuclear industry but also in various fields of basic as well as applied research in physics, chemistry and biology. As a result, the literature is being enriched with a large number of research papers and technical reports published each year. Thus, to enable the scientists to have an easy reference to these works, an endeavour has been made in this selected bibliography, to enlist the publications related to these fields. Since the interest is concerned mainly with heavy water production processes, deuterium isotope effects etc., several aspects (e.g. nuclear) of deuterium have not been covered here. The material in this bibliography which cites 2388 references has been classified under six broad headings, viz. (1) Production of heavy water, (2) Study of deuterium isotope effects, (3) Analysis and Properties of heavy water, (4) Laser Separation of deuterium, (5) Isotopic exchange reactions, and (6) Miscellaneous. The sources of information used for this compilation are chemical abstracts, nuclear science abstracts, INIS Atomindex and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in the B.A.R.C. library. However, in spite of sincere attempts for a wide coverage, no claim is being made towards the exhaustiveness of this bibliography. (author)

  3. Accelerator driven heavy water blanket on circulating fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazaritsky, V.D.; Blagovolin, P.P.; Mladov, V.R.; Okhlopkov, M.L.; Batyaev, V.F.; Stepanov, N.V.; Seliverstov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    A conceptual design of a heavy water blanket with circulating fuel for an accelerator driven transmutation system is described. The hybrid system consists of a high-current linear accelerator of protons and 4 targets, each placed inside a subcritical blanket

  4. Performance of Canadian commercial nuclear units and heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, L.W.; Ingolfsrud, L.J.

    The operating history of Canadian commercial CANDU type reactors, i.e. Pickering generating station-A, is described. Capacity factors and unit energy costs are analyzed in detail. Equipment performance highlights are given. The performance of the two Canadian heavy water plants is described and five more are under construction or planned. (E.C.B.)

  5. Long term assurance of supply of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The answer of Switzerland and Great Britain to a number of questions concerning the long-term assurance of the supply of heavy water are presented. The original problems are seen in the wider context of raw materials supply and its assurance in general. Non-proliferation aspects are touched

  6. Simulation of heavy metal contamination of fresh water bodies: toxic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    www.bioline.org.br/ja. Simulation of heavy metal contamination of fresh water bodies: toxic effects in the ... 96 hours (though sampling was done at the 48th hour). Biochemical markers of ... silver, while enhancing the bioavailability of mercury in Ceriodaphnia ..... Biochemical and molecular disorders of bilirubin metabolism.

  7. Water quality characteristics and pollution levels of heavy metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of this study was to assess the level of water quality of Lake Haiq, Ethiopia with respect to selected physical ... gated using standard analytical procedures. the level of the studied heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn) was determined using the .... no known discharge and hence used as reference site. Sampling ...

  8. Thermal neutron standard fields with the KUR heavy water facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Shibata, T.

    1978-01-01

    A heavy water facility attached to the KUR (Kyoto University Reactor, swimming pool type, 5 MW) yields pure thermal neutrons in the Maxwellian distribution. The facility is faced to the core of KUR and it contains about 2 tons of heavy water. The thickness of the layer is about 140 cm. The neutron spectrum was measured with the time of flight technique using a fast chopper. The measured spectrum was in good agreement with the Maxwellian distribution in all energy region for thermal neutrons. The neutron temperature was slightly higher than the heavy water temperature. The contamination of epithermal and fast neutrons caused by photo-neutrons of the γ-n reaction of heavy water was very small. The maximum intensity of thermal neutrons is 3x10 11 n/cm 2 sec. When the bismuth scatterer is attached, the gamma rays contamination is eliminated by the ratio of 0.05 of gamma rays to neutrons in rem. This standard neutron field has been used for such experiments as thermal neutron cross section measurement, detector calibration, activation analysis, biomedical purposes etc. (author)

  9. Decommissioning of the NPP A-1 heavy water management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, J.; Rezbarik, J.; Vargovcik, L.; Vykukel, I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with experience and techniques in the application of decontamination technology and remotely controlled robotic devices for the decontamination and dismantling of the heavy water management system during undergoing decommissioning process of the A-1 NPP as well as treatment of arising liquid waste All of these activities are characterized by high level of radioactivity and contamination. (authors)

  10. Initial site characterisation of a dissolved hydrocarbon groundwater plume discharging to a surface water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, S.J.; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Land and Water, Wembley, WA; Davis, G.B.; Rayner, J.L.; Fisher, S.J.; Clement, T.P.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary characterisation of a dissolved hydrocarbon groundwater plume flowing towards a tidally- and seasonally-forced estuarine system has been completed at a site in Perth, Western Australia. Installation and sampling of multiport boreholes enabled fine scale (0.5-m) vertical definition of hydrocarbon concentrations. Vertical electrical conductivity profiles from multiport and spear probe sampling into the river sediments indicated that two groundwater/river water interfaces or dispersion zones are present: (a) an upper dispersion zone between brackish river water and groundwater, and (b) a lower interface between groundwater and deeper saline water. On-line water level loggers show that near-shore groundwater levels are also strongly influence by tidal oscillation. Results from the initial site characterisation will be used to plan further investigations of contaminated groundwater/surface water interactions and the biodegradation processes occurring at the site

  11. Export of dissolved carbonaceous and nitrogenous substances in rivers of the "Water Tower of Asia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bin; Sillanpää, Mika; Kang, Shichang; Yan, Fangping; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Chaoliu

    2018-03-01

    Rivers are critical links in the carbon and nitrogen cycle in aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments. Here riverine carbon and nitrogen exports in nine large rivers on the Tibetan Plateau - the "Water Tower of Asia" - were investigated in the monsoon season from 2013 to 2015. Compared with the world average, concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, 30.7mg/L) were high in river basins of the plateau due to extensive topographic relief and intensive water erosion. Low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 1.16mg/L) were likely due to the low temperature and unproductive land vegetation environments. Average concentrations of riverine DIN (0.32mg/L) and DON (0.35 mg/L) on the Tibetan Plateau were close to the world average. However, despite its predominantly pristine environment, discharge from agricultural activities and urban areas of the plateau has raised riverine N export. In addition, DOC/DON ratio (C/N, ~6.5) in rivers of the Tibetan Plateau was much lower than the global average, indicating that dissolved organic carbon in the rivers of this region might be more bioavailable. Therefore, along with global warming and anthropogenic activities, increasing export of bioavailable riverine carbon and nitrogen from rivers of the Tibetan Plateau can be expected in the future, which will possibly influence the regional carbon and nitrogen cycle. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Gas stripping and recirculation process in heavy water separation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazzer, D.B.; Thayer, V.R.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is stripped from hot effluent, in a heavy water separation plant of the dual temperature isotope separation type, by taking liquid effluent from the hot tower before passage through the humidifier, passing the liquid through one or more throttle devices to flash-off the H 2 S gas content, and feeding the gas into an absorption tower containing incoming feed water, for recycling of the gas through the process

  13. Heavy-water extraction from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeRoy, R.L.; Hammerli, M.; Butler, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy water may be produced from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams using a combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange process. The method comprises contacting feed water in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas originating partly from a non-electrolytic hydrogen stream and partly from an electrolytic hydrogen stream, so as to enrich the feed water with the deuterium extracted from both the non-electrolytic and electrolytic hydrogen gas, and passing the deuterium water to an electrolyser wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed through the catalyst column. (L.L.)

  14. Tweens demulsification effects on heavy crude oil/water emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Hayati Roodbari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The demulsification role of Tweens (nonionic polymers was determined in the separation of water from heavy crude oil emulsion. According to the previous researches, these nonionic polymers, having hydrophilic and lipophilic groups, are appropriate for making oil in water emulsion. In this research their effects in certain concentrations on demulsifying of water in crude oil emulsion were proved. High molecular weight, alkenes’ chains and groups of ketone and ester in these polymers can improve their performance for the demulsification of water in crude oil emulsion. Their efficiencies are improved with electronegative groups such as oxygen. They leave no corrosion effect because they are neutral and do not leave counter ions.

  15. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLOURED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RI: IMPLICATIONS FOR PHYTOPLANKTON IN COASTAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    One indicator of health in estuarine and coastal ecosystems is the ability of local waters to transmit sunlight to planktonic, macrophytic, and other submerged vegetation for photosynthesis. The concentration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a primary factor affecti...

  16. Heavy water technology and its contribution to energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDiarmid, H.; Alizadeh, A.; Hopwood, J.; Duffey, R.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: As the global nuclear industry expands several markets are exploring avenues and technologies to underpin energy security. Heavy water reactors are the most versatile power reactors in the world. They have the potential to extend resource utilization significantly, to allow countries with developing industrial infrastructures access to clean and abundant energy, and to destroy long-lived nuclear waste. These benefits are available by choosing from an array of possible fuel cycles. Several factors, including Canada's early focus on heavy-water technology, limited heavy-industry infrastructure at the time, and a desire for both technological autonomy and energy self-sufficiency, contributed to the creation of the first commercial heavy water reactor in 1962. With the maturation of the industry, the unique design features of the now-familiar product-on-power refuelling, high neutron economy, and simple fuel design-make possible the realization of its potential fuel-cycle versatility. As resource constrains apply pressure on world markets, the feasibility of these options have become more attractive and closer to entering widespread commercial application

  17. The steam generating heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the evolution of the SGHWR concept by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and the production of early commercial designs, together with later development by the Design and Construction Companies. This is followed by a description of the current commercial design. Possible future developments are suggested. The many advantageous features of the concept are mentioned with a view to supporting optimism for the future of the system. Headings include the following: safety criteria and risk assessment; emergency core cooling system design and development; protective systems; reactor coolant system; reactivity control; off-load refuelling; pressure containment; 'fence' header coolant circuit design; feed water injection; continuous spray cooling; low pressure cooling systems for residual heat removal during refuelling; high pressure cooling system for guaranteed feed water supply; auxiliary systems; structural materials; calandria and neutron shields; fuel element development; alternative loop circuit design; future developments (use of hydraulic diodes to provide a substantial reverse flow resistance by the generation of a vortex; multi-drum and multi-pump schemes; refuelling alternatives; coolant circuit inversion; use of superheat channels). (U.K.)

  18. Design and Implementation of Remotely Monitoring System for Total Dissolved Solid in Baghdad Drinking Water Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Abdul-Ridha Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available he pollution of drinking water is a dangerous problem for the whole world, it can threaten the health of people and as people in developed society attaches more importance to environmental protection, it is of great research significance to intelligently and remotely monitoring the environment. Therefore in this paper, a remote water monitoring system for Baghdad drinking water system is suggested. The proposed system consists of data sensing and monitoring nodes at different locations in Baghdad to sensing and analyzes the data. These nodes are periodically measured Total Dissolved Solids (TDS. In case of measured value above TDS threshold which is 500 ppm, then an automated warning message will be sent to authorize persons in the maintenance center via Global Position System to take the correct action. This suggested structure has several advantages over traditional monitoring systems in terms of price, portability, reliability, applicability and takes a sample from a water tap in easy and real-time approach.

  19. Removal and recovery of tritium from light and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing tritium from light water are described, comprising contacting tritiated feed water in a catalyst column in countercurrent flow with hydrogen gas originating from an electrolysis cell so as to enrich this feed water with tritium from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and passing the tritium enriched water to an electrolysis cell wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed upwards through the catalyst column or recovered as product. The tritium content of the hydrogen gas leaving the top of the enricher catalyst column is further reduced in a stripper column containing catalyst which transfers the tritium to a countercurrent flow of liquid water. Anodic oxygen and water vapour from the anode compartment may be fed to a drier and condensed electrolyte recycled with a slip stream or recovered as a further tritium product stream. A similar method involving heavy water is also described. (author)

  20. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season.

  1. Operating performance of the prototype heavy water reactor Fugen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Since the full scale operation was started in March, 1979, the ATR Fugen power station has been verifying the performance and reliability of the machinery and equipment, uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel and so on, and obtaining the technical prospect for putting ATRs in practical use by accumulating operation and maintenance techniques, through about five years of operation. In this report, the operational results of the Fugen power station are described. Fugen is a heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled, pressure tube type reactor with 165 MWe output. As of the end of March, 1984, the total generated electric power was about 4.3 billion kWh, and the operation time was about 27,000 hours. The mean capacity ratio reached 58.8%. During the operation period, troubles including plant shutdown occurred eight times, but generally the performance and reliability of the machinery and equipment have been good. 580 fuels including 284 MOX fuels have been charged, but fuel breaking did not occur at all. The consumption of heavy water and the leak of tritium did not cause problem. The management of the core and fuel, the management of maintenance, the quality control of cooling water and heavy water, radiation control and the management of wastes are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Estimating dissolved organic carbon concentration in turbid coastal waters using optical remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Ford, Phillip W.; Matear, Richard J.; Oubelkheir, Kadija; Clementson, Lesley A.; Suber, Ken; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important component in the global carbon cycle. It also plays an important role in influencing the coastal ocean biogeochemical (BGC) cycles and light environment. Studies focussing on DOC dynamics in coastal waters are data constrained due to the high costs associated with in situ water sampling campaigns. Satellite optical remote sensing has the potential to provide continuous, cost-effective DOC estimates. In this study we used a bio-optics dataset collected in turbid coastal waters of Moreton Bay (MB), Australia, during 2011 to develop a remote sensing algorithm to estimate DOC. This dataset includes data from flood and non-flood conditions. In MB, DOC concentration varied over a wide range (20-520 μM C) and had a good correlation (R2 = 0.78) with absorption due to coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and remote sensing reflectance. Using this data set we developed an empirical algorithm to derive DOC concentrations from the ratio of Rrs(412)/Rrs(488) and tested it with independent datasets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to estimate DOC using remotely sensed optical observations in turbid coastal waters.

  3. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High resolution conductometry for isotopic assay of deuterium in mixtures of heavy water and light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthanarayanan, R.; Sahoo, P.; Murali, N.

    2014-01-01

    A PC based high resolution conductivity monitoring technique has been deployed for determination of isotopic purity of heavy water in samples containing heavy water and light water mixtures using pulsating sensor based conductivity monitoring instrument. The technique involves accurate determination of conductivities of a series of specially treated heavy water and light water mixtures of various compositions at a constant solution temperature. The shift in conductivity (Δκ), which is the difference between conductivities of composite mixture after and before the formation of a typical complex compound (boric acid–mannitol complex in this case), shows a smooth and reproducible decreasing trend with increase in percentage composition of heavy water. This relation, which is obtained by appropriate calibration, is used in the software program for direct display of isotopic purity of heavy water. The technique is examined for determination of percentage composition of heavy water in the entire range of concentration (0-100 %) with reasonable precision (relative standard deviation, RSD ≤1.5 %). About 1 mL of sample is required for each analysis and analysis is completed within a couple of minutes after pretreatment of sample. The accuracy in measurement is ≤1.75 %. (author)

  5. High purity heavy water production: need for total organic carbon determination in process water streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayushi; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Vithal, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    In recent times, demand for high purity heavy water (99.98% pure) in industries and laboratories has grown by manifold. Its application started in nuclear industry with the design of CANDU reactor, which uses natural uranium as fuel. In this reactor the purest grade of heavy water is used as the moderator and the primary coolant. Diverse industrial applications like fibre optics, medicine, semiconductors etc. use high purity heavy water extensively to achieve better performance of the specific material. In all these applications there is a stringent requirement that the total organic carbon content (TOC) of high purity heavy water should be very low. This is because the presence of TOC can lead to adverse interactions in different applications. To minimize the TOC content in the final product there is a need to monitor and control the TOC content at each and every stage of heavy water production. Hence a simple, rapid and accurate method was developed for the determination of TOC content in process water samples. The paper summarizes the results obtained for the TOC content in the water samples collected from process streams of heavy water production plant. (author)

  6. Effect of resuspension on the release of heavy metals and water chemistry in anoxic and oxic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung-Yup; Kim, Hong-Seok; Hwang, Inseong [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Two types of river sediments with contrasting characteristics (anoxic or oxic) were resuspended and the release of heavy metals and changes in water chemistry were investigated. During resuspension of the anoxic sediment, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and redox potential of the water layer decreased abruptly within the first 1 min, followed by increases toward the end of the resuspension period. Heavy metals were released rapidly in the first 6 h, probably due to the oxidation of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) of the anoxic sediment, and then the aqueous phase concentrations of the heavy metals decreased due to resorption onto the sediment until the 12-h point. During resuspension of the oxic sediment, the DO concentration and redox potential remained relatively constant in the oxic ranges. The heavy metals were released from the oxic sediment gradually during a 24-h resuspension period. The temporal maximum concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cd in the aqueous phases in both experiments frequently exceeded the USEPA water quality criteria or the water quality guidelines of Australia and New Zealand. This suggests that a resuspension event could bring about temporal water quality deterioration in the two sediment environments. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Transformation of heavy metals in lignite during supercritical water gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guifang; Yang, Xinfei; Chen, Shouyan; Dong, Yong; Cui, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiqiang; Ma, Chunyuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The transformations of heavy metals during lignite SCWG were investigated. • The risks of heavy metals in lignite and residues after SCWG were evaluated. • The effects of experimental conditions on corrosion during SCWG were studied. - Abstract: Transformation characteristics of heavy metals during lignite supercritical water gasification (SCWG) were studied. A sequential extraction procedure (modified Tessier method) was used to selectively extract different fractions of Pb, Cd, Cr, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn. Heavy metals transformed into more stable fractions after SCWG. For Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn, SCWG reduced the bioavailability and the risks posed by heavy metals in lignite. Under the experimental conditions, the conversion rates for Pb and Cd were 16.0%–25.2% and 16.3%–23.4%, respectively, whereas those for Mn, Cu, and Zn were much lower. Solid products enriched with Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were obtained after SCWG; the contents of these metals varied slightly in the liquid products under different experimental conditions. Excess Cr and Ni that did not originate from lignite were found in the residues, owing to reactor corrosion during lignite SCWG. Higher temperatures alleviated corrosion, whereas higher pressures and equivalence ratios (ER) had the opposite effect. None of the heavy metals were detected in the gas phase under the experimental conditions used in the present study. The correlation between the distributions of heavy metals and the experimental conditions were also studied. The transformation pathways of Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn during SCWG were deduced according to the experimental results.

  8. Using fluorescent dissolved organic matter to trace and distinguish the origin of Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Granskog, Mats A.; Bracher, Astrid; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Dodd, Paul A.; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change affects the Arctic with regards to permafrost thaw, sea-ice melt, alterations to the freshwater budget and increased export of terrestrial material to the Arctic Ocean. The Fram and Davis Straits represent the major gateways connecting the Arctic and Atlantic. Oceanographic surveys were performed in the Fram and Davis Straits, and on the east Greenland Shelf (EGS), in late summer 2012/2013. Meteoric (fmw), sea-ice melt, Atlantic and Pacific water fractions were determined and the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were characterized. In Fram Strait and EGS, a robust correlation between visible wavelength fluorescence and fmw was apparent, suggesting it as a reliable tracer of polar waters. However, a pattern was observed which linked the organic matter characteristics to the origin of polar waters. At depth in Davis Strait, visible wavelength FDOM was correlated to apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and traced deep-water DOM turnover. In surface waters FDOM characteristics could distinguish between surface waters from eastern (Atlantic + modified polar waters) and western (Canada-basin polar waters) Arctic sectors. The findings highlight the potential of designing in situ multi-channel DOM fluorometers to trace the freshwater origins and decipher water mass mixing dynamics in the region without laborious samples analyses. PMID:27667721

  9. Conceptual design of a large heavy water reactor for US siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, N.L.; Jesick, J.F.

    1979-09-01

    Information is presented concerning fuel management and safety and licensing assessment of the pressurized heavy water reactor; and commercial introduction of the pressurized heavy water reactor in the United States

  10. Device and method to enrich and process heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    A device to process and enrich heavy water is proposed which is based on a combined electrolysis catalyst exchange system in which a D 2 O enrichment of more than 99.8% is achieved in the end stage. Water partly enriched with D 2 -containing hydrogen gas from an electrolysis cell is brought into contact in a catalyst column. The water is further enriched here with deuterium. It is then fed to the electrolysis cell. Details of the apparatus are closely described. (UWI) [de

  11. Thorium utilization in heavy water moderated Accelerator Driven Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, Anil; Degweker, S.B.; Ghosh, Biplab

    2011-01-01

    Research on Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) is being carried out around the world primarily with the objective of waste transmutation. Presently, the volume of waste in India is small and therefore there is little incentive to develop ADS based waste transmutation technology immediately. With limited indigenous U availability and the presence of large Th deposits in the country, there is a clear incentive to develop Th related technologies. India also has vast experience in design, construction and operation of heavy water moderated reactors. Heavy water moderated reactors employing solid Th fuels can be self sustaining, but the discharge burnups are too low to be economical. A possible way to improve the performance such reactors is to use an external neutron source as is done in ADS. This paper discusses our studies on Th utilization in heavy water moderated ADSs. The study is carried out at the lattice level. The time averaged k-infinity of the Th bundle from zero burnup up to the discharge burnup is taken to be the same as the core (ensemble) averaged k-infinity. For the purpose of the analysis we have chosen standard PHWR and AHWR assemblies. Variation of the pitch and coolant (H 2 O/D 2 O) are studied. Both, the once through cycle and the recycling option are studied. In the latter case the study is carried out for various enrichments (% 233 U in Th) of the recycled Th fuel bundles. The code DTF as modified for lattice and burnup calculations (BURNTRAN) was used for carrying out the study. The once through cycle represents the most attractive ADS concept (Th burner ADS) possible for Th utilization. It avoids reprocessing of Th spent fuel and in the ideal situation the use of any fissile material either initially or for sustaining itself. The gain in this system is however rather low requiring a high power accelerator and a substantial fraction of the power generated to be fed back to the accelerator. The self sustaining Th-U cycle in a heavy moderated ADS

  12. Long-term dynamics of dissolved organic carbon: implications for drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Köhler, Stephan J; Futter, Martyn N

    2012-08-15

    Surface waters are the main source of drinking water in many regions. Increasing organic carbon concentrations are a cause for concern in Nordic countries since both dissolved and particulate organic carbon can transport contaminants and adversely affect drinking water treatment processes. We present a long-term study of dynamics of total (particulate and dissolved) organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in the River Fyris. This river supplies drinking water to approximately 200000 people in Uppsala, Sweden. The River Fyris is a main tributary to Lake Mälaren, which supplies drinking water to approximately 2 million people in the greater Stockholm area. Utilities responsible for drinking water supply in both Uppsala and Stockholm have expressed concerns about possible increases in TOC. We evaluate organic carbon dynamics within the Fyris catchment by calculating areal mass exports using observed TOC concentrations and modeled flows and by modeling dissolved organic carbon (as a proxy for TOC) using the dynamic, process based INCA-C model. Exports of TOC from the catchment ranged from 0.8 to 5.8 g m(-2) year(-1) in the period 1995-2010. The variation in annual exports was related to climatic variability which influenced seasonality and amount of runoff. Exports and discharge uncoupled at the end of 2008. A dramatic increase in TOC concentrations was observed in 2009, which gradually declined in 2010-2011. INCA-C successfully reproduced the intra- and inter-annual variation in concentrations during 1996-2008 and 2010-2011 but failed to capture the anomalous increase in 2009. We evaluated a number of hypotheses to explain the anomaly in 2009 TOC values, ultimately none proved satisfactory. We draw two main conclusions: there is at least one unknown or unmeasured process controlling or influencing surface water TOC and INCA-C can be used as part of the decision-making process for current and future use of rivers for drinking water supply. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  13. Analysis of hydrogen sulfide releases in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Dumitrescu, Maria; Preda, Irina; Lazar, Roxana

    1996-01-01

    Safety analyses conducted at ICIS concern primarily the heavy water production installations. The quantitative risk assessment needs the frequency calculation of accident sequences and consequences. In heavy water plants which obtain primary isotopic concentration of water by H 2 O - H 2 S exchange, large amounts of hydrogen sulfide which is a toxic, inflammable and explosive gas, are circulated. The first stage in calculating the consequences consists in potential analysis of H 2 S release. This work presents a study of this types of releases for pilot installations of the heavy water production at ICIS (Plant 'G' at Rm. Valcea). The installations which contain and maneuver large quantities of H 2 S and the mathematical models for different types of releases are presented. The accidents analyzed are: catastrophic column, container, spy-hole failures or gas-duct rupture and wall cracks in the installation. The main results are given as tables while the time variations of the flow rate and quantities of H 2 O released by stack disposal are plotted

  14. DESIGN OF A DISSOLVED AIR FLOAT (DAF) IN THE TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER A TEXTILE

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Colotta, G.

    2014-01-01

    We presented the design of a dissolved air flotation system (DAF) to separate coagulated solids (dye) in the wastewater of a textile plant. The obtained yields of removal of suspended solids (SS) they are 82%. The size of the float to treat 35 m3/h of residual water of a textile is 5,7 m. Se presenta el diseño de un flotador por aire disuelto (DAF) para separar sólidos coagulados y floculados (tinte) provenientes de los efluentes de una planta textil. Los rendimientos obtenidos de remoción...

  15. Measurement of the hydrogen yield in the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Hart, E.J.; Flynn, K.F.; Gindler, J.E.

    1976-04-01

    Hydrogen from the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products is stripped from the solution and collected by bubbling CO 2 through the solution. Quantitative measurements of the G value for hydrogen show that the yield is essentially the same as would be obtained by external gamma radiolysis of nonradioactive solutions of the same chemical composition. The hydrogen yield can be enhanced by addition of a hydrogen-atom donor, such as formic acid, to the solution. The yield of hydrogen from fission-waste solutions is discussed with respect to the question of whether it represents a significant energy source

  16. Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water at hydrothermal temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, H.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water was experimentally determined at 100, 200 and 300 deg C. The isotope exchange rate is strongly dependent on temperature and pH of the solution. Combining the temperature and pH dependence of the reaction rate, the exchange reaction was estimated to be first-order with respect to sulfate. The logarithm of apparent rate constant of exchange reaction at a given temperature is a function of the pH calculated at the experimental temperatures. From the pH dependence of the apparent rate constant, it was deduced that the isotope exchange reaction between dissolved sulfate and water proceeds through collision between H 2 SO 4 0 and H 2 O at low pH, and between HSO 4 - and H 2 O at intermediate pH. The isotope exchange rate obtained indicates that oxygen isotope geothermometry utilizing the studied isotope exchange is suitable for temperature estimation of geothermal reservoirs. The extrapolated half-life of this reaction to oceanic temperature is about 10 9 years, implying that exchange between oceanic sulfate and water cannot control the oxygen isotope ratio of oceanic sulfates. (author)

  17. Water and dissolved carbon transport in an eroding soil landscape using column experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieckh, Helene; Gerke, Horst; Glæsner, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    In the hummocky ground moraine soil landscape, a spatial continuum of more or less eroded soils developed from till under intensive agricultural cultivation. Water flow and solute transport are affected by the variable soil structural and pedological developments, which are posing a challenge...... for flux estimation. The objective of this study was to investigate transport of water, dissolved organic (DOC), and particulate carbon (PC) through soil profiles of an eroded Haplic Luvisol and a heavily eroded Haplic Regosol. We studied 5 soil horizons in three replicates each: Ap (0-20 cm) and E (20...... boundary. Breakthrough curves for a pre-applied tracer (Br-) on the soil surface and a tracer applied with irrigation water (3H2O) were modeled analytically using CXTFIT. The heterogeneity of the Luvisol horizons was generally higher than that of the Regosol horizons, which relates to the higher...

  18. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Holbrook, R; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-10-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeki Hamasaki

    Full Text Available Electrochemically reduced water (ERW is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  20. Optimization of the Determination Method for Dissolved Cyanobacterial Toxin BMAA in Natural Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Boyin; Liu, Zhiquan; Huang, Rui; Xu, Yongpeng; Liu, Dongmei; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Cui, Fuyi

    2017-10-17

    There is a serious dispute on the existence of β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in water, which is a neurotoxin that may cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson's disease (ALS/PDC) and Alzheimer' disease. It is believed that a reliable and sensitive analytical method for the determination of BMAA is urgently required to resolve this dispute. In the present study, the solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure and the analytical method for dissolved BMAA in water were investigated and optimized. The results showed both derivatized and underivatized methods were qualified for the measurement of BMAA and its isomer in natural water, and the limit of detection and the precision of the two methods were comparable. Cartridge characteristics and SPE conditions could greatly affect the SPE performance, and the competition of natural organic matter is the primary factor causing the low recovery of BMAA, which was reduced from approximately 90% in pure water to 38.11% in natural water. The optimized SPE method for BMAA was a combination of rinsed SPE cartridges, controlled loading/elution rates and elution solution, evaporation at 55 °C, reconstitution of a solution mixture, and filtration by polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. This optimized method achieved > 88% recovery of BMAA in both algal solution and river water. The developed method can provide an efficient way to evaluate the actual concentration levels of BMAA in actual water environments and drinking water systems.

  1. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from natural waters using industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation of excess nutrients in wastewater and stormwater is required to safeguard aquatic ecosystems. The use of low-cost, mineral-based industrial by-products with high Ca, Mg, Fe or Al content as a solid phase in constructed wetlands potentially offers a cost-effective wastewater treatment option in areas without centralised water treatment facilities. Our objective was to investigate use of water treatment residuals (WTRs), coal fly ash (CFA), and granular activated carbon (GAC) from biomass combustion in in-situ water treatment schemes to manage dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrients. Both CaO- and CaCO(3)-based WTRs effectively attenuated inorganic N species but exhibited little capacity for organic N removal. The CaO-based WTR demonstrated effective attenuation of DOC and P in column trials, and a high capacity for P sorption in batch experiments. Granular activated carbon proved effective for DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) removal in column trials, but was ineffective for P attenuation. Only CFA demonstrated effective removal of a broad suite of inorganic and organic nutrients and DOC; however, Se concentrations in column effluents exceeded Australian and New Zealand water quality guideline values. Water treated by filtering through the CaO-based WTR exhibited nutrient ratios characteristic of potential P-limitation with no potential N- or Si-limitation respective to growth of aquatic biota, indicating that treatment of nutrient-rich water using the CaO-based WTR may result in conditions less favourable for cyanobacterial growth and more favourable for growth of diatoms. Results show that selected industrial by-products may mitigate eutrophication through targeted use in nutrient intervention schemes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Specific Conductance and Dissolved-Solids Characteristics for the Green River and Muddy Creek, Wyoming, Water Years 1999-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melanie L.; Davidson, Seth L.

    2009-01-01

    Southwestern Wyoming is an area of diverse scenery, wildlife, and natural resources that is actively undergoing energy development. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to assess and enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale, while facilitating responsible energy development through local collaboration and partnerships. Water-quality monitoring has been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Green River near Green River, Wyoming, and Muddy Creek near Baggs, Wyoming. This monitoring, which is being conducted in cooperation with State and other Federal agencies and as part of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, is in response to concerns about potentially increased dissolved solids in the Colorado River Basin as a result of energy development. Because of the need to provide real-time dissolved-solids concentrations for the Green River and Muddy Creek on the World Wide Web, the U.S. Geological Survey developed regression equations to estimate dissolved-solids concentrations on the basis of continuous specific conductance using relations between measured specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations. Specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations were less varied and generally lower for the Green River than for Muddy Creek. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the site on the Green River was 318 milligrams per liter, and the median concentration for the site on Muddy Creek was 943 milligrams per liter. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 187 to 594 milligrams per liter in samples collected from the Green River during water years 1999-2008. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 293 to 2,485 milligrams per liter in samples collected from Muddy Creek during water years 2006-08. The differences in dissolved-solids concentrations in samples collected from the Green River compared to samples collected from Muddy

  3. Energy conservation measures adopted at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.V.; Venugopal, M.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of conservation of energy is well recognised all over the world as the world reserves of fossil fuels will eventually run out depending on the rate of their use. This paper deals with various energy conservation schemes adopted at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru (HWPM). Most energy conservation measures offer large financial saving with very short pay back periods. This fact has been well recognised by the management of HWPM as well as Heavy Water Board and their wholehearted and enthusiastic approach to energy conservation and energy management yielded very good results in reducing the operating cost. The process of energy conservation is not a one time exercise. Persistent efforts are on to identify the areas like condition of heat exchangers, margins in control valves, steam and condensate leakages etc. for further reduction in energy consumption

  4. Advanced technology heavy water monitors offering reduced implementation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalechstein, W.; Hippola, K.B.

    1984-10-01

    The development of second generation heavy water monitors for use at CANDU power stations and heavy water plants has been completed and the instruments brought to the stage of commercial availability. Applications of advanced technology and reduced utilization of custom manufactured components have together resulted in instruments that are less expensive to produce than the original monitors and do not require costly station services. The design has been tested on two prototypes and fully documented, including the inspection and test procedures required for manufacture to the CSA Z299.3 quality verfication program standard. Production of the new monitors by a commercial vendor (Barringer Research Ltd.) has begun and the first instrument is scheduled for delivery to CRNL's NRU reactor in late 1984

  5. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  6. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  7. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit's five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix

  8. Heavy metal removal from waste waters by ion flotation

    OpenAIRE

    Polat, Hürriyet; Erdoğan, D.

    2007-01-01

    Flotation studies were carried out to investigate the removal of heavy metals such as copper (II), zinc (II), chromium (III) and silver (I) from waste waters. Various parameters such as pH, collector and frother concentrations and airflow rate were tested to determine the optimum flotation conditions. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide were used as collectors. Ethanol and methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) were used as frothers. Metal removal reached about 74% under o...

  9. Possibilities of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, B.; Mihajlovic, A.; Drobnjak, Dj.

    1965-11-01

    There are serious economic reasons for using metal uranium in heavy water reactors, because of its high density, i.e. high conversion factor, and low cost of fuel elements production. Most important disadvantages are swelling at high burnup and corrosion risk. Some design concepts and application of improved uranium obtained by alloying are promising for achievement of satisfactory stability of metal uranium under reactor operation conditions [sr

  10. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K C [Ontario Hydro, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit`s five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  11. Heavy water standards. Qualitative analyses, sample treating, stocking and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Steflea, D.; Mihancea, I.; Varlam, M.; Irimescu, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents methods and procedures for measuring heavy water concentration, and also sampling, stocking and handling of samples to be analysed. The main concentration analysis methods are: mass spectrometry, for concentrations less then 1%, densitometry, for concentrations within the range 1% - 99% and infrared spectrometry for concentrations above 99%. Procedures of sampling, processing and purification appropriate to these measuring methods were established. 1 Tab

  12. Heavy water reactors on the once-through uranium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents preliminary technical and economic data to INFCE on the once-through uranium fuel cycle for use in early comparisons of alternate nuclear systems. The denatured thorium fuel cycle is discussed in a companion paper. Information for this paper was developed under an ongoing program, and more complete reporting of the evaluation of the heavy water reactor and its fuel cycles is planned toward the end of the year

  13. Environmental health scoping study at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, M.; Mostrom, M.; Coppock, R.; Florence, Z.

    1995-10-01

    There are concerns that hydrogen sulfide released from the Heavy Water Plant near Kincardine, Ontario may be the cause of the mortalities and morbidities observed in a nearby flock of sheep. The Philosopher's Wool sheep farm is about four kilometres south-southeast of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant. Ontario Hydro, the owner and operator of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant, claims that hydrogen sulphide emissions from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant are within regulatory limits and well below levels that cause harm. Accordingly, the Atomic Energy Control Board commissioned the Alberta Environmental Centre, Alberta Department of Environmental Protection, to develop a scoping study for this environmental health issue. The first objective was to describe a field investigation model to define clearly the environmental health and operation of the sheep farm. The second objective was to describe possible exposure patterns and develop a holistic environmental pathway model. If appropriate, the third study objective was to describe animal models of the actual situation to elucidate specific aspects of the environmental health concerns. It was not the objective of this report to provide a definitive answer to the present environmental health issue. Ontario Hydro provided data to the Alberta Environmental Centre, as di the sheep farmer, the attending veterinarian, the University of Guelph study team, and the Atomic Energy Control Board. A six-tiered strategy of sequential evaluations of the ovine health problem is based on the multiple-response paradigm. It assumes the observed ovine health results are the result of multiple effector events. Each tier constitutes a separate, but inter-related, study. Sequential evaluation and feedback of each tier allow sound scientific judgements and efficient use of resources. (author). 59 refs., 11 tabs., 22 figs

  14. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % 235 U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 rods containing 4.31 wt % 235 U and 2 wt % PuO 2 in natural UO 2 respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in 235 U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel

  15. Neutron scattering of a floating heavy water bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Woisetschlaeger, Jakob; Maier, Eugen; Beuneu, Brigitte; Teixeira, Jose

    2009-01-01

    When high voltage is applied to distilled water filled into two beakers close to each other, a water connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the first data on neutron scattering of a floating heavy water bridge are presented and possible interpretations are discussed. D 2 O was measured instead of H 2 O because of the very strong incoherent scattering of H. The obtained data support the 'bubble hypothesis' suggested earlier (Fuchs et al 2008).

  16. DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

    2009-07-31

    Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

  17. Reactivity requirements and safety systems for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kati, S.L.; Rustagi, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The natural uranium fuelled pressurised heavy water reactors are currently being installed in India. In the design of nuclear reactors, adequate attention has to be given to the safety systems. In recent years, several design modifications having bearing on safety, in the reactor processes, protective and containment systems have been made. These have resulted either from new trends in safety and reliability standards or as a result of feed-back from operating reactors of this type. The significant areas of modifications that have been introduced in the design of Indian PHWR's are: sophisticated theoretical modelling of reactor accidents, reactivity control, two independent fast acting systems, full double containment and improved post-accident depressurisation and building clean-up. This paper brings out the evolution of design of safety systems for heavy water reactors. A short review of safety systems which have been used in different heavy water reactors, of varying sizes, has been made. In particular, the safety systems selected for the latest 235 MWe twin reactor unit station in Narora, in Northern India, have been discussed in detail. Research and Development efforts made in this connection are discussed. The experience of design and operation of the systems in Rajasthan and Kalpakkam reactors has also been outlined

  18. The Battle for Heavy Water Three physicists' heroic exploits

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Up until the end of the 1970s you could still catch a glimpse of his massive silhouette in the corridors of CERN. Lew Kowarksi, one of the pioneers of the Laboratory, was not only a great physicist; he was also a genuine hero of World War II. In 1940, along with Frédéric Joliot and Hans von Halban, Lew Kowarski managed to get the entire world supply of heavy water away to safety from the Nazis after a fantastic escape from occupied France. At the end of the war, the three physicists played themselves in a film about their adventures entitled 'la Bataille de l'eau lourde'. This film, which has been loaned to us by the French National Film Library, will be shown at CERN for the first time next Thursday. At the beginning of the war, heavy water (D20, two atoms of deuterium and one oxygen atom) was of strategic importance. In 1939 Frédéric Joliot, aided by Hans von Halban and Lew Kowarski, demonstrated the nuclear chain reaction and the moderator role that heavy water plays in it. A few weeks before the inv...

  19. The importance of heavy water in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Due to similarities of chemical and almost physical properties in H 2 O and D 2 O but differences in nuclear and particle peculiarities provide valuable application for D 2 O. To sustain a controlled chain reaction, the energy of neutrons produced by fission must be reduced through collisions with other nuclei, a process called moderation. A good moderator has a mass close to that of the neutron to maximize energy loss per collision and a very small neutron capture cross section to minimize unwanted nuclear reactions. Deuterium is far the best moderator, more than 80 times better than hydrogen and 30 times better than 12 C ir 18 O. Heavy water is almost as good as deuterium and has the distinct advantage of being a nonflammable liquid. Heavy water is also an excellent neutron reflector, and thus decreases the number of neutrons that escape the reactor core without participating in fission reactions. For this reason a feasibility study and subsequently a technical survey was carried out on engineering of a pilot scale plant. As the result of this studies, the know-how of heavy water production on basis of selected method including dual temperature isotopic exchange and distillation techniques developed. Subsequently the primary and almost detail engineering documents prepared on best knowledge of our own engineers without external contribution

  20. Measurement of tritium activity in the aluminum pipe of JRR-2 heavy water primary cooling system using imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoishi, Shoji; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi

    2000-12-01

    JRR-2 is the heavy water cooling type nuclear reactor, which has been operated for 36 years (1960-1976) and in the process of decommissioning at present. For this reason, evaluation of tritium quantity permeated into the pipe and apparatus of the primary coolant heavy water circulating system is important. In the Radioisotope Production Division, activity of tritium in aluminum pipe was measured with imaging plate (IP), liquid scintillation analyzer and high purity germanium detector (HPGe). After acrylic paints was applied for the region except for tritium contamination on the surface of aluminum pipe, only the oxidized contaminated part was dissolved by 1.5%(1.21M) HF for 3 minutes, and measured with IP. As a result, the tritium was found to permeate in the depth of 25 μm. Moreover, 90% of it was found to be distributed within 7 μm. (author)

  1. The Effect of Pressure and Temperature on Mid-Infrared Sensing of Dissolved Hydrocarbons in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Charles; Myers, Matthew; Pejcic, Bobby

    2017-12-19

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy using a polymer coated internal reflection element/waveguide is an established sensor platform for the detection of a range of organic and hydrocarbon molecules dissolved in water. The polymer coating serves two purposes: to concentrate hydrocarbons from the aqueous phase and to exclude water along with other interfering molecules from the surface of the internal reflection element. Crucial to reliable quantification and analytical performance is the calibration of the ATR-FTIR sensor which is commonly performed in water under mild ambient conditions (i.e., 25 °C and 1 atm). However, there is a pressing need to monitor environmental and industrial processes/events that may occur at high pressures and temperatures where this calibration approach is unsuitable. Using a ruggedized optical fiber probe with a diamond-based ATR, we have conducted mid-infrared sensor experiments to understand the influence of high pressure (up to 207 bar) and temperature (up to 80 °C) on the detection of toluene and naphthalene dissolved in water. Using a poly(isobutylene) film, we have shown that the IR spectroscopic response is relatively unaffected by changes in pressure; however, a diminished response was observed with increasing temperature. We reveal that changes in the refractive index of the polymer film with temperature have only a minor effect on sensitivity. A more plausible explanation for the observed significant change in sensor response with temperature is that the partitioning process is exothermic and becomes less favorable with increasing temperature. This Article shows that the sensitivity is relatively invariant to pressure; however, the thermal variations are significant and need to be considered when quantifying the concentration of hydrocarbons in water.

  2. Enzymatic scavenging of oxygen dissolved in water: Application of response surface methodology in optimization of conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Afzal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, removal of dissolved oxygen in water through reduction by glucose, which was catalyzed by glucose oxidase – catalase enzyme, was studied. Central composite design (CCD technique was applied to achieve optimum conditions for dissolved oxygen scavenging. Linear, square and interactions between effective parameters were obtained to develop a second order polynomial equation. The adequacy of the obtained model was evaluated by the residual plots, probability-value, coefficient of determination, and Fisher’s variance ratio test. Optimum conditions for activity of two enzymes in water deoxygenation were obtained as follows: pH=5.6, T=40°C, initial substrate concentration [S] = 65.5 mmol/L and glucose oxidase activity [E] = 252 U/Lat excess amount of catalase. The deoxygenation process during 30 seconds, in the optimal conditions, was predicted 98.2%. Practical deoxygenation in the predicted conditions was achieved to be 95.20% which was close to the model prediction.

  3. A study on the photocatalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO 2 photocatalytic reaction characteristics of 4 nitrogen-containing and 12 aromatic organic compounds were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photocatalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the dependence of decomposition of the N-containing compounds were linearly proportional to their nitrogen atomic charge values, while that of the aromatic compounds were inversely proportional. The effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO 2 photocatalytic characteristics of EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5∼3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to a unit process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source water of the system water, and for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by chemical cleaning process in the domestic NPPs

  4. Carbon-14 measurements and characterization of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-14 was measured in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in ground water and compared with 14 C analyses of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Two field sites were used for this study; the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and the Milk River Aquifer in southern Alberta, Canada. The Stripa mine consists of a Precambrian granite dominated by fracture flow, while the Milk River Aquifer is a Cretaceous sandstone aquifer characterized by porous flow. At both field sites, 14 C analyses of the DOC provide additional information on the ground-water age. Carbon-14 was measured on both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic organic fractions of the DOC. The organic compounds in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were also characterized. The DOC may originate from kerogen in the aquifer matrix, from soil organic matter in the recharge zone, of from a combination of these two sources. Carbon-14 analyses, along with characterization of the organics, were used to determine this origin. Carbon-14 analyses of the hydrophobic fraction in the Milk River Aquifer suggest a soil origin, while 14 C analyses of the hydrophilic fraction suggest an origin within the Cretaceous sediments (kerogen) or from the shale in contact with the aquifer

  5. A study on the photocatalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO{sup 2} photocatalytic reaction characteristics of 4 nitrogen-containing and 12 aromatic organic compounds were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photocatalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the dependence of decomposition of the N-containing compounds were linearly proportional to their nitrogen atomic charge values, while that of the aromatic compounds were inversely proportional. The effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO{sup 2} photocatalytic characteristics of EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5{approx}3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to a unit process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source water of the system water, and for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by chemical cleaning process in the domestic NPPs.

  6. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on corrosion of 316NG stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Lijin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China); Peng, Qunjia, E-mail: qunjiapeng@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Shoji, Tetsuo [Frontier Research Initiative, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Dissolved hydrogen (DH) effect on corrosion of stainless steel in high temperature water. • Increasing DH caused decrease of Cr- but increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner oxide layer. • Concentration gradient of Cr and Fe in the inner oxide layer. • DH effect was attributed to the accelerated diffusion of Fe ion in the inner oxide layer. - Abstract: Characterizations of oxide films formed on 316 stainless steel in high temperature, hydrogenated water were conducted. The results show the oxide film consists of an outer layer with oxide particles of Fe–Ni spinel and hematite, and an inner continuous layer of Fe–Cr–Ni spinel. Increasing dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentrations causes decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner layer. A continuous decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations was observed from the surface of the inner layer to the oxide/substrate interface. The DH effect is attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Fe ions in the oxide film by hydrogen.

  7. Neutron emission during lithium deuteride hydration in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Kezerashvili, G.Ya.; Muratov, V.V.; Sinitskij, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment on neutron detection during lithium deuteride hydration in heavy water using a system of SNM-17 or SNM-18 gas counters was set up. Signals were simultaneously detected by 6 counters and the data were stored in a computer. At the same time the temperature of the reaction ampule external surface was measured. It was found that the neutron number per 1 gram of lithium deuteride reacted with water in the ampule was equal to several dozens if their initial energy was about 2.5 MeV. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Heavy water GS process R and D achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.

    1978-10-01

    R and D support of Canadian heavy water production plants during the past five years has involved mainly AECL and Ontario Hydro, and their contractors. Testing has been done in the production plants, in two pilot plants and in research laboratories on topics that include sieve tray design, in-plant behaviour of oil and sulfur and choice of antifoam agent to control excessive foaming. The benefits are increased production through higher plant flows and higher extraction of deuterium from the feed, less down time because of process problems and lower cost for materials used to control water chemistry. (author)

  9. The effect of dissolved organic carbon on pelagial and near-sediment water traits in lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Banaś

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC on the environmental conditions of macrophytes has been studied in 35 lakes divided into soft- and hardwater: oligohumic (16.0 mg C dm-3. The optimum environmental conditions for macrophytes have been found in oligohumic lakes, characterised by low water colour and its good transparency. In soft- and hardwater lakes increasing concentration of DOC is accompanied with an increase in the colour (r=0.95, while the visibility decreases. With increasing DOC in the near-sediment layer the pH values decrease while the concentration of nitrogen increases and the concentration of phosphorus slightly increases. In hardwater lakes with increasing DOC concentration, the redox potential, conductivity, total hardness and calcium concentration in the near-sediment water decrease, whereas the content of CO2 remains at a very low level.

  10. Portable mass spectrometer for express analysis of dissolved in water substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, V.T.; Pavlov, A.K.; Savchenko, M.I.; Dobychin, O.E.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometer for analysis under field conditions of chemical composition of dissolved in water substances is described. Special attention is paid to developing portable mass analyzer and device for a probe inlet. The device is intended for the systems of direct autonomous control of water basins contamination. Depending on the level of required work degree of autonomy and loading rate of the device, its dimensions and consumption way vary. The tests of the pilot device having 370x420x570 mm size, 23 kg mass and ≤ 40 W consumption capacity were carried out. The resolution capacity of the device is 100 (at the level of ≤ 3%) and relative sensitivity - ≤ 10 -6 [ru

  11. Dissolved stable noble gas measurements from primary water of Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcsu, L.; Molnar, M.; Szanto, Zs.; Svingor, E.; Futo, I.; Pinter, T.

    2001-01-01

    A sampling and measuring method of noble gases from the primary water circuit of a VVER type NPP was developed to provide relevant information about the kilter of heating rods and detailed additional information about some working parameters. The helium concentrations and 3 He/ 4 He ratios was used to estimate the content of tritium and alpha emitting isotopes of the primary water. By argon content measurements the air penetration and the required hydrazine amount for the oxygen absorption could be estimated with high accuracy. Continuous monitoring of the concentration and isotope ratios of Xe and Kr in the dissolved gas is proved to be a good tool for high sensitivity detection of small leakage of fuel elements. In case of block-3 xenon surplus was detected. The results indicate possible leakage of fuel rods.(author)

  12. Evaluation of Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF for Pretreatment of the Karoon River Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeim Banisaeid

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a pilot dissolved air flotation (DAF unit is evaluated. It is the objective of the present study to determine the removal efficiency of DAF in removing turbidity and organic matter from theKaroonRiverfeeding a water treatment plant. Water quality investigations over the study period revealed that, thanks to the self-purification process in the river, the Karoon water quality is acceptable with respect to total organic carbon (TOC (never exceeding 2.89 mg/l but its turbidity has great fluctuations (from as low as 42 to 1,000 NTU due to the nature of the river. Its true color is in desirable conditions. Suspended solids removal efficiency of the pilot DAF unit varied from 38% to 95%, with an average level of 72%. The results from this study indicate that DAF removal efficiency is inversely related to the volume of inflow of solids into the system so that increasing TSS decreases removal efficiency. The high turbidity level in the absence of a primary sedimentation unit causes the flotation system to lose its desired efficiency. FAD cannot be, therefore, recommended for water treatment plants fed by the Karoon water unless a pretreatment unit is used. Furthermore, as FAD's TOC removal efficiency varies by up to 82%, and since part of the organic content includes volatile organic matter causing odors and undesirable taste, FAD is recommended as a complementary process in the treatment of high quality water.

  13. Dissolved organic nitrogen and its biodegradable portion in a water treatment plant with ozone oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Tanush; Simsek, Halis; Kasi, Murthy; Knutson, Kristofer; Prüβ, Birgit; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak

    2014-05-01

    Biodegradability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) has been studied in wastewater, freshwater and marine water but not in drinking water. Presence of biodegradable DON (BDON) in water prior to and after chlorination may promote formation of nitrogenous disinfectant by-products and growth of microorganisms in the distribution system. In this study, an existing bioassay to determine BDON in wastewater was adapted and optimized, and its application was tested on samples from four treatment stages of a water treatment plant including ozonation and biologically active filtration. The optimized bioassay was able to detect BDON in 50 μg L(-1) as N of glycine and glutamic solutions. BDON in raw (144-275 μg L(-1) as N), softened (59-226 μg L(-1) as N), ozonated (190-254 μg L(-1) as N), and biologically filtered (17-103 μg L(-1) as N) water samples varied over a sampling period of 2 years. The plant on average removed 30% of DON and 68% of BDON. Ozonation played a major role in increasing the amount of BDON (31%) and biologically active filtration removed 71% of BDON in ozonated water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling water and dissolved gas chemistry at the Accesa sinkhole (southern Tuscany, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 38.5 m deep Lake Accesa is a sinkhole located in southern Tuscany (Italy that shows a peculiar water composition, being characterized by relatively high total dissolved solids (TDS values (2 g L-1 and a Ca(Mg-SO4 geochemical facies. The presence of significant amounts of extra-atmospheric gases (CO2 and CH4, which increase their concentrations with depth, is also recognized. These chemical features, mimicking those commonly shown by volcanic lakes fed by hydrothermal-magmatic reservoirs, are consistent with those of mineral springs emerging in the study area whose chemistry is produced by the interaction of meteoric-derived waters with Mesozoic carbonates and Triassic evaporites. Although the lake has a pronounced thermocline, water chemistry does not show significant changes along the vertical profile. Lake water balance calculations demonstrate that Lake Accesa has >90% of its water supply from sublacustrine springs whose subterranean pathways are controlled by the local structural assessment that likely determined the sinking event, the resulting funnel-shape being then filled by the Accesa waters. Such a huge water inflow from the lake bottom (~9·106 m3 yr-1 feeds the lake effluent (Bruna River and promotes the formation of water currents, which are able to prevent the establishment of a vertical density gradient. Consequently, a continuous mixing along the whole vertical water column is established. Changes of the drainage system by the deep-originated waters in the nearby former mining district have strongly affected the outflow rates of the local mineral springs; thus, future intervention associated with the ongoing remediation activities should carefully be evaluated to preserve the peculiar chemical features of Lake Accesa.

  15. Remote sensing estimation of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in optically shallow waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; Yu, Qian; Tian, Yong Q.; Becker, Brian L.

    2017-06-01

    It is not well understood how bottom reflectance of optically shallow waters affects the algorithm performance of colored dissolved organic matters (CDOM) retrieval. This study proposes a new algorithm that considers bottom reflectance in estimating CDOM absorption from optically shallow inland or coastal waters. The field sampling was conducted during four research cruises within the Saginaw River, Kawkawlin River and Saginaw Bay of Lake Huron. A stratified field sampling campaign collected water samples, determined the depth at each sampling location and measured optical properties. The sampled CDOM absorption at 440 nm broadly ranged from 0.12 to 8.46 m-1. Field sample analysis revealed that bottom reflectance does significantly change water apparent optical properties. We developed a CDOM retrieval algorithm (Shallow water Bio-Optical Properties algorithm, SBOP) that effectively reduces uncertainty by considering bottom reflectance in shallow waters. By incorporating the bottom contribution in upwelling radiances, the SBOP algorithm was able to explain 74% of the variance of CDOM values (RMSE = 0.22 and R2 = 0.74). The bottom effect index (BEI) was introduced to efficiently separate optically shallow and optically deep waters. Based on the BEI, an adaptive approach was proposed that references the amount of bottom effect in order to identify the most suitable algorithm (optically shallow water algorithm [SBOP] or optically deep water algorithm [QAA-CDOM]) to improve CDOM estimation (RMSE = 0.22 and R2 = 0.81). Our results potentially help to advance the capability of remote sensing in monitoring carbon pools at the land-water interface.

  16. Predicting Impact of Climate Change on Water Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen in Tropical Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Amin Danladi Bello

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the impact of climate change and human activities on river systems is imperative for effective management of aquatic ecosystems. Unique information can be derived that is critical to the survival of aquatic species under dynamic environmental conditions. Therefore, the response of a tropical river system under climate and land-use changes from the aspects of water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration were evaluated. Nine designed projected climate change scenarios and three future land-use scenarios were integrated into the Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF model to determine the impact of climate change and land-use on water temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO concentration using basin-wide simulation of river system in Malaysia. The model performance coefficients showed a good correlation between simulated and observed streamflow, water temperature, and DO concentration in a monthly time step simulation. The Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency for streamflow was 0.88 for the calibration period and 0.82 for validation period. For water temperature and DO concentration, data from three stations were calibrated and the Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency for both water temperature and DO ranged from 0.53 to 0.70. The output of the calibrated model under climate change scenarios show that increased rainfall and air temperature do not affects DO concentration and water temperature as much as the condition of a decrease in rainfall and increase in air temperature. The regression model on changes in streamflow, DO concentration, and water temperature under the climate change scenarios illustrates that scenarios that produce high to moderate streamflow, produce small predicted change in water temperatures and DO concentrations compared with the scenarios that produced a low streamflow. It was observed that climate change slightly affects the relationship between water temperatures and DO concentrations in the tropical rivers that we

  17. How Natural is the Dissolved Inorganic Composition of Mississippi River Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Johnson, S. T.; Meaux, S. J.; Brown, K.; Blum, M. J.; Allison, M. A.; Halder, J.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Cuesta, A. M.; Norris, E. S.; Wang, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolved inorganic composition of rivers provides insights into natural interactions between the hydrologic cycle and the "critical zone" of watersheds, and anthropogenic modifications thereof. For instance, major ion compositions allow us to infer how effectively weathering processes counteract increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Prerequisite to such assessments is the ability to detect and correct for anthropogenic modifications of river chemistry. An observatory campaign of the Mississippi River in New Orleans from July 2015 to October 2016 with an in-situ sensor system (LOBO-SUNA) and 161 discrete water sampling events reveals systematic changes in the dissolved ion and water stable isotope compositions, nutrient loading, and physical parameters of the Mississippi River. Monthly sampling has continued since as part of the Global Rivers Observatory. We compare this high-resolution data set to long-term data generated by the USGS at St. Francisville upstream of Baton Rouge, data from the USGS Baton Rouge gaging station and in-situ sensor system, as well as other historic data. Results reveal systematic changes in major ion composition in response to hydrologic conditions. In addition to annual and interannual changes, decadal trends in concentrations of certain major ions (Na, Mg, Ca) are consistent with anthropogenic activities in the drainage basin that are reminiscent of well-known, long-term changes in nutrient fluxes that affect the northern Gulf of Mexico. Our current working hypotheses to explain observed increases in Mg and Na concentrations, for example, are contaminations from road salt, from additives used in drinking and waste water treatment, as well as from groundwater pumping, particularly in the western part of the Mississippi River basin. Uncorrected, these changes impede our abilitiy to use the current chemical composition of Mississippi River water as a quantitative indicator of natural processes in the watershed.

  18. Critical heat flux experiments in a circular tube with heavy water and light water. (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.L.; Beus, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments were performed to establish the critical heat flux (CHF) characteristics of heavy water and light water. Testing was performed with the up-flow of heavy and of light water within a 0.3744 inch inside diameter circular tube with 72.3 inches of heated length. Comparisons were made between heavy water and light water critical heat flux levels for the same local equilibrium quality at CHF, operating pressure, and nominal mass velocity. Results showed that heavy water CHF values were, on the average, 8 percent below the light water CHF values

  19. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, M.A. Jafar; Al-Attas, Omar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water. - Highlights: • Co-exposure to multiple heavy metals in drinking water needs better understanding • Low-cost technologies for arsenic removal needs urgent attention • Protonated alginate needs further research for drinking water applications • Community level and PoU devices need improvement and cost reduction • Developing countries are most affected by heavy metals in drinking water

  20. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat, E-mail: Schowdhury@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Mazumder, M.A. Jafar [Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Attas, Omar [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Husain, Tahir [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water. - Highlights: • Co-exposure to multiple heavy metals in drinking water needs better understanding • Low-cost technologies for arsenic removal needs urgent attention • Protonated alginate needs further research for drinking water applications • Community level and PoU devices need improvement and cost reduction • Developing countries are most affected by heavy metals in drinking water.

  1. Spectroscopic detection of a ubiquitous dissolved pigment degradation product in subsurface waters of the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Röttgers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of light absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM from subsurface waters of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans showed a distinct absorption shoulder at 410–415 nm. This indicates an underlying absorption of a pigment whose occurrence is partly correlated with the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU but also found in the deep chlorophyll maximum. A similar absorption maximum at ~415 nm was also found in the particulate fraction of samples taken below the surface mixing layer and is usually attributed to absorption by respiratory pigments of heterotrophic unicellular organisms. In our study, fluorescence measurements of pre-concentrated dissolved organic matter (DOM samples from 200–6000 m confirmed a previous study suggesting that the absorption at ~415 nm was related to fluorescence at 650 nm in the oxygen minimum zone. The absorption characteristics of this fluorophore was examined by fluorescence emission/excitation analysis and showed a clear excitation maximum at 415 nm that could be linked to the absorption shoulder in the CDOM spectra. The spectral characteristics of the substance found in the dissolved and particulate fraction did not match with those of chlorophyll a degradation products (as found in a sample from the sea surface but can be explained by the occurrence of porphyrin pigments from either heterotrophs or autotrophs. Combining the observations of the fluorescence and the 415-nm absorption shoulder suggests that there are high concentrations of a pigment degradation product in subsurface DOM of all major oceans. Most pronouncedly we found this signal in the deep chlorophyll maximum and the oxygen minimum zone of tropical regions. The origin, chemical nature, turnover rate, and fate of this molecule is so far unknown.

  2. Diel production and microheterotrophic utilization of dissolved free amino acids in waters off southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, A.F.; Craven, D.B.; Henrichs, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    Diel patterns of dissolved free amino acid (DFAA) concentration and microheterotrophic utilization were examined in the spring and fall of 1981 in euphotic waters from the base of the mixed layer off the southern California coast. The average depths of the isotherms sampled were 19.2 m for spring and 9.0 for fall. Total DFAA levels were generally higher in the spring than in the fall, 18 to 66 nM and 14 to 20 nM, respectively. Two daily concentration maxima and minima were observed for total DFAAs as well as for most individual DFAAs. Maxima were usually measured in the mid-dark period and in the early afternoon; minima were typically observed in early morning and late afternoon. Bacterial cell numbers reached maximal values near midnight in both seasons. The increases coincided with one of the total DFAA maxima. The second total DFAA maximum occurred in early to midafternoon, during the time of maximum photosynthetic carbon production and rapid dissolved amino acid utilization. Microbial metabolism (incorporation plus respiration) of selected 3 H-amino acids was 2.7 to 4.1 times greater during the daylight hours. DFAA turnover times, based on these metabolic measurements, ranged between 11 and 36 h for the amino acids tested, and rates were 1.7 to 3.7 times faster in the daylight hours than at night. DFAA distributions were related to primary production and chlorophyll a concentrations. Amino acids were estimated to represent 9 to 45% of the total phytoplankton exudate. Microheterotrophic utilization or production of total protein amino acids was estimated as 3.6 μg of C liter -1 day -1 in spring and 1.9 μg of C liter -1 day -1 in the fall. Assimilation efficiency for dissolved amino acids averaged 65% for marine microheterotrophs

  3. Release of Dissolved CO2 from Water in Laboratory Porous Media Following Rapid Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A bench-top laboratory study is undertaken to investigate the effects of seismic shocks on brine aquifers into which carbon dioxide has been injected for permanent storage. Long-term storage in deep saline aquifers has been proposed and studied as one of the most viable near-term options for sequestering fossil fuel-derived carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to curb anthropogenic climate change. Upon injection into the subsurface, it is expected that CO2, as either a gas or supercritical fluid, will mix convectively with the formation water. The possibility exists, however, that dissolved CO2 will come out of solution as a result of an earthquake. The effect is similar to that of slamming an unsealed container of carbonated beverage on a table; previously dissolved CO2 precipitates, forms bubbles, and rises due to buoyancy. In this study, we measure the change in gas-phase CO2 concentration as a function of the magnitude of the shock and the initial concentration of CO2. In addition, we investigate and seek to characterize the nucleation and transport of CO2 bubbles in a porous medium after a seismic shock. Experiments are conducted using a Hele-Shaw cell and a CCD camera to quantify the fraction of dissolved CO2 that comes out of solution as a result of a sharp mechanical impulse. The data are used to identify and constrain the conditions under which CO2 comes out of solution and, further, to understand the end-behavior of the precipitated gas-phase CO2 as it moves through or is immobilized in a porous medium.

  4. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Cell growth and protein synthesis of unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of heavy water on the cell growth and protein synthesis of the photoautotrophically growing Chlamydomonas cells were studied. The growth rate of the cells is inversely proportional to the concentrations of heavy water. The cells can barely live in 90% heavy water, but they die in 99.85% heavy water within a few days. Incorporation of 14 Cleucine into cells is markedly stimulated by heavy water of various concentrations between 30 and 99.85% in the case of the short time incubation. Contrary to this, in the long time incubation as several days, heavy water inhibits the protein synthesis. Such two modes of the protein synthetic activities are dependent upon the incubation time of the cells grown photoautotrophically in the heavy water media. (author)

  6. Lambert-Beer law in ocean waters: optical properties of water and of dissolved/suspended material, optical energy budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavn, R H

    1988-01-15

    The role of the Lambert-Beer law in ocean optics is critically examined. The Lambert-Beer law and the three-parameter model of the submarine light field are used to construct an optical energy budget for any hydrosol. It is further applied to the analytical exponential decay coefficient of the light field and used to estimate the optical properties and effects of the dissolved/suspended component in upper ocean layers. The concepts of the empirical exponential decay coefficient (diffuse attenuation coefficient) of the light field and a constant exponential decay coefficient for molecular water are analyzed quantitatively. A constant exponential decay coefficient for water is rejected. The analytical exponential decay coefficient is used to analyze optical gradients in ocean waters.

  7. Cooling water treatment for heavy water project (Paper No. 6.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsangkar, H.N.

    1992-01-01

    With minor exceptions, water is the preferred industrial medium for the removal of unwanted heat from process systems. The application of various chemical treatments is required to protect the system from water related and process related problems of corrosion, scale and deposition and biofouling. The paper discusses the cooling water problems for heavy water industries along with the impact caused by associated fertilizer units. (author). 6 figs

  8. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E.; Ciccone, A.

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H 2 S, and its combustion product SO 2 . In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H 2 S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs

  9. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alp, E; Ciccone, A [Concord Environmental Corp., Downsview, ON (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H{sub 2}S, and its combustion product SO{sub 2}. In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H{sub 2}S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs.

  10. Dissolved organic carbon in water fluxes of Eucalyptus grandis plantations in northeastern Entre Ríos Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalia Tesón; Víctor H Conzonno; Marcelo F Arturi; Jorge L Frangi

    2014-01-01

    Water fluxes in tree plantations and other ecosystems carry dissolved organic carbon (DOC) provided by atmospheric inputs, autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms and from the lysis of dead material. These compounds may be colorless or provide a yellow-to-brown color to water and may also absorb visible light due to the presence of chromophores in the chemical...

  11. Development of a purification system at Dhruva to treat oil contaminated and chemically impure heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttraway, S.K.; Mishra, V.; Bitla, S.V.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Dhruva, a 100 MW (thermal) Research reactor uses Heavy Water as moderator, reflector and coolant. Normally during plant operation, the Heavy water from the system gets removed during operational and maintenance activities and this collected heavy water gets degraded and contaminated in the process. The degraded heavy water meeting the chemical specification requirement of the up gradation plant is sent for up gradation. Part of the Heavy water collected is contaminated with various organic and inorganic impurities and therefore cannot be sent for IP up gradation as it does not meet the chemical specification of the up gradation plant. This contaminated Heavy water was being stored in SS drums. Over the years of Reactor operation reasonable amount of contaminated Heavy water got collected in the plant. This Heavy water collected from leakages, during routine maintenance, operational activities and fuelling operation had tritium activity and variety of contamination including oil, chlorides, turbidity due to which the specific conductivity was very high. It was decided to purify this Heavy water in house to bring it up to up gradation plant chemical specification requirement. There were number of challenges in formulating a scheme to purify this Heavy water. The scheme needed to be simple and compact in design which could be set up in the plant itself. It should not pose radiological hazards due to radioactive Heavy water during its purification and handling. The contaminated Heavy water collected in drums had varying chemistry and IP. The purification plant should be able to do batch processing so that the different IP and chemical quality of Heavy water stored in different drums are not mixed during purification. It should be capable of removing the oil, chlorides, turbidity and decrease the conductivity to acceptable limits of the Up gradation plant. A purification plant was developed and commissioned after detail laboratory studies and trials. This paper explains

  12. Biogenic, urban, and wildfire influences on the molecular composition of dissolved organic compounds in cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ryan D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Peng, Zhuoyu; Boone, Eric; Chu, Rosalie K.; Dukett, James E.; Gunsch, Matthew J.; Zhang, Wuliang; Tolic, Nikola; Laskin, Alexander; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol formation and transformation occurs within aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets, yet little is known about the composition of high molecular weight organic compounds in cloud water. Cloud water samples collected at Whiteface Mountain, New York, during August-September 2014 were analyzed by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon, with a focus on sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Organic molecular composition was evaluated in the context of cloud water inorganic ion concentrations, pH, and total organic carbon concentrations to gain insights into the sources and aqueous-phase processes of the observed high molecular weight organic compounds. Cloud water acidity was positively correlated with the average oxygen : carbon ratio of the organic constituents, suggesting the possibility for aqueous acid-catalyzed (prior to cloud droplet activation or during/after cloud droplet evaporation) and/or radical (within cloud droplets) oxidation processes. Many tracer compounds recently identified in laboratory studies of bulk aqueous-phase reactions were identified in the cloud water. Organosulfate compounds, with both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound precursors, were detected for cloud water samples influenced by air masses that had traveled over forested and populated areas. Oxidation products of long-chain (C10-12) alkane precursors were detected during urban influence. Influence of Canadian wildfires resulted in increased numbers of identified sulfur-containing compounds and oligomeric species, including those formed through aqueous-phase reactions involving methylglyoxal. Light-absorbing aqueous-phase products of syringol and guaiacol oxidation were observed in the wildfire-influenced samples, and dinitroaromatic compounds were observed in all cloud water samples (wildfire, biogenic, and urban-influenced). Overall, the cloud water molecular composition depended on

  13. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO 2 photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO 2 photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  14. Will enhanced turbulence in inland waters result in elevated production of autochthonous dissolved organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhou, Jian; Jeppesen, Erik; Zhang, Yunlin; Qin, Boqiang; Shi, Kun; Tang, Xiangming; Han, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    Biological activity in lakes is strongly influenced by hydrodynamic conditions, not least turbulence intensity; which increases the encounter rate between plankter and nutrient patches. To investigate whether enhanced turbulence in shallow and eutrophic lakes may result in elevated biological production of autochthonous chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), a combination of field campaigns and mesocosm experiments was used. Parallel factor analysis identified seven components: four protein-like, one microbial humic-like and two terrestrial humic-like components. During our field campaigns, elevated production of autochthonous CDOM was recorded in open water with higher wind speed and wave height than in inner bays, implying that elevated turbulence resulted in increased production of autochthonous CDOM. Confirming the field campaign results, in the mesocosm experiment enhanced turbulence resulted in a remarkably higher microbial humic-like C1 and tryptophan-like C3 (pCDOM. This is consistent with the significantly higher mean concentrations of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the enhanced phytoplanktonic alkaline phosphatase activity (PAPA) recorded in the experimental turbulence groups than in the control group (pCDOM samples further suggested their probable autochthonous origin. Our results have implications for the understanding of CDOM cycling in shallow aquatic ecosystems influenced by wind-induced waves, in which the enhanced turbulence associated with extreme weather conditions may be further stimulated by the predicted global climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  16. A flow injection analyser conductometric coupled system for the field analysis of free dissolved CO{sub 2} and total dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinotti, Valter; Balordi, Marcella; Ciceri, Giovanni [RSE SpA - Environment and Sustainable Development Department, Milan (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    A flow injection analyser coupled with a gas diffusion membrane and a conductometric microdetector was adapted for the field analysis of natural concentrations of free dissolved CO{sub 2} and dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters and used in a number of field campaigns for marine water monitoring. The dissolved gaseous CO{sub 2} presents naturally, or that generated by acidification of the sample, is separated by diffusion using a hydrophobic semipermeable gas porous membrane, and the permeating gas is incorporated into a stream of deionised water and measured by means of an electrical conductometric microdetector. In order to make the system suitable and easy to use for in-field measurements aboard oceanographic ships, the single components of the analyser were compacted into a robust and easy to use system. The calibration of the system is carried out by using standard solutions of potassium bicarbonate at two concentration ranges. Calibration and sample measurements are carried out inside a temperature-constant chamber at 25 C and in an inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}). The detection and quantification limits of the method, evaluated as 3 and 10 times the standard deviation of a series of measurements of the matrix solution were 2.9 and 9.6 {mu}mol/kg of CO{sub 2}, respectively. Data quality for dissolved inorganic carbon was checked with replicate measurements of a certified reference material (A. Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego), both accuracy and repeatability were -3.3% and 10%, respectively. Optimization, performance qualification of the system and its application in various natural water samples are reported and discussed. In the future, the calibration step will be operated automatically in order to improve the analytical performance and the applicability will be increased in the course of experimental surveys carried out both in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Considering the present stage of

  17. Biosensor for detection of dissolved chromium in potable water: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Puja; Karn, Abhinav Kumar; Balasubramanian, P; Kale, Paresh G

    2017-08-15

    The unprecedented deterioration rate of the environmental quality due to rapid urbanization and industrialization causes a severe global health concern to both ecosystem and humanity. Heavy metals are ubiquitous in nature and being used extensively in industrial processes, the exposure to excessive levels could alter the biochemical cycles of living systems. Hence the environmental monitoring through rapid and specific detection of heavy metal contamination in potable water is of paramount importance. Various standard analytical techniques and sensors are used for the detection of heavy metals include spectroscopy and chromatographic methods along with electrochemical, optical waveguide and polymer based sensors. However, the mentioned techniques lack the point of care application as it demands huge capital cost as well as the attention of expert personnel for sample preparation and operation. Recent advancements in the synergetic interaction among biotechnology and microelectronics have advocated the biosensor technology for a wide array of applications due to its characteristic features of sensitivity and selectivity. This review paper has outlined the overview of chromium toxicity, conventional analytical techniques along with a particular emphasis on electrochemical based biosensors for chromium detection in potable water. This article emphasized porous silicon as a host material for enzyme immobilization and elaborated the working principle, mechanism, kinetics of an enzyme-based biosensor for chromium detection. The significant characteristics such as pore size, thickness, and porosity make the porous silicon suitable for enzyme entrapment. Further, several schemes on porous silicon-based immobilized enzyme biosensors for the detection of chromium in potable water are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of changes in water salinity on ammonium, calcium, dissolved inorganic carbon and influence on water/sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, P.

    2003-04-01

    The effect of a sudden increase in salinity from 10 to 37 in porewater concentration and the benthic fluxes of ammonium, calcium and dissolved inorganic carbon were studied in sediments of a small coastal lagoon, the Albufera d'Es Grau (Minorca Island, Spain). The temporal effects of the changes in salinity were examined over 17 days using a single diffusion-reaction model and a mass-balance approach. After the salinity change, NH 4+-flux to the water and Ca-flux toward sediments increased (NH 4+-flux: 5000-3000 μmol m -2 d -1 in seawater and 600/250 μmol m -2 d -1 in brackish water; Ca-flux: -40/-76 meq m -2 d -1 at S=37 and -13/-10 meq m -2 d -1 at S=10); however, later NH 4+-flux decreased in seawater, reaching values lower than in brackish water. In contrast, Ca-flux presented similar values in both conditions. The fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon, which were constant at S=10 (55/45 mmol m -2 d -1), increased during the experiment at S=37 (from ˜30 mmol m -2 d -1 immediately after salinity increase to ˜60 mmol m -2 d -1 after 17 days). In brackish conditions, NH 4+ and Ca 2+ fluxes were consistent with a single diffusion-reaction model that assumes a zero-order reaction for NH 4+ production and a first-order reaction for Ca 2+ production. In seawater, this model explained the Ca-flux observed, but did not account for the high initial flux of NH 4+. The mass balance for 17 days indicated a higher retention of NH 4+ in porewater in the littoral station in seawater conditions (9.5 mmol m -2 at S=37 and 1.6 mmol m -2 at S=10) and a significant reduction in the water consumption at both sites (5 mmol m -2 at S=37; 35/23 mmol m -2 at S=10). In contrast, accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon in porewater was lower in seawater incubations (-10/-1 meq m -2 at S=37; 50/90 meq m -2 at S=10) and was linked to a higher efflux of CO 2 to the atmosphere, because of calcium carbonate precipitation in water (675/500 meq m -2). These results indicate that increased

  19. Fouling Characteristics of Dissolved Organic Matter in Papermaking Process Water on Polyethersulfone Ultrafiltration Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpeng Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the papermaking industry, closure of process water (whitewater circuits has been used to reduce fresh water consumption. Membrane separation technology has potential for use in treating process water for recirculation. The purpose of this study was to reveal the fouling characteristics of a polyethersulfone (PES ultrafiltration membrane caused by dissolved organic matter (DOM in process water. Ultrafiltration membranes (UF and DAX ion exchange resins were applied to characterize the molecular weight (MW and hydrophilicity distribution of DOM. The interactions between various fractions of DOM and a PES ultrafiltration membrane were investigated. The membrane fouling characteristics were elucidated by examining the filtration resistances and linearized Herman’s blocking models. The results demonstrated that the membrane was fouled significantly by much of the MW distribution. The membrane was fouled more significantly by the low MW fraction rather than the high MW fraction. The filtration resistances and the fitted equation of Hermia’s laws indicated that hydrophilic organics were the main foulants. The hydrophilic organics partially block the membrane pores and form intermediate blocking, reducing the effective filtration area, while the hydrophobic organics form a gel layer or cake on the surface of the membrane.

  20. Dissolved gaseous mercury and mercury flux measurements in Mediterranean coastal waters: A short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantozzi L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a general agreement in the scientific community that the marine ecosystem can be a sink and/or source of the mercury that is cycling in the global environment, and current estimates of the global mercury budget for the Mediterranean region are affected by high uncertainty, primarily due to the little progress made so far in evaluating the role of chemical, physical and biological processes in the water system and in the lower atmosphere above the sea water (air-water interface. The lack of knowledge of the magnitude of the air-sea exchange mechanisms is, therefore, one of the main factors affecting the overall uncertainty associated with the assessment of net fluxes of Hg between the atmospheric and marine environments in the Mediterranean region. Results obtained during the last 15 years in the Mediterranean basin indicate the quantitative importance of such emission in the biogeochemical cycle of this element, highlighting the need for thorough investigations on the mechanisms of production and volatilization of dissolved gaseous mercury in waters.

  1. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  2. Using the soil and water assessment tool to estimate dissolved inorganic nitrogen water pollution abatement cost functions in central portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebeling, P C; Rocha, J; Nunes, J P; Fidélis, T; Alves, H; Fonseca, S

    2014-01-01

    Coastal aquatic ecosystems are increasingly affected by diffuse source nutrient water pollution from agricultural activities in coastal catchments, even though these ecosystems are important from a social, environmental and economic perspective. To warrant sustainable economic development of coastal regions, we need to balance marginal costs from coastal catchment water pollution abatement and associated marginal benefits from coastal resource appreciation. Diffuse-source water pollution abatement costs across agricultural sectors are not easily determined given the spatial heterogeneity in biophysical and agro-ecological conditions as well as the available range of best agricultural practices (BAPs) for water quality improvement. We demonstrate how the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) can be used to estimate diffuse-source water pollution abatement cost functions across agricultural land use categories based on a stepwise adoption of identified BAPs for water quality improvement and corresponding SWAT-based estimates for agricultural production, agricultural incomes, and water pollution deliveries. Results for the case of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) surface water pollution by the key agricultural land use categories ("annual crops," "vineyards," and "mixed annual crops & vineyards") in the Vouga catchment in central Portugal show that no win-win agricultural practices are available within the assessed BAPs for DIN water quality improvement. Estimated abatement costs increase quadratically in the rate of water pollution abatement, with largest abatement costs for the "mixed annual crops & vineyards" land use category (between 41,900 and 51,900 € tDIN yr) and fairly similar abatement costs across the "vineyards" and "annual crops" land use categories (between 7300 and 15,200 € tDIN yr). Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. The density behaviour of heavy oils in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2006-01-01

    The recent concern regarding the difficulty of cleaning up Low API gravity oils (LAPIO) spilled in water was discussed. Sinking and overwashing are 2 phenomena related to the behaviour of these heavy oils in water. Sinking refers to the complete submergence of the oil to the bottom of a waterbody, while over-washing refers to the overflowing of a layer of water over dense oil at sea when the oil is still close to the surface. The latter is important because even a micron-layer of water could render the oil undetectable, particularly at acute viewing angles, such as from a ship. This paper reviewed the properties of heavy oil, the prediction of density changes and the sinking/over-washing of heavy oil. In particular, it discussed a spill which occurred in August 2005 when 11 tank cars from train derailment spilled 800,000 litres of Bunker fuel mixed with high PAH-containing pole-treating oil into Lake Wabamun, Alberta. The behaviour of the oil included submergence, neutral buoyancy, resurfacing and formation of several types of aggregates of oil. This study summarized the behaviours and processes that transformed the particles of oil into small tar balls, larger logs, sheets, and large lumps into a slick. Sediment uptake or loss was found to be the major process that caused the changes in density. The behaviour of the oils was compared with respect to density and uptake of various types of sediment. The paper also reviewed the literature on dense oil behaviour. Weathering experiments performed on dense oils to determine if extensive weathering could render oils heavier than water showed that rarely is weathering the only factor in the bulk sinking of oil. Once an oil is submerged, little weathering occurs, either by dissolution or volatilization. The uptake of particulate matter is the most important process in increasing density. This study reviewed over-washing experiments to develop a mathematical solution of the conditions required for oil to be covered by a

  4. Consequence of potential accidents in heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, C.; Lazar, R.E.; Preda, I.A.; Dumitrescu, M.

    1998-01-01

    Heavy water plants realize the primary isotopic concentrations of water using H 2 O-H 2 S chemical exchange and they are chemical plants. As these plants are handling and spreading large quantities of hydrogen sulphide (high toxic, corrosive, flammable and explosive as) maintained in the process at relative high temperatures and pressures, it is required an assessing of risks associated with the potential accidents. The H 2 S released in atmosphere as a result of an accident will have negative consequences to property, population and environment. This paper presents a model of consequences quantitative assessment and its outcome for the most dangerous accident in heavy water plants. Several states of the art risk based methods were modified and linked together to form a proper model for this analyse. Five basic steps to identify the risks involved in operating the plants are followed: hazard identification, accident sequence development, H 2 S emissions calculus, dispersion analyses and consequences determination. A brief description of each step and some information of analysis results are provided. The accident proportions, the atmospheric conditions and the population density in the respective area were accounted for consequences calculus. The specific results of the consequences analysis allow to develop the plant's operating safety requirements so that the risk remain at an acceptable level. (authors)

  5. 20% inlet header break analysis of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Venkat Raj, V.; Singh, R.; Iyer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. A passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power levels, with no primary coolant pumps. Loss of coolant due to failure of inlet header results in depressurization of primary heat transport (PHT) system and containment pressure rise. Depressurization activates various protective and engineered safety systems like reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator, limiting the consequences of the event. This paper discusses the thermal hydraulic transient analysis for evaluating the safety of the reactor, following 20% inlet header break using RELAP5/MOD3.2. For the analysis, the system is discretized appropriately to simulate possible flow reversal in one of the core paths during the transient. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, steam quality and flow in different parts of the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. Flow and energy discharges into the containment are also estimated for use in containment analysis. (author)

  6. Observation on Heavy Metals in Sediment of Jakarta Bay Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rozak

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Observation on heavy metals in Jakarta Bay, from June and September 2003. Heavy metals Pb in sediment at the West have been conductet of Jakarta Bay Waters varied between Pb = 8,49-31,22 ppm, Cd = <0,001-0,47 ppm, Cu = 13,81-193,75 ppm, Zn = 82,18-533,59 ppm and Ni = 0,99-35,38 ppm,while those at the Center of Jakarta Bay, varied between Pb = 2,21-69,22 ppm, Cd = <0,001-0,28 ppm, Cu = 3,36-50,65 ppm, Zn = 71,13-230,54 ppm and Ni = 0,42-15,58 ppm and at the East of Jakarta Bay, Pb content varied between 0,25-77,42 ppm, Cd = <0,001-0,42 ppm, Cu = 0,79-44,94 ppm, Zn = 93,21-289,00 ppm and Ni = 0,42-128,47 ppm. Hevy metals content in sediment the West of Jakarta Bay was high of equivalent the Center and East of Jakarta Bay. At than those composition sediment at the west was black, that indicated high heavy metals content.

  7. Topical papers on heavy water, fuel fabrication and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A total of four papers is presented. The first contribution of the Federal Republic of Germany reviews the market situation for reactors and the relations between reactor producers and buyers as reflected in sales agreements. The second West German contribution gives a world-wide survey of fuel element production as well as of fuel and fuel element demand up to the year 2000. The Canadian paper discusses the future prospects of heavy-water production, while the Ecuador contribution deals with small and medium-sized nuclear power plants

  8. Core construction in a pressure tube type heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Aoki, Katsutada.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To replace a centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit with a reactor controlling machinery to decrease a distance between the fuel assemblies thereby saving use of heavy water and enhancing economy. Structure: A centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit, which is composed of a plurality of fuel assemblies orderly arranged in lattice fashion, is replaced with a reactor controlling members such as control rods, poison tubes and the like to provide an arrangement of lattice-free type fuel assembly, thus reducing the pitch as small as possible. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Search for neutron emission during the electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, P.R.P.; Saxena, R.N.; Morato, S.P.; Goldman, I.D.; Pinho, A.G. de; Nascimento, I.C.

    1990-03-01

    A liquid scintillator detector NE 213 with pulse shape discrimination technique was used to observe neutrons during the electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode. From the measured fore and background couting rates, a neutron emission rate of (8.2 ± 2.9) x 10 -3 n/(sec.g.) Pd was determined implying (2.9 ± 1.0) x 10 -24 fusions / [(dd pair).sec.] as compared to ≅ 10 -23 fusion/ [(dd pair).sec.] reported by Jones et al. using titanium electrode. (author) [pt

  10. Heavy metal removal from waste waters by ion flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, H; Erdogan, D

    2007-09-05

    Flotation studies were carried out to investigate the removal of heavy metals such as copper (II), zinc (II), chromium (III) and silver (I) from waste waters. Various parameters such as pH, collector and frother concentrations and airflow rate were tested to determine the optimum flotation conditions. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide were used as collectors. Ethanol and methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) were used as frothers. Metal removal reached about 74% under optimum conditions at low pH. At basic pH it became as high as 90%, probably due to the contribution from the flotation of metal precipitates.

  11. The spectrographic analysis of inorganic impurities in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J.; Normand, J.; Vie, R.

    1961-01-01

    Inorganic impurities in heavy water are determined by two spectrographic methods. First is described the copper-spark method which is sensitive and directly applicable, and is particular useful because of the absence of a support. Secondly the graphite impregnation method is given; this is used when the first method is not applicable (determination of copper) and for the alkali metals. For the usual elements, the sensitivity of the copper spark method is of the order of 0,1 μg/ml whereas for the graphite impregnation method the sensitivity is only 0,3 μg/ml. (author) [fr

  12. Advances in commercial heavy water reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Generating stations employing heavy water reactors have now firmly established an enviable record for reliable, economic electricity generation. Their designers recognize, however, that further improvements are both possible and necessary to ensure that this reactor type remains attractively competitive with alternative nuclear power systems and with fossil-fuelled generation plants. This paper outlines planned development thrusts in a number of important areas, viz., capital cost reduction, advanced fuel cycles, safety, capacity factor, life extension, load following, operator aida, and personnel radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Biologically labile photoproducts from riverine non-labile dissolved organic carbon in the coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasurinen, V.; Aarnos, H.; Vähätalo, A.

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the production of biologically labile photoproducts (BLPs) from non-labile riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC), we collected water samples from ten major rivers, removed labile DOC and mixed the residual non-labile DOC with artificial seawater for microbial and photochemical experiments. Bacteria grew on non-labile DOC with a growth efficiency of 11.5% (mean; range from 3.6 to 15.3%). Simulated solar radiation transformed a part of non-labile DOC into BLPs, which stimulated bacterial respiration and production, but did not change bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) compared to the non-irradiated dark controls. In the irradiated water samples, the amount of BLPs stimulating bacterial production depended on the photochemical bleaching of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The apparent quantum yields for BLPs supporting bacterial production ranged from 9.5 to 76 (mean 39) (μmol C mol photons-1) at 330 nm. The corresponding values for BLPs supporting bacterial respiration ranged from 57 to 1204 (mean 320) (μmol C mol photons-1). According to the calculations based on spectral apparent quantum yields and local solar radiation, the annual production of BLPs ranged from 21 (St. Lawrence) to 584 (Yangtze) mmol C m-2 yr-1 in the plumes of the examined rivers. Complete photobleaching of riverine CDOM in the coastal ocean was estimated to produce 10.7 Mt C BLPs yr-1 from the rivers examined in this study and globally 38 Mt yr-1 (15% of riverine DOC flux from all rivers), which support 4.1 Mt yr-1 of bacterial production and 33.9 Mt yr-1 bacterial respiration.

  14. Controls on stream water dissolved mercury in three mid-Appalachian forested headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Scanlon, Todd M.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the controls on dissolved mercury (HgD) transport is necessary to improve estimations of export from unmonitored watersheds and to forecast responses to changes in deposition and other environmental forcings. Stream water HgD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were evaluated over a range of discharge conditions in three streams within Shenandoah National Park, VA. Watersheds are distinguished by stream water pH (ranging from neutral to acidic) and soil size fractioning (ranging from clays to sands). At all sites, discharge was a significant but poor predictor of HgD concentrations (r2 from 0.13-0.52). HgD was strongly coupled with DOC at all sites (r2 from 0.74-0.89). UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), a proxy for DOC quantity and quality, slightly improved the predictions of HgD. Mean DOC quality differed between streams, with less aromatic DOC mobilized from the more acidic watershed. The site with less aromatic DOC and sandy soils mobilized more Hg to the stream for the same quantity and quality of DOC, likely due to the reduced capacity of the larger-grained soils to retain Hg, leaving a greater fraction associated with the organic matter. A similar amount of 0.54 ng HgD/mg DOC is transported at all sites, suggesting the less aromatic DOC transports less Hg per unit DOC, offsetting the effects of soil type. This research demonstrates that soil composition and DOC quality influence HgDexport. We also provide evidence that soil organic carbon is a primary control on Hg-DOC ratios (0.12-1.4 ng mg-1) observed across the U.S. and Sweden.

  15. Optical assessment of colored dissolved organic matter and its related parameters in dynamic coastal water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Varunan, Theenathayalan; Nagendra Jaiganesh, S. N.; Sahay, Arvind; Chauhan, Prakash

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of the curve of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and differentiation between marine and terrestrially derived CDOM pools in coastal environments are hampered by a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of CDOM, uncertainties in retrieved remote sensing reflectance and the weak signal-to-noise ratio of space-borne instruments. In the present study, a hybrid model is presented along with empirical methods to remotely determine the amount and type of CDOM in coastal and inland water environments. A large set of in-situ data collected on several oceanographic cruises and field campaigns from different regional waters was used to develop empirical methods for studying the distribution and dynamics of CDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and salinity. Our validation analyses demonstrated that the hybrid model is a better descriptor of CDOM absorption spectra compared to the existing models. Additional spectral slope parameters included in the present model to differentiate between terrestrially derived and marine CDOM pools make a substantial improvement over those existing models. Empirical algorithms to derive CDOM, DOC and salinity from remote sensing reflectance data demonstrated success in retrieval of these products with significantly low mean relative percent differences from large in-situ measurements. The performance of these algorithms was further assessed using three hyperspectral HICO images acquired simultaneously with our field measurements in productive coastal and lagoon waters on the southeast part of India. The validation match-ups of CDOM and salinity showed good agreement between HICO retrievals and field observations. Further analyses of these data showed significant temporal changes in CDOM and phytoplankton absorption coefficients with a distinct phase shift between these two products. Healthy phytoplankton cells and macrophytes were recognized to directly contribute to the

  16. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  17. Fluoride content in water in and around heavy water plant Manuguru colony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, C.; Dubey, S.K.; Reddy, A.R.; Ravi Kumar, T.S.P.; Selvaraj, S.

    1996-01-01

    Fluoride concentration in water used for human consumption has significant importance with respect to its toxic effects. Hence there was a need for analysing fluoride concentration in drinking water primarily used at Heavy water Plant, Manuguru (HWP (M)) colony and its nearby villages. We found that at HWP (M) colony there is not much variation in the fluoride concentration. However, nearby villages are having wide variation from 0.79 to 5.1 ppm. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  18. Correlation between conductivity and total dissolved solid in various type of water: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusydi, Anna F.

    2018-02-01

    Conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) are water quality parameters, which are used to describe salinity level. These two parameters are correlated and usually expressed by a simple equation: TDS = k EC (in 25 °C). The process of obtaining TDS from water sample is more complex than that of EC. Meanwhile, TDS analysis is very important because it can illustrate groundwater quality, particularly in understanding the effect of seawater intrusion better than EC analysis. These conditions make research in revealing TDS/EC ratios interesting to do. By finding the ratio value, TDS concentration can be measured easily from EC value. However, the ratio cannot be defined easily. Previous research results have found that the correlation between TDS and EC are not always linear. The ratio is not only strongly influenced by salinity contents, but also by materials contents. Furthermore, the analysis of TDS concentration from EC value can be used to give an overview of water quality. For more precision, TDS concentrations need to be analyzed using the gravimetric method in the laboratory.

  19. Water conservation by 3 R's - case histories of Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A.K.; Hiremath, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    The basics of water conservation revolve around three R's of Reduce, Recycle, and Reuse. The Heavy Water Plants are an excellent example of water savings, and these case studies will be of interest to the chemical industry. The issues involved with water conservation and re-use in different Heavy Water Plants are of different nature. In H 2 S-H 2 O process plants the water consumption has been substantially decreased as compared to the design water needs. To quote the figures HWP (Kota) was designed to consume 2280 m 3 /hr water, which included 453 m 3 /hr water as feed for deuterium extraction. Today the plant operates with only 1250 m 3 /hr water while processing 500 m 3 /hr feed; and is headed to decrease the total water consumption to 700 m 3 /hr. Similarly at HWP (Manuguru) the design had provided 5600 m 3 /hr water consumption, which is today operating with only 1750 m 3 /hr and poised to operate with 1600 m 3 /hr. The issues of water conservation in Ammonia Hydrogen exchange plants have an additional dimension since water losses mean direct loss of heavy water production. In adjoining ammonia plants deuterium shifts to steam in the reformer and shift converter, and this excess steam is condensed as rich condensate. It becomes incumbent on the fertilizer plant to maintain a tight discipline for conserving and re-using the rich condensate so that deuterium concentration in the synthesis gas is maintained. Efforts are also underway to utilize rich condensate of GSFC in the newly developed technology of water ammonia exchange at HWP (Baroda) and we are targeting 20% production gains by implementation of this scheme and with no increase in the pollution load. These case histories will be of interest to Chemical Process Industry. (author)

  20. The impacts of prescribed moorland burning on water colour and dissolved organic carbon: a critical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, J; Chapman, P J; Palmer, S M; Kay, P; Grayson, R

    2012-06-30

    Discolouration of natural surface waters due to the humic component of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a costly problem for water supply companies. This paper reviews what is known about the impacts of prescribed moorland vegetation burning on water colour. Relevant research has taken place at three scales: laboratory experiments on peat cores, plot scale sampling of soil waters and catchment scale sampling of stream waters. While laboratory studies suggest burning increases colour production, the evidence from catchment and plot studies is contradictory. Plot studies suggest colour production may decrease or remain unchanged following burning although there is evidence for some transient changes. Catchment studies suggest prescribed moorland burning causes stream water colour to increase, although in most cases the evidence is not clear cut since most studies could not clearly disentangle the effects of burning from those of vegetation cover. The differences in findings between plot and catchment studies may be explained by: i) the short-term nature of some studies which do not measure long-term response and recovery times to burning; ii) the lack of colour measurements from shallow soil depths which contribute more to streamflow than soil water from deeper in the peat; and iii) the possibility of hydrological interactions occurring between different experimental plots at some sites. Additionally, the increase in recent patch burning in some catchments that has been statistically attributed by some authors to increases in stream water colour cannot be reconciled with theoretical calculations. When dilution with waters derived from other parts of the catchment are taken into account, large values of colour have to be theoretically derived from those recently burnt areas that occupy a small proportion of the catchment area in order to balance the change in stream water colour observed in recent years. Therefore, much further process-based work is required to

  1. The effects of fire temperatures on water soluble heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.; Ubeda, X.; Martin, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Fire ash are majority composed by base cations, however the mineralized organic matter, led also available to transport a higher quantity of heavy metals that potentially could increase a toxicity in soil and water resources. The amount availability of these elements depend on the environment were the fire took place, burning temperature and combusted tree specie. The soil and water contamination from fire ash has been neglected, because the majority of studies are focused on base cations dynamic. Our research, beside contemplate major elements, is focused in to study the behavior of heavy metals released from ash slurries created at several temperatures under laboratory environment, prescribed fires and wildland fires. The results presented in these communication are preliminary and study the presence of Aluminium (Al3+), Manganese (Mn2+), Iron (Fe2+) and Zinc (Zn2+) of ash slurries generated in laboratory environment at several temperatures (150°, 200°, 250°, 300°, 350°, 400°,450°, 500°, 550°C) from Quercus suber, Quercus robur, Pinus pinea and Pinus pinaster and from a low medium temperature prescribed fire in a forest dominated Quercus suber trees. We observed that ash produced at lower and medium temperatures (Pinus ashes. Fe2+ and Zn2+ showed a reduced concentration in test solution in relation to unburned sample at all temperatures of exposition. In the results obtained from prescribed fire, we identify a higher release of Al3+ and a decrease of the remain elements. The solubilization of these elements are related with pH levels and ash calcite content, because their ability to capture ions in solution. Moreover, the amount and the type of ions released in relation to unburned sample vary in each specie. In this study Al3+ release is related with Quercus species and Mn2+ with Pinus species. Fire ashes can be an environmental problem, because at long term can increase soil acidity. After all base cations have being leached, pH values decrease, and

  2. The Influence of Water Circulation on Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in Bald Head Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrasse, M. C.; Osburn, C. L.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; He, R.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in biogeochemical cycles in estuaries such as tidal creeks draining coastal wetlands such as salt marshes. However, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the quantity and quality of the DOM that tidally exchanges between salt marshes and their adjacent estuaries. Tidal movements play a central role in lateral exchanges of materials and bidirectional flow results in the mixing of DOM from marsh plants and estuarine DOM. The aim of this study was to better understand the role of water circulation on the distribution and quality of DOM in Bald Head Creek, a tributary to the Cape Fear River estuary in eastern North Carolina. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, stable carbon isotopes, and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorbance at 254 nm (a254) were used to distinguish between DOM quantity and quality at three locations along the creek: Site 3 (upstream), Site 2 (middle stream), and Site 1 (near the creek mouth). Samples were collected over four tidal cycles between March-August 2016 and compared to time series data collected approximately weekly from 2014-2016. DOM characteristics differed substantially over the tidal cycle. Higher CDOM and DOC concentration were observed at low tide than at high tide at all three sites, suggesting greater export of carbon from the marsh into the creek as the tides recede. Analysis of CDOM quality based on specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) and spectral slope ratio (SR) showed that the marsh end-member (Site 3) source of DOM had greater aromaticity and higher molecular weight. Site 1 showed greater variability over the tidal cycle most likely due to a greater tidal influence, being closer to the mouth. Additionally, an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) and a hydrodynamic model were used to map water circulation and DOC concentration along the creek to compute exchanges with the adjacent estuary. Results suggest that estuarine OM dynamics are strongly controlled by

  3. Photochemical Degradation of Petroleum-Derived Water-Soluble Organics into the Background Dissolved Organic Carbon Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, D. C.; Ray, P. Z.; Roland, N. V.; Corilo, Y. E.; Tarr, M. A.; Guillemette, F.; Spencer, R. G.

    2016-02-01

    Water-soluble organic (WSO) photoproducts produced from Macondo crude oil (MC252) and a heavy fuel oil (HFO), a surrogate for that which was spilled into the San Francisco Bay by the M/V Cosco Busan, were isolated and irradiated with simulated sunlight to examine the photochemical fate of the products in aquatic ecosystems. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) reveals marked transformations in the elemental composition of WSOs at specific irradiation periods across a time series that correspond with shifts in bulk properties determined with optical measurements. Blue shifts in EEMs spectra correlate with an increase in formulas classified as unsaturated, high oxygen while the polyphenols and unsaturated, low oxygen compounds decrease. The characteristic A and C humic- and fulvic-like FDOM signatures begin to appear in the EEM spectra of WSOs that were irradiated for as little as 8 to 12 hours, the equivalent of 2 to 3 days of natural sunlight. The presence of the A and C signatures correlate to elemental compositions that exhibit a further decrease in the unsaturated, low oxygen and subsequent increase of unsaturated, high oxygen and highly oxygenated aliphatic compounds. Furthermore, van Krevelen plots reveal a shift toward the compositional space associated with carboxyl-rich aromatic moieties (CRAM) as a function of irradiation period and the appearance of the humic- and fulvic-like FDOM signatures in the EEM spectra. Although the photodegraded WSO products show similarities in FDOM and elemental composition to representative natural dissolved organic matter from their respective pools, persistent petroleum signatures that are not photoactive are still detected. Future studies are required to examine the bioavailability of these photodegraded WSO products to determine if they degrade or persist in the environment.

  4. Heavy water isotopic rectification in the ''ORPHEE'' reactor. SACLAY studies Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeune, P.; Breant, P.

    1993-01-01

    ORPHEE reactor supplies neutron beams, which are got back in a heavy water reflector. The neutron beams intensity depends on the reflector quality which is determined by the isotopic content of the heavy water. The deuterium submitted to core irradiation changes in radioactive tritium which must be eliminated largely for reasons of safety. The column must keep the heavy water isotopic content of the reflector to a value higher than 99.8% by eliminating light water by fractional distillation or rectification. This column is also used for the tritium elimination of heavy water. 13 figs

  5. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  6. Determination of colloidal and dissolved silver in water samples using colorimetric solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, April A; Lipert, Robert J; Porter, Marc D

    2010-03-15

    The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to resurgence in the use of silver as a biocidal agent in applications ranging from washing machine additives to the drinking water treatment system on the International Space Station (ISS). However, growing concerns about the possible toxicity of colloidal silver to bacteria, aquatic organisms and humans have led to recently issued regulations by the US EPA and FDA regarding the usage of silver. As part of an ongoing project, we have developed a rapid, simple method for determining total silver, both ionic (silver(I)) and colloidal, in 0.1-1mg/L aqueous samples, which spans the ISS potable water target of 0.3-0.5mg/L (total silver) and meets the US EPA limit of 0.1mg/L in drinking water. The method is based on colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) and involves the extraction of silver(I) from water samples by passage through a solid-phase membrane impregnated with the colorimetric reagent DMABR (5-[4-(dimethylamino)benzylidene]rhodanine). Silver(I) exhaustively reacts with impregnated DMABR to form a colored compound, which is quantified using a handheld diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Total silver is determined by first passing the sample through a cartridge containing Oxone, which exhaustively oxidizes colloidal silver to dissolved silver(I). The method, which takes less than 2 min to complete and requires only approximately 1 mL of sample, has been validated through a series of tests, including a comparison with the ICP-MS analysis of a water sample from ISS that contained both silver(I) and colloidal silver. Potential earth-bound applications are also briefly discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pollution of south of Tehran ground waters with heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmasi, R.; Tavassoli, A.

    2006-01-01

    The reuse of nutrients and organic matter in wastewater sludge via on agricultural lands application is a desirable goal. However, trace or heavy metals present in sludge pose the risk of human or phyto toxicity from land application. The aim of this research is possibility of ground water pollution of south of Tehran because of ten years irrigation with Ni, Cd and Pb borne waste water. For this purpose, 6 soil samples from southern parts of Tehran city and 2 ones from Zanjan city without lime and organic matter were selected. The soils differed in their texture from sandy to clayey. Each soil sample in duplicate and uniformly packed into PVC columns. Soil samples were irrigated with Cd, Pb and Ni-added wastewater. After irrigating, the columns were cut and the soils separated from sectioned pieces and their heavy metal concentrations (Pb, Cd and Ni) were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer y use of HNO 3 , 4N solution. Because of high sorption capacity of these elements by soils, these metals were accumulated in surface layer of the soils. Movement in the soils without lime and organic matter were as low as other samples. Ni has had the most accumulation or the least vertical movement, and Pb the opposite ones

  8. A new catalyst for heavy water production and its prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshio; Ohkoshi, Sumio; Takahashi, Tomiki

    1978-01-01

    The heavy water production process utilizing isotope exchange reaction between liquid water and hydrogen is the most promising method. Study was made for developing highly active and long life catalyst practically applied for this process. As platinum is used as this catalyst, catalytic activities using varieties of Polapacs and Shodexes instead of active carbon as the carriers of platinum catalyst were investigated. It became clear that the catalytic activity using Pt/Shodex 104 (3 wt %) was 1000 times as high as the activity using Pt/active carbon (1 wt %). This method is considered to be reasonable enough economically. There are many problems which must be solved hereafter for its practical use, and the further studies are required regarding the following points; forming of catalyst, life of catalyst, mass production of catalyst, most appropriate counter flow reacting device of hydrophobic catalyst, pressure and temperature effects on reaction. (Kobatake, H.)

  9. Conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactor with heavy water coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibi, Kohki; Shimada, Shoichiro; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi; Wada, Shigeyuki

    2001-12-01

    The conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactors, i.e. advanced water-cooled reactors using plutonium mixed-oxide fuel with high conversion ratios more than 1.0 and negative void reactivity coefficients, has been carried out. The core is designed on the concept of a pressurized water reactor with a heavy water coolant and a triangular tight lattice fuel pin arrangement. The seed fuel assembly has an internal blanket region inside the seed fuel region as well as upper and lower blanket regions (i.e. an axial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket fuel assemblies are introduced in a checkerboard pattern among the seed fuel assemblies (i.e. a radial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket region is shorter than the seed fuel region. This study shows that the heavy water moderated core can achieve negative void reactivity coefficients and conversion ratios of 1.06-1.11.

  10. High converter pressurized water reactor with heavy water as a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Reyev, D.

    1983-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in water breeder and high converter reactors. The increase in the conversion ratio of these reactors is obtained by hardening the neutron spectrum achieved by tightening the reactor's lattice. Another way of hardening the neutron spectrum is to replace the light water with heavy water. Two pressurized water reactor fuel cycles that use heavy water as a coolant are considered. The first fuel cycle is based on plutonium and depleted uranium, and the second cycle is based on plutonium and enriched uranium. The uranium ore and separative work unit (SWU) requirements are calculated as well as the fuel cycle cost. The savings in uranium ore are about40 and 60% and about40% in SWU for both fuel cycles considered

  11. Photomineralization and photomethanification of dissolved organic matter in Saguenay River surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Xie, H.

    2015-11-01

    Rates and apparent quantum yields of photomineralization (AQYDOC) and photomethanification (AQYCH4) of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Saguenay River surface water were determined at three widely differing dissolved oxygen concentrations ([O2]) (suboxic, air saturation, and oxygenated) using simulated-solar radiation. Photomineralization increased linearly with CDOM absorbance photobleaching for all three O2 treatments. Whereas the rate of photochemical dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loss increased with increasing [O2], the ratio of fractional DOC loss to fractional absorbance loss showed an inverse trend. CDOM photodegradation led to a higher degree of mineralization under suboxic conditions than under oxic conditions. AQYDOC determined under oxygenated, suboxic, and air-saturated conditions increased, decreased, and remained largely constant with photobleaching, respectively; AQYDOC obtained under air saturation with short-term irradiations could thus be applied to longer exposures. AQYDOC decreased successively from ultraviolet B (UVB) to ultraviolet A (UVA) to visible (VIS), which, alongside the solar irradiance spectrum, points to VIS and UVA being the primary drivers for photomineralization in the water column. The photomineralization rate in the Saguenay River was estimated to be 2.31 × 108 mol C yr-1, accounting for only 1 % of the annual DOC input into this system. Photoproduction of CH4 occurred under both suboxic and oxic conditions and increased with decreasing [O2], with the rate under suboxic conditions ~ 7-8 times that under oxic conditions. Photoproduction of CH4 under oxic conditions increased linearly with photomineralization and photobleaching. Under air saturation, 0.00057 % of the photochemical DOC loss was diverted to CH4, giving a photochemical CH4 production rate of 4.36 × 10-6 mol m-2 yr-1 in the Saguenay River and, by extrapolation, of (1.9-8.1) × 108 mol yr-1 in the global ocean. AQYCH4 changed little with

  12. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

  13. Competitive sorption of heavy metals by water hyacinth roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Liu, Hou-Qi; Feng, Hui-Min; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Lam, Paul Kwan-Sing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a global issue severely constraining aquaculture practices, not only deteriorating the aquatic environment but also threatening the aquaculture production. One promising solution is adopting aquaponics systems where a synergy can be established between aquaculture and aquatic plants for metal sorption, but the interactions of multiple metals in such aquatic plants are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the absorption behaviors of Cu(II) and Cd(II) in water by water hyacinth roots in both single- and binary-metal systems. Cu(II) and Cd(II) were individually removed by water hyacinth roots at high efficiency, accompanied with release of protons and cations such as Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ . However, in a binary-metal arrangement, the Cd(II) sorption was significantly inhibited by Cu(II), and the higher sorption affinity of Cu(II) accounted for its competitive sorption advantage. Ionic exchange was identified as a predominant mechanism of the metal sorption by water hyacinth roots, and the amine and oxygen-containing groups are the main binding sites accounting for metal sorption via chelation or coordination. This study highlights the interactive impacts of different metals during their sorption by water hyacinth roots and elucidates the underlying mechanism of metal competitive sorption, which may provide useful implications for optimization of phytoremediation system and development of more sustainable aquaculture industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of potential climate change impacts on peatland dissolved organic carbon release and drinking water treatment from laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, R.; Clark, J.M.; Bond, T.; Graham, N.; Hughes, D.; Freeman, C.

    2013-01-01

    Catchments draining peat soils provide the majority of drinking water in the UK. Over the past decades, concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have increased in surface waters. Residual DOC can cause harmful carcinogenic disinfection by-products to form during water treatment processes. Increased frequency and severity of droughts combined with and increased temperatures expected as the climate changes, have potentials to change water quality. We used a novel approach to investigate links between climate change, DOC release and subsequent effects on drinking water treatment. We designed a climate manipulation experiment to simulate projected climate changes and monitored releases from peat soil and litter, then simulated coagulation used in water treatment. We showed that the ‘drought’ simulation was the dominant factor altering DOC release and affected the ability to remove DOC. Our results imply that future short-term drought events could have a greater impact than increased temperature on DOC treatability. - Highlights: ► We model realistic temperature and moisture changes on peat and surface vegetation. ► Quantity, quality and treatability changes of dissolved organic carbon were examined. ► Moisture has significantly greater influence than temperature on DOC production. ► Dry conditions alter treatability of DOC released from surface litter. ► Droughts have greater impact on water treatment than short-term heat waves alone. - Future drought events are likely to alter soil moisture, which predominately controls production of peat-derived dissolved organic carbon and subsequently drinking water quality.

  16. Ps laser pulse induced stimulated Raman scattering of ammonium nitrate dissolved in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V. Rakesh; Kiran, P. Prem

    2018-04-01

    An intense picosecond laser pulse focused into a liquid medium generates a shock wave in the focal region. This shock wave while propagating into the medium varies the pressure and temperature of the liquid locally leading to the appearance of novel phases which are manifested by the appearance of Raman peaks. We present the phase changes of ammonium nitrate (AN) dissolved in water by studying the forward and backward stimulated Raman Scattering (FSRS and BSRS) signals due to propagation of 30 ps laser pulse induced shockwaves. The dominant peak corresponding to the NO3- symmetric stretching mode is observed with a Raman shift of 1045 cm-1 which represents phase IV of AN with an orthogonal crystalline structure. Apart from this peak, the dominant mode of liquid phase of water with a Raman shift of 3400 cm-1 and an ice VII peak at a Raman shift of 3050 cm-1 confirming the pressure of 10 GPa is observed. The effect of the concentration and input energy on the appearance of the phases will be presented.

  17. Procedure to remove dissolved nickel and/or radium compounds from water and facility therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moravec, J.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved nickel and/or radium compounds are removed from water on a granular material such as quartz sand, crushed coal or granulated MnO 2 whose surface contains oxides of manganese MnO x . The compounds to be removed are adsorbed into the MnO x layer. Subsequently the adsorbed compounds are desorbed with a reductant, such as sodium sulfite, which is present in a concentration forming a redox potential of -5 to -120 mV, and with a solution of sodium polyphosphate, such as sodium hexametaphosphate (NaPO 3 ) n . Two variants are possible: either MnO x is first acted upon with the reductant and subsequently with the polyphosphate, or a mixed solution of the two agents is used. The excess of the agents is removed with water or with a KMnO 4 solution at 0.001 to 25 g/L. The granular material as well as the agent solutions (after concentration) are reusable. (P.A.)

  18. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  19. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a more finely resolved vertical profile, allowing for a more complete understanding of lacustrine methane dynamics.

  20. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) profile during backwashing cycle of drinking water biofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin; Yu, Guozhong; Zhang, Huining; Xu, Jinli

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation was made in this study on the variation of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) during a whole backwashing cycle of the biofiltration for drinking water treatment. In such a cycle, the normalized DON concentration (C(effluent)/C(influent)) was decreased from 0.98 to 0.90 in the first 1.5h, and then gradually increased to about 1.5 in the following 8h. Finally, it remained stable until the end of this 24-hour cycle. This clearly 3-stage profile of DON could be explained by three aspects as follows: (1) the impact of the backwashing on the biomass and the microbial activity; (2) the release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) during the biofiltration; (3) the competition between heterotrophic bacteria and nitrifying bacteria. All the facts supported that more DON was generated during later part of the backwashing cycle. The significance of the conclusion is that the shorter backwashing intervals between backwashing for the drinking water biofilter should further decrease the DON concentration in effluent of biofilter. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  2. A degassing instrument for analysing CO2 dissolved in natural water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Brian; Pfrang, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Arising from our EGU 2017 presentation (http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/posters/20564, X2 352), interest has been expressed in its application to the analysis of the hydrocarbonate ion [HCO3-] in atmospheric water. Arising from the historic difficulty in analysing the aqueous [HCO3-] ion ('it is in all our reagents', pers. comm. UK laboratory) the classic determination has been to measure a suite of other anions and cations including [H+] via pH, and to treat the balance of negative charge as a measure of [HCO3-]. From this balance, dissolved CO2 can be inferred via the dissociation constant as published for pure water. CO2 + H2O ⇓♢[HCO3-] + [H+] K1 = 4.2 x 10-7 Our EGU 2016 presentation sought to determine how the ionic environment in 263 UK rain samples can influence the above equilibrium, which is work in progress. In the mean time we have received the following expression of interest from an atmospheric science advisory group. …….. is very interested in the role of H-carbonate in the ion balance of precipitation. They have had some discussions recently about the best approach to infer H-carbonate currently discussing the possibility of sending you samples from other locations for analysis. We have duly offered to use our degassing instrument to corroborate current analyses in a batch of 'blind' samples, and to provide a design for a basic degasser that water quality laboratories could evaluate in house. This paper therefore presents a circuit for degassing CO2 from water samples irrespective of whether in atmospheric equilibrium or supersaturated, including a prototype 4-way distribution and collection valve which it is hoped will make the analysis intuitive and therefore open to automation.

  3. Modeled Sources, Transport, and Accumulation of Dissolved Solids in Water Resources of the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W

    2011-10-01

    Information on important source areas for dissolved solids in streams of the southwestern United States, the relative share of deliveries of dissolved solids to streams from natural and human sources, and the potential for salt accumulation in soil or groundwater was developed using a SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes model. Predicted area-normalized reach-catchment delivery rates of dissolved solids to streams ranged from Salton Sea accounting unit.

  4. 76 FR 52994 - Application for a License To Export Heavy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Heavy Water Pursuant to 10 CFR... (liters). producing an active water). pharmaceutical ingredient known as CTP-499, which incorporates heavy water as the source of deuterium to achieve the hydrogen-deuterium exchange. November 30, 2010 December...

  5. Titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for in situ measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in fresh and marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Bennett, William W.

    2010-01-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in fresh and marine waters is reported. The new method, which uses a commercially available titanium dioxide based adsorbent (Metsorb), was evaluated and compared to the well-established fer...

  6. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  7. Development and implementation of the heavy water program at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davloor, R.; Bourassa, C.

    2014-01-01

    Bruce Power operates 8 pressurized heavy water reactor units requiring more than 6000 mega grams (Mg) of heavy water. A Heavy Water Management Program that has been developed to administer this asset over the past 3 years. Through a corporate management system the Program provides governance, oversight and support to the stations. It is implemented through organizational structure, program and procedure documents and an information management system that provides benchmarked metrics, business intelligence and analytics for decision making and prediction. The program drives initiatives such as major maintenance activities, capital programs, detritiation strategies and ensures heavy water systems readiness for outages and rehabilitation of units. (author)

  8. Development and implementation of the heavy water program at Bruce Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davloor, R.; Bourassa, C., E-mail: ram.davloor@brucepower.com, E-mail: carl.bourassa@brucepower.com [Bruce Power, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Bruce Power operates 8 pressurized heavy water reactor units requiring more than 6000 mega grams (Mg) of heavy water. A Heavy Water Management Program that has been developed to administer this asset over the past 3 years. Through a corporate management system the Program provides governance, oversight and support to the stations. It is implemented through organizational structure, program and procedure documents and an information management system that provides benchmarked metrics, business intelligence and analytics for decision making and prediction. The program drives initiatives such as major maintenance activities, capital programs, detritiation strategies and ensures heavy water systems readiness for outages and rehabilitation of units. (author)

  9. Treatment of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water stored at Darlington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A.; Williams, D.

    2010-01-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) has accumulated over 48 drums of chemistry laboratory waste arising from analysis of heavy water (D 2 O). Several organic, including Arsenazo III, and inorganic contaminants present in these drums results in high total organic carbon (TOC) and conductivity. These drums have not been processed due to uncertainties related to clean-up of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water. This paper provides details of chemical characterization as well as bench scale studies performed to demonstrate the feasibility of treating the downgraded D 2 O to the stringent target specifications of <1 ppm TOC and <0.1mS/m conductivity, required for feed to the Station Upgrading Plant (SUP). Both ionic organic species such as glycolate, acetate and formate as well as neutral organics such as acetone, methanol and ethylene glycol were detected in all the samples. Morpholine and propylene glycol were detected in one sample. Arsenazo III was determined to be not a major contaminant (maximum 8.4 ppm) in these waste drums, compared to the other organic contaminants present. Various unit processes such as pH adjustment, granular activated carbon (GAC), ion exchange resin (IX), UV-peroxide oxidation (UV-H 2 O 2 ) treatments, nanofiltration (NF) as well as reverse osmosis (RO) were tested on a bench scale both singly as well as in various combinations to evaluate their ability to achieve the stringent target conductivity and TOC specifications. Among the various bench scale tests evaluated, the successive processing train used at DNGS and consisting of GAC+IX+UV/H 2 O 2 +IX (polishing) unit operations was found to meet target specifications for both conductivity and TOC. Unit processes comprising (GAC+IX) and (RO-double pass + GAC+IX) met conductivity targets but failed to meet TOC specifications. The results of GAC+IX tests clearly emphasize the importance of using low flow rates for successful reduction in both conductivity as well as TOC. Detailed

  10. Accumulation of dissolved gases at hydrophobic surfaces in water and sodium chloride solutions: Implications for coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, M.A.; Nguyen, A.V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Division of Chemical Engineering

    2009-08-15

    Dissolved gases can preferentially accumulate at the hydrophobic solid-water interface as revealed by neutron reflectivity measurements. In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine accumulation of dissolved gases at a hydrophobic surface in water and sodium chloride solutions. The solvent-exchange method was used to artificially form gaseous domains accumulated at the interface suitable for AFM imaging. Smooth graphite surfaces were used as model surfaces to minimize the secondary effect of surface roughness on the imaging. The concentration of NaCl up to 1 M was found to have a negligible influence on the geometry and population of pre-existing nanobubbles, nanopancakes and nanobubble-nanopancake composites. The implications of the findings on coal flotation in saline water are discussed in terms of attraction between hydrophobic surfaces in water, bubble-particle attachment and hydrophobic coagulation between particles.

  11. The conservative behavior of dissolved organic carbon in surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean, during early summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuki; Takesue, Nobuyuki; Nishioka, Jun; Kondo, Yoshiko; Ooki, Atsushi; Kuma, Kenshi; Hirawake, Toru; Yamashita, Youhei

    2016-09-23

    The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by ultraviolet-visible absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy were measured in surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea, western Arctic Ocean, during the early summer of 2013. Neither the DOC concentration nor the optical parameters of the DOM correlated with salinity. Principal component analysis using the DOM optical parameters clearly separated the DOM sources. A significant linear relationship was evident between the DOC and the principal component score for specific water masses, indicating that a high DOC level was related to a terrigenous source, whereas a low DOC level was related to a marine source. Relationships between the DOC and the principal component scores of the surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea implied that the major factor controlling the distribution of DOC concentrations was the mixing of plural water masses rather than local production and degradation.

  12. Solution enthalpies of alkali metal halides in water and heavy water mixtures with dimethyl sulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Solution enthalpies of CsF, LiCl, NaI, CsI and some other halides of alkali metals and tetrabutylammonium have been measured by the method of calorimetry. Standard solution enthalpies of all alkali metals (except rubidium) halides in water and heavy water mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide at 298.15 K have been calculated. Isotopic effects in solvation enthalpy of the electrolytes mentioned in aqueous solutions of dimethylsulfoxide have been discussed. 29 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Method for separation of water from bituminous shales, etc. [water-free heavy product and water-containing light product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsing, G H

    1908-10-13

    The method is characterized by conducting all the products of distillation, coming from the retorts, into a controllable system of condensation. This system of condensation is so constructed that the products of distillation are cooled to such a temperature that only the water-free heavy distillates are being condensed, and is furthermore so constructed that the other products of distillation, not yet condensed, are being condensed in an ordinary system of coolers. The purpose is to separate the distillates into a water-free heavy product and a water-containing lighter product. The patent includes an additional claim.

  14. Pollution Status of Pakistan: A Retrospective Review on Heavy Metal Contamination of Water, Soil, and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Waseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water, soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health.

  15. Deepwater Horizon oil in Gulf of Mexico waters after 2 years: transformation into the dissolved organic matter pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas S; Osburn, Christopher; Shields, Michael R; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Young, Jordan; Guo, Laodong; Zhou, Zhengzhen

    2014-08-19

    Recent work has shown the presence of anomalous dissolved organic matter (DOM), with high optical yields, in deep waters 15 months after the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Here, we continue to use the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) technique coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling, measurements of bulk organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), oil indices, and other optical properties to examine the chemical evolution and transformation of oil components derived from the DWH in the water column of the GOM. Seawater samples were collected from the GOM during July 2012, 2 years after the oil spill. This study shows that, while dissolved organic carbon (DOC) values have decreased since just after the DWH spill, they remain higher at some stations than typical deep-water values for the GOM. Moreover, we continue to observe fluorescent DOM components in deep waters, similar to those of degraded oil observed in lab and field experiments, which suggest that oil-related fluorescence signatures, as part of the DOM pool, have persisted for 2 years in the deep waters. This supports the notion that some oil-derived chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) components could still be identified in deep waters after 2 years of degradation, which is further supported by the lower DIC and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) associated with greater amounts of these oil-derived components in deep waters, assuming microbial activity on DOM in the current water masses is only the controlling factor of DIC and pCO2 concentrations.

  16. Changes in Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon Affect Reconstructed History and Projected Future Trends in Surface Water Acidification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hruška, Jakub; Krám, Pavel; Moldan, Filip; Oulehle, Filip; Evans, C. D.; Wright, R. F.; Cosby, B. J.; Kopáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 7 (2014), s. 2015 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : acidification * surface waters * soils * dissolved organic carbon * magic model * preindustrial water chemistry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; DA - Hydrology ; Limnology (BC-A) Impact factor: 1.554, year: 2014

  17. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, M A Jafar; Al-Attas, Omar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hazard and operability study of Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S K; Khilnaney, V K [Heavy Water Board, Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The chemical process industry faces the tough challenge of achieving design productivity while maintaining high standards of safety. This task is particularly difficult than handling hazardous chemicals. Hazard and operability study (HazOp) is a technique which involves systematic and thorough study by a multidisciplinary team. This technique provides a means to analyse the design and modes of operations of a plant systematically so as to identify the potential occurrence of hazardous events and operational problems. HazOp is based on the premise that a hazard is not realised if the process is operated within its design intent. This paper gives an overall view of the HazOp study carried out at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru. Some selected recommendations from this study are highlighted. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Reactivity margins in heavy water moderated production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, F.D.

    1981-11-01

    The design of the reactor core and components of the heavy water moderated reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SFP) can be varied to produce a number of isotopes. For the past decade, the predominant reactor core design has been the enriched-depleted lattice. In this lattice, fuel assemblies of highly enriched uranium and target assemblies of depleted uranium, which produce plutonium, occupy alternate lattice positions. This heterogeneous lattice arrangement and a nonuniform control rod distribution result in a reactor core that requires sophisticated calculational methods for accurate reactivity margin and power distribution predictions. For maximum accuracy, techniques must exist to provide a base of observed data for the calculations. Frequent enriched-depleted lattice design changes are required as product demands vary. These changes provided incentive for the development of techniques to combine the results of calculations and observed reactivity data to accurately and conveniently monitor reactivity margins during operation

  20. Fuel enrichment reduction for heavy water moderated research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve heavy-water-moderated research reactors of significant power level (5 MW to 125 MW) currently operate in a number of countries, and use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. Most of these reactors could in principle be converted to use uranium of lower enrichment, subject in some cases to the successful development and demonstration of new fuel materials and/or fuel element designs. It is, however, generally accepted as desirable that existing fuel element geometry be retained unaltered to minimise the capital costs and licensing difficulties associated with enrichment conversion. The high flux Australian reactor, HIFAR, at Lucas Heights, Sydney is one of 5 Dido-class reactors in the above group. It operates at 10 MW using 80% 235 U HEU fuel. Theoretical studies of neutronic, thermohydraulic and operational aspects of converting HIFAR to use fuels of reduced enrichment have been made over a period. It is concluded that with no change of fuel element geometry and no penalty in the present HEU fuel cycle burn-up performance, conversion to MEU (nominally 45% 235 U) would be feasible within the limits of current fully qualified U-Al fuel materials technology. There would be no significant, adverse effects on safety-related parameters (e.g. reactivity coefficients) and only small penalties in reactor flux. Conversion to LEU (nominally 20% 235 U) a similar basis would require that fuel materials of about 2.3 g U cm -3 be fully qualified, and would depress the in-core thermal neutron flux by about 15 per cent relative to HEU fuelling. In qualitative terms, similar conclusions would be expected to hold for a majority of the above heavy water moderated reactors. (author)

  1. Fluorescence characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in shallow water along the Zhejiang coasts, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Fan, Daidu; Li, Daoji; Cai, Jingong

    2010-04-01

    Twenty-eight surface water samples from rivers, muddy intertidal flats, sand shores, and bedrock coasts were collected along the Zhejiang coastline in southeast China. In addition, three samples from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) were collected for comparison. CDOM (chromophoric dissolved organic matter) absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy, as well as nutrients and DOC were measured in these samples. According to salinity, nutrient, and DOC constituents, the 28 Zhejiang samples were categorized into four groups, i.e. highly-polluted, river derived, muddy-flat derived, and saltwater dominated ones. Among the six parameters (two humic-like and two protein-like peak intensities in fluorescence EEM contours, absorption at 300 nm, and DOC concentration) for the Zhejiang samples, any two of them were positively correlated. The submarine groundwater discharge, rather than local rivers, might have provided most of the freshwater that interacted with the saltwater during the mixing process. The high protein-like EEM peaks in samples from muddy salt marshes and rivers were probably caused by terrestrial inputs, land-based pollution, and local biological activities in combination. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Optical Proxies for Terrestrial Dissolved Organic Matter in Estuaries and Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Osburn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical proxies, especially DOM fluorescence, were used to track terrestrial DOM fluxes through estuaries and coastal waters by comparing models developed for several coastal ecosystems. Key to using optical properties is validating and calibrating them with chemical measurements, such as lignin-derived phenols - a proxy to quantify terrestrial DOM. Utilizing parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC, and comparing models statistically using the OpenFluor database (http://www.openfluor.org we have found common, ubiquitous fluorescing components which correlate most strongly with lignin phenol concentrations in several estuarine and coastal environments. Optical proxies for lignin were computed for the following regions: Mackenzie River Estuary, Atchafalaya River Estuary, Charleston Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, and Neuse River Estuary. The slope of linear regression models relating CDOM absorption at 350 nm (a350 to DOC and to lignin, varied 5 to 10 fold among systems. Where seasonal observations were available from a region, there were distinct seasonal differences in equation parameters for these optical proxies. Despite variability, overall models using single linear regression were developed that related dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration to CDOM (DOC = 40×a350+138; R2 = 0.77; N = 130 and lignin (Σ8 to CDOM (Σ8 = 2.03×a350-0.5; R2 = 0.87; N = 130. This wide variability suggested that local or regional optical models should be developed for predicting terrestrial DOM flux into coastal oceans and taken into account when upscaling to remote sensing observations and calibrations.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in N-methyl morpholine oxide/water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, S; Collier, J; Oyetunji, R; Stutts, B; Burnett, R

    2010-07-01

    In situ hydrolysis of cellulose (dissolving pulp) in N-methyl morpholine oxide (NMMO) solutions by commercially available Accellerase1000 is carried out. The yield of reducing sugars is followed as a function of time at three different temperatures and four different enzyme loadings to study the effect of system parameters on enzymatic hydrolysis. Initial results show that rates of hydrolysis of cellulose and yields of reducing sugars in the presence of NMMO-water is superior initially (ratio of initial reaction rates approximately 4) and comparable to that of regenerated cellulose (for times greater than 5h) when suspended in aqueous solutions. The usage of Accellerase1000 results predominantly in the formation of glucose with minimal amounts of cellobiose. This study proves the ability of cellulases to remain active in NMMO to carry out an in situ saccharification of cellulose thus eliminating the need to recover regenerated cellulose. Thus this work will form the basis for developing a continuous process for conversion of biomass to hydrogen, ethanol and other hydrocarbons. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on oxide film and PWSCC of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Totsuka, Nobuo; Nakajima, Nobuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In order to investigate the influence of dissolved hydrogen (DH) on the corrosion behavior and PWSCC of Alloy 600 in primary water of PWR under actual operating temperature range, we carried out electrochemical polarization measurement, repassivation test, analysis of the oxide film on the alloy by AES, XPS and PWSCC test. In all cases, the content of DH was changed from 0 to 45 cc/kgH{sub 2}O. The anodic polarization curve reveals that the peak current density increases with increasing DH. The result of the repassivation test shows that the repassivation rate decreases with increasing DH, and the changes of the above two become larger between 11 and 22 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH. According to the results of oxide film analysis, it is seen that the oxide films formed below 11 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH are relatively thick and rich in Ni, but those formed at higher DH contents are relatively thin and rich in Cr and Fe. The susceptibility of the alloy to PWSCC has a peak at 11 cc/kgH{sub 2}O of DH, which reveals that the property of the oxide film may play important role in PWSCC of alloy. (author)

  5. Pulse radiolysis of water by energetic heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, M.; Sugo, Y.; Iwamatsu, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Katsumura, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Water radiolysis is a fundamental process governing radiation effects in various aspects. Degree of water molecule decomposition depends on the type and LET (Linear Energy Transfer) value of radiations. However, the degradation of water molecules by α-particle has not been clearly understood. In this study, we aimed to clarify the reaction behavior of the groundwater induced by of α-particles from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in the geological disposal environment. α-radiolysis of water was investigated by use of high energy helium ions accelerated by the AVF cyclotron in TIARA facility, JAEA/Takasaki. The pulsed He ion irradiation technique and online time resolved absorbance measurement system was investigated for direct observation of chemical reactions of transient species produced by irradiations. Hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important species for reactions in aqueous samples because of its high reactivity and formation yield. NaCl was selected as a probe reagent for the OH radical produced by the irradiation with He ion, and dissolved in pure water. Because 50 MeV He ion has the penetration range at 1.5 mm in water, the sample cell has the thickness of 2 mm, and 50 μm glass windows on the top and bottom for preventing energy loss of the incident ions and measuring the absorbance. The transient absorbance was recorded for the aqueous NaCl solutions using semiconductor LASER diode at 375 nm as a probe light source. ClOH - was formed by the reaction of the OH radical with Cl - . The absorbance of ClOH - increased within the irradiation pulse width, and then decreased gradually. The formation yield of ClOH - which was estimated from the peak absorbance value, increased with the solute concentration. Precise analyses of chemical reactions occurred in track will be discussed at the presentation. This study is a part of the project on geological disposal funded by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan

  6. Water resources and effects of potential surface coal mining on dissolved solids in Hanging Woman Creek basin, southeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater resources of the Hanging Woman Creek basin, Montana include Holocene and Pleistocene alluvial aquifers and sandstone , coal, and clinker aquifers in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Surface water resources are composed of Hanging Woman Creek, its tributaries, and small stock ponds. Dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater ranged from 200 to 11,00 mg/L. Generally, concentrations were largest in alluvial aquifers and smallest in clinker aquifers. Near its mouth, Hanging Woman Creek had a median concentration of about 1,800 mg/L. Mining of the 20-foot to 35-foot-thick Anderson coal bed and 3-foot to 16-foot thick Dietz coal bed could increase dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow aquifers and in Hanging Woman Creek because of leaching of soluble minerals from mine spoils. Analysis of saturated-paste extracts from 158 overburden samples indicated that water moving through mine spoils would have a median increase in dissolved-solids concentration of about 3,700 mg/L, resulting in an additional dissolved-solids load to Hanging Woman Creek of about 3.0 tons/day. Hanging Woman Creek near Birney could have an annual post-mining dissolved-solids load of 3,415 tons at median discharge, a 47% increase from pre-mining conditions load. Post-mining concentrations of dissolved solids, at median discharge, could range from 2,380 mg/L in March to 3,940 mg/L in August, compared to mean pre-mining concentrations that ranged from 1,700 mg/L in July, November, and December to 2,060 mg/L in May. Post-mining concentrations and loads in Hanging Woman Creek would be smaller if a smaller area were mined. (USGS)

  7. Design of a thorium fuelled Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnani, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The main objective for development of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is to demonstrate thorium fuel cycle technologies, along with several other advanced technologies required for next generation reactors, so that these are readily available in time for launching the third stage. The AHWR under design is a 300 MWe vertical pressure tube type thorium-based reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. The fuel consists of (Th-Pu)O 2 and ( 233 ThU)O 2 pins. The fuel cluster is designed to generate maximum energy out of 233 U, which is bred in-situ from thorium and has a slightly negative void coefficient of reactivity, negative fuel temperature coefficient and negative power coefficient. For the AHWR, the well -proven pressure tube technology and online fuelling have been adopted. Core heat removal is by natural circulation of coolant during normal operation and shutdown conditions. Thus, it combines the advantages of light water reactors and PHWRs and removes the disadvantages of PHWRs. It has several passive safety systems for reactor normal operation, decay heat removal, emergency core cooling, confinement of radioactivity etc. The fuel cycle is based on the in-situ conversion of naturally available thorium into fissile 233 U in self sustaining mode. The uranium in the spent fuel will be reprocessed and recycled back into the reactor. The plutonium inventory will be kept a minimum and will come from fuel irradiated in Indian PHWRs. The 233 U required initially can come from the fast reactor programme or it can be produced by specially designing the initial core of AHWR using (Th,Pu)MOX fuel. There will be gradual transition from the initial core which will not contain any 233 U to an equilibrium core, which will have ( 233 U, Th) MOX fuel pins also in a composite cluster. The self sustenance is being achieved by a differential fuel loading of low and a relatively higher Pu in the composite clusters. The AHWR burns the

  8. Solar UV-treatment of water samples for stripping-voltammetric determination of trace heavy metals in Awash river, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelaneh Woldemichael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report about testing a new mobile and sustainable water sample digestion method in a preliminary field trial in Ethiopia. In order to determine heavy metals at the ultra-trace level by stripping voltammetric techniques in water samples from Awash River, we applied our new method of solar UV-assisted sample pretreatment to destroy the relevant interfering dissolved organic matter. The field tests revealed that 24 h of solar UV irradiation were sufficient to achieve the same sample pretreatment results as with classic digestion method based on intense and hard UV. Analytical results of this study suggest that both a hydroelectric power station and agrichemical applications at Koka Lake have increased the levels of the investigated metals zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, cobalt, nickel, and uranium.

  9. Survey of heavy metal pollution (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron and manganese in drinking water resources of Nurabad city, Lorestan, Iran 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHodratolah Shams Khorramabadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy water passes through the pipelines from supply resources to consuming places in which passing from these stages may cause some cases of contamination like heavy metal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination of heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese in water resources of Nurabad city of Lorestan in 2013. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, samples were collected from 7 wells of drinking water and 2 water storage tanks during 6 months in Nurabad. So that, heavy metal parameters such as copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese were measured using an atomic absorption device and also electrical conductivity, sulfate, chloride and total dissolved solids were also measured in accordance with standard methods. Results: Results indicated that the concentration of studied metals in water sources was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard, and in the water supply system the concentration of some metals was more than standard level. Moreover, the results showed that the concentration of studied heavy metals were more in winter than in autumn. Conclusion: Generally, in the water resources of Nurabad city the concentration of studied heavy metals was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard and there are not problems for water consumers. However, due to public health and the presence of a high concentration of these metals in the distribution supply, the heavy metal concentration in drinking water of this region should be monitored regularly by responsible organizations.

  10. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  11. Treatment of process water containing heavy metals with a two-stage electrolysis procedure in a membrane electrolysis cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, R.; Krebs, P. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Siedlungs- und Industriewasserwirtschaft, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Morgenstern, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Analytik, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Foerster, H.J.; Thiele, W. [Eilenburger Elektrolyse- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Ziegelstrasse 2, D-04838 Eilenburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The capability of a two-stage electrochemical treatment for the regeneration of acidic heavy-metal containing process water was examined. The process water came from sediment bioleaching and was characterized by a wide spectrum of dissolved metals, a high sulfate content, and a pH of about 3. In the modular laboratory model cell used, the anode chamber and the cathode chamber were separated by a central chamber fitted with an ion exchanger membrane on either side. The experiments were carried out applying a platinum anode and a graphite cathode at a current density of 0.1 A/cm{sup 2}. The circulation flow of the process water in the batch process amounted to 35 L/h, the electrolysis duration was 5.5 h at maximum and the total electrolysis current was about 1 A. In the first stage, the acidic process water containing metals passed through the cathode chamber. In the second stage, the cathodically pretreated process water was electrolyzed anodically. In the cathode chamber the main load of dissolved Cu, Zn, Cr and Pb was eliminated. The sulfuric acid surplus of 3-4 g/L decreased to about 1 g/L, the pH rose from initially 3.0 to 4-5, but the desired pH of 9-10 was not achieved. Precipitation in the proximity to the cathode evidently takes place at a higher pH than farther away. The dominant process in the anode chamber was the precipitation of amorphous MnO{sub 2} owing to the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). The further depletion of the remaining heavy metals in the cathodically pretreated process water by subsequent anodic treatment was nearly exhaustive, more than 99 % of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were removed from the leachate. The high depletion of heavy metals might be due to both the sorption on MnO{sub 2} precipitates and/or basic ferrous sulfate formed anodically, and the migration of metal ions through the cation exchanger membrane via the middle chamber into the cathode chamber. In the anode chamber, the sulfuric acid content increased to 6-7 g/L and the

  12. Removal of Heavy Metals from Drinking Water by Magnetic Carbon Nanostructures Prepared from Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Muneeb Ur Rahman Khattak, Muhammad; Zahoor, Muhammad; Muhammad, Bakhtiar; Khan, Farhat Ali; Ullah, Riaz; AbdEI-Salam, Naser M.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals contamination of drinking water has significant adverse effects on human health due to their toxic nature. In this study a new adsorbent, magnetic graphitic nanostructures were prepared from watermelon waste. The adsorbent was characterized by different instrumental techniques (surface area analyzer, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TG/DTA) and was used for the removal of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) from water. The adsorption parameters were determined for heavy metals adsorpti...

  13. Spatiotemporal Variation of Dissolved Carbon in Semi-humid/arid Inland Waters: A Case Study from Songnen Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K.; Li, L.; Zang, S.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial and seasonal variations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic carbon (DIC) in 34 waters across the semi-humid/arid Songnen Plain, China were examined with 320 samples collected in 2011-2012. Large variations in both the concentration and quality of DOC are revealed, ranging from 0.47 mgL-1 to 720 mgL-1, which is mainly caused by the hydro-climatic condition in the plain. Large variations of DOC and DIC concentrations are observed between open (mean ± sd: 5.6 ± 2.4 mgL-1, 57.4 ± 34.7 mgL-1) and closed lakes (43.3 ± 7.9 mgL-1, 172.9 ± 113.3 mgL-1). Temporally, higher DOC and DIC concentrations are measured for ice-underlying water in winter than ice-free seasons. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and DOC concentrations are higher after high discharge events with terrigenous sources of CDOM/DOC dominated, while autochthonous sources also contributed to CDOM/DOC concentrations during algal bloom seasons. An interesting result of this study is that the non-outflow conditions for various water catchments had condensed effects on the dissolved carbon, resulting in close relationships between salinity and dissolved carbon parameters, e.g. salinity vs DOC (R2 = 0.83, p DOC (R2 = 0.79, p DOC/DIC from salinity measurements for thousand of waters dispersed in the semi-arid Songnen Plain. Indices based on CDOM absorption spectra, e.g. E250:365, DOC specific CDOM absorption (SUVA254) and spectral slope ratio (Sr, S275-295/S350-400), were applied to characterize DOM components and sources. Our results indicate high molecular weight CDOM fractions are more abundant in open waters than closed waters.

  14. Studies on corrosion inhibitors for the cooling water system at the Heavy Water Project, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, B.P.; Mehta, C.T.; Abubacker, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Heavy Water Project at Kota uses the water from the Rana Pratap Sagar Lake as coolant in the open recirculation system. In order to find suitable corrosion inhibitors for the above system, a series of laboratory experiments on corrosion inhibitors were carried out using the constructional materials of the cooling water system and a number of proprietary formulations and the results are tabulated. From the data thus generated through various laboratory experiments, the most useful ones have been recommended for application in practice. (author)

  15. Transmutation of Americium in Light and Heavy Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee (Knoxville)/ORNL, Tennessee (United States)

    2009-06-15

    There is interest worldwide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In most disposal scenarios the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the capacity of these sites. On the long term, this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, and a major contributor 100 to 1000 years after discharge from the reactor is {sup 241}Am. One possible approach to reducing the decay-heat burden is to reprocess spent reactor fuel and use thermal spectrum reactors to 'burn' the Am nuclides. The viability of this approach is dependent upon the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic composition of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The currently available thermal spectrum reactor options include light water-reactors (LWRs) and heavy-water reactors (HWRs) such as the CANDU{sup R} designs. In addition, as a result of the recycle of spent LWR fuel, there would be a considerable amount of potential recycled uranium (RU). One proposed solution for the recycled uranium is to use it as fuel in Candu reactors. This paper investigates the possibilities of transmuting americium in 'spiked' bundles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Transmutation of Am in Candu reactors is also examined. One scenario studies a full core fuelled with homogeneous bundles of Am mixed with recycled uranium, while a second scenario places Am in an inert matrix in target channels in a Candu reactor, with the rest of the reactor fuelled with RU. A comparison of the transmutation in LWRs and HWRs is made, in terms of the fraction of Am that is transmuted and the impact on the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel. CANDU{sup R} is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (authors)

  16. Commissioning performance activities of Heavy Water Plant (Hazira) (Paper No. 1.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy Water Plant, Hazira is the fourth in the line of plants based on monothermal NH 3 -H 2 exchange process. The experience gained during operation of other heavy water plants is reflected in the construction, commissioning and operation of HWP, Hazira. This paper aims at outlining the strategy adopted for both commissioning and operation. (author)

  17. Programmable logic controllers in Heavy Water Project, Manuguru (Paper No. 3.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.C.; Bhaskar, R.; Maiti, A.; Venkatesu, G.; Satish, P.; Goel, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Enhancement to plant operational flexibility has been achieved in Heavy Water Project, Manuguru by installing programmable logic controllers for its control equipment. The earlier sulfide based Heavy Water Plant, Kota is using relay logic and diode based program-matrix for binary controls. Performance improvement and advantages of PLC and experience in its operation are described. (author). 3 refs

  18. Heavy metal pollution in drinking water - a global risk for the human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fabian Fernandez

    parts of the world heavy metal (HM) concentrations in drinking water are higher than some international guideline values. ..... become the basis for several drinking water treatment approaches ...... physiological and hygienic needs. Monitoring ...

  19. Operating experiences on ammonia water exchange system at Heavy Water Plant, Talcher (paper No. 6.12)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Ram, D.; Sharma, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Water Plant at Talcher employs bithermal ammonia hydrogen exchange process for the production of heavy water. The paper describes about the existing ammonia water exchange column, its start-up, operating experience and the problems encountered in operation of the column. The operating experiences gained and the data collected over the last few years can be utilised for design and operation of new ammonia water exchange column. (V.R). 2 figs

  20. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm -2 , and at 35 to 90 0 C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm -2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90 0 C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.2 A cm -2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.5 A cm -2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H 2 O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  1. Operation management of the prototype heavy water reactor 'Fugen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Akira; Takei, Hiroaki; Iwanaga, Shigeru; Noda, Masao; Hara, Hidemi

    1983-01-01

    The advanced thermal reactor Fugen power station has continued almost smooth operation since it began the full scale operation as the first homemade power reactor in Japan in March, 1979. In the initial period of operation, some troubles were experienced, but now, it can be said that the operational techniques of heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled, pressure tube type reactors have been established, through the improvement of the operational method and equipment, and the operational experience. Also, the verification of the operational ability, maintainability, reliability and safety of this new type reactor, that is the mission of the prototype reactor, achieved steadily the good results. Hereafter, the verification of operational performance is the main objective because it is required for the design, construction and operation of the demonstration reactor. The organization for the operation management and operation, the communication at the time of the abnormality, the operation of the plant, that is, start up, stop and the operation at the rated output, the works during plant stoppage, the operation at the time of the plant abnormality, the operation of waste treatment facility and others, the improvement of the operational method, and the education and training of operators are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Maps showing predicted probabilities for selected dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese threshold events in depth zones used by the domestic and public drinking water supply wells, Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2018-01-31

    The purpose of the prediction grids for selected redox constituents—dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese—are intended to provide an understanding of groundwater-quality conditions at the domestic and public-supply drinking water depths. The chemical quality of groundwater and the fate of many contaminants is influenced by redox processes in all aquifers, and understanding the redox conditions horizontally and vertically is critical in evaluating groundwater quality. The redox condition of groundwater—whether oxic (oxygen present) or anoxic (oxygen absent)—strongly influences the oxidation state of a chemical in groundwater. The anoxic dissolved oxygen thresholds of water, making drinking water undesirable with respect to taste, staining, or scaling. Three dissolved manganese thresholds, supply water wells. The 50 µg/L event threshold represents the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) benchmark for manganese (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2017; California Division of Drinking Water, 2014), whereas the 300 µg/L event threshold represents the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) health-based screening level (HBSL) benchmark, used to put measured concentrations of drinking-water contaminants into a human-health context (Toccalino and others, 2014). The 150 µg/L event threshold represents one-half the USGS HBSL. The resultant dissolved oxygen and dissolved manganese prediction grids may be of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to anoxic conditions. Prediction grids for selected redox constituents and thresholds were created by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) modeling and mapping team.

  3. Assessment of Heavy Metals in the Water of Sahastradhara Hill Stream at Dehradun, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Bharti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study on heavy metals assessment in the water of Sahastradhara hill-stream was conducted with different five sites at significant differences. The present paper deals with the water quality status of Sahastradhara stream by the assessment of heavy metals. Heavy Metals were found in fluctuated trend from first upstream to last downstream. The values of almost all Heavy Metals were found in increasing manner especially after the fourth sampling site. After the third sampling station, a solid waste dumping site was found. So, there may be a relation between heavy metals in stream water and solid waste dumping site. Concentrations of all Heavy Metals at fourth and fifth sampling site were found very high. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11076 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 164-172

  4. Tidal Marsh Outwelling of Dissolved Organic Matter and Resulting Temporal Variability in Coastal Water Optical and Biogeochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Neale, Patrick J.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Butterworth, Megan; Jaffe, Rudolf; Yamashita, Youhei

    2010-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are highly dynamic environments at the land-ocean interface where human activities, short-term physical forcings and intense episodic events result in high biological and chemical variability. Long being recognized as among the most productive ecosystems in the world, tidally-influenced coastal marshes are hot spots of biogeochemical transformation and exchange. High temporal resolution observations that we performed in several marsh-estuarine systems of the Chesapeake Bay revealed significant variability in water optical and biogeochemical characteristics at hourly time scales, associated with tidally-driven hydrology. Water in the tidal creek draining each marsh was sampled every hour during several semi-diurnal tidal cycles using ISCO automated samplers. Measurements showed that water leaving the marsh during ebbing tide was consistently enriched in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), frequently by more than a factor of two, compared to water entering the marsh during flooding tide. Estimates of DOC fluxes showed a net DOC export from the marsh to the estuary during seasons of both low and high biomass of marsh vegetation. Chlorophyll amounts were typically lower in the water draining the marsh, compared to that entering the marsh during flooding tide, suggesting that marshes act as transformers of particulate to dissolved organic matter. Moreover, detailed optical and compositional analyses demonstrated that marshes are important sources of optically and chemically distinctive, relatively complex, high molecular weight, aromatic-rich and highly colored dissolved organic compounds. Compared to adjacent estuarine waters, marsh-exported colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was characterized by considerably stronger absorption (more than a factor of three in some cases), larger DOC-specific absorption, lower exponential spectral slope, larger fluorescence signal, lower fluorescence per unit absorbance, and higher fluorescence at visible wavelengths

  5. Improvements on heavy water separation technology by isotopic water-hydrogen sulfide exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1987-01-01

    A series of possible variance is presented for the heavy water separation technology by isotopic H 2 O-H 2 S exchange at dual temperatures. The critical study of these variants, which are considered as characteristic quantities for the isotopes transport (production) and the extraction level is related to a dual temperature plant fed by liquid and cold column, which is the up-to-date technology employed in all heavy water production plants as variants of following plants are studied: dual temperature plant with double feeding; dual-temperature plant with equilibrium column (booster); dual-temperature-dual-pressure plant. Attention is paid to the variant with equilibration column (booster), executed and tested at the State Committee for Nuclear Energy and to the dual-temperature-dual pressure plant which presents the highest efficiency. (author)

  6. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, D.; Sur, P.; Mandal, S. K.; Saha, T.; Kole, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 96 surface water samples collected from river Ganga in West Bengal during 2004-05 was analyzed for p H, EC, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni. The p H was found in the alkaline range (7.21-8.32), while conductance was obtained in the range of 0.225-0.615 mmhos/cm. Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cr and Pb were detected in more than 92% of the samples in the range of 0.025-5.49, 0.025-2.72, 0.012-0.370, 0.012-0.375, 0.001-0.044 and 0.001- 0.250 mg/L,respectively, whereas Cd and Cu were detected only in 20 and 36 samples (0.001-0.003 and 0.0034.032 mg/L). Overall seasonal variation was significant for Fe, Mn, Cd and Cr. The maximum mean concentration of Fe (1.520 m a ) was observed in summer, Mn (0.423 mg/L) in monsoon but Cd (0.003 mg/L) and Cr (0.020 m a ) exhibited their maximum during the winter season. Fe, Mn and Cd concentration also varied with the change of sampling locations. The highest mean concentrations (mg/L) of Fe (1.485), Zn (0.085) and Cu (0.006) were observed at Palta, those for Mn (0.420) and Ni (0.054) at Berhampore, whereas the maximum of Pb (0.024 mg/L) and Cr (0.018 mg/L) was obtained at the downstream station, Uluberia. All in all, the dominance of various heavy metals in the surface water of the river Ganga followed the sequence: Fe > Mn Ni > Cr > Pb > Zn > Cu > Cd. A significant positive correlation was exhibited for conductivity with Cd and Cr of water but Mn exhibited a negative correlation with conductivity

  7. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su’ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  8. Plant life management processes and practices for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.-S.; Cleveland, J.; Clark, C.R.

    2006-01-01

    In general, heavy water reactor (HWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) owners would like to keep their NPPs in service as long as they can be operated safely and economically. Their decisions are depending on essentially business model. They involve the consideration of a number of factors, such as the material condition of the plant, comparison with current safety standards, the socio-political climate and asset management/ business planning considerations. Continued plant operation, including operation beyond design life, called 'long term operation, depends, among other things, on the material condition of the plant. This is influenced significantly by the effectiveness of ageing management. Key attributes of an effective plant life management program include a focus on important systems, structure and components (SSCs) which are susceptible to ageing degradation, a balance of proactive and reactive ageing management programmes, and a team approach that ensures the co-ordination of and communication between all relevant nuclear power plant and external programmes. Most HWR NPP owners/operators use a mix of maintenance, surveillance and inspection (MSI) programs as the primary means of managing ageing. Often these programs are experienced-based and/or time-based and may not be optimised for detecting and/or managing ageing effects. From time-to-time, operational history has shown that this practice can be too reactive, as it leads to dealing with ageing effects (degradation of SSCs) after they have been detected. In many cases premature and/or undetected ageing cannot be traced back to one specific reason or an explicit error. The root cause is often a lack of communication, documentation and/or co-ordination between design, commissioning, operation or maintenance organizations. This lack of effective communication and interfacing frequently arises because, with the exception of major SSCs, such as the fuel channels or steam generators, there is a lack of explicit

  9. Heavy water reactors physics; Physique des reacteurs a eau lourde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Y; Lourme, P; Naudet, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    An important research programme on heavy water reactor physics has been carried out in France for quite a few years. The decision to build the EL 4 prototype and so to choose the heavy water gas cooled type has renewed the interest in this programme and at the same time given to it a more specific orientation A summary of the results gained in this field is presented in this paper. In the first part are described the experimental investigations, most of them were carried out in the criticality facility AQUILON II. The experiments are grouped in four parts - Systematic studies of lattices Buckling measurements. - Specific studies of gas-cooled lattices. - Fine structure, spectral indices measurements etc... - Measurements on lattices or samples containing Uranium of various enrichment or Plutonium. The second part is devoted to a summary of the theoretical studies. The whole results have allowed an improvement of the calculation methods, have led to a better understanding of the neutron balance in lattices, and have permitted the establishment of a set of formula to predict not only the clean fuel conditions but also the evolution of the nuclear properties with irradiation. Some specific studies on power reactor are quoted. (authors) [French] Un important programme d'etudes sur la physique des reacteurs a eau lourde est mene en France depuis assez longtemps. La decision de construire le prototype EL 4 et de s'engager ainsi dans la filiere des reacteurs a eau lourde refroidis par gaz a redonne un nouvel interet a ce programme et l'a en meme temps oriente dans une direction plus particuliere. La presente communication, rassemble les resultats des etudes faites dans ce domaine depuis la derniere conference de Geneve. Dans la premiere partie on decrit les etudes experimentales dont la plupart ont ete effectuees dans la pile d'experiences critiques Aquilon II. Les experiences sont groupees en quatre ensembles: etude systematique de reseaux (mesures de laplaciens) etudes

  10. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulianti, Yanti [Department of Physics, University of Lampung Jl. Sumantri Brojonegoro No.1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia Email: y-yanti@unila.ac.id (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia Email: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id (Indonesia); Takaki, Naoyuki [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy (Graduate School) 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi,Setagayaku, Tokyo158-8557, Japan Email: ntakaki@tcu.ac.jp (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  11. Ancient dissolved methane in inland waters at low concentrations revealed by a new collection method for radiocarbon (^{14}C) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Joshua F.; Billett, Michael F.; Murray, Callum; Garnett, Mark H.

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas and is released to the atmosphere from freshwater systems in numerous biomes globally. Radiocarbon (14C) analysis of methane can provide unique information about its age, source and rate of cycling in natural environments. Methane is often released from aquatic sediments in bubbles (ebullition), but dissolved methane is also present in lakes and streams at lower concentrations, and may not be of the same age or source. Obtaining sufficient non-ebullitive aquatic methane for 14C analysis remains a major technical challenge. Previous studies have shown that freshwater methane, in both dissolved and ebullitive form, can be significantly older than other forms of aquatic carbon (C), and it is therefore important to characterise this part of the terrestrial C balance. We present a novel method to capture sufficient amounts of dissolved methane from freshwater environments for 14C analysis by circulating water across a hydrophobic, gas-permeable membrane and collecting the methane in a large collapsible vessel. The results of laboratory and field tests show that reliable dissolved δ13CH4 and 14CH4 samples can be readily collected over short time periods (˜4 to 24 hours), at relatively low cost and from a variety of surface water types. The initial results further support previous findings that dissolved methane can be significantly older than other forms of aquatic C, especially in organic-rich catchments, and is currently unaccounted for in many terrestrial C balances and models. This method is suitable for use in remote locations, and could potentially be used to detect the leakage of unique 14CH4 signatures from point sources into waterways, e.g. coal seam gas and landfill gas.

  12. Pulse radiolysis studies of liquid heavy water at temperatures up to 250 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.R.; Ouellette, D.C.; Elliot, A.J.

    2002-09-01

    This report documents the rate constants and associated activation energies for the reactions of the primary radical species, e aq - , ·OD and ·D, which are formed during the radiolysis of heavy water within the temperature range 20 to 250 o C. These heavy-water data have been compared with the corresponding information for light water. These kinetic data form part of the database that is required to model the aqueous radiation chemistry that occurs within the core of the heavy water cooled and moderated CANDU reactor. (author)

  13. Pulse radiolysis studies of liquid heavy water at temperatures up to 250 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, C.R.; Ouellette, D.C.; Elliot, A.J

    2002-09-01

    This report documents the rate constants and associated activation energies for the reactions of the primary radical species, e{sub aq}{sup -}, {center_dot}OD and {center_dot}D, which are formed during the radiolysis of heavy water within the temperature range 20 to 250 {sup o}C. These heavy-water data have been compared with the corresponding information for light water. These kinetic data form part of the database that is required to model the aqueous radiation chemistry that occurs within the core of the heavy water cooled and moderated CANDU reactor. (author)

  14. The wide spectrum high biocidal potency of Bioxy formulation when dissolved in water at different concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Traditional surface disinfectants that have long been applied in medicine, animal husbandry, manufacturing and institutions are inconvenient at best and dangerous at worst. Moreover, some of these substances have adverse environmental impacts: for example, quaternary ammonium compounds (“quats”) are reproductive toxicants in both fish and mammals. Halogens are corrosive both to metals and living tissues, are highly reactive, can be readily neutralized by metals, and react with organic matter to form toxic, persistent by-products such as dioxins and furans. Aldehydes may be carcinogenic to both human and animals upon repeated exposures, are corrosive, cross-link living tissues and many synthetic materials, and may lose efficacy when pathogens enzymatically adapt to them. Alcohols are flammable and volatile and can be enzymatically degraded by certain bacterial pathogens. Quats are highly irritating to mucous membranes and over time can induce pathogen resistance, especially if they are not alternated with functionally different disinfectants. In contrast, peracetic acid (PAA), a potent oxidizer, liberates hydrogen peroxide (itself a disinfectant), biodegrades to carbon dioxide, water and oxygen, and is at least as efficacious as contact biocides e.g., halogens and aldehydes. Nevertheless, the standard form of liquid PAA is highly corrosive, is neutralized by metals and organic matter, gives off noxious odours and must be stored in vented containers. For the reasons stated above, Bioxy formulations were developed, a series of powder forms of PAA, which are odourless, stable in storage and safe to transport and handle. They generate up to 10% PAA in situ when dissolved in water. A 0.2% aqueous solution of Bioxy (equivalent to 200 ppm PAA) effected a 6.76 log reduction in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) within 2 minutes after application. A 5% aqueous solution of Bioxy achieved a 3.93 log reduction in the bovine tuberculosis bacillus

  15. Dissolved iron in the Arctic shelf seas and surface waters of the central Arctic Ocean : Impact of Arctic river water and ice-melt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Bauch, D.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H. J. W.; van Heuven, S.; Ober, S.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved (10 nM) in the bottom waters of the Laptev Sea shelf may be attributed to either sediment resuspension, sinking of brine or regeneration of DFe in the lower layers. A significant correlation (R-2 = 0.60) between salinity and DFe is observed. Using delta O-18, salinity,

  16. Concentration and characterization of dissolved organic matter in the surface microlayer and subsurface water of the Bohai Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Wu, Guan-Wei; Gao, Xian-Chi; Xia, Qing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    A total of 19 sea-surface microlayer and corresponding subsurface samples collected from the Bohai Sea, China in April 2010 were analyzed for chlorophyll a, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and its major compound classes including total dissolved carbohydrates (TDCHO, including monosaccharides, MCHO, and polysaccharides, PCHO) and total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA, including dissolved free, DFAA, and combined fraction, DCAA). The concentrations of DOC in the subsurface water ranged from 130.2 to 407.7 μM C, with an average of 225.9±75.4 μM C, while those in the surface microlayer varied between 140.1 and 330.9 μM C, with an average of 217.8±56.8 μM C. The concentrations of chlorophyll a, DOC, TDCHO and THAA in the microlayer were, respectively correlated with their subsurface water concentrations, implying that there was a strong exchange effect between the microlayer and subsurface water. The concentrations of DOC and TDCHO were negatively correlated with salinity, respectively, indicating that water mixing might play an important role in controlling the distribution of DOC and TDCHO in the water column. Major constituents of DCAA and DFAA present in the study area were glycine, alanine, glutamic acid, serine and histidine. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to examine the complex compositional differences that existed among the sampling sites. Our results showed that DFAA had higher mole percentages of glycine, valine and serine in the microlayer than in the subsurface water, while DCAA tended to have higher mole percentages of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, threonine, arginine, alanine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and leucine in the microlayer. The yields of TDCHO and THAA exhibited similar trends between the microlayer and subsurface water. Carbohydrate species displayed significant enrichment in the microlayer, whereas the DFAA and DCAA exhibited non-uniform enrichment in the microlayer.

  17. Monitoring of heavy metals in selected Water Supply Systems in Poland, in relation to current regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuster-Janiaczyk, Agnieszka; Zeuschner, Piotr; Noga, Paweł; Skrzypczak, Marta

    2018-02-01

    The study presents an analysis of water quality monitoring in terms of the content of heavy metals, which is conducted in three independent water supply systems in Poland. The analysis showed that the monitoring of heavy metals isn't reliable - both the quantity of tested water samples and the location of the monitoring points are the problem. The analysis of changes in water quality from raw water to tap water was possible only for one of the analysed systems and indicate a gradual deterioration of water quality, although still within acceptable limits of legal regulations.

  18. Surface Water Modeling Using an EPA Computer Code for Tritiated Waste Water Discharge from the heavy Water Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1998-06-01

    Tritium releases from the D-Area Heavy Water Facilities to the Savannah River have been analyzed. The U.S. EPA WASP5 computer code was used to simulate surface water transport for tritium releases from the D-Area Drum Wash, Rework, and DW facilities. The WASP5 model was qualified with the 1993 tritium measurements at U.S. Highway 301. At the maximum tritiated waste water concentrations, the calculated tritium concentration in the Savannah River at U.S. Highway 301 due to concurrent releases from D-Area Heavy Water Facilities varies from 5.9 to 18.0 pCi/ml as a function of the operation conditions of these facilities. The calculated concentration becomes the lowest when the batch releases method for the Drum Wash Waste Tanks is adopted

  19. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.T.; Sutawane, U.B.; Rathi, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage, (2) isotope exchange, 3) isotope analysis, (4) properties and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762. (author)

  20. Thorium fuels for heavy water reactors. Romanian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodeanu, F.; Mirion, I.; Mehedinteanu, S.; Balan, V.

    1984-01-01

    The renewed interest in thorium fuel cycle due to the increased demand for fissile materials has resulted in speeding up the related research and development activities. For heavy water reactors the thorium cycles, especially SSET, are very promising and many efforts are made to demonstrate their feasibility. In our country, at INPR, the research and development activity has been initiated in the following areas: the conceptual design of thorium bearing fuel elements; fuel modelling; nuclear grade thorium dioxide powder technology; mixed oxide fuel technology. In the design area, the key factors in performance limitation, especially at extended burnup have been accounted and different remedies proposed. An irradiation programme has been settled and will start this year. The modelling activities are focused on mixed oxide behaviour and material data measurements are in progress. In the nuclear grade thorium powder technology area, a good piece of work has been done to develop an integrated technology for monasite processing (thorium being a by-product in lanthanides extraction). As regards the mixed oxide fuel technology, efforts have been made to obtain (ThU)O 2 pellets with good homogeneity and high density at different compositions. Besides the mixing powders route, other non-conventional technologies for refabrication like: microspheres, pellet impregnation and clay extrusion are studied. Experimental fuel rods for irradiation testing have been manufactured. (author)

  1. Asymmetric Modeling of the Industrial Heavy Water Plant (PIAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruel, Federico; Aprea, J; Guido Lavalle, German

    2000-01-01

    Software of asymmetric stationary simulation for the Industrial Heavy Water Plant (PIAP) was developed, based on an existing symmetric simulator (Brigitte 2.0).This software allows to turn off some of the isotopic enrichment twin units present in the plant and to simulate them asymmetrically, in other words, with different selection of parameters between twins.Other incorporations were done, such as passing flows between units and entering flows in strategic points of the plant.The iterative system in which the symmetric simulator is based was insufficient to develop the asymmetric simulator, so the system was modeled according to an implicit scheme for the units that form the simulator.This type of resolution resulted in a simulator that supports a big range of boundary conditions and internal parameters.Moreover, the time of calculus is short (∼3 minutes), making it actually useful.The asymmetric simulator is at the PIAP now, for its study and validation. It shows expected tendencies and results according to the symmetric simulator already validated

  2. Benchmarking severe accident computer codes for heavy water reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    Consideration of severe accidents at a nuclear power plant (NPP) is an essential component of the defence in depth approach used in nuclear safety. Severe accident analysis involves very complex physical phenomena that occur sequentially during various stages of accident progression. Computer codes are essential tools for understanding how the reactor and its containment might respond under severe accident conditions. International cooperative research programmes are established by the IAEA in areas that are of common interest to a number of Member States. These co-operative efforts are carried out through coordinated research projects (CRPs), typically 3 to 6 years in duration, and often involving experimental activities. Such CRPs allow a sharing of efforts on an international basis, foster team-building and benefit from the experience and expertise of researchers from all participating institutes. The IAEA is organizing a CRP on benchmarking severe accident computer codes for heavy water reactor (HWR) applications. The CRP scope includes defining the severe accident sequence and conducting benchmark analyses for HWRs, evaluating the capabilities of existing computer codes to predict important severe accident phenomena, and suggesting necessary code improvements and/or new experiments to reduce uncertainties. The CRP has been planned on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for HWRs. (author)

  3. Evaluation of A-1 reactor heavy-water calandria specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Container chains with surveillance specimens were placed in two special channels of the core peripheral part to test changes in mechanical properties due to reactor operation of caisson tube material. The specimens were made from the caisson tube material and placed by eight pieces on the outer surface of the containers. The first removed specimens were tested for corrosion losses, tensile strength, and fractured surfaces were then assessed. The changes in strength properties were found to be similar in both base material and welded joints. The corrosion film on surveillance specimens did not practically affect strength properties nor ductility. It was found that the Al-Mg-Si alloy used for the heavy water vessel caisson tubes following stabilization annealing was fully stable at operating temperatures of up to 100 degC. Slio.ht changes in properties can be attributed to the effect of a high neutron dose. Thus, the high radiation and temperature stability of the alloy was confirmed. (O.K.)

  4. Heavy metals in water, sediments and submerged macrophytes in ponds around the Dianchi Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixiu; Yao, Lu; Liu, Guihua; Liu, Wenzhi

    2014-09-01

    Through retaining runoff and pollutants such as heavy metals from surrounding landscapes, ponds around a lake play an important role in mitigating the impacts of human activities on lake ecosystems. In order to determine the potential for heavy metal accumulation of submerged macrophytes, we investigated the concentrations of 10 heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in water, sediments, and submerged macrophytes collected from 37 ponds around the Dianchi Lake in China. Our results showed that both water and sediments of these ponds were polluted by Pb. Water and sediments heavy metal concentrations in ponds received urban and agricultural runoff were not significantly higher than those in ponds received forest runoff. This result indicates that a large portion of heavy metals in these ponds may originate from atmospheric deposition and weathering of background soils. Positive relationships were found among heavy metal concentrations in submerged macrophytes, probably due to the coaccumulation of heavy metals. For most heavy metals, no significant relationships were found between submerged macrophytes and their water and sediment environments. The maximum concentrations of Cr, Fe and Ni in Ceratophyllum demersum were 4242, 16,429 and 2662mgkg(-1), respectively. The result suggests that C. demersum is a good candidate species for removing heavy metals from polluted aquatic environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Removal of heavy metals from waste water of tanning leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most dominant A. candidus on the isolation plates exhibited the highest activity for biosorption of heavy metals. The results indicate that fungi of contaminated soils have high level of metal biosorption capacities. Keywords: Fungi, industrial wastewater, biosorption, heavy metals. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  6. From fresh to marine waters: characterization and fate of dissolved organic matter in the Lena River delta region, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eGonçalves-Araujo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Connectivity between the terrestrial and marine environment in the Artic is changing as a result of climate change, influencing both freshwater budgets and the supply of carbon to the sea. This study characterizes the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM within the Lena Delta region and evaluates the behavior of DOM across the fresh water-marine gradient. Six fluorescent components (four humic-like; one marine humic-like; one protein-like were identified by Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC with a clear dominance of allochthonous humic-like signals. Colored DOM (CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC were highly correlated and had their distribution coupled with hydrographical conditions. Higher DOM concentration and degree of humification were associated with the low salinity waters of the Lena River. Values decreased towards the higher salinity Laptev Sea shelf waters. Results demonstrate different responses of DOM mixing in relation to the vertical structure of the water column, as reflecting the hydrographical dynamics in the region. Two mixing curves for DOM were apparent. In surface waters above the pycnocline there was a sharper decrease in DOM concentration in relation to salinity indicating removal. In the bottom water layer the DOM decrease within salinity was less. We propose there is a removal of DOM occurring primarily at the surface layer, which is likely driven by photodegradation and flocculation.

  7. Special operations in the heavy water system, III-2; III-2 Posebne operacije u sistemu teske vode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    Special operations in the heavy water system described in this chapter are as follows: treatment, drainage and pouring of heavy water, emptying of the heavy water system, cleaning and vacuuming of the heavy water system. [Serbo-Croat] Posebne operacije u sistemu teske vode opisane u ovom poglavlju su: tretiranje, dreniranje i razlivanje teske vode, praznjenje sistema teske vode, 'ispiranje' i vakumiranje sistema teske vode.

  8. Effective management of water systems in a chemical industry: a case study at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prahalad, B.; Pandey, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes about the important methods of water management in general followed by a description of the water system and measures taken/to be implemented at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru in particular in order to effectively tackle the effluent water by reuse of the treated effluents

  9. Estimation of some heavy metals in polluted well water and mercury accumulation in broiler organs

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Hussein Khamis; Abu-Zinadah, Osama Abdullah; EL-Rabey, Haddad Abdulsameih; Meerasahib, Mohammed Fareez

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the concentrations of heavy metals in well water and bioaccumulation of the most abundant metals in chicken tissues in some areas in the province of Mecca Almokaramah, Saudi Arabia. Among the heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Cr, Mn, Cu Hg, Pb and Ni) studied, mercury (Hg) revealed highest in concentration in well waters. The concentration of mercury in the ground water, beside in liver, kidney, muscle and blood samples of ten chickens fro...

  10. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  11. Investigation of the heavy water distillation system at the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecevic, V.; Badrljica, R.

    1963-01-01

    The heavy water distillation system was tested because this was not done before the reactor start-up. Detailed inspection of the system components showed satisfactory results. Leak testing was done as well as the testing of the instrumentation which enables reliable performance of the system. Performance testing was done with ordinary water and later 2700 l of heavy water from the reactor was purified, decreasing the activity by 45%

  12. Heavy metal pollution in drinking water - a global risk for human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water resources in the world have been profoundly influenced over the last years by human activities, whereby the world is currently facing critical water supply and drinking water quality problems. In many parts of the world heavy metal (HM) concentrations in drinking water are higher than some international guideline ...

  13. HEAVY METALS AS UNWANTED COMPONENTS OF BACKWASH WATER DERIVED FROM GROUNDWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nowak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some aspects of the problem of heavy metals presence in wastewater and sewage sludge from water treatment. In the first part, issues on quality of wastewaters and sludge produced during water treatment along with actions aimed at the neutralization of such wastes, were discussed. Subsequent parts of the work present the example of 12 groundwater treatment stations in a particular municipality, and the problem of backwash water quality, in particular, heavy metals contents. The analysis covered a period of three years: 2013, 2014, and 2015. The authors, using the discussed examples, have shown that besides hydrated iron and manganese oxides, also other toxic contaminants can be present in backwash water from groundwater treatment. In particular, the qualitative analysis of the backwash water revealed the presence of heavy metals, mainly zinc. The test results for backwash water were compared with those of filtrate qualitative assessment, wherein the heavy metals were not found. This fact indicated the metal retention in the filter bed and their unsustainable immobilization resulting in penetration of heavy metals from deposit to the backwash water along with other impurities, mainly iron and manganese oxides. The main conclusion from the study is to demonstrate the need for constant monitoring of the backwash water quality, including the presence of toxic heavy metals. This is also important because of the requirement to minimize the negative environmental impact of wastes generated during the water treatment process.

  14. A Management Strategy for the Heavy Water Reflector Cooling System of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. S.; Park, Y. C.; Lim, S. P. (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Heavy water is used as the reflector and the moderator of the HANARO research reactor. After over 10 years operation since first criticality in 1995 there arose some operational issues related with the tritium. A task force team(TFT) has been operated for 1 year since September 2006 to study and deduce resolutions of the issues concerning the tritium and the degradation of heavy water in the HANARO reflector system. The TFT drew many recommendations on the hardware upgrade, tritium containing air control, heavy water quality management, waste management, and tritium measurement system upgrade.

  15. Critical evaluation of heavy water project at Thal (Preprint No. PM-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, N.S.

    1989-04-01

    The project known as Thal Ammonia Extension was a heavy water project successfully completed by Rashtriya Chemicals and Fertilizers (RCF) Ltd. The project consisted of erecting a heavy water plant of 110 tons/year capacity at Thal. The process Know-how and engineering of the plant was supplied by the Heavy Water Projects Division of the Department of Atomic Energy. Salient features of the project, management features which resulted in fast completion of erection, bottlenecks faced and engineering innovations adopted for efficient operation of the plant are described. Some modifications which can lead to smoother operation are listed. (M.G.B.)

  16. Features in ammonia plant for maximising heavy water production (Paper No. 2.10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangri, N.N.; Singh, R.J.; Mukherjee, P.K.; Mishra, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever an ammonia plant is linked with heavy water production, a system should be foreseen in the design stage itself for total conservation of D 2 in synthesis gas and zero D 2 loss. The process should ensure recycle of D 2 rich condensate within the front end. This alone would be the single most important factor for improving heavy water production rate. The synthesis loop pressure should be chosen keeping in view the interest of heavy water plant (HWP). With vast experience in engineering NH 3 and HWP plants, it is possible to integrate HWP requirements at the design stage itself. (author)

  17. PRODUCTION OF HYDRATED ELECTRONS FROM PHOTOIONIZATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under UV irradiation, an important primary photochemical reaction of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is electron ejection, producing hydrated electrons (e-aq). The efficiency of this process has been studied in both fresh and seawater samples with both steady-state scave...

  18. Significant Features of Warm Season Water Vapor Flux Related to Heavy Rainfall and Draught in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Koji; Iseri, Yoshihiko; Jinno, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    In this study, our objective is to reveal complicated relationships between spatial water vapor inflow patterns and heavy rainfall activities in Kyushu located in the western part of Japan, using the outcomes of pattern recognition of water vapor inflow, based on the Self-Organizing Map. Consequently, it could be confirmed that water vapor inflow patterns control the distribution and the frequency of heavy rainfall depending on the direction of their fluxes and the intensity of Precipitable water. Historically serious flood disasters in South Kyushu in 1993 were characterized by high frequency of the water vapor inflow patterns linking to heavy rainfall. On the other hand, severe draught in 1994 was characterized by inactive frontal activity that do not related to heavy rainfall.

  19. Dissolved organic matter dynamics in surface waters affected by oil spill pollution: Results from the Serious Game exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnelli, M.; Galletti, Y.; Marchetti, E.; Mercadante, L.; Retelletti Brogi, S.; Ribotti, A.; Sorgente, R.; Vestri, S.; Santinelli, C.

    2016-11-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM, respectively) surface distribution was studied during the Serious Game exercise carried out in the Eastern Ligurian Sea, where an oil spill was localized by using satellite images and models. This paper reports the first DOC, CDOM and FDOM data for this area together with an evaluation of fluorescence as a fast and inexpensive tool for early oil spill detection in marine waters. The samples collected in the oil spill showed a fluorescence intensity markedly higher ( 5 fold) than all the other samples. The excitation-emission matrixes, coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), allowed for the identification in the FDOM pool of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, humic-like and protein-like fluorophores.

  20. Influence of dissolved hydrogen and temperature on primary water stress corrosion cracking of mill annealed alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsuka, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Yoshito [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Nakajima, Nobuo

    2002-09-01

    The influence of dissolved hydrogen and temperature on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 was experimentally studied at temperature ranging from 310 to 360degC and hydrogen contents ranging from 0 to 4 ppm using slow strain rate tensile technique (SSRT) and constant load tensile test. As a result, it was revealed that the PWSCC susceptibility of alloy 600 has a maximum near 3 ppm of dissolved hydrogen at 360degC and the peak shifts to 1 ppm at 320degC. The mechanism of the peak shift is not clear yet, however, it is possibly explained by the change of absorbed hydrogen in the metal caused by the change of hydrogen recombination reaction and/or change of the surface film. (author)

  1. Dissolved gas geochemical signatures of the ground waters related to the 2011 El Hierro magmatic reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F.; Hernández, P. A.; Padrón, E.; Pérez, N. M.; Sumino, H.; Melián, G. V.; Padilla, G. D.; Barrancos, J.; Dionis, S.; Nolasco, D.; Calvo, D.; Hernández, I.; Peraza, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro Island is the south westernmost and the youngest island of the Canary archipelago (Restinga village (at the southernmost part of El Hierro island), suggesting the existence of a submarine eruption. Since October 12, frequent episodes of, turbulent gas emission and foaming, and the appearance of steamy lava fragments has been observed on the sea surface. Instituto Volcanologico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) started a hydrogeochemical program on August 2011 in order to evaluate the temporal evolution of dissolved gases on four different observation points (vertical and horizontal wells) of El Hierro. Three wells are located on the north of the island (where the seismic activity occurred at the beginning of the volcano-seismic unrest) and one horizontal well (gallery) in the south. At each observation point the concentration of dissolved helium, CO2, N2, O2 and Ar and the isotopic composition of He, C-CO2 and Ar have been measured three times per week. Significant increases on the dissolved gases content, mainly on CO2 and He/CO2 ratio, have been measured at all the observation points prior to the increasing of released seismic energy. Isotopic composition of dissolved helium, measured as 3He/4He ratio, showed an significant increase (from 1-3 RA up to 7.2 RA, being RA the isotopic 3He/4He ratio on air) at all the observation points 20 days before the occurrence of the submarine eruption and these relatively high 3He/4He values have been maintained along the volcanic unrest period. The isotopic composition of CO2 has showed also significant changes in relation to the release of seismic energy. The results observed on this dissolved gases study have been tremendously beneficial on the volcanic surveillance tools to study and forecast the evolution of the seismic-volcanic crisis.

  2. Experimental Study on Behavior of Bow-tie Tree Generation by Using Heavy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Nakagawa, Wataru; Tsurumaru, Hidekazu

    Bow-tie tree (BTT) generated from contaminant, e.g., metal, carbon, amber(over cured resin) or void in insulator is a significant deterioration factor of XLPE power cable. However, essential role of water in generation and progress of BTT is not yet sufficiently cleared. In order to investigate the role of water we paid attention to difference in chemical properties of light water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O), moreover we evaluated influence of isotopic effect due to hydrogen and deuterium on behavior of BTT generation. In accelerated aging test the number of BTT in XLPE sample, in which copper powder of 500ppm was contaminated as BTT cores, dipped in heavy water (D2O:100wt%) decreased to one third compared with light water(D2O:0wt%). Furthermore, the maximum length of BTT decreased with increase in concentration of heavy water. The experimental results show that heavy water exerted a depression effect on generation and progress of BTT. We considered that the depression effect due to hydrogen isotope appeared by inhibiting ionization and elution of BTT cores, because salt-solubility and ionic mobility of heavy water are about 15 to 20% smaller than those of light water. Therefore, the essential role of water seemed to be production and transport of ions in XLPE.

  3. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in drinking water due to mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mining and smelting activities are the main causes for the increasing pollution of heavy metals from water sources. The toxicity of these heavy metals from the mining, milling and smelting companies can cause harmful and even lethal effects on the human health. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of As, ...

  4. Future development in heavy water reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, J.; Hart, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    1982 marks the 35th anniversary of the start-up of Canada's first research and test reactor, NRX. Its first power reactor has been operating successfully for the past 20 years. With 5,000 MWe of domestic capacity installed, Canada's major CANDU (Canada Deuterium, Uranium) nuclear program has a further 9,500 MWe under construction in Canada for completion by 1990 as well as committed offshore projects in Argentina, Korea and Romania. The CANDU operating record, by any measure of performance, has been outstanding. This performance is largely due to the discipline imposed on the development, design, construction and operation by two fundamental choices: natural uranium and heavy water. The impact of these two choices on availability, fuel utilization, safety and economics is discussed. Future plans call for building on those characteristics which have made CANDU so successful. When time for change comes, current assessments indicate that it will be possible to convert to more efficient advanced fuel cycles without major changes to the basic CANDU design. Primary attention is being focussed on thorium fuel cycles to ensure an abundant and continuing supply of low cost energy for the long term. The resource savings available from these fuel cycles in expanding systems are reviewed and compared with those available from LWR's and Fast Breeders. The results clearly illustrate the versatility of the CANDU reactor. It can benefit from enrichment plants or get along without them. It can complement LWR's or compete with them. It can complement Fast Breeder Reactors or compete with them as well. In the very long term CANDU's and Fast Breeders combined offer the potential of burning all the world's uranium and all the world's thorium. (author)

  5. Vertical distribution and temporal dynamics of dissolved 137Cs concentrations in soil water after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagami, Sho; Onda, Yuichi; Tsujimura, Maki; Hada, Manami; Pun, Ishwar

    2017-11-01

    Radiocesium ( 137 Cs) migration from headwater forested areas to downstream rivers has been investigated in many studies since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, which was triggered by a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The accident resulted in the release of a huge amount of radioactivity and its subsequent deposition in the environment. A large part of the radiocesium released has been shown to remain in the forest. The dissolved 137 Cs concentration and its temporal dynamics in river water, stream water, and groundwater have been reported, but reports of dissolved 137 Cs concentration in soil water remain sparse. In this study, soil water was sampled, and the dissolved 137 Cs concentrations were measured at five locations with different land-use types (mature/young cedar forest, broadleaf forest, meadow land, and pasture land) in Yamakiya District, located 35 km northwest of FDNPP from July 2011 to October 2012. Soil water samples were collected by suction lysimeters installed at three different depths at each site. Dissolved 137 Cs concentrations were analyzed using a germanium gamma ray detector. The dissolved 137 Cs concentrations in soil water were high, with a maximum value of 2.5 Bq/L in July 2011, and declined to less than 0.32 Bq/L by 2012. The declining trend of dissolved 137 Cs concentrations in soil water was fitted to a two-component exponential model. The rate of decline in dissolved 137 Cs concentrations in soil water (k 1 ) showed a good correlation with the radiocesium interception potential (RIP) of topsoil (0-5 cm) at the same site. Accounting for the difference of 137 Cs deposition density, we found that normalized dissolved 137 Cs concentrations of soil water in forest (mature/young cedar forest and broadleaf forest) were higher than those in grassland (meadow land and pasture land). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Removal of heavy metals from waste water of tanning leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LG

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... The results indicate that fungi of contaminated soils have high level of metal biosorption capacities. ... such as mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, copper, chromium and ... considered as an alternative remediation for heavy.

  7. incidence of heavy metals in kano metropolis drinking water sources

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    corrosion of brass fittings of certain submersible pumps and pipes used in borehole and taps specifically. The contamination of well with heavy metals might be due to seepage of sewage ... Chloride determination (Agumetric method):.

  8. Dissolved Pesticide Concentrations Detected in Storm-Water Runoff at Selected Sites in the San Joaquin River Basin, California, 2000-2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orlando, James L; Kuivila, Kathryn M; Whitehead, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    ...) and the University of California Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory (BML) water samples were collected at three sites within the San Joaquin River Basin of California and analyzed for dissolved pesticides...

  9. Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Total Dissolved Solids from Coal Mine Water: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coal mine water (CMW) is typically treated to remove suspended solids, acidity, and soluble metals, but high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) have been reported to impact the environment at several CMW discharge points. Consequently, various states have establishe...

  10. Heavy metal contamination of soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site: implications for dissemination of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qihang; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Geng, Xinhua; Chen, Shejun; Huang, Xuexia; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Zhuying; Zhu, Libin; Chen, Jiahao; Lu, Yayin

    2015-02-15

    Illegal e-waste recycling activity has caused heavy metal pollution in many developing countries, including China. In recent years, the Chinese government has strengthened enforcement to impede such activity; however, the heavy metals remaining in the abandoned e-waste recycling site can still pose ecological risk. The present study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site in Longtang, South China. Results showed that the surface soil of the former burning and acid-leaching sites was still heavily contaminated with Cd (>0.39 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (>1981 mg kg(-1)), which exceeded their respective guideline levels. The concentration of heavy metals generally decreased with depth in both burning site and paddy field, which is related to the elevated pH and reduced TOM along the depth gradient. The pond water was seriously acidified and contaminated with heavy metals, while the well water was slightly contaminated since heavy metals were mostly retained in the surface soil. The use of pond water for irrigation resulted in considerable heavy metal contamination in the paddy soil. Compared with previous studies, the reduced heavy metal concentrations in the surface soil imply that heavy metals were transported to the other areas, such as pond. Therefore, immediate remediation of the contaminated soil and water is necessary to prevent dissemination of heavy metals and potential ecological disaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Halogens in pore water of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Halogens are strongly enriched in peat and peatlands and such they are one of their largest active terrestrial reservoir. The enrichment of halogens in peat is mainly attributed to the formation of organohalogens and climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release of halogens from the peat substrate and the distribution of halogens in the peat pore water. In this study we have investigated the distribution of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water of three pristine peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat pore waters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth greater than 6m. Halogens and halogen species in pore water were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in pore water are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123 μg l−1, and 10–20 μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organobromine and organoiodine were the predominant species in pore waters, whereas chlorine in pore water was mostly chloride. Advection and diffusion of halogens were found to be generally low and halogen concentrations appear to reflect release from the peat substrate. Release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. It has been concluded that the release of halogenated dissolved organic matter (DOM is the predominant mechanism of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  12. Corrosion, inspection and other problems associated with Heat exchangers in the heavy water industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion, fabrication and inspection problems encountered in the heavy water industry Heat exchangers are discussed. Among the problems examined are erosion/corrosion of two pass exchangers, rolling of tubes, pitting, fretting and protection for long term storage. (auth)

  13. A progress review of Ontario Hydro's nuclear generation and heavy water production programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kee, F.J.; Woodhead, L.W.

    Performance and economics of CANDU reactors in service are described. Progress of commissioning, construction and planning of reactors at Pickering, Bruce, and Darlington is outlined. Heavy water production is reviewed. (E.C.B.)

  14. "Periodic-table-style" paper device for monitoring heavy metals in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaosi; Cao, Rong; Nilghaz, Azadeh; Guan, Liyun; Zhang, Xiwang; Shen, Wei

    2015-03-03

    If a paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) could be made by printing indicators for detection of heavy metals in chemical symbols of the metals in a style of the periodic table of elements, it could be possible for such μ-PAD to report the presence and the safety level of heavy metal ions in water simultaneously and by text message. This device would be able to provide easy solutions to field-based monitoring of heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharges and in irrigating and drinking water. Text-reporting could promptly inform even nonprofessional users of the water quality. This work presents a proof of concept study of this idea. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Cr(VI) were chosen to demonstrate the feasibility, specificity, and reliability of paper-based text-reporting devices for monitoring heavy metals in water.

  15. Assessment of heavy metal residues in water, fish tissue and human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Residual levels of lead, chromium, cadmium and zinc in water and fish tissue from. Ubeji River ... Key Words : Heavy metal residues , Fish tissue, Human blood, Ubeji River. ... is of critical concern because of their toxicity and.

  16. Application of brown coal activated mechanically at disposal of heavy metal from waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezovska, M.

    2003-01-01

    Sorptive characteristics of activated brown coal from mine of Novaky and impact of mechanical activation on sorption of heavy metals from water were examined. Experimental results indicate suitable choice and good absorption ability of used material

  17. A Review of Laboratory-Scale Research on Upgrading Heavy Oil in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for energy and the depletion of conventional crude oil, heavy oil in huge reserve has attracted extensive attention. However, heavy oil cannot be directly refined by existing processes unless they are upgraded due to its complex composition and high concentration of heteroatoms (N, S, Ni, V, etc.. Of the variety of techniques for heavy oil upgrading, supercritical water (SCW is gaining popularity because of its excellent ability to convert heavy oil into valued, clean light oil by the suppression of coke formation and the removal of heteroatoms. Based on the current status of this research around the world, heavy oil upgrading in SCW is summarized from three aspects: Transformation of hydrocarbons, suppression of coke, and removal of heteroatoms. In this work, the challenge and future development of the orientation of upgrading heavy oil in SCW are pointed out.

  18. Heavy metal baseline data for Kura water and harmonization of monitoring methodology along Kura river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadov, M.M.; Balayev, V.S.; Safarova, K.S.; Ibragimov, G.; Suleymanov, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : The river the Kura is main water artery of Azerbaijan Republic. In republic, the Kura river water are widely used for drinking and industrial water supply of a number of cities and large occupied items, irrigation pisciculture and fishery, cultural - improving purposes. The basic part of need of branches of a national economy of republic is satisfied with water of the Transit Rivers, main of which the Kura and her inflows are. Increased risk of pollution of waters pool the Kura realizes by the large economic project, such as the construction oil pipe line to a Baku - Supsa, Baku -Tbilisi-Ceyhan in connection with constant growth of a level oil producing shows, that the basic research of an ecological condition the Kura, is a urgent task now. As is known these pipelines there passes by pool the river the Kura and some times cross it. The disputed situation between Azerbaijan and Armenia, seismic activity of region and further periodic clearing inside of the pipeline once again requires the regular ecological control above ecosystem of Kura river pool. For the baseline data creation, in present work were investigated of trace heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) and major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) in water of the river Kura. Identification and quantification of trace metals sources in river Kura, as well as fate of those trace metals in that ecosystem are important environmental scientific issues. The samples for measurement were taken from the predefined stations at expedition executed in the period 2003-2005 y y. The dissolved metals and major cations were defined from samples filtered through membranous the filter pore size 0.45 micro m, without preliminary sample preparation. The analysis of trace heavy metals in the filtered samples, carried out in Perkin Elmer model, Analyst 800 atomic absorption spectrometer with Zeeman background corrector by electrothermal atomization. The Analyst 800 has auto sampler such as AS 800 and due

  19. Measurement of the heavy water level in the fuel channels of the RA reactor - Annex 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, M.

    1964-01-01

    The objective of measuring the heavy water level in the reactor channels was to verify experimentally the possibilities of reactor cooling with parallel operation of heavy water pumps od 1500 rotations/min at nominal power of 6.5 MW. Measurements were done in 2 periphery and 2 central fuel channels with pumps speed 1500, 1800 and 3000 rotations/min by a contact probe with electric resistance measuring device. precision of the measurement was ±1 cm

  20. A study on the establishment of component/equipment performance criteria considering Heavy Water Reactor characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Keun Sun; Kwon, Young Chul; Lee, Min Kyu; Lee, Yun Soo [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Seong Hoong; Ryo, Chang Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soong Pyung; Hwnag, Jung Rye; Chung, Chul Kee [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Foreign and domestic technology trends, regulatory requirements, design and researches for heavy water reactors are analyzed. Safety design guides of Canada industry and regulatory documents and consultative documents of Canada regulatory agency are reviewed. Applicability of MOST guidance 16 Revision 'guidance for technical criteria of nuclear reactor facility' is reviewed. Specific performance criteria are established for components and facilities for heavy water reactor.

  1. Ground water dating on the basis of the 14C content of dissolved humic and fulvic acids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Artinger, R.; Buckau, G.; Kardinal, C.; Geyer, S.; Wolf, M.; Halder, H.; Fritz, P.

    1995-05-01

    The groundwater dating on the basis of the 14 C content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is studied. Fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) are used as DOC fractions. In addition, the groundwaters are dated with the 14 C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The isotopic contents of 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 15 N, 18 O, and 34 S of groundwater and humic substances are alse determined. The isolated humic substances are characterized with regard to their chemical composition as well as their molecular size and spectroscopic properties. For aquifer systems which have a neglectable content of sedimentary organic carbon (SOC), the 14 C dating of FA show plausible groundwater ages. In aquifer systems with a high SOC content, the mixing of 14 C free FA from sediment partly falsifies the 14 C groundwater age as determined by dissolved FA. Due to the high transfer of HA from sediment to groundwater, HA are less suitable for groundwater dating. The FA characterization allows the distinction between FA of sedimentary origin and FA which infiltrate with seepage water. Several starting points for a correction of the calculated 14 C ages of FA exist. The results indicate, 14 C groundwater dating with fulvic acids is a valuable expansion of groundwater dating methods. (orig.) [de

  2. Elucidating mechanisms of toxic action of dissolved organic chemicals in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Garrett D; Wiseman, Steve B; Guan, Miao; Zhang, Xiaowei W; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2017-11-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is generated during extraction of bitumen in the surface-mining oil sands industry in Alberta, Canada, and is acutely and chronically toxic to aquatic organisms. It is known that dissolved organic compounds in OSPW are responsible for most toxic effects, but knowledge of the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity, is limited. Using bioassay-based effects-directed analysis, the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW has previously been fractionated, ultimately producing refined samples of dissolved organic chemicals in OSPW, each with distinct chemical profiles. Using the Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 gene reporter live cell array, the present study investigated relationships between toxic potencies of each fraction, expression of genes and characterization of chemicals in each of five acutely toxic and one non-toxic extract of OSPW derived by use of effects-directed analysis. Effects on expressions of genes related to response to oxidative stress, protein stress and DNA damage were indicative of exposure to acutely toxic extracts of OSPW. Additionally, six genes were uniquely responsive to acutely toxic extracts of OSPW. Evidence presented supports a role for sulphur- and nitrogen-containing chemical classes in the toxicity of extracts of OSPW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in organs of fresh water fish Cyprinus carpio (Common carp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodhini, R.; Narayanan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in various organs of the fresh water fish exposed to heavy metal contaminated water system. The experimental fish was exposed to Cr. Ni, Cd and Pb at sublethal concentrations for periods of 32 days. The elements Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr were assayed using Shimadzu AA 6200 atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the results were given as μg/g dry wt. The accumulation of heavy metal gradually increases in liver during the heavy metal exposure period. All the results were statistically significant at p Pb > Ni > Cr and Pb > Cd > Ni > Cr. Similarly, in case of kidney and flesh tissues, the order was Pb > Cd > Cr > Ni and Pb > Cr > Cd > Ni. In all heavy metals, the bioaccumulation of lead and cadmium proportion was significantly increased in the tissues of Cyprinus carpio (Common carp)

  4. Heavy metal contamination of water and fish in peri-urban dams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metals were measured in water, sediment and fish in dams located downstream of effluent discharge zones in Bulawayo and were compared to those in a pristine upstream dam. Water conductivity indicated pollution of downstream dams. Levels of lead (0.13 – 0.28 ppm) and cadmium (0.02 – 0.06 ppm) in water from ...

  5. Identification of dissolved organic matter in raw water supply from reservoirs and canals as precursors to trihalomethanes formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musikavong, Charongpun; Wattanachira, Suraphong

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) as trihalomethanes precursors in water from the U-Tapao Basin, Songkhla, Thailand was investigated. The sources of water in the basin consisted of two reservoirs and the U-Tapao canal. The canal receives water discharge from reservoirs, treated and untreated wastewater from agricultural processes, communities and industries. Water downstream of the canal is utilized as a raw water supply. Water samples were collected from two reservoirs, upstream and midstream of the canal, and the raw water supply in the rainy season and summer. The DOM level in the canal water was higher than that of the reservoir water. The highest trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) was formed in the raw water supply. Fourier-transform infrared peaks of the humic acid were detected in the reservoir and canal waters. Aliphatic hydrocarbon and organic nitrogen were the major chemical classes in the reservoir and canal water characterized by a pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometer. The optimal condition of the poly aluminum chloride (PACl) coagulation was obtained at a dosage of 40 mg/L at pH 7. This condition could reduce the average UV-254 to 57%, DOC to 64%, and THMFP to 42%. In the coagulated water, peaks of O-H groups or H-bonded NH, C˭O of cyclic and acyclic compounds, ketones and quinines, aromatic C˭C, C-O of alcohols, ethers, and carbohydrates, deformation of COOH, and carboxylic acid salts were detected. The aliphatic hydrocarbon, organic nitrogen and aldehydes and ketones were the major chemical classes. These DOM could be considered as the prominent DOM for the water supply plant that utilized PACl as a coagulant.

  6. The projects for heavy water production of the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Bourg, J.M.; Garcia, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    The bases and scope of the projects for heavy water production that are being currently developed by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) are described. As an introduction, the following points are presented: a) the fundamentals of heavy water utilization in a nuclear reactor, with a mention of its properties and uses, b) a review of the physicochemical bases of the principal methods for heavy water production: chemical exchange (monothermal and bithermal processes), distillation and electrolysis, with tables summarizing the fundamental characteristics of the first two ones, and an evaluation of the different production methods from the viewpoint of their application in an industrial scale; and c) a synthetic information, in the form of tables, about the world's heavy water production. The subject of heavy water production in Argentina is treated in the principal section, describing the scope, location, main characteristics and chemical processes corresponding to the projects being developed by CNEA, which currently are the installation of an Industrial Plant in Arroyito (Province of Neuquen), purchased on a turnkey basis and using the NH 3 /H 2 isotopic exchange method; the installation of an Experimental Plant in Atucha (Province of Buenos Aires), for the development of the domestic technology of heavy-water production by the SH 2 /H 2 O isotopic exchange method, and the development of the engineering of an industrial plant (''Module 80''), based on the Experimental Plant's technology. (M.E.L.) [es

  7. 1000 tones of heavy water produced at ROMAG PROD, Drobeta-Turnu Severin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    On May 25, 2001 the heavy water plant ROMAG PROD at Drobeta-Turnu Severin recorded the production of the 1000-th tone of nuclear purity heavy water. The heavy water plant ROMAG PROD makes use of a technology based on the results of isotopic deuterium separation research carried out at the Research and Design Institutes of Cluj, Craiova, Pitesti and Ploiesti during 1957-1970 and the separation technology tested at Ramnicu-Valcea pilot plant (at present the Cryogenics and Isotope Separation Institute). The first investments at ROMAG PROD were made in 1979 and on July 17, 1988 was produced the first amount of heavy water at the required parameters for CANDU type nuclear reactors. The period between 1990-1992 was dedicated to the project completion, upgrading the technological facilities and retrofitting the environmental protection and monitoring systems. Production was resumed in 1992. The first 500 t of heavy water required for the Cernavoda NPP first reactor operation were produced by summer 1997. The additional amount of 500 t of heavy water was produced between 1997-2001. ROMAG PROD obtained the ISO 9001/2001 certificate for the quality management system, the ISO 14001/1997 certificate for the environmental management system and the new environmental permit

  8. Uncertainty analysis of LBLOCA for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Lele, H.G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2008-01-01

    , uncertainty analysis for the Large Break LOCA (200% Inlet Header Break) of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out. The uncertainty analysis was carried out for the peak cladding temperature (PCT), based on the two different methods i.e., Wilk's method and the response surface technique. Their findings have also been compared

  9. Experience with dilute chemical decontamination in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Subramanian, Veena; Mittal, V.K.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) process has been used in several full system and components of nuclear coolant systems to effectively remove the radioactive contaminants that causes radiation field and consequent MANREM problem. The DCD process uses chemicals in very low concentrations (millimolar) and dissolves the oxide film along with the activity incorporated in the oxide film. In DCD process operated under the regenerative mode, the chemical formulation spent in the process of oxide dissolution is replenished by passing through cation exchange columns. Finally, after achieving sufficient decontamination of the system/component, the added decontamination chemicals along with the activities and metal ions released during the process are removed by mixed bed ion exchange columns and the system is restored to normal operating condition in few days time. In PHWRs, the regenerative DCD process is applied for full primary coolant system decontamination. The chemicals are added directly to the heavy water coolant with the fuel in the core. In Indian PHWRs (MAPS-1 and 2, RAPS-1 and 2, NAPS-1 and 2 and KAPS-1), the process has been applied eleven times. A chemical formulation based on NTA, Citric acid and Ascorbic acid has been applied seven times with good results. Decontamination factors in the range 2-30 have been obtained in different components with good MANREM savings in the subsequent maintenance works. Efforts are on to modify the process to take care of the challenges posed by antimony isotope. An inhibitor (Rodine-92B) based process was successfully tested in NAPS-2 for removing antimony isotopes ( 122 Sb and 124 Sb). Further refining of the antimony removal process is being worked out. Similarly, the process is being modified to effectively remove the hotspot causing stellite particles in the moderator system of PHWRs. A permanganate based process has been developed and tested in several adjustor rod drive mechanisms in KAPS and NAPS. The experience of

  10. PROCESS OF DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION IN THE TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER PUMPING IN THE INDUSTRY OF FISH MEAL

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Colotta, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper experimentally studies the separation of pollutants in waste water from industry meal and fish oil, through a process of dissolved air flotation (DAF). The experimental results showed a removal of 60% SS, 98% and 66% BOD FOG. En este trabajo se estudia experimentalmente la separación de contaminantes en aguas residuales provenientes de la industria de la harina y aceite de pescado, mediante un proceso de flotación con aire disuelto(DAF). Los resultados experimentales muestran un...

  11. The effects of charge, polymerization, and cluster size on the diffusivity of dissolved Si species in pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant cation in crustal rocks. The charge and degree of polymerization of dissolved Si significantly change depending on solution pH and Si concentration. We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the self-diffusion coefficients of dissolved Si, DSi, for 15 monomeric and polymeric species at ambient temperature. The results showed that DSi decreased with increasing negative charge and increasing degree of polymerization. The relationship between DSi and charge (Z) can be expressed by DSi/10-6 = 2.0 + 9.8e0.47Z, and that between DSi and number of polymerization (NSi) by DSi/10-6 = 9.7/NSi0.56. The results also revealed that multiple Si molecules assembled into a cluster and D decreased as the cluster size increased. Experiments to evaluate the diffusivity of Si in pore water revealed that the diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing Si concentration, a result consistent with the MD simulations. Simulation results can now be used to quantitatively assess water-rock interactions and water-concrete reactions over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions.

  12. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  13. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  14. A study of pollution extent in some drinking water resources by heavy elements in Hadramout governorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barheyan, Saad Awadh

    2001-01-01

    The paper is considered as a preliminary study of pollution extent in some drinking water resources in Hadramout governorate by heavy elements which differ in their toxicity. The elements subjected to study are Cd, Pb, Fe, Cr, Mn, Zn, Co and Cu. Atomic absorption spectrometric method of analysis (AAS) is used for the determination of heavy elements concentrations. The elemental analysis of drinking water samples shows that the concentration of the above-mentioned elements in drinking water resources, lies in the permissible limit given by the WHO. Similarity of elements content is observed in Thela and Fuwah waters, bu the case is different for Ghail Bawzeer and Asshihir waters due to their different lithospheric structures. Drinking water used by the civilians is not subjected to physical, biological or chemical treatment which may lead to total or partial removal of heavy elements and other rejected impurities. Drinking water running in distribution nets is a hard water and has a weak base (Ph which explains the reason why heavy elements are absorbed and precipitated inside drinking water pipes before they reach consumers. This type of hard water causes accumulation of salt precipitates inside the water pipes which results in many economic and health disturbances to consumers. The slight increase of Cr, Mn, and Co concentration in drinking water flowing in the pipes may be due to the effect of some anions such as nitrates which form soluble compounds with the elements contained in the chemical composition of the drinking water pipes. This paper is a strong indicator for determination of heavy elements concentrations in different drinking water resources in Hadramout govemorate. Such approach seeks a further comprehensive work with special focus on the study of lithospheric structure of the feeding water regions of Hadramout aquifers. (author)

  15. Construction management of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohra, S.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and Dr. Homi J. Bhabha, the visionary architects of Science and Technology of modern India foresaw the imperative need to establish a firm base for indigenous research and development in the field of nuclear electricity generation. The initial phase has primarily focused on the technology development in a systematic and structured manner, which has resulted in establishment of strong engineering, manufacturing and construction base. The nuclear power program started with the setting up of two units of boiling light water type reactors in 1969 for speedy establishment of nuclear technology, safety culture, and development of operation and maintenance manpower. The main aim at that stage was to demonstrate (to ourselves, and indeed to the rest of the world) that India, inspite of being a developing country, with limited industrial infrastructure and low capacity power grids, could successfully assimilate the high technology involved in the safe and economical operation of nuclear power reactors. The selection of a BWR was in contrast to the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR), which was identified as the flagship for the first stage of India's nuclear power program. The long-term program in three stages utilizes large reserves of thorium in the monazite sands of Kerala beaches in the third stage with first stage comprising of series of PHWR type plants with a base of 10,000 MW. India has at present 14 reactors in operation 12 of these being of PHWR type. The performance of operating units of 2720 MW has improved significantly with an overall capacity factor of about 90% in recent times. The construction work on eight reactor units with installed capacity of 3960 MW (two PHWRs of 540 MW each, four PHWRs of 220 MW each and two VVERs of 1000 MW each) is proceeding on a rapid pace with project schedules of less than 5 years from first pour of concrete. This is being achieved through advanced construction technology and management. Present

  16. Heavy metal driven co-selection of antibiotic resistance in soil and water bodies impacted by agriculture and aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Seiler, Claudia; Berendonk, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of antibiotic agents as growth promoters was banned in animal husbandry to prevent the selection and spread of antibiotic resistance. However, in addition to antibiotic agents, heavy metals used in animal farming and aquaculture might promote the spread of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. To investigate which heavy metals are likely to co-select for antibiotic resistance in soil and water, the available data on heavy metal pollution, heavy metal toxicity, heavy metal tolerance ...

  17. Dissolved gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of gaseous nitrogen, argon, oxygen and helium dissolved in groundwater are often different from their concentrations in rain and surface waters. These differences reflect changes in the gas content occurring after rain or surface water, having infiltrated into the ground, become isolated from equilibrium contact with the atmosphere. A study of these changes can give insight into the origin and subsequent subsurface history of groundwater. Nitrogen and argon concentrations for many groundwaters in southern Africa indicate that excess air is added to water during infiltration. The amount of excess air is believed to reflect the physical structure of the unsaturated zone and the climate of the recharge area. Since nitrogen and argon are essentially conservative in many aquifer environments in South Africa, their concentrations can be used in distinguishing grondwaters of different recharge origins. In some areas the high helium content of the groundwater suggests that much of the helium is derived through migration from a source outside (e.g. below) the aquifer itself. Radiogenic helium concentrations nevertheless show, in two artesian aquifers, a close linear relationship to the radiocarbon age of the groundwater. This indicates a uniformity in the factors responsible for the accumulation of helium, and suggests that in these circumstances helium data can be used to give information on the age of very old groundwater. In some groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations are found to decrease with increasing groundwater age. Whilst the rate of decrease may be very different for different aquifers, the field measurement of oxygen may be useful in preliminary surveys directed toward the location of recharge areas

  18. Optical Proxies for Dissolved Organic Matter in Estuaries and Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, C. L.; Montgomery, M. T.; Boyd, T. J.; Bianchi, T. S.; Coffin, R. B.; Paerl, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    The flux of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean from rivers and estuaries is a major part of the ocean's carbon cycle. Absorbing and fluorescing properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) often are used to fingerprint its sources and to track fluxes of terrestrial DOM into the ocean. They also are used as proxies for organic matter to calibrate remote sensing observations from air and space and from in situ platforms. In general, strong relationships hold for large river dominated estuaries (e.g., the Mississippi River) but little is known about how widely such relationships can be developed in estuaries that have relatively small or multiple riverine inputs. Results are presented from a comparison of six diverse estuarine systems: the Atchafalaya River (ARE), the Mackenzie River (MRE), the Chesapeake Bay (CBE), Charleston Harbor (CHE), Puget Sound (PUG), and the Neuse River (NRE). Mean DOM concentrations ranged from 100 to 700 µM and dissolved lignin concentrations ranged from ca. 3-30 µg L-1. Overall trends were linear between CDOM measured at 350 nm (a350) and DOC concentration (R2=0.77) and between a350 and lignin (R2=0.87). Intercepts of a350 vs lignin were not significantly different from zero (P=0.43) suggesting that most of the CDOM was terrestrial in nature. Deviations from these regressions were strongest in the Neuse River Estuary, the most eutrophic of the six estuaries studied. After this calibration procedure, fluorescence modeling via parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to make estimates of terrigenous and planktonic DOC in these estuaries.

  19. Impact of catchment geophysical characteristics and climate on the regional variability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Geneviève; Lebel, Alexandre; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-08-15

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a recognized indicator of natural organic matter (NOM) in surface waters. The aim of this paper is twofold: to evaluate the impact of geophysical characteristics, climate and ecological zones on DOC concentrations in surface waters and, to develop a statistical model to estimate the regional variability of these concentrations. In this study, multilevel statistical analysis was used to achieve three specific objectives: (1) evaluate the influence of climate and geophysical characteristics on DOC concentrations in surface waters; (2) compare the influence of geophysical characteristics and ecological zones on DOC concentrations in surface waters; and (3) develop a model to estimate the most accurate DOC concentrations in surface waters. The case study involved 115 catchments from surface waters in the Province of Quebec, Canada. Results showed that mean temperatures recorded 60 days prior to sampling, total precipitation 10 days prior to sampling and percentages of wetlands, coniferous forests and mixed forests have a significant positive influence on DOC concentrations in surface waters. The catchment mean slope had a significant negative influence on DOC concentrations in surface waters. Water type (lake or river) and deciduous forest variables were not significant. The ecological zones had a significant influence on DOC concentrations. However, geophysical characteristics (wetlands, forests and slope) estimated DOC concentrations more accurately. A model describing the variability of DOC concentrations was developed and can be used, in future research, for estimating DBPs in drinking water as well evaluating the impact of climate change on the quality of surface waters and drinking water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Physicochemical Characteristics and Heavy Metal Levels in Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    installations and automobiles, petrochemical industries, the glass factory and other product industries. Mining as well as other domestic activities contributes to heavy metal concentration and sediment load within an environment. This is the case with the Ashaka and Ughelli rivers where oil exploratory activities have led to ...