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Sample records for water dispersible clay

  1. Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Christoffer; Nordstierna, Lars; Nordin, Matias; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed.

  2. Preparation of thermally stable well-dispersed water-soluble CdTe quantum dots in montmorillonite clay host media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng

    2012-02-15

    In this work, a method to prepare a thermally stable QDs/clay powder is reported. First, several water soluble CdTe QDs characterised by different size-dependent emission wavelengths were synthesised through wet chemistry. Montmorillonite-Na(+) clay in water was dispersed into a muddy suspension by sonication. Then, the clay-water suspension was used as the host media for CdTe QDs to prepare the QDs/clay powder by freeze drying. The experiments showed that QDs/clay powder could be re-dispersed in water without changing the luminescent property of the QDs; this process was reversible. EDX showed that Cd and Te elements existed in the QDs/clay powder and the XRD tests showed that the clay [001] reflection peaks for raw clay, QDs (λ(em)=514 nm)/clay and QDs (λ(em)=560 nm)/clay were the same, namely 2θ=7.4°. Finally, QDs/clay powder was applied to the HDPE polymer extrusion process at 200 °C to produce thin films; the resultant QDs-polymer nanocomposite film exhibited strong fluorescence.

  3. Factors affecting clay dispersion in oxisols treated with vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thadeu Rodrigues de Melo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinasse is a potassium-rich waste generated in large amounts by the ethanol production that, applied in the soil, can promote changes in water dispersible clay and in its physical quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clay dispersion of Oxisols after vinasse application and correlate it with some chemical attributes. Samples were collected in two Oxisols (155 and 471 g of clay kg-1, put in pots, received dosages of vinasse (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 m3 ha-1 and remained incubated during 120 days. Phosphorous, organic carbon, pH H2O, pH KCl, pH CaCl2, Al3+, H+Al3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Delta pH and the proportion between monovalent and bivalent cations have been evaluated and correlated with the clay flocculation degree. Vinasse changed almost all chemical variables in both soils and increased the flocculation in the sandy soil, but did not change the clayey one. Delta pH, Mg2+ and K+ significantly correlated with the flocculation degree in the sandy soil. It is possible to conclude that the dispersive effect of K+ added by vinasse are irrelevant, considering the flocculant effect caused by the increment in Mg2+ and Delta pH after vinasse application.

  4. THE EFFECT OF CLAY DISPERSION ON THE CRYSTALLIZATION AND MORPHOLOGY OF POLYPROPYLENE/CLAY COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zhang; Xiao-lin Gao; Ke Wang; Qiang Fu

    2004-01-01

    PP/clay composites with different dispersions, namely, exfoliated dispersion, intercalated dispersion and agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, were prepared by direct melt intercalation or compounding. The effect of clay dispersion on the crystallization and morphology of PP was investigated via PLM, SAXS and DSC. Experimental results show that exfoliated clay layers are much more efficient than intercalated clay and agglomerates of clay in serving as nucleation agent due to the nano-scale dispersion of clay, resulting in a dramatic decrease in crystal size (lamellar thickness and spherulites) and an increase of crystallization temperature and crystallization rate. On the other hand, a decrease of melting temperature and crystallinity was also observed in PP/clay composites with exfoliated dispersion, due to the strong interaction between PP and clay. Compared with exfoliated clay layers, the intercalated clay layers have a less important effect on the crystallization and crystal morphology. No effect is seen for samples with agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, in regard to melting temperature, crystallization temperature, crystal thickness and crystallinity.

  5. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  6. Effects of clay dispersion on aquifer storage and recovery in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, L.F.; August, L.L.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of freshwater in brackish aquifers is a form of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) that can beneficially supplement water supplies in coastal areas. A 1970s field experiment in Norfolk, Virginia, showed that clay dispersion in the unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer occurred because of cation exchange on clay minerals as freshwater displaced brackish formation water. Migration of interstitial clay particles clogged pores, reduced permeability, and decreased recovery efficiency, but a calcium preflush was found to reduce clay dispersion and lead to a higher recovery efficiency. Column experiments were performed in this study to quantify the relations between permeability changes and clay mineralogy, clay content, and initial water salinity. The results of these experiments indicate that dispersion of montmorillonite clay is a primary contributor to formation damage. The reduction in permeability by clay dispersion may be expressed as a linear function of chloride content. Incorporating these simple functions into a radial, cross-sectional, variable-density, ground-water flow and transport model yielded a satisfactory simulation of the Norfolk field test - and represented an improvement over the model that ignored changes in permeability. This type of model offers a useful planning and design tool for ASR operations in coastal clastic aquifer systems.

  7. Water-dispersible clay in soils treated with sewage sludge Argila dispersa em água em solos tratados com lodo de esgoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tavares Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A by-product of Wastewater Treatment Stations is sewage sludge. By treatment and processing, the sludge is made suitable for rational and environmentally safe use in agriculture. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different doses of limed sewage sludge (50 % on clay dispersion in soil samples with different textures (clayey and medium. The study was conducted with soil samples collected from native forest, on a Red Latosol (Brazilian classification: Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico loamy soil in Londrina (PR and a Red-Yellow Latosol (BC: Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico medium texture soil in Jaguapitã (PR. Pots were filled with 3 kg of air-dried fine earth and kept in greenhouse. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with six treatments: T1 control, and treatments with limed sewage sludge (50 % as follows: T2 (3 t ha-1, T3 (6 t ha-1, T4 (12 t ha-1, T5 (24 t ha-1 and T6 (48 t ha-1 and five replications. The incubation time was 180 days. At the end of this period, the pots were opened and two sub-samples per treatment collected to determine pH-H2O, pH KCl (1 mol L-1, organic matter content, water-dispersible clay, ΔpH (pH KCl - pH-H2O and estimated PZC (point of zero charge: PZC = 2 pH KCl - pH-H2O, as well as the mineralogy of the clay fraction, determined by X ray diffraction. The results showed no significant difference in the average values for water-dispersible clay between the control and the other treatments for the two soil samples studied and ΔpH was the variable that correlated best with water-dispersible clay in both soils.As Estações de Tratamento de Esgoto Sanitário (ETES geram um subproduto (lodo de esgoto que, quando tratado e processado, adquire características que permitem sua utilização agrícola de maneira racional e ambientalmente segura. Este trabalho objetivou avaliar a influência de diferentes doses de lodo de esgoto caleado (50 % na dispersão de argilas em amostras de

  8. Unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This communication reports a unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite. A nanocomposite of poly[butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) with 3 wt% of organically modified montmorillonite was prepared by melt...

  9. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  10. Clay dispersability in moist earthworm casts of different soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Nijhuis, E.; Breemen, van N.

    1996-01-01

    Earthworms were fed soil from two polders, differing in soil age and land use (grass and arable). Sterilised and non-sterilised moist earthworm casts were, directly or after ageing (for 2, 4, 8 and 20 weeks), analysed for clay dispersability and polysaccharide content, either as such, or after treat

  11. Probing the water interactions in clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.H. [Lausanne Univ., Lausanne (Switzerland); Fischer, H.E. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    Clays, the microscopic mineral fraction of soils, are probably the most important substrate for interactions between water, the mineral world and the biosphere. A knowledge of the structuring of water and hydrated metal ions near clays surfaces is of importance in environmental science, including toxic and radioactive waste disposal, and in the industrial application of clays. The smectite clays, with their large hydrated internal surface areas represent excellent model systems for the interactions of aqueous phases with solid surface. We present the results of neutron diffraction experiments using isotopic substitutions to probe the structure in the aqueous interlayer region of Li-montmorillonite. (authors) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  12. The influence of clay type on reduction of water repellency by applied clays: a review of some West Australian work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKissock, I.; Walker, E. L.; Gilkes, R. J.; Carter, D. J.

    2000-05-01

    In Western Australia water repellency mostly occurs in soils with sandy texture; the severity of water repellency is influenced by very small changes in clay content. Additions of 1-2% clay can prevent water repellency and for some time clay amendments have been used by farmers to overcome water repellency. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of clays in ameliorating water repellency. Clays were assessed for effectiveness in reducing water repellency by mixing with water repellent sands and measuring water drop penetration time (WDPT) on the resultant mixtures. WDPT was measured on the initial mixtures, a wetting and drying cycle was imposed and WDPT measured again. Two sets of clays were assessed: four simple clays containing kaolinite (2) or smectite (2) group minerals and a group of clayey subsoil materials which had been collected by farmers. For the simple clays, clay mineral type was the most significant factor in determining response. Kaolin was much more effective than smectite. Imposition of a wetting and drying cycle greatly reduced water repellency. The dominant exchangeable cation of the clays (sodium or calcium) had little effect on the ability of the clays to reduce water repellency. The factor that was most predictive of the effectiveness of clayey subsoils materials in reducing water repellency was texture: clay content ( r2=0.18) or clay+silt content ( r2=0.23). These properties were more predictive of water repellency values after the wetting and drying cycle treatment ( r2=0.36, r2=0.44). The proportion of the clay fraction that consisted of kaolinite was next most predictive in determining effectiveness which is again indicative of kaolin group minerals being more effective than smectite group minerals. The exchangeable sodium percentage and clay dispersibility had no systematic effect on the ability of these clays to reduce water repellency. These results provide a basis for developing a practical field procedure to enable

  13. Effects of Using Pozzolan and Portland Cement in the Treatment of Dispersive Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Vakili, A. H.; Selamat, M. R.; H. Moayedi

    2013-01-01

    Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable o...

  14. Organic farming effects on clay dispersion in carbon-exhausted soils

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2009-01-01

    Many Danish soils are depleted in organic matter (OM) after decades of intensive cereal cultivation (Schjønning et al., 2009). In this paper we show that clay particles (colloids) in soils that are low in OM content are easily dispersed in the soil water, which in turn has important effects on soil ecosystem functions and services. Organic farming systems generally tend to increase soil OM contents and may thus mitigate the negative effects.

  15. Influência da qualidade da água de irrigação na dispersão da argila de Latossolos Irrigation water quality influence on clay dispersive behavior of Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofre Barroca de Almeida Neto

    2009-12-01

    , proporcionaram diminuição no teor de argila dispersa (ADA-S nos solos LV e LVd.The phenomenon of dispersion of soil clay can be caused by the quality of irrigation water. This study investigated the effect of irrigation water with different electric conductivities (EC, combined with different Sodium Adsorption Relation (SAR values on clay dispersion in soil commonly found in the state of Minas Gerais, with different mineralogies. The samples were collected from the B horizon of three soils (Oxisols in Viçosa, Belo Horizonte and Barroso, respectively, with high levels of the clay minerals kaolinite, hematite, and gibbsite, and are classified as Yellow-Red Latosol, Red Latosol and dystroferric Red Latosol. The physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the soils were characterized. The treatments corresponded to percolation, through the three soils, of NaCl and CaCl2 solutions with six different EC values (20; 50; 100; 200; 400, and 800 mS m-1 and five SAR values (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol c L-1, in a randomized block design with three replications. The solutions were applied in vertical column and constant load permeameters. The solution was applied until the EC of the effluent approached that in the applied solution (C/C0 = 1.0. To evaluate the effect of the solutions applied to the soil structure, the contents of clay dispersed in water (CDW were quantified. The values of CDW in the soil materials percolated with the different sodic-saline solutions (CDW-S were related to EC and SAR of the percolated solutiona. The soil behavior was distinct regardint clay dispersion, which was ascribed to its mineralogy as well as to the degree of weathering. The Yellow-Red Latosol showed a non-dispersive pattern in all treatments. In general, all percolation solutions, especially those with highest EC, regardless of the SAR value, indicated reduced dispersed clay (CDW-S in the Red Latosol and dystroferric Red Latosol.

  16. Rheology and Morphology of PP/ionomer/clay Nancomposites Depending on Selective Dispersion of Organoclays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Doohyun; Ock, Hyun Geun; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, structural developments of polypropylene / ionomer / clay ternary composites were investigated depending on the dispersion and localization of clay. The changes in physical properties were observed adding organoclays 1-10wt% to 90% polypropylene and 10% ionomer blends. The organoclays were localized inside of the dispersed phase under the composition of 3wt%, however, over that composition, clay particles formed stiff network structure in the dispersed phase and additional clays were localized at the interface between two phases. According to the developments of microstructure, the interaction of ternary composites changed from polypropylene-ionomer to polypropylene- ionomer and ionomer-clay which affected rheological properties. The storage modulus (G') of the composites was similar to the blends when clays were localized inside of dispersed phase but increased when clays were localized at interface. Also, the fractured morphology of the composites showed phase boundary and growing radius of dispersed phase depending on addition of fillers when clays were found inside. However, when fillers found at the interface between blends, the radius of the dispersed phase decreased and compatibilized morphology were observed. The interfacial interaction of the ternary composite was quantified depending on the structural development of dispersed phase and localization of clay particles by the rheological properties. The interaction of composites at solid state which was measured through peel adhesion strength increased by growth of interfacial interaction of each component. Furthermore, the crystallinity of the composites was decreased when the clay particles were localized at the interface.

  17. Impact factors on the structuration and the rheological behavior of the clay-water system for smectite dispersions; Facteurs determinant l'organisation et la rheologie du systeme argile-eau pour des suspensions de smectites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, S

    2007-11-15

    Smectite are swelling clays widely used in industry. Their mechanical properties are unequal according to their mineralogical and physico-chemical characteristics. The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the interlayer cation impact on the structure built by the smectite-water system according to the concentration. Homo-ionic (Na{sup +} et Ca{sup 2+}) and bi-ionic systems are observed. This study cross checks mineralogical methods, physicochemical analysis and broad range of rheometric tests. At low concentration (less than 60 g/l) the calcium dispersions are shear thinning and few viscous due to the layer association in huge deformable flocks. The sodium smectite layers are dispersed; the dispersions are highly viscous. The lowest viscosity is detected for mix of 20 % of sodium smectite and 80 % of calcium smectite. At higher concentration (60 to 100 g/l), the yield stress and viscoelastic properties are studied by creep-recovery tests, oscillatory tests and imposed shear step. At the liquid state, the flow is first heterogeneous with a shear banding effect then homogeneous. The results make it possible to define the concentration area characteristic of each mechanical behavior (viscosity, shear thinning and yield stress) according to the saturation cation. The thixotropic properties are characterized with de-structuring-restructuring tests. Two kinetics are determined. Finally we realize a data base with 12 natural and industrial bentonite. The rheograms would be efficient to differentiate the natural calcium bentonite (Newtonian law), natural sodium bentonite (Herschel-Bulkley law) and activated calcium bentonite (Bingham law). (author)

  18. SORPTION AND DISPERSION OF STRONTIUM RADIONUCLIDE IN THE BENTONITE-QUARTZ-CLAY AS BACKFILL MATERIAL CANDIDATE ON RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of sorption and dispersion characteristics of strontium in the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz as candidate of raw material for backfill material in the radioactive waste repository has been performed. The objective of this research is to know the grain size effect of bentonite, clay, and quartz on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to-quartz can be gives physical characteristics of best such as bulk density (rb, effective porosity (e, permeability (K, best sorption characteristic such as distribution coefficient (Kd, and best dispersion characteristics such as dispersivity (a and effective dispersion coefficient (De of strontium in the backfill material candidate. The experiment was carried out in the column filled by the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz with the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to quartz of 100/0, 80/20, 60/40, 40/60, 20/80, 0/100 respectively at saturated condition of water, then flowed 0.1 N Sr(NO32 as buffer solution with tracer of 0.05 Ci/cm3 90Sr as strontium radionuclide simulation was leached from immobilized radioactive waste in the radioactive waste repository. The concentration of 90Sr in the effluents represented as Ct were analyzed by Ortec b counter every 30 min, then by using profile concentration of Co and Ct, values of Kd, a and De of 90Sr in the backfill material was determined. The experiment data showed that the best results were -80+120 mesh grain size of bentonite, clay, quartz respectively on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to clay to quartz of 70/10/20 with physical characteristics of rb = 0.658 g/cm3, e = 0.666 cm3/cm3, and K = 1.680x10-2 cm/sec, sorption characteristic of Kd = 46.108 cm3/g, dispersion characteristics of a = 5.443 cm, and De = 1.808x10-03 cm2/sec can be proposed as candidate of raw material of backfill material

  19. Multisensor on-the-go mapping of readily dispersible clay, particle size and soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaene, Guillaume; Niedźwiecki, Jacek; Papierowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Particle size fractions affect strongly the physical and chemical properties of soil. Readily dispersible clay (RDC) is the part of the clay fraction in soils that is easily or potentially dispersible in water when small amounts of mechanical energy are applied to soil. The amount of RDC in the soil is of significant importance for agriculture and environment because clay dispersion is a cause of poor soil stability in water which in turn contributes to soil erodibility, mud flows, and cementation. To obtain a detailed map of soil texture, many samples are needed. Moreover, RDC determination is time consuming. The use of a mobile visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) platform is proposed here to map those soil properties and obtain the first detailed map of RDC at field level. Soil properties prediction was based on calibration model developed with 10 representative samples selected by a fuzzy logic algorithm. Calibration samples were analysed for soil texture (clay, silt and sand), RDC and soil organic carbon (SOC) using conventional wet chemistry analysis. Moreover, the Veris mobile sensor platform is also collecting electrical conductivity (EC) data (deep and shallow), and soil temperature. These auxiliary data were combined with VIS-NIR measurement (data fusion) to improve prediction results. EC maps were also produced to help understanding RDC data. The resulting maps were visually compared with an orthophotography of the field taken at the beginning of the plant growing season. Models were developed with partial least square regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). There were no significant differences between calibration using PLSR or SVMR. Nevertheless, the best models were obtained with PLSR and standard normal variate (SNV) pretreatment and the fusion with deep EC data (e.g. for RDC and clay content: RMSECV = 0,35% and R2 = 0,71; RMSECV = 0,32% and R2 = 0,73 respectively). The best models were used to predict soil properties from the

  20. Aqueous dispersion of red clay-based ceramic powder with the addition of starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Alcantar Umaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimum dispersion and rheological properties of red clay-based ceramic suspension loaded with unary and binary starch were investigated in aqueous medium. The aqueous ceramic suspension was prepared consisting of red clay, quartz, feldspar, and distilled water. Using a polyelectrolyte dispersant (Darvan 821A, the ternary ceramic powder was initially optimized to give the smallest average particle size at 0.8 wt. (% dispersant dosage as supported by sedimentation test. This resulted into an optimum high solid loading of 55 wt. (%. The addition of either unary or binary starches to the optimized ceramic slurry increased the viscosity but maintained an acceptable fluidity. The mechanism of such viscosity increase was found to be due to an adsorption of starch granules onto ceramic surfaces causing tolerable agglomeration. Correspondingly, the rheological evaluations showed that the flow behaviors of all starch-loaded ceramic slurries can be described using Herschel-Bulkley model. The parameters from this model indicated that all ceramic slurries loaded with starch are shear thinning that is required for direct casting process.

  1. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  2. Dispersion Interactions in Water Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidez, Emilie B; Gordon, Mark S

    2017-05-18

    The importance of dispersion forces in water clusters is examined using the effective fragment potential (EFP) method. Since the original EFP1 water potential does not include dispersion, a dispersion correction to the EFP1 potential (EFP1-D) was derived and implemented. The addition of dispersion to the EFP1 potential yields improved geometries for water clusters that contain 2-6 molecules. The importance of the odd E7 contribution to the dispersion energy is investigated. The E7 dispersion term is repulsive for all of the water clusters studied here and can have a magnitude that is as large as half of the E6 value. The E7 term therefore contributes to larger intermolecular distances for the optimized geometries. Inclusion of many-body effects and/or higher order terms may be necessary to further improve dispersion energies and optimized geometries.

  3. Photophysical and adsorption properties of pyronin B in natural bentonite clay dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Mohammad Reza; Kaya, Mehmet; Gür, Bahri; Onganer, Yavuz; Meral, Kadem

    2015-12-01

    The present study focused on the adsorption and photophysical properties of pyronin B (PyB) in bentonite aqueous dispersion. The photophysical properties of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were studied by using UV-vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. In this concept, the interaction of the dye with bentonite particles in the aqueous dispersion was spectroscopically followed depending on certain parameters such as interaction time, pH and the dye concentration. Obtained spectral data revealed that the aggregate structures (H-type) of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were formed in the dye concentration range studied. The non-fluorescence nature of H-aggregates and the clay minerals governed the fluorescence property of PyB. The mentioned non-radiative processes caused the fluorescence lifetime of the dye to decrease compared to that in water. The adsorption process of PyB on bentonite was examined depending on contact time and initial adsorbate concentration. An adsorption isotherm was good-fitted by the Freundlich model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.999. The adsorption of PyB on bentonite particles was in agreement with pseudo second-order kinetics.

  4. Chemical dispersants and pre-treatments to determine clay in soils with different mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil physical properties, including the clay content, is of utmost importance for agriculture. The behavior of apparently similar soils can differ in intrinsic characteristics determined by different formation processes and nature of the parent material. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of separate or combined pre-treatments, dispersion methods and chemical dispersant agents to determine clay in some soil classes, selected according to their mineralogy. Two Brazilian Oxisols, two Alfisols and one Mollisol with contrasting mineralogy were selected. Different treatments were applied: chemical substances as dispersants (lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and hexametaphosphate; pre-treatment with dithionite, ammonium oxalate, and hydrogen peroxide to eliminate organic matter; and coarse sand as abrasive and ultrasound, to test their mechanical action. The conclusion was drawn that different treatments must be applied to determine clay, in view of the soil mineralogy. Lithium hydroxide was not efficient to disperse low-CEC electropositive soils and very efficient in dispersing high-CEC electronegative soils. The use of coarse sand as an abrasive increased the clay content of all soils and in all treatments in which dispersion occurred, with or without the use of chemical dispersants. The efficiency of coarse sand is not the same for all soil classes.

  5. Effect of electrolyte on the microstructure and yielding of aqueous dispersions of colloidal clay

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite is a natural clay mineral and is available in abundance in nature. The aqueous dispersions of charged and anisotropic platelets of this mineral exhibit non-ergodic kinetically arrested states ranging from soft glassy phases dominated by interparticle repulsions to colloidal gels stabilized by salt induced attractive interactions. When the salt concentration in the dispersing medium is varied systematically, viscoelasticity and yield stress of the dispersion show non-monoton...

  6. Aggregate distribution, stability and release of water dispersible clay for two subtropical Oxisols Distribuição de agregados, estabilidade e liberação de argila dispersa em água para dois Latossolos subtropicais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos de Azevedo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of a soil regarding the dispersion and aggregation of its particles is very important for the development of environmental and agricultural soil functions. This study was conducted to determine how aggregate distribution and stability are impacted by land uses and how the release of Water Dispersible Clay (WDC relates to disaggregation in Oxisols from subtropical Brazil. Samples from two Oxisols, collected at three depths from sites under no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT and native vegetation (NV land uses were shaken in 250 mL plastic bottles for intervals up to 27 hours. The mass of aggregates was measured in five size classes ranging from 53 to 2000 µm. Most aggregates larger than 500 mm disappeared during the first 7.5 hours of shaking, concurrent with an increase in WDC release and without change in soil suspension pH and electrical conductivity, without increase in smaller aggregates. Therefore, there is no aggregate hierarchy in these soils and the release of WDC was caused by breaking aggregates within the 500 to 2000 mm range. Land uses affect mass of aggregates in each size class, but the aggregate stability depends on its size, not land use.O comportamento do solo em relação ao seu estado de agregação e dispersão é de alta relevância agrícola e ambiental. Este estudo foi conduzido para determinar como a distribuição e estabilidade de agregados são afetados por diferentes usos e como a liberação de argila dispersa em água (WDC se comporta em relação à desagregação em Latossolos subtropicais brasileiros. Amostras de dois Latossolos coletadas em três profundidades em locais sob plantio direto (NT, plantio convencional (CT e vegetação nativa (NV foram agitados em garrafas plásticas de 250 mL por até 27 horas. A massa de agregados foi medida em cinco classes de tamanho desde 53 até 2000 µm. A maioria dos agregados maiores que 500 mm desapareceu durante as primeiras 7,5 horas de agita

  7. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)

  8. Effect of electrolytes on the microstructure and yielding of aqueous dispersions of colloidal clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-14

    Na-montmorillonite is a natural clay mineral and is available in abundance in nature. The aqueous dispersions of charged and anisotropic platelets of this mineral exhibit non-ergodic kinetically arrested states ranging from soft glassy phases dominated by interparticle repulsions to colloidal gels stabilized by salt induced attractive interactions. When the salt concentration in the dispersing medium is varied systematically, viscoelasticity and yield stress of the dispersion show non-monotonic behavior at a critical salt concentration, thus signifying a morphological change in the dispersion microstructures. We directly visualize the microscopic structures of these kinetically arrested phases using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. We observe the existence of honeycomb-like network morphologies for a wide range of salt concentrations. The transition of the gel morphology, dominated by overlapping coin (OC) and house of cards (HoC) associations of clay particles at low salt concentrations to a new network structure dominated by face-face coagulation of platelets, is observed across the critical salt concentration. We further assess the stability of these gels under gravity using electroacoustics. This study, performed for concentrated clay dispersions for a wide concentration range of externally added salt, is useful in our understanding of many geophysical phenomena that involve the salt induced aggregation of natural clay minerals.

  9. Effect of mechanical and chemical clay removals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oats, W.J.; Ozdemir, O.; Nguyen, A.V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2010-04-15

    Fine minerals, mostly clays, are known to have a detrimental effect on coal flotation. This paper focuses on the effect of mechanical and chemical removals of fine minerals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation. The experimental results showed that the flotation recovery slightly increased from medium acidic to medium alkaline ranges. The flotation experiments carried out with dispersants at different dosages showed that the dispersants did not enhance the flotation recovery significantly. However, the removal of the fine fraction from the feed using a hydrocyclone significantly increased the flotation recovery. The bubble-particle attachment tests also indicated that the attachment time between an air bubble and the coal particles increased in the presence of clay particles. These attachment time results clearly showed that the clay particles adversely affected the flotation of coal particles by covering the coal surfaces which reduced the efficiency of bubble-coal attachment. An analysis based on the colloid stability theory showed that the clay coating was governed by the van der Waals attraction and that the double-layer interaction played a secondary role. It was also concluded that the best way to increase the flotation recovery in the presence of clays was to remove these fine minerals by mechanical means such as hydrocylones.

  10. Effects of using pozzolan and Portland cement in the treatment of dispersive clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, A H; Selamat, M R; Moayedi, H

    2013-01-01

    Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable of reducing dispersion potential to almost zero percent in only 7 days; and a 2% cement content was capable of achieving similar result in 14 days. However, treatment by cement alone is costly and could jeopardize the long term performance. Thus, a combined 5% pozzolan and 1.5% cement content was found capable of reducing dispersion potential from 100% to zero percent in 14 days. The results indicate that although simultaneous treatment with pozzolan and cement would extend the required curing time in comparison to treatment by cement alone of a higher content, the task could still be carried out in a reasonable period of curing time while avoiding the drawbacks of using either pozzolan or cement alone.

  11. Effects of Using Pozzolan and Portland Cement in the Treatment of Dispersive Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Vakili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable of reducing dispersion potential to almost zero percent in only 7 days; and a 2% cement content was capable of achieving similar result in 14 days. However, treatment by cement alone is costly and could jeopardize the long term performance. Thus, a combined 5% pozzolan and 1.5% cement content was found capable of reducing dispersion potential from 100% to zero percent in 14 days. The results indicate that although simultaneous treatment with pozzolan and cement would extend the required curing time in comparison to treatment by cement alone of a higher content, the task could still be carried out in a reasonable period of curing time while avoiding the drawbacks of using either pozzolan or cement alone.

  12. 2H-NMR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DISPERSION AND CONFINEMENT EFFECT ON PROBE MOLECULES IN RUBBER/CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE-GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-chuan Sun; Jian-jun Zhu; Tie-hong Chen

    2009-01-01

    2H-NMR spectroscopy of the probe molecule,deuterated benzene,was applied to characterize organo-clay dispersion and confinement effect on the local motion of benzene in rubber/clay nanocomposite-gels.The observed 2H line shapes of benzene in intercalated and exfoliated nanocomposites were obviously different,which can be used to estimate clay-dispersion quality.2H-NMR line shapes also reflect the different influence of intercalated or exfoliated layered-silicates on local motions of benzene,implying that probe molecules exhibit different local motions depending on different confined geometry in these nanocomposites.Viscosity measurements further confirmed these NMR results.

  13. Effect of amine functionalized polyethylene on clay-silver dispersion for polyethylene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Valdes, S.; Ibarra-A, M. C.; Ramírez-V, E.; Ramos-V, L. F.; Martinez-C, J. G.; Romero-G, J.; Ledezma-P, A. S.; Rodriguez-F, O. S.

    2014-08-01

    The compatibilization provided by maleic anhydride (MA) and 2-[2-(dimethylamino)-ethoxy] ethanol (DMAE) functionalized polyethylene for forming polyethylene-based nanocomposites was studied and compared. MA was grafted into PE by melt mixing to obtain PEgMA (compatibilizer 1), thereafter, PEgMA was reacted with DMAE and an antioxidant also by melt mixing to obtain PAgDMAE (compatibilizer 2). These compatibilizers were reacted using ultrasound with a solution of AgNO3 0.04 M and Ethylene glycol. Ammonium hydroxide was added in a ratio of 2:1 molar with respect to silver nitrate. These silver coated compatibilizers were mixed with PE and nano-clay (Cloisite I28E), thus forming the different hybrid PE-clay-silver nanocomposites. FTIR confirmed the formation of these two compatibilizers. All the compatibilized nanocomposites had better filler (clay and silver) dispersion and exfoliation compared to the uncompatibilized PE nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction, mechanical and antimicrobial properties attained showed that the PEgDMAE produced the better dispersed PE, clay and silver nanocomposites. The obtained nanocomposites showed outstanding antimicrobial properties against bacteria, Escherichia coli and fungus, Aspergillus niger. It is concluded that the PEgDMAE offers an outstanding capability for preparing nanocomposites with highly exfoliated and dispersed filler into the PE matrix.

  14. Water-clay surface interaction: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, O., E-mail: sobolev38@gmail.com [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France); Favre Buivin, F. [HES-SO Fribourg, Bd de Perolles 80-CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kemner, E.; Russina, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Beuneu, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin and Ikerbasque, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Charlet, L. [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: Interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces was studied by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} was used to reduce hydration of interlayer cations. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} (NC{sub 4}H{sub 12}), was used to saturate the interlayer space of nontronite NAu-1 in order to reduce hydration of interlayer cations that could hinder the effects related to the clay-water interactions. The water content was low in order to reduce hydrogen bonding between water molecules. It was found that water molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of nontronite. The diffusion activation energy value E{sub a} = 29 {+-} 3 kJ/mol was obtained for water molecules hydrating the clay surface. These results confirm the assumption that surfaces of smectite clays with tetrahedral substitutions are hydrophilic.

  15. Effect of clay aggregation on water diffusivity using low field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichet, Xavier; Fleury, Marc; Kohler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    Water diffusivity D measured by using NMR techniques in Na-smectite suspensions decreases with increasing smectite fraction (up to 50 wt%), but increases with increasing salinity (NaCl or CaCl(2) aqueous solutions) at a fixed clay fraction. The increase, larger for CaCl(2) solutions, is explained by aggregation of clay particles when high salinities are reached. Macroscopic organisation of dense mixtures of clay and aqueous solutions can be inferred by T(2) transverse NMR relaxation times which are sensitive to the volume to surface ratio. Dispersed suspensions exhibit mono-modal T(2) distributions, whereas bimodal T(2) distributions are observed for flocculated systems. The bimodal T(2) distributions are interpreted as a measurement of the spacing between clay particles within aggregates and between aggregates. Finally, the diffusion data can be gathered in an unique curve using the Debye length and the measured spacing between particles. When the thickness of the electro-diffuse layer (Debye length) is of the same order as the spacing between clay particles, the water diffusivity decreases. Otherwise it is constant at about 2.22+/-0.25x10(-9) m(2)/s. This last result illustrates clearly the effect of electro-chemical properties of smectite on water diffusivity.

  16. Water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birle Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations on the water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay in humid climate. As the organic soil used for the fill contains geogenetically elevated concentrations of arsenic, particular attention is paid on the seepage flow through the fill. The test fill is 5 m high, 30 m long and 25 m wide. The fill consists of the organic clay compacted at water contents wet and dry of Proctor Optimum covered by a drainage mat and a 60 cm thick top layer. For the determination of the water balance extensive measuring systems were installed. The seepage at the bottom measured so far was less than 2 % of the precipitation. The interflow in the drainage mat above the compacted organic clay was of similar magnitude. The estimated evapotranspiration reached approx. 84 % of the precipitation. According to these measurements the percolation is much lower than the percolation of many landfill covers in humid climates.

  17. Effect of exchangeable Mg on saturated hydraulic conductivity, disaggregation and clay dispersion of disturbed soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C.; Norton, L. D.

    2002-03-01

    Different opinions exist regarding the specific effect of Mg on soil physical and chemical properties. We hypothesized that Mg 2+, compared with Ca 2+, reduces saturated hydraulic conductivity ( Ks) via promoting clay swelling, disaggregation, and clay dispersion. Two soils (mixed, mesic Typic Hapludalfs) in packed soil columns were leached with either Ca- or Mg-containing solutions at the successive concentrations of 250, 10, 2, 0.5, and 0 mM. Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) in either Ca or Mg systems was determined with flocculation series tests. Aggregate stability and mean weight diameter (MWD) were assessed by wet-sieving. The CFCs were higher in Mg than in Ca for both soils, indicating that Mg is more dispersive than Ca. The MWDs measured using 1-2 mm aggregates of both soils were significantly larger for Ca-soils than for Mg-soils ( P=0.05). The Ksr (normalized with initial Ks) started to decline at higher concentrations for Mg than for Ca, and the reduction was much greater in Mg than in Ca above 0.5 mM. The Ksr and percent transmittance (inversely related to turbidity) of leachate at a given eluted pore volume following 'steady state' were higher in Ca than in Mg for both soils ( P=0.1), indicating lower permeability and more clay dispersion with the Mg treatment. Swelling and disaggregation, which reduced large pores, appeared to be the dominant process causing the rapid initial decline of Ksr. Clay dispersion and subsequent pore plugging became progressively important when electrolyte concentration was reduced to below CFCs.

  18. Water Absorbing Plantation Clay for Vertical Greenery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lih-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the arises of environmental conscious, the usage of vertical garden system has become more popular in urban cities. Citizens can enjoys the benefits of energy and cost saving besides ornamental effect. More investigations have been conducted on green facades led to the cities ecological enhancement.However, limited plants species can be planted for green facades systems as this system does not provide sufficient soil and nutrients for common plants. Alternative plantation methods such as planted box and felt system required additional maintenance attention. The idea of using clay composite which consists of nutritious soil, water absorbing polymer and flexible cement clay potentially become alternative vertical greenery systems that offers economic and sustainable plantation platform for more variety of plants.The fabricating of clay composite involved three processes, they are: mixing, moulding and drying. Physical properties characterisation (density, pH, compression test, aging test and water immersion test were tested on the dried fabricated clay composite to ensure their sustainability in tropical climate. The results showed that clay composite with 1.5 wt% of cement and 0.3 wt% superabsorbent polymer shows optimum water absorbing properties. This system are expected to enable more agriculture activities in urban living.

  19. Effect of Clay Content and Soil-water Potential On Mobilization and Leaching of Colloids In Unsaturated Macroporous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, C.; de Jonge, L. W.; Moldrup, P.

    The transport of strongly sorbed environmental contaminants may be enhanced due to sorption to mobile soil colloids. The most common source of mobile colloids in soil is the in-situ release of water-dispersible colloids (WDC), however experimental investigations of colloid mobilization in unsaturated macroporous soil are scarce. An understanding of the arrangement of colloids in aggregates, and the influence of clay on the development of the soil fabric and pore-size distributions is essential for the in- terpretation of colloid mobilization in soils. This emphasizes the important role of clay content, when evaluating the susceptibility of soils to release colloids and associated contaminants. This study was conducted to determine the effect of clay content and initial soil- water potential on colloid mobilization and leaching. Intact soil cores were sampled from an arable field at six locations along a naturally occurring texture gradient. Soil dispersibility was investigated using capillary saturation and drainage of field-moist packed aggregates. The amount of WDC in the soil was measured for each com- bination of clay content and initial soil-water potential (-2.5, -98 and -15530 hPa). Mobilization and leaching of colloids was investigated from unsaturated intact soil cores. The soils were irrigated at low intensity (1 mm/h), and effluent sampling was conducted at 5 cm tension. The results showed that colloid dispersion was significantly affected by both clay con- tent and initial soil-water potential. With a soil-water potential of -15530 hPa the col- loid release was generally low and no variation occurred between the soils. With in- creasing soil-water potential there was an increase in the amount of WDC for all soils. The increase in WDC was negatively correlated with clay content. The leaching of colloids from intact soil cores also decreased with increasing clay content at an ini- tial soil-water potential of -98 and -2.5 hPa, and no difference between

  20. Efficient one-step melt-compounding of copolyetheramide/pristine clay nanocomposites using water-injection as intercalating/exfoliating aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soulestin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyether-block-amide (PEBA /clay nanocomposites were prepared water-assisted by twin-screw extrusion. Both organomodified and pristine (i.e. purified but non-modified montmorillonite clays were used. A high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry analysis carried out in the processing conditions demonstrated that PEBA/water blend exhibits some miscibility and that amide blocks and water behave as a single phase. In addition to a significant decrease of the melting temperature, water injected into the melt plays a key role among the filler dispersion and prevents the matrix from degradation during melt-extrusion. This process enables the compounding of pristine clay-based nanocomposites whose dispersion state is high enough for the resulting mechanical performances in tension to be at least equivalent to what is reached with organomodified clay. Effects of the nanofiller dispersion onto the macromolecules’ mobility are detailed and fracture mechanisms are identified for the various structures.

  1. Preparation of nanocomposites polyurethane water bone with clay montmorillonite sodica and organophilic clay;Preparacao de nanocompositos a base de dispersoes aquosas de poliuretano com argilas hidrofilica e organofilica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Claudia P. [Sunchemical do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delpech, Marcia C.; Coutinho, Fernanda M.B.; Mello, Ivana L. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Nanocomposites based on water bone polyurethane (NWPU's) were synthesized based on poli(propylene glycol), dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and hydrazine (HYD), as chain extender. Two kinds of clays were employed: hydrophilic and organophilic. The nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and the mechanical properties were evaluated. The FTIR results showed the presence of specific groups of clay and the XRD suggested that occurred their intercalation/exfoliation through polyurethane matrix. The mechanical resistance of the systems showed significant increase when compared to water dispersions synthesized without clay. (author)

  2. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays.

  3. Relation between Quick Clay Formation by Salt Leaching and Pore-water Ion Composition

    OpenAIRE

    安部, 宏; ヘ, パニー; 大坪, 政美; 東, 孝寛; 金山, 素平

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that quick clay can be formed artificially by salt-leaching treatment on undisturbed Ariake clay. In the present study, however, artificial salt-leaching on the undisturbed clay taken from a site in Shiroishi-cho of Saga Prefecture failed to produce quick clay. To identify the cause, pore-water chemistry of the clay was assessed and the predominance of divalent cation in pore water was found to be responsible for the poor development of quick clay. Assuming that ...

  4. Harnessing Water and Resources from Clay Minerals on Mars and Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Clay minerals provide a source of water, metals, and cations that can be harvested to provide resources for human exploration on Mars, asteroids, etc. Planning how to access these resources from clays could be a vital component of human exploration.

  5. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of both unfrozen soils and permafrost soils are influenced by the amount of unfrozen water in the pore space. When dealing with foundation engineering in permafrost areas it is essential to estimate the unfrozen water content (wu). This paper deals with the establishing...... of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core...... of material properties similar to the test soil. The calibration for 5°C is seen to make a good fit to the permafrost core data. Further experiments should be performed in order to extend the range of water contents tested and hence the range of validity of the calibration equation....

  6. Water repellency of clay, sand and organic soils in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RASA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Water repellency (WR delays soil wetting process, increases preferential flow and may give rise to surface runoff and consequent erosion. WR is commonly recognized in the soils of warm and temperate climates. To explore the occurrence of WR in soils in Finland, soil R index was studied on 12 sites of different soil types. The effects of soil management practice, vegetation age, soil moisture and drying temperature on WR were studied by a mini-infiltrometer with samples from depths of 0-5 and 5-10 cm. All studied sites exhibited WR (R index >1.95 at the time of sampling. WR increased as follows: sand (R = 1.8-5.0 < clay (R = 2.4-10.3 < organic (R = 7.9-undefined. At clay and sand, WR was generally higher at the soil surface and at the older sites (14 yr., where organic matter is accumulated. Below 41 vol. % water content these mineral soils were water repellent whereas organic soil exhibited WR even at saturation. These results show that soil WR also reduces water infiltration at the prevalent field moisture regime in the soils of boreal climate. The ageing of vegetation increases WR and on the other hand, cultivation reduces or hinders the development of WR.;

  7. Experimental design applied optimization of a state in epoxy clay dispersion; Planejamento de experimentos aplicado a otimizacao do estado de dispersao de argilas em epoxi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Juliana D' Avila; Bertholdi, Jonas; Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Pezin, Sergio Henrique; Coelho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira, E-mail: julianadpaz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents some analysis showed that the exfoliation / intercalation of a montmorillonite clay in epoxy resin such as viscosity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Increasing the viscosity of epoxy resin diglycidyl ether bisphenol A with the addition of clay associated with the sonification system at the time of dispersion is a good indication of exfoliation. The X-ray diffraction already cured composite shows a decrease of crystallinity of clay and EDS microanalysis of SEM, non-uniform dispersion of clay in epoxy resin. Thermal analysis TG composite clay / epoxy shows an increase in thermal stability relative to pure epoxy. (author)

  8. Geology, Surficial - CLAY_ILITH_IN: Total Thickness of Clay in Indiana, Derived from the iLITH Water-Well Database (Indiana Geological Survey, Grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — CLAY_ILITH_IN is a grid that shows total thickness of clay, as derived from logs of water wells in the state of Indiana. (It presents the same data as shown in a...

  9. Geology, Surficial - CLAY_ILITH_PTS_IN: Total Thickness of Clay in Indiana, Derived from the iLITH Water-Well Database (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — CLAY_ILITH_PTS_IN is a point shapefile that shows total thickness of clay, as derived from logs of water wells in the state of Indiana. (It presents the source data...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites based on polyurethane in aqueous dispersions with non-modified hydrophilic clays; Sintese e caracterizacao de nanocompositos a base de poliuretanos em dispersoes aquosas com argilas hidrofilicas nao-modificadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, G.S.; Delpechi, M.C.; Santo, W.L.E., E-mail: mcd@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Several studies involving the formation of polyurethane nanocomposites employing clays of montmorillonite modified. This involves the presence of quaternary ammonium salts, the cation exchange needed to increase the interlayer space of clays that incorporate more than one step to the process, generates a higher cost. In this paper the synthesis of nanocomposite polyurethanes dispersed in water allowed not only the production of materials less harmful to the environment, but also the incorporation of hydrophilic clays, calcium and sodium in nature, without any modifications. Dispersions produced from 0.5, 1.0 and 2.5% clay (on the mass of prepolymer) were characterized in terms of total solids content, the films obtained by casting were evaluated for adhesiveness, diffraction X-rays, scanning electron microscopy. Most systems showed intercalated and partially exfoliated structures. (author)

  11. Properties of Eco-friendly Acrylic Resin/Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Non-aqueous Dispersion (NAD) Polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeongho; Lee, Minho; Jeon, Hyeon Yeol; Min, Byong Hun; Kim, Jeong Ho [Univ. of Suwon, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Chul [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Eco-friendly acrylic resin/clay nanocomposites containing pristine montmorillonite (PM) or modified clays (30B and 25A) were prepared from acrylic and styrenic monomers using non-aqueous dispersion (NAD) polymerization. Effect of nanoclays on physical properties of polymerization product and resulting nanocomposites was investigated. In view of NAD particle stability, addition of nanoclay at the beginning of polymerization is proved to be good. Results of gel fraction, acid value and viscosity of the NAD product showed that nanocomposites containing clay 25A showed better physical properties than the ones with other clays. GPC results exhibit the increase in molecular weight and decrease in polydispersity index for the 25A nanocomposite. Increase in layer distance confirmed from XRD analysis showed good dispersion of 25A in the nanocomposite. Thermal and dynamic mechanical analysis showed that highest glass transition temperature and storage modulus for 25A nanocomposites. These results indicate that 25A nanoclay gives the best properties in the process of non-aqueous dispersion polymerization of acrylic resin/nanoclay nanocomposites.

  12. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  13. Effects of Humic Acid and Solution pH on Dispersion of Na—and Ca—Soil Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANYEQING; HUQIONGYING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dispersed soil clays have a negative impact on soil structure and contribute to soil erosion and contaminant movement.In this study,two typical soils from the south of China were chosen for investigating roles of pH and humic acid(HA) on dispersion of soil clays.Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) of the soil clay suspension was determined by using light transmission at a wavelength of 600 nm.The results indicated that effects of pH and HA on dispersion of the soil clays were closely related to the type of the major minerals makin up the soil and to the valence of the exchangeable cations as well.At four rates of pH(4,6,8and 10),the CFC for the Na-yellow-brown soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.32 to 0.56,6.0 to 14.0,10.0 to 24.6 and 26.0 to 52.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively when Na-HA was added at the rate of from 0 to 40mgL-1,With the same Na-HA addition and three pH(6,8and 10)treatments,the CFC for the Na-red soil was incresed from 0.5 to 20.0,1.0 to 40.0 and 6.0 to 141.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively.Obviously,pH and HA has greater effects on clay dispersion of the red soil(dominated by 1:1 minerals and oxides) than on that of the yellow-brown soil(dominated by 2:1minerals).However,at three rates of pH(6,8and 10) and with the addition of Ca-HA from 0 to 40mg L-1,the CFC of the Ca-yellow-brown soil and Ca-red soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.55 to 0.81,0.75 to 1.28,0.55 to 1.45and 0.038 to 0.266.0.25 to 0.62,0.7to 1.6mmol CaCl2 L-1,respectively.So,Na-soil claye are more sensitive to pH and HA than Ca-soil clays.

  14. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Clay Pots in Removal of Water Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Naddafi , AH Mahvi, S Nasseri, M Mokhtari, H Zeraati

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, inexpensive technologies for drinking water supply in small communities are highly considered in developing countries. One of these technologies is the application of ceramic filters that are usually made of diatomaceous earth or clay soil. This research was carried out to determine the efficiency of clay pots (as a filter in removing water impurities. Pilot and the related clay parts were manufactured and its efficiency in removing TDS, hardness, NO3-, color and turbidity was measured by passing water through the clay pipes. The results showed that the clay filters had not the potential to remove hardness, EC, TDS and nitrate of water. However, they showed excellent efficiency in turbidity removal (≥ 90% and could significantly decrease the color of the water (≥ 60%.

  15. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju; Meshram, Siddharth; Subrt, J; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2010-08-15

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mgg(-1) at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L(-1), which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed ( approximately 97%) using 1M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of water sorption-based clay prediction models for calcareous soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle size distribution (PSD), particularly the active clay fraction, mediates soil engineering, agronomic and environmental functions. The tedious and costly nature of traditional methods of determining PSD prompted the development of water sorption-based models for determining the clay...

  17. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Bore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  18. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  19. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  20. Sedimentary fluxes and different dispersion mechanism of the clay sediments in the Adriatic Basin; Flussi sedimentari e differenti meccanismi di dispersione dei sedimenti argillosi nel Bacino Adriatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomadin, L. [Urbino Univ., Urbino (Italy). Ist. di Geodinamica e Sedimentologia

    2000-07-01

    Investigating the composition and the distribution of the muds deposited in the Adriatic, a typical shelf basin, numerous evidences of the variable provenance and dispersal of the clay sediments have been observed. The clay minerals behave, in fact, as excellent natural tracers. The distribution maps of illite and smectite (the most abundant components of the Adriatic clays) and of their crystallinity indices, show a prevailing longitudinal dispersion of the clay sediments, which is connected with the general cyclonic circulation of the marine currents. Two main fluxes toward SE have been recognised in the bottom sediments along the Italian peninsula: one Apennine flux close to the western coasts and one parallel Padane flux in the open sea. On the contrary, one subordinate Albanian flux conveys clay sediments toward NW along the eastern coasts of the basin. Also other transport mechanisms play an important role in the different areas of the Adriatic. In the shallow northern Adriatic, the clay sedimentation is controlled by a superficial dispersion of the fine suspended load carried by the large plume of the Po River. By increasing depth of the waters, gradient currents of variable provenance favour the longitudinal flows of the clay sediments. In the deepest Southern Adriatic, besides the NS-oriented fluxes, turbidity currents flow transversely to the basin and carry clay sediments from the Apulian shelf and from the Albanian-Montenegrin shelf into the bathyal basin. [Italian] La composizione e la distribuzione dei fanghi di un tipico bacino di piattaforma come l'Adriatico hanno fornito molteplici indicazioni sulla provenienza e la dispersione dei sedimenti argillosi. I minerali argillosi che li compongono, si comportano infatti da eccellenti traccianti naturali. Mappe di distribuzione di illite e smectite (i piu' abbondanti minerali presenti nei sedimenti argillosi adriatici) e dei loro indici di cristallinita', mettono in evidenza la prevalente

  1. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  2. Nontraditional clay raw materials as a component of inorganic dispersed phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodchenko Aleksandr Anatol'evich

    Full Text Available The research of raw base for construction materials allows theoretically justifying and experimentally confirming the ability to control the processes of structure formation in order to obtain materials with the desired properties. Clay matter has a complicated chemical and mineral composition. In recent decades the structures and properties of clay minerals have been investigated in detail with the help of modern research methods. Out of the whole quantity of clay deposits the production sector uses only the small part, which satisfies the standard technical documents in force. In case of using non-traditional clay rocks in the production of wall materials it is possible to cross over from traditional raw materials to another - composite binder, obtained on the basis of natural nanodispersed raw material, which helps to speed up neoformation synthesis, change their morphology, optimize microstructure of cementing compounds and consequently improve physical and mathematical properties of the products. Using non-traditional for construction industry clay rocks in the production of silicate materials increases the strength of raw-brick 4...11 times, which facilitates the production of high cavitated product and significantly expands the range of products.

  3. Phosphate adsorption by lanthanum modified bentonite clay in fresh and brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Egemose, Sara; Jensen, Henning S

    2013-05-15

    Effects of pH, alkalinity and conductivity on the adsorption of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) onto lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay (Phoslock(®)) were investigated in laboratory experiments using eight different types of filtered water representing freshwater with low and normal alkalinity and brackish water with high alkalinity. Different dose ratios (0-200; w/w) of Phoslock(®):P were applied to determine the maximum P binding capacity of Phoslock(®) at SRP concentrations typical of those of sediment pore water. The 100:1 Phoslock(®:)P dose ratio, recommended by the manufacturer, was tested with 12 days exposure time and generally found to be insufficient at binding whole target SRP pool. The ratio performed best in the soft water from Danish Lake Hampen and less good in the hard water from Danish Lake Langesø and in brackish water. The explanation may be an observed negative relationship between alkalinity and the SRP binding capacity of Phoslock(®). A comparative study of Lake Hampen and Lake Langesø suggested that the recorded differences in P adsorption between the two lakes could be attributed to a more pronounced dispersion of Phoslock(®) in the soft water of Lake Hampen, leading to higher fractions of dissolved (<0.2 μm) La and of La in fine particles. In the same two lakes, pH affected the SRP binding of Phoslock(®) negatively at a pH level above 8.1, the effect being reversible, however. The negative pH effect was most significant in hard water Lake Langesø, most likely because of higher [Formula: see text] concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nondestructive Measurement of Water Content and Moisture Migration of Unsaturated Red Clays in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the moisture migration mechanism of the unsaturated red clays, which are sensitive to water content change and widely distributed in South China, and then rationally use them as a filling material for highway embankments, a method to measure the water content of red clay cylinders using X-ray computed tomography (CT was proposed and verified. Then, studies on the moisture migrations in the red clays under the rainfall and ground water level were performed at different degrees of compaction. The results show that the relationship between dry density, water content, and CT value determined from X-ray CT tests can be used to nondestructively measure the water content of red clay cylinders at different migration time, which avoids the error reduced by the sample-to-sample variation. The rainfall, ground water level, and degree of compaction are factors that can significantly affect the moisture migration distance and migration rate. Some techniques, such as lowering groundwater table and increasing degree of compaction of the red clays, can be used to prevent or delay the moisture migration in highway embankments filled with red clays.

  5. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser......Soil texture, in particular the clay fraction, governs numerous environmental, agricultural and engineering soil processes. Traditional measurement methods for clay content are laborious and impractical for large-scale soil surveys. Consequently, clay prediction models that are based on water...... vapour sorption, which can be measured within a shorter period of time, have recently been developed. Such models are often based on single-point measurements of water adsorption and do not account for sorption hysteresis or organic matter content. The present study introduces regression relationships...

  6. Preparation and application of conducting polymer/Ag/clay composite nanoparticles formed by in situ UV-induced dispersion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Limin; Qiu, Jianhui; Yang, Chao; Sakai, Eiichi

    2016-02-03

    In this work, composite nanoparticles containing polypyrrole, silver and attapulgite (PPy/Ag/ATP) were prepared via UV-induced dispersion polymerization of pyrrole using ATP clay as a templet and silver nitrate as photoinitiator. The effects of ATP concentration on morphology, structure and electrical conductivity were studied. The obtained composite nanoparticles with an interesting beads-on-a-string morphology can be obtained in a short time (10 min), which indicates the preparation method is facile and feasible. To explore the potential applications of the prepared PPy/Ag/ATP composite nanoparticles, they were served as multifunctional filler and blended with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) matrix to prepare biodegradable composite material. The distribution of fillers in polymer matrix and the interfacial interaction between fillers and PBS were confirmed by scanning electron microscope, elemental mapping and dynamic mechanical analysis. The well dispersed fillers in PBS matrix impart outstanding antibacterial property to the biodegradable composite material as well as enhanced storage modulus due to Ag nanoparticles and ATP clay. The biodegradable composite material also possesses modest surface resistivity (10(6)~ 10(9) Ω/◻).

  7. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis of the soil water characteristic (SWC) has been extensively studied for matric potentials between zero and −1.5 MPa. However, little information is available on how to quantify, evaluate, and identify the causes of hysteresis at potentials below −10 MPa where vapor sorption plays...... an important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay...

  8. Effect of telechelic ionic groups on the dispersion of organically modified clays in bisphenol A polycarbonate nanocomposites by in-situ polymerization using activated carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colonna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of bisphenol A polycarbonate with organically modified clays have been prepared for the first time by in-situ polymerization using bis(methyl salicyl carbonate as activated carbonate. The use of the activated carbonate permits to conduct the polymerization reaction at lower temperature and with shorter polymerization time with respect to those necessary for traditional melt methods that uses diphenyl carbonate, affording a nanocomposite with improved color. Moreover, an imidazolium salt with two long alkyl chains has been used to modify the montmorillonite, providing an organically modified clay with high thermal stability and wide d-spacing. The addition of ionic groups at the end of the polymer chain increases the interaction between the clay surface and the polymer producing a better dispersion of the clay. The presence of the clay increases the thermal stability of the polymer.

  9. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  10. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  11. Influence of clay, surfactant and presence of dispersant in the non-aqueous fluids rheology; Influencia do tipo de argila, tipo de tensoativo e presenca de defloculante na reologia de fluidos nao aquosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, N.L.; Guedes, I.C.; Menezes, R.R.; Campos, L.F.A.; Ferreira, H.S., E-mail: hebersivini@ig.com.br, E-mail: heber@ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The bentonite clay used as a thickening agent in production of non-aqueous fluids and can not be used without a prior treatment to their organic surfaces become hydrophobic. These treated clays are called organoclays, and are usually obtained by adding, in aqueous solution, a quaternary ammonium salt. This work makes a detailed study of the variables involved in the dispersion of the bentonite clays in organophilization process, as well, the type of clay, type of surfactant and the presence of dispersant. It was observed this study that the process variables involved in the dispersion of the clays and organophilization, observed through characterization, have low influence on the peaks related to interplanar basal distance caused by the incorporation of the surfactant and bentonite clays been influential the type of clay and surfactant and the presence of sodium as dispersant agent, on the rheological properties. (author)

  12. Simulation of Water-Resistance of a Clay Layer During Mining: Analysis of a Safe Water Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qing-hong; CAI Rong; YANG Wei-feng

    2007-01-01

    Given previous research and prototypical geological conditions of a mining workface, we simulated fissure development in clay layers at the bottom of Quaternary strata and above bedrock, sand and water inrush during mining by model experiments. The results show that V-shaped fissures usually occur in the bottom clay layer at the front top of the active face and that the position of these fissures changes periodically with ground pressure intervals. These fissures occur exactly in the area where the horizontal strain is concentrated. The results also demonstrate that the permeability coefficient of the cracked clay decreases while fissures tend to close. The permeability of the cracked bottom clay layer increases rapidly after a turning point in the permeability coefficient-water head curve (K-H curve) under a certain vertical load. Under static water pressure, the permeability coefficient of cracked clay decreases when load increases. A turning point in the K-H curve showed up and can be seen as a cutoff point to decide water inrush under a certain load level. Under an instantaneous water head, the greatest ability of the cracked clay to avoid drastic water inflow is a little higher than that under static conditions.

  13. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  14. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  15. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  16. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  17. Dispersal of fine sediment in nearshore coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Fine sediment (silt and clay) plays an important role in the physical, ecological, and environmental conditions of coastal systems, yet little is known about the dispersal and fate of fine sediment across coastal margin settings outside of river mouths. Here I provide simple physical scaling and detailed monitoring of a beach nourishment project near Imperial Beach, California, with a high portion of fines (40% silt and clay by weight). These results provide insights into the pathways and residence times of fine sediment transport across a wave-dominated coastal margin. Monitoring of the project used physical, optical, acoustic, and remote sensing techniques to track the fine portion of the nourishment sediment. The initial transport of fine sediment from the beach was influenced strongly by longshore currents of the surf zone that were established in response to the approach angles of the waves. The mean residence time of fine sediment in the surf zone—once it was suspended—was approximately 1 hour, and rapid decreases in surf zone fine sediment concentrations along the beach resulted from mixing and offshore transport in turbid rip heads. For example, during a day with oblique wave directions and surf zone longshore currents of approximately 25 cm/s, the offshore losses of fine sediment in rips resulted in a 95% reduction in alongshore surf zone fine sediment flux within 1 km of the nourishment site. However, because of the direct placement of nourishment sediment on the beach, fine suspended-sediment concentrations in the swash zone remained elevated for several days after nourishment, while fine sediment was winnowed from the beach. Once offshore of the surf zone, fine sediment settled downward in the water column and was observed to transport along and across the inner shelf. Vertically sheared currents influenced the directions and rates of fine sediment transport on the shelf. Sedimentation of fine sediment was greatest on the seafloor directly offshore

  18. Effect of Nanocomposite Structures on Fracture Behavior of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Different Dispersion Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic modifier and processing method on morphology and mechanical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites were investigated. In this study, the preparation of nanocomposites by exfoliation-adsorption method involved an ultrasonic mixing procedure, and mechanical blending was used for in situ intercalative polymerization. The microstructure study revealed that the organoclay, which was ultrasonically mixed with the epoxy, partially exfoliated and intercalated. In contrast, organoclay remained in phase-separated and flocculated state after the mechanical blending process. Tensile stiffness increased significantly for the nanocomposite prepared by ultrasonic dispersion method through realizing the reinforcing potential of exfoliated silicate layers. Nanocomposites with exfoliated and intercalated nanoclay morphology were ineffective in enhancing the fracture toughness whereas nanocomposites with phase-separated and flocculated morphology have improved crack resistance predominantly by crack deflecting and pinning mechanisms.

  19. The effect of very low water content on the complex dielectric permittivity of clays, sand-clay and sand rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, T. A.; Bobrov, P. P.; Kroshka, E. S.; Lapina, A. S.; Rodionova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of measurements of complex relative permittivity of bentonite and clayey sandstone with different degrees of salinity with low moisture are given in the range of temperatures -20° to  +105 °C at frequencies from 25 Hz to 1 GHz. It is shown, that even a small amount of water in sandy and sandy-argillaceous rocks causes an increase of the real part of complex relative permittivity at frequencies below 100 Hz. The explanation by linearly-broken dependence of refractive index on moisture is given at its small values. By a dielectric method it is shown that in the process of water film formation on the surface of a mineral, the water molecules binding energy changes. Big distinctions in low-frequency dielectric relaxation times testify to the change of binding energy of molecules of water on the surface of a mineral. Also dependences of relaxation times on temperature are various. The results of dielectric measurements showed a strong influence of the salt on the dielectric permittivity of the clay and clayey sandstone even at a low moisture level.

  20. Networking and rheology of concentrated clay suspensions "matured" in mineral medicinal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Carola; Sánchez-Espejo, Rita; Cerezo, Pilar; Machado, José; Bonferoni, Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Salcedo, Inmaculada; Viseras, César

    2013-09-10

    This work studied the influence of "maturation" conditions (time and agitation) on aggregation states, gel structure and rheological behaviour of a special kind of pharmaceutical semisolid products made of concentrated clay suspensions in mineral medicinal water. Maturation of the samples was carried out in distilled and sulphated mineral medicinal water, both in static conditions (without agitation) and with manual stirring once a week, during a maximum period of three months. At the measured pH interval (7.5-8.0), three-dimensional band-type networks resulting from face/face contacts were predominant in the laminar (disc-like) clay suspensions, whereas the fibrous (rod-like) particles formed micro-aggregates by van der Waals attractions. The high concentration of solids in the studied systems greatly determined their behaviour. Rod-like sepiolite particles tend to align the major axis in aggregates promoted by low shearing maturation, whereas aggregates of disc-like smectite particles did not have a preferential orientation and their complete swelling required long maturation time, being independent of stirring. Maturation of both kinds of suspensions resulted in improved rheological properties. Laminar clay suspensions became more structured with time, independently from static or dynamic maturation conditions, whereas for fibrous clay periodic agitation was also required. Rheological properties of the studied systems have been related to aggregation states and networking mechanisms, depending on the type of clay minerals constituents. Physical stability of the suspensions was not impaired by the specific composition of the Graena medicinal water.

  1. Removal of Chromate Ions from Water by Anionicc CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houri, B.; Legrouri, A.; Barroug, A.; Forano, C.; Besse, J.-P.

    1999-03-01

    The removal of chromate ions from aqueous solutions by [Mg-Al-Cl], [Zn-Al-Cl] and [Zn-Cr-Cl] anionic clays was investigated. The solids, prepared by coprecipitation at constant pH, were found to be pure upon characterisation by X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The interaction of the solid materials with CrO42- ions has been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy. The treatment of solutions containing 15 to 300 ppm of CrO42- was successful. The sorption capacities of the anionic clays for the CrO42- ions are close to 1 mmol/g. L'élimination des ions chromate de solutions aqueuses par les argiles anioniques [Mg-Al-Cl], [Zn-Al-Cl] et [Zn-Cr-Cl] a été étudiée. Les solides, préparés par coprécipitation à pH constant, ont été caractérisés par diffraction des rayons X et spectroscopie infrarouge à transformée de Fourier. L'interaction de ces matériaux avec les ions CrO42- a été suivie par spectroscopie UV-visible. Le traitement de solutions contenant de 15 à 300 ppm de CrO42- a donné de bons résultats. La capacité d'élimination de ces argiles anioniques pour les ions CrO42- est d'environ 1 mmol/g. .

  2. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Greenaway, A.; Christie, M. J.; Baltrusaitis, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, fresh, unprocessed mineral aerosol has been found to contribute to the number of available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters for a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) used to calculate CCN activities of clay minerals. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to experimental water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98×22 and 1.79×0.11 for Na-montmorillonite and 75×17 and 1.77×0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained for these clays are significantly different from FHH adsorption parameters derived from CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clay minerals. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to the different approaches used, the hydratable nature of the clays and the relative difficulty in measuring CCN activation of hydratable clays due to relatively long adsorption and desorption equilibration times. However, despite these differences, the calculated CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar and are in excellent agreement with experimental CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clays. The different FHH adsorption parameters, however, translate to lower sc-Ddry CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH = -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively) than have been reported previously. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clay aerosol is less sensitive to changes in dry particle diameter (Ddry) and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. This study illustrates that FHH-AT using adsorption

  3. NMR and Electrochemical Investigation of the Transport Properties of Methanol and Water in Nafion and Clay-Nanocomposites Membranes for DMFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Baglio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water and methanol transport behavior, solvents adsorption and electrochemical properties of filler-free Nafion and nanocomposites based on two smectite clays, were investigated using impedance spectroscopy, DMFC tests and NMR methods, including spin-lattice relaxation and pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE diffusion under variable temperature conditions. Synthetic (Laponite and natural (Swy-2 smectite clays, with different structural and physical parameters, were incorporated into the Nafion for the creation of exfoliated nanocomposites. Transport mechanism of water and methanol appears to be influenced from the dimensions of the dispersed platelike silicate layers as well as from their cation exchange capacity (CEC. The details of the NMR results and the effect of the methanol solution concentration are discussed. Clays particles, and in particular Swy-2, demonstrate to be a potential physical barrier for methanol cross-over, reducing the methanol diffusion with an evident blocking effect yet nevertheless ensuring a high water mobility up to 130 °C and for several hours, proving the exceptional water retention property of these materials and their possible use in the DMFCs applications. Electrochemical behavior is investigated by cell resistance and polarization measurements. From these analyses it is derived that the addition of clay materials to recast Nafion decreases the ohmic losses at high temperatures extending in this way the operating range of a direct methanol fuel cell.

  4. Study of change in dispersion and orientation of clay platelets in a polymer nanocomposite during tensile test by variostage small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To understand the change in dispersion and orientation of clay platelets in three-dimensional space during tensile test, neat polymer and its nanocomposite samples were studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). The samples after...

  5. Aggregation of cationic p-phenylene ethynylenes on Laponite clay in aqueous dispersions and solid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Eric H; Zhang, Yue; Whitten, David G

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies of cationic p-phenylene ethynylenes oligomers (OPEs) have revealed strong antimicrobial activity and strong photophysical changes upon their aggregation that can be utilized for sensing various chemicals and biomolecules. In this article, the adsorption of two types of OPEs with different placement of charged groups onto the synthetic clay Laponite is studied, and the changes to photophysical properties, photochemical degradation efficiency, and biocidal effectiveness are determined. In addition to solution-phase studies, the material and biocidal properties of solid films formed from the OPE-Laponite complex were assessed. The results of this study suggest that OPEs aggregate on Laponite and induce aggregation between Laponite discs, leading to drastic changes to their photophysical and material properties. Solid OPE-Laponite films were shown to have fair resistance to dissolution in aqueous solution compared with Laponite alone, and adhesion and minor killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria on the surface was observed. The results of this study give insight into controlling the colloidal phases of Laponite via molecular aggregation, may be useful for development of sensors and biocides involving Laponite as a scaffold, and lead to further control over slow-release and surface interactions of biocidal materials.

  6. Unaffected microscopic dynamics of macroscopically arrested water in dilute clay gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, Tilo; Wiegart, Lutz; Juranyi, Fanni; Struth, Bernd; Schober, Helmut

    2008-12-01

    Adequate clay minerals considerably affect the macroscopic mechanical behavior of water even at concentrations of a few percent. Thus when 2wt.% laponite clay mineral nanoparticles are added to water, the resulting colloidal suspension after some time takes on the semisolid characteristics of a jellylike material at room temperature. Cold neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy data are in agreement with the assumption that notwithstanding this macroscopic change, the mobility of the water molecules on intermolecular and intramolecular length scales remains largely unaffected. This observation is discussed in the context of the properties and the role of water in different more or less dilute ionic environments. The result contributes to the ongoing debate of the properties and role of water in living cells.

  7. Effects of clay amendment on adsorption and desorption of copper in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Stagnitti, F.; Allinson, G.; Turoczy, N.; Li, P.; LeBlanc, M.; Cann, M.A.; Doerr, S.H.; Steenhuis, M.M.; Parlange, J.Y.; Rooij, de G.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  8. Removal of Uranium from Contaminated Water by Clay Ceramics in Flow-Through Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Florez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Uranium contamination of groundwater increasingly concerns rural residents depending on home wells for their drinking water in communities where uranium is a source of contamination. Established technologies to clean up contaminated aquifers are ineffective in large contaminated areas or are prohibitively expensive. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs are a low-cost alternative to these methods. In this paper, the applicability of clay ceramic pellets was investigated as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs material for the treatment of uranium-contaminated groundwater. Flow-through columns were fabricated and used to mimic the flow path of a contaminant plume through the reactive media. Experiment results show that clay ceramic pellets effectively remove uranium from uranium-contaminated water and also can be a cost-efficient technique for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater by a clay pellet barrier. Using clay ceramic pellets is also a practical treatment method for uranium removal from drinking water and can supply potable water for households in the affected areas.

  9. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Ability of treated kapok (Ceiba pentandra) fiber for removal of clay particle from water turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafur, Nurfitri Abdul; Sakakibara, Masayuki; Jahja, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    Kapok (Ceiba pentandra, family Bombacaceae) fiber (KF) is a by-product of traditional agriculture in tropical countries and is mainly used as fiberfill in fabric. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of using KF to remove clay particles from turbid water. Firstly, KF was boiled at 100 ºC in deionized water for 15 min to remove the surface oil. A suspension of montmorillonite powder mixed 1 L of deionized water, divided into volumes of 100, 200, 300, and 400 mL, was used as the turbid water source. The ability of KF to remove clay particles from the water was assessed by filtering the water through 60 g of treated KF in a ∼397.9 cm3 acrylic column. Results showed that the treated KF effectively removed the clay particles from the entire volume of turbid water in this experiment; the results also demonstrate that this KF fiber has value as a simple and inexpensive tool for water treatment, especially in developing countries.

  11. Geomechanical and water vapor absorption characteristics of clay-bearing soft rocks at great depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Na; Liu Longbiao; Hou Dongwen; He Manchao; Liu Yilei

    2014-01-01

    The geological and physico-mechanical properties characterization of deep soft rocks is one of the critical scientific issues for deep soft rock engineering. In the present study, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and mercury intrusion porosimetry experiments were carried out to investigate the mineral compositions, microstructure and porosity characteristics of the 13 clay-bearing soft rock samples collected from a deep coal mine in China. Water vapor absorption and uniaxial compressive experiments were also performed to examine water absorption characteristics and water-induced strength degradation effect of the investigated deep soft rock samples. The results show that the dominant mineral components in mudstone, coarse sandstone and fine sandstone samples were calcite, quartz and clay respectively. The contents of clay minerals in all samples were relatively high and ranged from 12.3% (N-4) to 56.5% (XS-1). Water vapor absorption processes of all the soft rock samples follow an exponential law which is very similar to the water vapor absorption behavior of conglomerate samples reported in our earlier study. Correlation analyses also suggested that there were good positive correlation relationships between water absorptivity and clay minerals for both mudstone and sandstone samples. Furthermore, it was found that vapor absorption was not correlated with the porosity for mudstone, however, positive correlation relationship was found between them for sand-stone. Correlation analysis between UCS, modulus of elasticity and water content demonstrated that both of them tend to decrease with the increase of their water content due to water absorption.

  12. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  13. Application of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay hybrid for defluoridation of underground water resources: implication for point of use treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available of Water Reuse and Desalination, 6(4) Application of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay hybrid for defluoridation of underground water resources: implication for point of use treatment V. Masindi Abstract A new synthesis method...

  14. Study of the Effect of Clay Particles on Low Salinity Water Injection in Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Rezaei Gomari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for optimal recovery of crude oil from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs around the world has never been greater for the petroleum industry. Water-flooding has been applied to the supplement primary depletion process or as a separate secondary recovery method. Low salinity water injection is a relatively new method that involves injecting low salinity brines at high pressure similar to conventional water-flooding techniques, in order to recover crude oil. The effectiveness of low salinity water injection in sandstone reservoirs depends on a number of parameters such as reservoir temperature, pressure, type of clay particle and salinity of injected brine. Clay particles present on reservoir rock surfaces adsorb polar components of oil and modify wettability of sandstone rocks to the oil-wet state, which is accountable for the reduced recovery rates by conventional water-flooding. The extent of wettability alteration caused by three low salinity brines on oil-wet sandstone samples containing varying clay content (15% or 30% and type of clay (kaolinite/montmorillonite were analyzed in the laboratory experiment. Contact angles of mica powder and clay mixture (kaolinite/montmorillonite modified with crude oil were measured before and after injection with three low salinity sodium chloride brines. The effect of temperature was also analyzed for each sample. The results of the experiment indicate that samples with kaolinite clay tend to produce higher contact angles than samples with montmorillonite clay when modified with crude oil. The highest degree or extent of wettability alteration from oil-wet to intermediate-wet state upon injection with low salinity brines was observed for samples injected with brine having salinity concentration of 2000 ppm. The increase in temperature tends to produce contact angles values lying in the higher end of the intermediate-wet range (75°–115° for samples treated at 50 °C, while their corresponding

  15. An Aquifer Reflections on Deep Clay Conditions for Water Quantity Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabariah Musa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the on-site testing of deep clay area through the well response and aquifer reflection analysis. The analysis was conducted using AQTESOLV software on pumping and recovery data to determine the well responses and aquifer characteristics of deep clay area. A simple experimental model was installed at the site using deep well of REWES (Recharge Well System model assists with four monitoring wells around the model. The monitoring wells were located at 4m, 10m, 20m and 35m from the model. The site has been identified identified to have the unconfined aquifer with deep compacted clay. Due to flatten and low flow, pumping analysis and ground water response were used to evaluate water quantity and potential prospective of circulate water cycle for urban stormwater management. As reflection on water cycle, almost 20% from withdrawal capacity able to refill the ground system with limited space. It was found that the available storage, S and hydraulic conductivity, K  of the clayey area are 0.001 and 32 m/day respectively. Therefore, the response on water cycle indicate some potential space to restore and withdrawal at peak time and thus, the  water can be used in safely conditions.

  16. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  17. Valence holes observed in nanodiamonds dispersed in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Pflüger, Mika; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Xiao, Jie; Aziz, Emad F

    2015-02-21

    Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp(2)-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed.

  18. Dispersion characteristics of fine particles in water, ethanol and kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Dispersion behavior of hydrophilic calcium carbonate particles and hydrophobic talcum particles in water, ethanol and kerosene media has been studied by sedimentation analysis. It is found that the dispersion of fine particles complies with the principle of polarity compatibility. That is to say, the dispersion effect will be improved when surface polarity of particles is similar to that of liquid media. The adsorption models of oleic acid on the surface of particles in water and ethanol are proposed.

  19. Acidities of confined water in interlayer space of clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Wang, R.; Meijer, E.J.; Zhou, H.

    2011-01-01

    The acid chemistry of confined waters in smectite interlayers have been investigated with first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. Aiming at a systematic picture, we establish the model systems to take account of the three possible controlling factors: layer charge densities (0 e, 0.5

  20. Removal of Fluoride from Water by Adsorption onto Fired Clay Pots: Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kofa, G. P.; Gomdje, V. H.; C. Telegang; S. Ndi Koungou

    2017-01-01

    Excessive fluoride in potable water is a serious health problem in rural areas of many developing countries. Hence, there is a need to find a simple and cost-effective method for water defluoridation in such areas. In the northern part of Cameroon, clay pots are used for cooking food and water storage. The firing of these pots consists of intensive burning using fire wood. They were tested as a potential adsorbent for removing excess fluoride from water. Experiments were carried out in a jar ...

  1. Experimental Evidence for Hyperfiltration of Saline Water through Compacted Clay Aquitard in the Hebei Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Zongyu Chen; Baoqian Duan; Jingli Shao

    2014-01-01

    It becomes an increasing concern that groundwater quality in exploited deep confined aquifer may deteriorate due to brackish water leakage from its overlying saline aquifer in Hebei Plain. However, the monitoring data show that the TDS does not significantly change in the exploited aquifer. Some physics or chemistry processes must have taken place in aquitards during brackish leakage. The semi-permeable membrane function of clay aquitard during the process of hyperfiltration (reverse os-mosis) should be one of the most important processes. To confirm and test this hyperfiltration mecha-nism, a series of experiments were performed in which NaCl solutions were hydraulically forced through different clay sampled from aquitard. The solution 7 g/L in NaCl was forced through at 20 °C by a fluid pressure of 0.5 kN. The results show that hyperfiltration indeed happens in caly aquitard. Semi-permeability is quantified by the reflection coefficientσ. The mean rejection coefficients (σ) for clay samples #1, #2 and #3 were estimated to be 0.063, 0.164 and 0.040, respectively. This behavior of clay was well explained with the theory of the diffuse double layer. The hyperfiltration effect is to the great extent responsible for the chemical process in the aquitard.

  2. Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Polymer Volume 52, Issue 12, 26 May 2011, Pages 2628?2642 Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering ? Jayita Bandyopadhyaya... frequency and temperature sweep tests. Graphical abstract Keywords ? Blend composites; ? Small-angle X-ray scattering; ? Solid-state rheology ...

  3. Evaluating four measures of water quality in clay pots and plastic safe storage containers in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Ayers, Tracy L; Knee, Jacqueline; Oremo, Jared; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H; Nyagol, Ronald O; Stauber, Christine E; Lantagne, Daniele S; Quick, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Household water treatment with chlorine can improve microbiological quality and reduce diarrhea. Chlorination is typically assessed using free chlorine residual (FCR), with a lower acceptable limit of 0.2 mg/L, however, accurate measurement of FCR is challenging with turbid water. To compare potential measures of adherence to treatment and water quality, we chlorinated recently-collected water in rural Kenyan households and measured total chlorine residual (TCR), FCR, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and E. coli concentration over 72 h in clay and plastic containers. Results showed that 1) ORP served as a useful proxy for chlorination in plastic containers up to 24 h; 2) most stored water samples disinfected by chlorination remained significantly less contaminated than source water for up to 72 h, even in the absence of FCR; 3) TCR may be a useful proxy indicator of microbiologic water quality because it confirms previous chlorination and is associated with a lower risk of E. coli contamination compared to untreated source water; and 4) chlorination is more effective in plastic than clay containers presumably because of lower chlorine demand in plastic. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A

    Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils....... It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods...... cm intact soil columns sampled from the same field grid also showed that the largest mass of particles and phosphorus leached from this part of the field. Thus, the presented WDC method comparison and results seem highly relevant in regard to field-scale mapping of leaching risk in regard to colloid...

  5. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A;

    Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils....... It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods...... cm intact soil columns sampled from the same field grid also showed that the largest mass of particles and phosphorus leached from this part of the field. Thus, the presented WDC method comparison and results seem highly relevant in regard to field-scale mapping of leaching risk in regard to colloid...

  6. Water retention of rigid soils from a two-factor model for clay

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    Water retention is one of the key soil characteristics. Available models of soil water retention relate to the curve-fitting type. The objective of this work is to suggest a physical model of water retention (drying branch) for soils with a rigid matrix. "Physical" means the prediction based on the a priori measured or estimated soil parameters with a clear physical meaning. We rely on the two-factor model of clay that takes into account the factors of capillarity and shrinkage. The key points of the model to be proposed are some weak pseudo shrinkage that the rigid soils demonstrate according to their experimental water retention curves, and some specific properties of the rigid grain matrix. The three input parameters for prediction of soil water retention with the rigid grain matrix include inter-grain porosity, as well as maximum and minimum grain sizes. The comparison between measured and predicted sand water retention curves for four different sands is promising.

  7. Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Alvarado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at providing evidence of particle suspension contributions to emulsion stability, which has been cited as a contributing factor in crude oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Kaolinite and silica particle dispersions were characterized as functions of brine salinity. A reference aqueous phase, representing reservoir brine, was used and then diluted with distilled water to obtain brines at 10 and 100 times lower Total Dissolved Solid (TDS. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and X-ray Diffraction (XRD were used to examine at the morphology and composition of clays. The zeta potential and particle size distribution were also measured. Emulsions were prepared by mixing a crude oil with brine, with and without dispersed particles to investigate emulsion stability. The clay zeta potential as a function of pH was used to investigate the effect of particle charge on emulsion stability. The stability was determined through bottle tests and optical microscopy. Results show that both kaolinite and silica promote emulsion stability. Also, kaolinite, roughly 1 mm in size, stabilizes emulsions better than larger clay particles. Silica particles of larger size (5 µm yielded more stable emulsions than smaller silica particles do. Test results show that clay particles with zero point of charge (ZPC at low pH become less effective at stabilizing emulsions, while silica stabilizes emulsions better at ZPC. These result shed light on emulsion stabilization in low-salinity waterflooding.

  8. The influence of water and salt content on the thermal conductivity coefficient of red clay brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Dalia; Koniorczyk, Marcin

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments aimed at the determination of hygro-thermal properties of red clay brick containing water or salt. The main objective of the research is the determination of the relation between the apparent thermal conductivity of brick and its water or Na2SO4 in water solution content. The research is conducted using stationary technique for the dry specimens, as well as the ones containing 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% water or sodium sulphate solution. The experimental results confirm the negative influence of water or sodium sulphate solution on thermal properties of material. However we observe that the presence of Na2SO4 in pores slightly weakens this negative impact.

  9. Effects of bentonite clay solids on poliovirus concentration from water by microporous filter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobsey, M D; Cromeans, T

    1985-01-01

    To determine whether suspended solids interfere with enteric virus recovery from water by microporous filter methods, the effects of bentonite clay solids at a concentration of 10 nephelometric turbidity units on the recovery of poliovirus type 1 from seeded, activated carbon-treated, filtered tap water were studied. Volumes (500 ml) of virus-laden water at pH 5.5 or 7.5, with and without 50 mM MgCl2, were filtered through 47-mm-diameter, electropositive (Virosorb 1MDS) and electronegative (Filterite) filters that had been pretreated with Tween 80 to minimize direct virus adsorption to filter surfaces. Bentonite solids enhanced virus retention on both types of filters, even under conditions in which viruses were not solids associated. However, bentonite solids also interfered with elution of retained viruses when eluting with 0.3% beef extract-50 mM glycine (pH 9.5). Under some conditions, overall virus recoveries were lower from water with bentonite solids than from solids-free control water. The results of this study indicate that clay turbidity can interfere somewhat with virus recovery by current microporous filter methods. PMID:2988438

  10. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  11. Experimental research on factors influencing dynamic shear modulus of dispersive clay%分散性土动剪切模量影响因素的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙仲林; 党进谦; 樊恒辉; 王飞

    2012-01-01

    The dispersive clay is a special soil which has low erosion resistance ability, impermeability, and high dispersion in pure water; it would cause serious harm to water conservancy construction. There have been many results on identification and modification of dispersive clay; but study of dynamic characteristics of dispersive clay is seldom reported in the newspapers. By using the DTC-199 dynamic torsional shear instrument to study the dynamic shear modulus of a kind of dispersive clay coming from a rolling soil dam in Ningxia. By changing the initial conditions such as moisture content, dry density and confining pressure and so on, to study its dynamic characteristics and its variation rules of dynamic shear modulus in different experimental conditions, then to compare and analyze the results. We can get that: dispersive ciay's dynamic shear stress-strain relations conform Hardin-Dmevich hyperbolic model; controlling the initial conditions, as other condition is the same, the lower moisture content, the greater dynamic shear modulus; the greater dry density is, the greater dynamic shear modulus is; the higher confining pressure is, the greater dynamic shear modulus is. Initial shear modulus and the maximum dynamic shear stress change as the same way. Dynamic shear modulus become smaller as dynamic shear strain increases. Compared with ordinary clay, the moisture content has greater impact on its strength and deformation.%分散性土耐冲蚀性低、抗渗性能差,在纯水中具有很高的分散性,严重威胁水利工程的安全.在分散性土的鉴别和改性方面已有很多成果,但分散性土动力特性的研究见诸报端的还很少.利用日本诚研社生产的DTC-199型电液伺服加荷往复扭剪三轴仪,对取自宁夏某碾压均质土坝的分散性土的动剪切模量进行了探索.通过改变试样的含水率、干密度和围压等初始条件,研究分散性土在不同试验条件下的动力特性及剪切模量的变化

  12. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability; Membranas de polietersulfona/argila e sua permeabilidade a agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena, E-mail: thamyrescc@gmail.com, E-mail: vanismedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: edcleide.araujo@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio.lira@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao, E-mail: amanda.leite@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (ECT/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2017-04-15

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  13. Low resistivity oil(gas)-bearing reservoir conductive model --Dual water clay matrix conductive model in the north area of Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘和平; 王家映; 樊政军; 马勇; 柳建华; 李明强

    2001-01-01

    Shaly sands reservoir is one of the most distributive types of the oil(gas)-bearing reservoirs discovered in China, and low resistivity oil(gas)-bearing reservoirs are mostly shaly sands reservoirs. Therefore, shaly sands reservoir conductive model is the key to evaluate low resistivity oil(gas)-bearing reservoirs using logging information. Some defects were found when we studied the clay distribution type conductive model, dual-water conductive model, conductive rock matrix model, etc. Some models could not distinguish the conductive path and nature of microporosity water and clay water and some models did not consider the clay distribution type and the mount of clay volume. So, we utilize the merits,overcome the defects of the above models, and put forward a new shaly sands conductive model-dual water clay matrix conductive model (DWCMCM) in which dual water is the free water and the microporosity water in shaly sands and the clay matrix(wet clay) is the clay grain containing water. DWCMCM is presented here, the advantages of which can tell the nature and conductive path from different water (microporosity water and freewater), in consid-eration of the clay distribution type and the mount of clay volume in shaly sands. So, the results of logging interpretation in the oil(gas)-bearing reservoirs in the north of Tarim Basin area, China with DWCMCM are better than those interpreted by the above models.

  14. The Use of Converter Slag (Magnetite and Bentonite Clay for Amoxicillin Adsorption from Polluted Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maichin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of pharmaceuticals compounds in the aquatic environment has attracted much interest from the academic community, since these compounds are potential endocrine disrupters and persist in the environment causing irreversible damage to the ecosystem. In Brazil little research has been conducted to measure, treat and remove β-lactam antibiotics such as amoxicillin present in surface water. Thus, the development and implementation of new treatment method which allow the removal or reduction of these compounds in surface waters are need. This study, focus on the development of low cost adsorbent material composed by steel manufacture converter slag (magnetite and bentonite clay to adsorb and remove amoxicillin (amox from water under laboratory conditions. To demonstrate the favorable aspects, the study was performed by experimental calculations of thermodynamics, kinetic and empirical model. The obtained results were similar with others found in literature which indicate the steel industry residue -magnetite and bentonite clay can be use to remove amoxicillin, with approximately 50% of removal percentage.

  15. Effect of suction change on water content and total volume of an expansive clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Liang-tong; CHEN Ping; NG C.W.W.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory study was carried out on both natural and compacted specimens to investigate the complex soil-water interaction in an unsaturated expansive clay. The laboratory study includes the measurement of soil-water characteristic curves, 1D free swelling tests, measurement of swelling pressure and shrinkage tests. The test results revealed that the air-entry value of the natural specimen was quite low due to cracks and fissures present. The hydraulic hysteresis of the natural specimen was relatively insignificant as compared with the compacted specimen. Within a suction range 0 to 500 kPa, a bilinear relationship between free swelling strain (or swelling pressure) and initial soil suction was observed for both the natural and compacted specimens. As a result of over-consolidation and secondary structures such as cementation and cracks, the natural specimens exhibited significant lower swelling (or swelling pressure) than the compacted specimen. The change of matric suction exerts a more significant effect on the water phase than on the soil skeleton for this expansive clay.

  16. Valence holes observed in nanodiamonds dispersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Pflüger, Mika; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Xiao, Jie; Aziz, Emad F.

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed.Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, details on XAS/XES normalization and background correction procedures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06639a

  17. Study on water-dispersible colloids in saline-alkali soils by atomic force microscopy and spectrometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Meng, Ronghua; Wang, Wenjie

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that water-dispersible colloids play an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants in soils. In this study, water-dispersible colloids extracted from saline-alkali soils have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV absorption spectra. AFM observation indicated that the water-dispersible colloids contain some large plates and many small spherical particles. XRD, XPS, and UV absorption measurement revealed that the water-dispersible colloids are composed of kaolinite, illite, calcite, quartz and humic acid. In addition, UV absorption measurement demonstrated that the humic acids are associated with clay minerals. Water-dispersible colloids in the saline-alkali soils after hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride treatment and an agricultural soil (nonsaline-alkali soil) were also investigated for comparison. The obtained results implied that the saline-alkali condition facilitates the formation of a large quantity of colloids. The use of AFM combined with spectrometric methods in the present study provides new knowledge on the colloid characteristics of saline-alkali soils. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:525-531, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Adsorption of cobalt ions from waste water on activated Saudi clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jlil, Saad A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to remove the Cobalt ions from wastewater by three types of Saudi clay. These were collected from Tabbuk city (Tabbuk clay), Khiber city (Khiber clay), and Bahhah city (Bahhah clay). The paper also examined the effect of different activators on the enhancement of adsorption capacity of clays for cobalt ions. The results showed minor enhancement in the adsorption capacities of cobalt ions on three types of clays activated by acid treatment. The adsorption capacity of clays improved particularly for Tabbuk clay when treated with hydrogen peroxide as an activator. The adsorption capacity increased from 3.94 to 12.9 mg/g for the untreated and treated Tabbuk clay, respectively. Also, the adsorption capacity of Bahhah clay increased by activating with sodium chloride from 3.44 to 12.55 mg/g for untreated and treated sample, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated using five equilibrium equations, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, BET, and Toth isotherm equations. Langmuir isotherm agreed well with the experimental data of Khiber and Bahhah clay, while Freundlich model and Langmuir-Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk and Bahhah clay activated by NaCl. The results showed that Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk clay when activated by H2O2 and H2SO4. Finally, the BET model did not describe the experimental data well for the three types of clay after activation.

  19. Selection of potential cold water marine species for testing of oil dispersants, and chemically dispersed oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.A. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A study regarding marine species for toxicity testing for Alaska conditions was presented and the potential adverse impacts of a large marine oil spill in cold water were discussed with the objective to determine if the spill should be treated by the use of oil dispersants. Without dispersion, the oil can pollute marine epifauna and can deposit on beaches. The decision to apply dispersants to a marine oil spill requires knowledge of the toxicity of the undispersed oil to pelagic marine life occurring via natural dispersion as opposed to the toxicity of the oil-dispersant mixture. Most standard toxicity tests apply to warm water species. This paper discussed the need to have a standard test species relevant to Alaska waters for toxicity testing. In this study, toxicity testing was done according to the methods of the Chemical Response to Oil Spills : Ecological Effects Research Forum (CROSERF). The testing included capturing adult species in the winter and holding them until larval hatching. Toxicity testing was completed in a narrow time frame before hatching ceased. Many chemical samples were tested. Topsmelt, urchins, shellfish, mysids, copepods, pink salmon fry, and tidepool sculpin were considered by the author to be the most useful for certain types of toxicity testing. 29 refs.

  20. Oil spill dispersants. Risk assessment for Swedish waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, C.; Lager, H.; Fejes, J.

    2001-12-01

    IVL has compiled a list of the international usage of oil spill dispersants and presents the technical limitations with the use of such agents as well as the biological effects of these chemical products. IVL, has also conducted an analysis of the pros and cons to using dispersants against oil spills in waters and has applied this with a risk assessment of chemical methods to combat oil spills in the Kattegat and Skagerrak and the Baltic Sea.

  1. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  2. Content and distribution of fluorine in rock, clay and water in fluorosis area Zhaotong, Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, K.; Li, H.; Feng, F. (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-04-15

    About 160 samples of coal, pyritic coal balls, coal seam gangue, clay, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin county, China to determine the fluorine content, distribution pattern and source in this fluorosis area. The study shows that the average fluorine content in the coal samples collected from 3 coal mines of the Late Permian coals in Zhenxiong and Weixin county, Zhaotong City, which are the main mining coals there, is 77.13 mg/kg. The average fluorine content coals collected form thee typical fluorosis villages in 72.56 mg/kg. Both of them are close to the world average and little low than the Chinese average. The fluorine content of drinking water is lower than 0.35 mg/L, the clay used as an additive for coal-burning and as a binfer in briquette-making by local residents has a high content of fluorine, ranging from 367-2,435 mg/kg, with the majority higher than 600 mg/kg and an average of 1,084.2 mg/kg. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Characterization of Colloidal Phosphorus Species in Drainage Waters from a Clay Soil Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regelink, I.C.; Koopmans, G.F.; Salm, van der C.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P

  4. Considering Organic Carbon for Improved Predictions of Clay Content from Water Vapor Sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2014-01-01

    to water vapor sorption isotherms that can be rapidly measured with a fully automated vapor sorption analyzer are a viable alternative. In this presentation we evaluate the performance of recently developed regression models based on comparison with standard CF measurements for soils with high organic...... carbon (OC) content and propose a modification to improve prediction accuracy. Evaluation of the CF prediction accuracy for 29 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 25% and with OC contents from 2.0 to 8.4% showed that the models worked reasonably well for all soils when the OC content was below 2.......4%. For soils with OC>2.4% and CFcontent. Based on 20 soils with CF between 3 and 15% and OC between 2.6 and 8.4%, we propose correction factors to account for the sorbed water content associated with OC. Evaluation of the OC...

  5. Translational diffusion of water and its dependence on temperature in charged and uncharged clays: A neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, Fátima; Jurányi, Fanni; Gimmi, Thomas; Van Loon, Luc; Unruh, Tobias; Diamond, Larryn W

    2008-11-07

    The water diffusion in four different, highly compacted clays [montmorillonite in the Na- and Ca-forms, illite in the Na- and Ca-forms, kaolinite, and pyrophyllite (bulk dry density rho(b)=1.85+/-0.05 gcm(3))] was studied at the atomic level by means of quasielastic neutron scattering. The experiments were performed on two time-of-flight spectrometers and at three different energy resolutions [FOCUS at SINQ, PSI (3.65 and 5.75 A), and TOFTOF at FRM II (10 A)] for reliable data analysis and at temperatures between 27 and 95 degrees C. Two different jump diffusion models were used to describe the translational motion. Both models describe the data equally well and give the following ranking of diffusion coefficients: Na-montmorillonitewaterwater due to their hydrophobic surfaces. The time between jumps, tau(t), follows the sequence: Ca-montmorillonite>or=Na-montmorillonite>Ca-illite>Na-illite>or=kaolinite>pyrophyllite>or=water, in both jump diffusion models. For clays with a permanent layer charge (montmorillonite and illite) a reduction in the water content by a factor of 2 resulted in a decrease in the self-diffusion coefficients and an increase in the time between jumps as compared to the full saturation. The uncharged clay kaolinite exhibited no change in the water mobility between the two hydration states. The rotational relaxation time of water was affected by the charged clay surfaces, especially in the case of montmorillonite; the uncharged clays presented a waterlike behavior. The activation energies for translational diffusion were calculated from the Arrhenius law, which adequately describes the systems in the studied temperature range. Na- and Ca-montmorillonite (approximately 11-12 kJmol), Na-illite (approximately 13 kJmol), kaolinite and pyrophyllite (approximately 14 kJmol), and Ca-illite (approximately 15 kJmol) all had lower activation energies than bulk water (approximately 17 kJmol in this study). This may originate from the reduced number and

  6. Alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes on clay-water interfaces: Mechanisms for the retention of uranium by altered clay surfaces on the nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Michael; Legrand, Christine A.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-scale processes on the solid-water interface of clay minerals control the mobility of metals in the environment. These processes can occur in confined pore spaces of clay buffers and barriers as well as in contaminated sediments and involve a combination of alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes of multiple species and phases. This study characterizes nano-scale processes on the interface between clay minerals and uranyl-bearing solution near neutral pH. Samples of clay minerals with a contact pH of ∼6.7 are collected from a U mill and mine tailings at Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada. The tailings material contains Cu-, As-, Co-, Mo-, Ni-, Se-bearing polymetallic phases and has been deposited with a surplus of Ca(OH)2 and Na2CO3 slaked lime. Small volumes of mill-process solutions containing sulfuric acid and U are occasionally discharged onto the surface of the tailings and are neutralized after discharge by reactions with the slaked lime. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique and other analytical methods (SEM, XRD, XRF and ICP-OES) are used to characterize the chemical and mineralogical composition of phases within confined pore spaces of the clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite and in the surrounding tailings material. Alteration zones around the clay minerals are characterized by different generations of secondary silicates containing variable proportions of adsorbed uranyl- and arsenate-species and by the intergrowth of the silicates with the uranyl-minerals cuprosklodowskite, Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2](H2O)6 and metazeunerite, Cu[(UO2)(AsO4)2](H2O)8. The majority of alteration phases such as illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and vermiculite have been most likely formed in the sedimentary basin of the U-ore deposit and contain low amounts of Fe (Iron-enriched Al-silicates or illite-smectites (Fe >10 at.%) formed most likely in the limed tailings at high contact pH (∼10.5) and their

  7. Gas equilibration and pore water sampling experiment in the opalinus clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinsot, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Lab. de recherche souterrain 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Fierz, T. [Solexperts, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland); Cailteau, C.; Donato, P. de [Institut National Polytechnique, LEM, UMR 7569 CNRS, ENSG/INPL, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Cailteau, C.; Pironon, J. [G2R-CREGU (UMR 7566 CNRS), 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pepa, S. [Metro Mesures, 91 - Mennecy (France); Wersin, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Canniere, P. de [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Gubler, H.E. [Bundesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Badertscher, N. [Geotechnical Institute, St-Ursanne (Switzerland); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The study of the mechanisms governing the composition of the interstitial fluids in clay formations with very low permeability constitutes a part of the scientific programmes associated with the feasibility analyses of deep repositories for the geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste. Several in-situ geochemical experiments have been performed since 1996 in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory to develop methods for studying these mechanisms in the Opalinus Clay formation. These experiments enabled to build a conceptual model of the interstitial water in the Opalinus Clay. The main uncertainties of this model deal with the carbonate system and the redox state of the water. Consecutively, the PC-C experiment was initiated in 2003 to reduce these uncertainties using: i) a gas equilibration, and, ii) isobar water sampling. (authors)

  8. Refinements of water parameters for molecular dynamics: Simulations of adsorption at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, L.; Yu, C.; Teppen, B.J.;

    1999-01-01

    In the context of a long-term program involving molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption phenomena at the clay mineral/aqueous solution interface, we are testing the viability of combining a force field that we developed specificially for clays with other, independently derived potential...... parameters for molecular species which are important in clay adsorption. For the current study the importance of variations in the potential parameters of water were investigated and polarization effects on oxygen studied as a function of intermolecular interactions. For this purpose ab initio MP2/6-311GG...... atomic charges were determined for several oligomers of water and for the water dimer at different intermolecular separations. Charge variations of up to ~0.1 electron charge unit on oxygen are found and, together with changes in van der Waals constants, their significance for dynamics simulations...

  9. Defluoridation of drinking water using Al3+-modified bentonite clay: Optimization of fluoride adsorption conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhahangwele, M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Al(sup3+)-bentonite clay (Alum-bent) was prepared by ion exchange of base cations on the matrices of bentonite clay. Intercalation of bentonite clay with Al(sup3+) was performed in batch experiments. Parameters optimized include time, dosage, and Al...

  10. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the

  11. Electrolyte low concentrations effects on the the rheology of water and bentonitic clays basis drilling fluids; Efeito de baixas concentracoes de eletrolitos na reologia de fluidos de perfuracao a base de agua e argilas bentoniticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Luciana Viana [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Engenharia de Processos]. E-mail: lucianaa@labdes.ufpb.br; Viana, Josiane Dantas; Farias, Kassie Vieira; Lira, Helio de Lucena; Ferreira, Heber Carlos [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais]. E-mail: josianedantas@bol.com.br; kassievieira@bol.com.br; helio@dema.ufpb.br; heber@dema.ufpb.br; Franca, Kepler Borges [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: kepler@labdes.ufpb.br

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of low electrolytes concentration on the rheology of the water based oil well drilling fluids and bentonite clays from Boa Vista, PB. It were selected seven samples of bentonite clays (four from industry and three from natural polycationic clay treated with concentrated Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution). The drilling fluids were prepared with a concentration of 4.86 % w/w, according to PETROBRAS norms and treated with different CaCl{sub 2} + MgCl{sub 2} concentration. After, the drilling fluids were submitted to a cure for 24 hours and measured apparent viscosity (AV), plastic viscosity (PV) and water loss (WL). To study the effect of the electrolyte on the rheology of the dispersions it was developed a factorial design 2{sup 2} + 3 test in the central point. The results showed that the addition of CaCl{sub 2} + MgCl{sub 2} caused a degradation of the drilling fluids prepared with industrialized clays, as showed by the decrease in AV and PV and great increase in WL. Also, it was observed an increase in AV and a decrease in PV in the drilling fluids prepared with natural clays treated with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, conducting a flocculated-gel state. (author)

  12. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay; Preparacao de caracterizacao de argilas bentonitas organofilicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Engenharia Ambiental; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: meuris@feq.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  13. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  14. Promoting cell proliferation using water dispersible germanium nanowires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bezuidenhout

    Full Text Available Group IV Nanowires have strong potential for several biomedical applications. However, to date their use remains limited because many are synthesised using heavy metal seeds and functionalised using organic ligands to make the materials water dispersible. This can result in unpredicted toxic side effects for mammalian cells cultured on the wires. Here, we describe an approach to make seedless and ligand free Germanium nanowires water dispersible using glutamic acid, a natural occurring amino acid that alleviates the environmental and health hazards associated with traditional functionalisation materials. We analysed the treated material extensively using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, High resolution-TEM, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Using a series of state of the art biochemical and morphological assays, together with a series of complimentary and synergistic cellular and molecular approaches, we show that the water dispersible germanium nanowires are non-toxic and are biocompatible. We monitored the behaviour of the cells growing on the treated germanium nanowires using a real time impedance based platform (xCELLigence which revealed that the treated germanium nanowires promote cell adhesion and cell proliferation which we believe is as a result of the presence of an etched surface giving rise to a collagen like structure and an oxide layer. Furthermore this study is the first to evaluate the associated effect of Germanium nanowires on mammalian cells. Our studies highlight the potential use of water dispersible Germanium Nanowires in biological platforms that encourage anchorage-dependent cell growth.

  15. Wind and water dispersal of wetland plants across fragmented landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soomers, H.; Karssenberg, D.J.; Soons, M.B.; Verweij, P.A.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.; Wassen, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity in wetlands is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, of which agricultural activities often are a cause. Dispersal of plant seeds via wind and ditches (water) may contribute to connecting remnant wetland plant populations in modern agricultural landscapes, and help to

  16. MICROBIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF A NEW WATER DISPERSIBLE MAGNETIC NANOBIOCOMPOSITE

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu; Alina Maria Holban; Ecaterina Andronescu; Maria Tomoiaga; Anton Ficai; Coralia Bleotu; Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to fabricate a novel water dispersible nanobiocomposite useful for the improvement of classical antimicrobial therapies. Water-soluble magnetite nanoparticles were protected by chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol to increase system’s bioaccommodation. The presence of magnetite was confirmed by XRD. SEM results also indicate that the fabricated nanobiocomposite is composed of nanosized magnetite particles. FT-IR spectrum of the nanobiocomposite, revealed the presence of adsorption peaks...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite: Removal of lead from water using montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aroui, L. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et Electrochimie du Solide (LEES), Faculte de Technologie, Universite Ferhat ABBAS, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Zerroual, L., E-mail: zerroual@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire d' Energetique et Electrochimie du Solide (LEES), Faculte de Technologie, Universite Ferhat ABBAS, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Boutahala, M. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes Chimiques (LGPC), Faculte de Technologie, Universite Ferhat ABBAS, Setif 19000 (Algeria)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The replacement of Na by Pb in the interlayer space of the smectite leads to a decrease in the intensity of the the (0 0 1) reflection as the concentration of lead nitrate increases. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading probably to the exfoliation of the caly. In addition, the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities is significantly influenced. This leads to a lowering of the water content and a decrease in the ionic conductivity of the clay. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the clay, Pb replaces Na ions and a significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the clay with regard to its dehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the interlayer space, the exchange of Na by Pb leads to a decrease in the protonic conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite material with good conductivity is synthesized. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained with Pb(II) sorption on an Algerian Clay. The experiments were carried out using a batch process. Powder X-rays diffraction patterns (PXRD) prove that in the montmorillonite Pb replaces Na ions. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading to the disappearance of the d{sub 001} reflection of the clay at high concentrations of lead. The replacement of hydrated Na with Pb ions influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities with a lowering of the water content. A PbO{sub 2}-clay composite material with good electrical conductivity is synthesized.

  18. Microwave-Assisted Preparation of Biodegradable Water Absorbent Polyacrylonitrile/Montmorillonite Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prafulla K. Sahoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN/Montmorillonite (MMT clay nanocomposite was prepared in a microwave oven using a transition metal Co(III complex taking ammonium persulfate (APS as initiator with a motive of converting hydrophobic PAN into hydrophilic nanocomposite material via nanotechnology by the inclusion of MMT to the virgin polymer. UV-visible spectral analysis revealed various interactions between the developed complex with other reaction components. The formation of the PAN/MMT nanocomposites was characterized by FTIR. Furthermore, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, the composite so obtained was found to have nano-order. XRD and TEM were suggesting that montmorillonite layers were exfoliated during the polymerization process. An increasing in the thermal stability for the developed nanocomposite was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The water absorption and biodegradation properties were carried out for its ecofriendly nature and better commercialization.

  19. Suitable Types and Constituent Ratios for Clay-Pot Water Filters to Improve the Physical and Bacteriological Quality of Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watcharaporn Wongsakoonkan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate suitable types and ratios of materials for making clay-pots, and their performance to improve the physical and bacteriological quality of drinking water. Synthetic water was prepared and used to select suitable types and ratios for clay-pot water filters. The clay-pots were prepared by combining clay with sand, coconut-shell charcoal, and rice-husk charcoal, at various ratios. The results indicated that all types and ratios could remove 100% of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli, and were thus suitable for treating drinking water. However, for practical use, the system should have real-world application. Therefore, filtration rate/inner surface area/time was used as a criterion to determine suitable types and ratios. Different types of clay-plot water filter yielded significantly different filtration rates (p 0.01. A ratio with a maximal filtration rate of 60:40(0.38 ± 0.28 mL/cm2/hr was found to be suitable. The quality of filtered water was acceptable in terms of turbidity, coliform bacteria level, and Escherichia coli, according to WHO drinking-water quality guidelines.

  20. Irrigation with saline-sodic water: effects on two clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a 4-year experiment aimed at evaluating the effect of irrigation with saline-sodic water on the soil are reported. The research was carried out at the Campus of the Agricultural Faculty of Bari University (Italy on 2 clay soils (Bologna – T1 and Locorotondo – T2. The soils were cropped to borlotto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., capsicum (Capsicum annuum L., sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., wheat (Triticum durum Desf grown in succession; the crops were irrigated with 9 saline-sodic types of water and subjected to two different leaching fractions (10% and 20% of the watering volume. The 9 solutions were obtained dissolving in de-ionised water weighted amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl and calcium chloride (CaCl2, deriving from the combination of 3 saline concentrations and 3 sodicity levels. The crops were irrigated whenever the water lost by evapotranspiration from the soil contained in the pots was equal to 30% of the soil maximum available water. The results showed that, though the soils were leached during the watering period, they showed a high salt accumulation. Consequently, the saturated soil extract electrical conductivity increased from initial values of 0.65 and 0.68 dS m-1 to 11.24 and 13.61 dS m-1 at the end of the experiment, for the soils T1 and T2, respectively. The saline concentration increase in irrigation water caused in both soils a progressive increase in exchangeable sodium, and a decrease in exchangeable calcium and non-significant variations in exchangeable potassium (K and magnesium (Mg.

  1. Calculation of Clay Permeability Using a Rectangular Particle-Water Film Model by the Double-Scale Asymptotic Expansion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowu Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Permeability of soil plays an important role in geotechnical engineering and is commonly determined by methods combining measurements with theory. Using the double-scale asymptotic expansion method, the Navier-Stokes equation is numerically solved to calculate the permeability, based on the homogenization method and the assumption that the homogeneous microstructure of the relevant porous media is represented accurately as the Representative Elemental Volume (REV. In this study, the commonly used square model is tested in the calculation of sea clay permeability. The results show large deviations. It is suspected that the square model could not represent the flattened shape of the clay particles and the bound water film wrapping around them. Hence, the Rectangle Particle-Water Film Model (i.e., the R-W model is proposed. After determining the horizontal and vertical characteristic length of the unit cell using two pairs of initial data, the permeabilities of other different void ratios could be inversely calculated. The results of three types of clay obtained using the R-W model agree well with the experimental data. This shows the efficient feasibility and accuracy of the R-W model by providing a good representation of the clay particles when using the double-scale asymptotic expansion method to calculate clay permeability.

  2. Removal of Fluoride from Water by Adsorption onto Fired Clay Pots: Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Kofa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fluoride in potable water is a serious health problem in rural areas of many developing countries. Hence, there is a need to find a simple and cost-effective method for water defluoridation in such areas. In the northern part of Cameroon, clay pots are used for cooking food and water storage. The firing of these pots consists of intensive burning using fire wood. They were tested as a potential adsorbent for removing excess fluoride from water. Experiments were carried out in a jar test at room temperature (25 ± 2°C. Effects of contact time (0–90 min, pH (4, 5, 7, 8, and 9, stirring speed (60, 90, 120, and 200 rpm, and ionic strength (0–1000 mg/L were investigated. Results showed that equilibrium was attained in 10 min whatever the pH. Pseudo-second-order and pore diffusion models described well the adsorption process. The highest amount of fluoride adsorbed (1.6 mg/g was obtained at pH 4-5 and the optimum stirring speed is 120 rpm. Ionic strength has a significant effect on fluoride adsorption.

  3. Sugar-influenced water diffusion, interaction, and retention in clay interlayer nanopores probed by theoretical simulations and experimental spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Galdi, Stephen M.; Kelch, Sabrina E.; Aoki, Thalia G.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamics in clay nanopores is important for gaining insights into the trapping of water, nutrients, and contaminants in natural and engineered soils. Previous investigations have focused on the interlayer organization and molecular diffusion coefficients (D) of cations and water molecules in cation-saturated interlayer nanopores of smectite clays. Little is known, however, about how these interlayer dynamic properties are influenced by the ubiquitous presence of small organic compounds such as sugars in the soil environment. Here we probed the effects of glucose molecules on montmorillonite interlayer properties. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed re-structuring of the interlayer organization of the adsorptive species. Water-water interactions were disrupted by glucose-water H-bonding interactions. ;Dehydration; of the glucose-populated nanopore led to depletion in the Na solvation shell, which resulted in the accumulation of both Na ions (as inner-sphere complexes) and remaining hydrated water molecules at the mineral surface. This accumulation led to a decrease in both DNa and Dwater. In addition, the reduction in Dglucose as a function of increasing glucose content can be explained by the aggregation of glucose molecules into organic clusters H-bonded to the mineral surface on both walls of the nanopore. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction data were consistent with the theoretical predictions. Compared to clay interlayers devoid of glucose, increased intensities and new peaks in the 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectra confirmed increasing immobilization of Na as a function of increasing glucose content. And, the X-ray diffraction data indicated a reduced collapse of glucose-populated interlayers exposed to decreasing moisture conditions, which led to the maintenance of hydrated clay nanopores. The coupling of theoretical and experimental findings sheds light on the molecular to nanoscale mechanisms that

  4. Treatment with coated layer double hydroxide clays decreases the toxicity of copper-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Deanne; Nar, Mangesh; D'Souza, Nandika Anne; Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J; Roberts, Aaron P

    2014-05-01

    Copper is a common pollutant found in watersheds that exerts toxic effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates. Layer double hydroxide (LDH) clays are able to adsorb a wide range of contaminants through ion-exchange mechanisms. Coating LDH clays with various materials alters the aggregation of clay particles into the nano-size range, thus increasing relative surface area and offering great potential for contaminant remediation. The goal of this study was to determine if treatment with coated LDH clays decreases the toxicity of copper-containing solutions to Daphnia magna. Four LDH clays with different coatings used to alter hydrophobicity were as follows: used: Na(+) montmorillonite, Zn-Al LDH-nitrate, Zn-Al LDH-stearate, and Zn-Al LDH-carbonate. It was determined that coated LDH clays decreased copper toxicity by decreasing bioavailability and that smaller aggregate sizes decreased bioavailability the most. 96 h LC50 values increased by as much as 4.2 times with the treatment of the solutions with 100 mg/L LDH clay. Copper analysis of the clay and solutions indicated that the clays work by decreasing copper bioavailability by way of a binding mechanism. Coated LDH clays hold promise as a small-scale remediation tool or as an innovative tool for toxicity identification and evaluation characterization of metals.

  5. Evidence and characteristics of a diverse and metabolically active microbial community in deep subsurface clay borehole water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Boven, Patrick; Leys, Natalie

    2013-12-01

    The Boom Clay in Belgium is investigated in the context of geological nuclear waste disposal, making use of the High Activity Disposal Experimental Site (HADES) underground research facility. This facility, located in the Boom Clay at a depth of 225 m below the surface, offers a unique access to a microbial community in an environment, of which all geological and geochemical characteristics are being thoroughly studied. This study presents the first elaborate description of a microbial community in water samples retrieved from a Boom Clay piezometer (borehole water). Using an integrated approach of microscopy, metagenomics, activity screening and cultivation, the presence and activity of this community are disclosed. Despite the presumed low-energy environment, microscopy and molecular analyses show a large bacterial diversity and richness, tending to correlate positively with the organic matter content of the environment. Among 10 borehole water samples, a core bacterial community comprising seven bacterial phyla is defined, including both aerobic and anaerobic genera with a range of metabolic preferences. In addition, a corresponding large fraction of this community is found cultivable and active. In conclusion, this study shows the possibility of a microbial community of relative complexity to persist in subsurface Boom Clay borehole water. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  7. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  8. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  9. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  10. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  11. Water and clay based drilling fluids for oil wells; Fluidos hidroargilosos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.C.A. de; Amorim, L.V.; Santana, L.N. de L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)], e-mail: nalealves@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the onshore drilling of wells are commonly used aqueous fluids containing bentonite clays. However, to perform their functions generally there is the necessity of additives to drilling fluids, like viscositying, filtered reducer and lubricant. Thus, this work aims to develop water and clay base drilling fluids with low solid text, and with polymeric and lubricants additives. Were studied a sample of industrialized sodium bentonite clays, three polymeric compounds in the ternary form and a sample of lubricant, in different concentrations. Were determined the flow curves, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force in Fann 35A viscometer, the filtered volume in API filter-press and the lubricity coefficient in Ofite lubricimeter. The results showed that the fluid had pseudoplastic behavior, the polymeric additives adjusts their rheological properties and filtration and the addition of 1% of lubricant is sufficient to improve the lubricity of fluids. (author)

  12. Defluoridation of water using as-synthesized Zn/Al/Cl anionic clay adsorbent: equilibrium and regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, S; Mayadevi, S

    2009-08-15

    Zn/Al/Cl anionic clay has been synthesized by co-precipitation method and applied for adsorption of fluoride in aqueous medium. Equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Generalized isotherm equations. Thermodynamic parameters like DeltaG and DeltaH values show the feasibility and exothermic nature of the adsorption process. Influence of solution pH and presence of other anions on fluoride adsorption by the clay has also been studied. Presence of carbonate in water was found to have an adverse effect on fluoride adsorption by the clay. pH(pzc) of the clay has been found to be 8.97. A two-step 1st order kinetic model was used to explain the fluoride adsorption kinetics of the as-synthesized clay. It was possible to regenerate the adsorbent with an aqueous solution of 0.01 M NaOH and the effect of regeneration on fluoride adsorption was reported up to five regeneration cycles.

  13. The use of lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) as sorbent for PAHs removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah; Christy, Alfred A; Barth, Tanja; Francis, George William

    2012-05-30

    Lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) has been explored as a sorbent for the removal of PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) from water. The efficacy of LECA as a sorbent for PAHs was assessed using contact time, mass of sorbent and sorption isotherms in a series of batch experiments. Maximum (optimum) sorption was reached at 21 h after which the amount of PAHs sorbed remained almost constant. Batch experiments were conducted by shaking a 100ml solution mixture of individual PAHs (containing 0.02 mg/L) with LECA. The maximum sorption was 70.70, 70.82 and 72.12%, respectively for phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene when a mass of 0.2 g of sorbent was used. There was an increase in sorption as a result of an increase in mass of sorbent until a maximum was reached at a mass of 4.0 g LECA with 92.61, 93.91 and 94.15% sorption of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene respectively. Sorption data were fitted to the linearised forms of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models to determine the water-LECA partitioning coefficient. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the removal process while the hydrophobicity of the PAHs also influenced the sorption capacity. LECA can be used as an alternative method for aqueous PAHs removal.

  14. Preparation and properties of biodegradable starch–clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Well-dispersed starch-clay nanocomposites were prepared by adding a dilute clay dispersion to a solution of starch followed by coprecipitation in ethanol. The clay didn\\'t significantly influence the type of crystalline structure of starch molecules although the amount of crystallinity appears to be somewhat lower in the nanocomposites. The nanocomposites show improved modulus and strength without a decrease in elongation at break. The increase in modulus and strength is 65% and 30%, respectively for the nanocomposite containing 5 wt.% clay compared to the unfilled starch materials. Further increases in clay result in deterioration in properties most likely due to poorer clay dispersion and lower polymer crystallinity. As the amount of water increases, the modulus of both pure starch and starch nanocomposites decreases, although the change is less pronounced in the nanocomposites suggesting that the addition of clay to form nanocomposites can improve the stability of starch-based products during transportation and storage. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dispersion corrections to density functionals for water aromatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Urs; Parrinello, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-02-08

    We investigate recently published methods for extending density functional theory to the description of long-range dispersive interactions. In all schemes an empirical correction consisting of a C6r(-6) term is introduced that is damped at short range. The coefficient C6 is calculated either from average molecular or atomic polarizabilities. We calculate geometry-dependent interaction energy profiles for the water benzene cluster and compare the results with second-order Møller-Plesset calculations. Our results indicate that the use of the B3LYP functional in combination with an appropriate mixing rule and damping function is recommended for the interaction of water with aromatics.

  16. Point-of-use water purification using clay pot water filters and copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-24

    Nov 24, 2011 ... causes water-borne diseases such as diarrhoea, which often lead to deaths, children being the most vulnerable. Therefore ... The 600 µm and 900 µm pots could reduce the total coliform ... disinfection systems; sunlight exposure techniques such ... arsenic contaminants from water and its potential for use in.

  17. Non-classical dispersive shock waves in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Patrick; Hoefer, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A classical model for shallow water waves with strong surface tension is the Kawahara equation, which is the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) including a fifth order derivative term. A particular problem of interest to these types of equations is step initial data, known as the Riemann problem, which results in a shock in finite time. Unlike classical shock waves, where a discontinuity is resolved by dissipation, the dispersive regularization results in the discontinuity resolved as a dispersive shock wave (DSW). When parameter choices result in non-convex dispersion, three distinct dynamic regimes are observed that can be characterized solely by the amplitude of the initial step. For small jumps, a perturbed KdV DSW with positive polarity and orientation is generated, accompanied by small amplitude radiation from an embedded solitary wave leading edge, termed a radiating DSW. For moderate jumps, a crossover regime is observed with waves propagating forward and backward from the sharp transition region. For sufficiently large jumps, a new type of DSW is observed we term a translating DSW were a partial, non-monotonic, negative solitary wave at the trailing edge is connected to an interior nonlinear periodic wave and exhibits features common to both dissipative and dispersive shock waves.

  18. The effect of phosphorus binding clay (Phoslock) in mitigating cyanobacterial nuisance: A laboratory study on the effects on water quality variables and plankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, J.F.X.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory study examined the lanthanum modified clay Phoslock® for its effectiveness to bind soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), release of nutrients from this modified clay, its influence on water quality variables (pH, oxygen saturation %, conductivity and turbidity), effects on phytoplankton

  19. The effect of phosphorus binding clay (Phoslock) in mitigating cyanobacterial nuisance: A laboratory study on the effects on water quality variables and plankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, J.F.X.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory study examined the lanthanum modified clay Phoslock® for its effectiveness to bind soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), release of nutrients from this modified clay, its influence on water quality variables (pH, oxygen saturation %, conductivity and turbidity), effects on phytoplankton

  20. Water-dispersible three-dimensional LC-nanoresonators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Clericò

    Full Text Available Nanolithography techniques enable the fabrication of complex nanodevices that can be used for biosensing purposes. However, these devices are normally supported by a substrate and their use is limited to in vitro applications. Following a top-down procedure, we designed and fabricated composite inductance-capacitance (LC nanoresonators that can be detached from their substrate and dispersed in water. The multimaterial composition of these resonators makes it possible to differentially functionalize different parts of the device to obtain stable aqueous suspensions and multi-sensing capabilities. For the first time, we demonstrate detection of these devices in an aqueous environment, and we show that they can be sensitized to their local environment and to chemical binding of specific molecular moieties. The possibility to optically probe the nanoresonator resonance in liquid dispersions paves the way to a variety of new applications, including injection into living organisms for in vivo sensing and imaging.

  1. Halloysite clay nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles dispersed in ionic liquid applied in the development of a catecholamine biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Daniela; Scheeren, Carla Weber; Dupont, Jairton; Vieira, Iolanda Cruz

    2012-08-21

    Halloysite clay nanotubes were used as a support for the immobilization of the enzyme peroxidase from clover sprouts (Trifolium), and employed together with platinum nanoparticles in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ionic liquid (Pt-BMI·PF(6)) in the development of a new biosensor for the determination of catecholamines by square-wave voltammetry. Under optimized conditions, the analytical curves showed detection limits of 0.05, 0.06, 0.07, 0.12 μM for dopamine, isoproterenol, dobutamine and epinephrine, respectively. The biosensor demonstrated high sensitivity, good repeatability and reproducibility, and long-term stability (18% decrease in response over 150 days). A recovery study of dopamine in pharmaceutical samples gave values from 97.5 to 101.4%. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of dopamine in pharmaceutical samples, with a maximum relative error of ±1.0% in relation to the standard (spectrophotometric) method. The good analytical performance of the proposed method can be attributed to the efficient immobilization of the peroxidase in the nanoclay, and the facilitation of electron transfer between the protein and the electrode surface due to the presence of the Pt nanoparticles and ionic liquid.

  2. Evaluate the action of polymeric additives in protect and recover water and bentonite clay based drilling fluids contaminated by degradation agents; Analise da acao de aditivos polimericos na protecao e recuperacao de fluidos de perfuracao base agua e bentonita contaminados por sais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, L.F.A.; Ferreira, H.S.; Amorim, L.V.; Franca, K.B.; Ferreira, H.C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this paper is study influences of electrolytes and cellulose polymers on rheological and water loss properties of dispersions of bentonite compositions. Evaluate the action of degradation additives CaSO{sub 4}, MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} and polymeric additives to protect and recover water and clay based. The results show a negative effect of degradation additives the rheological and water loss properties of drilling fluids. The cellulose polymers can be successfully applied to protect and recover of the rheological properties and water loss of the dispersions contaminated. (author)

  3. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  4. Dispersões aquosas à base de nanocompósitos de poliuretanos e argilas hidrofílicas brasileiras: síntese e caracterização Aqueous dispersions based on nanocomposites of polyurethanes and hydrophilic brasilian clays: synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C Delpech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram sintetizados nanocompósitos à base de poliuretanos em dispersão aquosa (NWPUs e argilas brasileiras hidrofílicas (Brasgel PA e Brasgel NT do tipo montmorilonita (MMT, de natureza sódica e cálcica, respectivamente, tendo a primeira maior hidrofilicidade. Os monômeros empregados na síntese das dispersões foram: poli(glicol propilênico (PPG; ácido dimetilolpropiônico (DMPA, diisocianato de isoforona (IPDI e hidrazina, como extensor de cadeia. Foram variados a proporção de segmentos rígidos e flexíveis e o teor das argilas adicionadas (na faixa de 0,5 a 2,5% em massa. As argilas foram caracterizadas por espectrometria na região do infravermelho (FTIR e difração de raio X (XRD e tiveram seu grau de inchamento determinado. Os NWPUs foram avaliados em termos de teor de sólidos totais, FTIR, XRD e propriedades mecânicas. A ausência dos picos de cristalinidade, característicos das argilas puras, e resistência mecânica superior frente às dispersões sem argila, confirmaram a formação de nanocompósitos.In this work nanocomposites based on polyurethane aqueous dispersion (NWPUs were synthesized employing montmorillonite (MMT hydrophilic brazilian clays (Brasgel PA and Brasgel NT, containing sodium and calcium, respectively, being the former more hydrophilic. The monomers used in the synthesis of the dispersions were: poly (propylene glycol (PPG; dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI and hydrazine, as chain extender. It was varied the proportion between hard and soft segments and clay content (added in the range from 0.5 to 2.5% per mass. The clays were previously delaminated in water and incorporated in the moment of prepolymer dispersion. The clays were characterized by infrared spectrometry (FTIR and X ray diffraction (XRD and their degree of swelling were determined. Solid content of the formulations were calculated. The films, cast from aqueous dispersions, were characterized by

  5. Nanocompósitos derivados de dispersões aquosas de poliuretano e argila: influência da argila na morfologia e propriedades mecânicas Nanocomposites derived from polyurethane aqueous dispersion and clay: influence of the clay on the morphology and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Ayres

    2007-12-01

    . Water was used as swelling agent to make the basal space of silicate layers widen without any chemical treatment. According to XRD curves, the nanocomposites showed intercalation of the polymer with respect to the clay, while small angle X ray scattering (SAXS results showed that some degree of clay exfoliation was present in the produced film. The incomplete exfoliation of the clay proved that a re-aggregation process of the nanocomponents (originally delaminated in the aqueous dispersion had occurred during film formation. The degree of hydrogen bonding, evaluated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, was used to investigate the effect of clay on the microphase separation of the polyurethane and indicated that the presence of the clay particles changed the structure of the polymer phase domains. PUD exhibited values of tensile strength and elongation at break about 30 MPa and 1400%, respectively. The incorporation of 1 weight % of MMT improved by 230 and 20% the modulus and strength on the polymer respectively, while keeping the elongation at break almost unchanged.

  6. The use of lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) as sorbent for PAHs removal from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah, E-mail: mariannkansah@yahoo.com [Department of Science, Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Agder Service Box 422, No 4604, Kristiansand (Norway); Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Christy, Alfred A. [Department of Science, Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Agder Service Box 422, No 4604, Kristiansand (Norway); Barth, Tanja; Francis, George William [Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of contact time on sorption PAH by LECA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of mass of sorbent (LECA) on sorption of PAH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorption Isotherms for PAH-LECA interaction. - Abstract: Lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) has been explored as a sorbent for the removal of PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) from water. The efficacy of LECA as a sorbent for PAHs was assessed using contact time, mass of sorbent and sorption isotherms in a series of batch experiments. Maximum (optimum) sorption was reached at 21 h after which the amount of PAHs sorbed remained almost constant. Batch experiments were conducted by shaking a 100 ml solution mixture of individual PAHs (containing 0.02 mg/L) with LECA. The maximum sorption was 70.70, 70.82 and 72.12%, respectively for phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene when a mass of 0.2 g of sorbent was used. There was an increase in sorption as a result of an increase in mass of sorbent until a maximum was reached at a mass of 4.0 g LECA with 92.61, 93.91 and 94.15% sorption of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene respectively. Sorption data were fitted to the linearised forms of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models to determine the water-LECA partitioning coefficient. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the removal process while the hydrophobicity of the PAHs also influenced the sorption capacity. LECA can be used as an alternative method for aqueous PAHs removal.

  7. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  8. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  9. Magnetic chitosan/clay beads: A magsorbent for the removal of cationic dye from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bée, Agnès; Obeid, Layaly; Mbolantenaina, Rakotomalala; Welschbillig, Mathias; Talbot, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic composite material composed of magnetic nanoparticles and clay encapsulated in cross-linked chitosan beads was prepared, characterized and used as a magsorbent for the removal of a cationic dye, methylene blue (MB), from aqueous solutions. The magnetic properties of these beads represent an advantage to recover them at the end of the depollution process. The optimal weight ratio R=clay:chitosan for the removal of MB in a large range of pH was determined. For beads without clay, the maximal adsorption capacity of MB occurs in the pH range [9-12], while for beads with clay, the pH range extends by increasing the amount of clay to reach [3-12] for R>0.5. Adsorption isotherms show that the adsorption capacity of magnetic beads is equal to 82 mg/g. Moreover, the kinetics of dye adsorption is relatively fast since 50% of the dye is removed in the first 13 min for an initial MB concentration equal to 100 mg/L. The estimation of the number of adsorption sites at a given pH shows that the main driving force for adsorption of MB in a large range of pH is the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged dye and the permanent negative charges of clay.

  10. Estimated ground-water use in Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties, Minnesota, for 2030 and 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterstein, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, is studying six alternatives for delivering water to the Red River of the North Valley in North Dakota and to the cities of Breckenridge, Moorhead, and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. In order to evaluate these alternatives the Bureau of Reclamation needs estimates of ground-water use for 2030 and 2050 for six counties in Minnesota: Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, conducted a study to estimate ground-water use in these counties for 2030 and 2050.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Morphology of the Clay/Waterborne Polyurethane Nanocomposite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yongcheng; WANG Junwei; ZHAO Yuhua; KANG maoqing; WANG Xinkui

    2006-01-01

    Stable clay/waterborne polyurethane nanocompostie dispersions were synthesized by sulfonated poly ( butylene adipate ) diol , 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate , dimethyl propionic acid, 1,4-butanediol, triethyl anine and clay-water dispersion through a route named prepolymer acetone mixing progress. The reinforced mechanical properties and thermal resistance of films casting from it were examined by dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and tensile tests. Furthermore, the morphology of these nanocompostie films and dispersions were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy( SEM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction analyses( WXRD ). The experimental results reveal that the clay could be predominantly dispersed in the pristine polymer forming nanocomposties, and evidendy enhanced the tensile properties and modulus of it. Additionally, the best-reinforced effect could occur when the clay content was near 1 wt% .

  12. MODIFIED ULTRAVIOLET-CURABLE WATER DISPERSIBLE POLYURETHANE-ACRYLATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-wen Yang; Zhi-ming Wang; Zhao-hua Zeng; Hui-ya Yuan; Yong-lie Chen

    2001-01-01

    Three kinds of UV-curable self-emulsified polyurethane-acrylate (PUA) prepolymer, i.e., conventional, chain extended and grafted PUAs, were prepared. The relatively small particle size of the PUA dispersions indicates that the PUA prepolymers exhibit sufficient aqueous dispersibility. The PUA prepolymers can substantially lower the interfacial tension of water. Chain-extended PUA dispersions exhibit pseudoplastic behavior and thixotropy to a greater extent than do their conventional counterpart. The chain-extended and grafted PUA photocure to higher conversion than do the conventional PU equivalent. The results of DSC measurement suggest that there exists phase mixing between the hard and the soft segment phases for the PUAs based on PEG 400 that is the comparatively short soft segment in the prepolymer. For the PUA prepolvmers based on PEG having higher Mn values, chain-extending and grafting could impede the phase separation between the hard and the soft segment domains. The adhesion, impact strength and flexibility of the photocured films were tested.

  13. Dispersion of oil into water using lecithin-Tween 80 blends: The role of spontaneous emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehm, David A; Rokke, David J; Paul, Prakash G; Lee, Han Seung; Vizanko, Brent S; McCormick, Alon V

    2017-02-01

    Lecithin-rich mixtures of the nontoxic surfactants lecithin and Tween 80 are effective marine oil spill dispersants, but produce much higher oil-water interfacial tension than other, comparably effective dispersants. This suggests interfacial phenomena other than interfacial tension influence lecithin-Tween 80 dispersants' effectiveness. The interface between seawater and dispersant-crude oil mixtures was studied using light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, and droplet coalescence tests. Lecithin:Tween 80 ratio was varied from 100:0 to 0:100 and wt% dispersant in the oil was varied from 1.25 to 10wt%. Tween 80-rich dispersants cause oil-into-water spontaneous emulsification, while lecithin-rich dispersants primarily cause water-into-oil spontaneous emulsification. Possible mechanisms for this spontaneous emulsification are discussed, in light of images of spontaneously emulsifying interfaces showing no bursting microstructures, interfacial gel, or phase inversion, and negligible interfacial turbulence. Dispersant loss into seawater due to oil-into-water spontaneous emulsification may explain why Tween 80-rich dispersants are less effective than lecithin-rich dispersants with comparable interfacial tension, although longer droplet coalescence times observed for Tween 80-rich, self-emulsifying dispersant-oil mixtures may mitigate the effects of dispersant leaching. Conversely, surfactant retention in oil via lecithin-rich dispersants' water-into-oil emulsification may explain why lecithin-Tween 80 dispersants are as effective as dispersants containing other surfactant blends which produce lower interfacial tension.

  14. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal in the Recirculating Aquaculture System with Water Treatment Tank containing Baked Clay Beads and Chinese Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeknarin Thanakitpairin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to describe the nitrogen and phosphorus removal in Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS by crop plants biomass production. The 3 experiment systems consisted of 1 treatment (fish tank + baked clay beads + Chinese cabbage and 2 controls as control-1 (fish tank only and control-2 (fish tank + baked clay beads, were performed. With all experimental RAS, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus was cultured at 2 kg/m3 density. The baked clay beads (8-16 mm in diameter were filled as a layer of 10 cm in the water treatment tank of control-2. While in the treatment tank, Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis was planted at 334 plants/m2 in baked clay beads layer. During 35 days of experiment, the average fish wet-weight in control-1, control-2 and treatment systems increased from 16.31±1.49, 15.18±1.28 and 11.31±1.49 g to 29.43±7.06, 28.65±3.12 and 27.20±6.56 g, respectively. It was found that the growth rate of 0.45±0.15 g-wet weight/day in a treatment tank was higher than in those 2 controls, which were rather similar at 0.37±0.16 and 0.38±0.05 g-wet weight/day, respectively. The fish survival rate of all experimental units was 100%. The average Chinese cabbage wet-weight in treatment system increased from 0.15±0.02 g to 1.00±0.38 g. For water quality, all parameters were within the acceptable range for aquaculture. The assimilation inorganic nitrogen in a treatment tank showed a slower rate and lower nitrite accumulation relative to those in control tanks. The nitrogen and phosphorus balance analysis illustrated that most of the nitrogen and phosphorus input in all systems was from feed (82-87% and 21-87% while at the final day of experiments, nitrogen and phosphorus in tilapia culture revealed at 15-19% and 4-13%. The accumulation of nitrogen and phosphorus in the water, up to 56% and 70%, was found in control-1 while water in the tank with baked clay beads had substantial lower nitrogen and phosphorus concentration. The

  15. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  16. Shoreline clean up during the Sea Empress incident: the role of surf washing (clay-oil flocculation), dispersants and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunel, T. [AEA Technology, Culham (United Kingdom); Lee, K. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Mont-Joli, PQ (Canada). Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne; Swannell, R.; Wood, P.; Rusin, J.; Bailey, N.; Halliwell, C.; Davies, L.; Sommerville, M.; Dobie, A.; Mitchell, D.; McDonagh, M. [AEA Technology, Culham (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An outline of the at sea operations which took place in response to the Sea Empress oil spill, was presented. The grounding of the Sea Empress resulted in the release of 70,000 tonnes of blended crude oil into the environment. A qualitative account of the events which followed the incident were described. The early mobilization of a monitoring team has demonstrated the importance of scientific measurements to identify and maximize the efficiency of various cleanup operations. One of the important responses to this incident was the application of dispersants which by inducing flocculation, thereby reducing contact of oil directly with the substrate, and by reducing adhesion of the oil to the shoreline, contributed greatly to minimizing shoreline impact. 19 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Clay hydration/dehydration in dry to water-saturated supercritical CO2: Implications for caprock integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Miller, Quin R.; Chen, Jeffrey; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Martin, Paul F.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Wet scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of carbonating and hydrating certain minerals, whereas anhydrous scCO2 can dehydrate water-containing minerals. Because these geochemical processes affect solid volume and thus porosity and permeability, they have the potential to affect the long-term integrity of the caprock seal. In this study, we investigate the swelling and shrinkage of an expandable clay found in caprock formations, montmorillonite (Ca-STx-1), when exposed to variable water-content scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar using a combination of in situ probes, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), and in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). We show that the extent of montmorillonite clay swelling/shrinkage is dependent not only on water hydration/dehydration, but also on CO2 intercalation reactions. Our results also suggest a competition between water and CO2 for interlayer residency where increasing concentrations of intercalated water lead to decreasing concentrations of intercalated CO2. Overall, this paper demonstrates the types of measurements required to develop fundamental knowledge that will enhance modeling efforts and reduce risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2.

  18. Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  19. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

    2005-12-01

    Our goal in this study is to utilize novel anionic clay sorbents for treating and reclaiming/reusing power-plant effluents, in particular, boiler blow-down waters containing heavy metals, such as As and Se. Developing and using novel materials for such application is dictated by the challenge posed by reclaiming and recycling these too-clean-to-clean effluent streams, generated during electricity production, whose contaminant levels are in the ppm/ppb (or even less) trace levels. During the study model blow-down streams have been treated in batch experiments. Adsorption isotherms as a function of pH/temperature have been established for both As and Se. Adsorption rates have also measured as a function of concentration, temperature, pH, and space time. For both the equilibrium and rate measurements, we have studied the As/Se interaction, and competition from background anions. A homogeneous surface diffusion model is used to describe the experimental kinetic data. The estimated diffusivity values are shown to depend on the particle size. On the other hand, a model taking into account the polycrystalline nature of these adsorbent particles, and the presence of an intercrystallite porous region predicts correctly that the surface diffusivity is particle size independent. A mathematical model to describe flow experiments in packed-beds has also been developed during phase I of this project. The goal is to validate this model with flow experiments in packed-beds during the phase II of this project, to determine the adsorption capacity under flow conditions, and to compare it with the capacity estimated from the adsorption isotherms determined from the batch studies.

  20. MICROBIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF A NEW WATER DISPERSIBLE MAGNETIC NANOBIOCOMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to fabricate a novel water dispersible nanobiocomposite useful for the improvement of classical antimicrobial therapies. Water-soluble magnetite nanoparticles were protected by chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol to increase system’s bioaccommodation. The presence of magnetite was confirmed by XRD. SEM results also indicate that the fabricated nanobiocomposite is composed of nanosized magnetite particles. FT-IR spectrum of the nanobiocomposite, revealed the presence of adsorption peaks specific for PVA, CS and Fe3O4. Our results demonstrate that the nanobiocomposite has the ability to modify and improve antimicrobial activity of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime against S.aureus and P.aeruginosa. Fabricated nanobiocomposite exhibited a low cytotoxic effect on eukaryotic cells being thus a good candidate for developing new antimicrobial strategies aiming to potentate the antimicrobial effect of drugs and controlling their delivery.

  1. Adsorption studies of a water soluble dye, Reactive Red MF-3B, using sonication-surfactant-modified attapulgite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianhua; Liu, Yuanfa; Jin, Qingzhe; Wang, Xingguo; Yang, Jun

    2007-05-08

    The removal of water-soluble Reactive Red MF-3B from aqueous media by sonication-surfactant-modified attapulgite clay was studied in a batch system. The surfactant used was octodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (OTMAC). Adsorbent characterizations were investigated using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The effects of pH, contact time, initial solute concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of Reactive Red MF-3B onto modified clay were investigated. On the basis of kinetic studies, specific rate constants involved in the processes were calculated and second-order adsorption kinetics was observed in the case. Film diffusion was found to be the rate-limiting step. Reactive Red MF-3B adsorption was found to increase with increase temperature. The Reactive Red MF-3B equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, the former being found to provide the better fit of the experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. From the results it can be concluded that the surfactant-modified clay could be a good adsorbent for treating Reactive Red MF-3B-contaminated waters.

  2. An Aquifer Reflections on Deep Clay Conditions for Water Quantity Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Sabariah Musa; Nor Azazi Zakaria; Lau Tze Liang

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the on-site testing of deep clay area through the well response and aquifer reflection analysis. The analysis was conducted using AQTESOLV software on pumping and recovery data to determine the well responses and aquifer characteristics of deep clay area. A simple experimental model was installed at the site using deep well of REWES (Recharge Well System) model assists with four monitoring wells around the model. The monitoring wells were located at 4m, 10m, 20m an...

  3. A possible role of fluctuating clay-water systems in the production of ordered prebiotic oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, N.; White, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A model is proposed for the intermediate stages of prebiotic evolution, based on the characteristics of the adsorption and condensation of amino acids and nucleotides on the surface area of clay minerals in a fluctuating environment. Template replication and translation of adsorbed oligonucleotides and catalytic effects by peptide products on further condensation are proposed, due to specific properties of hypohydrous clay surfaces as well as the biomolecules themselves. Experimental evidence supports some of the proposed interactions, and all of them can be tested experimentally.

  4. Characterizing storm water dispersion and dilution from small coastal streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Leonel; Siegel, David A.; McWilliams, James C.; Uchiyama, Yusuke; Jones, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the dispersion and dilution of storm water from small coastal creeks is important for understanding the importance of land-derived subsidies to nearby ecosystems and the management of anthropogenic pollutants. In Southern California, creek runoff is episodic, intense, and short-lived while the plumes are buoyant, all of which make the field sampling of freshwater plumes challenging. Numerical modeling offers a viable way to characterize these systems. The dilution and dispersion of freshwater from two creeks that discharge into the Santa Barbara Channel, California is investigated using Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) simulations with a horizontal resolution of 100 m. Tight coupling is found among precipitation, hydrologic discharge, wind forcing, and submesoscale flow structures which all contribute to plume evolution. During flooding, plumes are narrow and attached to the coast, due to downwelling/onshore wind forcing and intense vorticity filaments lying parallel to the shelf. As the storm passes, the winds typically shift to offshore/upwelling favorable conditions and the plume is advected offshore which enhances its dilution. Plumes reach the bottom nearshore while they form thin layers a few meters thick offshore. Dilution field of passive tracers released with the runoff is strongly anisotropic with stronger cross-shelf gradients than along-shelf. Dispersion analysis of statistical moments of the passive tracer distribution results in scale-dependent diffusivities consistent with the particle-pair analysis of Romero et al. Model validation, the roles of submesoscale processes, and wind forcing on plume evolution and application to ecological issues and marine resource management are discussed.

  5. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  6. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  7. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  8. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    hysteresis and hysteresis was dependent on the degree of interlayer expansion, where kaolinite exhibited little hysteresis and montmorillonite showed significant hysteresis between the sorption isotherms. For soils, clay and OM effects on hysteresis depended on the method used for quantifying hysteresis...

  9. Water and clay based drilling fluids: rheologic, filtration and lubricity behavior; Fluidos hidroargilosos: comportamento reologico, de filtracao e lubricidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Luciana V.; Pereira, Melquesedek S.; Ferreira, Heber C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to provide continuity for UFCG studies presenting results of rheological, filtration and the lubricity behaviors obtained with fluids prepared with bentonite clays from Paraiba, in binary compositions, after treatment with lubricants agents. It was selected two samples of bentonite clays and four lubricants (Lub 1, Lub 2, Lub 3 and Lub 4). The results showed that: depending on the composition, the drilling fluids presented bingham and pseudo plastic rheological behaviors, and with the additives bingham behavior; among the rheological and filtration properties evaluated, the apparent viscosity, yield limiting and the water loss are the have changes with the addition of lubricants; the values of the lubricity coefficient (LC) of fluids without additives were next of 0.50, independent of the composition of the bentonite clay mixture; after addition of the lubricants, the LC of fluids reduced for values next to 0,11, independent of its concentration and lubricants the best-performing are the Lub 2 and Lub 4. (author)

  10. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  11. Metal corrosion and argillite transformation at the water-saturated, high-temperature iron-clay interface: A microscopic-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, Michel L. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, CEA - Laboratory for the Reactivity of Surfaces and Interfaces, DPC/SCP/LRSI, CEN Saclay, Bat. 391, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); UMR 8587 ' LAMBE' , Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, 91 025 Evry (France)], E-mail: Michel.Schlegel@cea.fr; Bataillon, Christian [CEA - Laboratory for the Study of Aqueous Corrosion, DPC/SCCME/LECA, CEN Saclay, Bat. 458, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Benhamida, Keltoum; Blanc, Cecile; Menut, Denis; Lacour, Jean-Luc [Department of Physics and Chemistry, CEA - Laboratory for the Reactivity of Surfaces and Interfaces, DPC/SCP/LRSI, CEN Saclay, Bat. 391, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman microspectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, micro X-ray fine structure adsorption spectroscopy, and micro laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) were combined to decipher the chemical and mineralogical properties of a saturated Fe-clay interface reacted at 90 deg. C and 50 bar for 8 months. The results collectively confirm the presence of a corrosion layer and a clay transformation layer. The corrosion layer is made of a magnetite-containing internal sublayer and a Fe-phyllosilicate external sublayer enriched in Na, with traces of goethite presumably resulting from sample reaction with air. The clay transformation layer is made of predominantly Ca-rich siderite (FeCO{sub 3}). It is depleted in Al and K, suggesting dissolution of rock-forming minerals. The corroded thickness determined from the amount of Fe in corrosion and transformation layers and assuming zero porosity equals 19 {+-} 9 {mu}m. These data indicate that the interfacial clay was transformed by dissolution of calcite and clay minerals and precipitation of siderite close to the original surface. Silica released upon clay dissolution diffused into the corrosion layer and coprecipitated with oxidized Fe to form Fe-phyllosilicate.

  12. Diffusive transport and reaction in clay rocks: A storage (nuclear waste, CO2, H2), energy (shale gas) and water quality issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurent; Alt-Epping, Peter; Wersin, Paul; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Clay rocks are low permeability sedimentary formations that provide records of Earth history, influence the quality of water resources, and that are increasingly used for the extraction or storage of energy resources and the sequestration of waste materials. Informed use of clay rock formations to achieve low-carbon or carbon-free energy goals requires the ability to predict the rates of diffusive transport processes for chemically diverse dissolved and gaseous species over periods up to thousands of years. We survey the composition, properties and uses of clay rock and summarize fundamental science challenges in developing confident conceptual and quantitative gas and solute transport models.

  13. Adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor from water by clays and organoclays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Min; XIE Xiao-mei

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor onto kaolin, montmorillonite, bentonite clays and respective organoclays prepared by the exchange of quaternary ammonium as tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide(TTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide(DTAB), and cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC) were studied. The adsorption equilibrium data points were fitted to Freundlich isotherm equations. The adsorption of phenthoate and acetochlor were significantly enhanced by surfactant treatment of the clays. The amount of both pesticides adsorbed per unit mass of organoclay followed the order of TTA-kaolin TTA(C14)-montmorillonite > DTA(C12)-montmorillonite. Phenthoate is adsorbed to greater extent than acetochlor by each adsorbent, which may be due to the higher hydrophobicity of phenthoate, indicating considerable hydrophobic interaction between adsorbent/adsorbate systems.

  14. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  15. Hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattonjai, Piyachat

    2016-06-01

    The developed hypoplastic model for simulation of compressibility characteristics of cement-admixed Bangkok soft clay at high water content was proposed in this paper. By using unique equation, the model is able to predict the relationship between void ratio and vertical effective stress of different water and cement content of soil cement. For practically convenient utilization and understanding, the parameters of Q1 which represented to initial cement bonding of soil (the initial value of structure tensor at time = 0) and C2 which effected to the model stiffness on isotropic consolidation direction, at 45° for loading and 225° for unloading of stress response envelope, were proposed as the function of cement and water content by comparing with dry weight of soil. By numerical integration that satisfied one-dimensional settlement, the simulation results were directly compared with fifteen experimental results to verify the accuracy of the proposed model.

  16. Influence of chemical admixtures on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in water and cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Cui, Suping; Wang, Jiachen; Wang, Jianfeng

    2017-03-01

    The influence of ultrasonic and three types of chemical surfactants (including cationic surfactants: CTAB, anionic surfactants: SDS, and nonionic surfactants: TX-405) on the dispersion of CNTs was investigated. The techniques include UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer, laser particle size analyser and scanning electrical microscope (SEM). The results show that: 1) Ultrasonic leads to a dispersive effect on CNTs in water, and the optimal ultrasonic time is 120 s; 2) Three types of surfactants have positive effects on the dispersion of CNTs in water, among which cationic surfactant (CATB) leads to the best dispersibility; 3) CNTs with more carboxyl groups show better dispersion in water indicated from UV-vis-NIR spectra and particle size measurement; 4) The optimum concentration of surfactants is 5:1 (the mass ratio of dispersant to CNTs); 5) Three types of surfactants can improve the dispersion of CNTs in cement pastes indicated from SEM images at the optimum dosage.

  17. Effects of Three Types of Oil Dispersants on Biodegradation of Dispersed Crude Oil in Water Surrounding Two Persian Gulf Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Zolfaghari-Baghbaderani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the most effective and biodegradable dispersant of spilled oil in water surrounding two Persian Gulf provinces. Methods. This study compared the effects of three dispersants, Pars 1, Pars 2, and Gamlen OD4000 on removal of oil in two Persian Gulf provinces' water. Overall, 16 stations were selected. Using the Well method, the growth rate of isolated bacteria and fungi was identified. To specify the growth rate of microorganisms and their usage of oil in the presence of the above-mentioned dispersants, as exclusive sources of carbon, the bacteria were grown in culture medium for 28 days at 120 rpm, 30∘C, and their optical density was measured by spectrophotometry. Then, we tested biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD in microorganisms. Results. The highest growth rate was documented for the growth of microorganisms on either Pars 1 or Pars 2 dispersants or their mixtures with oil. However, the culture having microorganisms grown on Pars 1 had higher BOD and COD than the other two dispersants (9200 and 16800 versus 500 and 960, P<0.05. Mixture of oil and Pars 2 as well as oil and Pars 1 dispersants showed the highest BODs and CODs, respectively. In the Bahregan province, microorganisms grown on Pars 2 had maximum amount of BOD and COD in comparison with Pars 1 and Gamlen dispersants (7100 and 15200 versus 6000 and 10560, P<0.05. Conclusion. Pars 1 and Pars 2 were the most effective dispersants with highest degradability comparing Gamlen. In each region, the most suitable compound for removing oil spill from offshores with least secondary contamination should be investigated.

  18. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow-Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore Tsotsis

    2010-01-08

    Arsenic (As) and Selenium (Se) are found in water in the form of oxyanions. Relatively high concentrations of As and Se have been reported both in power plant discharges, as well as, in fresh water supplies. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently classifies As as a group 1 chemical, that is considered to be carcinogenic to humans. In Phase I of this project we studied the adsorption of As and Se by uncalcined and calcined layered double hydroxide (LDH). The focus of the present work is a systematic study of the adsorption of As and Se by conditioned LDH adsorbents. Conditioning the adsorbent significantly reduced the Mg and Al dissolution observed with uncalcined and calcined LDH. The adsorption rates and isotherms have been investigated in batch experiments using particles of four different particle size ranges. As(V) adsorption is shown to follow a Sips-type adsorption isotherm. The As(V) adsorption rate on conditioned LDH increases with decreasing adsorbent particle size; the adsorption capacity, on the other hand, is independent of the particle size. A homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and a bi-disperse pore model (BPM) - the latter viewing the LDH particles as assemblages of microparticles and taking into account bulk diffusion in the intraparticle pore space, and surface diffusion within the microparticles themselves - were used to fit the experimental kinetic data. The HSDM estimated diffusivity values dependent on the particle size, whereas the BPM predicted an intracrystalline diffusivity, which is fairly invariant with particle size. The removal of As(V) on conditioned LDH adsorbents was also investigated in flow columns, where the impact of important solution and operational parameters such as influent As concentration, pH, sorbent particle size and flow rate were studied. An early breakthrough and saturation was observed at higher flow rates and at higher influent concentrations, whereas a decrease in the sorbent particle

  19. Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2010-04-01

    Materials with small particle size are being extensively used in composites and hybrid materials. Exfoliated clay–polymer hybrids show enhanced properties. Exfoliation of clay platelets can be affected by selecting dispersing agents. In the present work, clay dispersed by natural dispersant (soap stone powder), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) dispersed clay and acid clay (amorphous clay) are taken. They are then polymerized with poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) by solution intercalation method. The thermal stability of these different clay–PMMA hybrids have been studied and compared with that of pure PMMA by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The bonding of clay with PMMA has been studied by IR. Morphology of clay–PMMA hybrids has been shown by SEM and XRD which indicate partially exfoliated structure in T606-4 and intercalated structures in T606-6 and T606-2.

  20. A WEAKLY NONLINEAR WATER WAVE MODEL TAKING INTO ACCOUNT DISPERSION OF WAVE PHASE VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 李东永

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a weakly nonlinear water wave model using a mild slope equation and a new explicit formulation which takes into account dispersion of wave phase velocity, approximates Hedges' (1987) nonlinear dispersion relationship, and accords well with the original empirical formula. Comparison of the calculating results with those obtained from the experimental data and those obtained from linear wave theory showed that the present water wave model considering the dispersion of phase velocity is rational and in good agreement with experiment data.

  1. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of soils from the moray cusco archaeological site: a study by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron Loayza, Maria L., E-mail: malucelo@hotmail.com; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A.; Mejia Santillan, Mirian E. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Laboratorio de Analisis de Suelos, Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Moessbauer, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this work is to report the advances in the elemental and structural characterization of the clay fraction of soils from the terraces of the Moray Archaeological site, located 38 km north of the city of Cusco, Cusco Region. One sample was collected from each of the twelve terraces of this site and its clay fraction was separated by sedimentation. Previously the pH of the raw samples was measured resulting that all of the samples were from alkaline to strongly alkaline. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used for the elemental characterization, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS), using the {gamma} 14.4 keV nuclear resonance transition in {sup 57}Fe, were used for the structural characterization of the clays and clay minerals present in each sample. The EDXRF analyses of all the samples show the presence of relatively high concentrations of sulfur in some of the samples and relatively high concentrations of calcium in all of the samples, which may be related to the high alkalinity of the samples. By XRD it is observed the presence of quartz, calcite, gypsum, cronstedtite, 2:1 phyllosilicates, and iron oxides. The mineralogical analysis of Fe by TMS shows that it is present in the form of hematite and occupying Fe{sup 2 + } and Fe{sup 3 + } sites in phyllosilicates, cronstedtite, and other minerals not yet identified.

  2. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of soils from the moray cusco archaeological site: a study by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón Loayza, María L.; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A.; Mejía Santillán, Mirian E.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the advances in the elemental and structural characterization of the clay fraction of soils from the terraces of the Moray Archaeological site, located 38 km north of the city of Cusco, Cusco Region. One sample was collected from each of the twelve terraces of this site and its clay fraction was separated by sedimentation. Previously the pH of the raw samples was measured resulting that all of the samples were from alkaline to strongly alkaline. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used for the elemental characterization, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), using the γ 14.4 keV nuclear resonance transition in 57Fe, were used for the structural characterization of the clays and clay minerals present in each sample. The EDXRF analyses of all the samples show the presence of relatively high concentrations of sulfur in some of the samples and relatively high concentrations of calcium in all of the samples, which may be related to the high alkalinity of the samples. By XRD it is observed the presence of quartz, calcite, gypsum, cronstedtite, 2:1 phyllosilicates, and iron oxides. The mineralogical analysis of Fe by TMS shows that it is present in the form of hematite and occupying Fe2 + and Fe3 + sites in phyllosilicates, cronstedtite, and other minerals not yet identified.

  3. Optimal regime of jet fuel water impregnation by ultrasonic dispersion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Бережний

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed is the efficiency of existing method and devices of jet fuel water impregnation, their advantages and disadvantages. Proposed is a principal scheme of installation and optimal regime of jet fuel water impregnation by ultrasonic dispersion method

  4. Linking the diffusion of water in compacted clays at two different time scales: tracer through-diffusion and quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, Fátima; Gimmi, Thomas; Jurányi, Fanni; Van Loon, Luc; Diamond, Larryn W

    2009-05-15

    Diffusion of water and solutes through compacted clays or claystones is important when assessing the barrier function of engineered or geological barriers in waste disposal. The shape and the connectivity of the pore network as well as electrostatic interactions between the diffusant and the charged clay surfaces or cations compensating negative surface charges affect the resistance of the porous medium to diffusion. Comparing diffusion measurements performed at different spatial or time scales allows identification and extraction of the different factors. We quantified the electrostatic constraint q for five different highly compacted clays (rhob = 1.85 +/- 0.05 g/cm3) using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) data. We then compared the QENS data with macroscopic diffusion data for the same clays and could derive the true geometric tortuosities G of the samples. Knowing the geometric and electrostatic factors for the different clays is essential when trying to predict diffusion coefficients for other conditions. We furthermore compared the activation energies Ea for diffusion at the two measurement scales. Because Ea is mostly influenced by the local, pore scale surroundings of the water, we expected the results to be similar at both scales. This was indeed the case for the nonswelling clays kaolinite and illite, which had Ea values lower than that of bulk water, but not for montmorillonite, which had values lower than that in bulk water at the microscopic scale, but larger at the macroscopic scale. The differences could be connected to the strongly temperature dependent mobility of the cations in the clays, which may act as local barriers in the narrow pores at low temperatures.

  5. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for clay sediment (gwava-s_clay)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the amount of clay sediment in the soil, in percent times 1000, in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data...

  6. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  7. Effects of Clay on Properties of Polycarboxylate Superplasticizer and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; WANG Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The inlfuence law of clay on mortar lfuidity mixed with polycarboxylate superplasticizer was studied. Several methods of inhibiting clay adsorption of polycarboxylate superplasticizer were discussed. The experimental results show that clay has signiifcant effect on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer and montmorillonite clay has more signiifcant impact on mortar lfuidity than other clays. The pH value and the salts of the solution can affect the adsorption of clay to polycarboxylate superplasticizer. The incorporation of a small amount of sodium hydroxide solution, sodium silicate or cationic surfactants can improve the effect of the clay on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

  8. Influence of Long-term Application of Feedlot Manure Amendments on Water Repellency of a Clay Loam Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jim J; Beasley, Bruce W; Hazendonk, Paul; Drury, Craig F; Chanasyk, David S

    2017-05-01

    Long-term application of feedlot manure to cropland may increase the quantity of soil organic carbon (C) and change its quality, which may influence soil water repellency. The objective was to determine the influence of feedlot manure type (stockpiled vs. composted), bedding material (straw [ST] vs. woodchips [WD]), and application rate (13, 39, or 77 Mg ha) on repellency of a clay loam soil after 17 annual applications. The repellency was determined on all 14 treatments using the water repellency index ( index), the water drop penetration time (WDPT) method, and molarity of ethanol (MED) test. The C composition of particulate organic matter in soil of five selected treatments after 16 annual applications was also determined using C nuclear magnetic resonance-direct polarization with magic-angle spinning (NMR-DPMAS). Manure type had no significant ( > 0.05) effect on index and WDPT, and MED classification was similar. Mean index and WDPT values were significantly greater and MED classification more hydrophobic for WD than ST. Application rate had no effect on the index, but WDPT was significantly greater and MED classification more hydrophobic with increasing application rate. Strong ( > 0.7) but nonsignificant positive correlations were found between index and WDPT versus hydrophobic (alkyl + aromatic) C, lignin at 74 ppm (O-alkyl), and unspecified aromatic compounds at 144 ppm. Specific aromatic compounds also contributed more to repellency than alkyl, O-alkyl, and carbonyl compounds. Overall, all three methods consistently showed that repellency was greater for WD- than ST-amended clay loam soil, but manure type had no effect. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    Compacted clay liners are widely utilized as leachate barrier in landfills for waste. The main purpose of this research was to study the transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay. The subjects of interest included the diffusional migration of chemicals at low flow rates, the effective porosity of fine-grained soils, the transport of solutes in unsaturated clays, and the effect of adsorption processes on the transport of reactive solutes. Two clay soils, kaolinite and Lufkin clay, were used in the laboratory column tests and subjected to constant hydraulic gradients of 1 to 50. Inorganic tracers (Cl{sup {minus}} Br{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}, and Zn{sup 2+}) were added to the permeating water as a step input. Conclusions are: (a) the experimental data from soil specimens subjected to various gradients showed that diffusional transport did affect the migration of the tracers in fine-grained media. At low gradients, hydrodynamic dispersion was almost solely related to molecular diffusion rather than mechanical mixing; (b) the breakthrough curves for kaolinite specimens showed that the ratios of effective porosity to total porosity were 0.25 to 1.0. The effect of low effective porosity on transport of the tracers was much greater than that of diffusion; (c) the soils that were not presoaked before tracers were introduced had lower effective porosity and greater dispersion of solutes that did the presoaked soils; (d) no evidence of the existence of a threshold gradient was observed; and (e) the retardation factors predicted from batch equilibrium tests matched the results from column tests poorly, probably due to hydrodynamic effects or geochemical differences between the two soil/solution systems.

  10. Simultaneous removal of multiple pesticides from water: effect of organically modified clays as coagulant aid and adsorbent in coagulation-flocculation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabeer, T P Ahammed; Saha, Ajoy; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Manjaiah, K M; Varghese, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water sources with agrochemical residues became a major concern in the twenty-first century. Coagulation-flocculation is the most widely used water-treatment process, but the efficiency to remove pesticides and other organic pollutants are limited compared to adsorption process. Thus, simultaneous action of adsorption on normal bentonite or organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M) and octadecylamine + amino-propyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] followed by coagulation-flocculation by alum and poly aluminium chloride has been evaluated for removal of 10 different pesticides, namely atrazine, lindane, metribuzin, aldrin, chlorpyriphos, pendimethalin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, p,p'-DDT, cypermethrin and two of its metabolites, endosulphan sulphate and p,p'-DDE, from water. The coagulation without integration of adsorption was less effective (removal % varies from 12 to 49) than the adsorption-coagulation integrated system (removal % varies from 71 to 100). Further, coagulation integrated with adsorption was more effective when organically modified montmorillonite was used as adsorbent compared to normal bentonite. The removal efficiency of organic clay depends upon the concentration of pesticides, doses of clay minerals, and efficiency was more for ODAAPS-M as compared to ODA-M. The combination of ODAAPS-M-clay with coagulants was also used efficiently for the removal of pesticides from natural and fortified natural water collected and the results exhibit the usefulness of this remediation technique for application in water decontamination and in treatment of industrial and agricultural waste waters.

  11. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  12. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  13. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient....

  14. Synthesis, characterization and application of a dispersant based on rosin for coal-water slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junguo; Zhang Guanghua; Shang Ting; Zhu Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    A rosin derivative and maleopimaric acid diethanolamide (MAD), was synthesized, characterized by FTIR and 1H NMR, and applied as dispersant for the coal-water slurry (CWS) prepared from Chinese Shenfu coal. The CWS application performance investigation shows that the MAD dispersant has better abilities in reducing CWS viscosity and stabilizing the slurry than a commercial dispersant-sulfonated naphtha-lene-formaldehyde condensate (SNF). The physicochemical property investigation of the two tested dispersants shows that the adsorption amount of the MAD at coal-water interface is much larger than that of SNF, and the MAD has better wetting property than the SNF on the coal surface. It indicated that the excellent capabilities of MAD are related to the adsorption mode of standing upright on the coal surface. Based on the above, the mechanism of dispersion and stabilization of the CWS prepared from MAD dispersant is presented.

  15. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  16. Results from an in-situ pore water chemistry experiment in opalinus clay: evidence of microbially mediated anaerobic redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P.; Mettler, S. [NAGRA - National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Canniere, P. de [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pearson, F.J. [Ground-Water Geochemistry, New Bern (United States); Gaucher, E. [BRGM, 75 - Paris (France); Hohener, P. [BioRem, CH (Switzerland); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Mader, U. [Bern Univ., CH (Switzerland); Vinsot, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Gabler, H.E. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Hama, K. [JNC - Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) Horonobe (Japan); Hernan, P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Low permeability argillaceous rocks are considered potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in a number of countries. Characterisation of pore water chemistry is important for assessing radionuclide behaviour, but technically challenging because of intimate clay-water association. The application of different techniques, such as in-situ extraction, squeezing and leaching has led to improved understanding. However, because of potential experimental artefacts (e.g. degassing of CO{sub 2}, ingress of O{sub 2} ), significant uncertainties remain, especially with regard to pH/pCO{sub 2} and Eh conditions. Moreover, the pore water chemistry may be perturbed by the drilling procedure itself, thus leading to oxidation and biodegradation effects. In order to reduce uncertainties mentioned above and to gain deeper insight into geochemical processes regulating pH and Eh, the internationally supported Pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment was started at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory in 2002. The basis of the study is an in-situ experiment employing the diffusive equilibration method. The field study was complemented with lab investigations which include chemical analyses for principal inorganic solutes, for reduced sulphur species and for a variety of specific organic compounds, gas measurements of core samples and a core infiltration study based on advective displacement. (authors)

  17. New test for oil soluble/water dispersible gas pipeline inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmann, D.W.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The wheel test provides good mixing of the condensate and water phases, the coupons are exposed to both phases. Therefore, the wheel test cannot distinguish between inhibitors that need continuous mixing of the these phases to maintain a water dispersion of the inhibitor and inhibitors that will self disperse into the water. This concept becomes important for pipelines in stratified flow where the water can settle out. In these cases with low turbulence, the inhibitor must self disperse into the water to be effective. The paper describes a test method to measure the effectiveness of an inhibitor and its ability to self disperse. The effectiveness of several inhibitors as predicted by the new test method is discussed relative to data from the wheel test and breaker tests. Field performance of these inhibitors in a gas gathering line, with liquids in stratified flow, are cities and compared with the results of the various laboratory tests.

  18. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, B.M.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Yasseri, S.; Castro-Castellon, A.T.; Gibbs, M.; Meis, S.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, J.; Sleep, D.; Oosterhout, van F.

    2013-01-01

    Phoslock is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentr

  19. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, B.M.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Yasseri, S.; Castro-Castellon, A.T.; Gibbs, M.; Meis, S.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, J.; Sleep, D.; Oosterhout, van F.

    2013-01-01

    Phoslock is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La

  20. Effects of a thermal perturbation on mineralogy and pore water composition in a clay-rock: An experimental and modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailhanou, H.; Lerouge, C.; Debure, M.; Gaboreau, S.; Gaucher, E. C.; Grangeon, S.; Grenèche, J.-M.; Kars, M.; Madé, B.; Marty, N. C. M.; Warmont, F.; Tournassat, C.

    2017-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of clay-rocks are, at least partly, controlled by the chemical composition of their pore water. In evaluating the concept of disposing of radioactive waste in clay-rock formations, determining pore water composition is an important step in predicting how a clay-rock will behave over time and as a function of external forces, such as chemical and thermal perturbations. This study aimed to assess experimental and modeling methodology to calculate pore water composition in a clay-rock as a function of temperature (up to 80 °C). Hydrothermal alteration experiments were carried out on clay-rock samples. We conducted comprehensive chemical and mineralogical characterization of the material before and after reaction, and monitored how the chemical parameters in the liquid and gas phases changed. We compared the experimental results with the a priori predictions made by various models that differed in their hypotheses on the reactivity of the minerals present in the system. Thermodynamic equilibrium could not be assessed unequivocally in these experiments and most of the predicted mineralogy changes were too subtle to be tracked quantitatively. However, from observing the neo-formation of minerals such as goethite we were able to assess the prominent role of Fe-bearing phases in the outcome of the experiments, especially for the measured pH and pCO2 values. After calibrating the amount of reacting Fe-bearing phases with our data, we proposed a thermodynamic model that was capable of predicting the chemical evolution of the systems under investigation as well as the evolution of other systems already published in the literature, with the same clay-rock material but with significant differences in experimental conditions.

  1. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  2. A study of clay pore water and sporopollens for characterizing paleoenvironments in the Hebei Plain, Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hong; Liang, Xing; Lu, Guoping; Peng, Fei; Jin, Menggui; Gu, Yansheng

    2017-08-01

    We developed a clay pore water (CPW) isotopic method for tracing paleoenvironments characterized by sporopollens. The thick clayey layers have the advantage of preserving pore water regardless of whether the water is inherent in the clayey layers or not. Therefore, the clayey layers are a suitable target from which paleoenvironmental information can be extracted. Sediment sporopollens as well as CPW deuterium and oxygen isotopes were investigated in drilling cores obtained from a 130-m borehole at a field site in Hengshui in the North China Plain. Our interpretation of δ18O in CPW was consistent with sporopollens climate indices, indicating that CPW was an effective proxy for obtaining paleoenvironmental information. Sporopollens species were abundant in the cores, but the quantity of each species was low. Furthermore, mean annual temperature and precipitation curves were established using a pollen-climatic response surface model. The results indicated two warm-humid periods (5.2-0 m, 22.6-11 m) and one cold-dry period (8.8-6.4 m) in the Holocene as well as two warm-humid periods (90.6-83 m, 110.6-108.2 m) and three cold-dry periods (approximately 40 m, 66.4-56.8 m, approximately 100 m) in the Late Pleistocene. Data derived from the sporopollens and CPW cumulatively elucidate the environmental change in Northern China.

  3. Preparation and characterization of polymer-clay nanocomposite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposite films were prepared by means of electrodeposition of aqueous suspension including cathodic electrophoretic acrylic resin (CEAR) and Na+-montmorillonite (NMMT). Studies of XRD,SEM and TEM indicated well-dispersed NMMT platelets in the films prepared. The ideal dispersity achieved was thought to be the result of aqueous compatibility between CEAR molecules and NMMT platelets and the result of the water-involved process as well. The modulus and strength of the polymer/clay nanocomposite coatings tested by tensile testing and nano-indentation were effectively improved compared to those of the virgin CEAR film. In addition,the adhesion strength,flexibility and water-resistance represented by Chinese national standard (GB) kept the best grades.

  4. Pollutant dispersion studies - An update on the problems in Indian coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.

    Pollutant dispersion problems along the Indian coastal waters are characterisEd. by site-specificity, as a result of seasonal and physiographic variabilities. Presence of large rivers, estuaries and backwaters add to the problems of waste disposal...

  5. Dispersion processes in coastal waters - Some outstanding practical issues for monitoring and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.

    This paper highlights on the issues of dispersion processes in coastal waters like space-time description of field parameters, limitation of physical models, limitations of numerical formulations, Eulerian-Lagrangian transformations, shear...

  6. Properties and organic activation of ocean clay in the East Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiping Zhang; Xiaoguo Chi; Chunyan Tian; Baojun Wang; Huahua Lü; Xuefa Shi

    2006-01-01

    In order to make use of ocean clay reasonably and excavate its potential applications the properties of ocean clay in Chinese investigating area of the East Pacific have been tested with the chemical analysis, XRFS, ICP/MAS, granulometry and SSA, etc. The results show that the clay sediments of this area are rich in clay minerals, fine granularity, bigger SSA, bigger water absorbability and lower ion changing ability etc. To improve the adaptability of ocean clay and macromolecule materials, using the dry milling method with silane, aluminate, stearic acid coupling agents etc the properties of ocean clay are improved. The effect has been evaluated by testing the water absorbing of the modified ocean clay and their dispersing in paraffin liquid. The result is that KH550 is better than any other active reagents, and the best activation technics is that 1.5% (volume) of KH550 quantity, 20min of milling time. The DTA, XRD, SEM and IR analyses and SSA testing show that the organic activation can not change the mineral structure but can densify the structure of clay, and activation mechanism is chemical covered mainly and chemical combined secondly.

  7. Synthesis of Water-dispersed Polyurethane Adhesive and Its Application in Pigment Printing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林苗; 杨勇

    2004-01-01

    Water-dispersed polyurethane (PU) adhesive is a novel and highly efficient adhesive with broad application potential. In this study, the key parameters affecting the synthesis and application of this adhesive were examined, and optimal conditions were identified. The water-dispersed PU adhesive was successfully synthesized, and applied in the fastness test of pigment printing on cotton fabric. The data demonstrated that all the fastnesses of PU adhesive were better than that of the conventional PA one.

  8. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANT DISPERSION IN SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somboon Otarawanna; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2005-01-01

    A finite element method for analysis of pollutant dispersion in shallow water is presented. The analysis is divided into two parts: ( 1 ) computation of the velocity flow field and water surface elevation, and (2) computation of the pollutant concentration field from the dispersion model. The method was combined with an adaptive meshing technique to increase the solution accuracy ,as well as to reduce the computational time and computer memory. The finite element formulation and the computer programs were validated by several examples that have known solutions. In addition, the capability of the combined method was demonstrated by analyzing pollutant dispersion in Chao Phraya River near the gulf of Thailand.

  9. Water-based polyurethane dispersions: Chemistry, Technology and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, I.P.; COSTA, M. R.; Ferreira, M.J.; Barreiro, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, polyurethane-polyurea aqueous dispersions (PUDs) have developed a solid reputation for high performance applications, particularly in the field of adhesives and coatings. PUDs are mostly environmentally compatible products; they are totally devoid or contain only low amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC). This is an important feature in view of the present environmental policies where governments and internal agencies are placing emphasis on developing sustain...

  10. Strength properties of composite clay balls containing additives from industry wastes as new filter media for enhanced pollutants removal in water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, J.; Gallage, C; Biyanvilage, D.; Madabhushi, G; Fenner,R.

    2016-01-01

    This is a metadata record relating to an article that cannot be shared due to publisher copyright. Pebble matrix filtration (PMF) is a water treatment technology that can remove suspended solids in highly turbid surface water during heavy storms. PMF typically uses sand and natural pebbles as filter media. Hand-made clay pebbles (balls) can be used as alternatives to natural pebbles in PMF treatment plants, where natural pebbles are not readily available. Since the high turbidity is a sea...

  11. Nafion–clay nanocomposite membranes: Morphology and properties

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Alonso, Rafael

    2009-05-01

    A series of Nafion-clay nanocomposite membranes were synthesized and characterized. To minimize any adverse effects on ionic conductivity the clay nanoparticles were H+ exchanged prior to mixing with Nafion. Well-dispersed, mechanically robust, free-standing nanocomposite membranes were prepared by casting from a water suspension at 180 °C under pressure. SAXS profiles reveal a preferential orientation of Nafion aggregates parallel to the membrane surface, or normal plane. This preferred orientation is induced by the platy nature of the clay nanoparticles, which tend to align parallel to the surface of the membrane. The nanocomposite membranes show dramatically reduced methanol permeability, while maintaining high levels of proton conductivity. The hybrid films are much stiffer and can withstand much higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. The superior thermomechanical, electrochemical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite membranes are of significant interest for direct methanol fuel cell applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Akkari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP homogeneously assembled to the clay–SiO2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO2-clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite–silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM. The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants.

  13. Copper-ion-assisted self-assembly of silicate clays in rod- and disklike morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2010-06-15

    Self-assembled rodlike (0.3-2.5 microm in diameter and 5.3-31 microm in length) and disklike microstructures (1.8-10.6 microm in width and 0.1-1.0 microm in thickness) are uniquely present in amorphous clay aggregates. Clay units were prepared by intercalation of Na(+)-montmorillonite (Na(+)-MMT) with copper ions (Cu(2+)) and poly(oxypropylene)-amine salt (POP) in simultaneous or stepwise ionic exchange reactions. Differences in process control during incorporation of Cu(2+) and hydrophobic POP greatly affected the layer structure of the clay units (d spacing of 12-53 A) and consequently their amphiphilic dispersion properties. By controlling the dispersion in water and drying at 80 degrees C, highly ordered self-assembly structures were obtained, presumably as a result of self-piling of clay units in competing vertical and horizontal directions. In general, association with Cu(2+) yielded units with a disklike microstructure, in contrast to the rod-like structure obtained for POP-intercalated clay. The self-assembled structures were characterized using X-ray diffraction, UV adsorption, thermal gravimetric analysis, zeta potential, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. Control of the clay self-piling process provides a new synthetic route for the fabrication of bottom-up microstructures that are potentially useful for templates, sensors, and electronic devices.

  14. Determination of water content in clay and organic soil using microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarenko, V. V.; Nikitenkov, A. N.; Matveenko, I. A.; Molokov, V. Yu; Vasilenko, Ye S.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the techniques of soil water content determination using microwave radiation. Its practical application would allow solving the problems of resource efficiency in geotechnical survey due to reduction of energy and resource intensity of laboratory analysis as well as its acceleration by means of decreasing labour intensity and, as a result, cost reduction. The article presents a detail analysis of approaches to soil water content determination and soil drying, considers its features and application. The study in soil of different composition, typical for Western Siberia including organic and organic-mineral ones, is a peculiarity of the given article, which makes it rather topical. The article compares and analyzes the results of the investigation into soil water content, which are obtained via conventional techniques and the original one developed by the authors, consisting in microwave drying. The authors also give recommendation on microwave technique application to dry soil.

  15. Studies on Dissolution Enhancement of Prednisolone, a Poorly Water-Soluble Drug by Solid Dispersion Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Zakeri-Milani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prednisolone is a class II substance according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. It is a poorly water soluble agent. The aim of the present study was to improve dissolution rate of a poorly water-soluble drug, prednisolone, by a solid dispersion technique. Methods: Solid dispersion of prednisolone was prepared with PEG 6000 or different carbohydrates such as lactose and dextrin with various ratios of the drug to carrier i.e., 1:10, 1:20 and 1:40. Solid dispersions were prepared by coevaporation method. The evaluation of the properties of the dispersions was performed using dissolution studies, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffractometery. Results: The results indicated that lactose is suitable carriers to enhance the in vitro dissolution rate of prednisolone. The data from the x-ray diffraction showed that the drug was still detectable in its solid state in all solid dispersions except solid dispersions prepared by dextrin as carrier. The results from infrared spectroscopy showed no well-defined drug–carrier interactions for coevaporates. Conclusion: Solid dispersion of a poorly water-soluble drug, prednisolone may alleviate the problems of delayed and inconsistent rate of dissolution of the drug.

  16. Advances in interaction mechanism of water (gas) on clay minerals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Manchao; Sun Xiaoming; Zhao Jian

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with large-scale deformations in soft-rock tunnels is a very important issue in soft-rock tunnel engineering. The mechanism of this large-scale deformation is closely related to the physical and chem-ical properties of soft rock, interaction between soft rock and water, and interaction between soft rock and gas contained in soft rock. In order to gain a better predictive understanding of the governing prin-ciples associated with this phenomenon, we used experimental and theoretical methods to study the effects of point defect on physical and chemical properties of soft rock and mechanism of interaction between water (gas) and soft rock. Firstly, we calculated the impurity formation energies and transition energy levels of defects by using the first-principle calculation, the results showed the microscopic mech-anism of defects substitution in kaolinite and effects of defects on the structure of kaolinite. Moreover, comparing the experimental and theoretical results, we found the mechanism of interaction between water and soft rock. The results show that water is one of the most important factors which can induce various kinds of geological disasters. At last, the interaction between soft rock and surrounding gas as CO2, CH4 and CO is disused, the influence of surrounding gas on soft rock should not be ignored.

  17. Uso da eletrodiálise na eliminação de Ca2+ e Mg2+ e sua influência na reologia de dispersões de argilas bentoníticas da Paraíba Electrodialysis uses in Paraíba bentonite clay dispersions to eliminate Ca2+ and Mg2+ and its influence on rheology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Amorim

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho avalia a influência dos cátions Ca2+ e Mg2+, através da eletrodiálise, na reologia de dispersões de argilas bentoníticas de Boa Vista, PB. As dispersões de argila foram preparadas com 4,86% em massa, e realizado o processo de eletrodiálise com uma membrana polimérica catiônica, em um reator de bancada, sendo utilizadas tensões de 7, 10 e 13 V e tempos de ensaios de 40, 80 e 120 min, segundo planejamento fatorial do tipo 2² + 3 experimentos no ponto central. Após a eletrodiálise, as dispersões foram tratadas com Na2CO3 e após cura, determinadas as viscosidades aparente e plástica, em viscosímetro Fann 35A e o volume de filtrado, em filtroprensa Fann. Para quantificar os cátions eliminados, foram determinados os cátions trocáveis antes e após o processo de eletrodiálise. Os resultados mostraram que a eletrodiálise poderá ser uma valiosa ferramenta no estudo dos fatores que determinam o comportamento reológico das dispersões de argilas bentoníticas, e ainda que os cátions Ca2+ e Mg2+, parcialmente eliminados, não interferem na reologia das dispersões estudadas.The aim of this work is to evaluate, by electrodialysis, the influence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the rheology of bentonite clay dispersions from Boa Vista, PB. Dispersions were prepared with 4.86 wt.% and submitted to electrodialysis process by using a cationic polymeric membrane in the batch reactor. The electrodialysis was set up according to 2² + 3 factorial design by using 7, 10 and 13 V and 40, 80 and 120 min. After electrodialysis, the dispersions were treated with Na2CO3 and after curing, the apparent and plastic viscosities were measured using a viscosimeter and water loss with a filter-press. Moreover, exchanged cations were determinated before and after the electrodialysis process. The results show that the electrodialysis can be a valuable tool to identify the factors that dictate the rheological behavior of bentonite clay dispersions, as

  18. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  19. Diffusive-dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe: Impact of water table fluctuations and heterogeneities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathwohl, Peter; Haberer, Cristina; Ye, Yu;

    Diffusive–dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe is important for many groundwater quality issues such as transfer of volatile compounds into (and out of) the groundwater, the supply of oxygen for aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons as well as for precipitation of minerals (e.g. iron...... hydroxides). 2D-laboratory scale experiments were used to investigate the transfer of oxygen into groundwater under non-reactive and reactive conditions, at steady state and with water table fluctuations. Results show that transfer of oxygen is limited by transverse dispersion in the capillary fringe...... and the dispersion coefficients are the same as below the water table. Water table fluctuations cause temporarily increased fluxes of oxygen into groundwater during draining conditions and entrapped air after water table rise. High-permeability inclusions in the capillary fringe enhance mass transfer of oxygen...

  20. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  1. A Spectral Element Method for Nonlinear and Dispersive Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Bigoni, Daniele; Eskilsson, Claes

    The use of flexible mesh discretisation methods are important for simulation of nonlinear wave-structure interactions in offshore and marine settings such as harbour and coastal areas. For real applications, development of efficient models for wave propagation based on unstructured discretisation...... methods is of key interest. We present a high-order general-purpose three-dimensional numerical model solving fully nonlinear and dispersive potential flow equations with a free surface.......The use of flexible mesh discretisation methods are important for simulation of nonlinear wave-structure interactions in offshore and marine settings such as harbour and coastal areas. For real applications, development of efficient models for wave propagation based on unstructured discretisation...

  2. Laponite assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Maksym; Lebovka, Nikolai; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The ability of Laponite to stabilize aqueous suspensions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated with the help of analytical centrifugation, microscopic image analysis, and measurements of electrical conductivity of hybrid Laponite+MWCNT suspensions. The impact of nanotube concentration C(n) (0.0025-0.5 wt%) and Laponite/MWCNTs ratio X (varied within 0-1 wt/wt) on the properties of Laponite+MWCNT hybrid suspensions was discussed. It was observed that sonication of MWCNTs at critical minimal concentration of Laponite X(c)≈0.25±0.05 resulted in efficient dispersion and formation of stabilized suspensions of individual nanotubes. The stabilization of nanotubes in the presence of Laponite was explained by adsorption of Laponite particles and formation of a hydrophilic charged shell on the surface of nanotubes. Increase of MWCNT concentration above the critical value resulted in percolation and formation of spatially extended electrically conductive networks of particles.

  3. Effect of Application of Increasing Concentrations of Contaminated Water on the Different Fractions of Cu and Co in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Volk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish the fate of copper (Cu and cobalt (Co in sandy loam and clay loam soils that had been irrigated with increasing concentrations of contaminated water. A sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the fractions of Cu and Co in these soils. The concentration of bioavailable Cu and Co on clay loam was 1.7 times that of sandy loam soil. Cu on sandy loam soil was largely in the organic > residual > exchangeable > water-soluble > carbonate fractions, whereas on clay loam soil the element was largely in organic > exchangeable > residual > carbonate > water-soluble fractions. Co was largely observed in the exchangeable, water-soluble, and carbonate fractions, but with no particular trend observed in both soil types. When crops are grown on sandy soils that have a low capacity to hold heavy metals, the resulting effect would be high uptake of the heavy metals in crop plants. Because the predominant forms of Cu and Co vary in soils, it is expected that the metals will behave differently in the soils.

  4. Defining an exposure-response relationship for suspended kaolin clay particulates and aquatic organisms: work toward defining a water quality guideline for suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Andrew K; Palmer, Carolyn G

    2015-04-01

    Water quality guidelines for suspended solids generally rely on the percentage departure from reference condition, an approach that has been criticized. Attempts to develop a biological effects-base guideline have, however, been confounded by low data availability. Furthermore, the high biological response variability to suspended solids exposure suggests that organisms are responding not only to exposure concentration and duration but also to other mechanisms of effect associated with suspended particles (e.g., size, shape, and geochemical composition). An alternative option is to develop more situation and site specific guidelines by generating biological effects data to suspended particles of a particular geochemistry and restricted size range. With this in mind, aquatic organism responses to kaolin clay particle exposure were collated from the literature and incorporated into 2 exposure-response relationship approaches. The species sensitivity distribution approach produced a hazardous concentration affecting 5% of species estimate of 58 mg/L for mortality responses, and 36 mg/L for sublethal data. The severity-of-ill-effect approach produced similar estimates for lethal and sublethal data. These results suggest that aquatic organisms are slightly more tolerant of kaolin clay particles than particles from barite or bentonite clays, based on results from previous studies on these clay types. This type of information can enable better estimates of the risk faced by aquatic organisms exposed to suspended solids. For example, when the sediments of a particular water body are dominated by a particular type of clay particle, then the most appropriate exposure-response relationship can be applied. © 2015 SETAC.

  5. Viscous property of dried clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-sheng; LI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    One dimensional and triaxial compression tests of air-dried and oven-dried Fujinomori clay and Pisa clay were carried out. Water content is less than 4.5 % and 1.0% for air-dried and oven-dried clay specimens, respectively. In all tests, axial strain rate was changed stepwise many times and drained creep tests were performed several times during monotonic loading at a constant strain rate. Global unloading (and also reloading in some tests) was applied during which creep loading tests were performed several times. Cyclic loading with small stress amplitude and several cycles was also performed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the clay in tests. Local displacement transducer was used in triaxial compression test to increase measuring accuracy of axial strain. The results show that air-dried and oven-dried clay have noticeable viscous properties; during global unloading, creep deformation changes from positive to negative, i.e. there exist neutral points (zero creep deformation or no creep deformation point) in global unloading part of strain-stress curve; viscous property of Fujinomori clay decreases when water content decreases, i.e. viscous property of air-dried Fujinomori clay is more significant than that of oven-dried Fujinomori clay.

  6. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recently, phase-change materials. While broadly similar, these substances absorb and release heat in unique patterns characteristic of their mineralogies, densities, fluidities, emissivities, and latent heats of fusion. Current architectural practice, however, shows little awareness of these differences and the resulting potential to match materials to desired thermal performance. This investigation explores that potential, illustrating the correspondence between physical parameters and thermal storage-and-release patterns in direct-, indirect-, and isolated-gain passive solar configurations. Focusing on heating applications, results demonstrate the superiority of water walls for daytime warmth, the tunability of granite and concrete for evening warmth, and the exceptional ability of phase-change materials to sustain near-constant heat delivery throughout the night.

  7. “ Enhancement of Solubility of poorly water soluble drug by solid dispersion technique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R.Tagalpallewar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Atovaquone and Satrinidazole has poor solubility resulting in low oral absorption hence low oral bioavailability. Hence to improve the solubility of poorly Atovaquone and Satrinidazole , hydrophilic polymers were used to enhance the dissolution by solid dispersion technique. Polyehylene Glycol 4000 and PVP k30 used to enhance the dissolution of both the drug by Solubilisation. Many alternative techniques have been used to improve such bioavailability; this study thus employed the simple solid dispersion technique and incorporated excipients which can increase the bioavailability of these drugs directly enhancing the dissolution rate of the drug and indirectly by reducing particle size.The aim of present work is to enhance the dissolution of poorly water soluble drug by using solid dispersion technique. To improve the dissolution rate, by using the various concentration of carrier or matrix with drug and hence ,improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drug by formulating solid dispersion.To enhance the solubility of poorly water soluble drug ,by means of solubilising agent. In case of poorly water soluble drug, dissolution may be the rate limiting step in the process of absorption. In such case ,we can improve their solubility and dissolution rate.To study the effect of surfactant on the solid dispersion of poorly water soluble drug.

  8. The granulometric composition of solid dispersions of secondary water and oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashev, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the chemical and granulometric composition of solid dispersions in stratum waters and intermediate emulsion layers from settlers for commercial preparation of oil. The probable sources of the solid dispersions and their role in the destabilization of the modes for preparing conditioned oil are indicated, along with the need to consider factors which cause the manifestation of a high content of mechanical admixtures, development of technical and technological measures for their complete are partial prevention in well production.

  9. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of prechirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion.

  10. Enhanced thermal conductivity of nano-SiC dispersed water based nanofluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Manna; S K Singh; G Paul

    2012-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticle dispersed water based nanofluids were prepared using up to 0.1 vol% of nanoparticles. Use of suitable stirring routine ensured uniformity and stability of dispersion. Thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid measured using transient hot wire device shows a significant increase of up to 12% with only 0.1 vol% nanoparticles and inverse dependence of conductivity on particle size. Use of ceramic nanoparticles appears more appropriate to ensure stability of dispersion in nanofluid in closed loop single-phase heat transfer applications.

  11. Influence of clay minerals on curcumin properties: Stability and singlet oxygen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Joyce L. S.; Valandro, Silvano R.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Schmitt, Carla C.

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has showed promising photophysical properties regarding to biological and chemical sciences. However, the main barrier for those applications are their low solubility and stability in aqueous solution. The effects of two different clay minerals, the montmorillonite (SWy-2) and the Laponite RD (Lap) nanoclay, on the stabilization of Curcumin were investigated. Their effects were compared with two well-established environments (acidic and neutral aqueous media). CUR/clay hybrids were prepared using a simple and fast method, where CUR solution was added into clay suspensions, to obtain well dispersed hybrids in water. The degradation process of CUR and CUR/clays hybrids was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopic. For both studied hybrids, the CUR degradation process was suppressed by the presence of the clay particles. Furthermore, the Lap showed a great stabilization effect than SWy-2. This behavior was due to the smaller particle size and higher exfoliation ability of Lap, providing a large surface for CUR adsorption compared to SWy-2. The degradation process of CUR solutions and CUR/clay hybrids was also studied in the presence of light. CUR photodegradation process was faster not only in the aqueous solution but also in the clay suspension compared to those studied in the dark. The presence of clay particles accelerated the photodegradation of CUR due to the products formation in the reactions between CUR and oxygen radicals. Our results showed that the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) of CUR were about 59% higher in the clay suspensions than CUR in aqueous solution. Therefore, the formation of CUR/clay hybrids, in particularly with Lap, suppressed the degradation in absence light of CUR and increased the singlet oxygen generation, which makes this hybrids of CUR/clay a promising material to enlarge the application of CUR in the biological sciences.

  12. Monitoring instream turbidity to estimate continuous suspended-sediment loads and yields and clay-water volumes in the upper North Santiam River Basin, Oregon, 1998-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2003-01-01

    Three real-time, instream water-quality and turbidity-monitoring sites were established in October 1998 in the upper North Santiam River Basin on the North Santiam River, the Breitenbush River, and Blowout Creek, the main tributary inputs to Detroit Lake, a large, controlled reservoir that extends from river mile 61 to 70. Suspended-sediment samples were collected biweekly to monthly at each station. Rating curves provided estimated suspended-sediment concentration in 30-minute increments from log transformations of the instream turbidity monitoring data. Turbidity was found to be a better surrogate than discharge for estimating suspended-sediment concentration. Daily and annual mean suspended-sediment loads were estimated using the estimated suspended-sediment concentrations and corresponding streamflow data. A laboratory method for estimating persistent (residual) turbidity from separate turbidity samples was developed. Turbidity was measured over time for each sample. Turbidity decay curves were derived as the suspended sediment settled. Each curve was used to estimate a turbidity value for a given settling time. Medium to fine clay particle (size clay particle persistent turbidity for each site. The monitored instream 30-minute turbidity values were converted to a calculated persistent turbidity value that would have resulted after 8.5 hours of settling in the laboratory. Persistent turbidities of 10 NTU and above were tabulated for each site. (Water of 10 NTU and above can interfere with or damage treatment filters and result in intake closures at drinking-water facilities.) A method was developed that used the persistent turbidity experiments, turbidity decay curves, and stream discharge to estimate the volume of water containing suspended clay that entered Detroit Lake from the three main tributaries. 'Suspended-clay water' was defined as water having a value of at least 10 NTU after settling the required 8.5 hours. The suspended-clay concentrations of 10

  13. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  14. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  15. Low-temperature synthesis of water-dispersible anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jieying; Feng, Jie; Li, Wenying; Yu, William W

    2013-04-15

    Water-dispersible anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized at a low temperature (80°C) without using surfactants via the mechanism of electrostatic stabilization. The water-dispersible TiO2 nanoparticles solution was stable and no precipitation occurred after 3months. Photocatalytic evaluation demonstrated that the as-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles possess excellent quinoline degradation performance (a 2.33×10(-2)min(-1) apparent reaction rate constant comparing to 1.22×10(-2)min(-1) for P25) and recycle stability (the photocatalytic activity remained 96.6% of the initial activity after four cycles of repetitive uses). These could be attributed to the small size and good water-dispersibility of the as-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles that led to large specific surface area and easy photogenerated electron-hole transportation.

  16. A hydrophobic peptide fraction that enhances the water dispersibility of curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Yamashita

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the complexation between curcumin (Cur and a peptide mixture (Pep. Pep was prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis of casein and used as an excipient for poorly water-soluble Cur. An aqueous solution of Pep and an acetone solution of Cur were mixed and lyophilized to obtain a white-yellow powder of the peptide and Cur complex (Cur-Pep. The water dispersibility of Cur was enhanced by the complexation with Pep. Pep was fractionated using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ultrafiltration to identify which peptides preferentially interact with Cur. Relatively hydrophobic peptides with high molecular weights (>5 kDa were more effective in enhancing the water dispersibility of Cur than other fractions. Cur-Pep dispersed under acidic and neutral conditions, at which amphoteric Pep is positively or negatively charged. Cur-Pep exists as a hydrocolloid with particle size 160–330 nm in aqueous media.

  17. Dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in salt water environment by Corexit 9500A in the presence of natural coastal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Lee, Mengshan; Berbakov, Jillian; Tansel, Derya Z.; Koklonis, Urpiana

    2014-04-01

    Effectiveness of Corexit 9500A for dispersing Louisiana crude oil was evaluated in salt water solutions containing natural materials in relation to salinity and dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR). Experimental results showed that both salinity and DOR had significant effects on dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in the presence of different natural materials. The natural materials added to the salt water solutions included sea sand (South Beach, Miami, Florida), red mangrove leaves (Rhizophora mangle), seaweed (Sargassum natans), and sea grass (Halodule wrightii). Dispersant effectiveness (amount of oil dispersed into the water) was reduced significantly with increasing salinity with the minimum effectiveness observed in the salinity range between 30 and 50 ppt in all aqueous samples containing natural materials. When significant amounts of floating oil were present, the partially submerged natural materials enhanced the transfer of oil into the water column, which improved the dispersion effectiveness. However, dispersant effectiveness was significantly reduced when the amount of floating oil was relatively small and could not be released back to the water column. Surface tension may not be an adequate parameter for monitoring the effectiveness of dispersants in salt water environment. When distilled water was used (i.e., zero salinity), surface tension was significantly reduced with increasing dispersant concentration. However, there was no clear trend in the surface tension of the salt water solutions (17-51 ppt) containing crude oil and natural materials with increasing dispersant concentration.

  18. Synthesis of Water-Based Dispersions of Polymer/TiO2 Hybrid Nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We develop a strategy for preparing water-based dispersions of polymer/TiO2 nanospheres that can be used to form composite materials applicable in various fields. The formed hybrid nanospheres are monodisperse and possess a hierarchical structure. It starts with the primary TiO2 nanoparticles of about 5 nm, which first assemble to nanoclusters of about 30 nm and then are integrated into monomer droplets. After emulsion polymerization, one obtains the water-based dispersions of polymer/TiO2 nanospheres. To achieve universal size, it is necessary to have treatments with intense turbulent shear generated in a microchannel device at different stages. In addition, a procedure combining synergistic actions of steric and anionic surfactants has been designed to warrant the colloidal stability of the process. Since the formed polymer/TiO2 nanospheres are stable aqueous dispersions, they can be easily mixed with TiO2-free polymeric nanoparticle dispersions to form new dispersions, where TiO2-containing nanospheres are homogeneously distributed in the dispersions at the nanoscale, thus leading to various applications. As an example, the proposed strategy has been applied to generate polystyrene/TiO2 nanospheres of about 100 nm in diameter.

  19. INFLUENCE OF LIGNOSULFONATES ON THE PROPERTIES OF DIMETHOMORPH WATER-DISPERSIBLE GRANULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Different molecular weight fractions of lignosulfonates (LS, LS having different cations, and modified LS with different degree of sulfonation and intrinsic viscosity were prepared and used as dispersants for Dimethomorph water-dispersible granules (DWG. The suspending ratio of DWG was tested to evaluate the effectiveness of LS as a dispersant. Moreover, the stability of DWG suspensions was measured by a new instrument (Turbiscan LabExpert. The suspending ratios of DWG having different molecular weight fraction of LS increased with increasing molecular weight in a suitable range. The kind of cation associated with the LS didn’t have an obvious influence the effectiveness of LS as a dispersant. Furthermore, the higher degree of sulfonation of LS, of which the intrinsic viscosity was similar, the better was its effectiveness as a dispersant. When the intrinsic viscosity increased within a suitable range, the effectiveness of LS as a dispersant increased. Similar findings were achieved by evaluating the stability of DWG suspensions with all the LS as dispersants, and larger molecular weight could decrease the growth of particle size.

  20. “PREPARATION OF SOLID DISPERSION OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUG FORMULATION AND CONSIDERATION”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Godge G.R.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates enhancement of the dissolution profile of furosemide using solid dispersion (SD with eudragit(RLPO & RSPO & also control it’s by using solvent evaporation technique. 1: 0.5(w/w 1:1(w/w ,1:1.5 solid dispersions were prepared by solvent evaporation technique using solvent water and methanol in 1:1 ratio. Dissolution studies using the USP paddle method were performed for solid dispersions of furosemide at 37 ± 0.5 C and 55 rpm in simulated gastric fluid (SGF of pH 1.2. Fourier transformer infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and x-ray diffractometry (XRD were performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and carrier, hence its effect on dissolution. Tablets were formulated containing solid dispersion products and compared with pure drug . IR spectroscopy, XRD, and DSC showed change in the crystal structure towards amorphous one of furosemide (FRMD. Dissolution of furosemide improved and release is controlled significantly in solid dispersion with the ratio 1:1.5 of eudragit RLPO & RSPO . Tablets containing solid dispersion exhibited better dissolution profile than pure drug. Thus, the solid dispersion technique can be successfully used for improvement of dissolution of furosemide as well as control it’s release.

  1. Effect of gelatin on the water dispersion and centrifugal purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanium Maria, Kazi; Mieno, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    We report a convenient and effective procedure for the water dispersion and purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The purification procedure involves a combination of dispersion and centrifugation, in which gelatin; an environmentally friendly material is used as a dispersing agent. It has been found that an aqueous solution of gelatin effectively disperses SWNTs for more than a month. Another advantage of using gelatin as a dispersing agent is that it can be easily removed by washing with water and filtration. The centrifugation procedure employs a centrifugal force of about 2500 times the gravitational force to separate the particles. Although carbonaceous and metallic impurities usually have higher density than SWNTs in arc-produced carbon soot, the centrifugation can easily remove impurities leaving undamaged SWNTs in solution when appropriate centrifugal force and a centrifugation time are used. Centrifugation is carried out for three times to sufficiently remove impurities. Finally, the SWNTs are separated from the gelatin by heating in water and filtering.

  2. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, Stacey Leigh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  3. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water...... dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were...

  4. Ground-water quality and its relation to hydrogeology, land use, and surface-water quality in the Red Clay Creek basin, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    The Red Clay Creek Basin in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Pennsylvania and Delaware is a 54-square-mile area underlain by a structurally complex assemblage of fractured metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks that form a water-table aquifer. Ground-water-flow systems generally are local, and ground water discharges to streams. Both ground water and surface water in the basin are used for drinking-water supply. Ground-water quality and the relation between ground-water quality and hydrogeologic and land-use factors were assessed in 1993 in bedrock aquifers of the basin. A total of 82 wells were sampled from July to November 1993 using a stratified random sampling scheme that included 8 hydrogeologic and 4 land-use categories to distribute the samples evenly over the area of the basin. The eight hydrogeologic units were determined by formation or lithology. The land-use categories were (1) forested, open, and undeveloped; (2) agricultural; (3) residential; and (4) industrial and commercial. Well-water samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, nutrients, volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCB's), and radon-222. Concentrations of some constituents exceeded maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Concentrations of nitrate were greater than the MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen (N) in water from 11 (13 percent) of 82 wells sampled; the maximum concentration was 38 mg/L as N. Water from only 1 of 82 wells sampled contained VOC's or pesticides that exceeded a MCL; water from that well contained 3 mg/L chlordane and 1 mg/L of PCB's. Constituents or properties of well-water samples that exceeded SMCL's included iron, manganese, dissolved solids, pH, and corrosivity. Water from 70 (85 percent) of the 82 wells sampled contained radon-222 activities greater than the proposed MCL of

  5. Ground-water quality and its relation to hydrogeology, land use, and surface-water quality in the Red Clay Creek basin, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    The Red Clay Creek Basin in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Pennsylvania and Delaware is a 54-square-mile area underlain by a structurally complex assemblage of fractured metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks that form a water-table aquifer. Ground-water-flow systems generally are local, and ground water discharges to streams. Both ground water and surface water in the basin are used for drinking-water supply. Ground-water quality and the relation between ground-water quality and hydrogeologic and land-use factors were assessed in 1993 in bedrock aquifers of the basin. A total of 82 wells were sampled from July to November 1993 using a stratified random sampling scheme that included 8 hydrogeologic and 4 land-use categories to distribute the samples evenly over the area of the basin. The eight hydrogeologic units were determined by formation or lithology. The land-use categories were (1) forested, open, and undeveloped; (2) agricultural; (3) residential; and (4) industrial and commercial. Well-water samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, nutrients, volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCB's), and radon-222. Concentrations of some constituents exceeded maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Concentrations of nitrate were greater than the MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen (N) in water from 11 (13 percent) of 82 wells sampled; the maximum concentration was 38 mg/L as N. Water from only 1 of 82 wells sampled contained VOC's or pesticides that exceeded a MCL; water from that well contained 3 mg/L chlordane and 1 mg/L of PCB's. Constituents or properties of well-water samples that exceeded SMCL's included iron, manganese, dissolved solids, pH, and corrosivity. Water from 70 (85 percent) of the 82 wells sampled contained radon-222 activities greater than the proposed MCL of

  6. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    -type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...... have been tested successfully. At a natural water content of w=40-45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k...

  7. Using GPR early-time amplitude analysis to monitor variations in soil water content at a clay-rich agricultural site in response to irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeo, Jonathan; Van Dam, Remke; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are increasingly used to analyze spatial variation in soil water content (SWC). Electrical resistivity (ER), ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) have all been applied to this problem. However, TDR is limited in terms of its ability to provide good spatial coverage over large areas, ER can be very time consuming depending on the survey, and GPR direct wave and reflection methods are ineffective in clay-rich environments. We employed a relatively new GPR methodology, early-time amplitude analysis, during an infiltration experiment conducted in a clay-rich agricultural field. The research took place at the Samford Ecological Research Facility, Queensland, Australia, with the goal of monitoring changes in SWC in response to irrigation. We hypothesize that early-time analysis can be used to detect and monitor infiltration in clay-rich soils where direct wave and reflection GPR fails, thus opening new avenues of hydrogeophysical research in the increasingly important field of water resource management. Initial field work showed that traditional methods of using GPR reflection surveys and ground wave velocity analysis were ineffective due to the excessive signal attenuation caused by the clay-rich soil at the site. GPR and TDR datasets were collected over a 20 meter by 15 meter section of the field. GPR datasets were collected once daily, at 10 am, and TDR measurements were collected once daily at 11 am from Thursday, August 28th, 2014 until Monday, September 1st, 2014. A sprinkler irrigation was carried out on the evening of Thursday, August 28th. The results suggest that the early-time GPR method is capable of monitoring the resulting changes in SWC due to infiltration in clayey soils despite the failure of reflection and ground wave velocity analysis. The early time GPR results are consistent with moisture content estimates from TDR and gravimetric analysis of soil cores taken in the field.

  8. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part A - Overview, experimental design and water data of an experiment in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P., E-mail: paul.wersin@gruner.ch [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Gruner Ltd., Gellertstrasse 55, 4020 Basel (Switzerland); Leupin, O.X. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Mettler, S. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Solexperts Ltd., Mettlenbachstrasse 25, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Gaucher, E.C. [BRGM, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Maeder, U. [University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); De Canniere, P. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA, Laboratoire de Recherche Souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, RD960 BP9, 55290 Bure (France); Gaebler, H.E. [BGR, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Kunimaro, T. [JAEA, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kiho, K. [CRIEPI, 1646 Abiko, Abiko-city Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, 85301 Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > The composition was affected by the complex interplay of diffusion, mineral and surface reactions. > The {sup 13}C signals for carbon species showed significant variations which could only be partly explained. > The main cations remained remarkably constant during the experiment. > This underlines the strong buffering via cation exchange and carbonate dissolution/precipitation. - Abstract: An in situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed porewater chemistry (PC) experiment, was carried out for a period of 5 years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby a traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed-off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions of the porewater, but because of unexpected microbiologically-induced redox reactions, the objective was extended to elucidate the biogeochemical processes occurring in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO{sub 2} and porewater chemistry in the low permeability clay formation. The behaviour of the conservative tracers {sup 2}H and Br{sup -} could be explained by diffusive dilution in the clay and moreover the results showed that diffusive equilibration between the borehole water and the formation occurred within about 3 year's time. However, the composition and pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions differed considerably from those of the in situ porewater. Thus, pH was lower and pCO{sub 2} was higher than indicated by complementary laboratory investigations. The noted differences are explained by microbiologically-induced redox reactions occurring in the borehole and in the interfacial wall area which were caused by an organic source released from the equipment material. The degradation of this source was accompanied by sulfate reduction and - to a lesser extent - by methane generation, which induced a high rate of acetogenic reactions

  9. Spatial patterns of water-dispersed seed deposition along stream riparian gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraaije, Rob G A; Moinier, Sophie; van Gogh, Iris; Timmers, Robert; van Deelen, Joost J; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Soons, Merel B

    2017-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems along streams naturally harbour a high plant diversity with many increasingly endangered species. In our current heavily modified and fragmented catchments, many of these species are sensitive to dispersal limitation. Better understanding of riparian plant dispersal pathways is required to predict species (re-)colonization potential and improve success rates of stream and riparian zone conservation and restoration. Dispersal by water (hydrochory) is an important mechanism for longitudinal and lateral dispersal of riparian species. Crucially for recruitment potential, it also influences the elevation along the riparian hydrological gradient where seeds become deposited. Due to the complex interplay between abiotic and biotic factors, however, it remains unclear how exactly patterns in seed deposition are formed. We compared hydrochorous and non-hydrochorous seed deposition, and quantified patterns of seed deposition along the bare substrate of newly created stream riparian gradients. Water levels were monitored and seed deposition was measured with seed traps along the full range of riparian hydrological conditions (from permanently flooded to never flooded). Average seed numbers and species richness were significantly higher in flooded than in non-flooded seed traps (5.7 and 1.5 times higher, respectively). Community-weighted trait means indicated that typically water-dispersed seeds were more dominant in flooded than in non-flooded seed traps and gradually decreased in concentration from the channel to the upland. Moreover, highly buoyant seeds accumulated at the average water line, and clear elevational sorting of non-buoyant seeds occurred within the floodplain. These results establish a critical role of flooding in shaping patterns of seed deposition along the riparian gradient, delivering many seeds of typical riparian species to riparian zones and depositing them at species-specific elevations as influenced by seed traits, suggesting

  10. Characterization of highly hydrophobic coatings deposited onto pre-oxidized silicon from water dispersible organosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almanza-Workman, A. Marcia; Raghavan, Srini; Petrovic, Slobodan; Gogoi, Bishnu; Deymier, Pierre; Monk, David J.; Roop, Ray

    2003-01-01

    The formation and quality of highly hydrophobic coatings deposited from water dispersible organosilanes onto pre-oxidized single crystal silicon were studied using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, dynamic contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Highly hydrophobic films of a commercially available water dispersible silane and two different cationic alkoxysilanes were prepared by dip coating. It was found using atomic force microscopy that, in general, the structure of these highly hydrophobic films is a continuous film with some particulates attributed to bulk polymerization of the precursor molecule in water. Film defects were quantified using EIS by the value of charge transfer resistance at the hydrofluoric acid/silicon interface. Potential applications of this type of coatings include reduction/elimination of stiction in micro-electromechanical systems, contact printing in materials microfabrication, inhibition of corrosion and oxidation, prevention of water wetting, lubrication and protein adsorption.

  11. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the

  12. Folded localized excitations in the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yan; Ma Song-Hua; Fang Jian-Ping

    2013-01-01

    By using a mapping approach and a linear variable separation approach,a new family of solitary wave solutions with arbitrary functions for the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system (MDWW) is derived.Based on the derived solutions and using some multi-valued functions,we obtain some novel folded localized excitations of the system.

  13. Nonpropagating Solitons in (2+1)-Dimensional Dispersive Long-Water Wave System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian-Ping; ZHENG Chun-Long; LIU Qing

    2005-01-01

    With the help of an extended mapping approach, a new type of variable separation excitation with three arbitrary functions of the (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long-water wave system (DLW) is derived. Based on the derived variable separation excitation, abundant non-propagating solitons such as dromion, ring, peakon, and compacton etc.are revealed by selecting appropriate functions in this paper.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Water Proton Relaxation in Protein Solutions and Tissue: T1ρ Dispersion Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Enn-Ling; Kim, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Image contrast in clinical MRI is often determined by differences in tissue water proton relaxation behavior. However, many aspects of water proton relaxation in complex biological media, such as protein solutions and tissue are not well understood, perhaps due to the limited empirical data. Principal Findings Water proton T1, T2, and T1ρ of protein solutions and tissue were measured systematically under multiple conditions. Crosslinking or aggregation of protein decreased T2 and T1ρ, but did not change high-field T1. T1ρ dispersion profiles were similar for crosslinked protein solutions, myocardial tissue, and cartilage, and exhibited power law behavior with T1ρ(0) values that closely approximated T2. The T1ρ dispersion of mobile protein solutions was flat above 5 kHz, but showed a steep curve below 5 kHz that was sensitive to changes in pH. The T1ρ dispersion of crosslinked BSA and cartilage in DMSO solvent closely resembled that of water solvent above 5 kHz but showed decreased dispersion below 5 kHz. Conclusions Proton exchange is a minor pathway for tissue T1 and T1ρ relaxation above 5 kHz. Potential models for relaxation are discussed, however the same molecular mechanism appears to be responsible across 5 decades of frequencies from T1ρ to T1. PMID:20052404

  15. Spontaneous oil-in-water emulsification induced by charge-stabilized dispersions of various inorganic colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacanna, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311471676; Kegel, W.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113729464; Philipse, A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073532894

    2007-01-01

    Charge-stabilized dispersions of inorganic colloids are shown to induce spontaneous emulsification of hydrophobic (TPM) molecules to stable oil-in-water emulsions, with monodisperse, mesoscopic oil droplet diameters in the range of 30-150 nm, irrespective of the polydispersity of the starting

  16. Enhancing the water dispersibility of paclitaxel by complexation with hydrophobic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Asuka; Oshima, Tatsuya; Baba, Yoshinari

    2015-11-01

    The complex between paclitaxel (Ptx) and a peptide mixture (Pep) was prepared to enhance of the water-dispersibility of Ptx. Pep was prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis of casein, followed by fractionation using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ultrafiltration. The Ptx and Pep complex (Ptx-Pep) was prepared by mixing an ethanol solution of Ptx and an aqueous solution of Pep followed by lyophilization. The water dispersibility test of Ptx-Pep prepared using different fractions of Pep demonstrated that a fraction (Pep-A), containing relatively hydrophobic peptides with high molecular weights, was effective in enhancing the water dispersibility of Ptx. The sequences of the major peptides in Pep-A were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry with "LIFT" technique. The water dispersibility of the complex between Ptx and Pep-A (Ptx-Pep-A) was independent of pH, even though it is positively or negatively charged under strongly acidic and neutral conditions. As the particle size of Ptx-Pep-A in aqueous media was 147-215 nm, Ptx-Pep-A was present as a hydrocolloidal material in aqueous media.

  17. Efficacy of water dispersible formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus for aflatoxin management in corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of water dispersible granule (WDG) formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus in controlling aflatoxin contamination of corn. In 2011, when aflatoxin was present at very high levels, no WDG treatment provided s...

  18. Water Vapor Interference Correction in a Non Dispersive Infrared Multi-Gas Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN You-Wen; LIU Wen-Qing; ZENG Yi; WANG Shi-Mei; HUANG Shu-Hua; XIE Pin-Hua; YU Xiao-Man

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an effective method to eliminate the interfering effect of water vapor in a non-dispersive infrared multi-gas analyzer.The response coefficients of water vapor at each filter channel are measured from the humidity of the ambient air.Based on the proposed method,the water vapor interference is corrected with the measured response coefficients.By deducting the absorbance of each filter channel related to water vapor,the measuring precision of the analyzer is improved significantly and the concentration retrieval correlation accuracy of each target gas is more than 99%.

  19. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the White Clay Creek subbasin of the Christina River Basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 1994-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Christina River Basin drains 565 square miles (mi2) in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. Water from the basin is used for recreation, drinking water supply, and to support aquatic life. The Christina River Basin includes the major subbasins of Brandywine Creek, White Clay Creek, and Red Clay Creek. The White Clay Creek is the second largest of the subbasins and drains an area of 108 mi2. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the streams. A multi-agency water-quality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point and nonpoint-source contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on stream water quality. To assist in non point-source evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the three major subbasins and for the Christina River, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Water-quality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in smaller subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint-source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base- flow samples were collected during 1998 at two sites in the White Clay Creek subbasin and at nine sites in the other subbasins. The HSPF model for the White Clay Creek Basin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into 17 reaches draining areas that ranged from 1.37 to 13 mi2. Ten different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the White Clay Creek Basin are agricultural, forested, residential

  20. High-performance 3D printing of hydrogels by water-dispersible photoinitiator nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Amol A.; Saada, Gabriel; Cooperstein, Ido; Larush, Liraz; Jackman, Joshua A.; Tabaei, Seyed R.; Cho, Nam-Joon; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of water-soluble photoinitiators with high absorbance in the ultraviolet (UV)–visible range, rapid three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogels for tissue engineering is challenging. A new approach enabling rapid 3D printing of hydrogels in aqueous solutions is presented on the basis of UV-curable inks containing nanoparticles of highly efficient but water-insoluble photoinitiators. The extinction coefficient of the new water-dispersible nanoparticles of 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) is more than 300 times larger than the best and most used commercially available water-soluble photoinitiator. The TPO nanoparticles absorb significantly in the range from 385 to 420 nm, making them suitable for use in commercially available, low-cost, light-emitting diode–based 3D printers using digital light processing. The polymerization rate at this range is very fast and enables 3D printing that otherwise is impossible to perform without adding solvents. The TPO nanoparticles were prepared by rapid conversion of volatile microemulsions into water-dispersible powder, a process that can be used for a variety of photoinitiators. Such water-dispersible photoinitiator nanoparticles open many opportunities to enable rapid 3D printing of structures prepared in aqueous solutions while bringing environmental advantages by using low-energy curing systems and avoiding the need for solvents. PMID:27051877

  1. High-performance 3D printing of hydrogels by water-dispersible photoinitiator nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Amol A; Saada, Gabriel; Cooperstein, Ido; Larush, Liraz; Jackman, Joshua A; Tabaei, Seyed R; Cho, Nam-Joon; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    In the absence of water-soluble photoinitiators with high absorbance in the ultraviolet (UV)-visible range, rapid three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogels for tissue engineering is challenging. A new approach enabling rapid 3D printing of hydrogels in aqueous solutions is presented on the basis of UV-curable inks containing nanoparticles of highly efficient but water-insoluble photoinitiators. The extinction coefficient of the new water-dispersible nanoparticles of 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) is more than 300 times larger than the best and most used commercially available water-soluble photoinitiator. The TPO nanoparticles absorb significantly in the range from 385 to 420 nm, making them suitable for use in commercially available, low-cost, light-emitting diode-based 3D printers using digital light processing. The polymerization rate at this range is very fast and enables 3D printing that otherwise is impossible to perform without adding solvents. The TPO nanoparticles were prepared by rapid conversion of volatile microemulsions into water-dispersible powder, a process that can be used for a variety of photoinitiators. Such water-dispersible photoinitiator nanoparticles open many opportunities to enable rapid 3D printing of structures prepared in aqueous solutions while bringing environmental advantages by using low-energy curing systems and avoiding the need for solvents.

  2. Influence of dispersants on petroleum bioavailability to primary producers in a brackish water food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younghans-Haug, C.O.; Wolfe, M.F.; Tjeerdema, R.S. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sowby, M.L. [Office of Oil Spill Prevention and Response, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Petroleum is transported and processed within biologically rich brackish environments worldwide. Past research has investigated disposition of chemically dispersed oil in mammals, fish, and higher invertebrates, yet little is known about how chemical dispersion influences petroleum behavior within primary producers within brackish water food chains. One concern is whether chemical dispersion influences petroleum bioavailability to primary producers and the potential for increased petroleum bioaccumulation. This research examines changes in petroleum bioavailability to the euryhaline phytoplankton Isochrysis galbana by measuring bioconcentration factors (BCFS) including uptake and deputation rates for dispersed and undispersed brackish water oil spills. Isochrysis is a major food source for zooplankton which are consumed by a multitude of larval fish having both ecological and commercial importance. Prudhoe Bay Crude oil, Corexit 9527, and {sup 14}C-naphthalene were used for these studies. Constant-concentration flow-through exposures were employed for the uptake and BCF experiments. Work was performed below the ``no observable effect concentration`` to eliminate stress-induced metabolic altercations that could in themselves influence petroleum behavior. Exposure chamber and experimental design will be discussed, and study results presented. Understanding how chemical dispersion alters petroleum behavior within the lowest levels of the food chain leads to better delineation of consumer risks.

  3. Synthesis of water-dispersible silver nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of water-soluble silver oxalate precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Takanari; Saito, Kota; Matsuda, Yukiko; Sato, Ibuki; Kon, Hiroki; Uruma, Keirei; Ishizaki, Manabu; Kanaizuka, Katsuhiko; Sakamoto, Masatomi; Ohya, Norimasa; Kurihara, Masato

    2014-08-01

    Silver oxalate, one of the coordination polymer crystals, is a promising synthetic precursor for transformation into Ag nanoparticles without any reducing chemicals via thermal decomposition of the oxalate ions. However, its insoluble nature in solvents has been a great disadvantage, especially for systematic control of crystal growth of the Ag nanoparticles, while such control of inorganic nanoparticles has been generally performed using soluble precursors in homogeneous solutions. In this paper, we document our discovery of water-soluble species from the reaction between the insoluble silver oxalate and N,N-dimethyl-1,3-diaminopropane. The water-soluble species underwent low-temperature thermal decomposition of the oxalate ions at 30 °C with evolution of CO2 to reduce Ag+ to Ag0. Water-dispersible Ag nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized from the water-soluble species in the presence of gelatin via similar thermal decomposition at 100 °C. The gelatin-protected and water-dispersible Ag nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 25.1 nm appeared. In addition, antibacterial activity of the prepared water-dispersible Ag nanoparticles has been preliminarily investigated.

  4. Water-based, nonfluorinated dispersions for environmentally benign, large-area, superhydrophobic coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Bayer, Ilker S; Qin, Jian; Waldroup, Don; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2013-12-26

    Low-cost, large-area, superhydrophobic coating treatments are of high value to technological applications requiring efficient liquid repellency. While many applications are envisioned, only few are realizable in practice due to either the high cost or low durability of such treatments. Recently, spray deposition of polymer-particle dispersions has been demonstrated as an excellent means for producing low-cost, large-area, durable, superhydrophobic composite coatings/films; however, such dispersions generally contain harsh or volatile solvents, which are required for solution processing of polymers as well as for dispersing hydrophobic nanoparticles, thus inhibiting scalability due to the increased cost in chemical handling and environmental safety concerns. Moreover, such coatings usually contain fluoropolymers due to their inherent low surface energy, a requirement for superhydrophobicity, but concerns over their biopersistence has provided an impetus for eliminating these chemicals. For spray coating, the former problem can be overcome by replacing organic solvents with water, but this situation seems paradoxical: Producing a highly water-repellent coating from an aqueous dispersion. We report a water-based, nonfluorinated dispersion for the formation of superhydrophobic composite coatings applied by spray on a variety of substrates. We stabilize hydrophobic components (i.e., polymer, nanoparticles) in water, by utilizing chemicals containing acid functional groups (i.e., acrylic acid) that can become ionized in aqueous environments under proper pH control (pH > 7). The functional polymer utilized in this study is a copolymer of ethylene and acrylic acid, while the particle filler is exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP), which contains functional groups at its periphery. Once spray deposited and dried, the components become insoluble in water, thus promoting liquid repellency. Such coatings can find a wide range of applications due to their benign processing

  5. Effects of dredging and lanthanum-modified clay on water quality variables in an enclosure study in a hypertrophic pond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, Miquel; Waajen, Guido; Engels, Bart; Oosterhout, van Frank

    2017-01-01

    An enclosure experiment was conducted between July and September 2009 to compare the effectiveness of a phosphate fixative, the lanthanum-modified bentonite clay Phoslock® (LMB), dredging, and their combination in controlling eutrophication in a hypertrophic urban pond in Heesch, The Netherlands.

  6. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clays for the adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine, and caffeine from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2012-11-15

    Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are considered emerging contaminants, and their efficient removal from water is going to be a challenging endeavor. Microporous adsorbent materials, including pillared clays, could offer a potential solution if tailored properly. Although pillared clays have been employed previously for the removal of organics, the effective removal of PPCPs will only be possible if their surface and textural properties are manipulated from the bottom-up. This work presents the use of modified inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) for the adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine, and caffeine. The IOCs have been modified with Co(2+), Cu(2+), or Ni(2+) to induce complexation-like adsorbate-adsorbent interactions at ambient conditions, in an attempt to provide an efficient and yet reversible driving force in the sub-ppm concentration range. Furthermore, the IOCs were partially calcined to increase effective surface area by an order of magnitude while preserving some hydrophobicity. In general, the Ni(2+) IOCs exhibited the greatest interaction with salicylic and clofibric acids, respectively, while the Co(2+) adsorbents excelled at adsorbing caffeine at low concentrations. All of the metal-modified IOCs showed comparable adsorption capacities for the case of carbamazepine, probably due to the lack of availability of particular functional groups in this adsorbate.

  8. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Red Clay Creek subbasin of the Christina River Basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 1994-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    (mi2) in Pennsylvania and Delaware and includes the major subbasins of Red Clay Creek, White Clay Creek, Brandywine Creek, and Christina River. The Red Clay Creek is the smallest of the subbasins and drains an area of 54 mi2. Streams in the Christina River Basin are used for recreation, drinking-water supply, and to support aquatic life. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the stream. A multi-agency, waterquality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point and nonpointsource contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on stream water quality. To assist in nonpointsource evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the four main subbasins of the Christina River Basin, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Water-quality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in smaller subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint-source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base-flow samples were collected during 1998 at 1 site in the Red Clay Creek subbasin and at 10 sites elsewhere in the Christina River Basin. The HSPF model for the Red Clay Creek subbasin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into nine reaches draining areas that ranged from 1.7 to 10 mi2. One of the reaches contains a regulated reservoir. Ten different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the Red Clay Creek subbasin are agricultural, forested, residential

  9. Nanostructured Boron Nitride With High Water Dispersibility For Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Paviter; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Baban; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Singh, Ajay; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-10-01

    Highly water dispersible boron based compounds are innovative and advanced materials which can be used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer treatment (BNCT). Present study deals with the synthesis of highly water dispersible nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN). Unique and relatively low temperature synthesis route is the soul of present study. The morphological examinations (Scanning/transmission electron microscopy) of synthesized nanostructures showed that they are in transient phase from two dimensional hexagonal sheets to nanotubes. It is also supported by dual energy band gap of these materials calculated from UV- visible spectrum of the material. The theoretically calculated band gap also supports the same (calculated by virtual nano lab Software). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the synthesized material has deformed structure which is further supported by Raman spectroscopy. The structural aspect of high water disperse ability of BN is also studied. The ultra-high disperse ability which is a result of structural deformation make these nanostructures very useful in BNCT. Cytotoxicity studies on various cell lines (Hela(cervical cancer), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7)) show that the synthesized nanostructures can be used for BNCT.

  10. Oscillatory shear response of moisture barrier coatings containing clay of different shape factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugge, C; Vanderhoek, N; Bousfield, D W

    2011-06-01

    Oscillatory shear rheology of barrier coatings based on dispersed styrene-butadiene latex and clay of various shape factors or aspect ratio has been explored. Barrier performance of these coatings when applied to paperboard has been assessed in terms of water vapour transmission rates and the results related to shape factor, dewatering and critical strain. It has been shown that a system based on clay with high shape factor gives a lower critical strain, dewatering and water vapour transmission rate compared with clays of lower shape factor. The dissipated energy, as calculated from an amplitude sweep, indicated no attractive interaction between clay and latex implying a critical strain that appears to be solely dependent on the shape factor at a constant volume fraction. Particle size distribution was shown to have no effect on the critical strain while coatings of high elasticity exhibited high yield strains as expected. The loss modulus demonstrated strain hardening before the elastic to viscous transition. The loss modulus peak was identified by a maximum strain which was significantly lower for a coating based on clay with a high shape factor. The characteristic elastic time was found to vary between 0.6 and 1.3s. The zero shear viscosity of barrier dispersion coatings were estimated from the characteristic elastic time and the characteristic modulus to be of the order of 25-100 Pa s.

  11. Multi scale experimental study of water and ionic transport in porous charged media: clays; Etude experimentale multiechelle du transport ionique et aqueux en milieu poreux charge: argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadene, A

    2005-10-15

    Clays are porous media of industrial interest. Due to their retention capacities and low permeability to water, they are the principal candidate for the conception of engineered barriers radioactive waste disposal. The main interest of this study is the experimental determination of the cationic and water dynamics in montmorillonite and fluoro-hectorite at low water contents This latter synthetic smectite has been used as a model clay to help the interpretation of the results issued from the first natural one. After a summary on the clayey system, this work reports the many experimental techniques (Atomic Force Microscopy, Photo-Correlation Spectroscopy, Micro-calorimetry, Powder Diffraction) used during the preliminary study concerning structural characterisation of the samples. The study of the sodic form of smectites with the use of a combination of quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques (Time of Flight and Spin Echo) succeeded to water diffusion coefficients but also to a discernment of the limits of such techniques. Experiments with montmorillonite samples are in agreement with the simulations, so tending to a validation of the models. Experimental data obtained from synthetic hectorites will be in the near future compared to simulations In the last part, this work shows the application of Broad Band Dielectric Spectroscopy for the investigation of ionic dynamic in these porous media. Many models have been developed for the interpretation of the experimental raw data obtained with this technique. (author)

  12. Rheology and structure of aqueous bentonite–polyvinyl alcohol dispersions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S İşçı; C H Ünlü; O Atici; N Güngör

    2006-10-01

    The influence of polymer on flow behaviour of Balikesir, Turkey bentonite dispersions (2%, w/w) was studied for non-ionic polymer, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). In a range of 3.3 × 10-6 – 3.3 × 105 mol/l, PVA was added to the bentonite dispersions in different concentrations and its behaviour was observed on rheology parameters. Thixotropy was detected by a hysteresis loop of the flow curves. The data were interpreted taking into account the interactions of colloidal clay particles, bentonitic clay concentrations, structure, and concentrations of added PVA. The particle size analysis was explained by surface orientation of PVA to the clay particles dispersed in aqueous solution. Zeta potential determination also emphasized that PVA molecules got attached on the face and edge surface of clay particles. The morphology of bentonite dispersions was analysed by scanning electron micrograph (SEM). FTIR studies carried out in parallel to rheology studies showed that hydrogen bonds were formed between surface of the clay, and absorbed PVA molecules and adsorbed water. The presence of PVA did not prevent extensive swelling of bentonite.

  13. Research on Synthesizing Disperser with Fraction of Anthracene Oil for Coal Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-guang; GUO Zhao-bing; WU Jian-jun; XIE Qiang; WANG Xiao-chun

    2003-01-01

    Experiment of synthesizing a disperser for coal water slurry (CWS) by using fractions of anthracene oil from high-temperature coal tar was performed. The orthogonal test was used to investigate the influence of temperature, time, quantity of sulfonation agent and condensation agent and the interaction of these factors on properties of the disperser. The result shows that the influence of temperature, time, quantity of sulfonation agent and condensation agent, and the interaction of sulfonation time and sulfonation agent has a significant influence on the properties of disperser. The optimal condition of synthesis is that in 150g of the fractions of anthracene oil, 40 mL of sulfonation agent is added and sulfonated for 3 h at 130℃, then, 10 mL of condensing agent is added and condensated for 1.5 h at 115 ℃.

  14. Determination of trace lead in biological and water samples with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction preconcentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pei; Sang, Hongbo

    2008-09-01

    A new method for the determination of trace lead was developed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed approach, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP) was used as a chelating agent, and carbon tetrachloride and ethanol were selected as extraction and dispersive solvents. Some factors influencing the extraction efficiency of lead and its subsequent determination, including extraction and dispersive solvent type and volume, pH of sample solution, concentration of the chelating agent, and extraction time, were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor of this method for lead was reached at 78. The detection limit for lead was 39 ng L(-1) (3 sigma), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.2% (n=7, c=10 ng mL(-1)). The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of lead in human urine and water samples.

  15. Content of arsenic, selenium, mercury in the coal, food, clay and drinking water on the Zhaotong fluorosis area, eastern Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kun-li; Li Hui-jie; Chen Tong-bin (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research

    2008-03-15

    About 160 samples of coal, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin County, Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province, to determine the arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) content by AAF-800. The study found that the As content in the main coal seam from the Late Permian coal mines in Zhaotong City is 8.84 mg/kg and some civil coal can reach 89.09 mg/kg. The Se and Hg in the coal samples of Late Permian is lower, but Se and Hg are more concentrated in the pyritic coal balls and the pyritic gangue of the coal seam. The As content in corn and capsicum dried by coal-burning is more than 0.7 mg/kg, the natural standard amount of arsenic content permitted in food by China. The Se and Hg content in corn dried by coal-burning is lower than the natural standard of Se and Hg content in food in China but the Se and Hg content of capsicum dried by coal-burning exceeds the amount permitted by the natural standard for food in China. Clay, used as an additive for the coal-burning process and as a binder in making briquettes, contains a high content of As, generally more than 16 mg/kg. However, the Se and Hg content of clay itself are low. The As, Se and Hg content of drinking water are lower than the natural standard of As, Se and Hg content in the drinking water. So, there is high-As content coal and high-As content dried corn and capsicum in the endemic fluorosis area of Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province. The high As content of the dried corn and capsicum might have originated from the high arsenic content of burnt coal and clay. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Premiminary tests on modified clays for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids

    OpenAIRE

    den Hamer, Davina; Di Emidio, Gemmina; Bezuijen, Adam; Verastegui Flores, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of a bentonite suspension declines in aggressive systems like brackish or saline pore water. An engineered clay (HYPER clay) was developed for sealing materials with enhanced resistance to aggressive conditions. The modified clay is produced by treating a sodium activated bentonite with a cellulose polymer following the HYPER clay process method. This study investigates the suitability of the modified clay for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids. Drilling fluids become contam...

  17. Resolving precipitation-induced water content profiles through inversion of dispersive GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has become a popular tool for monitoring hydrologic processes. When monitoring infiltration, the thin wetted zone that occurs near the ground surface at early times may act as a dispersive waveguide. This low-velocity layer traps the GPR waves, causing specific frequencies of the signal to travel at different phase velocities, confounding standard traveltime analysis. In a previous numerical study we demonstrated the potential of dispersion analysis for estimating the depth distribution of waveguide water contents. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of the methodology when applying it to experimental time-lapse dispersive GPR data collected during a laboratory infiltration experiment in a relatively homogenous soil. A large sand-filled tank is equipped with an automated gantry to independently control the position of 1000 MHz source and receiver antennas. The system was programmed to repeatedly collect a common mid-point (CMP) profile at the center of the tank followed by two constant offset profiles (COP) in the x and y direction. Each collection was completed in 30 s and repeated 50 times during a 28 min experiment. Two minutes after the start of measurements, the surface of the sand was irrigated at a constant flux rate of 0.006 cm/sec for 23 minutes. Time-lapse COPs show increases in traveltime to reflectors in the tank associated with increasing water content, as well as the development of a wetting front reflection. From 4-10 min, the CMPs show a distinct shingling characteristic that is indicative of waveguide dispersion. Forward models where the waveguide is conceptualized as discrete layers and a piece-wise linear function were used to invert picked dispersion curves for waveguide properties. We show the results from both inversion approaches for multiple dispersive CMPs and show how the single layer model fails to represent the gradational nature of the wetting front.

  18. Characterization of clay deposits from Egypt and assessment of their potential application for waste water treatment: How dissolved organic matter determines the interaction of heavy metals and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey Mohammed, Y.B.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using clay minerals abundant in local soils in Egypt as low cost materials to reduce Cu, Ni and Zn pollution of soil and groundwater originating from polluted wastewater; specifically focusing on the influence of the interaction of clay

  19. Larvae from deep-sea methane seeps disperse in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Shawn M; Van Gaest, Ahna L; Johnson, Shannon B; Vrijenhoek, Robert C; Young, Craig M

    2014-07-07

    Many species endemic to deep-sea methane seeps have broad geographical distributions, suggesting that they produce larvae with at least episodic long-distance dispersal. Cold-seep communities on both sides of the Atlantic share species or species complexes, yet larval dispersal across the Atlantic is expected to take prohibitively long at adult depths. Here, we provide direct evidence that the long-lived larvae of two cold-seep molluscs migrate hundreds of metres above the ocean floor, allowing them to take advantage of faster surface currents that may facilitate long-distance dispersal. We collected larvae of the ubiquitous seep mussel "Bathymodiolus" childressi and an associated gastropod, Bathynerita naticoidea, using remote-control plankton nets towed in the euphotic zone of the Gulf of Mexico. The timing of collections suggested that the larvae might disperse in the water column for more than a year, where they feed and grow to more than triple their original sizes. Ontogenetic vertical migration during a long larval life suggests teleplanic dispersal, a plausible explanation for the amphi-Atlantic distribution of "B." mauritanicus and the broad western Atlantic distribution of B. naticoidea. These are the first empirical data to demonstrate a biological mechanism that might explain the genetic similarities between eastern and western Atlantic seep fauna. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium-ammonium exchange experiments on clay minerals using a (45)Ca tracer technique in marine pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, Charlotte; Wehrmann, Laura M; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ferdelman, Tim G; Teichert, Barbara M A; Gussone, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cation exchange processes is important for evaluating early diagenetic and synsedimentary processes taking place in marine sediments. To quantify calcium (Ca) exchange and Ca-ammonium exchange in a seawater environment, we performed experiments with a radioactive (45)Ca tracer on clay mineral standards (Fithian illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite) and marine sediments from the North Atlantic Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1306A in artificial seawater (ASW). The results show that equilibrium during the initial attachment of Ca as well as the exchange of Ca by [Formula: see text] is attained in less than 2 min. On average 8-20% of the exchangeable sites of the clay minerals were occupied by Ca in a seawater medium. The conditional selectivity coefficient, describing the [Formula: see text] exchange in ASW is mineral specific and it was determined to be 0.07 for montmorillonite, 0.05 for a natural marine sediment and 0.013 for Fithian illite.

  1. Inversion of dispersion coefficient in water quality model using optimal perturbation algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-tao NIE; Jian-hua TAO

    2009-01-01

    As a primary parameter in the water quality model for shallow bays,the dispersion coefficient is traditionally determined with a trial-and-error method,which is time-consuming and requires much experience.In this paper,based on the measured data of chemical oxygen demand(COD),the dispersion coefficient is calculated using an inversion method.In the process,the regularization method is applied to treat the ill-posedness.and an operator identity perturbation method is used to obtain the solution.Using the model with an inverted dispersion coefficient,the distributions of COD,inorganic nitrogen(IN),and inorganic phosphorus(IP)in Bohai Bay are predicted and compared with the measured data.The results indicate that the method is feasible and the inverted dispersion coefficient can be used to predict other pollutant distribution.This method may also be further extended to the inversion of other parameters in the water quality model.

  2. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  3. Oceanic dispersion of radioactive cesium in the western North Pacific - Eastward dispersion in surface water and southward intrusion with mode water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ambe, Daisuke; Shigenobu, Yuya; Fujimoto, Ken; Ono, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Tomowo [National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Fisheries Research Agency, 2-12-4, Fukuura, Kanazawa, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-8648 (Japan); Morita, Takami [Fisheries Research Agency, 2-3-3, Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 220-6115 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident after the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 resulted in elevation of the level of anthropogenic radioactivity in the marine environment in the western North Pacific from atmospheric fallout and direct discharges of highly radioactive liquid waters. Intensive monitoring on iodine-131, cesium-134 (Cs-134) and cesium-137 (Cs-137) in seawater near offshore FNPP, and those in marine organisms in the broad area around Japan were conducted, while the information of radioactive contamination in the North Pacific is still limited due to the limitation of the observational data. In this study, we report the concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in seawater collected from western North Pacific during June 2011 and November 2012. The eastward dispersion of FNPP-derived radioactive cesium in the surface water has been observed with prevention of southward dispersion due to the strong eastward current (Kuroshio Extension; KE) in the North Pacific. Although the concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs-137 were remarkably decreased between 2011 and 2012 at 145 deg. E and 155 deg. E, they were almost comparable between these two years at 175 deg. E. The inventories of Cs-137 between 0-500 m around KE at 147 deg. E were ranged from 3800 to 11000 Bq/m{sup 2} in October 2011, and from 1000 to 2400 Bq/m{sup 2} in November 2012. Surface water had the highest concentration of radioactive Cs at northern part of KE, subsurface peak of radioactive Cs were observed at KE and south of KE in both years. Furthermore, the southward dispersion of FNPP-derived radioactive Cs in the subsurface waters were also observed south of Japan Islands. We found the FNPP-derived Cs-134 (1.8-6.8 mBq/kg) at southernmost 18 deg. N, 135 deg. deg. E in September 2012. The potential density at the subsurface peaks of Cs-134 and increase of water column inventories of Cs-137 after the winter season of 2011-2012, suggested that the main water mass

  4. Observation of dispersive shock waves developing from initial depressions in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo, S.; Klein, M.; Clauss, G. F.; Onorato, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate surface gravity waves in a shallow water tank, in the limit of long wavelengths. We report the observation of non-stationary dispersive shock waves rapidly expanding over a 90 m flume. They are excited by means of a wave maker that allows us to launch a controlled smooth (single well) depression with respect to the unperturbed surface of the still water, a case that contains no solitons. The dynamics of the shock waves are observed at different levels of nonlinearity equivalent to a different relative smallness of the dispersive effect. The observed undulatory behavior is found to be in good agreement with the dynamics described in terms of a Korteweg-de Vries equation with evolution in space, though in the most nonlinear cases the description turns out to be improved over the quasi linear trailing edge of the shock by modeling the evolution in terms of the integro-differential (nonlocal) Whitham equation.

  5. Pre-concentration of uranium from water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Nemch, Tabandeh Karimi [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for the determination of uranium in water samples prior to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as complexing agent. The effect of various parameters on the extraction step including type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, pH of solution, concentration of PAN, extraction time, sample volume and ionic strength were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor were 0.3 μg L{sup -1} and 194, respectively. Furthermore, the relative standard deviation of the ten replicate was <2.6%. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of uranium in the water samples.

  6. Geohydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in the Red Clay Creek Basin, Chester County, Pennsylvania, and New Castle County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, K.L.; Reif, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The 54-square-mile Red Clay Creek Basin, located in the lower Delaware River Basin, is underlain primarily by metamorphic rocks that range from Precambrian to Lower Paleozoic in age. Ground water flows through secondary openings in fractured crystalline rock and through primary openings below the water table in the overlying saprolite. Secondary porosity and permeability vary with hydrogeologic unit, topographic setting, and depth. Thirty-nine percent of the water-bearing zones are encountered within 100 feet of the land surface, and 79 percent are within 200 feet. The fractured crystalline rock and overlying saprolite act as a single aquifer under unconfined conditions. The water table is a subdued replica of the land surface. Local ground-water flow systems predominate in the basin, and natural ground-water discharge is to streams, comprising 62 to 71 percent of streamflow. Water budgets for 1988-90 for the 45-square-mile effective drainage area above the Woodale, Del., streamflow-measurement station show that annual precipitation ranged from 43.59 to 59.14 inches and averaged 49.81 inches, annual streamflow ranged from 15.35 to 26.33 inches and averaged 20.24 inches, and annual evapotranspiration ranged from 27.87 to 30.43 inches and averaged 28.98 inches. The crystalline rocks of the Red Clay Creek Basin were simulated two-dimensionally as a single aquifer under unconfined conditions. The model was calibrated for short-term steady-state conditions on November 2, 1990. Recharge was 8.32 inches per year. Values of aquifer hydraulic conductivity in hillside topographic settings ranged from 0.07 to 2.60 feet per day. Values of streambed hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0.08 to 26.0 feet per day. Prior to simulations where ground-water development was increased, the calibrated steady-state model was modified to approximate long-term average conditions in the basin. Base flow of 11.98 inches per year and a ground-water evapotranspiration rate of 2.17 inches per

  7. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weigh...

  8. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jelínek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC, the cis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC are expected in the trans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water – bentonite interaction and the swelling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as well as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  9. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petr Jelnek; Stanisaw M.Dobosz; Jaroslav Beo; Katarzyna Major-Gabry

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), thecis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC) are expected in thetrans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water - bentonite interaction and the sweling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as wel as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  10. Engineering of (10-hydroxycamptothecin intercalated layered double hydroxide)@liposome nanocomposites with excellent water dispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Wu, Xiaowen; Mi, Yuwei; Li, Haiping; Hou, Wanguo

    2017-09-01

    A hierarchical nanocomposite of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), a nonionic and lipophilic anticancer drug, intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) encapsulated in liposomes was constructed. HCPT molecules were first incorporated into sodium cholate (Ch) micelles, and the resultant negatively charged HCPT-loaded Ch micelles were then co-assembled with positively charged LDH single-layer nanosheets, forming a HCPT/Ch intercalated LDH (HCPT-Ch-LDH) host-gest nanohybrid. The nanohybrid particles were further coated with liposomes (LSs), gaining a core-shell nanocomposite, denoted as (HCPT-Ch-LDH)@LS. The so-obtained samples were characterized using TEM, SAXS, FT-IR, DLS, and elemental analyses. Special emphasis was placed on the effect of liposome-coating for the HCPT-Ch-LDH on its water dispersity and drug-release. The results showed that the nanocomposite has excellent water dispersity and enhanced drug sustained-release performance in comparison with the HCPT-Ch-LDH, demonstrating that the liposome-coating for drug-LDH nanohybrids is an effective strategy to enhance their water dispersity and sustained-release performances. This work provides an effective strategy for engineering of LDH-based delivery systems for nonionic and lipophilic drugs.

  11. Cellulose gel dispersion: From pure hydrogel suspensions to encapsulated oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napso, Sofia; Rein, Dmitry M; Khalfin, Rafail; Kleinerman, Olga; Cohen, Yachin

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose hydrogel particles were fabricated from molecularly-dissolved cellulose/IL solutions. The characteristics of the formed hydrogels (cellulose content, particles' size and porosity) were determined as a function of cellulose concentration in the precursor solutions. There is a significant change in the hydrogel structure when the initial cellulose solution concentration increases above about 7-9%wt. These changes include increase of the cellulose content in the hydrogel, and decrease in its pore size. The finest cellulose particle dispersions can be obtained using low concentration cellulose/IL solutions (cellulose concentration in dispersion less than 2%wt.) or hydrogels (concentration less than 1%wt.) in a dispersing medium consisting of IL with no more than 20%wt. water. Stable paraffin oil-in-water emulsions are achieved by mixing oil and water with cellulose/IL solutions. The optimal conditions for obtaining the finest particles (about 20μm in diameter) are attained using cellulose solutions of concentration between 0.7 and 4%wt. at temperature of 70°C and oil/cellulose mass ratios between 1 and 1.5.

  12. Non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species in Lithuanian fresh waters, Part 1: Distributions, dispersal and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbačiauskas K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasions are of increasing global concern. They impact on biodiversity and may result in high economic loss. This demands improvement in knowledge of the dynamics of species dispersal with the goal of preventing future invasions, and predicting and reducing undesirable impacts. This study reports on non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species (NIMS which have invaded Lithuanian fresh waters. Fifteen NIMS have been recorded during a 12-year study. They include one cnidarian, two molluscan and twelve crustacean species. The deliberate introduction of peracaridans and crayfish for fishery and aquaculture enhancement has substantially contributed to the current NIMS composition. Invaders of Ponto-Caspian origin are dominant, and the collector-gatherers are the largest group with respect to feeding mode. Current NIMS distributions, the history of their primary invasion and patterns of local dispersal are analysed. The main invasion vectors have been inland shipping and deliberate introductions, while secondary spread proceeded both naturally and by various human mediated vectors. The current distribution of most NIMS may remain constant in the future, whilst further expansion of a few NIMS, which possess good dispersal abilities and are well-adapted to freshwater environments, seems very probable. Using multivariate analysis of data from water bodies with established peracaridan invaders, allowed predictions on which unsurveyed water bodies could contain such invaders. Invasions of new NIMS and diversification of donor areas, pathways and vectors are considered.

  13. Highly water-dispersible silver sulfadiazine decorated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone and its antibacterial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ping; Wu, Longlong [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Li, Binjie, E-mail: lbj821@163.com [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Medical School of Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhao, Yanbao [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Qu, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu 476000 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Highly water-dispersible silver sulfadiazine (SSD) was prepared by liquid phase method with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a surface modification agent. The structure and morphology of the PVP-modified silver sulfadiazine (P-SSD) were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry. The produced particles are ginkgo leaf-like architecture with the sizes of micron-nanometer. Due to hydrophilic PVP decorated on the surface, the P-SSD has excellent dispersion in water over a period of 24 h, which is obviously stable by comparison to that of the commercial silver sulfadiazine (C-SSD). In addition, the P-SSD exhibits good antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). - Highlights: • Polyvinyl pyrrolidone decorated silver sulfadiazine was synthesized via a one-pot protocol. • The produced particles present ginkgo leaf-like architectures with sizes of micro-nanometer. • The resulted silver sulfadiazine has highly dispersible in water over a period of 24 h. • The obtained sliver sulfadiazine exhibits excellent antibacterial activities against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

  14. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  15. Control Effect of 80%Nicosulfuron·Atrazine Water-dispersible Granules on Weeds in Spring Maize Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueqi SHEN; Rende Ql

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the control effect of different concentrations of 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules on weeds in spring maize field. [Method] Maize field was sprayed with 300, 375, 450, 750 g/hm2 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules respectively, with 40 g/L nico-sulfuron suspending concentrate and 38% atrazine suspending concentrate as con-trol agents. Artificial weeding and control (CK) plots were set. [Result] Fresh weight control efficiency of 375-750 g/hm2 80% nicosulfuron ·atrazine water-dispersible granules was significantly higher than that of 40 g/L nicosulfuron suspending con-centrate and 38% atrazine suspending concentrate; no obvious phytotoxicity symp-toms were observed after application of 300-450 g/hm2 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules; 750 g/hm2 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules posed certain impact on the growth of maize seedlings. Compared with control plots, various doses of 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules signifi-cantly improved the yield of maize. [Conclusion] ln the present study, 375-450 g/hm2 80% nicosulfuron·atrazine water-dispersible granules exhibited high control effect on weeds in maize field and were safe for the growth of maize seedlings.

  16. Structure, dynamics, and function of the hammerhead ribozyme in bulk water and at a clay mineral surface from replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B; Wright, David W; Suter, James L; Coveney, Peter V

    2015-03-01

    Compared with proteins, the relationship between structure, dynamics, and function of RNA enzymes (known as ribozymes) is far less well understood, despite the fact that ribozymes are found in many organisms and are often conceived as "molecular fossils" of the first self-replicating molecules to have arisen on Earth. To investigate how ribozymal function is governed by structure and dynamics, we study the full hammerhead ribozyme in bulk water and in an aqueous clay mineral environment by computer simulation using replica-exchange molecular dynamics. Through extensive sampling of the major conformational states of the hammerhead ribozyme, we are able to show that the hammerhead manifests a free-energy landscape reminiscent of that which is well known in proteins, exhibiting a "funnel" topology that guides the ribozyme into its globally most stable conformation. The active-site geometry is found to be closely correlated to the tertiary structure of the ribozyme, thereby reconciling conflicts between previously proposed mechanisms for the self-scission of the hammerhead. The conformational analysis also accounts for the differences reported experimentally in the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme, which is reduced when interacting with clay minerals as compared with bulk water.

  17. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  18. Study on some rheological parameters of water and clay basis drilling fluids additivated with industrial sodium silicate; Estudo de alguns parametros reologicos de fluidos de perfuracao a base de agua e argila aditivados com silicato de sodio industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Luciana Viana [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Engenharia de Processos]. E-mail: lucianaa@labdes.ufpb.br; Viana, Josiane Dantas; Farias, Kassie Vieira [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais]. E-mail: josianedantas@bol.com.br; kassievieira@bol.com.br; Franca, Kepler Borges; Lira, Helio de Lucena; Ferreira, Heber Carlos [Universidade Federal, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Eng. Quimica]. E-mail: kepler@labdes.ufpb.br; helio@dema.ufpb.br; heber@dema.ufpb.br

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study some rheological parameters of water based oil well drilling fluids and bentonite clay from Boa Vista, PB, treated with industrial sodium silicate. It were selected there samples of natural polycationic bentonite clays and four industrial sodium bentonite clays. The natural clays were treated with concentrated Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. The drilling fluids were prepared with concentration of 4.86% w/w, according to PETROBRAS norms, and additivated with four different concentration of industrial sodium silicate. After 24 hours of cure, it were measured apparent viscosity (AV) and plastic viscosity (PV) by using a Fann 35A viscosimeter and water loss (WL) by using a Fann filter press. The results showed a change in the rheology of the drilling fluids. The drilling fluids prepared with industrialized clays showed a decrease in AV and an increase in WL. For the drilling fluids prepared with natural clays treated with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, it was observed a decrease in AV and WL and an increase in PV. Also, it was observed a change in the drilling fluids state from flocculated-gel to a partially flocculated. (author)

  19. Soil-Water and Deformation Characteristics of Unsaturated Shanghai Soft Clays%非饱和上海软土的土-水和变形特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振新; 孙德安

    2012-01-01

    使用压力板法和滤纸法测量非饱和上海软土的吸力,得到第②,③,④层上海原状土和第②,③层上海重塑土的土·水特征曲线,以及土体脱水干燥过程中吸力和孔隙比之间的关系.土-水特性试验结果表明:第②,③,④层上海原状土和第②,③层上海重塑土的进气值分别为150 ~180,220~250,650 ~ 800,260 ~310,550 ~ 600 kPa.干燥收缩试验结果表明:上海黏土的收缩过程可分为3个阶段,即弹性阶段、弹塑性阶段和缩限阶段.当基质吸力较小时,收缩变形较小,土体处于弹性阶段;当基质吸力增大到一定值时,收缩变形明显,土体处于弹塑性阶段;当土体变形基本不随基质吸力变化时,土体处于缩限阶段.%Using the methods of pressure plate and filter paper to measure soil suction, the soil-water characteristic curves and shrinkage deformation curves of undisturbed Shanghai soft clays (layers (2), (3) and (4)) and reconstituted Shanghai soft clays (layers (2) and (3)) are obtained from drying tests. It is found from the soil-water characteristic tests that the air-entering values of undisturbed Shanghai soft clays (layers (2),(3) and (4)) and reconstituted Shanghai soft clays (layers (2) and (3)) are 150-180, 220 ~ 250, 650 -800, 260 -310, and 550 -600 kPa, respectively. The process of soil shrinkage can be divided into three stages: elastic stage, elastoplastic stage and stage of shrinkage limit. When the imposed matric suction is small, the soil is at the elastic stage. When the large suction is applied, the shrinkage deformation becomes noticeable, and the soil is at the elastoplastic stage. At the stage of shrinkage limit, almost no deformation occurs during the increase of matric suction.

  20. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  1. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  2. Modifying bentonite with Al-fe from concentrated clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Moreno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports modifying a Colombian bentonite with an Al-Fe mixture from 10% and 50% p/p clay suspensions as well as dry materal, using water or acetone as dispersal phase. The solids thus obtained were characterised using atomic abdorption, residual cationic interchange ability and x-ray diffraction. Catalytic activity was evaluated regarding phenol oxidation reaction with hydrogen peroxide in diluted aqueous medium. The results indicated that solids prepared in concentraded suspension presented structural, textural and catalytic propierties comparable with modified solids in diluted suspension (2% weight.

  3. Clay at Nili Fossae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across. CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE. In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image. The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image at the upper right

  4. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization of vinyl benzyl triammonium chloride in the presence of advanced functionalized clay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raluca Ianchis; Dan Donescu; Ludmila Otilia Cinteza; Violeta Purcar; Cristina Lavinia Nistor; Critian Petcu; Cristian Andi Nicolae; Raluca Gabor; Silviu Preda

    2014-05-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites were synthesized by solution polymerization method using advanced functionalized clay and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as monomer. First stage consisted in the silylation of a commercial organo-modified clay-Cl 20A using alkoxysilanes with different chain lengths. In the second step, the synthesis and characterization of polymer-nanocomposites were followed. To evaluate the clay functionalization process as well as the final polymer-clay products, thermogravimetric,X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and three test liquid contact angles analyses were used. The loss of ammonium ions from commercial clay, the grafting degree, the lengths and the nature of alkyl chain influence the dispersion of the advanced modified clay into the polymer solution and, furthermore, the properties of the final polymer-clay nanocomposite film.

  5. Application of iron-rich natural clays in Camlica, Turkey for boron sorption from water and its determination by fluorimetric-azomethine-H method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, Serap [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Seki, Yoldas [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Yurdakoc, Mueruevvet [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)]. E-mail: m.yurdakoc@deu.edu.tr; Merdivan, Melek [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2007-07-19

    In this study, iron-rich natural Camlica Bentonites, CB1 and CB2, were used for the sorption of boron in water samples. Boron was determined by newly progressed fluorimetric azomethine-H method. The optimum conditions found using factorial designs are pH 10, 45 deg. C, 0.250 g of clay and 20 mL of sample volume. It was found that 180 min is enough time for the equilibrium state to be reached in boron adsorption. At these conditions, boron sorption percentage was 80% for CB1 and 30% for CB2. The adsorption isotherms are well described by linear Freundlich model. Various geothermal waters in our country were also studied for boron sorption.

  6. The role of wind in the dispersal of floating seeds in slow-flowing or stagnant water bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarneel, Judith M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836923; Beltman, Boudewijn|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069582548; Buijze, Anneke; Groen, Roderick; Soons, Merel B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255636792

    QuestionWhat is the role of wind in the dispersal of waterborne seeds in slow-flowing and stagnant water bodies at different temporal and spatial scales? (i) Is there a direct effect of wind on seed dispersal speed and distance? (ii) Are prevailing wind conditions reflected in the seed deposition

  7. Response of the bacterial community in oil-contaminated marine water to the addition of chemical and biological dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Almeida Couto, Camila Rattes; Jurelevicius, Diogo de Azevedo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Seldin, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The use of dispersants in different stages of the oil production chain and for the remediation of water and soil is a well established practice. However, the choice for a chemical or biological dispersant is still a controversial subject. Chemical surfactants that persist long in the environment may

  8. Synthesis, characterization and studies on magneto-viscous properties of magnetite dispersed water based nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Gayatri [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal (India); Kumar Das, Prasanta, E-mail: pkd@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal (India); Manna, Indranil [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal (India); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic nanofluids, commonly known as ferrofluids, containing surfactant coated magnetite nanoparticles (having mean size ∼11 nm) uniformly dispersed in water are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The rheological properties of magnetic nanofluid at different concentrations of nanoparticle loading have been investigated by varying different parameters including the magnetic field strength. Shear thinning is observed in the non-Newtonian magnetic nanofluids under the application of magnetic field. The observed increase in yield stress (calculated by fitting the Herschel and Bulkley model) with the applied magnetic field and concentration of dispersed nanoparticles confirm the formation of large aggregates that restrict or prohibit the flow characteristics of the otherwise Newtonian magnetic nanofluid. The hysteresis observed during the application and withdrawal of magnetic field suggests that the chain or column like structures fail to relax within the allowed measurement time interval. - Highlights: • Magnetite dispersed water nanofluids are prepared by chemical precipitation method. • Effect of shear and magnetic field on the viscosity of nanofluids are investigated. • Applied field enhances the viscosity by several times and causes shear thinning. • Chain-like or columnar aggregates of nanoparticles formed increases the viscosity.

  9. Phase separation kinetics in amorphous solid dispersions upon exposure to water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel fluorescence technique employing environment-sensitive fluorescent probes to study phase separation kinetics in hydrated matrices of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) following storage at high humidity and during dissolution. The initial miscibility of the ASDs was confirmed using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fluorescence spectroscopy, as an independent primary technique, was used together with conventional confirmatory techniques including DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence microscopy, and IR spectroscopy to study phase separation phenomena. By monitoring the emission characteristics of the environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, it was possible to successfully monitor amorphous-amorphous phase separation (AAPS) as a function of time in probucol-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and ritonavir-PVP ASDs after exposure to water. In contrast, a ritonavir-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) ASD, did not show AAPS and was used as a control to demonstrate the capability of the newly developed fluorescence method to differentiate systems that showed no phase separation following exposure to water versus those that did. The results from the fluorescence studies were in good agreement with results obtained using various other complementary techniques. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy can be utilized as a fast and efficient tool to detect and monitor the kinetics of phase transformations in amorphous solid dispersions during hydration and will help provide mechanistic insight into the stability and dissolution behavior of amorphous solid dispersions.

  10. Phenology, fruit production and seed dispersal of Astrocaryum jauari (Arecaceae) in Amazonian black water floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Maria Teresa F; Parolin, Pia; Junk, Wolfgang J

    2006-12-01

    Astrocaryum jauari Mart. (Arecaceae) is one of the commonest palm species occurring in nutritionally poor Amazonian black water floodplains. It is an emergent or subcanopy tree that grows on river banks and islands, with a wide distribution along the entire flooding gradient, tolerating flood durations between 30 and 340 days. The species is important for fish nutrition in the floodplains, and is also used for hearts of palm. In the present study, the auto-ecology of A. jauari was analysed over a period of two years in the Anavilhanas Archipelago, Rio Negro, Brazil, with a focus on phenology, fruit production, and seed dispersal. Fruit fall is annual and synchronized with high water levels, with a production of 1.6 ton of fruit ha(-1). The fruits are eaten by at least 16 species of fish which either gnaw the pulp, fragment the seed, or ingest the entire fruit, thus acting as dispersal agents. Besides ichthyocory, barochory (with subsequent vegetative propagation) is an important dispersal mode, enhancing the occurrence of large masses of individuals in the Anavilhanas islands and in the region of maximum palm heart extraction near Barcelos.

  11. Just add water: reproducible singly dispersed silver nanoparticle suspensions on-demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCuspie, Robert I.; Allen, Andrew J.; Martin, Matthew N.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2013-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of interest due to their antimicrobial attributes, which are derived from their inherent redox instability and subsequent release of silver ions. At the same time, this instability is a substantial challenge for achieving stable long-term storage for on-demand use of AgNPs. In this study, we describe and validate a "just add water" approach for achieving suspensions of principally singly dispersed AgNPs. By lyophilizing (freeze drying) the formulated AgNPs into a solid powder, or cake, water is removed thereby eliminating solution-based chemical changes. Storing under inert gas further reduces surface reactions such as oxidation. An example of how to optimize a lyophilization formulation is presented, as well as example formulations for three AgNP core sizes. This "just add water" approach enables ease of use for the researcher desiring on-demand singly dispersed AgNP suspensions from a single master batch. Implementation of this methodology will enable studies to be performed over long periods of time and across different laboratories using particles that are identical chemically and physically and available on-demand. In addition, the approach of freeze drying and on-demand reconstitution by adding water has enabled the development of AgNP reference materials with the required shelf-life stability, one of the principal objectives of this research.

  12. Just add water: reproducible singly dispersed silver nanoparticle suspensions on-demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCuspie, Robert I., E-mail: robert.maccuspie@nist.gov; Allen, Andrew J.; Martin, Matthew N.; Hackley, Vincent A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Materials Measurement Science Division (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of interest due to their antimicrobial attributes, which are derived from their inherent redox instability and subsequent release of silver ions. At the same time, this instability is a substantial challenge for achieving stable long-term storage for on-demand use of AgNPs. In this study, we describe and validate a 'just add water' approach for achieving suspensions of principally singly dispersed AgNPs. By lyophilizing (freeze drying) the formulated AgNPs into a solid powder, or cake, water is removed thereby eliminating solution-based chemical changes. Storing under inert gas further reduces surface reactions such as oxidation. An example of how to optimize a lyophilization formulation is presented, as well as example formulations for three AgNP core sizes. This 'just add water' approach enables ease of use for the researcher desiring on-demand singly dispersed AgNP suspensions from a single master batch. Implementation of this methodology will enable studies to be performed over long periods of time and across different laboratories using particles that are identical chemically and physically and available on-demand. In addition, the approach of freeze drying and on-demand reconstitution by adding water has enabled the development of AgNP reference materials with the required shelf-life stability, one of the principal objectives of this research.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and studies on magneto-viscous properties of magnetite dispersed water based nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gayatri; Kumar Das, Prasanta; Manna, Indranil

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanofluids, commonly known as ferrofluids, containing surfactant coated magnetite nanoparticles (having mean size ∼11 nm) uniformly dispersed in water are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The rheological properties of magnetic nanofluid at different concentrations of nanoparticle loading have been investigated by varying different parameters including the magnetic field strength. Shear thinning is observed in the non-Newtonian magnetic nanofluids under the application of magnetic field. The observed increase in yield stress (calculated by fitting the Herschel and Bulkley model) with the applied magnetic field and concentration of dispersed nanoparticles confirm the formation of large aggregates that restrict or prohibit the flow characteristics of the otherwise Newtonian magnetic nanofluid. The hysteresis observed during the application and withdrawal of magnetic field suggests that the chain or column like structures fail to relax within the allowed measurement time interval.

  14. Fabricating Water Dispersible Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications through Ligand Exchange and Direct Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Lam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stable superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, which can be easily dispersed in an aqueous medium and exhibit high magnetic relaxivities, are ideal candidates for biomedical applications including contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a versatile methodology to render water dispersibility to SPIONs using tetraethylene glycol (TEG-based phosphonate ligands, which are easily introduced onto SPIONs by either a ligand exchange process of surface-anchored oleic-acid (OA molecules or via direct conjugation. Both protocols confer good colloidal stability to SPIONs at different NaCl concentrations. A detailed characterization of functionalized SPIONs suggests that the ligand exchange method leads to nanoparticles with better magnetic properties but higher toxicity and cell death, than the direct conjugation methodology.

  15. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2011-10-01

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be prepared from clays by suitably adjusting their acidity and surface area by acid activation. In the present work, preparation, characterization and performance of Pt (II) clays, Cu (II) clays, acid clay, and sol–gel hybrids of Cu (II) clays as solid catalysts in a test Friedel–Craft alkylation reaction of benzyl chloride with toluene using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are reported. Product formation has been analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. The main objective of this work is to show how clay as a solid catalyst affects reaction rates and activation energies. Acidity and dispersion of solid catalysts are twomain factors which govern a catalysis reaction. Kinetic parameter analysis and XRD studies confirm that acid Pt (II) clay and Pt (II) clay dispersed by natural dispersants aremore effective catalysts. In contrast to the reactions using AlCl3, the experimental conditions are non-polluting and the final work up does not require any aqueous treatment.

  16. Dispersion and toxicity of selected manufactured nanomaterials in natural river water samples: effects of water chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Youn, Sejin; Hovsepyan, Anna; Llaneza, Veronica L; Wang, Yu; Bitton, Gabriel; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J

    2009-05-01

    Experimental conditions that mimic likely scenarios of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) introduction to aquatic systems were used to assessthe effect of nanoparticle dispersion/solubility and water chemical composition on MN-toxicity. Aqueous suspensions of fullerenes (C60), nanosilver (nAg), and nanocopper (nCu) were prepared in both deionized water and filtered (0.45 microm) natural river water samples collected from the Suwannee River basin, to emphasize differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and solution ionic strengths (I). Two toxicity tests, the Ceriodaphnia dubia and MetPLATE bioassays were used. Results obtained from exposure studies show that water chemistry affects the suspension/solubility of MNs as well as the particle size distribution, resulting in a wide range of biological responses depending on the type of toxicity test used. Under experimental conditions used in this study, C60 exhibited no toxicity even when suspended concentrations exceeded 3 mg L(-1). MetPLATE results showed that the toxicity of aqueous suspensions of nCu tends to increase with increasing DOC concentrations, while increasing I reduces nCu toxicity. The use of the aquatic invertebrate C. dubia on the other hand showed a tendency for decreased mortality with increasing DOC and I. MetPLATE results for nAg showed decreasing trends in toxicity with increasing DOC concentrations and I. However, C. dubia exhibited contrasting biological responses, in that increasing DOC concentrations reduced toxicity, while the latter increased with increasing I. Overall, our results show that laboratory experiments that use DI-water and drastic MN-suspension methods may not be realistic as MN-dispersion and suspension in natural waters vary significantly with water chemistry and the reactivity of MNs.

  17. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weight ratio of 1:1 of indomethacin and lactose were ground using a high speed vibrating ball mill. Particle size was determined by electron microscopy, the reduction of crystallinity was determined by calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy was used to find evidence of any interactions between the drug and the carrier and the determination of apparent solubility allowed for the corroboration of changes in solubility. Before grinding, scanning electron microscopy showed the drug and lactose to have an average particle size of around 50 and 30 μm, respectively. After high speed grinding, indomethacin and the mixture had a reduced average particle size of around 5 and 2 μm, respectively, showing a morphological change. The ground mixture produced a solid dispersion that had a loss of crystallinity that reached 81% after 30 min of grinding while the drug solubility of indomethacin within the solid dispersion increased by 2.76 fold as compared to the pure drug. Drug activation due to hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group of the drug and the hydroxyl group of lactose as well as the decrease in crystallinity of the solid dispersion and the reduction of the particle size led to a better water solubility of indomethacin. PMID:23798775

  18. Dielectric relaxation behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock: A hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Norman; Bore, Thierry; Robinet, Jean-Charles; Coelho, Daniel; Taillade, Frederic; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Water content is a key parameter to monitor in nuclear waste repositories such as the planed underground repository in Bure, France, in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay formation. High-frequency electromagnetic (HF-EM) measurement techniques, i.e., time or frequency domain reflectometry, offer useful tools for quantitative estimation of water content in porous media. However, despite the efficiency of HF-EM methods, the relationship between water content and dielectric material properties needs to be characterized. Moreover, the high amount of swelling clay in the COx clay leads to dielectric relaxation effects which induce strong dispersion coupled with high absorption of EM waves. Against this background, the dielectric relaxation behavior of the clay rock was studied at frequencies from 1 MHz to 10 GHz with network analyzer technique in combination with coaxial transmission line cells. For this purpose, undisturbed and disturbed clay rock samples were conditioned to achieve a water saturation range from 0.16 to nearly saturation. The relaxation behavior was quantified based on a generalized fractional relaxation model under consideration of an apparent direct current conductivity assuming three relaxation processes: a high-frequency water process and two interface processes which are related to interactions between the aqueous pore solution and mineral particles (adsorbed/hydrated water relaxation, counter ion relaxation and Maxwell-Wagner effects). The frequency-dependent HF-EM properties were further modeled based on a novel hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach developed for soils. The results show the potential of HF-EM techniques for quantitative monitoring of the hydraulic state in underground repositories in clay formations.

  19. Modified clay sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a clay-based sorbent. It comprises a clay having an external surface and lamellar layers; and cationic surfactant ions having a hydrocarbon portion and a cationic head portion, the cationic surfactant ions being irreversibly bound to the external surface by the hydrocarbon portion. This patent also describes cetylpyridinium-aluminum hydroxy-montmorillonite; the clay-based sorbent wherein the clay is a non-expandable clay; and the clay-based sorbent wherein the cationic surfactant ions are selected from the group consisting of ionized cetylpyridinium chloride and cetylakonium chloride.

  20. "Squalenoylcurcumin" nanoassemblies as water-dispersible drug candidates with antileishmanial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh-Ali, Zakaria; Caron, Joachim; Cojean, Sandrine; Bories, Christian; Couvreur, Patrick; Loiseau, Philippe M; Desmaële, Didier; Poupon, Erwan; Champy, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound, showed antiparasitic potential, including trypanocidal and leishmanicidal activity, in several in vitro and in vivo models. The molecule is well tolerated in humans. However, it is insoluble in water and displays poor oral bioavailability as a result of low absorption. New derivatives of curcumin were prepared by esterification of one or two of its phenolic groups with 1,1',2-tris-norsqualenic acid. These "squalenoylcurcumins" were formulated as water-dispersible nanoassemblies of homogeneous size, and they proved to be stable. Squalenoylcurcumins were inactive against Trypanosoma brucei brucei trypomastigotes, even as nanoassemblies, in contrast with curcumin. However, against Leishmania donovani promastigotes, the activities of the squalenoylcurcumins and their nanoassemblies were enhanced relative to that of curcumin. In L. donovani axenic and intramacrophagic amastigotes, they showed activity in the range of miltefosine, with good selectivity indexes. In regard to their dispersibility in water and to the safety of curcumin, these nanoassemblies are promising candidates for preclinical study toward the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis.

  1. Mechanical balance laws for fully nonlinear and weakly dispersive water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kalisch, Henrik; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The Serre-Green-Naghdi system is a coupled, fully nonlinear system of dispersive evolution equations which approximates the full water wave problem. The system is an extension of the well known shallow-water system to the situation where the waves are long, but not so long that dispersive effects can be neglected. In the current work, the focus is on deriving mass, momentum and energy densities and fluxes associated with the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. These quantities arise from imposing balance equations of the same asymptotic order as the evolution equations. In the case of an even bed, the conservation equations are satisfied exactly by the solutions of the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. The case of variable bathymetry is more complicated, with mass and momentum conservation satisfied exactly, and energy conservation satisfied only in a global sense. In all cases, the quantities found here reduce correctly to the corresponding counterparts in both the Boussinesq and the shallow-water scaling. One consequence o...

  2. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-09-01

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL‑1, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene.

  3. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL−1, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene. PMID:27666869

  4. The reactivity of well-dispersed zerovalent iron nanoparticles toward pentachlorophenol in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Chih-ping; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2015-04-01

    In order to prevent the aggregation of nanoparticles (NPs), surface modification or the addition of a stabilizer are used for stabilization. However, the real reactivity of NPs is still unclear because of the surface coating. For different physical dispersion methods, the particle stabilization for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles and their reactivity are studied. The particle properties of different preparations and their reactivity toward one polychlorinated aromatic compound, pentachlorophenol (PCP), with different electrolytes are also evaluated. Ultrasonication (US) with magnetic stirring disperses NZVI and Pd/Fe NPs well in water and does not affect the surface redox property a lot under the operating conditions in this study. The well-suspended NZVI cannot dechlorinate PCP but adsorption removal is observed. Compared to shaking, which gives limited removal of PCP (about 43%), Pd/Fe NPs remove 81% and 93% of PCP from water in the US and the US/stirring systems, respectively, which demonstrates that a greater surface area is exposed because of effective dispersion of Pd/Fe NPs. As the Pd doping increases, the dechlorination kinetics of PCP is improved, which shows that a catalyst is needed. With US/stirring, chloride ions do not significantly affect the removal kinetics of PCP, but the removal efficiency increases in the presence of nitrate ions because PCP anions were adsorbed and coagulated by the greater amount of iron (hydro)oxides that are generated from the reduction of nitrate on Pd/Fe. However, bicarbonate ions significantly block the adsorption and reaction sites on the Pd/Fe NP surface with US/stirring. The US/stirring method can be used to evaluate the actual activity of NPs near the nanoscale. The use of Pd/Fe NPs with US/stirring removes PCP from water effectively, even in the presence of common anions expect a high concentration of bicarbonate.

  5. Measurement and conceptual modelling of herbicide transport to field drains in a heavy clay soil with implications for catchment-scale water quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tediosi, A; Whelan, M J; Rushton, K R; Thompson, T R E; Gandolfi, C; Pullan, S P

    2012-11-01

    Propyzamide and carbetamide are essential for blackgrass control in oilseed rape production. However, both of these compounds can contaminate surface waters and pose compliance problems for water utilities. The transport of propyzamide and carbetamide to an instrumented field drain in a small clay headwater tributary of the Upper Cherwell catchment was monitored over a winter season. Despite having very different sorption and dissipation properties, both herbicides were transported rapidly to the drain outlet in the first storm event after application, although carbetamide was leached more readily than propyzamide. A simple conceptual model was constructed to represent solute displacement from mobile pore water and preferential flow to drains. The model was able to reproduce the timing and magnitude of herbicide losses well, lending support to its conceptual basis. Measured losses in drainflow in the month following application were 1.1 and 8.1%, respectively, for propyzamide and carbetamide. Differences were due to a combination of differences in herbicide mobility and due to the fact that the monitoring period for carbetamide was hydrologically more active. For both compounds, losses were greater than those typically reported elsewhere for other herbicides. The data suggest that drainflow is the dominant pathway for the transfer of these herbicides to the catchment outlet, where water is abstracted for municipal supply. This imposes considerable constraints on the management options available to reduce surface water concentrations of herbicides in this catchment.

  6. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  7. Quantifying Microstegium vimineum seed movement by non-riparian water dispersal using an ultraviolet-marking based recapture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekiela, Daniel R; Barney, Jacob N

    2013-01-01

    Microstegium vimineum is a shade tolerant annual C4 invasive grass in the Eastern US, which has been shown to negatively impact species diversity and succession in hardwood forests. To date, empirical studies have shown that population expansion is limited to dispersal. However, this likely does not fully account for all mechanisms of population-scale dispersal as we observe greater rates of population expansion. Though water, both riparian and non-riparian water (i.e., ephemeral overland flow), have been speculated mechanisms for M. vimineum dispersal, few studies have empirically tested this hypothesis. We designed an experiment along the slopes of a Southwest Virginia hardwood forest to test the role of non-riparian water on local seed dispersal. We developed a seed marking technique by coating each seed with an ultraviolet (UV) powder that did not affect buoyancy to aid in situ seed recapture. Additionally, a new image analysis protocol was developed to automate seed identification from UV photos. Total seed mobility (summation of individual seed movement within each transect) was positively correlated with precipitation. Over a period of one month with 52.32 mm of precipitation, the maximum dispersal distance of any single recaptured seed was 2.4 m, and the average distance of dispersed seed was 0.21±0.04 m. This is the first quantitative evidence of non-riparian water dispersal in a forest understory, which accounts for an additional pathway of population expansion.

  8. Water-stable all-biodegradable microparticles in nanofibers by electrospinning of aqueous dispersions for biotechnical plant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Priyanka; Bubel, Kathrin; Agarwal, Seema; Greiner, Andreas

    2012-02-13

    Pheromone eluting oligolactide (OLA) microcapsules immobilized in electrospun biodegradable polyester nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning of aqueous dispersions of the microcapsules. OLA was prepared by conventional melt polycondensation of lactic acid. Following the protocol of the solvent displacement method, OLA was dissolved in acetone and mixed with Brij S20 and the pheromone of the European grape vine moth, Lobesia Botrana, (E,Z)-7,9-dodecadien-l-yl acetate (DA). Up to 32 wt % of this mixture could be dispersed in water with colloidal stability of several weeks without any sedimentation. Without DA as well as OLA, no stable dispersions of OLA in water were obtained. Replacement of DA by classical hydrophobes typically used for miniemulsions did not yield stable dispersions, but the addition of octyl acetate, which shows structural similarity to DA, yielded stable dispersions in water up to 10 wt %. Dispersions of OLA/DA were successfully electrospun in combination with an aqueous dispersion of a biodegradable block copolyester resulting in water-stable nanofibers containing OLA/DA microcapsules. Release of DA from microcapsules and fibers was retarded in comparison with non-encapsulated DA, as shown by model studies.

  9. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of highly stable dispersions of water-soluble copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jing; Wu, Xue-dong; Xue, Qun-ji

    2013-01-15

    Water-soluble and highly stable dispersions of copper nanoparticles were obtained using a biomolecule-assisted synthetic method. Dopamine was utilized as both reducing and capping agent in aqueous medium. The successful formation of DA-stabilized copper particles was demonstrated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Zeta potential measurement, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The mechanism of dopamine on the effective reduction and excellent stability of copper nanoparticles was also discussed. This facile biomolecule-assisted technique may provide a useful tool to synthesize other nanoparticles that have potential application in biotechnology.

  10. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Guo, Xianglong; Shen, Zhao; Zhang, Lefu

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer.

  11. Amorphous solid dispersions and nano-crystal technologies for poorly water-soluble drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brough, Chris; Williams, R O

    2013-08-30

    Poor water-solubility is a common characteristic of drug candidates in pharmaceutical development pipelines today. Various processes have been developed to increase the solubility, dissolution rate and bioavailability of these active ingredients belonging to BCS II and IV classifications. Over the last decade, nano-crystal delivery forms and amorphous solid dispersions have become well established in commercially available products and industry literature. This article is a comparative analysis of these two methodologies primarily for orally delivered medicaments. The thermodynamic and kinetic theories relative to these technologies are presented along with marketed product evaluations and a survey of commercial relevant scientific literature.

  12. Water-dispersible ascorbic-acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, V.; Jayaprabha, K. N.; Joy, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of size ~5 nm surface functionalized with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) form a stable dispersion in water with a hydrodynamic size of ~30 nm. The anti-oxidant property of ascorbic acid is retained after capping, as evidenced from the capability of converting methylene blue to its reduced leuco form. NMR relaxivity studies show that the ascorbic-acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide aqueous nanofluid is suitable as a contrast enhancement agent for MRI applications, coupled with the excellent biocompatibility and medicinal values of ascorbic acid.

  13. Plasma treatment of multiwall carbon nanotubes for dispersion improvement in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changlun; Ogino, Akihisa; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2010-03-01

    Microwave excited Ar/H2O surface-wave plasma was used to treat multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to modify their surface characteristics and thus improve their dispersion capability in water. Changes in the atom composition and structure properties of MWCNTs were analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and the surface morphology of MWCNTs was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that Ar/H2O plasma treatment greatly enhanced the content of oxygen, and modified surface microstructure properties. The integrity of nanotube patterns, however, was not damaged.

  14. Periodic folded waves for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water wave equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wen-Hua

    2009-01-01

    A general solution,including three arbitrary functions,is obtained for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave (MDWW) equation by means of the WTC truncation method.Introducing proper multiple valued functions and Jacobi elliptic functions in the seed solution,special types of periodic folded waves are derived.In the long wave limit these periodic folded wave patterns may degenerate into single localized folded solitary wave excitations.The interactions of the periodic folded waves and the degenerated single folded solitary waves axe investigated graphically and found to be completely elastic.

  15. Energy-Saving Vibration Impulse Coal Degradation at Finely Dispersed Coal-Water Slurry Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiseev V.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental research results of processes of finely dispersed coal-water slurry preparation for further generation of energetic gas in direct flow and vortex gas generator plants have been presented. It has been stated that frequency parameters of parabolic vibration impulse mill influence degradation degree. Pressure influence on coal parameters in grinding cavity has been proven. Experimental researches have proven efficiency of vibration impulse mill with unbalanced mass vibrator generator development. Conditions of development on intergranular walls of coal cracks have been defined.

  16. Study of smectite clays of the city Pedra Lavrada - PB for use in water-based drilling fluids; Estudo das argilas esmectiticas do municipio de Pedra Lavrada-PB para uso em fluidos de perfuracao base agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, I.A. da; Costa, J.M.R.; Cardoso, M.A.F.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C., E-mail: isabelle_albuquerquecg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Ferreira, H.S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (DEMAT/CT/UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Paraiba has large reserves of bentonite clays, with the largest deposits in Boa Vista, PB. Recently new deposits were discovered in the cities of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada-PB, creating great expectations for further expansion of reserves for industrial production. The aim of this work is the study of smectite clays from the city of Pedra Lavrada, PB for use in drilling fluids water based. The characterization was made by the diffraction of laser (AG), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), chemical composition by X-ray fluorescence (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), exchange capacity of cations (ECC) and surface area (SA). The results obtained so far showed that the samples presented at its mineral composition smectite, kaolinite and quartz. In relation to rheological properties showed that the bentonite clay sample Dark presents promising features for use in water based drilling fluids. (author)

  17. Anticorrosive performance of waterborne epoxy coatings containing water-dispersible hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mingjun; Ren, Siming; Chen, Jia; Liu, Shuan; Zhang, Guangan; Zhao, Haichao; Wang, Liping; Xue, Qunji

    2017-03-01

    Homogenous dispersion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets in solvents or in the polymer matrix is crucial to initiate their many applications. Here, homogeneous dispersion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in epoxy matrix was achieved with a water-soluble carboxylated aniline trimer derivative (CAT-) as a dispersant, which was attributed to the strong π-π interaction between h-BN and CAT-, as proved by Raman and UV-vis spectra. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed a random dispersion of h-BN nanosheets in the waterborne epoxy coatings. The deterioration process of water-borne epoxy coating with and without h-BN nanosheets during the long-term immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution was investigated by electrochemical measurements and water absorption test. Results implied that the introduction of well dispersed h-BN nanosheets into waterborne epoxy system remarkably improved the corrosion protection performance to substrate. Moreover, 1 wt% BN/EP composite coated substrate exhibited higher impedance modulus (1.3 × 106 Ω cm2) and lower water absorption (4%) than those of pure waterborne epoxy coating coated electrode after long-term immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution, demonstrating its superior anticorrosive performance. This enhanced anticorrosive performance was mainly ascribed to the improved water barrier property of epoxy coating via incorporating homogeneously dispersed h-BN nanosheets.

  18. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock®) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Bryan M; Lürling, Miquel; Yasseri, Said; Castro-Castellon, Ana T; Gibbs, Max; Meis, Sebastian; McDonald, Claire; McIntosh, John; Sleep, Darren; Van Oosterhout, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Phoslock(®) is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentrations associated with the use of Phoslock(®) across 16 case study lakes. Impact-recovery trajectories associated with total lanthanum (TLa) and filterable La (FLa) concentrations in surface and bottom waters were quantified over a period of up to 60 months following Phoslock(®) application. Both surface and bottom water TLa and FLa concentrations were waters between 0.026 mg L(-1)-2.30 mg L(-1) and 0.002 mg L(-1) to 0.14 mg L(-1), respectively. Results of generalised additive modelling indicated that recovery trajectories for TLa and FLa in surface and bottom waters in lakes were represented by 2nd order decay relationships, with time, and that recovery reached an end-point between 3 and 12 months post-application. Recovery in bottom water was slower (11-12 months) than surface waters (3-8 months), most probably as a result of variation in physicochemical conditions of the receiving waters and associated effects on product settling rates and processes relating to the disturbance of bed sediments. CHEAQS PRO modelling was also undertaken on 11 of the treated lakes in order to predict concentrations of La(3+) ions and the potential for negative ecological impacts. This modelling indicated that the concentrations of La(3+) ions will be very low (0.8 mEq L(-1)), but higher (up to 0.12 mg L(-1)) in lakes characterised by very low alkalinity. The effects of elevated La(3+) concentrations following Phoslock(®) applications in lakes of very low alkalinity requires further evaluation. The implications for the use of Phoslock(®) in eutrophication management are discussed.

  19. Nano dimensional hybrid organo-clay Langmuir-Blodgett films

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-01-01

    Clay mineral particles are interesting nanosized building blocks due to their high aspect ratio and the chemical properties. The main interest in this nanosized building blocks results essentially from the colloidal size and the permanent structural charge of the particles. Smectites or swelling clay minerals are naturally occurring nanomaterials that can be fully delaminated to elementary clay mineral platelets in dilute aqueous dispersion. This dilute aqueous smectite suspensions are well s...

  20. Identification of dimethoate-containing water using partitioned dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Geng, Ying; Xiang, Bingren

    2011-01-01

    A simple, rapid and efficient extraction procedure, partitioned dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, has been developed in combination with near-infrared spectroscopy for the extraction and discrimination of dimethoate from aqueous samples. For this technique, the appropriate mixture of extraction solvent (CCl(4)) and disperser solvent (THF) was utilized. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was applied to build the model with several pre-process methods over the wavenumber regions between 7100 cm(-1) to 7300 cm(-1). The best model gave satisfactory classification accuracy, 98.6% for calibration set (n=74) and 97.6% for prediction set (n=42), using preprocessing of standard normal variate followed by Savitzky-Golay first derivative. The method was successfully applied to bottled water, tap water, lake water and farm water samples. The results demonstrated the possibility of near-infrared spectroscopy after partitioned dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the identification of water contaminated by dimethoate.

  1. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    varied from 5.9 to 8.0 centipoises for 10 g clay per 350 ml water. Some of these natural .... lignite to clay mud to improve its rheological and filtration properties. ... naturally active bentonitic clays from Wyoming and Texas which are used in the ...

  2. Polyamide 66/Brazilian Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyamide 66 (PA66/Brazilian clay nanocomposites were produced via direct melt intercalation. A montmorillonite sample from the Brazilian state of Paraíba was organically modified with esthearildimethylammonium chloride (Praepagen, quaternary ammonium salt and has been tested to be used in polymer nanocomposites. The dispersion analysis and the interlayer spacing of the clay particles in matrix were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Thermal behavior of the obtained systems was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry (TG, and heat deflection temperature (HDT was reported too. The nanocomposites exhibited a partially exfoliated structure, very interesting HDT values which are higher than those of pure PA66, and good thermal stability.

  3. Numerical model of the circulation and dispersion in the east Adriatic coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg Paklar, Gordana; Dzoic, Tomislav; Koracin, Darko; Matijevic, Slavica; Grbec, Branka; Ivatek-Sahdan, Stjepan

    2017-04-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) was implemented to reproduce physical properties of the area around submarine outlet Stobrec in the middle Adriatic coastal area. ROMS model run was forced with realistic atmospheric fields obtained from meteorological model Aladin, climatological river discharges, tides and dynamics of the surrounding area imposed at the open boundaries. Atmospheric forcing included momentum, heat and water fluxes calculated interactively from the Aladin surface fields during ROMS model simulations. Simulated fields from the Adriatic and shelf scale models were used to prescribe the initial and open boundary conditions for fine resolution coastal domain. Model results were compared with available CTD measurements and discussed in the light of the climatological circulation and thermohaline properties of the middle Adriatic coastal area. Variability in the circulation is related to the prevailing atmospheric conditions, changes in the hydrological conditions and water mass exchange at the open boundaries. Basic features of the coastal circulation are well reproduced by the ROMS model, as well as temperatures and salinities which are within corresponding seasonal intervals, although with lower stratification than measured ones. In order to reproduce dispersion of the passive tracer the ROMS model was coupled with Lagrangian dispersion model. Multiyear monitoring of the physical, chemical and biological parameters around the sewage outlet was used to assess the quality of the dispersion model results. Among measured parameters, redox potential of the surface sediment layer was selected to be compared with model results as its negative values are direct consequence of increased organic matter input that can be attributed to the sewage system inflow.

  4. The influence of natural organic matter on the speciation and solubility of Eu in Boom Clay pore water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D.J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); China Inst. of Atomic Energy, BJ (China); Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    The influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the speciation and solubility of europium (Eu) was studied under geochemical conditions representative for the Boom Clay. Different organic matter types were used, and analysis was performed both after 0.45 {mu}m microfiltration and after 30 000 MWCO ultrafiltration to distinguish between larger colloids (assumed to be immobile under in situ conditions) and small dissolved species. Equilibrium was approached from undersaturation starting from synthesised Eu(OH){sub 3}(s), which, during the experiment, transformed into EuOHCO{sub 3}(s), in agreement with thermodynamic considerations. In the absence of NOM, the Eu solution concentrations after 0.45 {mu}m filtration exceeded the thermodynamic solubility of EuOHCO{sub 3}(s) by several orders of magnitude, indicating the presence of inorganic Eu colloids. In the presence of NOM, the Eu solubility increased with increasing NOM concentration as was expected, but, surprisingly, was dependent on the operational size cut-off: at an identical NOM concentration in the filtrate, the Eu solution concentration after 0.45 {mu}m filtration was consistently higher compared to the Eu concentration after 30 000 MWCO filtration. This latter observation necessitates detailed knowledge concerning the pore size cut-off of Boom Clay under in situ conditions in order to use the correct Eu-NOM complexation constant and/or maximum solubility in transport calculations. At higher NOM concentrations (TOC > 30 mg/L) the Eu solubility after 0.45 {mu}m filtration was seemingly independent of the NOM concentration. In contrast, after 30 000 MWCO ultrafiltration, the Eu solution increased linearly with increasing DOC, from the expected thermodynamic solubility ({proportional_to} 5 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}) at 0 mg L{sup -1} DOC to {proportional_to} 3 x 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1} at 80 mg L{sup -1} DOC. All of the data sets were modelled using the Nagra/PSI database [1] for solubility, hydrolysis and

  5. Rapid screening of water soluble arsenic species in edible oils using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    A methodology for the non-chromatographic screening of the main arsenic species present in edible oils is discussed. Reverse dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to extract water soluble arsenic compounds (inorganic arsenic, methylarsonate, dimethylarsinate and arsenobetaine) from the edible oils into a slightly acidic aqueous medium. The total arsenic content was measured in the extracts by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using palladium as the chemical modifier. By repeating the measurement using cerium instead of palladium, the sum of inorganic arsenic and methylarsonate was obtained. The detection limit was 0.03 ng As per gram of oil. Data for the total and water-soluble arsenic levels of 29 samples of different origin are presented. Inorganic arsenic was not found in any of the samples marketed as edible oils.

  6. Micellar dispersions with tolerance for extreme water hardness for use in petroleum recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braden, W.B. Jr.; Flourny, K.H.

    1977-11-22

    A thickened, miscible flooding medium useful for displacing petroleum in subterranean reservoirs is described. The medium consists of a dispersion of light hydrocarbons, an aqueous fluid, and a surfactant system. This aqueous fluid may have from 1,500 to 12,000 ppm polyvalent ions present, such as calcium and magnesium. The surfactant system is comprised of an aqueous solution of an anionic surfactant such as a water-soluble salt of an alkyl or an alkylaryl sulfonate, for example sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, plus a water-soluble salt of an alkyl or alkylaryl polyethoxylated sulfate anionic surfactant, such as sodium dodecyl polyethoxy sulfate, plus a nonionic surfactant such as a fatty acid diethanolamide, a polyethoxylated aliphetic alcohol, or a polyethoxylated alkyl phenol. A method is described for recovering petroleum from subterranean reservoirs using the described thickened fluid. (8 claims)

  7. Synthesis of Water Dispersible and Catalytically Active Gold-Decorated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Mondini, Sara; Marelli, Marcello; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Ponti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Polito, Laura

    2016-07-19

    Hetero-nanoparticles represent an important family of composite nanomaterials that in the past years are attracting ever-growing interest. Here, we report a new strategy for the synthesis of water dispersible cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoxFe3-xO4 NPs) decorated with ultrasmall (2-3 nm) gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure is based on the use of 2,3-meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), which plays a double role. First, it transfers cobalt ferrite NPs from the organic phase to aqueous media. Second, the DMSA reductive power promotes the in situ nucleation of gold NPs in proximity of the magnetic NP surface. Following this procedure, we achieved a water dispersible nanosystem (CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs) which combines the cobalt ferrite magnetic properties with the catalytic features of ultrasmall Au NPs. We showed that CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs act as an efficient nanocatalyst to reduce 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and that they can be magnetically recovered and recycled. It is noteworthy that such nanosystem is more catalytically active than Au NPs with equal size. Finally, a complete structural and chemical characterization of the hetero-NPs is provided.

  8. Development testing of large volume water sprays for warm fog dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.; Beard, K. V.

    1986-01-01

    A new brute-force method of warm fog dispersal is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray induced air flow. Fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of the technique depends upon the drop size spectra in the spray, the height to which the spray can be projected, the efficiency with which fog laden air is processed through the curtain of spray, and the rate at which new fog may be formed due to temperature differences between the air and spray water. Results of a field test program, implemented to develop the data base necessary to assess the proposed method, are presented. Analytical calculations based upon the field test results indicate that this proposed method of warm fog dispersal is feasible. Even more convincingly, the technique was successfully demonstrated in the one natural fog event which occurred during the test program. Energy requirements for this technique are an order of magnitude less than those to operate a thermokinetic system. An important side benefit is the considerable emergency fire extinguishing capability it provides along the runway.

  9. Determination of four heterocyclic insecticides by ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Ercheng; Zhu, Wentao; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2009-02-01

    A novel microextraction method termed ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) combining high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the determination of insecticides in water samples. Four heterocyclic insecticides (fipronil, chlorfenapyr, buprofezin, and hexythiazox) were selected as the model compounds for validating this new method. This technique combines extraction and concentration of the analytes into one step, and the ionic liquid was used instead of a volatile organic solvent as the extraction solvent. Several important parameters influencing the IL-DLLME extraction efficiency such as the volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of disperser solvent, extraction time, centrifugation time, salt effect as well as acid addition were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, good enrichment factors (209-276) and accepted recoveries (79-110%) were obtained for the extraction of the target analytes in water samples. The calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficient ranged from 0.9947 to 0.9973 in the concentration level of 2-100 microg/L, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were 4.5-10.7%. The limits of detection for the four insecticides were 0.53-1.28 microg/L at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3.

  10. Paraffin dispersant application for cleaning subsea flow lines in the deep water Gulf of Mexico cottonwood development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, David; White, Jake; Pogoson, Oje [Baker Hughes Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Barros, Dalmo; Ramachandran, Kartik; Bonin, George; Waltrich, Paulo; Shecaira, Farid [PETROBRAS America, Houston, TX (United States); Ziglio, Claudio [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a paraffin dispersant (in seawater) application to clean paraffin deposition from a severely restricted 17.4-mile dual subsea flow line system in the Gulf of Mexico Cottonwood development. In principle, dispersant treatments are simple processes requiring effective dispersant packages and agitation to break-up and disperse deposition. Dispersants have been used onshore for treating wax deposition for decades. Implementation of a treatment in a long deep water production system, however, poses numerous challenges. The Cottonwood application was one of the first ever deep water dispersant applications. The application was designed in four separate phases: pre-treatment displacement for hydrate protection, dispersant treatment for paraffin deposition removal, pigging sequence for final flow line cleaning, and post-treatment displacement for hydrate protection. In addition, considerable job planning was performed to ensure the application was executed in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Two dynamically positioned marine vessels were used for pumping fluids and capturing returns. The application was extremely successful in restoring the deep water flow lines back to near pre-production state. Final pigging operations confirmed the flow lines were cleaned of all restrictions. Significant paraffin deposition was removed in the application. Approximately 900 bbls of paraffin sludge was recovered from the 4000 bbl internal volume flow line loop. Furthermore, the application was completed with zero discharge of fluids. The application provided significant value for the Cottonwood development. It allowed production from wells to be brought on-line at a higher capacity, thereby generating increased revenue. It also allowed resumption of routine pigging operations. As such, the Cottonwood dispersant application illustrates that with proper planning and execution, paraffin dispersant treatments can be highly effective solutions for cleaning

  11. Production and Characterisation of Zeolite from Ahako Clay in Kogi State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. KOVO

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite, a multi-purpose material normally sourced from clay is usually for many Engineering applications. However, it is only those Zeolite that are technically well prepared that can give optimum performance during application. Obtaining a constant route for development of Zeolite in Nigeria will be a welcome development. In this study, therefore, emphasis was placed on the development of various type of Zeolite. In attempt to synthesize the Zeolite samples, 1kg of Ahako clay was beneficiated by soaking it in deionised water for four days during which the mixture was vigorously agitated. Subsequently, the mixture was sieved with a minus 60 mesh (Tyler fraction or Micro sphere of which the screened mixture was treated with 1 litre of sodium bicarbonate solution and sodium hexameta-phosphate in the ratio of 1:4 primarily for deflocculation or dispersion. The washed clay was dried in an oven set at 45oc for two days after which it was ground to fine powder.The beneficiated clay was calcined at 600°C in furnace (model 6H-85IR for two hours. Subsequently, the calcined clay was formulated into various samples by properly incorporation sodium hydroxide (Noah, Silica gel and deionised water or weight basis.The results of the XRF showed that the crude and treated clay (calcined clay contained 73.18% by weight of Sio2 and 14.5% by weight of Al2O3 and 73.20% by weight of SiO2, 7.48 by weight of Al2O3.The developed Zeolite sample should feature in their spectra (IR that are consistent with Zeolite D as obtained in sample 1 (freshly prepared, Zeolite N-A as obtained in sample II cum sample IV after aging time of 48hours and Zeolite A as obtained in sample III.

  12. Cyclodextrin-grafted barium titanate nanoparticles for improved dispersion and stabilization in water-based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Gómez, R. [Universidad de Navarra, Departamento de Química y Edafología (Spain); Martinez-Tarifa, J. M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica (Spain); González-Benito, J. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales e Ingeniería Química, IQMAAB (Spain); González-Gaitano, G., E-mail: gaitano@unav.es [Universidad de Navarra, Departamento de Química y Edafología (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Ceramic nanoparticles with piezoelectric properties, such as BaTiO{sub 3} (BT), constitute a promising approach in the fields of nanocomposite materials and biomaterials. In the latter case, to be successful in their preparation, the drawback of their fast aggregation and practically null stability in water has to be overcome. The objective of this investigation has been the surface functionalization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles with cyclodextrins (CDs) as a way to break the aggregation and improve the stability of the nanoparticles in water solution, preventing and minimizing their fast precipitation. As a secondary goal, we have achieved extra-functionality of the nanoparticles, bestowed from the hydrophobic cavity of the macrocycle, which is able to lodge guest molecules that can form inclusion complexes with the oligosaccharide. The nanoparticle functionalization has been fully tracked and characterized, and the cytotoxicity of the modified nanoparticles with fibroblasts and pre-osteoblasts cell lines has been assessed with excellent results in a wide range of concentrations. The modified nanoparticles were found to be suitable for the easy preparation of nanocomposite hydrogels, via dispersion in hydrophilic polymers of typical use in biomedical applications (PEG, Pluronics, and PEO), and further processed in the form of films via water casting, showing very good results in terms of homogeneity in the dispersion of the filler. Likewise, as examples of application and with the aim of exploring a different range of nanocomposites, rhodamine B was included in the macrocycles as a model molecule, and films prepared from a thermoplastic matrix (EVA) via high-energy ball milling have been tested by impedance spectroscopy to discuss their dielectric properties, which indicated that even small modifications in the surface of the nanoparticles generate a different kind of interaction with the polymeric matrix. The CD-modified nanoparticles are thus suitable for easy

  13. Mechanical balance laws for fully nonlinear and weakly dispersive water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Henrik; Khorsand, Zahra; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The Serre-Green-Naghdi system is a coupled, fully nonlinear system of dispersive evolution equations which approximates the full water wave problem. The system is known to describe accurately the wave motion at the surface of an incompressible inviscid fluid in the case when the fluid flow is irrotational and two-dimensional. The system is an extension of the well known shallow-water system to the situation where the waves are long, but not so long that dispersive effects can be neglected. In the current work, the focus is on deriving mass, momentum and energy densities and fluxes associated with the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. These quantities arise from imposing balance equations of the same asymptotic order as the evolution equations. In the case of an even bed, the conservation equations are satisfied exactly by the solutions of the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. The case of variable bathymetry is more complicated, with mass and momentum conservation satisfied exactly, and energy conservation satisfied only in a global sense. In all cases, the quantities found here reduce correctly to the corresponding counterparts in both the Boussinesq and the shallow-water scaling. One consequence of the present analysis is that the energy loss appearing in the shallow-water theory of undular bores is fully compensated by the emergence of oscillations behind the bore front. The situation is analyzed numerically by approximating solutions of the Serre-Green-Naghdi equations using a finite-element discretization coupled with an adaptive Runge-Kutta time integration scheme, and it is found that the energy is indeed conserved nearly to machine precision. As a second application, the shoaling of solitary waves on a plane beach is analyzed. It appears that the Serre-Green-Naghdi equations are capable of predicting both the shape of the free surface and the evolution of kinetic and potential energy with good accuracy in the early stages of shoaling.

  14. Direct Electrochemistry of Myoglobin in DDAB-Clay Composite Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ordered films were made by casting a mixture of aqueous dispersions of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)-clay composite and myoglobin (Mb) solution on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes.The Mb-DDAB-clay film electrodes showed stable and reversible cyclic voltammetric responses in buffers and can catalyze the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA).

  15. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  16. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  17. Biodegradation behaviors and water adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol)/starch/carboxymethyl cellulose/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Sabouri, Narges

    2013-09-01

    The focus of this work is to study the effect of sodium montmorillonite (MMT-Na) clay content on the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/starch (S)/carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) blends using enzyme cellulase. The rate of glucose production from each nanocomposite substrates was most rapid for the substrate without MMT-Na and decreased with the addition of MMT-Na for PVA/S/CMC blend (51.5 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/1% MMT (45.4 μg/ml h), PVA/S/CMC/3% MMT (42.8 μg/ml h), and PVA/S/CMC/5% MMT (39.2 μg/ml h). The results of this study have revealed that films with MMT-Na content at 5 wt.% exhibited a significantly reduced rate and extent of hydrolysis. Enzymatic degradation behavior of MMT-Na containing nanocomposites of PVA/S/CMC was based on the determinations of weight loss and the reducing sugars. The degraded residues have been characterized by various analytical techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  18. Evaporation induced orientational order in soft solid phases of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Hemmen, Henrik; Dommersnes, Paul; Fossum, Jon Otto

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the possibility for promoting uniaxial orientational order in initially isotropic, soft solid dispersions of the synthetic clays Na-fluorohectorite and Laponite RD. We observe that strong orientational order can emerge from initially isotropic states when the samples are subjected to a slow concentration increase through evaporation of the dispersion water. During evaporation, there is a gradient in the order which, if evaporation is halted, slowly relaxes towards a uniform order throughout the samples. It is evident that the development of orientational order is not counterindicated by the viscoelastic nature of the samples, and that although the translational and likely also rotational diffusion of the particles is restricted in the soft solid state, the orientational degree of freedom can undergo a transition from a collectively random to an ordered state.

  19. Evaluation of the permeability of microporous membranes polyamide 6 / clay bentonite for water-oil separation; Avaliacao da permeabilidade de membranas microporosas de poliamida 6/argila bentonitica para separacao agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, P.S.S.; Medeiros, K.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Lira, H.L., E-mail: keilamm@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    The petroleum refining industries have faced major problems in relation to the treatment of their effluents before disposal into the environment. Among the conventional technologies treatment of these effluents, the process of oil-water separation by means of membranes has been extensively used, for having enormous potentiality. Therefore, in this study, hybrid membranes of polyamide 6/ bentonite clay were produced by the technique of phase inversion and by precipitation of the solution from the nanocomposites obtained by melt intercalation. The clay was organically modified with the quaternary ammonium salt (Cetremide®). The nanocomposites were obtained from (PA6) with untreated (AST) and treated clay (ACT), which were subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Already membranes were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and flow measurements. From the XRD results, it was observed an exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structure for the nanocomposites and for the membranes. From SEM images it was observed that the presence of AST and ACT clays in the polymeric matrix caused changes in membrane morphology and pore formation. The flow with distilled water in the membranes showed a decrease initially and then followed by stability. All membranes tested in the process of separating emulsions of oil in water, particularly those of nanocomposites obtained a significant reduction of oil concentration in the permeate, thus showing that these membranes have a great potential to be applied to the water-oil separation. (author)

  20. An investigation on dispersion and stability of water-soluble fullerenol (C60OH) in water via UV-Visible spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Abolhassan

    2017-02-01

    An investigation on dispersion, stability, and agglomeration of water-soluble fullerenol in water was studied via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the dispersion quality and stability of water-soluble fullerenol commenced decreasing after 150 h (more than six days) of solution preparation time. Furthermore, increasing the fullerenol concentration in water (Cfullerenol) showed promotion of the agglomeration in lower residence time. Considering the results of DLS and HRTEM micrographs, an average particle size of the fullerenol in the solution was measured to be ∼150 nm after a residence of 2 months highlighting its high agglomeration tendency even at low concentration.

  1. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer between organic dyes adsorbed onto nano-clay and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Schoonheydt, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this communication we investigate two dyes N, N'-dioctadecyl thiacyanine perchlorate (NK) and octadecyl rhodamine B chloride (RhB) in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films with or with out a synthetic clay laponite. Observed changes in isotherms of RhB in absence and presence of nano-clay platelets indicate the incorporation of clay platelets onto RhB-clay hybrid films. AFM images confirm the incorporation of clay into hybrid films. FRET is observed in clay dispersion and LB films with and without clay. Efficiency of energy transfer is maximum in LB films with clay.

  2. Research on Dispersed Oil Droplets Breakage and Emulsification in the Dynamic Oil and Water Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangdong Guo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil and water dynamic hydrocyclone is one type of facilities that separate two phases or multiple phases applied widely in the fields such as food processing, environmental protection, biological pharmacy, petroleum and chemistry. The dispersed oil droplets in the dynamic oil and water hydrocyclone were often broken into small drops by shear force, which decreased the separation efficiency of dynamic oil-water hydrocyclone greatly. To avoid the breakage of the oil droplets, the turbulence field and the velocity field of the dynamic hydrocyclone were studied by the software of Fluent to analyze the main reason that led to breakage of oil droplets. Results indicated that the deformation of oil droplets was caused by the viscous shear force; the breakage of oil droplets was caused by the Reynolds shear stress and the local pressure fluctuations. The main area that the drops were prone to breakup of the dynamic hydrocyclone is that the rotating grating nearby, the wall boundary layer of the drum and center axis of the drum. Finally, the breakage of oil droplets and emulsification of oil and water in the dynamic hydrocyclone were verified by the experiments.

  3. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence.

  4. Hydroxypropyl cellulose stabilizes amorphous solid dispersions of the poorly water soluble drug felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Ashish L; Malekar, Swapnil A; Cote, Catherine; Worthen, David R

    2014-11-04

    Overcoming the low oral bioavailability of many drugs due to their poor aqueous solubility is one of the major challenges in the pharmaceutical industry. The production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) of these drugs using hydrophilic polymers may significantly improve their solubility. However, their storage stability and the stability of their supersaturated solutions in the gastrointestinal tract upon administration are unsolved problems. We have investigated the potential of a low viscosity grade of a cellulosic polymer, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL), and compared it with a commonly used vinyl polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone vinyl acetate (PVP-VA), for stabilizing the ASDs of a poorly water soluble drug, felodipine. The ASDs were produced using hot melt mixing and stored under standard and accelerated stability conditions. The ASDs were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Drug dissolution and partitioning rates were evaluated using single- and biphasic dissolution studies. The ASDs displayed superior drug dissolution and partitioning as compared to the pure crystalline drug, which might be attributed to the formation of a drug-polymer molecular dispersion, amorphous conversion of the drug, and drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions. Late phase separation and early re-crystallization occurred at lower and higher storage temperatures, respectively, for HPC-SSL ASDs, whereas early phase separation, even at low storage temperatures, was noted for PVP-VA ASDs. Consequently, the partitioning rates for ASDs dispersed in HPC-SSL were greater than those of PVP-VA at lower and room temperature storage, whereas the performance of both of the ASDs was similar when stored at higher temperatures.

  5. Toxic effects of chemical dispersant Corexit 9500 on water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; McNabb, Nicole A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Iguchi, Taisen; Kohno, Satomi

    2017-02-01

    In 2010, approximately 2.1 million gallons of chemical dispersants, mainly Corexit 9500, were applied in the Gulf of Mexico to prevent the oil slick from reaching shorelines and to accelerate biodegradation of oil during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Recent studies have revealed toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on marine microzooplankton that play important roles in food chains in marine ecosystems. However, there is still little known about the toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on freshwater zooplankton, even though oil spills do occur in freshwater and chemical dispersants may be used in response to these spills. The cladoceran crustacean, water flea Daphnia magna, is a well-established model species for various toxicological tests, including detection of juvenile hormone-like activity in test compounds. In this study, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the acute and chronic toxicity of Corexit 9500 using D. magna. The acute toxicity test was conducted according to OECD TG202 and the 48 h EC50 was 1.31 ppm (CIs 0.99-1.64 ppm). The reproductive chronic toxicity test was performed following OECD TG211 ANNEX 7 and 21 days LOEC and NOEC values were 4.0 and 2.0 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that Corexit 9500 has toxic effects on daphnids, particularly during the neonatal developmental stage, which is consistent with marine zooplankton results, whereas juvenile hormone-like activity was not identified. Therefore, our findings of the adverse effects of Corexit 9500 on daphnids suggest that application of this type of chemical dispersant may have catastrophic impacts on freshwater ecosystems by disrupting the key food chain network. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Disturbance of water-extractable phosphorus determination by colloidal particles in a heavy clay soil from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.F.; Chardon, W.J.; Salm, van der C.

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication January 25, 2005. Water extraction methods are widely used to extract phosphorus (P) from soils for both agronomic and environmental purposes. Both the presence of soil colloids in soil water filtrates, and the contribution of colloidal P to the molybdate-reactive phosphorus

  7. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  8. Multi-scale modeling of the behaviour of water and ions clays; Modelisation multi-echelles du comportement de l'eau et des ions dans les argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotenberg, B

    2007-10-15

    Predicting the fate of radioactive waste stored in a clay formation requires a good understanding of the transport properties of water and ions in clays. Their diffusion in this charged porous medium is described by empirical parameters such as their partitioning coefficient Kd which accounts for the interactions with the mineral surfaces. The present work deals with the relevance of this concept and its definition based on microscopic grounds. We have first modeled the ionic contribution to the dielectric properties of clays and suggested an experimental determination of Kd from dielectric spectroscopy measurements. Using microscopic simulations (Monte-Carlo and Molecular Dynamics), we then have computed the Gibbs free energy and enthalpy for ionic exchange in the case of alkaline cations. They control the value of Kd and its evolution with the temperature. The results for cesium are in good agreement with both microcalorimetric measurements and the determination of Kd at different temperatures. We have participated in the development of a new lattice simulation method (Lattice Fokker-Planck), which we have then used to link explicitly the microscopic dynamics of ions to the diffusion-reaction model underlying the definition of Kd. Finally, we have used Molecular Dynamics to investigate the kinetics of exchange of water and ions between clay particles (interlayer) and the extra-particle porosity. The results confirm the generally admitted idea that water and ions can explore the whole porosity, whereas anions are excluded from the interlayers. (author)

  9. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles.

  10. Experimental Study on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanism and effect of basalt fiber reinforced clay soil, a series of unconfined compressive strength tests conducted on clay soil reinforced with basalt fiber have been performed under the condition of optimum water content and maximum dry density. Both the content and length of basalt fiber are considered in this paper. When the effect of content is studied, the 12 mm long fibers are dispersed into clay soil at different contents of 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, and 0.35%. When the effect of length is researched, different lengths of basalt fibers with 4 mm, 8 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm are put into soil at the same content of 0.05%. Experimental results show that basalt fiber can effectively improve the UCS of clay soil. And the best content and length are 0.25% and 12 mm, respectively. The results also show that the basalt fiber reinforced clay soil has the “poststrong” characteristic. About the reinforcement mechanism, the fiber and soil column-net model is proposed in this paper. Based on this model and SEM images, the effect of fiber content and length is related to the change of fiber-soil column and formation of effective fiber-soil net.

  11. Synthesis of highly stable, water-dispersible copper nanoparticles as catalysts for nitrobenzene reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ravneet; Giordano, Cristina; Gradzielski, Michael; Mehta, Surinder K

    2014-01-01

    We report an aqueous-phase synthetic route to copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) using a copper-surfactant complex and tests of their catalytic efficiency for a simple nitrophenol reduction reaction under atmospheric conditions. Highly stable, water-dispersed CuNPs were obtained with the aid of polyacrylic acid (PAA), but not with other dispersants like surfactants or polymethacrylic acid (PMAA). The diameter of the CuNPs could be controlled in the range of approximately 30-85 nm by modifying the ratio of the metal precursor to PAA. The catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol takes place at the surface of CuNPs at room temperature and was accurately monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The catalytic efficiency was found to be remarkably high for these PAA-capped CuNPs, given the fact that at the same time PAA is efficiently preventing their oxidation as well. The activity was found to increase as the size of the CuNPs decreased. It can therefore be concluded that the synthesized CuNPs are catalytically highly efficient in spite of the presence of a protective PAA coating, which provides them with a long shelf life and thereby enhances the application potential of these CuNPs. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dielectric Dispersion Studies Indicate Change in Structure of Water by Potentised Homeopathic Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Response of living bodies to different vastly `diluted' homeopathic medicines are different (rejecting the sceptic's view of `placebo' effect), though they are chemically same. Till now there is no satisfactory answer to how one such medicine differs from another in terms of scientifically measurable parameters. This paper tries to address this basic issue by taking two medicines of the same potency and two different potencies of the same medicine, namely, Arnica Mont 30c, 200c and Anacardium Orient 30c, 200c. These potencies are well above the Avogadro limit. The investigation reported here proceeds with the concept of `induced molecular structure' advanced by a number of scientists. Dielectric dispersion is used as the tool for experimental verification. It is based on the fact that when the exciting frequency of applied electric field equals the characteristic frequency, then macromolecules resonate leading to anomalous dielectric dispersion associated with sharp increase in dielectric loss, the resonance frequencies being different for macromolecules of different structures or dimensions. The results suggest that medicine- and potency-specific attributes are acquired by the vehicle (i.e. water) in the form of macromolecules generated by the potentization process of homeopathy making one medicine structurally different from another.

  13. Water dispersible superparamagnetic Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salunkhe, Ashwini B. [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Khot, Vishwajeet M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Ruso, Juan M. [Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Patil, S.I., E-mail: patil@physics.unipune.ac.in [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) are synthesized chemically, and dispersed in an aqueous suspension for hyperthermia therapy application. Different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, particle concentration which regulates the competence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle as a heating agents in hyperthermia are investigated. Specific absorption rate (SAR) decreases with increase in the particle concentration and increases with increase in applied magnetic field intensity. Highest value of SAR is found to be 91.84 W g{sup −1} for 5 mg. mL{sup −1} concentration. Oleic acid conjugated polyethylene glycol (OA-PEG) coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have shown superior cyto-compatibility over uncoated nanoparticles to L929 mice fibroblast cell lines for concentrations below 2 mg. mL{sup −1}. Present work provides the underpinning for the use of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as a potential heating mediator for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic, water dispersible CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were synthesized by simple and cost effective Co precipitation route. • Effect of coating on various physical and chemical properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were studied. • The effect of coating on induction heating as well as biocompatibility of NPs were studied.

  14. Influence of Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal Stability of Water-Dispersible Nanofibrillar Polyaniline/Nanotube Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant influence on the thermal stability of polyaniline (PANI in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is reported. By means of in-situ rapid mixing approach, water-dispersible nanofibrillar PANI and composites, consisting of MWCNTs uniformly coated with PANI in the state of emeraldine salt, with a well-defined core-shell heterogeneous structure, were prepared. The de-protonation process in PANI occurs at a lower temperature under the presence of MWCNTs on the polyaniline composite upon thermal treatment. However, it is found that the presence of MWCNTs significantly enhances the thermal stability of PANI’s backbone upon exposure to laser irradiation, which can be ascribed to the core-shell heterogeneous structure of the composite of MWCNTs and PANI, and the high thermal conductivity of MWCNTs.

  15. Ultra-pure, water-dispersed Au nanoparticles produced by femtosecond laser ablation and fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiliūtė, Reda; Maximova, Ksenia A; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Yong, Jiawey; Hartley, Jennifer S; Mohsin, Abu SM; Blandin, Pierre; Chon, James WM; Sentis, Marc; Stoddart, Paul R; Kabashin, Andrei; Rotomskis, Ričardas; Clayton, Andrew HA; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ultra-pure gold nanoparticles have been prepared by methods of femtosecond laser ablation from a solid target and fragmentation from already formed colloids. Despite the absence of protecting ligands, the solutions could be (1) fairly stable and poly size-dispersed; or (2) very stable and monodispersed, for the two fabrication modalities, respectively. Fluorescence quenching behavior and its intricacies were revealed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in rhodamine 6G water solution. We show that surface-enhanced Raman scattering of rhodamine 6G on gold nanoparticles can be detected with high fidelity down to micromolar concentrations using the nanoparticles. Application potential of pure gold nanoparticles with polydispersed and nearly monodispersed size distributions are discussed. PMID:23888114

  16. Experimental study on stimulated scattering of ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jiulin, E-mail: hyq1304@126.com; Wu, Haopeng [Nanchang Hangkong University, Jiangxi Engineering Laboratory for Optoelectronics Testing Technology (China); Yan, Feng; Yang, Junjie [Nanchang Hangkong University, School of Measuring and Optical Engineering (China); He, Xingdao, E-mail: xingdaohe@126.com [Nanchang Hangkong University, Jiangxi Engineering Laboratory for Optoelectronics Testing Technology (China)

    2016-01-15

    The backward stimulated scattering (BSS) from ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water has been investigated experimentally by employing a Nd:YAG pulse laser with ∼532 nm wavelength and ∼8 ns pulse width as the pump laser source. The present results show that the BSS effect is uniquely and unequivocally different compared to other known stimulated scattering, such as stimulated Rayleigh scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and stimulated Raman scattering, and it displays the characteristics of no frequency shift and threshold dependence on initial spontaneous Mie scattering seed source. These can be understood by means of the Mie scattering theory and a laser-induced stationary Bragg grating model.

  17. In vitro thrombogenicity investigation of new water-dispersible polyurethane anionomers bearing carboxylate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussard, L; Burel, F; Couvercelle, J-P; Lesouhaitier, O; Merhi, Y; Tabrizian, M; Bunel, C

    2005-01-01

    New segmented polyurethane (PU) anionomers based on hydroxytelechelic polybutadiene were synthesized via an aqueous dispersion process. Incorporation of carboxylic groups was achieved using thioacids of different length. Surface properties were investigated by mean of water absorption analysis and static contact-angle measurements using water, diiodomethane, formamide and ethylene glycol. Blood compatibility of the PUs was evaluated by in vitro adhesion assays using 111In-radiolabeled platelet-rich plasma and [125I]fibrinogen. Morphology of the adhered platelets was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results were compared to two biomedical-grade PUs, namely Pellethane and Tecoflex. Insertion of carboxylic groups increased surface hydrophilicity and limited water uptake ( < 8% for an ion content of 5% by weight). Surface energy of all synthesized PUs was between 40 and 45 mJ/m2. Platelet adhesion and fibrinogen adsorption on the PU anionomer surfaces were affected as a function to the increase of graft length; thiopropionic was the most haemocompatible, followed by thiosuccinic and then thioglycolic acid. SEM analyses of all ionic PU samples exhibited low platelet adhesion to surfaces with no morphological modification. In conclusion, increased hydrophily, dynamic mobility and charge repulsion are synergistic key factors for enhanced haemocompatibility.

  18. Liquid water from first principles: The importance of exact exchange, dispersion interactions, and nuclear quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distasio, Robert; Li, Zhaofeng; Santra, Biswajit; Wu, Xifan; Car, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment on the structure of liquid water at ambient conditions has been quite difficult to achieve to date. In this work, we report that highly accurate ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water that account for exact exchange (via the hybrid PBE0 functional [PRB 79, 085102 (2009)]), dispersion interactions [PRL 102, 073005 (2009)], and nuclear quantum effects (presently approximated by a 30K increase in the simulation temperature) result in excellent agreement with experiments [PRL 101, 065502 (2008)]. The importance of each of these effects in the theoretical prediction of the structure of liquid water will be demonstrated by a detailed comparative analysis of the predicted and experimental oxygen-oxygen radial distribution functions. In addition, we will discuss the connection between the experimentally observed scattering intensity, I(k), and the final radial distribution function, g(r), via the structure and form factors. This work was supported by NSF CHE-0956500, DOE-DE- SC0005180, and DOE: DE-SC0008626.

  19. Water drilling fluids: evaluation of lubricity and clay swelling control; Fluidos de perfuracao a base de agua: avaliacao de lubricidade e controle de inchamento de argilas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Thiago de Freitas; Arruda, Jefferson Teixeira; Medeiros, Ana Catarina; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the oil well drilling, drilling fluids are used in order to transport the cuttings until the surface. This fluid is also responsible for the mechanical sustentation of the well walls, the control of undesirable production of fluids in the formation, the lubricity and the cooling of the bit. The drilling fluids based on water are extensively applied due to their lower cost, thermal stability, biodegradability, easiness of pumping and treatment, resulting in smaller environmental impacts. However, some situations, such as hydrophilic shale drilling, request the use of additives to avoid the hydration of them and, consequently, the tool imprisonment or migration (filtration) of the drilling fluids into the rock. The goal of this work was to develop and test formulations of water-base drilling fluids with high capacity of inhibition of clay swelling and lubricity, obtaining drillings with larger penetration rate and calipers without enlargements. The results showed that the appropriate combination of commonly used commercial products can promote the obtaining of fluids with equal or better performance than those used by world companies. (author)

  20. Potential for Recycling Nutrients from Biosolids Amended with Clay and Lime in Coarse-Textured Water Repellence, Acidic Soils of Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjutha Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biosolids in soils is an efficient method of recycling nutrients from biosolids and it is considered even safer when it is modified after mixing and diluting with other suitable soil organic amendments. A variety of soil organic amendments, such as green manures and composts, are used for modifying and co-composting with biosolids. However, these may not be considered as appropriate biosolids disposal and remedial measures for soils with unique problems such as low soil pH, water repellence nature, and poor water and nutrient retention capacities due to soil textural issues. Historically, soil amendments such as lime, clay, and recently biochar are being applied for such problematic soils at Western Australia and these researches focused mostly on improvement in soil physical and chemical properties. However, studies with potential for applying modified biosolids with these amendments are not complete yet. This review focused on identifying such gaps in these studies from over 170 peer-reviewed key research and review articles published over decades to latest in these areas.

  1. Brazilian clay organophilization aiming its use in oil / water removal; Organofilizacao de argila brasileira visando seu uso na remocao oleo/agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, M.F.; Lima, W.S.; Oliveira, G.C.; Silva, M.M.; Rodrigues, M.G.F., E-mail: mariaugusta.f@gmail.com, E-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Clays when subjected to modification with the addition of organic surfactant are called organoclays acquire hydrophobic character, they have an affinity for organic compounds. The organoclays can be used as adsorbents are considered promising agents in environmental control. The objective is to prepare organoclays clays from commercial use in order to remove organic contaminants. The clay used was gray, as polycationic, supplied by Süd-Chemie company and the quaternary ammonium salt was cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (Cetremide). The fresh samples and organoclay were characterized by the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Cation Exchange Capacity, testing expansion and affinity with organic compounds: Swelling of Foster and adsorption capacity. The results showed appropriate conditions organophilic process. Through XRD confirmed the increase in basal spacing for the modified clay in relation to the clay in nature. (author)

  2. Quantifying Microstegium vimineum seed movement by non-riparian water dispersal using an ultraviolet-marking based recapture method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Tekiela

    Full Text Available Microstegium vimineum is a shade tolerant annual C4 invasive grass in the Eastern US, which has been shown to negatively impact species diversity and succession in hardwood forests. To date, empirical studies have shown that population expansion is limited to <1 m yr(-1, which is largely driven by gravity dispersal. However, this likely does not fully account for all mechanisms of population-scale dispersal as we observe greater rates of population expansion. Though water, both riparian and non-riparian water (i.e., ephemeral overland flow, have been speculated mechanisms for M. vimineum dispersal, few studies have empirically tested this hypothesis. We designed an experiment along the slopes of a Southwest Virginia hardwood forest to test the role of non-riparian water on local seed dispersal. We developed a seed marking technique by coating each seed with an ultraviolet (UV powder that did not affect buoyancy to aid in situ seed recapture. Additionally, a new image analysis protocol was developed to automate seed identification from UV photos. Total seed mobility (summation of individual seed movement within each transect was positively correlated with precipitation. Over a period of one month with 52.32 mm of precipitation, the maximum dispersal distance of any single recaptured seed was 2.4 m, and the average distance of dispersed seed was 0.21±0.04 m. This is the first quantitative evidence of non-riparian water dispersal in a forest understory, which accounts for an additional pathway of population expansion.

  3. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Jelínek; Dobosz, Stanisław M.; Jaroslav Beňo

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), the cis- is...

  4. How to remove the influence of trace water from the absorption spectra of SWNTs dispersed in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Yang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs can be efficiently dispersed in the imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs, at relatively high concentration, with their intrinsic structure and properties retained. Due to the hygroscopicity of the ILs, water bands may be introduced in the absorption spectra of IL-dispersed SWNTs and cause problems in spectral deconvolution and further analysis. In order to remove this influence, a quantitative characterization of the trace water in [BMIM]+[PF6]− and [BMIM]+[BF4]− was carried out by means of UV–vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. A simple yet effective method involving spectral subtraction of the water bands was utilized, and almost no difference was found between the spectra of the dry IL-dispersed SWNT samples treated under vacuum for 10 hours and the spectra of the untreated samples with subtraction of the pure water spectrum. This result makes it more convenient to characterize SWNTs with absorption spectra in the IL-dispersion system, even in the presence of trace amount of water.

  5. Using DVS-NIR to assess the water sorption behaviour and stability of a griseofulvin/PVP K30 solid dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanjing; Buckton, Graham

    2015-11-30

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the distribution of water in a physically unstable amorphous solid dispersion (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and griseofulvin (as a model hydrophobic drug)), both as the sample absorbs water and during prolonged exposure to elevated humidity by use of dynamic vapour sorption combined with near infrared (DVS-NIR). The solid dispersion absorbed much less water than the sum of the water sorption of the individual components. This suggests that griseofulvin hindered PVP from absorbing water through the formation of the solid dispersion. Prolonged storage of the solid dispersion at 75% RH resulted in no significant mass change. Whilst this would usually be interpreted as the absence of crystallization, the NIR spectra demonstrated that crystallization occurred. The reason for the lack of a weight loss was that the expelled water from amorphous griseofulvin was sorbed by PVP, meaning that as the dispersion was broken by the crystallisation of griseofulvin, the PVP was once again free to sorb water (in line with the higher water sorption shown by PVP alone, and in contrast with the lower sorption of water by the solid dispersion). As water is a key factor in the physical stability of amorphous systems, understanding how and where water is absorbed and how this is liable to change is an important advance and offers promise in understanding the mechanism of stabilisation of solid dispersions, and therefore may be useful to predict the stability of new API dispersions.

  6. Water-dispersible PVA-based dry microballoons with potential for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzvetkov, George, E-mail: nhgtz@wmail.chem.uni-sofia.bg [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Paradossi, Gaio; Tortora, Mariarosaria [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica and CNR-INFM-SOFT, 00133 Roma (Italy); Fernandes, Paulo [Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam (Germany); Fery, Andreas [Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Graf-Zeiler, Birgit [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Fink, Rainer H. [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-04-06

    This paper reports on the preparation and characterization of stable poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-based dry hollow microparticles, readily convertible to gas-filled microballoons (MBs) in water suspension. The rehydrated MBs can be used as ultrasound contrast agents and for targeted drug delivery, while the dry MBs are suitable for encapsulation of biologically active gases. The MBs powder material is obtained by freeze-drying the as-prepared telechelic PVA-shelled MBs aqueous dispersion. The microstructure of the lyophilized MBs as well as of the starting and the reconstituted MBs in water suspension was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). STXM observations below and above the oxygen K-edge reveal that 80% of the MBs originating from the lyophilized particles are gas-filled. Moreover, local carbon K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) measurements evidenced that the chemical composition of the polymeric shell is preserved during the freeze-drying process and subsequent shelf storage for at least more than one year.

  7. Microwave-Assisted Polyol Synthesis of Water Dispersible Red-Emitting Eu3+-Modified Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eu3+-modified carbon dots (C-dots, 3–5 nm in diameter, were prepared, functionalized, and stabilized via a one-pot polyol synthesis. The role of Eu2+/Eu3+, the influence of O2 (oxidation and H2O (hydrolysis, as well as the impact of the heating procedure (conventional resistance heating and microwave (MW heating were explored. With the reducing conditions of the polyol at the elevated temperature of synthesis (200–230 °C, first of all, Eu2+ was obtained resulting in the blue emission of the C-dots. Subsequent to O2-driven oxidation, Eu3+-modified, red-emitting C-dots were realized. However, the Eu3+ emission is rapidly quenched by water for C-dots prepared via conventional resistance heating. In contrast to the hydroxyl functionalization of conventionally-heated C-dots, MW-heating results in a carboxylate functionalization of the C-dots. Carboxylate-coordinated Eu3+, however, turned out as highly stable even in water. Based on this fundamental understanding of synthesis and material, in sum, a one-pot polyol approach is established that results in H2O-dispersable C-dots with intense red Eu3+-line-type emission.

  8. Kinetics of anisotropic ordering in Laponite dispersions induced by a water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujala, Ravi Kumar; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report the kinetics of ordering occurring at the water-air interface of Laponite dispersions. Propagation of such ordering into the bulk and its relaxation dynamics were systematically studied through light scattering measurements. Depolarization ratio Dp, which accounted for the optical anisotropy, was measured as a function of depth from the interface and aging of the samples. The extent of spatial ordering was found to be several decades larger than the typical particle size. Spatial ordering originated from the interface and percolated into the bulk with aging time tw. Growth in Dp with waiting time was found to follow power-law behavior given as Dp˜twn, with n increasing from 0.1 to 4 as one moved away from the interface into the bulk. Dp decreased exponentially with depth h given as Dp˜e-(h/h0), where h0 is the decay length, increasing from 0.4 to 0.75 mm with aging time. Dynamic structure factor measurements performed on the samples at various aging times, depths, and temperatures yielded two distinct relaxation times: one fast mode followed by a slow mode. The fast mode remained invariant while slow mode relaxation time followed an exponential decay with depth. This study indicated that the arrested phase nucleated from the interface and propagated into the bulk, which was not observed when the surface was insulated with a layer of hydrophobic liquid. Dilution of the concentrated samples destroyed the aforesaid ordering and made the dispersion homogeneous implying the ordered state was a glass.

  9. Degradation of disperse azo dyes from waters by solar photoelectro-Fenton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Ricardo [Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACh, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Garcia-Segura, Sergi [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ureta-Zanartu, M.S. [Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACh, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Brillas, Enric, E-mail: brillas@ub.edu [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Reactive azo dyes are almost totally mineralized by solar photoelectro-Fenton. > The process yields high current efficiencies and low energy consumptions. > It is more efficient and inexpensive by decreasing current and increasing dye content. > Nitrate ions are the main inorganic ions released during the mineralization process. > The process is also effective for the remediation of textile dyeing solutions. - Abstract: Solutions of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1 (DR1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3), commonly used in the Chilean textile industry, in 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.5 mmol dm{sup -3} Fe{sup 2+} of pH 3.0 were comparatively degraded by electro-Fenton (EF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) using a 2.5 dm{sup 3} recirculation flow plant containing a BDD/air-diffusion cell coupled with a solar photoreactor. Organics were oxidized in EF with hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between electrogenerated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and added Fe{sup 2+}. The oxidizing power of SPEF was enhanced by the additional production of hydroxyl radicals from the photolysis of Fe(III) hydrated species and the photodecomposition of Fe(III) complexes with intermediates by UV light of solar irradiation. Total decolorization, complete dye removal and almost overall mineralization for both dye solutions were only achieved using the most potent SPEF process, yielding higher current efficiencies and lower energy consumptions than EF. Final carboxylic acids like pyruvic, acetic, oxalic and oxamic were detected during the SPEF treatments. NO{sub 3}{sup -} ion was released as inorganic ion. The use of a solution pH of 2.0-3.0 at 50 mA cm{sup -2} was found preferable for SPEF. Synthetic textile dyeing solutions containing the dyes were treated under these conditions yielding lower decolorization rate, slower dye removal and smaller mineralization degree than only using 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} Na

  10. Effects of waves on water dispersion in a semi-enclosed estuarine bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpey, M. T.; Ardhuin, F.; Otheguy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The bay of Saint Jean de Luz - Ciboure is a touristic destination located in the south west of France on the Basque coast. This small bay is 1.5km wide for 1km long. It is semi-enclosed by breakwaters, so that the area is mostly protected from waves except in its eastern part, where wave breaking is regularly observed over a shallow rock shelf. In the rest of the area the currents are generally weak. The bay receives fresh water inflows from two rivers. During intense raining events, the rivers can introduce pollutants in the bay. The input of pollutants combined with the low level dynamic of the area can affect the water quality for several days. To study such a phenomenon, mechanisms of water dispersion in the bay are investigated. The present paper focuses on the effects of waves on bay dynamics. Several field experiments were conducted in the area, combining wave and current measurements from a set of ADCP and ADV, lagrangian difter experiments in the surfzone, salinity and temperature profile measurements. An analysis of this set of various data is provided. It reveals that the bay combines remarkable density stratification due to fresh water inflows and occasionally intense wave-induced currents in the surfzone. These currents have a strong influence on river plume dynamics when the sea state is energetic. Moreover, modifications of hydrodynamics in the bay passes are found to be remarkably correlated with sea state evolutions. This result suggests a significant impact of waves on the bay flushing. To further analyse these phenomena, a three dimensional numerical model of bay hydrodynamics is developed. The model aims at reproducing fresh water inflows combined with wind-, tide- and wave-induced currents and mixing. The model of the bay is implemented using the code MOHID , which has been modified to allow the three dimensional representation of wave-current interactions proposed by Ardhuin et al. [2008b] . The circulation is forced by the wave field modelled

  11. Water dispersible CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with improved colloidal stability for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munjal, Sandeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Khare, Neeraj, E-mail: nkhare@physics.iitd.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Nehate, Chetan; Koul, Veena [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Single phase cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CFO) nanoparticles of a controlled size (∼6 nm) exhibiting superparamagnetic properties have been synthesized by hydrothermal technique using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. The oleic acid coated CFO nanoparticles are stable in non-polar organic media, such as hexane but are not well dispersible in water. The surface of these nanoparticles has been further modified by citric acid using ligand exchange process, which makes CFO nanoparticles more stable colloidal solution in water. Citric acid coated CFO nanoparticles exhibits high dispersibility in water, high zeta potential, very low coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. Biocompatibility of these CFO nanoparticles is demonstrated through cytotoxicity test in L929 cell line. - Highlights: • Synthesis of uniform size (~6nm) CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) magnetic nano-particles, with a narrow size distribution using hydrothermal techniques with oleic acid as surfactant and convert the CFO nano-particles highly dispersible in water by modifying the surface of nanoparticles through ligand exchange process. • The bio-compatibility of these highly water dispersal citric acid coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was demonstrated with mouse fibroblast L929 cells lines, using a MTT cytotoxicity assay. • The surface of these oleic acid coated nanoparticles was modified with citric acid using ligand exchange method, that makes these nanoparticles water highly dispersible. • The biocompatibility of citric acid coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was demonstrated with mouse fibroblast L929 cells lines, using a MTT cytotoxicity assay.

  12. Computer model of two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a model that simulates solute transport in flowing ground water. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be applied to a wide range of problem types. It is applicable to one- or two-dimensional problems involving steady-state or transient flow. The model computes changes in concentration over time caused by the processes of convective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, and mixing (or dilution) from fluid sources. The model assumes that the solute is non-reactive and that gradients of fluid density, viscosity, and temperature do not affect the velocity distribution. However, the aquifer may be heterogeneous and (or) anisotropic. The model couples the ground-water flow equation with the solute-transport equation. The digital computer program uses an alternating-direction implicit procedure to solve a finite-difference approximation to the ground-water flow equation, and it uses the method of characteristics to solve the solute-transport equation. The latter uses a particle- tracking procedure to represent convective transport and a two-step explicit procedure to solve a finite-difference equation that describes the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion, fluid sources and sinks, and divergence of velocity. This explicit procedure has several stability criteria, but the consequent time-step limitations are automatically determined by the program. The report includes a listing of the computer program, which is written in FORTRAN IV and contains about 2,000 lines. The model is based on a rectangular, block-centered, finite difference grid. It allows the specification of any number of injection or withdrawal wells and of spatially varying diffuse recharge or discharge, saturated thickness, transmissivity, boundary conditions, and initial heads and concentrations. The program also permits the designation of up to five nodes as observation points, for which a summary table of head and concentration versus time is printed at the end of the

  13. Biomineralization regulation by nano-sized features in silk fibroin proteins: synthesis of water-dispersible nano-hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Liu, Xi; Liu, Shanshan; Zhang, Aili; Lu, Qiang; Kaplan, David L; Zhu, Hesun

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, silk fibroin (SF) was used as a template to prepare nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) via a biomineralization process. We observed that the content of SF affected both the morphology and water dispersibility of nano-HA particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zetasizer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine nano-HA particle features including the surface morphology, aggregation performance, and crystallization. Rod-like nano-HA particles with desired water dispersibility were achieved when the ratio of SF/HA (calculated) was above 7:3. SEM, TEM, and zeta potential results revealed that nano-HA particles were enclosed by the SF which formed a negative charge layer preventing the aggregation of HA nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Moreover, the nano-HA particles were able to re-disperse in water without precipitation for two weeks at room temperature, 60°C, and 90°C. Our work suggested a facile and effective approach of designing water-dispersible nano-HA particles which may have wide potential application in tissue engineering especially bone regeneration.

  14. Evaluation by design of experiments of active clay specimens behavior in the presence of distilled water, saline solutions and cationic inhibitors; Avaliacao por analise estatistica experimental do comportamento de corpos de prova de argila aditivada na presenca de agua destilada, solucoes salinas e inibidores cationicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Emanuella Layne Ferreira; Araujo, Bruno Alysson Barbosa Duarte; Borges, Mauricio Rodrigues; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    During the drilling, in general, there are layers of clays which water absorption easily as smectites. In drilling with clays swelling when is applied water-base fluid there is necessary the use of the clay inhibitors to avoid the incorporation of the cutting to the drilling fluid. The most used chemical inhibitors in drilling fluids are sodium and potassium chlorides. However, the cationic inhibitors have been used as alternative form to increase the inhibition power of the drilling fluids. In this work was evaluated the behaviour of the activated clay test bodies in the presence of distilled water, aqueous solution potassium chlorides, and cationic inhibitors. The solutions were submitted at Capillary Suction Timer tests to evaluation the capacity of the water retention in activated clay samples. At the interpretation of the results was used Design of Experiments (DOE) by Response Surface Methodology (RSM), using Umetrics MODDE 7.0{sup TM} programme. It was observed that the clay samples when in contact with the solutions presented lower water retention than in the presence of distilled water only. This result indicates that the clay was inhibited. (author)

  15. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  16. Dispersion and retrievability of water quality indicators during tidal cycles in coastal Salaya, Gulf of Kachchh (West coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.; Jayakumar, S.; Ramaiah, N.; Vethamony, P.

    Author version: Environ. Monit. Assess., vol.169(1-4); 2010; 639-645 Dispersion and retrievability of water quality indicators during tidal cycles in coastal Salaya, Gulf of Kachchh (West coast of India). C.Mohandass *, S. Jaya Kumar, N. Ramaiah...; Brookings et al. 1985), affect ambient nutrient concentrations as well as water quality. Understanding their influence is critical to both basic ecology of tidal creeks and for evolving sampling protocols and pollutant-mitigation advisories. Lindquist...

  17. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  18. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  19. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  20. Siderophore sorption to clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Patricia A; Haack, Elizabeth A; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2009-08-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight organic ligands exuded by some aerobic organisms and plants to acquire Fe under Fe-limited conditions. The hydroxamate siderophores may sorb to aluminosilicate clays through a variety of mechanisms depending upon the nature of the clay and of the siderophore along with solution conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and presence of metal cations. They may also affect metal binding to clays. Here, we review previous studies of siderophore sorption to aluminosilicate clays; briefly discuss how the techniques of X-ray diffractometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy may be applied to such studies; review effects of siderophores on metal sorption to clays; and highlight some areas for future research.

  1. Interaction of Auramine O with montmorillonite clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Avelardo U.C.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Gessner, Fergus; Neumann, Miguel G. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil); Schmitt Cavalheiro, Carla C., E-mail: carla@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The spectroscopic behaviour of Auramine O (AuO) in aqueous suspensions of montmorillonite clays was studied using absorption and static and dynamic fluorescence techniques. The fluorescence of Auramine O increases immediately after mixing the dye solution with the suspension of clay due to its adsorption on the external surface of the clays, which restricts the torsional molecular motion of Auramine. At longer times, the dye molecules migrate into the interlamellar region of the clay particles. Aggregation of the dye molecules can occur in the interlayer region, leading to the decrease of the fluorescence emission. The fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub F}) of AuO on the natural montmorillonites SAz-1, SWy-1, Syn-1 and Laponite clays were 0.015, 0.007, 0.016 and 0.017, respectively. These values are higher than the Φ{sub F} of AuO in aqueous solution and are of the same order of magnitude of the Φ{sub F} found for viscous solvents such as n-hexanol and n-heptanol (0.014 and 0.015). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies of adsorbed Auramine on clays revealed multi-exponential decays with components in the 25–36, 219–362 and 1300–1858 ps ranges. The short-lived components can be attributed to species bound to external surface and the longer lifetime is assigned to dye molecules in interlayer spaces interacting strongly with the clay. It seems clear that the binding of Auramine to clays causes a significant reduction of the rate of internal conversion that does involve rotational diffusion, so that the clay will be locked in a conformational geometry unfavourable for internal conversion. -- Highlights: ► Auramine O was dissolved in dispersions of different clays. ► The fluorescence quantum yields were higher than in aqueous solution. ► Decrease of the emission and triexponential decays were observed on SAz-1, LapRDS and SYn-1. ► On Swy-1 the decrease was slower and the decay monoexponential. ► The dye produces aggregates on the internal

  2. Movimiento del agua en Argiudoles de la Pampa Ondulada con diferente mineralogía de arcillas Water movement in some Argiudolls of the rolling Pampa differing in their clay mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Guillermo Castiglioni

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Los suelos zonales de la Pampa Ondulada son Argiudoles Típicos y Vérticos los cuales se diferencian en la composición mineralógica de su fracción arcilla. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue analizar las vinculaciones entre la tasa de movimiento del agua edáfica con algunos atributos relacionados con la composición mineralógica de la fracción arcilla, en distintos suelos representativos de la región mencionada. Se tomaron muestras de los horizontes A, BA/BE, Bt y BC de dos Argiudoles Típicos y de un Argiudol Vértico, realizando sobre las mismas determinaciones relacionadas con la cantidad y tipo de las arcillas presentes. A su vez mediante diferentes técnicas se evaluaron el sistema poroso del suelo y el movimiento de agua edáfica. En los horizontes Bt, aquellos parámetros que integran el tipo y el contenido de arcillas, como el COLE y la CIC, mostraron estar mejor vinculados con el movimiento de agua edáfica que cuando se consideró únicamente el porcentaje de arcilla. La distinta porosidad estructural generada dentro de los agregados de los horizontes Bt, originó diferencias en su difusividad y conductividad hidráulica no saturada, a contenidos de humedad por encima del 50% de saturación. En aquellos horizontes con mayor actividad biológica y menor contenido de arcilla, el movimiento de agua se realizó en forma independiente de las características de las arcillas presentes.Typic and Vertic Argiudolls, which differ in the composition of their clay fraction, are the zonal soils in the Rolling Pampa of Argentina. The aim of this work has been to analize the relationship between water movement and diverse soil properties in some representative soils of the Rolling Pampa, differing in their clay mineralogy. The A, BA/ BE, Bt and BC horizons of two Typic and one Vertic Argiudolls were sampled and a number of properties related with clay content and clay type were measured. Soil porosity and soil water movement were also

  3. Prisoners in their habitat? Generalist dispersal by habitat specialists: a case study in southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Centeno-Cuadros

    Full Text Available Habitat specialists inhabiting scarce and scattered habitat patches pose interesting questions related to dispersal such as how specialized terrestrial mammals do to colonize distant patches crossing hostile matrices. We assess dispersal patterns of the southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus, a habitat specialist whose habitat patches are distributed through less than 2% of the study area (overall 600 km² and whose populations form a dynamic metapopulational network. We predict that individuals will require a high ability to move through the inhospitable matrix in order to avoid genetic and demographic isolations. Genotypes (N = 142 for 10 microsatellites and sequences of the whole mitochondrial Control Region (N = 47 from seven localities revealed a weak but significant genetic structure partially explained by geographic distance. None of the landscape models had a significant effect on genetic structure over that of the Euclidean distance alone and no evidence for efficient barriers to dispersal was found. Contemporary gene flow was not severely limited for A. sapidus as shown by high migration rates estimates (>10% between non-neighbouring areas. Sex-biased dispersal tests did not support differences in dispersal rates, as shown by similar average axial parent-offspring distances, in close agreement with capture-mark-recapture estimates. As predicted, our results do not support any preferences of the species for specific landscape attributes on their dispersal pathways. Here, we combine field and molecular data to illustrate how a habitat specialist mammal might disperse like a habitat generalist, acquiring specific long-distance dispersal strategies as an adaptation to patchy, naturally fragmented, heterogeneous and unstable habitats.

  4. Resistance to fresh and salt water in intertidal mites (Acari: Oribatida): implications for ecology and hydrochorous dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingstl, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    The resistance to fresh water and seawater in three intertidal oribatid mite species from Bermuda, Alismobates inexpectatus, Fortuynia atlantica and Carinozetes bermudensis, was tested in laboratory experiments. Larvae are more sensitive to fresh and salt water, nymphs and adults showed equal tolerances. Fortuynia atlantica and A. inexpectatus were more resistant to salt water whereas C. bermudensis survived longer in fresh water. Differences in the resistance to fresh and salt water among the three species may be related to their different vertical occurrences in the eulittoral zone but also to the ability of single species to dwell in periodically brackish waters. In all three species half of the specimens survived at least 10 days in fresh water and more than 18 days in salt water. Maximal submersion time in fresh and salt water ranged from 40 to 143 days. Based on median lethal times it could be estimated that each species would be able to survive transport in seawater along the Gulf Stream over a distance of 3,000 km, from Central America to Bermuda. Thus hydrochorous dispersal should be assumed as the most likely mode of dispersal in intertidal fortuyniid and selenoribatid mites.

  5. 描述黏粒含量对土-水特征曲线影响规律的分形模型%A fractal model describing the relation between clay content and soil-water characteristic curve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶高梁; 张季如; 庄心善; 杨琳

    2014-01-01

    Clay content of soil has an important influence on soil-water characteristic curve. To establish a theoretical model describing the influence of clay content on soil-water characteristic curve, the relation be-tween the clay content and fractal dimension in terms of mass has been established by means of a fractal theory. This relation was verified by test data and used to explain the basic rule that the fractal dimension increases with the increase of clay content. On this basis, a fractal model which reflects the influence of clay content on soil-water characteristic curve was suggested based on the previous results. The results show that the soil-water characteristic curves predicted by the model are in good agreement with several tests data. The model was applied to predict the soil-water characteristic curves of some soils with different clay content and shows the influence of clay content on the soil-water characteristic curve, i.e., large clay content corresponds to large water content of volume in the case of same soil suction.%土体黏粒含量对土-水特征曲线有重要影响。为了建立描述黏粒含量对土-水特征曲线影响规律的理论模型,本文基于分形理论,建立了质量分维数与黏粒含量的关系式,利用已有试验数据验证了该式的合理性,并从理论上解释了质量分维数随黏粒含量增大的基本规律。在此基础上,结合已有的研究成果,建立了分形模型描述土体黏粒含量对土-水特征曲线影响规律,该模型预测的土-水特征曲线与已有不同土类样本的试验数据吻合较好,从而证明了该模型的有效性。最后,利用该模型同时预测了不同黏粒含量典型土体的土-水特征曲线,阐明了黏粒含量对土-水特征曲线影响的基本规律,即相同吸力条件下,黏粒含量越高,则体积含水率越高。

  6. Characterization of biodegradable polyurethane nanoparticles and thermally induced self-assembly in water dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chun-Wei; Su, Chiu-Hun; Jeng, U-Ser; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2014-04-23

    Waterborne polyurethanes (PU) with different compositions of biodegradable oligodiols as the soft segment were synthesized as nanoparticles (NPs) in this study. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS), multiangle light scattering (MALS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we demonstrated that these NPs were compact spheres with different shape factors. The temperature-dependent swelling of the PU NPs in water was distinct. In particular, PU NPs with 80 mol % polycaprolactone (PCL) diol and 20 mol % poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) diol as the soft segment had significant swelling (∼450%) at 37 °C. This was accompanied by a sol-gel transition observed in about 2 min for the NP dispersion. The thermally induced swelling and self-assembly of these NPs were associated with the secondary force (mainly hydrogen bonding) and degree of crystallinity, which depended on the soft segment compositions. The thermo-responsiveness of the PU NPs with mixed biodegradable oligodiols may be employed to design smart biodegradable carriers for delivery of cells or drugs near body temperature.

  7. Ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of aromatic amines in water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Chang Fan; Zheng Liang Hu; Mei Lan Chen; Chao Shen Tu; Yan Zhu

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a new microextraction method termed ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) was demonstrated for the extraction of 2-methylaniline, 4-chloroaniline, 1-naphthylamine and 4-aminobiphenyl in aqueous matrices. After extraction the ionic liquid (IL) phase was injected directly into the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system for determination. Some parameters that might affect the extraction efficiency were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linear relationship, sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) for the four analytes were in the range of 0.45-2.6 μg L-1. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D., n = 6) were in the range of 6.2-9.8%. This method was applied for the analysis of the real water samples. The recoveries ranged from 93.4 to 106.4%. The main advantages of the method are high speed, high recovery, good repeatability and volatile organic solvent-free.

  8. Dispersion/dilution enhances phytoplankton blooms in low-nutrient waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehahn, Yoav; Koren, Ilan; Sharoni, Shlomit; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Vardi, Assaf; Boss, Emmanuel

    2017-03-31

    Spatial characteristics of phytoplankton blooms often reflect the horizontal transport properties of the oceanic turbulent flow in which they are embedded. Classically, bloom response to horizontal stirring is regarded in terms of generation of patchiness following large-scale bloom initiation. Here, using satellite observations from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre and a simple ecosystem model, we show that the opposite scenario of turbulence dispersing and diluting fine-scale (∼1-100 km) nutrient-enriched water patches has the critical effect of regulating the dynamics of nutrients-phytoplankton-zooplankton ecosystems and enhancing accumulation of photosynthetic biomass in low-nutrient oceanic environments. A key factor in determining ecological and biogeochemical consequences of turbulent stirring is the horizontal dilution rate, which depends on the effective eddy diffusivity and surface area of the enriched patches. Implementation of the notion of horizontal dilution rate explains quantitatively plankton response to turbulence and improves our ability to represent ecological and biogeochemical processes in oligotrophic oceans.

  9. Solubility of amphotericin B in water-lecithin-dispersions and lecithin-based submicron emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Claudia; Perez, Sebastian; Monteagudo, Ezequiel; Carlucci, Adriana; Bregni, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate water-lecithin-dispersions (WLDs) as carriers for amphotericin B (AmB) and to compare the drug solubility in WLDs and O/W lecithin-based submicron emulsions (SMEs) in order to evaluate the influence of lecithin content on the dosage form solubilization of the active compound. WLDs and different SMEs with either 1.2 or 2.4% of lecithin were prepared. WLD with 2.4% lecithin show a 10-fold increase in solubilization of AmB compared with 1.2% lecithin WLD. SMEs with 1.2% lecithin show an increase of over 400 times in solubilization compared with WLD containing the same concentration of lecithin, whereas SMEs with 2.4% lecithin show an increase of over 40 times compared with the corresponding WLD. Drug solubilization in SMEs with 2.4% lecithin is not significantly greater than in those containing 1.2% lecithin. The content of surfactant Brij 97 ® had a significant influence on drug solubilization in SMEs (P < 0.05). Results indicate that indicate that SMEs are proper systems to solubilize AmB. It can be assumed that solubilization is due to the formulation microstructure and not to the separate components themselves.

  10. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  11. Crystalline structure and morphological properties of porous cellulose/clay composites: The effect of water and ethanol as coagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Safoura; Desobry, Stephane; Keramat, Javad; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-05

    In this study, cellulose foams incorporated with surface-modified montmorillonite (SM-MMT) were prepared following NaOH dissolution and regeneration into water and ethanol. According to the SEM images, the type of coagulating agent significantly affected the morphological properties of composite foams. The crystalline parameters were evaluated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), which showed an increase in crystal size as the effect of SM-MMT; however, the crystal size decreased for the samples treated with ethanol. The distribution of hydrogen bond types was also investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Resolving the hydrogen-bonded OH stretching band at around 3340 into five bands indicated that presence of SM-MMT caused the shift of OH-stretching vibration band to lower wave number due to new hydrogen bonds between cellulose and SM-MMT. In general, the results indicated a change in the contents of the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds when the coagulant was changed or SM-MMT was incorporated.

  12. Possibilities of practical usage of dispersed aluminim oxidation by liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larichev, M. N.; Laricheva, O. O.; Shaitura, N. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this work is to show the possibility of practical usage of the environmentally pure oxidation process of preliminarily dispersed aluminum (aluminum powders of the ASD or PAD grade according to TU (Technical Specifications) 48-5-226-87, which are serially produced in industry) with liquid water in order to obtain gaseous hydrogen in volumes sufficient to provide the operation of energizers based on airhydrogen fuel cells (AHFC) for portable and stationary devices (up to 3 kW). It is shown that the synthesis of aluminum oxides-hydroxides with the specified phase and chemical compositions as well as the particle shape and size can be provided simultaneously with producing commercial hydrogen. The practical usage of hydrogen, which is formed in the oxidation reaction of metallic aluminum with liquid water at pressures close to atmospheric (particularly, to service AHFCs), requires reaction intensification to increase the oxidation rate of aluminum. In this work, we considered the aspects of practical implementation of thermal, ultrasonic, and chemical activation as well as their combinations for this purpose. As the chemical activator of oxidation, we used the additives of calcium oxide (<5% of the mass of oxidized aluminum). Application of each activation method affects the phase and chemical compositions as well as the structure of formed aluminum hydroxides, which provides the possibility of their reproducible production. Thus, simultaneously with the production of commercial hydrogen, solid oxidation products satisfying the needs of industry in aluminum oxides and having the specified composition, purity, and particle shape and size can be synthesized. The acquired experimental results and elements of the design of specially developed industrial apparatuses, which were used when performing this work, can be applied when designing the model of the hydrogen generator—the prototype of the hydrogen generator for portable and stationary devices or devices

  13. Optical pH measurements with water dispersion of polyaniline nanoparticles and their redox sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Tom; Harju, Leo; Ivaska, Ari

    2006-05-01

    A new method for optical pH and redox measurements with a commercially available water dispersion of polyaniline (PANI) nanoparticles (mean particle size, 46 nm) is presented. The pH measurements are based on the acid-base equilibrium of PANI and were carried out either by combining both the automated sequential injection analysis (SIA) and UV-visible spectrophotometric techniques or with a fiber-optic light guide. In the former case, the detection was done in continuous mode at lambda = 800 nm by using the SIA technique for transporting the sample to a flow-through cell, which was placed in the light path of the photometer. With the fiber-optic light guide, the detection was done in batch mode at lambda = 400 and 580 nm. In both methods, fresh pH reagent (PANI) solution was used in each measurement, thus overcoming the problem with hysteresis (memory effect), which is usually observed with PANI films. The PANI nanoparticles were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy in pH buffer solutions between pH 2-12 and a protonation constant of logK(0.5H,L)(H(0.5)L) = 4.4 was calculated from these data. Fast pH measurements can be done between pH 6 and 10.5 depending on the measuring technique. It is possible to determine pH with an accuracy of 0.1 pH unit between pH 8 and 10.5 (RSD, 0.5-2%). Redox transitions typical for PANI films were also observed for water solutions of PANI nanoparticles in the presence of the hexacyanoferrate(II/III) and the iron(II/III) oxalate redox couples. The absorbance at lambda = 875 nm is linearly dependent on the logarithm of the concentration ratio (0.1-10) of the iron oxalate redox couple.

  14. Dispersed three-pulse infrared photon echoes of nitrous oxide in water and octanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, J T; Schneck, J R; Chieffo, L R; Erramilli, S; Ziegler, L D

    2013-12-12

    Dispersed IR three-pulse photon echoes due to the antisymmetric (ν3) stretch mode of N2O dissolved in H2O and 1-octanol at room temperature are reported and analyzed. The experimentally determined transition frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) in these two solvents is explained in terms of inertial solvent contributions, hydrogen bond network fluctuations, and, for octanol, the motions of the alkyl chains. The H2O hydrogen bond fluctuations result in 1.5 ps FFCF decay, in agreement with relaxation rates determined from photon echo based measurements of other aqueous solutions including salt solutions. In octanol, hydrogen bond fluctuations decay on a slower time scale of 3.3 ps and alkyl chain motions result in an inhomogeneous broadening contribution to the ν3 absorption spectrum that decays on a 35 ps time scale. Rotational reorientation of N2O is nearly 3 times faster in octanol as compared to water. Although the vibrational ν3 N2O absorption line shapes in water and octanol are similar, the line widths result from different coherence loss mechanisms. A hot band contribution in the N2O in octanol solution is found to have a significant effect on the echo spectrum due to its correspondingly stronger transition moment than that of the fundamental transition. The dephasing dynamics of the N2O ν3 stretch mode is of interest as a probe in ultrafast studies of complex or nanoconfined systems with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions such as phospholipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. These results demonstrate the value of the N2O molecule to act as a reporter of equilibrium fluctuations in such complex systems particularly due to its solubility characteristics and long vibrational lifetime.

  15. Influence of maltodextrin dextrose equivalent value on rheological and dispersion properties of sunflower oil in water emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokić Petar P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of dextrose equivalent (DE of maltodextrin present in continuous phase on flow along with dispersion properties of sunflower oil in water emulsions has been investigated. Both, rheological and disperse characteristics of the emulsions were greatly influenced by continuous phase viscosity and thus by the DE value of maltodextrin.. The smaller DE value the greater high shear viscosity and the smaller the droplet size. Irrespective of the amount and DE value of maltodextrin used was, all the emulsions showed a pseudoplastic behaviour.

  16. Using a test solution of NaCl in water for studying the finely dispersed spraying of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmatov, A. N.; Vorozhtsov, B. I.; Arkhipov, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Both theoretically and experimentally, the suitability of a technique for studying the finely dispersed spraying of liquids based on an analysis of salt residue particles formed as a result of evaporation of test solutions of NaCl in water was evaluated. Data gained in studying the dispersion of droplets in the droplet clouds produced by pulsed and ultrasonic atomizers are reported. During pulsed atomization, salt residue particles of various morphologies were found to form, this finding pointing to realization of unsteady conditions for particle evolution.

  17. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m(2)g(-1). As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle water jet resistance and thermal stability up to 400 °C compared to the surfaces fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  18. Fabrication of water-dispersible single-walled carbon nanotube powder using N-methylmorpholine N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyejun; Woo, Jong Seok; Han, Joong Tark; Park, Soo-Young

    2017-09-13

    Dispersion of nanocarbon materials in liquid media is one of prerequisites for practical applications via solution processing such as spraying, printing, spinning, etc. Here we report that water-dispersible single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared through successive treatments with chlorosulfuric acid (CSA)/H2O2 and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMO) monohydrate. The powder of the CSA/H2O2- and NMO-treated SWCNTs (N-SWCNTs) could be readily redispersed in water in concentrations as high as 1 g L-1 without requiring a dispersant. The mechanism responsible for the high dispersity of the N-SWCNT powder in polar solvents, including water, was elucidated based on the high polarity of the NMO molecule. In order to highlight the wide applicability of the N-SWCNTs, they were used successfully to prepare conducting thin films by spray-coating plastic substrates with an aqueous hybrid solution containing the N-SWCNTs and Ag nanowires (NWs). In addition, a flexible, large-area thin-film heater was prepared based on the N-SWCNT/AgNW hybrid film with a transmittance of 93% and sheet resistance of 30 Ω sq-1. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Simulation Of Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination For Remediation Of Tce In A Fractured Clay System: A New Model Approach And Application To Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann;

    2010-01-01

    with interspersed sand lenses and stringers. The transport model couples diffusion dominated transport in the clay matrix, with advective‐dispersive transport in the fractures and higher permeability sand lenses. The reactive model calculates sequential reductive dechlorination of TCE (trichloroethylene) to its...... a contamination of trichloroethylene located in a fractured clay till. The site is simulated using the model developed. Fracture geometry, site parameters and degradation rates are based on observations from the site and lab studies. The risk for drinking water is assessed and cleanup times are simulated using...

  20. Improving the physical properties of starch using a new kind of water dispersible nano-hybrid reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Noé J; Candal, Roberto; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia; Rubiolo, Gerardo H

    2015-08-20

    Plasticized cassava starch matrix composites reinforced by a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-hercynite (FeAl2O4) nanomaterial were developed. The hybrid nanomaterial consists of FeAl2O4 nanoparticles anchored strongly to the surface of the MWCNT. This nano-hybrid filler shows an irregular geometry, which provides a strong mechanical interlocking with the matrix, and excellent stability in water, ensuring a good dispersion in the starch matrix. The composite containing 0.04wt.% of the nano-hybrid filler displays increments of 370% in the Young's modulus, 138% in tensile strength and 350% in tensile toughness and a 70% decrease in water vapor permeability relative to the matrix material. All of these significant improvements are explained in terms of the nano-hybrid filler homogenous dispersion and its high affinity with both plasticizers, glycerol and water, which induces crystallization without deterioration of the tensile toughness.

  1. Water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of fungicides in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wan-Chi; Chu, Shang-Ping; Kong, Po-Hsin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chen, Jung-Hsuan; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-09-17

    A sample preparation method, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction assisted by an emulsion with low concentration of a surfactant in water and dispersed solvent coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was developed for the analysis of the fungicides cyprodinil, procymidone, fludioxonil, flusilazole, benalaxyl, and tebuconazole in wine. A microsyringe was used to withdraw and discharge a mixture of extraction solvent and 240 μL of an aqueous solution of Triton X-100 (the dispersed agent) four times within 10 s to form a cloudy emulsion in the syringe. This emulsion was then injected into a 5 mL wine sample spiked with all of the above fungicides. The total extraction time was approximately 0.5 min. Under optimum conditions using 1-octanol (12 μL) as extraction solvent, the linear range of the method in analysis of all six fungicides was 0.05-100 μg L(-1), and the limit of detection ranged from 0.013 to 0.155 μg L(-1). The absolute recoveries (n = 3) and relative recoveries (n = 3) were 30-83 and 81-108% for white wine at 0.5, 5, and 5 μg L(-1), and 30-92 and 81-110% for red wine, respectively. The intraday (n = 7) and interday (n = 6) relative standard deviations ranged from 4.4 to 8.8% and from 4.3 to 11.2% at 0.5 μg L(-1), respectively. The method achieved high enrichment factors. It is an alternative sample preparation technique with good performance.

  2. Graphene arrested in laponite-water colloidal glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Saeed M; Qutubuddin, Syed; Schiraldi, David A

    2012-02-28

    Graphene production in water from graphite sources is an important technological route toward harvesting the unique properties of this material. Graphene forms thermodynamically unstable dispersions in water, limiting the use of this solvent due to aggregation. We show that graphene-water dispersions can be controlled kinetically to produce graphene by using laponite clay. Laponite exhibits rapid gelation kinetics when dispersed in water above its gelation concentration, allowing graphene aggregation to be halted after exfoliation in water at ambient conditions. The transparency of laponite colloidal glass and films is important in examining the extent of graphene exfoliation.

  3. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Cox, Stephen J; Hu, Xiao L; Sorella, Sandro; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields...

  4. Effects of oil dispersants on photodegradation of pyrene in marine water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yanyan [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Fu, Jie [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); O’Reilly, S.E. [U.S. Department of the Interior, Gulf of Mexico OCS, Office of Environment, New Orleans, LA 70123 (United States); Zhao, Dongye, E-mail: zhaodon@auburn.edu [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Oil dispersant enhances pyrene photodegradation in seawater. • Oil dispersant increases formation of superoxide radicals. • Pyrene photodegradation shows a two-stage kinetics and follows first-order rate law. • Pyrene is degraded mainly through electron transfer from excited pyrene to oxygen. • Higher ionic strength and temperature and lower HA favor pyrene photodegradation. - Abstract: This work investigated effects of a popular oil dispersant (Corexit EC9500A) on UV- or sunlight-mediated photodegradation of pyrene (a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in seawater. The presence of 18 and 180 mg/L of the dispersant increased the first-order photodegradation rate by 5.5% and 16.7%, respectively, and reduced or ceased pyrene volatilization. By combining individual first-order rate laws for volatilization and photodegradation, we proposed an integrated kinetic model that can adequately predict the overall dissipation of pyrene from seawater. Mechanistic studies indicated that superoxide radicals played a predominant role in pyrene photodegradation, and the dispersant enhanced formation of superoxide radicals. 1-Hydroxypyrene was the main intermediate regardless of the dispersant, suggesting that electrons were transferred from excited pyrene to oxygen. In the presence of 18 mg/L of the dispersant, the photodegradation rate increased with increasing ionic strength and temperature, but decreased with increasing HA concentration, and remained independent of solution pH. The results are important in understanding roles of oil dispersants on environmental fate of persistent oil components in natural and engineered systems.

  5. Neoformation of clay in lateral root catchments of mallee eucalypts: a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboom, William H; Pate, John S; Aspandiar, Mehrooz

    2010-01-01

    A previous paper (Annals of Botany 103: 673-685) described formation of clayey pavements in lateral root catchments of eucalypts colonizing a recently formed sand dune in south-west Western Australia. Here chemical and morphological aspects of their formation at the site are studied. Chemical and physical examinations of soil cores through pavements and sand under adjacent heath assessed build-up of salts, clay and pH changes in or below pavements. Relationships of root morphology to clay deposition were examined and deposits subjected to scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Xylem transport of mineral elements in eucalypt and non-eucalypt species was studied by analysis of xylem (tracheal) sap from lateral roots. The columns of which pavements are composed develop exclusively on lower-tier lateral roots. Such sites show intimate associations of fine roots, fungal filaments, microbiota and clay deposits rich in Si, Al and Fe. Time scales for construction of pavements by eucalypts were assessed. Cores through columns of pavemented profiles showed gross elevations of bulk density, Al, Fe and Si in columns and related increases in pH, Mg and Ca status in lower profiles. A cutting through the dune exhibited pronounced alkalinity (pH 7-10) under mallee woodland versus acidity (pH 5-6.5) under proteaceous heath. Xylem sap analyses showed unusually high concentrations of Al, Fe, Mg and Si in dry-season samples from column-bearing roots. Deposition of Al-Fe-Si-rich clay is pivotal to pavement construction by eucalypts and leads to profound chemical and physical changes in relevant soil profiles. Microbial associates of roots are likely to be involved in clay genesis, with parent eucalypts supplying the required key mineral elements and carbon sources. Acquisition of the Al and Fe incorporated into clay derives principally from hydraulic uplift from ground water via deeply penetrating tap roots.

  6. Theoretical study of the atrazine pesticide interaction with pyrophyllite and Ca(2+) -montmorillonite clay surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunces, Bastien; Hoyau, Sophie; Benoit, Magali; Tarrat, Nathalie; Bessac, Fabienne

    2017-01-30

    Atrazine, a pesticide belonging to the s-triazine family, is one of the most employed pesticides. Due to its negative impact on the environment, it has been forbidden within the European Union since 2004 but remains abundant in soils. For these reasons, its behavior in soils and water at the atomic scale is of great interest. In this article, we have investigated, using DFT, the adsorption of atrazine onto two different clay surfaces: a pyrophyllite clay and an Mg-substituted clay named montmorillonite, with Ca(2+) compensating cations on its surface. The calculations show that the atrazine molecule is physisorbed on the pyrophyllite surface, evidencing the necessity to use dispersion-corrected computational methods. The adsorption energies of atrazine on montmorillonite are two to three times larger than on pyrophyllite, depending on the adsorption pattern. The computed adsorption energy is of about -30 kcal mol(-1) for the two most stable montmorillonite-atrazine studied isomers. For these complexes, the large adsorption energy is related to the strong interaction between the chlorine atom of the atrazine molecule and one of the Ca(2+) compensating cations of the clay surface. The structural modifications induced by the adsorption are localized: for the surface, close to substitutions and particularly below the Ca(2+) cations; in the molecule, around the chlorine atom when Ca(2+) interacts strongly with this basic site in a monodentate mode. This study shows the important role of the alkaline earth cations on the adsorption of atrazine on clays, suggesting that the atrazine pesticide retention will be significant in Ca(2+) -montmorillonite clays. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Water- and organo-dispersible gold nanoparticles supported by using ammonium salts of hyperbranched polystyrene: preparation and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Nishikata, Takashi; Kojima, Keisuke; Chikama, Katsumi; Nagashima, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (1 nm in size) stabilized by ammonium salts of hyperbranched polystyrene are prepared. Selection of the R groups provides access to both water- and organo-dispersible gold nanoparticles. The resulting gold nanoparticles are subjected to studies on catalysis in solution, which include reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride, aerobic oxidation of alcohols, and homocoupling of phenylboronic acid. In the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the catalytic activity is clearly dependent on the size of the gold nanoparticles. For the aerobic oxidation of alcohols, two types of biphasic oxidation are achieved: one is the catalyst dispersing in the aqueous phase, whereas the other is in the organic phase. The catalysts are reusable more than four times without loss of the catalytic activity. Selective synthesis of biphenyl is achieved by the homocoupling of phenylboronic acid catalyzed by organo-dispersible gold nanoparticles.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Epoxy/Clay Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Jin; Seo, Dong Il; Lee, Jae Rock [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Taejon (Korea); Kim, Dae Su [School of Chemical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In this work, one of the smectitic clay, montmorillonite, was organically modified with dodecylammonium chloride to prepare the polymer/clay nanocomposites by melt intercalation. After DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A)/clay nanocomposites has been mixed with weight percent of clay, it was synthesized by heating the mixture to the exfoliation temperature at a heating rate of 10 degree C/min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the silicate interlayer of organically modified clay increased about 8 AA. No significant change in silicate interlayer of nanocomposites was observed with the increased clay content. The silicate interlayer of nanocomposites contained a uniform dispersion of exfoliated clay layers. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) showed that two exothermic processes occurred during the reaction. The lower temperature process was attributed to polymerization of pre-intercalated epoxide on the internal surfaces. Polymerization of the extragallery monomer on the external and internal surfaces of the clay particles occurred at the higher temperature. Thermal stability coefficient was increased with increasing the clay content as indicated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). 30 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Permeability Features of Water-Resistant Clay Layer in Northern Shaanxi Province While Shallowly Buried Coal Mining%陕北浅埋煤层开采隔水土层渗透性变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 李文平; 常金源; 都平平; 高颖

    2011-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of exploiting shallowly buried coal on the ground water and surface water in Shennan Mining Area of northern Shaanxi, we studied the water-resisting degrees of the key aquifuges in overlying soil strata under mining influence. Based on the geologic investigation in Shennan Mining Area, the results of water pressure tests, and the permeability coefficient of clays in Lishi and Bode Ground which are determined by medium-pressured triaxial servo with the process of clay loading and unloading, we proposed the effect of shallowly buried coal mining on the permeability coefficient of the clays. The results show that the shallowly buried coal mining results in thin bedrock roof falling completely, and the destabilization of clay strata results in a change of permeability coefficient of the clays with several orders in the connected fissures area. However, in the pull-apart area, the ground fissures make the permeability coefficient of clay in Lishi Ground largen. With the increase of pressure, the permeability coefficient of clay in Bode Ground becomes smaller, resulting in plastic deformation of the clay, giving a basis for calculating the phreatic level which determinates the possibility of water preserving for exploiting the shallowly buried coal seams.%为评价陕北神南矿区浅埋煤层开采对地下水及地表水的影响,对煤层上覆关键隔水土层的采动隔水性进行研究.在进行了神南矿区野外地质调查的基础上,采用中压三轴伺服仪测定神南矿区离石组黄土及保德组红土在三轴加载及卸载过程中的渗透系数,并结合采前、采后现场压水试验成果研究了浅埋煤层开采前后关键隔水黏土层渗透系数变化特征.试验结果表明:浅埋煤层开采引起薄层基岩整体切落,在贯通裂隙发育区上覆隔水土层失稳表现为渗透系数几个数量级的巨大增加;而在拉张区黏土层上部的离石黄土受地面裂缝影响渗透性

  10. Aqueous coating dispersion (pseudolatex) of zein improves formulation of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X N; Guo, H X; Heinamaki, J

    2010-05-01

    Zein is an alcohol soluble protein of corn origin that exhibits hydrophobic properties. Pseudolatexes are colloidal dispersions containing spherical solid or semisolid particles less than 1 microm in diameter and can be prepared from any existing thermoplastic water-insoluble polymer. The novel plasticized film-coating pseudolatex of zein was studied in formulation of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug. Film formation of plasticized aqueous dispersion was compared with film forming properties of plasticized organic solvent system (ethanol) of zein. The water vapor permeability (WVP), water uptake and erosion, and moisture sorption were evaluated with free films. The tablets containing metoprolol tartrate as a model drug were used in pan-coating experiments. Aqueous film coatings plasticized with PEG 400 exhibited very low water uptake. No significant difference in WVP, moisture sorption and erosion were found between aqueous films and organic solvent-based films of zein plasticized with PEG 400. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) images on microstructure of films showed that colloidal particle size of zein in the aqueous films was smaller than that observed in the solvent-based films. In addition, the aqueous-based films were more compact and smoother than the respective solvent-based films. The aqueous zein-coated tablets containing very water-soluble drug (metoprolol tartrate) exhibited clear sustained-release dissolution profiles in vitro, while the respective solvent-based film-coated tablets showed much faster drug release. Furthermore, aqueous zein-coated tablets had lower water absorption at high humidity conditions. In conclusion, the plasticized aqueous dispersion (pseudolatex) of zein can be used for moisture resistant film coating of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug.

  11. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  12. Soil Water Repellency of Sands and Clay as Affected by Particle Size%砂土和黏土的颗粒差异对土壤斥水性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松; 吴珺华; 董红艳; 张燕明

    2016-01-01

    斥水性土壤广泛存在于自然界中,并且对土壤环境和作物生长等有重要影响。建立理想化的土壤颗粒模型对砂土和黏土的斥水特性进行计算分析。结果表明:当接触角很小时,砂土中不存在斥水现象。随着接触角的增大,砂土斥水性与含水率密切相关,砂土的密实度对其斥水性也有重要影响,当砂土比较密实时,土壤的“亲水”与“斥水”特性对含水率特别敏感,随着含水率的变化,砂土可能由亲水性较好的土壤转变为斥水性土壤;当砂土比较松散时,土壤颗粒的斥水性对含水率并不敏感。当黏土接触角略小于90°且湿润半径b也较小时,黏土也存在斥水现象。如果黏土颗粒的接触角较小或接触角小于90°且湿润半径b较大,黏土总是亲水的。黏土含水率较大时,斥水特性由土壤颗粒的接触角决定。%Water-repellent soils,existing widely in nature,have some important effects on soil environment and crop growth. In order to analyze water repellency of sand and clay,models of sand and clay different in particle size were built. Results showed that no phenomenon of water repellency was found in sand soil when the contact angle of water with sand was small. Water repellency of sand soil was closely related to soil water content when the sand-water contact angle was big. Compactness of the soil was another important factor affecting soil water repellency. When the sand soil was highly compacted,whether the soil was hydrophilic or hydrophobic was very sensitive to water content,and it might switch from one state to another with changing soil water content. When the sand soil was quite loose,it was no longer sensitive to soil water content. In clay soil with soil-water contact angle being slightly less than 90°and wetting radius b being small,the phenomenon of water repellency was observed. But when the clay soil was much smaller than 90°in soil-water and

  13. Clay Mineralogy of Shallow Core Sediments of Lake Acigöl, Denizli, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budakoglu, Murat; Karaman, Muhittin; Geredeli, Serpil; Unal, Hatice; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet

    2014-05-01

    Lake Acıgöl is a hypersaline and active industrial salt production lake located in Denizli, Turkey. Lake Acıgöl has been investigated to elucidate the distribution clay minerals under the saline conditions of the lake and carbonate and ophiolitic rocks controlled lake basin. The lake is very shallow and generally characterized by an un-stratified and whole oxygenated water table. Determination clay minerals in the bulk samples via XRD method was not possible due to the their small amount. Therefore, the sequential clay enrichment procedure applied to the bulk samples such as sample dispersion, removal of soluble salts and ions, and particle-size fractionation. The XRD analyses of normal, glycolated and heat-treated shallow core samples show that the dominant clay minerals in the samples to be illite, including the swelling montmorillonite and kaolinite minerals are encountered less frequently. Glauberite, Blodite, Dansite and Nickelblodite have been also identified as soda minerals by XRD studies.

  14. Assessment of the use of dispersants on oil spills in California marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel, K.; Ross, S.; Belore, R. [S.L. Ross Environmental Research Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Buffington, S. [U.S. Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Ogawa, C.; Panzer, D. [U.S. Minerals Management Service, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The technical issues regarding the use of dispersants to clean up oil spills from offshore production sources and transportation sources in California were assessed in this study which examined both operational and environmental issues. The operational issues included the dispersibility of produced and imported oils, along with the capabilities of California response resources to deal with typical spills and limiting environmental impacts to offshore environments. The environmental issues include the risks associated with typical spills and potential net environmental benefit of chemically dispersing oil spills. Most crude oils produced offshore California are heavy and border on the undispersable range, but the imported crudes are somewhat lighter. Modeling has shown that most produced oils and some imported oils emulsify quickly and weather more quickly to the point where they are no longer dispersible. There is a very narrow window of time for chemical dispersions to be used effectively. The net environmental benefit analysis demonstrates that the use of dispersants lessens the total environmental impact of spill scenarios. It was emphasized that it is necessary to act quickly if chemical dispersion is to be effective. Rapid response strategies are needed, including locally based vessel and helicopter spraying systems. 19 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Studies on incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays in polyurethane foams for increasing flame retardancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliano, J.; Gavilán García, Irma

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution we report the results of studying the incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays into polyurethane foams. A suspension in water of a sodium bentonite from Argentine Patagonia was interchanged with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) for 4 h at 80°C, rendering an exfoliated clay, which is nanometric in only one dimension. This nanoclay, when dispersed in the polyurethane, resulted in the same fire retardancy rating (UL-94) than when polyurethane was treated with a commercial nanoclay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low augmentations of polyurethane samples treated with the synthethized nanoclay (2,5% w/w) showed no differences respect to untreated polyurethane, except for the irregularity of void edges.

  16. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available are manufactured from raw clay as their primary ingredient. However concrete brick has also become a favoured material in recent times. This review will adumbrate the impact of these building materials on energy use and the environment....

  17. Clay goes patchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegel, W.K.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  18. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  19. Ultra-pure, water-dispersed Au nanoparticles produced by femtosecond laser ablation and fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiliūtė R

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reda Kubiliūtė,1,2 Ksenia A Maximova,3 Alireza Lajevardipour,1 Jiawey Yong,1 Jennifer S Hartley,1 Abu SM Mohsin,1 Pierre Blandin,3 James WM Chon,1 Marc Sentis,3 Paul R Stoddart,1 Andrei Kabashin,3 Ričardas Rotomskis,2 Andrew HA Clayton,1,4 Saulius Juodkazis1,4 1Centre for Micro-Photonics and Industrial Research Institute Swinburne, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia; 2Laboratory of Biomedical Physics, Vilnius University Institute of Oncology, Baublio, Vilnius, Lithuania; 3Aix-Marseille University, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Lasers, Plasmas and Photonics Processing Laboratory, Campus de Luminy, Marseille, France; 4The Australian National Fabrication Facility, Victoria node, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia Abstract: Aqueous solutions of ultra-pure gold nanoparticles have been prepared by methods of femtosecond laser ablation from a solid target and fragmentation from already formed colloids. Despite the absence of protecting ligands, the solutions could be (1 fairly stable and poly size-dispersed; or (2 very stable and monodispersed, for the two fabrication modalities, respectively. Fluorescence quenching behavior and its intricacies were revealed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in rhodamine 6G water solution. We show that surface-enhanced Raman scattering of rhodamine 6G on gold nanoparticles can be detected with high fidelity down to micromolar concentrations using the nanoparticles. Application potential of pure gold nanoparticles with polydispersed and nearly monodispersed size distributions are discussed. Keywords: nanotechnologies applications, methods of nanofabrication and processing, materials for nanomedicine

  20. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYAMIDE 11/CLAY NANOCOMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yu; Qin Zhang; Qiang Fu

    2004-01-01

    Polyamide 11 (PA 11) is a widely used polyamide resin, but its application is limited since the impact properties,tensile strength, and thermal properties are not very satisfactory for industrial application. In order to improve the mechanical properties of PA 11, in this paper, the preparation of polyamide 11/clay nanocomposites (PACN) via in-situ intercalated polymerization was reported. SEM, TEM and XRD were employed to investigate the dispersion of clay sheet in the matrix.The results indicate that clay layers were homogeneously dispersed in PA11 matrix on a nano-scale, and an exfoliated and intercalated structure co-existed in the composites. The mechanical and thermal properties of the obtained nanocomposites were improved to certain extent by the addition of clay.

  1. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  2. Manufacturing of solid dispersions of poorly water soluble drugs by spray drying: formulation and process considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Amrit; Worku, Zelalem Ayenew; Meeus, Joke; Guns, Sandra; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2013-08-30

    Spray drying is an efficient technology for solid dispersion manufacturing since it allows extreme rapid solvent evaporation leading to fast transformation of an API-carrier solution to solid API-carrier particles. Solvent evaporation kinetics certainly contribute to formation of amorphous solid dispersions, but also other factors like the interplay between the API, carrier and solvent, the solution state of the API, formulation parameters (e.g. feed concentration or solvent type) and process parameters (e.g. drying gas flow rate or solution spray rate) will influence the final physical structure of the obtained solid dispersion particles. This review presents an overview of the interplay between manufacturing process, formulation parameters, physical structure, and performance of the solid dispersions with respect to stability and drug release characteristics.

  3. Magnetic fabric analyses in analogue models of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lasanta, Cristina; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Casas-Sainz, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies in sedimentary rocks subjected to deformation indicate that magnetic fabrics orientation can be conditioned by multiple factors: sedimentary conditions, magnetic mineralogy, successive tectonic events, etc. All of them difficult the interpretation of the AMS as a marker of the deformation conditions. Analogue modeling allows to isolate the variables that act in a geological process and to determine the factors and in which extent they influence in the process. This study shows the magnetic fabric analyses applied to several analogue models developed with common commercial red clays. This material resembles natural clay materials that, despite their greater degree of impurities and heterogeneity, have been proved to record a robust magnetic signal carried by a mixture of para- and ferromagnetic minerals. The magnetic behavior of the modeled clay has been characterized by temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility curves (from 40 to 700°C). The measurements were performed combining a KLY-3S Kappabridge susceptometer with a CS3 furnace (AGICO Inc., Czech Republic). The obtained results indicate the presence of an important content of hematite as ferromagnetic phase, as well as a remarkable paramagnetic fraction, probably constituted by phyllosilicates. This mineralogy is common in natural materials such as Permo-Triassic red facies, and magnetic fabric analyses in these natural examples have given consistent results in different tectonic contexts. In this study, sedimentary conditions and magnetic mineralogy are kept constant and the influence of the tectonic regime in the magnetic fabrics is analyzed. Our main objective is to reproduce several tectonic contexts (strike-slip and compression) in a sedimentary environment where material is not yet compacted, in order to determine how tectonic conditions influence the magnetic fabric registered in each case. By dispersing the clays in water and after allowing their

  4. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  5. Mucoadhesive amorphous solid dispersions for sustained release of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFountaine, Justin S; Prasad, Leena Kumari; Miller, Dave A; McGinity, James W; Williams, Robert O

    2017-04-01

    The oral delivery of mucoadhesive patches has been shown to enhance the absorption of large molecules such as peptides. We hypothesized that this mechanism could have utility for poorly soluble small molecules by utilizing a mucoadhesive polymer as the matrix for an amorphous solid dispersion. Binary dispersions of itraconazole and carbomer (Carbopol 71G) were prepared utilizing a thermokinetic mixing process (KinetiSol Dispersing) and the physicochemical properties were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, calorimetry, and liquid chromatography. Adhesion of the dispersions to freshly excised porcine intestine was investigated with a texture analyzer. Minitablets were compressed from the optimal dispersion and further investigated in vitro and in vivo in rats. Thermokinetic mixing successfully processed amorphous dispersions up to 30% drug loading and each dispersion exhibited works of adhesion that were approximately an order of magnitude greater than a negative control in vitro. Ethylcellulose (EC) coated and uncoated minitablets prepared with the 30% drug load dispersion were delivered orally to rats and exhibited sustained release characteristics, with overall bioavailability greater for the uncoated minitablets compared to the EC-coated minitablets, similar to the rank order observed in our in vitro dissolution experiments. Necropsy studies showed that minitablets delivered with enteric-coated capsules targeted release to the distal small intestine and adhered to the intestinal mucosa, but the rat model presented limitations with respect to evaluating the overall performance. Based on the in vitro and in vivo results, further investigations in larger animals are a logical next step where fluid volumes, pH, and transit times are more favorable for the evaluated dosage forms.

  6. Response of the bacterial community in oil-contaminated marine water to the addition of chemical and biological dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Camila Rattes de Almeida; Jurelevicius, Diogo de Azevedo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Seldin, Lucy

    2016-12-15

    The use of dispersants in different stages of the oil production chain and for the remediation of water and soil is a well established practice. However, the choice for a chemical or biological dispersant is still a controversial subject. Chemical surfactants that persist long in the environment may pose problems of toxicity themselves; therefore, biosurfactants are considered to constitute an environmentally friendly and effective alternative. Nevertheless, the putative effects of such agents on the microbiomes of oil-contaminated and uncontaminated marine environments have not been sufficiently evaluated. Here, we studied the effects of the surfactant Ultrasperse II(®) and the surfactin (biosurfactant) produced by Bacillus sp. H2O-1 on the bacterial communities of marine water. Specifically, we used quantitative PCR and genetic fingerprint analyses to study the abundance and structure of the bacterial communities in marine water collected from two regions with contrasting climatic conditions. The addition of either chemical surfactant or biosurfactant influenced the structure and abundance of total and oil-degrading bacterial communities of oil-contaminated and uncontaminated marine waters. Remarkably, the bacterial communities responded similarly to the addition of oil and/or either the surfactant or the biosurfactant in both set of microcosms. After 30 days of incubation, the addition of surfactin enhanced the oil-degrading bacteria more than the chemical surfactant. However, no increase of hydrocarbon biodegradation values was observed, irrespective of the dispersant used. These data contribute to an increased understanding of the impact of novel dispersants on marine bacteriomes before commercial release into the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Highly stable noble metal nanoparticles dispersible in biocompatible solvents: synthesis of cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles in water and DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju-Nam, Yon; Abdussalam-Mohammed, Wanisa; Ojeda, Jesus J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of novel cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersible in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for their potential use in biomedical applications. All the cationic-functionalising ligands currently reported in the literature are ammonium-based species. Here, the synthesis and characterisation of an alternative system, based on phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions and phosphonioalkylthioacetate were carried out. We have also demonstrated that our phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions readily disproportionate into phosphonioalkylthiolates in situ during the synthesis of gold nanoparticles produced by the borohydride reduction of gold(III) salts. The synthesis of the cationic gold nanoparticles using these phosphonium ligands was carried out in water and DMSO. UV-visible spectroscopic and TEM studies have shown that the phosphonioalkylthiolates bind to the surface of gold nanoparticles which are typically around 10 nm in diameter. The resulting cationic-functionalised gold nanoparticles are dispersible in aqueous media and in DMSO, which is the only organic solvent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drug carrier tests. This indicates their potential future use in biological applications. This work shows the synthesis of a new family of phosphonium-based ligands, which behave as cationic masked thiolate ligands in the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles. These highly stable colloidal cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersed in water and DMSO can offer a great opportunity for the design of novel biorecognition and drug delivery systems.

  8. Examination of effective stress in clay rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effective stress in indurated clay rock theoretically and experimentally. A stress concept is derived from the analysis of the microstructure and of the pore water in the highly-indurated Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks, and subsequently validated by various experiments performed on these claystones. The concept suggests that the interparticle or effective stress in a dense clay–water system is transferred through both the adsorbed interparticle pore water in narrow pores and the solid–solid contact between non-clay mineral grains. The experiments show that the adsorbed pore water in the claystones is capable of bearing deviatoric effective stresses up to the failure strength. The applied stresses are for the most part or even totally transferred by the bound pore water, i.e. the swelling pressure in the interparticle bound pore water is almost equivalent to the effective stress. This stress concept provides a reasonable view to the nature of the effective stress in argillaceous rock and forms the fundamental basis for studies of the hydro-mechanical properties and processes in clay formations.

  9. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction for the fast determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi-Guo; Lee, Hian Kee

    2010-02-15

    A new two-step microextraction technique, combining dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (D-micro-SPE), was developed for the fast gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental samples. A feature of the new procedure lies in that any organic solvent immiscible with water can be used as extractant in DLLME. A special apparatus, such as conical-bottom test tubes, and tedious procedures of centrifugation, refrigeration of the solvent, and then thawing it, associated with classical DLLME or similar techniques are not necessary in the new procedure, which potentially lends itself to possible automation. In the present D-micro-SPE approach, hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles were used to retrieve the extractant of 1-octanol in the DLLME step. It is noteworthy that the target of D-micro-SPE was the 1-octanol rather than the PAHs. Because of the rapid mass transfer associated with the DLLME and the D-micro-SPE steps, fast extraction could be achieved. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The optimal conditions were as follows: vortex at 3200 rpm in the DLLME step for 2 min and in D-micro-SPE for 1 min and then desorption by sonication for 4 min with acetonitrile as the solvent. The results demonstrated that enrichment factors ranging from 110- to 186-fold were obtained for the analytes. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 11.7-61.4 pg/mL and 0.04-0.21 ng/mL, respectively. The linearities were 0.5-50, 1-50, or 2-50 ng/mL for different PAHs. Finally, the two-step extraction method was successfully used for the fast determination of PAHs in river water samples. This two-step method, combining two different and efficient miniaturized techniques, provides a fast means of sample pretreatment for environmental water samples.

  10. Engineering property test of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志彬; 刘松玉; 蔡奕

    2015-01-01

    Engineering property of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil was studied through a series of laboratory experiments. Oil contents (mass fraction) of 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% and 20% were selected to represent different contamination degrees, and the soil specimens were manually prepared through mixing and static compaction method. Initial water content and dry density of the test kaolin clay were controlled at 10% and 1.58 g/cm3, respectively. Test results indicate that since part of the diesel oil will be released from soil by evaporation, the real water content should be derived through calibration of the quasi water content obtained by traditional test method. As contamination degree of the kaolin clay increases, both liquid limit and plastic limit decrease, but there’s only a slight increase for plasticity index. Swelling pressure of contaminated kaolin clay under confined condition will be lowered when oil-content gets higher. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of the oil-contaminated kaolin clay is influenced by not only oil content but also curing period. Increase of contamination degree will continually lower UCS of the kaolin clay specimen. In addition, electrical resistivity of the contaminated kaolin clay with given water content decreases with the increase of oil content. However, soil resistivity is in good relationship with oil content and UCS. Finally, oil content of 8% is found to be a critical value for engineering property of kaolin clay to transit from water-dominated towards oil-dominated characteristics.

  11. The individual and collective effects of exact exchange and dispersion interactions on the ab initio structure of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStasio, Robert A.; Santra, Biswajit; Li, Zhaofeng; Wu, Xifan; Car, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we report the results of a series of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of ambient liquid water using a hierarchy of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to investigate the individual and collective effects of exact exchange (Exx), via the PBE0 hybrid functional, non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions, via a fully self-consistent density-dependent dispersion correction, and an approximate treatment of nuclear quantum effects, via a 30 K increase in the simulation temperature, on the microscopic structure of liquid water. Based on these AIMD simulations, we found that the collective inclusion of Exx and vdW as resulting from a large-scale AIMD simulation of (H2O)128 significantly softens the structure of ambient liquid water and yields an oxygen-oxygen structure factor, SOO(Q), and corresponding oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, gOO(r), that are now in quantitative agreement with the best available experimental data. This level of agreement between simulation and experiment demonstrated herein originates from an increase in the relative population of water molecules in the interstitial region between the first and second coordination shells, a collective reorganization in the liquid phase which is facilitated by a weakening of the hydrogen bond strength by the use of a hybrid XC functional, coupled with a relative stabilization of the resultant disordered liquid water configurations by the inclusion of non-local vdW/dispersion interactions. This increasingly more accurate description of the underlying hydrogen bond network in liquid water also yields higher-order correlation functions, such as the oxygen-oxygen-oxygen triplet angular distribution, POOO(θ), and therefore the degree of local tetrahedrality, as well as electrostatic properties, such as the effective molecular dipole moment, that are in much better agreement with experiment.

  12. The individual and collective effects of exact exchange and dispersion interactions on the ab initio structure of liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStasio, Robert A.; Santra, Biswajit [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Li, Zhaofeng [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Wu, Xifan [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Car, Roberto [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    In this work, we report the results of a series of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of ambient liquid water using a hierarchy of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to investigate the individual and collective effects of exact exchange (Exx), via the PBE0 hybrid functional, non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions, via a fully self-consistent density-dependent dispersion correction, and an approximate treatment of nuclear quantum effects, via a 30 K increase in the simulation temperature, on the microscopic structure of liquid water. Based on these AIMD simulations, we found that the collective inclusion of Exx and vdW as resulting from a large-scale AIMD simulation of (H{sub 2}O){sub 128} significantly softens the structure of ambient liquid water and yields an oxygen-oxygen structure factor, S{sub OO}(Q), and corresponding oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, g{sub OO}(r), that are now in quantitative agreement with the best available experimental data. This level of agreement between simulation and experiment demonstrated herein originates from an increase in the relative population of water molecules in the interstitial region between the first and second coordination shells, a collective reorganization in the liquid phase which is facilitated by a weakening of the hydrogen bond strength by the use of a hybrid XC functional, coupled with a relative stabilization of the resultant disordered liquid water configurations by the inclusion of non-local vdW/dispersion interactions. This increasingly more accurate description of the underlying hydrogen bond network in liquid water also yields higher-order correlation functions, such as the oxygen-oxygen-oxygen triplet angular distribution, P{sub OOO}(θ), and therefore the degree of local tetrahedrality, as well as electrostatic properties, such as the effective molecular dipole moment, that are in much better agreement with experiment.

  13. Calculation of the debris flow concentration based on clay content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ningsheng; CUI Peng; LIU Zhonggang; WEI Fangqiang

    2003-01-01

    The debris flow clay content has very tremendous influence on its concentration (γC). It is reported that the concentration can be calculated by applying the relative polynomial based on the clay content. Here one polynomial model and one logarithm model to calculate the concentration based on the clay content for both the ordinary debris flow and viscous debris flow are obtained. The result derives from the statistics and analysis of the relationship between the debris flow concentrations and clay content in 45 debris flow sites located in the southwest of China. The models can be applied for the concentration calculation to those debris flows that are impossible to observe. The models are available to calculate the debris flow concentration, the principles of which are in the clay content affecting on the debris flow formation, movement and suspending particle diameter. The mechanism of the relationship of the clay content and concentration is clear and reliable. The debris flow is usually of micro-viscous when the clay content is low (<3%), by analyzing the developing tendency on the basics of the relationship between the clay content and debris flow concentration. Indeed, the less the clay content, the less the concentration for most debris flows. The debris flow tends to become the water rock flow or the hyperconcentrated flow with the clay content decrease. Through statistics it is apt to transform the soil into the viscous debris flow when the clay content of ranges is in 3%-18%. Its concentration increases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 5% and 10%. But the value decreases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 10% and 18%. It is apt to transform the soil into the mudflow, when the clay content exceeds 18%. The concentration of the mudflow usually decreases with the increase of the clay content, and this developing tendency reverses to that of the micro-viscous debris flow. There is

  14. PREFERENTIAL INTERCALATION BEHAVIOR OF CLAY AND ITS EFFECT ON THE THERMAL DEGRADATION IN IMMISCIBLE PP/PS BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhu; Hai-yun Ma; Li-fang Tong; Zheng-ping Fang

    2008-01-01

    The typical immiscible PP/PS blend based clay nanocomposites were prepared via melt blending.The dispersion of clay was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Thermal stability and dynamic mechanical properties were measured by thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA),respectively.Preferential intercalation behavior of clay in PP/PS blends was found.The dispersion of clay is significantly influenced by the polarity of PP and PS,meanwhile the location of clay can be controlled by the alternation of the polarity of PP and PS through chemical modification.The clay migrates from PS phase to PP phase with the improvement of the polarity of PP.However,when the PS is sulfonated,clay migrates back to the dispersed PS phase again.The dispersion and location of clay have profound influence on the thermal and dynamic mechanical behavior of PP/PS blends.The better the dispersion of clay in either continuous phase or disperse phase,the higher the thermal stability of the blends.Besides,samples with clay located in the continuous phase can display the best strengthening effect.

  15. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  16. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attenti