WorldWideScience

Sample records for water dispenser development

  1. Potable water dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, H. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A dispenser particularly suited for use in dispensing potable water into food and beverage reconstitution bags is described. The dispenser is characterized by an expansible chamber, selectively adjustable stop means for varying the maximum dimensions, a rotary valve, and a linear valve coupled in a cooperating relation for delivering potable water to and from the chamber.

  2. Small-Portion Water Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerns, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure regulated and flow timed to control amount dispensed. Dispenser provides measured amount of water for reconstituting dehydrated foods and beverages. Dispenser holds food or beverage package while being filled with either cold or room-temperature water. Other uses might include dispensing of fluids or medicine. Pressure regulator in dispenser reduces varying pressure of water supply to constant pressure. Electronic timer stops flow after predetermined length of time. Timed flow at regulated pressure ensures controlled volume of water dispensed.

  3. ZNF 197L is dispensable in mouse development | Tang | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZNF 197L is dispensable in mouse development. R Tang, G Xu, A Kimi, J Shen, Z Li, K Yamamura, H Tang. Abstract. The gene trap technique is a newly powerful approach for characterizing and mutating genes in mouse. We used gene trap method to identify mice gene of unknown function and to establish their mouse line ...

  4. Neurocan is dispensable for brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, X H; Brakebusch, C; Matthies, H

    2001-01-01

    Neurocan is a component of the extracellular matrix in brain. Due to its inhibition of neuronal adhesion and outgrowth in vitro and its expression pattern in vivo it was suggested to play an important role in axon guidance and neurite growth. To study the role of neurocan in brain development we ...... appear largely normal. Mild deficits in synaptic plasticity may exist, as maintenance of late-phase hippocampal long-term potentiation is reduced. These data indicate that neurocan has either a redundant or a more subtle function in the development of the brain....

  5. Evaluation of a liquid dispenser for assay development and enzymology in 1536-well format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butendeich, Heike; Pierret, Noëlle M; Numao, Shin

    2013-06-01

    Although developments in liquid dispensers have made the use of 1536-well plates for high-throughput screening (HTS) standard, there is still a gap in dispenser technology for performing matrix experiments with several components. Experiments such as those performed during assay development and enzymological studies are therefore still performed by manual pipetting in lower-density plates. We have evaluated a new dispenser, the Certus liquid dispenser (Gyger Fluidics GmbH, Switzerland), that is capable of flexible dispensing in 1536-well format, with a dead volume of less than 200 µL. Taking advantage of the precision of the dispenser for volumes down to 50 nL, we have created concentration gradients on plates by dispensing different volumes of reagent and then backfilling with buffer. Using this method and the flexibility of the dispenser software, we have performed several multidimensional experiments varying two to three components, including an assay development for an HTS, a mode of inhibition study, and a cofactor optimization, in which we determined 32 KM values. Overall, the flexibility of the plate layout for multiple components, the accuracy to dispense volumes ranging 2 log orders, and minimal reagent usage enable this dispenser for complex biochemical experiments.

  6. Pediatric burns due to hot water from water dispenser: a neglected issue that should be highly concerned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing; Xi, Hui-Jun; Wang, Jia-Lin; Yan, Ying; Tang, Hong-Tai; Zhu, Shi-Hui; Lü, Kai-Yang; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2012-06-01

    More and more Chinese drink hot water from water dispensers while many children were scalded due to this change. The present study aimed to propose a feasible strategy for prevention. A retrospective study was conducted for all water dispensers related pediatric burns admitted to Changhai Hospital from January 2005 to December 2009. The number of new cases and incidences of pediatric burns due to hot water from water dispensers was significantly increasing year after year. In the total 238 involved cases, 175 cases happened on males and 78.9% were at the age of 1 - 4 years. The burn areas were mainly located in upper extremities. All water dispensers in the surveyed families had no isolate protection devices and 85.2% of their locations were easy for children to reach. Nearly half of the children were in the same room with their guardians when injured. Total 196 burned children were playing the taps of water dispensers before injured, unfortunately, 80.6% of them have not been stopped until burned. As the kind of burns is quite serious and with bad outcome, some recommendations should be followed, such as buying water dispensers with protection devices, keeping children from touching them and so on.

  7. Ghrelin is dispensable for embryonic pancreatic islet development and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathon T.; Mastracci, Teresa L.; Vinton, Carol; Doyle, Michelle L.; Anderson, Keith R.; Loomis, Zoe L.; Schrunk, Jessica M.; Minic, Angela D.; Prabakar, Kamalaveni R.; Pugliese, Alberto; Sun, Yuxian; Smith, Roy G.; Sussel, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that has been implicated in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Ghrelin is predominantly produced in the stomach, but is also expressed in many other tissues where its functions are not well characterized. In the rodent and human pancreas, ghrelin levels peak at late gestation and gradually decline postnatally. Several studies have suggested that ghrelin regulates beta cell function during embryonic development and in the adult. In addition, in a number of mouse models, ghrelin cells appear to replace insulin and glucagon-producing cells in the islet. In this analysis, we investigated whether the absence or overexpression of ghrelin influenced the development and differentiation of the pancreatic islet during embryonic development. These studies revealed that ghrelin is dispensable for normal pancreas development during gestation. Conversely, we demonstrated that elevated ghrelin in the Nkx2.2 null islets is not responsible for the absence of insulin- and glucagon-producing cells. Finally, we have also determined that in absence of insulin, ghrelin cells form in their normal numbers and ghrelin is expressed at wild type levels. PMID:19268691

  8. College Cafeteria Signage Increases Water Intake but Water Position on the Soda Dispenser Encourages More Soda Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuclard, Astrid Linn; Park-Mroch, Jennifer; O'Shea, Amy M J; Wansink, Brian; Irvin, Jill; Laroche, Helena H

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of improved water location visibility and water dispenser position on the soda dispenser on undergraduate students' beverage choices. Two focus groups with pilot intervention surveys before and after, adding a small sign above the soda dispensers' water button for 6 weeks in a large US university's all-you-can-eat, prepaid dining hall (measured with chi-square tests and logistic and ordinal logistic regression). Focus groups included 15 students. Survey participants included 357 students before and 301 after the intervention. After the intervention, more students reported ever having drunk water with the meal (66.4% to 77.0%; P = .003) and water consumption frequency increased (P = .005). Postintervention, the odds of drinking water increased by 1.57. Preference for other drinks was the main reason for not drinking water. A total of 59% of students had ever changed their preference from water to soda. The clear indication of the water's location increased students' reported water consumption. Further investigation is needed into how a non-independent water dispenser influences students' beverage choice. Clearly labeled, independent water dispensers are recommended. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  9. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality Versus Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmember food and drinking packages. There is one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. Shuttle mission STS-126 delivered the USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) to ISS on ULF2; subsequent activation occurred on November 2008. The PWD is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six, but nominally supplies only half this crew size. The PWD design provides incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US food and beverage packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Water Recovery System (WRS) Fuel Cell Water Bus, which feeds from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 L of hot water (65 to 93 ?C) every 30 min. During a single meal, this quantity of water supports three to four crewmembers? food rehydration and beverages. The unit design has a functional life expectancy of 10 years, with replacement of limited life items, such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance is acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there were several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is discussed for the following key areas: 1) microbial contamination, 2) no-dispense and water leakage scenarios, and 3) under-dispense scenarios.

  10. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality vs Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmembers food and drinking packages with one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. The USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) was delivered to ISS on ULF2, Shuttle Mission STS-126, and was subsequently activated in November 2008. The PWD activation on ISS is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six but nominally supplies only half the crew. The PWD is designed to provide incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US style food packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Laboratory Fuel Cell Water Bus, which is fed from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 liters of hot water (65 to 93oC) every thirty minutes. This quantity supports three to four crewmembers to rehydrate their food and beverages from this location during a single meal. The unit is designed to remain functional for up to ten years with replacement of limited life items such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance has been acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there have been several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is outlined for the following key areas: microbiology, PWD to food package water leakage, no-dispense scenarios, under-dispense scenarios, and crewmember feedback on actual on-orbit use.

  11. Microbiological quality of drinking water from dispensers in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasi Daniela; Amiranda Ciro; Arnese Antonio; Cavallotti Ivan; Liguori Giorgio; Angelillo Italo F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Water coolers are popular in office buildings and commercial stores and the quality of this source of drinking water has the potential to cause waterborne outbreaks, especially in sensitive and immunocompromised subjects. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of water plumbed in coolers from commercial stores in comparison with tap water in Italy. Methods For each sample, microbial parameters and chemical indicators of contamination were evaluated and informat...

  12. Microbiological quality of drinking water from dispensers in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasi Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water coolers are popular in office buildings and commercial stores and the quality of this source of drinking water has the potential to cause waterborne outbreaks, especially in sensitive and immunocompromised subjects. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of water plumbed in coolers from commercial stores in comparison with tap water in Italy. Methods For each sample, microbial parameters and chemical indicators of contamination were evaluated and information about the date of installation, time since last ordinary and extraordinary maintenance of water coolers was collected. Results In all samples the chemical parameters (nitrite, ammonium, free active chlorine residual did not exceed the reference values of the drinking water regulation; the pH value in 86.8% samples of the carbonated waters was lower than the reference limit. The microbiological results indicated that the bacteria count at 22°C and 37°C was higher than the required values in 71% and 81% for the non-carbonated water and in 86% and 88% for the carbonated one, respectively. Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli were not detected in any of the water samples. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found in only one sample of the tap water and in 28.9% and 23.7% of the non-carbonated and carbonated water samples, respectively. No statistically significant differences in bacterial counts at 22°C and 37°C have been found between the non-carbonated and carbonated water from the sampled coolers in relation with the time since the last filter was substituted. The bacteriological quality of tap water was superior to that of non-carbonated and carbonated water from coolers. Conclusion The results emphasize the importance of adopting appropriate routinely monitoring system in order to prevent or to diminish the chances of contamination of this water source.

  13. Microbiological quality of drinking water from dispensers in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Giorgio; Cavallotti, Ivan; Arnese, Antonio; Amiranda, Ciro; Anastasi, Daniela; Angelillo, Italo F

    2010-01-26

    Water coolers are popular in office buildings and commercial stores and the quality of this source of drinking water has the potential to cause waterborne outbreaks, especially in sensitive and immunocompromised subjects. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of water plumbed in coolers from commercial stores in comparison with tap water in Italy. For each sample, microbial parameters and chemical indicators of contamination were evaluated and information about the date of installation, time since last ordinary and extraordinary maintenance of water coolers was collected. In all samples the chemical parameters (nitrite, ammonium, free active chlorine residual) did not exceed the reference values of the drinking water regulation; the pH value in 86.8% samples of the carbonated waters was lower than the reference limit. The microbiological results indicated that the bacteria count at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C was higher than the required values in 71% and 81% for the non-carbonated water and in 86% and 88% for the carbonated one, respectively. Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli were not detected in any of the water samples. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found in only one sample of the tap water and in 28.9% and 23.7% of the non-carbonated and carbonated water samples, respectively. No statistically significant differences in bacterial counts at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C have been found between the non-carbonated and carbonated water from the sampled coolers in relation with the time since the last filter was substituted. The bacteriological quality of tap water was superior to that of non-carbonated and carbonated water from coolers. The results emphasize the importance of adopting appropriate routinely monitoring system in order to prevent or to diminish the chances of contamination of this water source.

  14. Control of microbial contamination in drinking water from microfiltering dispensers by dialysis ultrafilters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolelli Luca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tap water filtering devices are widely employed to improve odor and taste of tap water, or to obtain refrigerated or sparkling drinking water. The presence of disinfectants-resistant bacteria in tap water is responsible of the biofilm formation inside tubes and tanks. The consequent contamination of dispensed water is a well-known hygiene problem because of the quite constant presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria likes P. aeruginosa. In this study, we tested the technical feasibility and effectiveness of the addition to different commercial devices of a packaged polysulphone fibers filter. We aimed to find a simple solution to implement the quality of the delivered water. Water contamination levels were determined in a wide selection of microfiltered water dispensers and we selected among them a representative group of 10 devices, new or in use. The packaged ultrafilter was introduced in about half of them, to monitor, when possible, in parallel the contamination levels and flow rate of a couple of identical units, with and without the filter. The placement of the dialysis filters resulted feasible at different positions along the water circuits of the variously designed filtration units. Delivered water resulted completely free from bacteria when the filter was placed exactly at, or very close to, the outlet in spite of the inner surfaces contamination. This performance was not obtained in presence of a more or less long tract of water circuits downstream the ultrafilter: a significant but not complete reduction of the plate count numbers was observed. The filters worked in continue over the whole study period, ten months, showing exactly the same efficiency. Moreover, the flow rate in presence of the filter was quite unaffected. The addition of this kind of filter to already in use water dispensers was technically easy, and its use can be recommended in all cases a simple but reliable water sanitization is requested.

  15. International Space Station (ISS) Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Beverage Adapter (BA) Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerly, Rachel; Benoit, Jace; Shindo, David

    2012-01-01

    The Potable Water Dispenser used on the International Space Station (ISS) interfaces with food and drink packages using the Beverage Adapter and Needle. Unexpected leakage has been seen in this interface. The Beverage Adapter used on ]orbit was returned to the ground for Test, Teardown, and Evaluation. The results of that investigation prompted a redesign of the Beverage Adapter and Needle. The Beverage Adapter materials were changed to be more corrosion resistant, and the Needle was redesigned to preclude leakage. The redesigns have been tested and proven.

  16. Development of a new dispenser for microbiological control agents and evaluation of dissemination by bumblebees in greenhouse strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Veerle; Put, Kurt; Vandeven, Jessica; Jans, Kris; Sterk, Guido; Hoffmann, Lucien; Smagghe, Guy

    2010-11-01

    To date, in modern agriculture, biological control strategies are increasingly becoming the preferred pest management approach. However, the success of microbiological control agents (MCAs) largely depends on efficient dissemination into the crop. The pollinator-and-vector technology employs pollinating insects like bees for a better dissemination. In this study, a new dispenser for bumblebee workers of Bombus terrestris L. was developed. Binab-T-vector and Prestop-Mix were used as two typical MCA products for dissemination. In a first series of experiments in the laboratory for optimisation, the newly developed dispenser was a two-way type dispenser, 20 cm long, with two rectangular compartments and different entrance and exit holes. In addition, the amounts of MCA loaded on the workers were 10 times higher with the new dispenser as compared with the side-by-side passageway (SSP) dispenser. Typically, the highest amounts were recovered from the thorax and legs of the workers. In a second series of experiments under greenhouse conditions with the use of queen-right B. terrestris hives, successful dissemination in strawberry flowers was obtained at different distances from the hive (0-8 m, 8-18 m and 18-21 m), and the workers inoculated the first, second and third flowers that were consecutively visited. In addition, the new dispenser caused no adverse effects on worker foraging intensity, whereas a dramatic reduction was scored with an SSP dispenser. Finally, the data suggested that it is necessary to refill the newly developed dispenser at 3 day intervals. The results demonstrated that, with the use of the newly developed dispenser, bumblebee workers carried high amounts of MCA, and this resulted in a successful dissemination of MCA into strawberry flowers. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Advanced combined iodine dispenser and detector. [for microorganism annihilation in potable water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.; Powell, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    A total weight of 1.23 kg (2.7 lb), a total volume of 1213 cu m (74 cu in), and an average power consumption of 5.5W was achieved in the advanced combined iodine dispenser/detector by integrating the detector with the iodine source, arranging all iodinator components within a compact package and lowering the parasitic power to the detector and electronics circuits. These achievements surpassed the design goals of 1.36 kg (3.0 lb), 1671 cu m (102 cu in) and 8W. The reliability and maintainability were improved by reducing the detector lamp power, using an interchangeable lamp concept, making the electronic circuit boards easily accessible, providing redundant water seals and improving the accessibility to the iodine accumulator for refilling. The system was designed to iodinate (to 5 ppm iodine) the fuel cell water generated during 27 seven-day orbiter missions (equivalent to 18,500 kg (40,700 lb) of water) before the unit must be recharged with iodine crystals.

  18. Extension of the commercial agreement on water dispensers: appendices 1-4; Erweiterung der Branchenvereinbarung Wasserdispenser. Anhaenge 1-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieder, T.; Huser, A.

    2006-07-01

    These appendices to a final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) present the results of work done within the framework of a voluntary agreement between the Federal Office of Energy and the four most important suppliers of bottled water dispensers in Switzerland. The first appendix lists water dispensers with water-mains connections and quotes figures on the number of units and their energy use. Two prognoses are presented for the year 2015, one with and one without any action being taken. The second appendix presents the German Gas and Water association's suggestion for standards, while the third appendix presents the hygiene regulations of the Swiss Department of Home Affairs. The fourth appendix presents the answer sent by the U.S.A's Environmental Protection Agency to an e-mail on the subject.

  19. Occurrence of non-fermenting gram negative bacteria in drinking water dispensed from point-of-use microfiltration devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franza Zanetti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Many devices have been marketed in order to improve the organoleptic characteristics of tap water resulting from disinfection with chlorine derivates. The aim of the presented study was to assess the degree of contamination by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria (NF-GNB of drinking water dispensed from microfiltration devices at point-of-use. Methods. Water samples were collected from 94 point-of-use water devices fitted with a filter (0.5μm pore size containing powdered activated carbon. The microbiological contamination of water entering and leaving the microfiltered water dispensers was compared. The NF-GNB loads were correlated to Total Heterotrophic Counts (HPCs at 37 and 22 °C, residua chlorine, and some structural and functional features of the devices. Results. NF-GNB were detected from 23% of supply water samples, 33% of still unchilled water, 33% of still chilled water and 18% of carbonated chilled water. The most frequent isolates were Pseudomonadaceae: Steno.maltophilia 30.2% of isolates, Pseudomonas 20.5%, Delftia acidovorans 13.4%, while the species more largely distributed was Ps. aeruginosa recovered from 13% of samples. The distribution of the various NF-GNB was different in the water entering and in that leaving the devices. Ps.aeruginosa and Steno.maltophilia were the predominant species in water leaving the microfiltration dispensers, probably due to their capacity to colonize the circuits and to prevail over the others. Recovery of NF-GNB was favoured by the reduction in residual chlorine of the supply water, occasional use, the absence of a bacteriostatic element in the filter and inadequate disinfection of the water lines. Conclusions. The presence of high concentrations of potentially pathogenic species of NF-GNB (Ps.aeruginosa, Steno. maltophilia, Burkhol.cepacia in the water dispensed from microfiltration devices represents a risk of waterborne infections for vulnerable individuals. When

  20. Occurrence of non-fermenting gram negative bacteria in drinking water dispensed from point-of-use microfiltration devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Franza; de Luca, Giovanna; Leoni, Erica; Sacchetti, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Many devices have been marketed in order to improve the organoleptic characteristics of tap water resulting from disinfection with chlorine derivates. The aim of the presented study was to assess the degree of contamination by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria (NF-GNB) of drinking water dispensed from microfiltration devices at point-of-use. Water samples were collected from 94 point-of-use water devices fitted with a filter (0.5 μm pore size) containing powdered activated carbon. The microbiological contamination of water entering and leaving the microfiltered water dispensers was compared. The NF-GNB loads were correlated to Total Heterotrophic Counts (HPCs) at 37 and 22 °C, residua chlorine, and some structural and functional features of the devices. NF-GNB were detected from 23% of supply water samples, 33% of still unchilled water, 33% of still chilled water and 18% of carbonated chilled water. The most frequent isolates were Pseudomonadaceae: Steno.maltophilia 30.2% of isolates, Pseudomonas 20.5%, Delftia acidovorans 13.4%, while the species more largely distributed was Ps. aeruginosa recovered from 13% of samples. The distribution of the various NF-GNB was different in the water entering and in that leaving the devices. Ps.aeruginosa and Steno.maltophilia were the predominant species in water leaving the microfiltration dispensers, probably due to their capacity to colonize the circuits and to prevail over the others. Recovery of NF-GNB was favoured by the reduction in residual chlorine of the supply water, occasional use, the absence of a bacteriostatic element in the filter and inadequate disinfection of the water lines. The presence of high concentrations of potentially pathogenic species of NF-GNB (Ps.aeruginosa, Steno. maltophilia, Burkhol.cepacia) in the water dispensed from microfiltration devices represents a risk of waterborne infections for vulnerable individuals. When these devices are used in environments such as hospitals, nursing homes

  1. Development of an automated dispenser for the delivery of medicinal or vaccine-laden baits to raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyser, Timothy J; Redding, James V; Bevis, Crystal M; Page, L Kristen; Swihart, Robert K

    2015-04-01

    Medicinal baits are distributed to manage zoonotic diseases, including raccoon (Procyon lotor) rabies, but efficient distribution strategies are needed for suburban environments. We developed an automated dispenser that transfers fishmeal polymer baits at user-specified intervals from a magazine to a receptacle fitted with a filter that exploits raccoon dexterity to limit consumption by nontarget species. We introduce the concept of automated dispensers and describe bait removal success rates for raccoons versus nontarget species. We monitored visitation with remote cameras after deploying a dispenser, programmed to present two baits per night, in three disjunct forest patches in northwest Indiana. Raccoons removed 72% of baits; nontarget, white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) removed 11%; Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) removed 9%. Bait removal success varied significantly between raccoons (76%) and opossums (21%), improving bait delivery specificity relative to hand baiting. Accumulation of baits in receptacles resulted in excess (more than one) bait consumption (39% of baits consumed by raccoons were excess), suggesting design improvements are needed to present additional baits only after previous baits have been consumed. Automated dispensers successfully sustained bait availability throughout the operational period. Subsequent research is needed to determine whether a sustained availability of baits achieved with automated dispensers is more effective for the treatment of raccoons in suburban environments than traditional distribution methods.

  2. N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreas development but required for β-cell granule turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny K; Voss, Ulrikke; Kesavan, Gokul; Kostetskii, Igor; Wierup, Nils; Radice, Glenn L.; Semb, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules mediates adhesive interactions that are required for the formation and maintenance of tissues. Previously, we demonstrated that N-cadherin, which is required for numerous morphogenetic processes, is expressed in the pancreatic epithelium at E9.5, but later becomes restricted to endocrine aggregates in mice. To study the role of N-cadherin during pancreas formation and function we generated a tissue specific knockout of N-cadherin in the early pancreatic epithelium by inter-crossing N-cadherin-floxed mice with Pdx1Cre mice. Analysis of pancreas-specific ablation of N-cadherin demonstrates that N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreatic development, but required for β-cell granule turnover. The number of insulin secretory granules is significantly reduced in N-cadherin-deficient β-cells, and as a consequence insulin secretion is decreased. PMID:20533404

  3. Foam Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    William G. Simpson, a NASA/Marshall employee, invented and patented a foam mixing dispensing device. He is supplying his Simpson mixer to a number of foam applications where it is used to apply foam for insulation purposes.

  4. Type 4 pili are dispensable for biofilm development in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Elad; Zilberman, Shaul; Sendersky, Eleonora; Simkovsky, Ryan; Shimoni, Eyal; Gershtein, Diana; Herzberg, Moshe; Golden, Susan S; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2017-07-01

    The hair-like cell appendages denoted as type IV pili are crucial for biofilm formation in diverse eubacteria. The protein complex responsible for type IV pilus assembly is homologous with the type II protein secretion complex. In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, the gene Synpcc7942_2071 encodes an ATPase homologue of type II/type IV systems. Here, we report that inactivation of Synpcc7942_2071 strongly affected the suite of proteins present in the extracellular milieu (exo-proteome) and eliminated pili observable by electron microscopy. These results support a role for this gene product in protein secretion as well as in pili formation. As we previously reported, inactivation of Synpcc7942_2071 enables biofilm formation and suppresses the planktonic growth of S. elongatus. Thus, pili are dispensable for biofilm development in this cyanobacterium, in contrast to their biofilm-promoting function in type IV pili-producing heterotrophic bacteria. Nevertheless, pili removal is not required for biofilm formation as evident by a piliated mutant of S. elongatus that develops biofilms. We show that adhesion and timing of biofilm development differ between the piliated and non-piliated strains. The study demonstrates key differences in the process of biofilm formation between cyanobacteria and well-studied type IV pili-producing heterotrophic bacteria. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β is dispensable for development of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Hirata, Ayako; Nakayama, Sohei; VanderLaan, Paul A; Levantini, Elena; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Hirai, Hideyo; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Costa, Daniel B; Watanabe, Hideo; Kobayashi, Susumu S

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Although disruption of normal proliferation and differentiation is a vital component of tumorigenesis, the mechanisms of this process in lung cancer are still unclear. A transcription factor, C/EBPβ is a critical regulator of proliferation and/or differentiation in multiple tissues. In lung, C/EBPβ is expressed in alveolar pneumocytes and bronchial epithelial cells; however, its roles on normal lung homeostasis and lung cancer development have not been well described. Here we investigated whether C/EBPβ is required for normal lung development and whether its aberrant expression and/or activity contribute to lung tumorigenesis. We showed that C/EBPβ was expressed in both human normal pneumocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that overall lung architecture was maintained in Cebpb knockout mice. Neither overexpression of nuclear C/EBPβ nor suppression of CEBPB expression had significant effects on cell proliferation. C/EBPβ expression and activity remained unchanged upon EGF stimulation. Furthermore, deletion of Cebpb had no impact on lung tumor burden in a lung specific, conditional mutant EGFR lung cancer mouse model. Analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that expression, promoter methylation, or copy number of CEBPB was not significantly altered in human lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data suggest that C/EBPβ is dispensable for development of lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. The cytosolic glyoxalases of Plasmodium falciparum are dispensable during asexual blood-stage development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus A. Wezena

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The enzymes glyoxalase 1 and 2 (Glo1 and Glo2 are found in most eukaryotes and catalyze the glutathione-dependent conversion of 2-oxoaldehydes to 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids. Four glyoxalases are encoded in the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the cytosolic enzymes PfGlo1 and PfcGlo2, the apicoplast enzyme PftGlo2, and an inactive Glo1-like protein that also carries an apicoplast-targeting sequence. Inhibition or knockout of the Plasmodium glyoxalases was hypothesized to lead to an accumulation of 2-oxoaldehydes and advanced glycation end-products (AGE in the host-parasite unit and to result in parasite death. Here, we generated clonal P. falciparum strain 3D7 knockout lines for PFGLO1 and PFcGLO2 using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Although 3D7Δglo1 knockout clones had an increased susceptibility to external glyoxal, all 3D7Δglo1 and 3D7Δcglo2 knockout lines were viable and showed no significant growth phenotype under standard growth conditions. Furthermore, the lack of PfcGlo2, but not PfGlo1, increased gametocyte commitment in the knockout lines. In summary, PfGlo1 and PfcGlo2 are dispensable during asexual blood-stage development while the loss of PfcGlo2 may induce the formation of transmissible gametocytes. These combined data show that PfGlo1 and PfcGlo2 are most likely not suited as targets for selective drug development.

  7. Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-07-01

    A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

  8. Medication dispenser for narcotic rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vien Q; Gale, Timothy J; Stack, Clive R

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a medication dispenser developed for narcotic rehabilitation programs. The dispenser holds up to four doses of medication and operates under remote supervision. A direct-into-mouth dispensing mechanism is a feature of the device. The mechanical dispenser mechanism includes a rotating barrel, medication tubes and dispensing slider unit. The electronic design involves a microprocessor PIC18F4550, stepper-motors, sensing devices a LabVIEW-based computer interface for remote supervisory control and monitoring. The dispenser stores medication and successfully delivers it directly into the mouth under remote supervision.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE SPRAY DISPENSER TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents the operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water, and...

  10. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Alexan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” as it holds the medication dispensing parameters for the drugs it contains: dispensing time and date and name. Based on this information, the actual dispensing is done.

  11. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    OpenAIRE

    Alexan, Alexandru I.; Oşan, Anca Roxana; Oniga, István László

    2013-01-01

    Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” ...

  12. Automatic fluid dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  13. IL-4 and IL-4 receptor expression is dispensable for the development and function of natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna Sharma

    Full Text Available CD4 T cells acquire functional properties including cytokine production upon antigenic stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR and differentiate into T helper (Th cells. Th1 cells produce interferon (IFN-γ and Th2 cells produce interleukin (IL-4. Th1 and 2 cells utilize IFN-γ and IL-4 for further maturation and maintenance, respectively. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells develop in the thymus and acquire functional ability to produce IL-4 and IFN-γ in the thymus in the absence of antigenic stimulation. In response to antigenic stimulation, iNKT cells rapidly produce IFN-γ and IL-4. However, it is still unknown as to whether iNKT cells require these cytokines for maturation or survival in vivo. In this study, using IL-4- and IL-4 receptor- (IL-4R deficient mice, we demonstrate that IL-4 as well as IL-4R expression is dispensable for the development, function and maintenance of iNKT cells.

  14. DNA methyltransferase 3b is dispensable for mouse neural crest development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget T Jacques-Fricke

    Full Text Available The neural crest is a population of multipotent cells that migrates extensively throughout vertebrate embryos to form diverse structures. Mice mutant for the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b exhibit defects in two neural crest derivatives, the craniofacial skeleton and cardiac ventricular septum, suggesting that DNMT3b activity is necessary for neural crest development. Nevertheless, the requirement for DNMT3b specifically in neural crest cells, as opposed to interacting cell types, has not been determined. Using a conditional DNMT3b allele crossed to the neural crest cre drivers Wnt1-cre and Sox10-cre, neural crest DNMT3b mutants were generated. In both neural crest-specific and fully DNMT3b-mutant embryos, cranial neural crest cells exhibited only subtle migration defects, with increased numbers of dispersed cells trailing organized streams in the head. In spite of this, the resulting cranial ganglia, craniofacial skeleton, and heart developed normally when neural crest cells lacked DNMT3b. This indicates that DNTM3b is not necessary in cranial neural crest cells for their development. We conclude that defects in neural crest derivatives in DNMT3b mutant mice reflect a requirement for DNMT3b in lineages such as the branchial arch mesendoderm or the cardiac mesoderm that interact with neural crest cells during formation of these structures.

  15. Ubiquitin specific protease 21 is dispensable for normal development, hematopoiesis and lymphocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Pannu

    Full Text Available USP21 is a ubiquitin specific protease that catalyzes protein deubiquitination, however the identification of its physiological substrates remains challenging. USP21 is known to deubiquitinate transcription factor GATA3 and death-domain kinase RIPK1 in vitro, however the in vivo settings where this regulation plays a biologically significant role remain unknown. In order to determine whether USP21 is an essential and non-redundant regulator of GATA3 or RIPK1 activity in vivo, we characterized Usp21-deficient mice, focusing on mouse viability and development, hematopoietic stem cell function, and lymphocyte differentiation. The Usp21-knockout mice were found to be viable and fertile, with no significant dysmorphology, in contrast to the GATA3 and RIPK1 knockout lines that exhibit embryonic or perinatal lethality. Loss of USP21 also had no effect on hematopoietic stem cell function, lymphocyte development, or the responses of antigen presenting cells to TLR and TNFR stimulation. GATA3 levels in hematopoietic stem cells or T lymphocytes remained unchanged. We observed that aged Usp21-knockout mice exhibited spontaneous T cell activation, however this was not linked to altered GATA3 levels in the affected cells. The contrast in the phenotype of the Usp21-knockout line with the previously characterized GATA3 and RIPK1 knockout mice strongly indicates that USP21 is redundant for the regulation of GATA3 and RIPK1 activity during mouse development, in hematopoietic stem cells, and in lymphocyte differentiation. The Usp21-deficient mouse line characterized in this study may serve as a useful tool for the future characterization of USP21 physiological functions.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase a is dispensable and not a drug target during erythrocytic development

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Storm, Janet

    2011-07-14

    Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum contains three genes encoding potential glutamate dehydrogenases. The protein encoded by gdha has previously been biochemically and structurally characterized. It was suggested that it is important for the supply of reducing equivalents during intra-erythrocytic development of Plasmodium and, therefore, a suitable drug target. Methods The gene encoding the NADP(H)-dependent GDHa has been disrupted by reverse genetics in P. falciparum and the effect on the antioxidant and metabolic capacities of the resulting mutant parasites was investigated. Results No growth defect under low and elevated oxygen tension, no up- or down-regulation of a number of antioxidant and NADP(H)-generating proteins or mRNAs and no increased levels of GSH were detected in the D10Δgdha parasite lines. Further, the fate of the carbon skeleton of [13C] labelled glutamine was assessed by metabolomic studies, revealing no differences in the labelling of α-ketoglutarate and other TCA pathway intermediates between wild type and mutant parasites. Conclusions First, the data support the conclusion that D10Δgdha parasites are not experiencing enhanced oxidative stress and that GDHa function may not be the provision of NADP(H) for reductive reactions. Second, the results imply that the cytosolic, NADP(H)-dependent GDHa protein is not involved in the oxidative deamination of glutamate but that the protein may play a role in ammonia assimilation as has been described for other NADP(H)-dependent GDH from plants and fungi. The lack of an obvious phenotype in the absence of GDHa may point to a regulatory role of the protein providing glutamate (as nitrogen storage molecule) in situations where the parasites experience a limiting supply of carbon sources and, therefore, under in vitro conditions the enzyme is unlikely to be of significant importance. The data imply that the protein is not a suitable target for future drug development against intra

  17. Upk3b is dispensable for development and integrity of urothelium and mesothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Rudat

    Full Text Available The mesothelium, the lining of the coelomic cavities, and the urothelium, the inner lining of the urinary drainage system, are highly specialized epithelia that protect the underlying tissues from mechanical stress and seal them from the overlying fluid space. The development of these epithelia from simple precursors and the molecular characteristics of the mature tissues are poorly analyzed. Here, we show that uroplakin 3B (Upk3b, which encodes an integral membrane protein of the tetraspanin superfamily, is specifically expressed both in development as well as under homeostatic conditions in adult mice in the mesothelia of the body cavities, i.e., the epicardium and pericardium, the pleura and the peritoneum, and in the urothelium of the urinary tract. To analyze Upk3b function, we generated a creERT2 knock-in allele by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. We show that Upk3bcreERT2 represents a null allele despite the lack of creERT2 expression from the mutated locus. Morphological, histological and molecular analyses of Upk3b-deficient mice did not detect changes in differentiation or integrity of the urothelium and the mesothelia that cover internal organs. Upk3b is coexpressed with the closely related Upk3a gene in the urothelium but not in the mesothelium, leaving the possibility of a functional redundancy between the two genes in the urothelium only.

  18. Slingshot-3 dephosphorylates ADF/cofilin but is dispensable for mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaka, Kazuyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Nagafuchi, Akira; Shima, Yasuyuki; Chisaka, Osamu; Uemura, Tadashi

    2008-05-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) and cofilin constitute a family of key regulators of actin filament dynamics. ADF/cofilin is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-3 by LIM-kinases and reactivated by dephosphorylation by Slingshot (SSH) family phosphatases. Defects in LIM kinases or ADF/cofilin have been implicated in morbidity in human or mice; however, the roles of mammalian SSH in vivo have not been addressed. In this study, we examined the endogenous expression of each mouse SSH member in various cell lines and tissues, and showed that SSH-3L protein was strongly expressed in epithelial cells. Our structure-function analysis of SSH-3L suggested the possibility that the C-tail unique to SSH-3L negatively regulates the catalytic activity of this phosphatase. Furthermore we made ssh-3 knockout mice to examine its potential in vivo roles. Unexpectedly, ssh-3 was not essential for viability, fertility, or development of epithelial tissues; and ssh-3 did not genetically modify the corneal disorder of the corn1/ADF/destrin mutant. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Arf4 is required for Mammalian development but dispensable for ciliary assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is a sensory organelle, defects in which cause a wide range of human diseases including retinal degeneration, polycystic kidney disease and birth defects. The sensory functions of cilia require specific receptors to be targeted to the ciliary subdomain of the plasma membrane. Arf4 has been proposed to sort cargo destined for the cilium at the Golgi complex and deemed a key regulator of ciliary protein trafficking. In this work, we show that Arf4 binds to the ciliary targeting sequence (CTS of fibrocystin. Knockdown of Arf4 indicates that it is not absolutely required for trafficking of the fibrocystin CTS to cilia as steady-state CTS levels are unaffected. However, we did observe a delay in delivery of newly synthesized CTS from the Golgi complex to the cilium when Arf4 was reduced. Arf4 mutant mice are embryonic lethal and die at mid-gestation shortly after node formation. Nodal cilia appeared normal and functioned properly to break left-right symmetry in Arf4 mutant embryos. At this stage of development Arf4 expression is highest in the visceral endoderm but we did not detect cilia on these cells. In the visceral endoderm, the lack of Arf4 caused defects in cell structure and apical protein localization. This work suggests that while Arf4 is not required for ciliary assembly, it is important for the efficient transport of fibrocystin to cilia, and also plays critical roles in non-ciliary processes.

  20. ROR gamma t is dispensable for the development of intestinal mucosal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, T; Shiohara, T; Hibi, T; Suematsu, M; Ishikawa, H

    2008-05-01

    To examine the origin of intestinal mucosal T cells and, in particular, unconventional CD8 alpha alpha(+) T cells, we have undertaken a thorough analysis of the gut immune compartment in euthymic and athymic mice carrying either wild-type or mutant transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-gamma t (ROR gamma t). We identified a previously unrealized complexity of gut cryptopatch (CP) cells that challenges the previous assertion that CP cells comprise ROR gamma t-expressing adult counterparts of fetal lymphoid tissue inducer (Lti) cells. We showed that many CP cells express intermediate T cell differentiation markers, whether or not they express ROR gamma t, and found that CPs are not completely dependent on ROR gamma t, as previously reported, but merely fewer in number in the ROR gamma t-deficient condition. Indeed, c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(-) cells inside the CP and c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(-) and c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(low) cells outside the CP basically remain in the gut mucosa of ROR gamma t-deficient ROR gamma t(EGFP/EGFP) mice. Consistent with these non-Lti-like c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-) cells being gut T cell progenitors, ROR gamma t-deficient mice develop the normal number of intestinal mucosal T cells. These results clearly reassert the intraintestinal differentiation of the body's largest peripheral T cell subpopulation.

  1. Quality of antiretroviral and opportunistic infection medications dispensed from developing countries and Internet pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Hoag, Stephen W; Eng, Maria L; Polli, James; Pandit, Neha Sheth

    2015-02-01

    Generic manufacturers help decrease the cost of antiretroviral (ARV) and antimicrobial medications which are used to treat opportunistic infections (OIs) in developing countries. Concerns have been expressed about potential quality issues with such medications as a result of the identification of numerous counterfeit medications in developing countries. However, few studies have assessed the quality of these medications using the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) compendial standards. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of ARV and OI medications obtained from various sources, including South Africa, United States, China, Ethiopia, Thailand, Laos, Mexico, Nigeria and five Internet pharmacies. Zidovudine, lamivudine, efavirenz, nevirapine, isoniazid and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim tablets/capsules were obtained from eight countries and five Internet pharmacies. The tablets/capsules were separated into distinct samples, based on the drug's active ingredient, manufacturer and drug control number. Each distinct sample was analysed for drug content, dissolution, content uniformity and breaking force using USP 32-National Formulary 27 (USP 32-NF 27) compendial methods and compared to the USP standards. A total of 2027 tablets/capsules were obtained with 88 distinct samples identified. All samples met the USP 32-NF 27 standards for drug content with a range of 92.7-108.6%. Six of the 88 samples failed the dissolution test by 1.5-8.3% below the standard range. Ninety-eight per cent of all 88 samples met the USP criteria for content uniformity based on weight variation. One sample of isoniazid was found to have a low breaking force of 2.8 kiloponds. The results of this study show that there were no problems with the samples of ARV and OI medications tested for drug quality from the specified locations. As there are many studies and reports that discuss the poor quality of generic medications with only a few assessing drug quality, the implications of this study

  2. Plug-in nanoliter pneumatic liquid dispenser with nozzle design flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Ho; Kim, Hojin; Lee, Sanghyun; Baek, Seungbum; Kim, Joonwon

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel plug-in nanoliter liquid dispensing system with a plug-and-play interface for simple and reversible, yet robust integration of the dispenser. A plug-in type dispenser was developed to facilitate assembly and disassembly with an actuating part through efficient modularization. The entire process for assembly and operation of the plug-in dispenser is performed via the plug-and-play interface in less than a minute without loss of dispensing quality. The minimum volume of droplets pneumatically dispensed using the plug-in dispenser was 124 nl with a coefficient of variation of 1.6%. The dispensed volume increased linearly with the nozzle size. Utilizing this linear relationship, two types of multinozzle dispensers consisting of six parallel channels (emerging from an inlet) and six nozzles were developed to demonstrate a novel strategy for volume gradient dispensing at a single operating condition. The droplet volume dispensed from each nozzle also increased linearly with nozzle size, demonstrating that nozzle size is a dominant factor on dispensed volume, even for multinozzle dispensing. Therefore, the proposed plug-in dispenser enables flexible design of nozzles and reversible integration to dispense droplets with different volumes, depending on the application. Furthermore, to demonstrate the practicality of the proposed dispensing system, we developed a pencil-type dispensing system as an alternative to a conventional pipette for rapid and reliable dispensing of minute volume droplets.

  3. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  4. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  5. Perceptions of Dispensers Regarding Dispensing Practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia, 2Department of Social and. Administrative Pharmacy, College of ... among drug sellers and consumers regarding quality of medicines. It highlighted lack ... practices and the salient issues and factors affecting dispensing practices in ...

  6. Perceptions of Dispensers Regarding Dispensing Practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interviews which focused on three major components, namely dispensing practices, regulation and influencing factors, and suggestions for improvements were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results: Thematic content analysis of the interview components yielded further seven major themes which ...

  7. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2010-06-01

    Since the late 1970s, energy labeling programs and mandatory energy performance standards have been used in many different countries to improve the efficiency levels of major residential and commercial equipment. As more countries and regions launch programs covering a greater range of products that are traded worldwide, greater attention has been given to harmonizing the specific efficiency criteria in these programs and the test methods for measurements. For example, an international compact fluorescent light (CFL) harmonization initiative was launched in 2006 to focus on collaboration between Australia, China, Europe and North America. Given the long history of standards and labeling programs, most major energy-consuming residential appliances and commercial equipment are already covered under minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and/or energy labels. For these products, such as clothes washers and CFLs, harmonization may still be possible when national MEPS or labeling thresholds are revised. Greater opportunity for harmonization exists in newer energy-consuming products that are not commonly regulated but are under consideration for new standards and labeling programs. This may include commercial products such as water dispensers and vending machines, which are only covered by MEPS or energy labels in a few countries or regions. As China continues to expand its appliance standards and labeling programs and revise existing standards and labels, it is important to learn from recent international experiences with efficiency criteria and test procedures for the same products. Specifically, various types of standards and labeling programs already exist in North America, Europe and throughout Asia for products in China's 2010 standards and labeling programs, namely clothes washers, water dispensers, vending machines and CFLs. This report thus examines similarities and critical differences in energy efficiency values, test procedure specifications and

  8. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  9. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFord, Henry S.; Moss, Owen R.

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  10. RhoA is dispensable for skin development, but crucial for contraction and directed migration of keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Ben; Peyrollier, Karine; Pedersen, Esben

    2011-01-01

    , suggesting that RhoB and RhoC have partially overlapping functions with RhoA. Loss of RhoA decreased directed cell migration in vitro caused by reduced migration speed and directional persistence. These defects were not related to the decreased cell contraction and were independent of ROCK, as ROCK...... inhibition by Y27632 increased directed migration of both control and RhoA-null keratinocytes. Our data indicate a crucial role for RhoA and contraction in regulating cell spreading and a contraction-independent function of RhoA in keratinocyte migration. In addition, our data show that RhoA is dispensable...

  11. Water Saving for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2013-04-01

    The project "Water Saving for Development (WaS4D)" is financed by European Territorial Cooperational Programme, Greece-Italy 2007-2013, and aims at developing issues on water saving related to improvement of individual behaviors and implementing innovative actions and facilities in order to harmonize policies and start concrete actions for a sustainable water management, making also people and stakeholders awake to water as a vital resource, strategic for quality of life and territory competitiveness. Drinkable water saving culture & behavior, limited water resources, water supply optimization, water resources and demand management, water e-service & educational e-tools are the key words of WaS4D. In this frame the project objectives are: • Definition of water need for domestic and other than domestic purposes: regional and territorial hydro-balance; • promotion of locally available resources not currently being used - water recycling or reuse and rainwater harvesting; • scientific data implementation into Informative Territorial System and publication of geo-referred maps into the institutional web sites, to share information for water protection; • participated review of the regulatory framework for the promotion of water-efficient devices and practices by means of the definition of Action Plans, with defined targets up to brief (2015) and medium (2020) term; • building up water e-services, front-office for all the water issues in building agricultural, industrial and touristic sectors, to share information, procedures and instruments for the water management; • creation and publication of a user friendly software, a game, to promote sustainability for houses also addressed to young people; • creation of water info point into physical spaces called "Water House" to promote education, training, events and new advisory services to assist professionals involved in water uses and consumers; • implementation of participatory approach & networking for a

  12. EVALUASI DAMPAK PENERAPAN AUTOMATED DISPENSING MACHINE TERHADAP DISPENSING ERROR DI FARMASI RAWAT JALAN INSTALASI FARMASI RUMAH SAKIT BETHESDA YOGYKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwoadi Sujatno

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dispensing error is not uncommon in the medication proccess. Otomatisation of outpatient pharmacy services decrease the incidence of dispensing error, as well as improving the efficiency of picking, packing and labeling process. Since August 2014 an automated dispensing machine was installed in outpatient pharmascy Bethesda Hospital Yogyakarta, integrated with electronic prescribing and hospital information system. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of automated dispensing machine on the dispensing error at outpatient pharmacy Services using before and after study method. The procentage of drugs deliver by automated dispensing machine at the third and sixth month of implementation was 46% and 59%. Failure mode and effeect analysis of dispensing process done before the implementation, and the integration with electronic prescription and hospital information system, as well as the development of smart pack is the key of successed. The average of medications picked after the implementation of automated dispensing machine was (37,915.33 ± 3,160.12, higher than before implementation (36,812.67 ± 2,890.81, but not significant. The average of dispensing error after implementation (15,67 ± 6,28 was reduced significantly (p<0,05 than before (50.33 ± 34.47. The most frequent type of dispensing error were wrong quantity dispensed, wrong drug dispensed and wrong strength dispensed. The implementation of automated dispensing machine significantly reduce the incidence of dispensing error. Further investigaation needed to know the incidence of dispesning error cause by the machine and manual and factors that influenced.

  13. Development of single-dispenser pheromone suppression of Epiphyas postvittana, Planotortrix octo and Ctenopseustis obliquana in New Zealand stone fruit orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, David M; McLaren, Gillian F; Manning, Lee-Anne M; Mitchell, Vanessa J; Attfield, Bernie; Colhoun, Kate; El-Sayed, Ashraf M

    2012-06-01

    Pheromones of two native leafrollers of economic importance to the New Zealand horticulture industry, Planotortrix octo [(Z)-8-tetradecenyl acetate and tetradecyl acetate] and Ctenopseustis obliquana [(Z)-5-tetradecenyl acetate and (Z)-8-tetradecenyl acetate], were reinvestigated and combined with pheromone of Epiphyas postvittana [light-brown apple moth, (E)-11-tetradecenyl actetate and (E, E)-9,11-tetradecen-1-yl acetate] to develop a single dispenser for mating disruption of three pest species for integrated pest management. Additional compounds identified from pheromone gland extracts were characterised as repellents for P. octo. However, for C. obliquana from Central Otago, a change in ratio of (Z)-5-tetradecenyl acetate and (Z)-8-tetradecenyl acetate and the addition of three compounds found in the gland (dodecyl acetate, tetradecyl acetate and hexadecanal) led to a significant improvement in catch over previous lures. Males from Central Otago showed antennal electrophysiological responses to hexadecanal, unlike C. obliquana from Auckland, which did not. Three multiple-species disruption blends were devised in a single dispenser to target E. postvittana, P. octo and C. obliquana. Disruption of traps was recorded in single-tree replicates with all three blends, but the five-component blend was overall most effective at disruption and was deployed area wide in commercial orchard plots. Deployment of single dispensers into commercial stone fruit orchards led to disruption of trapping for the three species and measurable reductions in insecticide use in cherries, peaches and nectarines without increased fruit damage (assessed in apricots). Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. A Simulated Learning Environment for Teaching Medicine Dispensing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jenny; Styles, Kim; Sewell, Keith; Trinder, Peta; Marriott, Jennifer; Maher, Sheryl; Naidu, Som

    2016-02-25

    To develop an authentic simulation of the professional practice dispensary context for students to develop their dispensing skills in a risk-free environment. A development team used an Agile software development method to create MyDispense, a web-based simulation. Modeled on virtual learning environments elements, the software employed widely available standards-based technologies to create a virtual community pharmacy environment. Assessment. First-year pharmacy students who used the software in their tutorials, were, at the end of the second semester, surveyed on their prior dispensing experience and their perceptions of MyDispense as a tool to learn dispensing skills. The dispensary simulation is an effective tool for helping students develop dispensing competency and knowledge in a safe environment.

  15. High-Voltage Droplet Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus that is extremely effective in dispensing a wide range of droplets has been developed. This droplet dispenser is unique in that it utilizes a droplet bias voltage, as well as an ionization pulse, to release a droplet. Apparatuses that deploy individual droplets have been used in many applications, including, notably, study of combustion of liquid fuels. Experiments on isolated droplets are useful in that they enable the study of droplet phenomena under well-controlled and simplified conditions. In this apparatus, a syringe dispenses a known value of liquid, which emerges from, and hangs onto, the outer end of a flat-tipped, stainless steel needle. Somewhat below the needle tip and droplet is a ring electrode. A bias high voltage, followed by a high-voltage pulse, is applied so as to attract the droplet sufficiently to pull it off the needle. The voltages are such that the droplet and needle are negatively charged and the ring electrode is positively charged.

  16. An alternative direct compound dispensing method using the HP D300 digital dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Raisa E; Zheng, Wei; McKew, John C; Chen, Catherine Z

    2013-10-01

    Evaluation of compound activity in vitro is crucial to drug discovery efforts and require that the compounds be accurately and reliably titrated and dispensed to the assay wells. The HP D300 dispenser uses inkjet technology to achieve small-volume dispensing that allows concentration-response testing using the direct dilution paradigm. Although inkjet technology has been long in existence, it is new to the field of screening and drug development. We have evaluated the D300 dispenser in a biochemical assay, a cell-based reporter gene assay, and a cytotoxicity assay. The software for this instrument is user friendly, and the compound-dispensing process is streamlined. However, a limitation is that this dispenser is currently applicable to only 96-well and 384-well plate formats and not to 1536-well high-density plates. Our results indicate that the D300 generates clean and reproducible results that correlate with those produced with more commonly used instruments such as the pin tool. We found that the instrument is useful and can improve the throughput of compound dispensing in 96-well and 384-well plates.

  17. Water development projects map

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new map showing major water development projects across the United States has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The map shows the location, size, and ownership of approximately 2800 of the nation's major multipurpose and flood control dams and virtually all of the reservoir storage and flood control capacity of the country. Other features illustrated on the map include U.S. Bureau of Reclamation surface water irrigation projects; watershed protection projects of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service; hydroelectric power facilities, including both federal plants and nonfederal plants leased by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigation and flood damage reduction projects; and the federal systems of wild and scenic rivers. The map also delineates major rivers and the 21 USGS water resources region boundaries so that users of the map can locate development projects with respect to drainage basins.

  18. THE ORIGINS OF THE CASHLESS SOCIETY: CASH DISPENSERS, DIRECT TO ACCOUNT PAYMENTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ON-LINE REAL-TIME NETWORKS, C.1965-1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the technological choices made at the dawn of the massification of retail finance. We describe and analyze the early development of electronic banking and the foundations of the cashless society through the experiences of organizations with similar governance in two different competitive environments — Swedish and British savings banks. We document how the adoption of direct-to-account wage deposits and the subsequent deployment of networks of cash dispensers interacted with the adoption of on-line real-time (OLRT computing, and distinguish on- line and OLRT communication as distinct stages in the evolution of computer networks. We emphasize the role of middle managers in the selection of alternative technologies and show how delivering a cashless society proved more difficult than anticipated.

  19. Development and evaluation of an emulsified paraffin wax dispenser for season-long mating disruption of Grapholita molesta in commercial peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lame, Frédérique M; Miller, James R; Attrerholt, Cynthia A; Gut, Larry J

    2007-08-01

    The University of California at Davis patented the use of emulsified wax to release pheromones for mating disruption. Advantages of these dispensers include low cost, self-adhesion, and biodegradation. We compared the efficacy and practicality of Confuse-OFM, a commercial emulsified wax formulation of oriental fruit moth, Grapiholita molesta (Busck), pheromone with those of Check-Mate OFM-F sprayable pheromone and Isomate-M 100 polyethylene tube dispensers in commercial peach (Prunus spp.) orchards. Efficacy was measured with male captures in pheromone-, virgin female-, and liquid attractant-baited bucket traps as well as by noting injury to shoots and fruit. Two applications of Confuse-OFM were as effective as two applications of CheckMate OFM-F and one application of Isomate-M 100. However, Confuse-OFM was tedious to apply and wasted pheromone with an initially high release rate. We developed a new emulsified wax formulation (Wax Dollops) that maintained release rates above a 5 mg/ha/h threshold twice as long as Confuse-OFM in the laboratory. Field trials confirmed that one application of 3-ml dollops (590 dollops per ha) provided season-long (approximately 15 wk) control equivalent to that of Isomate-M 100 and Confuse-OFM applied as described above. Several applicators were developed for Wax Dollops, including a pneumatic gun that shot dollops >2 m. However, the most efficient method for application was wiping dollops onto tree branches by using a flat-bladed spatula. This research was the basis for a new line of commercial pheromone pest control products equally effective to current commercial formulations but with advantages in cost and flexibility.

  20. Study on optimized dispensing of F-18 FDG auto dispenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Bong Geun; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Eon; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Tae Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This is a study on the optimized dispensing of the auto dispenser used for the purpose of reducing the exposure dose and accurate radiation dose of radioisotope with regard to the PET/CT practitioners. The research method was to find the optimized dispensing method through evaluating the results according to the syringe type, dispensing rate, and vial pressure and through the application of corrected values. As a result of this study, 9.38 mCi has been dispensed on average in the case of 5 ml syringe, and the reproducibility close to 10 mCi was shown at the dispense of 9.55 mCi in the case of 3 ml syringe. In the evaluation according to the dispensing rate, the quantity of radioisotope close to 10 mCi was dispensed at the rate of 5 mm/min when the measurement was carried out by increasing the rate by 5 mm/min units in the order of 5, 10, 15 and 20 mm/min . In the evaluation result according to the vial pressure before/after the use of Needle filter, it was measured to be 9.53 mCi before use and 9.84 mCi after use confirming that the dispensing after using Needle filter showed the optimal value. In addition, in the evaluation of radioactivity before/after the application of corrected values according to the increase in dispense frequency, it was measured 9.53 mCi before correction and 10.07 mCi after correction confirming that the value with correction applied was closer to the quantitative value. Thus, a good optimized method was confirmed to use a 3 ml syringe with dispensing rate of 5 mm/min, to use a Needle filter at dispensing, and to set the corrected value of [y = 0.097 × χ] according to the dispensing frequency of equipment.

  1. Lyophilized spore dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, A. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lyophilized spore dispenser is provided which produces a finely divided, monoparticulate cloud of bacterial spores. The spores are contained within a tightly sealed chamber, and a turbulator orifice connected to an air supply source provides a jet of air which stirs up the spores and causes the spores to be suspended in eddy currents within the chamber. This air jet also produces a positive pressure within the chamber which forces the spores out of an injection orifice.

  2. Medicine dispensing service in primary health care of SUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Silvana Nair; Bernardo, Noemia Liege Maria da Cunha; Álvares, Juliana; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Costa, Ediná Alves; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Soares, Luciano

    2017-11-13

    To characterize the medicine dispensing services in the primary health care network in Brazil and in its different regions, aiming to promote the access and rational use of medicines. This is a cross-sectional, quantitative study with data obtained from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), 2015. Observation visits were carried out in 1,175 dispensing units, and interviews were held with 1,139 professionals responsible for the dispensation of medicines in the dispensing units and 495 municipal coordinators of pharmaceutical services. More than half (53%) of the units presented a space smaller than 10 m2 for dispensing of medicines; 23.8% had bars or barriers between users and dispenser; 41.7% had computerized system; and 23.7% had counters for individual care. Among those responsible for dispensation, 87.4% said they always or repeatedly inform users how to use the medicines, and 18.1% reported developing some type of clinical activity. Isolated pharmacies presented a more developed physical and personal structure than those belonging to health units, but we found no significant differences regarding the information provided and the development of clinical activities. There are major differences in the organization models of dispensation between cities, with regional differences regarding the physical structure and professionals involved. The centralization of medicine dispensing in pharmacies separated from the health services is associated with better structural and professional conditions, as in the dispensing units of the South, Southeast, and Midwest regions. However, the development of dispensation as health service does not prevail in any pharmacy or region of the Country yet.

  3. Medicine dispensing service in primary health care of SUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Nair Leite

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To characterize the medicine dispensing services in the primary health care network in Brazil and in its different regions, aiming to promote the access and rational use of medicines. METHODS This is a cross-sectional, quantitative study with data obtained from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines, 2015. Observation visits were carried out in 1,175 dispensing units, and interviews were held with 1,139 professionals responsible for the dispensation of medicines in the dispensing units and 495 municipal coordinators of pharmaceutical services. RESULTS More than half (53% of the units presented a space smaller than 10 m2 for dispensing of medicines; 23.8% had bars or barriers between users and dispenser; 41.7% had computerized system; and 23.7% had counters for individual care. Among those responsible for dispensation, 87.4% said they always or repeatedly inform users how to use the medicines, and 18.1% reported developing some type of clinical activity. Isolated pharmacies presented a more developed physical and personal structure than those belonging to health units, but we found no significant differences regarding the information provided and the development of clinical activities. CONCLUSIONS There are major differences in the organization models of dispensation between cities, with regional differences regarding the physical structure and professionals involved. The centralization of medicine dispensing in pharmacies separated from the health services is associated with better structural and professional conditions, as in the dispensing units of the South, Southeast, and Midwest regions. However, the development of dispensation as health service does not prevail in any pharmacy or region of the Country yet.

  4. A chip-to-chip nanoliter microfluidic dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Zhou, Ying; Qiu, Haiwei; Huang, Huang; Sun, Changhong; Xi, Jianzhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2009-07-07

    A high-throughput microfluidic device is developed to handle liquid dispensation in nanoliter range. The dispenser system shows no cross-contamination between the microwells, indicating its great potential in large-scale screening experiments. An array of 115 nl PCR reactions, as well as the single channel addressable chip demonstrate the high flexibility and wide applications of this novel system.

  5. E85 Dispenser Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.; Johnson, C.; Sears, T.; Bergeron, P.

    2009-12-01

    This study reviews E85 dispensing infrastructure advances and issues and evaluates the geographic concentration of flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs), E85 stations, ethanol production facilities, and E85 suppliers. Costs, space, financial incentives, and barriers to adding E85 fueling equipment at existing stations are also assessed. This study found that E85 is increasingly available in the U.S. in half of the states; however, the other half have minimal or no E85 fueling options. Despite these gains, E85 is only available at 1% of U.S. gasoline stations. Ethanol production reached 9.5 billion gallons in 2008, but less than 1% is consumed as E85. FFVs have not reached a significant concentration in any county, metropolitan area, or state.

  6. Water Demand at Recreation Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Simon; Hughes, Trevor C

    1980-01-01

    Design criteria for drinking water systems at recreation developments, particularly summer home type, cause frequent confrontations with regulatory agencies. Developers claim extremely low water use rates due to low occupancy rates, but regulatory agencies are concerned about changes over time from essentially weekend use to more permanent residency and also about occasional peak day water demands similar to those...

  7. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  8. Digital Imaging and Piezo-dispenser Actuator in Automatic Flocculation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani TOMPERI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an image-based on-line control system for a coiled pipe flocculator. A digital imaging technique developed previously is utilized to measure the characteristic floc size and a high-pressure piezo-dispenser is introduced for accurate dosing and rapid mixing of the flocculant. The controller is a conventional PI controller. Step change experiments on feed water quality, flow rate and desired floc size have been carried out for controller tuning and testing. The paper shows that the piezo-dispenser provides better flocculation results than a conventional dosing pump, and the flocculation result can be automatically controlled even when the feed water quality rapidly changes. The proposed flocculator is a simple, inexpensive and practical system for long-term laboratory tests to investigate the functionality of flocculants on varying feed waters.

  9. MicroRNA-21 and Dicer are Dispensable for Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and the Development of Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Jorge Matias; Yan, Jun; Jang, Myoung-Kuk; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Affo, Silvia; Yu, Lexing; Olinga, Peter; Friedman, Richard A; Chen, Xin; Schwabe, Robert F

    2017-11-01

    Fibrosis and cancer represent two major complications of chronic liver disease. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the development of fibrosis and cancer, thus constituting potential therapeutic targets. Here, we investigated the role of miR-21, a microRNA that has been implicated in the development of fibrosis in multiple organs and also been suggested to act as "oncomir". Accordingly, miR-21 was the microRNA that showed the strongest upregulation in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in multiple models of fibrogenesis, with an 8- to 24-fold induction compared to quiescent HSC. However, miR-21 antisense inhibition did not suppress the activation of murine or human HSC in culture or in liver slices. Moreover, antisense inhibition or genetic deletion of miR-21 in two independently generated knockout mice did not alter HSC activation or liver fibrosis in models of toxic and biliary liver injury. Despite a strong upregulation of miR-21 in injury-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and in cholangiocarcinoma, miR-21 deletion or antisense inhibition did not reduce the development of liver tumors. As inhibition of the most upregulated microRNA did not affect HSC activation, liver fibrosis and fibrosis-associated liver cancer, we additionally tested the role of microRNAs in HSC by HSC-specific Dicer deletion. Although Dicer deletion decreased microRNA expression in HSC and altered the expression of select genes, it only exerted negligible effects on HSC activation and liver fibrosis. In conclusion, genetic and pharmacologic manipulation of miR-21 does not inhibit the development of liver fibrosis and liver cancer. Moreover, suppression of microRNA synthesis does not significantly affect HSC phenotype and activation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress AML development but are dispensable for disease maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Milica; Guitart, Amelie V.; Sepulveda, Catarina; Villacreces, Arnaud; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Panagopoulou, Theano I.; Ivens, Alasdair; Menendez-Gonzalez, Juan; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Allen, Lewis; Glykofrydis, Fokion; Subramani, Chithra; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Post, Annemarie E.M.; Schaak, Katrin; Gezer, Deniz; So, Chi Wai Eric; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Wood, Andrew; O'Carroll, Dónal; Ratcliffe, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemogenesis occurs under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow (BM). Knockdown of key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia with shRNA, namely hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or HIF-2α, in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples results in their apoptosis and inability to engraft, implicating HIF-1α or HIF-2α as therapeutic targets. However, genetic deletion of Hif-1α has no effect on mouse AML maintenance and may accelerate disease development. Here, we report the impact of conditional genetic deletion of Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α at different stages of leukemogenesis in mice. Deletion of Hif-2α accelerates development of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) and shortens AML latency initiated by Mll-AF9 and its downstream effectors Meis1 and Hoxa9. Notably, the accelerated initiation of AML caused by Hif-2α deletion is further potentiated by Hif-1α codeletion. However, established LSCs lacking Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α propagate AML with the same latency as wild-type LSCs. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the HIF pathway or HIF-2α knockout using the lentiviral CRISPR-Cas9 system in human established leukemic cells with MLL-AF9 translocation have no impact on their functions. We therefore conclude that although Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress the development of AML, they are not required for LSC maintenance. PMID:26642852

  11. Philosophy for water development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Hendricks, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    There is probably no one in this room who has not had an experience analogous to the one I here describe. You sat at the dinner table next to a nice lady who impressed you with her breadth of interest in community affairs. She said to you "Oh, you work in the field of water resources. That certainly is a major problem facing the United States, isn't it? You know, we have had long discussions about this matter in a club to which I belong. We have made a considerable study of this matter and all of us are convinced that a key element in the survival of America is to find a solution to our water problem."You know," she said, "there are certainly a lot of different kinds of organizations mixing up in the field of water. They all seem to be running off in different directions. It seems to me that one of the things we need most is a national water policy. Don't you think so?”I know how you answered the question. You must have about got started on a discussion of some of the complications when the conversation turned to the question of how long did it take you to get home in that last big snow. So, in effect, you continue to talk about the water problem even if merely as you exchange pleasantries about the day's weather. But then you went home and you thought some more about what the nice lady said and you asked yourself "well, now, truly how do we solve the Nation's water problem? What has a national water policy to do with a solution of this problem?" In the next few minutes I wish to exchange with you some of our thoughts on this matter.

  12. California Water Resources Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    overbank flows Study efforts during calendar year 1977 will focus on occur an average of once every three years, especially the stormwater runoff...of disposing of waterborne wastes, includ- trol, navigation, salinity control, water supply, tidelands ing reclamation and reuse where appropriate...studies for Wilson and Wildwood Creeks streams in the South Coastal Basins have been com- Keys Canyon pleted: Moose Canyon Agua Hedionda Creek Otay

  13. Clean Water for Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Aniruddha B; Kumar, Jyoti Kishen

    2015-01-01

    Availability of safe drinking water, a vital natural resource, is still a distant dream to many around the world, especially in developing countries. Increasing human activity and industrialization have led to a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological pollutants entering water bodies and affecting human lives. Efforts to develop efficient, economical, and technologically sound methods to produce clean water for developing countries have increased worldwide. We focus on solar disinfection, filtration, hybrid filtration methods, treatment of harvested rainwater, herbal water disinfection, and arsenic removal technologies. Simple, yet innovative water treatment devices ranging from use of plant xylem as filters, terafilters, and hand pumps to tippy taps designed indigenously are methods mentioned here. By describing the technical aspects of major water disinfection methods relevant for developing countries on medium to small scales and emphasizing their merits, demerits, economics, and scalability, we highlight the current scenario and pave the way for further research and development and scaling up of these processes. This review focuses on clean drinking water, especially for rural populations in developing countries. It describes various water disinfection techniques that are not only economically viable and energy efficient but also employ simple methodologies that are effective in reducing the physical, chemical, and biological pollutants found in drinking water to acceptable limits.

  14. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Keiji; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2010-05-25

    To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles. Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution) and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time. With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 +/- 0.5 seconds to 4.6 +/- 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa), the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R(2) = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R(2) = 0.563). Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.

  15. Development of an iodine generator for reclaimed water purification in manned spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, R. A.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1973-01-01

    A successful 30-day test is described of a prototype Iodine Generating and Dispensing System (IGDS). The IGDS was sized to iodinate the drinking water nominally consumed by six men, 4.5 to 13.6 kg (10 to 30 lb) water per man-day with a + or - 10 to 20% variation with iodine (I2) levels of 0.5 to 20 parts per million (ppm). The I2 treats reclaimed water to prevent or eliminate microorganism contamination. Treatment is maintained with a residual of I2 within the manned spacecraft water supply. A simplified version of the chlorogen water disinfection concept, developed by life systems for on-site generation of chlorine (Cl2), was used as a basis for IGDS development. Potable water contaminated with abundant E. Coliform Group organisms was treated by electrolytically generated I2 at levels of 5 to 10 ppm. In all instances, the E. coli were eliminated.

  16. A new manual dispensing system for in meso membrane protein crystallization with using a stepping motor-based dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, Masakatsu; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    A reliable and easy to use manual dispensing system has been developed for the in meso membrane protein crystallization method. The system consists of a stepping motor-based dispenser with a new microsyringe system for dispensing, which allows us to deliver any desired volume of highly viscous lipidic mesophase in the range from ~50 to at least ~200 nl. The average, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation of 20 repeated deliveries of 50 nl cubic phase were comparable to those of a current robotic dispensing. Moreover, the bottom faces of boluses delivered to the glass crystallization plate were reproducibly circular in shape, and their centers were within about 100 μm from the center of the crystallization well. The system was useful for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins in meso.

  17. A systematic review of the nature of dispensing errors in hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldhwaihi K

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Aldhwaihi, Fabrizio Schifano, Cinzia Pezzolesi, Nkiruka Umaru Department of Pharmacy, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK Background: Dispensing errors are common in hospital pharmacies. Investigating dispensing errors is important for identifying the factors involved and developing strategies to reduce their occurrence. Objectives: To review published studies exploring the incidence and types of dispensing errors in hospital pharmacies and factors contributing to these errors. Methods: Electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Ovid, and Web of Science were searched for articles published between January 2000 and January 2015. Inclusion criteria were: studies published in English, and studies investigating type, incidence and factors contributing to dispensing errors in hospital pharmacies. One researcher searched for all relevant published articles, screened all titles and abstracts, and obtained complete articles. A second researcher assessed the titles, abstracts, and complete articles to verify the reliability of the selected articles. Key findings: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria all of which were conducted in just four countries. Reviewing incident reports and direct observation were the main methods used to investigate dispensing errors. Dispensing error rates varied between countries (0.015%–33.5% depending on the dispensing system, research method, and classification of dispensing error types. The most frequent dispensing errors reported were dispensing the wrong medicine, dispensing the wrong drug strength, and dispensing the wrong dosage form. The most common factors associated with dispensing errors were: high workload, low staffing, mix-up of look-alike/sound-alike drugs, lack of knowledge/experience, distractions/interruptions, and communication problems within the dispensary team. Conclusion: Studies relating to dispensing errors in hospital pharmacies are few in number and have been conducted in

  18. Task Analysis in Optical & Contact Lens Dispensing. Dispensing Opticians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrushowy, Eugene; Stanley, Dale

    A task force of opticians and educators in British Columbia was assembled to determine the knowledge and skills required of dispensing opticians and contact lens specialists. The ideas generated by the task force were analyzed and distilled into the standardized tasks listed in this document, using Krathwohl's taxonomy. The document contains 36…

  19. The mitochondrial alternative oxidase Aox1 is needed to cope with respiratory stress but dispensable for pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Monroy, Christian A; Pohlmann, Thomas; Piñón-Zárate, Gabriela; Matus-Ortega, Genaro; Guerra, Guadalupe; Feldbrügge, Michael; Pardo, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase is an important enzyme that allows respiratory activity and the functioning of the Krebs cycle upon disturbance of the respiration chain. It works as a security valve in transferring excessive electrons to oxygen, thereby preventing potential damage by the generation of harmful radicals. A clear biological function, besides the stress response, has so far convincingly only been shown for plants that use the alternative oxidase to generate heat to distribute volatiles. In fungi it was described that the alternative oxidase is needed for pathogenicity. Here, we investigate expression and function of the alternative oxidase at different stages of the life cycle of the corn pathogen Ustilago maydis (Aox1). Interestingly, expression of Aox1 is specifically induced during the stationary phase suggesting a role at high cell density when nutrients become limiting. Studying deletion strains as well as overexpressing strains revealed that Aox1 is dispensable for normal growth, for cell morphology, for response to temperature stress as well as for filamentous growth and plant pathogenicity. However, during conditions eliciting respiratory stress yeast-like growth as well as hyphal growth is strongly affected. We conclude that Aox1 is dispensable for the normal biology of the fungus but specifically needed to cope with respiratory stress.

  20. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  1. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Niklas; Flynn, Michael; Wjee (er. Rau); Lunn, Griffin; Jackson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrogen and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  2. Alternative Water Processor Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Mitchell, Julie L.; Adam, Niklas M.; Barta, Daniel; Meyer, Caitlin E.; Pensinger, Stuart; Vega, Leticia M.; Callahan, Michael R.; Flynn, Michael; Wheeler, Ray; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Life Support Project is developing an Alternative Water Processor (AWP) as a candidate water recovery system for long duration exploration missions. The AWP consists of biological water processor (BWP) integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). The basis of the BWP is a membrane aerated biological reactor (MABR), developed in concert with Texas Tech University. Bacteria located within the MABR metabolize organic material in wastewater, converting approximately 90% of the total organic carbon to carbon dioxide. In addition, bacteria convert a portion of the ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system is expected to produce water with a total organic carbon less than 50 mg/l and dissolved solids that meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. This paper describes the test definition, the design of the BWP and FOST subsystems, and plans for integrated testing.

  3. The frequency and potential causes of dispensing errors in a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beso, Adnan; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Barber, Nick

    2005-06-01

    To determine the frequency and types of dispensing errors identified both at the final check stage and outside of a UK hospital pharmacy, to explore the reasons why they occurred, and to make recommendations for their prevention. A definition of a dispensing error and a classification system were developed. To study the frequency and types of errors, pharmacy staff recorded details of all errors identified at the final check stage during a two-week period; all errors identified outside of the department and reported during a one-year period were also recorded. During a separate six-week period, pharmacy staff making dispensing errors identified at the final check stage were interviewed to explore the causes; the findings were analysed using a model of human error. Percentage of dispensed items for which one or more dispensing errors were identified at the final check stage; percentage for which an error was reported outside of the pharmacy department; the active failures, error producing conditions and latent conditions that result in dispensing errors occurring. One or more dispensing errors were identified at the final check stage in 2.1% of 4849 dispensed items, and outside of the pharmacy department in 0.02% of 194,584 items. The majority of those identified at the final check stage involved slips in picking products, or mistakes in making assumptions about the products concerned. Factors contributing to the errors included labelling and storage of containers in the dispensary, interruptions and distractions, a culture where errors are seen as being inevitable, and reliance on others to identify and rectify errors. Dispensing errors occur in about 2% of all dispensed items. About 1 in 100 of these is missed by the final check. The impact on dispensing errors of developments such as automated dispensing systems should be evaluated.

  4. Automatic Control System for Dispensing Precise Amounts of FInely Divided Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, J. M.; McGraw, H. R.; Draut, C. F.

    1973-06-01

    A device for automatic dispensing of precise amounts of finely divided solids has been developed. Precision is a function of dispensing time. Smaller than gram quantities may be dispensed at a rate of about 1/3 g/min with a precision corresponding to a weight range of about 0.001 g for a series. The process consists in moving the material with the effect of the vibratory motion of a miniature air-powered vibrator. Operation is automatically controlled by the electronic system of the weighing unit interfaced to the pneumatic dispensing device via a combination fluidic and pneumatic control system.

  5. WATER MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safer Karima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available «Of course I wish I was in school. I want to learn, I want to read and write... But how mom need me to fetch water» - Benny Bazan, Bolivia; «…the factories consume a lot of water, while we can hardly find enough basic our needs, not to mention what we need to irrigate crops» - Gopal Jojor, India. Voices are united by the same thing: the denial of access to water. It’s what began the United Nations report of human development for the year 2006. The observed increase of the population and increasing water pressure to use some form of this article despite the enormous availability and large, underground or surface quantities, but the supply and demand equation is no longer as in the past in spite of the new techniques introduced Kthalih seawater. And has worked to highlight the importance of this element as the most important determinants of sustainable development, which aims to rationality and adulthood and dealing with efforts to achieve growth and meet the needs of the population of housing and economic activities and food and education, without prejudice to the negative form of ecological, and sustainable development is the way only to ensure a good quality of life for residents of the present and the future.

  6. Measurement and analysis of thermal photoemission from a dispenser cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L. Jensen

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Photocathodes for free electron lasers (FELs are required to produce nano-Coulomb pulses in picosecond time scales with demonstrable reliability, lifetime, and efficiency. Dispenser cathodes, traditionally a rugged and long-lived thermionic source, are under investigation to determine their utility as a photocathode and have shown promise. The present study describes theoretical models under development to analyze experimental data from dispenser cathodes and to create predictive time-dependent models to predict their performance as an FEL source. Here, a steady-state model of a dispenser cathode with partial coverage of a low work function coating and surface nonuniformity is developed. Quantitative agreement is found for experimental data, especially with regard to temperature, field, laser intensity, and quantum efficiency versus laser wavelength dependence. In particular, for long wavelength incident lasers of sufficient intensity, the majority of the absorbed energy heats the electron gas and background lattice, and photoemission from the heated electron distribution constitutes the emitted current.

  7. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yoshikawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Keiji Yoshikawa1, Hiroshi Yamada21Yoshikawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 2Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles.Methods: Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time.Results: With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 ± 0.5 seconds to 4.6 ± 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P < 0.0001. When using the bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa, the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R2 = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R2 = 0.563.Conclusions: Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.Keywords: dispensing time, model eye dropper bottle, model ophthalmic solution, nozzle internal space volume, nozzle inner aperture diameter

  8. Raw Milk Hygiene at Local Markets and Automatic Milk Dispenser Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Şteţca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, direct sales of raw milk to the final consumer is developed based on the local regulations. These are in accordance to European Regulation that must meet some quality requirements for the total number of germs, somatic cells, without antibiotics, coming from healthy animals who did not suffer from diseases that can be transmitted to humans through milk. Raw milk is sold in Romania in local markets and by automatic milk dispenser machines. Based on these regulations, a study regarding the quality and security to human health of raw milk was conducted on the commercialized milk in local markets and automatic milk dispensers. During May-June 2014 samples of raw milk were collected from Cluj-Napoca local markets and automatic milk dispensers. All samples were kept to refrigeration conditions until the moment of analyze which took place at the sampling day. The following parameters were taken into account: fat content, protein, casein, lactose, nonfat dry matter, pH, milk freezing point, added water, antibiotics residues, milk urea, number of germ cells and somatic cells. All obtained results were verified by the validated methods applied. Our research can be forward conducted in order to verify the hygiene and composition of milk from the whole dairy chain. 

  9. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many water utilities, particularly in the developing countries, continue to operate inefficient water distribution systems (WDSs) with a significant amount of water and revenue losses. Various factors, manageable to different extents, contribute to water losses, such as poor infrastructure, high pressures, illegal water use, etc.

  10. Exploring the rice dispensable genome using a metagenome-like assembly strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wen; Li, Guangwei; Zhao, Hu; Wang, Gongwei; Lian, Xingming; Xie, Weibo

    2015-09-07

    The dispensable genome of a species, consisting of the dispensable sequences present only in a subset of individuals, is believed to play important roles in phenotypic variation and genome evolution. However, construction of the dispensable genome is costly and labor-intensive at present, and so the influence of the dispensable genome in genetic and functional genomic studies has not been fully explored. We construct the dispensable genome of rice through a metagenome-like de novo assembly strategy based on low-coverage (1-3×) sequencing data of 1483 cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions. Thousands of protein-coding genes are successfully assembled, including most of the known agronomically important genes absent from the Nipponbare rice reference genome. We develop an integration approach based on alignment and linkage disequilibrium, which is able to assign genomic positions relative to the reference genome for more than 78.2 % of the dispensable sequences. We carry out association mapping studies for rice grain width and 840 metabolic traits using 0.46 million polymorphisms between the dispensable sequences of different rice accessions. About 23.5 % of metabolic traits have more significant association signals with polymorphisms from dispensable sequences than with SNPs from the reference genome, and 41.6 % of trait-associated SNPs have concordant genomic locations with associated dispensable sequences. Our results suggest the feasibility of building a species' dispensable genome using low-coverage population sequencing data. The constructed sequences will be helpful for understanding the rice dispensable genome and are complementary to the reference genome for identifying candidate genes associated with phenotypic variation.

  11. Prescription habits of dispensing and non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trap, Birna; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2002-01-01

    The number of dispensing doctors has increased in the last decade, but the implication of this trend on the quality of health care and drug use is unknown. We present a comparative drug utilization study of 29 dispensing doctors and 28 non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe based on standard indicato...

  12. Sustainable development of water resources, water supply and environmental sanitation.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Austin, LM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available , Colombo, Sri Lanka, 2006 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER RESOURCES, WATER SUPPLY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION Operational safety of urine diversion toilets in Durban, South Africa L M Austin, South Africa There are approximately 50 000...

  13. Dissolvable microneedle fabrication using piezoelectric dispensing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Evin A; O'Mahony, Conor; Cronin, Michael; O'Mahony, Thomas; Moore, Anne C; Crean, Abina M

    2016-03-16

    Dissolvable microneedle (DMN) patches are novel dosage forms for the percutaneous delivery of vaccines. DMN are routinely fabricated by dispensing liquid formulations into microneedle-shaped moulds. The liquid formulation within the mould is then dried to create dissolvable vaccine-loaded microneedles. The precision of the dispensing process is critical to the control of formulation volume loaded into each dissolvable microneedle structure. The dispensing process employed must maintain vaccine integrity. Wetting of mould surfaces by the dispensed formulation is also an important consideration for the fabrication of sharp-tipped DMN. Sharp-tipped DMN are essential for ease of percutaneous administration. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of a piezoelectric dispensing system to dispense picolitre formulation volumes into PDMS moulds enabling the fabrication of bilayer DMN. The influence of formulation components (trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) content) and piezoelectric actuation parameters (voltage, frequency and back pressure) on drop formation is described. The biological integrity of a seasonal influenza vaccine following dispensing was investigated and maintained voltage settings of 30 V but undermined at higher settings, 50 and 80 V. The results demonstrate the capability of piezoelectric dispensing technology to precisely fabricate bilayer DMN. They also highlight the importance of identifying formulation and actuation parameters to ensure controlled droplet formulation and vaccine stabilisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimalarial Drugs for Pediatrics - Prescribing and Dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess dispensing and prescribing practices with regard to antimalarial drugs for pediatrics in private pharmacies and public hospitals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study that assessed the knowledge and practice of 200 drug dispensers in the private community ...

  15. Hand-Controlled Brazing-Paste Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1994-01-01

    Hand control proven superior to foot control. Hand-operated switch added to hand-held brazing-alloy-paste dispenser yields improved, more consistent brazing-alloy beads. Dispenser used to apply paste between adjacent tubes in heat exchanger. Switch reliable and safe, and removed and reattached easily.

  16. Conversion of cold beverage dispenser's refrigeration system to R744 refrigerant

    OpenAIRE

    Visek, Matej; Elbel, Stefan; Hrnjak, Pega

    2016-01-01

    Cold beverage dispensers belong to the group of light commercial refrigeration machines that includes beverage coolers, ice machines and storage units for food items. Beverage dispensers use a vapor compression system to charge a thermal storage, usually an ice bank, which is used to indirectly cool tap water and beverage concentrate. For these machines, R290 (propane) and R744 (carbon dioxide) are among the favorite candidates to completely replace high GWP HFC refrigerants in the future. Be...

  17. Dispensing apparatus for use in a cued food delivery task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deweese, Menton M.; Claiborne, Kimberly N.; Ng, Jennifer; Dirba, Danika D.; Stewart, Hannah L.; Schembre, Susan M.; Versace, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological models of obesity postulate that obese individuals have difficulty regulating food intake partly because they attribute excessive salience to stimuli signaling food availability. Typically, human studies that investigate the relationship between brain responses to food-related stimuli and obesity present food cues without subsequent delivery of food. However, in order to identify the brain correlates of cue reactivity, we must record brain responses to food-related cues signaling food availability. Therefore, we have developed a dispensing apparatus for use in a cued-food delivery task in which event-related potentials (ERPs) to food-related images predicting food delivery and images not predicting food delivery can be recorded. Here, we describe a method where:•The experimental apparatus dispenses an edible item (i.e., a chocolate candy) which may or may not be eaten, or a non-edible control item (e.g., a plastic bead).•Deposit boxes are available to store uneaten candies and the non-edible control items.•The dispensing mechanism is capable of recording the exact timestamp when each delivery event occurs (e.g., release from the dispenser, arrival in the receptacle, storage in the deposit box). PMID:26870667

  18. Topical Metered-dosing Dispenser Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Kupiec, Thomas C; Vu, Nicole T

    2016-01-01

    Topical metered-dosing dispensers are designed for dosing accuracy and ease-of-use by the patients while protecting the packaged products from environmental exposure and contamination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, precision, and residual of available topical metered-dosing dispensers with different types of topical cream for practical application. Triplicate samples of five different dispensers were tested. This test was completed using three types of commercial topical cream-bases of dissimilar Total Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Load Percentages, Transdermal Penetration Percentages, and Specific Gravities. The dispensers were evaluated according to specified dose-uniformity criteria for a total dispensing capacity of 30 mL at 0.5 mL per dose for 60 doses. The study shows Topi-CLICK performed with the best precision and accuracy of dosing in comparison to the airless-pump type dispensers. While the dispensing was highly variable with airless pumps and may require calibration for each packaged product, remarkably the performance of Topi-CLICK was not affected by different types of cream-bases and does not require additional metering calibration. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  19. Piezoelectric dispenser based on a piezoelectric-metal-cavity actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K H; Sun, C L; Kwok, K W; Chan, H L W

    2009-07-01

    A piezoelectric dispenser has been fabricated based on the idea of a piezoelectric-metal-cavity (PMC) actuator. The PMC actuator consists of a metal ring sandwiched between two identical piezoelectric unimorphs. The radial contraction of the piezoelectric ceramic is converted into a flextensional motion of the unimorph, causing a large flexural displacement in the center part of the actuator. With the PMC actuator as a fluid chamber, the large flexural actuation can be used to produce the displacement needed to eject fluid. By applying an appropriate voltage to the piezoelectric unimorphs, a drop-on-demand ejection of ink or water can be achieved. The efficiency of fluid ejection can be enhanced after installing a valve in the fluid chamber. With the simple PMC structure, the dispenser can be operated with a low driving voltage of 12-15 V.

  20. DEVELOPMENTS IN OZONATION OF WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensar OĞUZ

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone, has been used in both industrial and synthetic chemistry. From this point of view, ozone-organic chemistry related papaers have been published by many researcher. Forthermore; its role in air and water pollution problems is more important today. As a result of ozone researches, it is clear that ozone is to be the brightest expection for future in industrial, domestic, and driking water treatment. Ozone, a high grade oxidation matter, has been used for removing the pollutants and toxic materials from waste waters.

  1. The Quality of Pharmacy Practice Among Dispensers in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of pharmacy practice provided by dispensers in private pharmacies was studied. Parameters used include levels of education of the dispensers, access to health information, knowledge and practice regarding dispensing of drugs to patients, and disposal of expired drugs. A total of 150 dispensers selected from ...

  2. Refinement of Foam Backfill Technology for Expedient Airfield Damage Repair; Phase 2: Development of Prototype Foam Dispensing Equipment and Improved Tactics, Techniques and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    efficiently enough that the surface is immediately dry upon removal from water. The material is a two-part treatment that may be spray, roll, or dip...valves were opened. ERDC TR-17-14 15 4. The diesel generator was started. The start key was held in the pre- heat position until the engine block...surface. These cracks were potentially created to release heat within the foam. The surface of the foam was removed via shovels and an excavator to

  3. Household Water Treatments in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smieja, Joanne A.

    2011-01-01

    Household water treatments (HWT) can help provide clean water to millions of people worldwide who do not have access to safe water. This article describes four common HWT used in developing countries and the pertinent chemistry involved. The intent of this article is to inform both high school and college chemical educators and chemistry students…

  4. Impact of Formulation Properties and Process Parameters on the Dispensing and Depositioning of Drug Nanosuspensions Using Micro-Valve Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhoeffer, Bastian; Kwade, Arno; Juhnke, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Flexible manufacturing processes with continuously adjustable dose strengths are considered particularly innovative and interesting for applications in personalized medicine, continuous manufacturing, or early drug development. A piezo-actuated micro-valve has been investigated for the dispensing and depositioning of drug nanosuspensions onto substrates to facilitate the manufacturing of solid oral dosage forms. The investigated micro-valve has been characterized regarding dispensing behavior, mass flow, accuracy, and robustness. The amount of dispensed drug compound during 1 dispensing event could be continuously adjusted from a few micrograms to several milligrams with high accuracy. Fluid properties, dispensing parameters of the micro-valve, and the resulting steady state mass flow could be correlated adequately for low-viscous drug nanosuspensions. High-speed imaging was used to investigate the dispensing behavior of the micro-valve regarding the evolution of the dispensed drug nanosuspension after ejection from the nozzle and the behavior during impact on flat and dry solid substrates. The experimentally determined breakup length of the dispensed liquid jet could be correlated with a semiempirical equation. From image sequences of the jet impact, We-Re phase diagrams could be established, providing a profound understanding and systematic guidance for the controlled depositioning of the entire dispensed drug nanosuspension onto the substrate. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PROJECT OF COAGULANT DISPENSER IN PULVERIZATION AERATOR WITH WIND DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Osuch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are one of most important freshwater ecosystems, playing significant role in functioning of nature and human economy. Swarzędzkie Lake is good example of ecosystem, which in last half-century was exposed to the influence of strong anthropopressure. Direct inflow of sewage with large number of biogens coming to the lake with water of inflows caused distinct disturbance of its functioning. In autumn 2011 restoration begined on Swarzędzkie Lake for reduction of lake trophy and improvement of water quality. For achieving better and quicker effect, simultaneously combination of some methods was applied, among others method of oxygenation of over-bottom water with help of pulverization aerator and method of precise inactivation of phosphorus in water depths. Characterization and analysis of improved coagulant dispenser applying active substance only during work of pulverization aerator is the aim of this thesis. Principle of dispenser work, its structure and location in pulverization aerator were explained. It was stated, that introduction to water a factor initiating process of phosphorus inactivation causes significant reduction of mineral phosphorus in water and size of coagulant dose correlates with intensity of work of pulverization aerator with wind drive.

  6. Implications of Water Development for Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Rosegrant, M. W.

    2001-05-01

    Water development for agriculture-the major water user worldwide-is one of the most critical factors for food security in many regions of the world. The role of water withdrawals in irrigated agriculture and food security has been receiving substantial attention in recent years. This paper will address key questions regarding implications of water development for food security at both regional and global scale, including what is the current status of water availability for agriculture? How will water availability and water demand evolve over the next three decades, taking into account availability and variability in water resources, the water supply infrastructure, and irrigation and nonagricultural water demands? What is the role of irrigation in food production now and in the future? What risk will be put on regional and global food production, demand and trade if municipal and industrial water demand is high, environmental water requirement is increasing, or groundwater overdraft is phased off? What is the contribution of infrastructure investment in enhancing irrigation water supply capacity, improving water use efficiency, and increasing rainfall harvesting particularly in arid and semi-arid regions and countries? These questions are explored through a global modeling framework, IMPACT-Water, developed in the International Food Policy Research Institute. In general, the results show that, under plausible assumptions on developments in irrigation and water investment, the rapid growth in water demand, particularly for domestic and industrial purposes, coupled with the a continued slowdown in investments, could be a serious threat to future growth in food production, causing negative impacts on low-income developing countries and the poor consumers in these countries. Food production, demand and trade and food prices will be increasingly affected by declining water availibility for irrigation. Developing countries, especially those with arid climates, poor

  7. Dispenser Concept for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV, Drone, UAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Suri, Manan

    2017-01-01

    System, design and methodology to load and dispense different articles from an autonomous aircraft are disclosed. In one embodiment, the design of a unique detachable dispenser for delivery of articles is described along with an intelligent methodology of loading and delivering the articles to and from the dispenser. Design of the dispenser, interaction of the dispenser with the flight control unit and ground control or base-station, and interaction of the base station with the sender or reci...

  8. Professional Development for Water Quality Control Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Clinton Lewis

    This study investigated the availability of professional development opportunities for water quality control personnel in the midwest. The major objective of the study was to establish a listing of educational opportunities for the professional development of water quality control personnel and to compare these with the opportunities technicians…

  9. Qualification, knowledge and experience of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain A; Ibrahim MIM

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacies are managed by a variety of dispensers in terms of qualification, knowledge and experience in Pakistan. Objective The study aimed to document the state of knowledge, experience and qualification of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan. Methods A comparative cross sectional study was conducted at a randomly selected sample of 371 pharmacies in the three cities of Pakistan. A structured questionnaire for data collection was developed and finalized by focused group d...

  10. Developing a water market readiness assessment framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarah Ann; Loch, Adam; Crase, Lin; Young, Mike; Grafton, R. Quentin

    2017-09-01

    Water markets are increasingly proposed as a demand-management strategy to deal with water scarcity. Water trading arrangements, on their own, are not about setting bio-physical limits to water-use. Nevertheless, water trading that mitigates scarcity constraints can assist regulators of water resources to keep water-use within limits at the lowest possible cost, and may reduce the cost of restoring water system health. While theoretically attractive, many practitioners have, at best, only a limited understanding of the practical usefulness of markets and how they might be most appropriately deployed. Using lessons learned from jurisdictions around the world where water markets have been implemented, this study attempts to fill the existing water market development gap and provide an initial framework (the water market readiness assessment (WMRA)) to describe the policy and administrative conditions/reforms necessary to enable governments/jurisdictions to develop water trading arrangements that are efficient, equitable and within sustainable limits. Our proposed framework consists of three key steps: 1) an assessment of hydrological and institutional needs; 2) a market evaluation, including assessment of development and implementation issues; and 3) the monitoring, continuous/review and assessment of future needs; with a variety of questions needing assessment at each stage. We apply the framework to three examples: regions in Australia, the United States and Spain. These applications indicate that WMRA can provide key information for water planners to consider on the usefulness of water trading processes to better manage water scarcity; but further practical applications and tests of the framework are required to fully evaluate its effectiveness.

  11. Fabrication and Measurement of Low Work Function Cesiated Dispenser Photocathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Moody, Nathan A; Jensen, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Photoinjector performance is a limiting factor in the continued development of high powered FELs and electron beam-based accelerators. Presently available photocathodes are plagued with limited efficiency and short lifetime in an RF-gun environment, due to contamination or evaporation of a photosensitive surface layer. An ideal photocathode should have high efficiency at long wavelengths, long lifetime in practical vacuum environments, and prompt emission. Cathodes with high efficiency typically have limited lifetime, and vice versa, and the needs of the photocathode are generally at odds with those of the drive laser. A potential solution is the low work function dispenser cathode, where lifetime issues are overcome by periodic in situ regeneration that restores the photosensitive surface layer, analogous to those used in the microwave power tube industry. This work reports on the fabrication techniques and performance of cesiated metal photocathodes and cesiated dispenser cathodes, with a focus on understan...

  12. Direct-Dispense Polymeric Waveguides Platform for Optical Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hajj-Hassan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an automated robotic technique called direct-dispense to fabricate a polymeric platform that supports optical sensor arrays. Direct-dispense, which is a type of the emerging direct-write microfabrication techniques, uses fugitive organic inks in combination with cross-linkable polymers to create microfluidic channels and other microstructures. Specifically, we describe an application of direct-dispensing to develop optical biochemical sensors by fabricating planar ridge waveguides that support sol-gelderived xerogel-based thin films. The xerogel-based sensor materials act as host media to house luminophore biochemical recognition elements. As a prototype implementation, we demonstrate gaseous oxygen (O2 responsive optical sensors that operate on the basis of monitoring luminescence intensity signals. The optical sensor employs a Light Emitting Diode (LED excitation source and a standard silicon photodiode as the detector. The sensor operates over the full scale (0%-100% of O2 concentrations with a response time of less than 1 second. This work has implications for the development of miniaturized multisensor platforms that can be cost-effectively and reliably mass-produced.

  13. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bid is dispensable for development of insulitis and diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollah, Zia U A; Wali, Jibran; McKenzie, Mark D; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Graham, Kate L; Fynch, Stacey; Szanyi, Joshua; Santamaria, Pere; Brodnicki, Thomas; Allison, Janette; Strasser, Andreas; Kay, Thomas W H; Thomas, Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by death of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Beta-cell apoptosis induced by FasL may be important in type 1 diabetes in humans and in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. Deficiency of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only molecule Bid protects beta cells from FasL-induced apoptosis in vitro. We aimed to test the requirement for Bid, and the significance of Bid-dependent FasL-induced beta-cell apoptosis in type 1 diabetes. We backcrossed Bid-deficient mice, produced by homologous recombination and thus without transgene overexpression, onto a NOD genetic background. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis demonstrated that diabetes-related genetic regions were NOD genotype. Transferred beta cell antigen-specific CD8+ T cells proliferated normally in the pancreatic lymph nodes of Bid-deficient mice. Moreover, Bid-deficient NOD mice developed type 1 diabetes and insulitis similarly to wild-type NOD mice. Our data indicate that beta-cell apoptosis in type 1 diabetes can proceed without Fas-induced killing mediated by the BH3-only protein Bid.

  14. Pakistan's Water Challenges: A Human Development Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Shezad (Shafqat); K.A. Siegmann (Karin Astrid)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This paper gives an overview of the human and social dimensions of Pakistan’s water policies to provide the basis for water-related policy interventions that contribute to the country’s human development, with special attention being given to the concerns of women and the

  15. Water Management in Islam | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2001-01-01

    Jan 1, 2001 ... In the Middle East and North Africa, water is rapidly becoming the key development issue. In response, policymakers have proposed or tried to implement policies such as higher water tariffs or privatization, but have done so without considering local culture and values. Yet culture, including religion, clearly ...

  16. Dynamically programmable electronic pill dispenser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Artacho, Irene; Cantos-Frontela, Joaquin; Peixoto, Nathalia

    2010-06-01

    Compliance in medicine dispensation has proven critical for dosage control, diagnosis, and treatment. We have designed, manufactured, and characterized a novel dynamically programmable e-pill dispensing system. Our system is initially programmed remotely through a cell phone. After programming, the system may be reconfigured in order to adapt pill dispensation to new conditions. In this paper we describe the mechanics, electronics, control, and communication protocols implemented. Our dyn-e-pill devices can be actuated for over 350 h with two pill retrievals per hour. We challenged the charging circuit and demonstrated that the system has a lifetime longer than 6 h with a 30 min charging cycle, while it lasts for 14 h of uninterrupted use with a full charge.

  17. State legal innovations to encourage naloxone dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Corey; Carr, Derek

    The opioid overdose epidemic continues to claim the lives of tens of thousands of Americans every year. Increased access to the opioid antagonist naloxone can reduce opioid-related morbidity and mortality. In this commentary, we describe several recent legal innovations designed to encourage pharmacists to ensure that naloxone is available when and where it is needed, and dispel some common misconceptions regarding potential legal risks associated with pharmacy naloxone dispensing. Data are drawn from state laws and regulations, as catalogued by the Westlaw database. States have rapidly modified law and policy to increase layperson access to naloxone. As of August 2016, 44 states permit naloxone to be prescribed for administration to a person with whom the prescriber does not have a prescriber-patient relationship. Forty-two states permit naloxone to be dispensed via a non-patient-specific mechanism such as a standing or protocol order, and 5 states permit some pharmacists to prescribe naloxone on their own authority. The liability risk associated with naloxone dispensing is no higher than any other medication, and may be lower than some. However, to encourage the prescription and dispensing of naloxone, 36 states provide additional protection from civil liability for pharmacy naloxone dispensing, and 32 states provide protection from potential criminal action. Naloxone access laws in 31 states explicitly provide that dispensing naloxone as permitted by law cannot be grounds for disciplinary action by the state board of pharmacy or similar entity. Pharmacists are key members of the health care team and are uniquely situated to reduce potential opioid overdose risk. Pharmacists should be aware of and utilize innovative state laws designed to increase access to naloxone. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of medicines dispensing pattern of private pharmacies in Rajshahi, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shuvashis; Hossain, Md Tawhid

    2017-02-13

    In developing country like BANGLADESH, people depend more on pharmacies due to expediency, shorter waiting time, cost reduction, availability of credit and flexible opening hours. The aim of this study was to investigate medicines dispensing patterns of the pharmacies in RAJSHAHI, BANGLADESH and to identify and analyze contribution of drugsellers and quacks in irrational drug use. This cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2016 - April, 2016 in 75 randomly selected private pharmacies including both licensed and unlicensed pharmacies of covering LAKSHMIPUR area. During the whole study process, total 7944 clients visited the pharmacies under observation and 24,717 medicines were dispensed. 22.70% of all these drugs were sold without a prescription. Out of the 5610 items dispensed without prescription, 66.2% were dispensed on the request of clients themselves and 33.8% on the recommendation of a drug seller. Number of medicine in a prescription was highly variable ranging from 2 to 5 medicines per prescriptions (mean = 3.03). The average number of medicines dispensed from each of the pharmacies during the observation period was 392, varied pharmacy to pharmacy - ranging from 194 to 588. Lowest selling medicines were sedative and hypnotics and highest selling medicines were antimicrobials. The recommendation rate for antibiotics was highest for the quacks (26.48%) though the major amount of the antimicrobials (n = 3039, 65.83%) were dispensed on prescription. Macrolides, quinolones, metronidazoles and cephalosporins are most favourite drug of quacks, clients and pharmacists. Majority of medicines were dispensed irrationally without any prescription and over the counter dispensing of many low safety profile drugs was common. The results and discussion presented in this paper will be helpful to provide a baseline to redirect further studies in this area.

  19. Qualification of a precision pattern dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ammel, Raf; Sobiech-Matura, Katarzyna; Wätjen, Uwe; Vercammen, Tom; Castelein, Pieter; Wuyts, Roel; Paul, Johan

    2017-06-16

    In order to automate sample preparation processes, a precision pattern dispenser was designed to reproducibly dispense radioactive solutions at pre-defined positions. It is composed of an automatic liquid sample handling unit coupled to an XYZ table. Qualification tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the instrument and to assess the compliance with the requirements, in particular trueness (< 2%) and repeatability (< 1%). The instrument allows preparing sources in different source holders and on air filters, in a fast and accurate way. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Process For Patterning Dispenser-Cathode Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Several microfabrication techniques combined into process cutting slots 100 micrometer long and 1 to 5 micrometer wide into tungsten dispenser cathodes for traveling-wave tubes. Patterned photoresist serves as mask for etching underlying aluminum. Chemically-assisted ion-beam etching with chlorine removes exposed parts of aluminum layer. Etching with fluorine or chlorine trifluoride removes tungsten not masked by aluminum layer. Slots enable more-uniform low-work function coating dispensed to electron-emitting surface. Emission of electrons therefore becomes more uniform over cathode surface.

  1. Virtual water trade and development in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A debate has long existed on the relationships between human population, natural resources, and development. Recent research has expanded this debate to include the impacts of trade; specifically, virtual water trade, or the water footprint of traded commodities. We conduct an empirical analysis of the relationships between virtual water trade, population, and development in Africa. We find that increases in virtual water imports do not lead to increases in population growth nor do they diminish human welfare. We establish a new index of virtual water trade openness and show that levels of undernourishment tend to fall with increased values of virtual water trade openness. Countries with small dam storage capacity obtain a higher fraction of their agricultural water requirements from external sources, which may indicate implicit "infrastructure sharing" across nations. Globally, increased crop exports tend to correlate with increased crop water use efficiency, though this relationship does not hold for Africa. However, internal African trade is much more efficient in terms of embodied water resources than any other region in the world. Thus, internal African trade patterns may be compensating for poor internal production systems.

  2. Emergency Contraceptive Pill Knowledge, Attitudes and Dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... metropolis completed a questionnaire that assessed knowledge about ECP, attitude towards this contraceptive and actual dispensing practices. The results showed that the mean age of the respondents was 38.8 (10.9) years. There were more male (57.3%) than female respondents (42.7%). The overall mean knowledge ...

  3. Household Storage of Pharmaceuticals, Sources and Dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study was conducted in rural areas of Kibaha district within the Coastal region of Tanzania to assess knowledge on dosage, storage, expiry and ... The majority of drug store (53 %) and ordinary retail shop (75 %) sellers did not dispense correct doses of antimalarials due to low literacy and lack of dosage ...

  4. Alcohol Dispenser Training in Amherst Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Carlene

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts of the Alcohol Dispenser Training program in Amherst, Massachusetts over a five-year period. Evaluations indicate that participants agree that training is worthwhile, that they are more aware of the effects of alcohol on their patrons, and that they have better knowledge of appropriate strategies for preventing intoxication of…

  5. Guide to Permitting Hydrogen Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The purpose of this guide is to assist project developers, permitting officials, code enforcement officials, and other parties involved in developing permit applications and approving the implementation of hydrogen motor fuel dispensing facilities. The guide facilitates the identification of the elements to be addressed in the permitting of a project as it progresses through the approval process; the specific requirements associated with those elements; and the applicable (or potentially applicable) codes and standards by which to determine whether the specific requirements have been met. The guide attempts to identify all applicable codes and standards relevant to the permitting requirements.

  6. Epinephrine dispensing for the out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis in infants and children: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, F E; Peterson, S; Black, C D

    2001-06-01

    Epinephrine is life-saving in the treatment of anaphylaxis. A limited number of fixed-dose epinephrine formulations are available for out-of-hospital treatment of this disorder. To examine dispensing patterns for epinephrine formulations over 4 consecutive years in a population of 279,638 infants, children, and adolescents (from birth up to but not including the 17th birthday). We used the Drug Programs Information Network, an administrative claims database for prescriptions dispensed in ambulatory care settings, developed from real-time computer links with retail pharmacies in the province of Manitoba, Canada. We studied the specific epinephrine formulation dispensed and the precise age of the infant or child at the time it was dispensed. Epinephrine formulations were dispensed for 1.2% of the pediatric population (3,340 children). Boys comprised 59.5% of the recipients. Of all epinephrine formulations, 38.6% were dispensed as EpiPen Jr (0.15 mg), and 57.4% were dispensed as EpiPen (0.3 mg). EpiPen Jr was dispensed for patients ranging in age from 2 months to 16 years, 10 months, inclusive. EpiPen was dispensed for patients ranging in age from 1 year, 8 months to 16 years, 11 months, inclusive. During the 4 years studied, a subgroup of children transitioned from EpiPen Jr to EpiPen auto-injectors at a mean age of 6 years, 6 months +/- 2 years, 8 months (range 1 year, 10 months to 16 years, 11 months). Both EpiPen Jr and EpiPen auto-injectors were dispensed over almost the entire age range of the pediatric population. Physicians should consider a child's age more carefully when prescribing these auto-injectors. Additional concentrations of epinephrine are needed in these fixed-dose formulations.

  7. Dispensing and quality of Amoxycillin preparations in retail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on dispensing practice and quality of amoxycillin capsules and syrups was conducted in retail pharmacies in 5 regions of Tanzania. Data on dispensing practice was collected by interviewing 75 dispensers through structured questionnaires. Quality of amoxycillin capsule formulations and dry powder for suspension ...

  8. A cost-effective and versatile xenon gas dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joseph C; Lenz, Warren N; Reed, Terry L; McGough, Christopher G

    2005-04-01

    To modify a commercial xenon gas dispenser so that two xenon unit-dose vials could be combined with a modified dispenser to deliver a recommended dose. To maintain the same operating mechanism, changes were made only to the vial shield and the needle port of the original gas dispenser. The modified gas dispenser consisted of two puncture needles and two vial holders shielded with the same thickness of lead as the commercial dispenser. Our evaluation showed that the modified gas dispenser operated the same way as the commercial unit, and the average 133Xe residual activity in either one or two xenon unit-dose vials of the modified gas dispenser was not significantly different from that in one vial of the commercial xenon gas dispenser. The modified xenon gas dispenser allows the stock of xenon gas vials to be managed cost-effectively. The modified unit can be used to dispense two low-activity xenon gas vials to deliver a standard dose to a patient. Also, the modified gas dispenser can be used to combine different amounts of xenon activity in two unit-dose vials in order to customize the dose delivered to patients with special needs (e.g., obese patients). Our modified device can also function as a single-dose dispenser by placing an empty vial alongside the unit-dose vial of radioactive xenon gas.

  9. 21 CFR 200.50 - Ophthalmic preparations and dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic preparations and dispensers. 200.50... preparations and dispensers. (a)(1) Informed medical opinion is in agreement that all preparations offered or... of injury resulting from contamination during use. (c) Eye cups, eye droppers, and other dispensers...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6430 - Liquid medication dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid medication dispenser. 880.6430 Section 880.6430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6430 Liquid medication dispenser. (a) Identification. A Liquid medication dispenser is a...

  12. A Curriculum For Dispensing Optician A Case Study In Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Dieu MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Until 2011 there had been no full-time training course for dispensing optician diploma in Vietnam. Most of the practicing opticians with no qualification and formal training have learnt their skills through apprentice. In response to the demand of the industry Nguyen Tat Thanh University Vietnam has teamed up with Bradford College United Kingdom to develop a curriculum for a of formal 2-year full-time training for dispensing optician. The curriculum is applied for 4 semesters and graduate gets called Intermediate Professional Diploma level included 4 semesters. In VN after high school students can obtain different many levels of study such as Intermediate Professional Diploma College Bachelor Master and PhD. The 1st semester is basis of Intermediate Professional Diploma level. The 2nd semester is the study of refractive error and primary care each for 4 weeks 100 hours in theory and primary eye care 4 weeks for theory 100 hours. Also in this semester the learners have practiced clinical rotation at the Ophthalmic Hospital Ophthalmic Service in General Hospital for 10 weeks. The 3rd semester is specialized of dispensing Optician included Lenses frame contact lenses and laboratory for optician. In the 4th semester the training concentrates in the management of the eyeglasses shop and practicing in making spectacles for customers are in the 4th semester. The 1st intake of the course was opened started in 2011 and had 30 students graduated in 2013. This paper describes the experience of developing the curriculum in the context of a developing country where the industry is still under regulated and less developed. The first program optician that privileged on primary eye care will be satisfied for community WHO 2020 1 optometrist for 50.000 people and 10 ophthalmologists for 1.000.000 people. Some characteristics of first course students have been noted. The result of this curriculum will be evaluated in the coming time.

  13. Development of waste water reuse water system for power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K.K.; Kim, D.H.; Weon, D.Y.; Yoon, S.W.; Song, H.R. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    1. Status of waste water discharge at power plants 2. Present status of waste water reuse at power plants 3. Scheme of waste water reuse at power plants 4. Standardization of optimum system for waste water reuse at power plants 5. Establishment of low cost zero discharge system for waste water 6. Waste water treatment technology of chemical cleaning. (author). 132 figs., 72 tabs.

  14. MULTIPLE-PURPOSE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is an economic and social advantage to all members of a society. The water ... Tf a mineral resources is little exploited by present generation, it can ..... economy. Different uses of multiple-purpose development have conflicting interests. Because of conflicting requirements, the design of multiple-purpose projects is mainly a ...

  15. Antidepressant medication dispensing among montelukast initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Esther H; Kaplan, Sigal; Mosholder, Andrew; Moeny, David; Ding, Yulan; Wu, Yute; Iyasu, Solomon; Hammad, Tarek A

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the potential association between montelukast use and psychiatric adverse events by monitoring changes in antidepressant medication dispensing rates before and after initiating montelukast. The primary study group of montelukast initiators was identified using the Wolters Kluwer's SOURCE Lx® pharmacy claims database (WK). This group included 232,159 patients ≤45 years old who had at least two montelukast prescriptions from 2003 to 2007. Comparison groups comprised of 264,704 fluticasone initiators and 89,635 long-acting β-agonist corticosteroid (LABA/ICS) initiators were also identified. Antidepressant medication dispensing rates in these three groups were determined using WK, and changes in rates before and after the first asthma controller medication prescription date were evaluated using interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). ITS was performed separately for four age categories, with a focus on youth (12-17 years) and young adult (18-24 years). For patients 18-24 years old, antidepressant medication dispensing rates increased significantly after initiating montelukast [1.93% (1.55-2.32%, p montelukast. However, similar increases were observed in the fluticasone and LABA/ICS comparison groups. The results of this study cannot support a specific association between initiation of montelukast treatment and an increase in psychiatric adverse effects.

  16. Over-the-counter suboptimal dispensing of antibiotics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukonzo JK

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jackson K Mukonzo,1,2 Proscovia M Namuwenge,1 Gildo Okure,3 Benjamin Mwesige,1 Olivia K Namusisi,4 David Mukanga4 1Center for Operational Research Africa, Kampala, Uganda; 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 3School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 4African Field Epidemiologist Network, Kampala, Uganda Background: Overuse and misuse of antibiotics is a serious global problem. While resistance to older antibiotics is increasing, development of newer molecules has stalled. Resistance to the existing antibiotics that is largely driven by their high-volume use is a global public health problem. Uganda is one of the countries where prescription-only drugs, including antibiotics, can be obtained over the counter. We determined the rate of antibiotic dispensing and use in Uganda. Methods: The study utilized a descriptive cross-sectional study design to determine the number of antibiotic "prescribed" daily doses per 1,000 clients. Data were collected from one health center II, eight general/district hospitals, one national referral hospital, and 62 registered community pharmacies. From each study site, data were collected for five consecutive days over the months of November 2011 to January 2012. Results: The overall antibiotic issue rate was 43.2%. Amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole–trimethoprim, cloxacillin, and ampicillin, belonging to the WHO anatomical therapeutic chemical classifications of penicillin with extended spectra, imidazole derivatives, fluoroquinolones, and sulfonamide–trimethoprim combinations, constituted 70% of the issued antibiotics. About 41% of antibiotics were issued over the counter. At community pharmacies, where 30% of antibiotic dispensing occurred, the number of prescribed daily doses/1,000 antibiotic clients was 4,169 compared to 6,220, 7,350 and 7,500 at general/district hospitals, the national referral hospital, and the health center, respectively. Conclusion

  17. Improving outpatient primary medication adherence with physician guided, automated dispensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moroshek JG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacob G Moroshek1,2 1Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, 2Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Background: Physician dispensing, different from pharmacist dispensing, is a way for practitioners to supply their patients with medications, at the point of care. The InstyMeds dispenser and logistics system can automate much of the dispensing, insurance adjudication, inventory management, and regulatory reporting that is required of physician dispensing. Objective: To understand the percentage of patients that exhibit primary adherence to medication in the outpatient setting when choosing InstyMeds. Method: The InstyMeds dispensing database was de-identified and analyzed for primary adherence. This is the ratio of patients who dispensed their medication to those who received an eligible prescription. Results: The average InstyMeds emergency department installation has a primary adherence rate of 91.7%. The maximum rate for an installed device was 98.5%. Conclusion: Although national rates of primary adherence have been found to be in the range of 70%, automated physician dispensing vastly improves the rate of adherence. Improved adherence should lead to better patient outcomes, fewer return visits, and lower healthcare costs. Keywords: automated dispensing, adherence, compliance, medication, physician dispensing, InstyMeds

  18. WVU Hydrogen Fuel Dispensing Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William [West Virginia University Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was to construct a site similar to the site at Central West Virginia Regional Airport in Charleston, WV to show that duplication of the site was a feasible method of conducting hydrogen stations. Phase II of the project was necessitated due to a lack of funding that was planned for the development of the station in Morgantown. The US Department of Energy determined that the station in Charleston would be dismantled and moved to Morgantown and reassembled at the Morgantown site. This necessitated storage of the components of the station for almost a year at the NAFTC Headquarters which caused a number of issues with the equipment that will be discussed in later portions of this report. This report will consist of PHASE I and PHASE II with discussions on each of the tasks scheduled for each phase of the project.

  19. Nanotechnology for potable water and general consumption in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hillie, T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available that affect people in developing and developed countries. The challenges outlined are; poor governance, water scarcity, sanitation and climate change. Nanotechnology is sufficiently advanced to help provide potable water and water for general assumption...

  20. Dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Beerens, Bas; Schmidt, Sarah M; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Rep, Martijn

    2016-12-01

    The genomes of many filamentous fungi consist of a 'core' part containing conserved genes essential for normal development as well as conditionally dispensable (CD) or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes. In the plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, one LS chromosome harbours effector genes that contribute to pathogenicity. We employed flow cytometry to select for events of spontaneous (partial) loss of either the two smallest LS chromosomes or two different core chromosomes. We determined the rate of spontaneous loss of the 'effector' LS chromosome in vitro at around 1 in 35 000 spores. In addition, a viable strain was obtained lacking chromosome 12, which is considered to be a part of the core genome. We also isolated strains carrying approximately 1-Mb deletions in the LS chromosomes and in the dispensable core chromosome. The large core chromosome 1 was never observed to sustain deletions over 200 kb. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that some of the sites at which the deletions occurred were the same in several independent strains obtained for the two chromosomes tested, indicating the existence of deletion hotspots. For the core chromosome, this deletion hotspot was the site of insertion of the marker used to select for loss events. Loss of the core chromosome did not affect pathogenicity, whereas loss of the effector chromosome led to a complete loss of pathogenicity. © 2016 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY BRITISH SOCIETY FOR PLANT PATHOLOGY AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. Disease Propagation Analysis and Mitigation Strategies for Effective Mass Dispensing*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eva K; Chen, Chien H; Pietz, Ferninand; Benecke, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mass dispensing of medical countermeasures has been proven to be an effective and crucial means to contain the outbreak of highly infectious disease. The large influx of individuals to the point-of dispensing (POD) centers to receive vaccinations or prophylactic treatment, however, raises the potential risk of serious intra-facility cross-infections. To mitigate the effect, a thorough understanding of how disease propagates during the dispensing under different transmission parameters versus ...

  2. Using nylon strips to dispense mosquito attractants for sampling the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, F; Biswaro, L; Mbeleyela, E; Killeen, G F; Mukabana, R; Moore, S J

    2010-03-01

    Synthetic versions of human derived kairomones can be used as baits when trapping host seeking mosquitoes. The effectiveness of these lures depends not only on their attractiveness to the mosquitoes but also on the medium from which they are dispensed. We report on the development and evaluation of nylon strips as a method of dispensing odorants attractive to the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s. (Giles). When a synthetic blend of attractants was dispensed using this method, significantly more mosquitoes were trapped than when two previous methods, open glass vials or low density polyethylene sachets were used. We conclude that the nylon strips are suitable for dispensing odorants in mosquito trapping operations and can be adopted for use in rural and remote areas. The nylon material required is cheap and widely available and the strips can be prepared without specialized equipment or electricity.

  3. Dispensation fra CFC-reglerne for selskaber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Peter Koerver

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen, der er fagfællebedømt, omhandler dispensationsbestemmelsen i SEL § 32, stk. 2, 2-4 pkt, hvorefter Skatterådet kan tillade, at indkomsten i et datterselskab med koncession til at udøve forskellig økonomisk virksomhed ikke skal være omfattet af reglerne om CFC-beskatning. I den forbindels...... analyseres de betingelser, som skal opfyldes for at opnå dispensation på baggrund af nyere administrativ praksis. Der ses på de danske CFC-reglers anvendelsesområde i den henseende....

  4. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  5. Water Development: A Philosophical and Ethical Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D.

    2015-12-01

    As one reviewer said about John McPhee's Encounters With the Archdruid:"So the real issues relate to what is natural? How should lands be used? What role do humans have in using, caring for, being part of the land and can we do so responsibly?" This quote applies equally to more than just land development -- it applies to water project too. Although Marc Reisner wrote Cadillac Desert in 1986, the lessons it presents about water development are current today. Not much has changed really in the past three decades. People still live in arid places where, perhaps, they should not live. Engineers still redesign nature to meet human needs, only to find out later that there are unintended consequences. About the only thing that has changed is that today the Bureau of Reclamation and other agencies do not spend megabucks to construct huge water projects. And, insignificant by comparison, some restoration and dam removal projects have begun on a limited scale. We developed an exercise, based on selected chapters from Reisner's book and a video derived from the book, to help students develop critical thinking and ethical reasoning skills. As we did so, we realized that there was much more that could be included. The ethical dilemmas associated with water development and related engineering projects are many. So, now, the original exercise has been expanded to 7 units. The original five units are based on Cadillac Desert. The sixth is based on a recent great documentary film, DamNation. The last unit is inspired by a terrific chapter from John McPhee's 1971 book Encounters with the Archdruid. The format is that student read articles and book chapters and then write responses to questions designed to get them to reflect on what they read. So, the exercises may be assigned as homework, but for the most value there must be some significant group discussions. If all units are used, this provides several weeks of homework for students, but instructors may cherry pick the units

  6. Water Quality Vocabulary Development and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, B. A.; Yu, J.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Semantic descriptions of observed properties and associated units of measure are fundamental to understanding of environmental observations, including groundwater, surface water and marine water quality. Semantic descriptions can be captured in machine-readable ontologies and vocabularies, thus providing support for the annotation of observation values from the disparate data sources with appropriate and accurate metadata, which is critical for achieving semantic interoperability. However, current stand-alone water quality vocabularies provide limited support for cross-system comparisons or data fusion. To enhance semantic interoperability, the alignment of water-quality properties with definitions of chemical entities and units of measure in existing widely-used vocabularies is required. Modern ontologies and vocabularies are expressed, organized and deployed using Semantic Web technologies. We developed an ontology for observed properties (i.e. a model for expressing appropriate controlled vocabularies) which extends the NASA/TopQuadrant QUDT ontology for Unit and QuantityKind with two additional classes and two properties (see accompanying paper by Cox, Simons and Yu). We use our ontology to populate the Water Quality vocabulary with a set of individuals of each of the four key classes (and their subclasses), and add appropriate relationships between these individuals. This ontology is aligned with other relevant stand-alone Water Quality vocabularies and domain ontologies. Developing the Water Quality vocabulary involved two main steps. First, the Water Quality vocabulary was populated with individuals of the ObservedProperty class, which was determined from a census of existing datasets and services. Each ObservedProperty individual relates to other individuals of Unit and QuantityKind (taken from QUDT where possible), and to IdentifiedObject individuals. As a large fraction of observed water quality data are classified by the chemical substance involved, the

  7. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... prediction of the total amount of water savings under reduced pressures, with only 6% difference between measured and estimated volume ... efficiently used for estimating water savings when a calibrated simulation model .... that under high pressure these appliances consume water faster but the volumes ...

  8. The changing patterns of dispensing branded and generic drugs for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease between 2006 and 2011 in Japan: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hamada, Shota; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Muto, Manabu; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-02-27

    Despite rising healthcare costs, generic drugs are less frequently dispensed in Japan compared with other developed countries. This study aimed to describe changes in dispensing of branded and generic drugs and to explore possible factors that promote the use of generic drugs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a Japanese medical and pharmacy claims database. All proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) with indications for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) described on Japanese labels were included. Patterns of dispensing branded and generic drugs for the treatment of GERD between 2006 and 2011 were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to investigate factors associated with receiving generic drugs. The study cohort included 14,590 patients (male: 50.2%, mean age: 43.1 years). Branded drugs for GERD were still frequently dispensed despite an increase in the share of generic drugs. Only 4.3% of patients who initially received branded drugs switched to generic drugs. The percentage of patients who received only generic drugs increased over time (6.5% to 22.1%). The frequency of generic drug dispensing was the highest in the setting where both prescription and dispensing were implemented in clinics (43.3%), while the lowest in the setting where both prescription and dispensing were implemented in hospitals (11.5%). Factors associated with receiving generic drugs included year of dispensing (adjusted OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.94 to 2.55 for 2009-11 v 2006-8), prescription and dispensing setting (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.44 to 2.26 for prescription in hospitals and dispensing in community pharmacies; OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.72 for prescription in clinics and dispensing in community pharmacies; and OR 4.55, 95% CI 3.68 to 5.62 for prescription and dispensing in clinics v prescription and dispensing in hospitals) and H2RAs (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.49 to 1.81 compared to PPIs). The share of generic drugs for the

  9. Water Resources Management for Shale Energy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoxtheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons, especially natural gas, from shale formations has been facilitated by advents in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Shale energy resources are very promising as an abundant energy source, though environmental challenges exist with their development, including potential adverse impacts to water quality. The well drilling and construction process itself has the potential to impact groundwater quality, however if proper protocols are followed and well integrity is established then impacts such as methane migration or drilling fluids releases can be minimized. Once a shale well has been drilled and hydraulically fractured, approximately 10-50% of the volume of injected fluids (flowback fluids) may flow out of the well initially with continued generation of fluids (produced fluids) throughout the well's productive life. Produced fluid TDS concentrations often exceed 200,000 mg/L, with elevated levels of strontium (Sr), bromide (Br), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), chloride (Cl), radionuclides originating from the shale formation as well as fracturing additives. Storing, managing and properly disposisng of these fluids is critical to ensure water resources are not impacted by unintended releases. The most recent data in Pennsylvania suggests an estimated 85% of the produced fluids were being recycled for hydraulic fracturing operations, while many other states reuse less than 50% of these fluids and rely moreso on underground injection wells for disposal. Over the last few years there has been a shift to reuse more produced fluids during well fracturing operations in shale plays around the U.S., which has a combination of economic, regulatory, environmental, and technological drivers. The reuse of water is cost-competitive with sourcing of fresh water and disposal of flowback, especially when considering the costs of advanced treatment to or disposal well injection and lessens

  10. An automatic dose dispenser for microtablets--a new concept for individual dosage of drugs in tablet form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenberg, Susanne; Nyholm, Dag; Aquilonius, Sten Magnus; Nyström, Christer

    2003-08-11

    A new concept for individualising the dosage of drugs in solid form is presented. The principle is based on the use of standardised units (microtablets), each containing a subtherapeutic amount of the active ingredient. The required dose is fine-tuned by counting out a specific number of these units. The microtablets are counted electronically from the attached cassette by the automatic dispensing device. The individual dose is set and the dispenser counts and delivers the correct number of microtablets. The usefulness of the automatic dispenser concept and acceptability of the apparatus were evaluated in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). After initial instruction on use of the dispenser, 20 patients operated it themselves. All patients were generally satisfied with their management of the automatic dispenser and most would be happy to use the device again. Further technical development is required before use in clinical practice, but the current prototype may be acceptable for some patients. It is concluded that the final version of the automatic dose dispenser concept will offer potential for improvement of drug administration for patients with PD or other diseases requiring individual dosage.

  11. Impact of Robotic Dispensing Machines in German Pharmacies on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the impact of robotic dispensing machines in community pharmacies on staff efficiency and sales of over-the-counter drugs. Setting: The study was done on 253 community pharmacies in Germany that use a robotic dispensing machine manufactured by ROWA during 2008. Method: Data concerning the financial ...

  12. Evaluation and remediation of bulk soap dispensers for biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Lindsey A; Ramsay, Bradley D; Goeres, Darla M; Fields, Matthew W; Zapka, Carrie A; Macinga, David R

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies evaluating bulk soap in public restroom soap dispensers have demonstrated up to 25% of open refillable bulk-soap dispensers were contaminated with ~ 6 log(10)(CFU ml(-1)) heterotrophic bacteria. In this study, plastic counter-mounted, plastic wall-mounted and stainless steel wall-mounted dispensers were analyzed for suspended and biofilm bacteria using total cell and viable plate counts. Independent of dispenser type or construction material, the bulk soap was contaminated with 4-7 log(10)(CFU ml(-1)) bacteria, while 4-6 log(10)(CFU cm(-2)) biofilm bacteria were isolated from the inside surfaces of the dispensers (n = 6). Dispenser remediation studies, including a 10 min soak with 5000 mg l(-1) sodium hypochlorite, were then conducted to determine the efficacy of cleaning and disinfectant procedures against established biofilms. The testing showed that contamination of the bulk soap returned to pre-test levels within 7-14 days. These results demonstrate biofilm is present in contaminated bulk-soap dispensers and remediation studies to clean and sanitize the dispensers are temporary.

  13. Dispensing patterns of prescription-only antiobesity preparations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ilse Truter

    Phentermine was the most commonly dispensed active ingredient, followed by orlistat. Further studies on patient outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of these products should be conducted. Keywords: antiobesity medicine, dispensing patterns, drug utilisation review, DUR, pharmacy. Introduction. Obesity is a major global ...

  14. Methods used to assess drug prescribing and dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of drugs, observations to assess drug sellers/dispensers roles and consumers behaviour, interviews with the drug sellers and nonprofessional providers themselves, use of simulated client approach and use of the patients care indicators such as generic prescribing/dispensing, number of drugs selected from the essential ...

  15. Prevalence of opioid dispensings and concurrent gastrointestinal medications in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R E; Bosnic, N; Sweeney, C T; Duncan, A W; Levine, K B; Brogan, M; Cook, S F

    2008-01-01

    Opioids are frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain. A side effect of opioid usage is the inhibition of gastrointestinal (GI) motility, known as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD). OBD is typically treated prophylactically with laxatives and/or acid suppressants. The present study describes the prevalence of outpatient opioid dispensing, opioid patient demographics, and concomitant dispensing of opioids and GI medications in the Quebec Public Prescription Drug Insurance Plan in 2005. Using a retrospective cohort design, opioid dispensings were identified using claims and reimbursement data. Laxative and acid suppressant dispensings were also identified. Concurrent use was defined as having at least one 'GI medication-exposed day' overlapping an 'opioid-exposed day'. More than 11% of the drug plan population was dispensed an opioid in 2005, and dispensings increased with age. Approximately two-thirds of patients who received an opioid were given codeine. Approximately one-third of opioid patients were concomitantly dispensed a GI medication, yet only 2% were dispensed a laxative. Although the GI side effects of opioids are well known, these side effects appear to increase with age and duration of opioid use. Opioid-related side effects, particularly OBD, should be effectively managed so as not to lead to the cessation of opioid therapy.

  16. Anthelmintic drug dispensing in South Africa: An analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than two billion people worldwide are infected with helminths. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the dispensing patterns of anthelmintic products using dispensing data of South African community pharmacies. A retrospective, cross-sectional drug utilisation study was conducted on a 2013 community ...

  17. Ocular Hazards in Ophthalmic Dispensing Industry in South East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of ocular hazards in ophthalmic dispensing industry in south east Nigeria was carried out using 70 subjects drawn from different towns in the region. Tables were used to analyze the data obtained from his study. Results showed that ocular hazards are involved in ophthalmic dispensing depending on the ...

  18. Dispensing patterns of prescription-only antiobesity preparations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the dispensing patterns of prescription-only antiobesity preparations in South Africa (classified as Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) group A08). Design: Retrospective, cross-sectional drug utilisation study using electronic dispensing records. Setting: Private sector ...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1905 - Dispensing of diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dispensing of diesel fuel. 75.1905 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1905 Dispensing of diesel fuel. (a) Diesel-powered equipment in underground coal mines may be refueled only from safety cans...

  20. Dispensing patterns of prescription-only antiobesity preparations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ilse Truter

    dispensing database of approximately 54 million records dispensed by 327 community pharmacies in South Africa in 2013. A community pharmacy refers to pharmacies from which some, or all, of the services as prescribed in terms of regulation 18 of the. Regulations Relating to the Practice of Pharmacy in the Pharmacy.

  1. Automated dose dispensing in Danish primary health care - a technology under construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herborg H

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to conduct a health technology assessment (HTA of automated dose dispensing in the Danish primary health care sector. The present article answers the sub question of how various groups of actors spoke about and understood the shaping of automated dose dispensing (positioning in discourses.Methods: The project utilized two methods: 11 qualitative research interviews with selected key actors and a net-based qualitative questionnaire of 97 selected practitioners.Results: Three main types of discourse were identified with respect to the development of automated dose dispensing, namely ‘optimistic’, ‘sceptical’ and ‘pragmatic’. A wide diversity of opinion about automated dose dispensing was identified among the three discourses and their attendant scenarios. A number of factors are found in all three types of discourse, and are therefore considered to express common recommendations for decision makers and practitioners. These factors are described in the article.Conclusions: The article argues in favour of HTA, which to a great extent clarifies and initiates the perspectives of various groups of actors about the same technology. Our analyses show that conscious strategies must be employed to make the technology work successfully with the actors involved. The preferences, ideas and proposals for future actions and initiatives identified in the project could be the basis for defining future development strategies.

  2. Efficacy of a Feed Dispenser for Horses in Decreasing Cribbing Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mazzola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cribbing is an oral stereotypy, tends to develop in captive animals as a means to cope with stress, and may be indicative of reduced welfare. Highly energetic diets ingested in a short time are one of the most relevant risk factors for the development of cribbing. The aim of this study was to verify whether feeding cribbing horses through a dispenser that delivers small quantities of concentrate when activated by the animal decreases cribbing behaviour, modifies feeding behaviour, or induces frustration. Ten horses (mean age 14 y, balanced for sex, breed, and size (mean height 162 cm, were divided into two groups of 5 horses each: Cribbing and Control. Animals were trained to use the dispenser and videorecorded continuously for 15 consecutive days from 1 h prior to feeding to 2 h after feeding in order to measure their behaviours. The feed dispenser, Quaryka®, induced an increase in time necessary to finish the ration in both groups of horses (P<0.05. With Quaryka, cribbers showed a significant reduction of time spent cribbing (P<0.05. After removal of the feed dispenser (Post-Quaryka, cribbing behaviour significantly increased. The use of Quaryka may be particularly beneficial in horses fed high-energy diets and ingesting the food too quickly.

  3. Efficacy of a Feed Dispenser for Horses in Decreasing Cribbing Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Silvia; Palestrini, Clara; Cannas, Simona; Fè, Eleonora; Bagnato, Gaia Lisa; Vigo, Daniele; Frank, Diane; Minero, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Cribbing is an oral stereotypy, tends to develop in captive animals as a means to cope with stress, and may be indicative of reduced welfare. Highly energetic diets ingested in a short time are one of the most relevant risk factors for the development of cribbing. The aim of this study was to verify whether feeding cribbing horses through a dispenser that delivers small quantities of concentrate when activated by the animal decreases cribbing behaviour, modifies feeding behaviour, or induces frustration. Ten horses (mean age 14 y), balanced for sex, breed, and size (mean height 162 cm), were divided into two groups of 5 horses each: Cribbing and Control. Animals were trained to use the dispenser and videorecorded continuously for 15 consecutive days from 1 h prior to feeding to 2 h after feeding in order to measure their behaviours. The feed dispenser, Quaryka®, induced an increase in time necessary to finish the ration in both groups of horses (P < 0.05). With Quaryka, cribbers showed a significant reduction of time spent cribbing (P < 0.05). After removal of the feed dispenser (Post-Quaryka), cribbing behaviour significantly increased. The use of Quaryka may be particularly beneficial in horses fed high-energy diets and ingesting the food too quickly.

  4. Disease propagation analysis and mitigation strategies for effective mass dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eva K; Chen, Chien H; Pietz, Ferninand; Benecke, Bernard

    2010-11-13

    Mass dispensing of medical countermeasures has been proven to be an effective and crucial means to contain the outbreak of highly infectious disease. The large influx of individuals to the point-of dispensing (POD) centers to receive vaccinations or prophylactic treatment, however, raises the potential risk of serious intra-facility cross-infections. To mitigate the effect, a thorough understanding of how disease propagates during the dispensing under different transmission parameters versus POD design and operational factors is necessary. In this study, we employ a large-scale simulation/optimization decision support system, RealOpt, to analyze the propagation of highly infectious disease within dispensing sites. The simulation results are validated and benchmarked by a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations. Pros and cons of using analytical versus simulation tools are discussed. We further perform sensitivity analysis on the dynamics of intra-POD disease propagation, and explore feasible mitigation strategies for effective mass dispensing.

  5. An automatic molecular dispenser of chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Amendola, Valeria; Bergamaschi, Greta; Dollenz, Riccardo; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Lo Vecchio, Carmelo

    2013-03-11

    The combined activity of the 1.1.1-cryptand and of a dicopper(II) bistren cryptate complex including chloride makes the Cl(-) ion be continuously and slowly delivered to the solution, without any external intervention. The 1.1.1-cryptand slowly releases OH(-) ions, according to a defined kinetics, and each OH(-) ion displaces a Cl(-) ion from the cryptate. Chloride displacement induces a sharp colour change from bright yellow to aquamarine and can be conveniently monitored spectrophotometrically, even in diluted solutions. The 1.1.1-cryptand is the motor of a molecular dispenser (the dicopper(II) cryptate) delivering chloride ion automatically, from the inside of the solution. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Managing water pressure for water savings in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... The Kotež district is a suburb located in the northern part of the city, on the flatlands on the left bank of the Danube River at an altitude of 71.50 m asl, at the edge of the Belgrade water supply system's lowest pressure zone. The water distribution network in Kotež was constructed during the 1970s and is pre-.

  7. The status quo of research on South Africa's water resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African water resource management institutional landscape has seen some dramatic changes since the new dispensation came into power in 1994. Not only have legislation and policies changed, but there has also been a significant increase in the number of non-state actors in the policy development process.

  8. Smart DNA Fabrication Using Sound Waves: Applying Acoustic Dispensing Technologies to Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigowska, Paulina; Shen, Yue; Zheng, Yijing; Rosser, Susan; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) technology uses focused acoustic energy to transfer nanoliter-scale liquid droplets with high precision and accuracy. This noncontact, tipless, low-volume dispensing technology minimizes the possibility of cross-contamination and potentially reduces the costs of reagents and consumables. To date, acoustic dispensers have mainly been used in screening libraries of compounds. In this paper, we describe the first application of this powerful technology to the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology, for DNA synthesis and assembly at the nanoliter scale using a Labcyte Echo 550 acoustic dispenser. We were able to successfully downscale PCRs and the popular one-pot DNA assembly methods, Golden Gate and Gibson assemblies, from the microliter to the nanoliter scale with high assembly efficiency, which effectively cut the reagent cost by 20- to 100-fold. We envision that acoustic dispensing will become an instrumental technology in synthetic biology, in particular in the era of DNA foundries. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  9. A Disposable Dispensing Valve for Non-Contact Microliter Applications in a 96-Well Plate Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Kartmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a miniaturized, disposable, normally-closed electromagnetic dispensing valve for the microliter range to process 96-well plates. The novel injection-molded valve is designed to fit into a 9 mm grid to realize an eight channel dispensing head, enabling the serial processing of well plates row-by-row. The presented dispensing valve design originates from a miniaturization study of a previously developed functional model. The outer diameter of the valve, including all actuating components, was reduced by 8 mm to an overall diameter of 8.5 mm without compromising the performance. Additionally, the actuation current of the valve could be reduced to 5 A. The valve is characterized for a volume range between 840 nL and 5.3 μL. The performance of the injection molded valve is competitive to commercially available dispensing valves, featuring the advantages of low fabrication costs, disposability, low mounting size, easy handling, and super silent actuation.

  10. Miniature-dispenser-based bioassay to evaluate the compatibility of powder formulations used in an entomovectoring approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Veerle; Put, Kurt; Vandeven, Jessica; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-06-01

    Entomovectoring as a plant protection strategy demands the design of an appropriate bioassay to assess the risks of potential side effects of the powder formulations in the dispenser towards the vectoring insect. This study reports on the development of a laboratory miniature-dispenser-based bioassay. This bioassay system was used to investigate the compatibility of five model products, Prestop-Mix, Signum, kaolin, wheat flour and cellulose, with the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris L. The laboratory one-way miniature-dispenser bioassay showed that the fungicides and the carrier/diluent kaolin caused a worker mortality of > 70% after 5 weeks of exposure, while worker loss with wheat flour and cellulose was no higher than in the blank control (i.e. empty miniature dispenser) (dispenser bioassay comprised separated passageways and demonstrated that only kaolin was toxic (89 ± 11%). These results were also confirmed in a flight-cage experiment. In addition, a negative effect was observed against reproduction/colony development when nests were exposed to kaolin (P dispenser and flight-cage bioassays. In the context of entomovectoring technology, the developed laboratory two-way miniature-dispenser bioassay gives a reliable prediction of the hazards associated with powder products. Additionally, the present data indicate the possibility of using cellulose and kaolin as respective negative and positive control carriers/diluents in future risk assessment experiments. Overall, the results show that, apart from kaolin, the tested fungicides and carriers/diluents are safe to be used with B. terrestris. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Development of approaches to integrated water resources management

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Guoting

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need to manage water resources in a sustainable way, particularly in semi arid areas, with dramatic social and economic development as well as rapid population growth. Optimising water allocation in a river basin is an important aspect ensuring equitable and efficient water use. This research develops an optimisation approach (the Integrated Water Resource Optimisation model, IWRO) to optimise the conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater resources in ...

  12. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  13. The development of water quality methods within ecological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the South African National Water Act (NWA, No 36 of 1998), the ecological Reserve is defined as the quality and quantity of water required to ensure appropriate protection of water resources, so as to secure ecologically sustainable development and use. Aquatic ecosystems are recognised as the core location of water ...

  14. The Development of Water Management Institutions and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines past scenarios and future prospects for the development of water management institutions and provisions for water delivery in Cameroon. The major aim of the paper is to reconstruct the history of water management that led to the current water delivery system in Cameroon using the exploratory ...

  15. Development of a water quality index based on a European ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... water supply rather than general supply, and has been developed by studying the supranational standard, i.e. the European Community Standard. Three classification schemes for water quality are proposed for surface water quality assessment. Water quality determinants of the new index are cadmium, cyanide, mercury, ...

  16. Application of basic pharmacology and dispensing practice of antibiotics in accredited drug-dispensing outlets in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzi OM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi,1 VS Manyilizu21Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Logistics System Strengthening Unit, John Snow Inc, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaBackground: Provision of pharmaceutical services in accredited drug-dispensing outlets (ADDOs in Tanzania has not been reported. This study compared the antibiotics dispensing practice between ADDOs and part II shops, or duka la dawa baridi (DLDBs, in Tanzania.Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in ADDOs and DLDBs. A simulated client method for data collection was used, and a total of 85 ADDOs, located in Mvomero, Kilombero, and Morogoro rural districts, were compared with 60 DLDBs located in Kibaha district. The research assistants posed as simulated clients and requested to buy antibiotics from ADDOs and DLDBs after presenting a case scenario or disease condition. Among the diseases presented were those requiring antibiotics and those usually managed only by oral rehydration salt or analgesics. The simulated clients wanted to know the antibiotics that were available at the shop. The posed questions set a convincing ground to the dispenser either to dispense the antibiotic directly, request a prescription, or refer the patient to a health facility. Proportions were used to summarize categorical variables between ADDOs and DLDBs, and the chi-square test was used to test for statistical difference between the two drug-outlet types in terms of antibiotic-dispensing practice.Results: As many as 40% of trained ADDO dispensers no longer worked at the ADDO shops, so some of the shops employed untrained staff. A larger proportion of ADDOs than DLDBs dispensed antibiotics without prescriptions (P = 0.004. The overall results indicate that there was no difference between the two types of shops in terms of adhering to regulations for dispensing antibiotics. However, in some circumstances, eg

  17. Antibiotic dispensation by Lebanese pharmacists: a comparison of higher and lower socio-economic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Rita; Lahoud, Nathalie; Salameh, Pascale; Saleh, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Indiscriminate use of antibiotics contributes to a global spread of antimicrobial resistance. Previous studies showed an excessive consumption of antibiotics purchased without medical prescription from community pharmacies, mainly in developing countries. There is a shortage of studies revealing the role of community pharmacists in the overuse of antibiotics. Our objective is to study the dispensing policy of non-medical prescription antibiotics in community pharmacies, assessing the possible influence of the socio-economic level of the area over this practice. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and May 2011 among 100 pharmacists working in Beirut's pharmacies and its suburbs. Pharmacies were divided into 2 groups according to the socio-economic level of the population living in the pharmacy area. A self-administered questionnaire was filled by pharmacists. Over-the-counter antibiotic availability existed in both higher and lower socio-economic areas: on the whole, 32% of antibiotics were dispensed without medical prescription, with higher frequency in lower socio-economic areas (p=0.003). Dispensing injectable antibiotics without medical prescription was significantly higher in lower socio-economic areas (p=0.021), as well as dispensing an association of 2 antibiotics without medical prescription (p=0.001). Pharmacists working in lower socio-economic areas recommended more frequent antibiotics to children and the elderly (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Dispensing antibiotics without medical prescription in Beirut community pharmacies is a common practice, particularly in lower socioeconomic areas. This public health problem should be addressed at the social, educational, and legislative levels. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychotropic drug dispensing in people with and without cancer in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Pierre; Cortaredona, Sébastien; Tournier, Marie; Rey, Dominique; Bendiane, Marc-Karim; Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Verdoux, Hélène

    2017-02-01

    To compare annual and monthly prevalence of psychotropic drug (PD) dispensing and the number and duration of psychotropic treatment episodes among people with and without cancer over a 2-year follow-up. We studied the following two cohorts of adult patients affiliated with the National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF): cancer patients followed for 2 years after diagnosis and individuals without cancer matched to cancer patients. Using information about anxiolytic, hypnotic, antidepressant, and antipsychotic dispensing in community pharmacies, we applied conditional log-binomial regressions to estimate adjusted relative risks for monthly dispensing of PDs. Annual prevalence of PD dispensing-all categories included-among cancer patients was significantly higher for almost all the categories we studied than among individuals without cancer. Monthly prevalence of anxiolytic/hypnotic dispensing started to rise several months before diagnosis and peaked immediately after. Among patients with cancer and their matched controls, treatment duration exceeded 1 month for hypnotics in 40 and 35 %, respectively (p < 0.01), and 3 months for anxiolytics in 23 and 23 % (p = 0.8); it was less than 6 months for antidepressants in 76 and 75 % (p = 0.5). Prevalence of psychotropic treatment was higher among cancer patients than among persons without cancer. Psychotropic treatment duration was not in line with recommendations for significant fractions of cancer patients or their controls. Training of health professionals involved in cancer supportive care should be reinforced and specific guidelines developed to help them address psychological distress of cancer survivors.

  19. Centrifugal multiplexing fixed-volume dispenser on a plastic lab-on-a-disk for parallel biochemical single-end-point assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Moonwoo; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Dong Sung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a multiple sample dispenser for precisely metered fixed volumes was successfully designed, fabricated, and fully characterized on a plastic centrifugal lab-on-a-disk (LOD) for parallel biochemical single-end-point assays. The dispenser, namely, a centrifugal multiplexing fixed-volume dispenser (C-MUFID) was designed with microfluidic structures based on the theoretical modeling about a centrifugal circumferential filling flow. The designed LODs were fabricated with a polystyrene substrate through micromachining and they were thermally bonded with a flat substrate. Furthermore, six parallel metering and dispensing assays were conducted at the same fixed-volume (1.27 μl) with a relative variation of ±0.02 μl. Moreover, the samples were metered and dispensed at different sub-volumes. To visualize the metering and dispensing performances, the C-MUFID was integrated with a serpentine micromixer during parallel centrifugal mixing tests. Parallel biochemical single-end-point assays were successfully conducted on the developed LOD using a standard serum with albumin, glucose, and total protein reagents. The developed LOD could be widely applied to various biochemical single-end-point assays which require different volume ratios of the sample and reagent by controlling the design of the C-MUFID. The proposed LOD is feasible for point-of-care diagnostics because of its mass-producible structures, reliable metering/dispensing performance, and parallel biochemical single-end-point assays, which can identify numerous biochemical.

  20. Microfluidic Dispensing Device Using Wettability Gradient and Electrowetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Harada, Shouhei; Daimon, Katsuya

    We have designed a novel microfluidic dispensing device using automatic droplet transportation on a wettability gradient surface that is sequentially followed by electrowetting-based liquid handling. While a droplet moves along the wettability gradient in a main channel, a portion of the droplet is drawn into a side channel and stored in a reservoir temporarily. Next, the stored liquid is dispensed into a mixing channel when a voltage is applied between two electrodes. The fabricated device succeeded in dispensing two liquids of different nanoscale volumes after extracting them from a microscale volume droplet.

  1. Development of a water quality index based on a European ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study comprised the development of a new index called the 'universal water quality index (UWQI)'. This index has advantages over pre-existing indices by reflecting the appropriateness of water for specific use, e.g. drinking water supply rather than general supply, and has been developed by studying the ...

  2. Water- and foodborne viruses: current developments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the major advances made in preventive health care and food technology, water and foodborne transmission of human enteric viruses is a well-recognised widespread public health problem.1-3. Factors such as changing lifestyles and demographics, faster and more frequent travel, decreasing water supplies and ...

  3. Facing the water barrier | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A world "water crisis" is poised to deliver its most devastating blow to the Middle East and North Africa — with consequences that rival any conflict — unless this arid region turns the tide on the way it manages water. SEE ALSO...

  4. Water Loss Management: Tools and Methods for Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutikanga, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in developing countries are struggling to provide customers with a reliable level of service due to their peculiar water distribution characteristics including poorly zoned networks with irregular supply operating under restricted budgets. These unique conditions demand unique tools

  5. Water Loss Management : Tools and Methods for Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutikanga, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in developing countries are struggling to provide customers with a reliable level of service due to their peculiar water distribution characteristics including poorly zoned networks with irregular supply operating under restricted budgets. These unique conditions demand unique tools

  6. Development of functional geopolymers for water purification, and construction purposes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alshaaer, M; El-Eswed, B; Yousef, R.I; Khalili, F; Rahier, H

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of functional geopolymers based on local resources such as kaolinitic soil and zeolitic tuff for the construction of water storage containers and water transfer channels...

  7. UPLC-QTOF-MS with chemical profiling approach for rapidly evaluating chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Erxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction was rapidly evaluated by UPLC-QTOF-MS coupled with the MarkerLynx software. Two different kinds of decoctions, namely traditional decoction: water extract of mixed six constituent herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and dispensing granules decoction: mixed water extract of each individual herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, were prepared. Results Chemical difference was found between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions, and albiflorin, paeoniflorin, gallic acid, amygdalin, and hydroxysafflor yellow A were identified as the significantly changed components during decocting Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction. All the peaks of mass spectrum from Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction and each herb were extracted and integration by using QuanLynx™. And the optimized data was used for linear regression analysis. The contribution of each herb in Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and the optimal compatibility proportion of dispensing granule decoction were derived from the linear regression equation. Conclusions The optimal dosage proportionality of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu dispensing granule decoction was obtained as 2.5:0.2:1:0.5:0.6:0.1 (DG : CX : BS : SD : TR : HH, which guided better clinic application of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction as dispensing granule decoctions usage, and it also provided some experimental data to reveal the compatibility rule of the relative TCM formulae.

  8. Effect of type of water supply on water quality in a developing community in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to provide water to developing communities in South Africa have resulted in various types of water supplies being used. This study examined the relationship between the type of water supply and the quality of water used. Source (communal...

  9. Securing water quality and quantity: Research and development perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pienaar, H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available impacting on economic growth ? The physical water value chain - research and development aspects ? CSIR-NRE capabilities and relevant research projects ? Concluding remarks ? CSIR 2012 Slide 2 Introduction ? SA?s progressive water legislation... ? CSIR 2012 Slide 13 Concluding remarks ? South Africa's water situation presents us with range of research and development opportunities, most of which are cunningly disguised as insurmountable problems ? CSR-NRE ensures alignment of its water R...

  10. Development of the Next Generation Type Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Tachihara, Satoru; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Ueoka, Terumi; Soejima, Fujito

    We are working in the development of a compact, low power water recycling device that can supply delicious drinking water which can be consumed safely and with peace of mind in order to help astronauts lead a healthy and comfortable life in space. This device uses electrolysis to decompose ammonia and organic matter, purifies the water using a reverse osmosis membrane, adds minerals to the water, and then sterilizes the water, thereby maintaining water quality. An online system for measuring TOC and harmful substances is also used to manage the water quality.

  11. Foreign private capital inflows in Nigeria's democratic dispensation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FPCI) in Nigeria in the current democratic dispensation with a view to finding out whether the inflows have recorded significant increase since the institution of Democracy in the country. Relevant theories and empirical data were reviewed.

  12. Controllable evaporation of cesium from a dispenser oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U; Friedl, R; Fröschle, M

    2012-12-01

    This instrument allows controlled evaporation of the alkali metal cesium over a wide range of evaporation rates. The oven has three unique features. The first is an alkali metal reservoir that uses a dispenser as a cesium source. The heating current of the dispenser controls the evaporation rate allowing generation of an adjustable and stable flow of pure cesium. The second is a blocking valve, which is fully metallic as is the body of the oven. This construction both reduces contamination of the dispenser and enables the oven to be operated up to 300 °C, with only small temperature variations (dispenser oven can be easily transferred to the other alkali-metals.

  13. Iodine generator for reclaimed water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, R. A.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The system disclosed is for controlling the iodine level in a water supply in a spacecraft. It includes an iodine accumulator which stores crystalline iodine, an electrochemical valve to control the input of iodine to the drinking water and an iodine dispenser. A pump dispenses fluid through the iodine dispenser and an iodine sensor to a potable water tank storage. The iodine sensor electronically detects the iodine level in the water, and through electronic means, produces a correction current control. The correction current control operates the electro-chemical iodine valve to release iodine from the iodine accumulator into the iodine dispenser.

  14. Clinical outcomes following the dispensing of ready-made and recycled spectacles: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Matthew G

    2014-05-01

    Uncorrected refractive error is the leading cause of global visual impairment. Given resource constraints in developing countries, the gold standard method of refractive error correction, custom-made spectacles, is unlikely to be available for some time. Therefore, ready-made and recycled spectacles are in wide use in the developing world. To ensure that refractive error interventions are successful, it is important that only appropriate modes of refractive error correction are used. As a basis for policy development, a systematic literature review was conducted of interventional studies analysing visual function, patient satisfaction and continued use outcomes of ready-made and recycled spectacles dispensed to individuals in developing countries with refractive errors or presbyopia. PubMed and CINAHL were searched by MESH terms and keywords related to ready-made and recycled spectacle interventions, yielding 185 non-duplicated papers. After applying exclusion criteria, eight papers describing seven studies of clinical outcomes of dispensing ready-made spectacles were retained for analysis. The two randomised controlled trials and five non-experimental studies suggest that ready-made spectacles can provide sufficient visual function for a large portion of the world's population with refractive error, including those with astigmatism and/or anisometropia. The follow-up period for many of the studies was too short to confidently comment on patient satisfaction and continued-use outcomes. No studies were found that met inclusion criteria and discussed recycled spectacles. The literature also notes concerns about quality and cost effectiveness of recycled spectacles, as well as their tendency to increase developing countries' reliance on outside sources of help. In light of the findings, the dispensing of ready-made spectacles should be favoured over the dispensing of recycled spectacles in developing countries. © 2014 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry

  15. Office organization and experiences with hearing aid dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, H A; Pappas, J J; Graham, S S; Winston, M E; Parrott, P

    1979-01-01

    Roles of the otolaryngologist and the audiologist in providing hearing health care are expanding as a result of current trends in amplification technology, legislation, and patient populations. Within clinic dispensing of hearing aids has become a part of this role expansion. Requirements for setting up a dispensary, fitting procedures, fee analysis, and statistical results of 4 1/2 years' experience are discussed. On the basis of the benefits described, direct dispensing is advocated.

  16. Prevalence of opioid dispensings and concurrent gastrointestinal medications in Quebec

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Rachel E.; Nevzeta Bosnic; Sweeney, Carolyn T; Duncan, Ashlee W.; Levine, Kristen B; Michael Brogan; Cook, Suzanne F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids are frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain. A side effect of opioid usage is the inhibition of gastrointestinal (GI) motility, known as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD). OBD is typically treated prophylactically with laxatives and/or acid suppressants.AIM: The present study describes the prevalence of outpatient opioid dispensing, opioid patient demographics, and concomitant dispensing of opioids and GI medications in the Quebec Public Prescription Drug In...

  17. Chemical water shutoff profile research status and development trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L. T.

    2017-08-01

    Excess water production is now a common problem encountered in almost every water flooding mature oilfield. The exploitation of oil field is faced with great challenge because of the decrease of oil field production. For the development of high water cut rare the status quo chemical water shutoff profile control technology is an important solution to solve this problem. Oilfield chemical water shutoff has important application prospects. This paper analyzes the water shutoff profile control and water shutoff profile control agent currently oilfield applications, moreover the use and development of blocking agent profile technology is to improve reservoir recovery and propose solutions. With the constant increase in water cut, profile technology should be simple, efficient, practical and profile control agent of development should be economic, environmental, and long period

  18. Providers′ knowledge, attitude and dispensing practices of E-Pills in government dispensaries of south district in Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Vertika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Delhi is one of the well developed districts in the capital with best public health care facilities. Knowledge, attitude and dispensing practices of emergency contraceptive pills (E-pills were assessed among health care providers of government dispensaries in South Delhi. Study Design: A descriptive epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Both medical and paramedical (n = 428 providers in 63 government health care facilities were interviewed between August to December 2007 using a semi-structured interview schedule. Results: Among the different categories of the providers, medical officers were observed to be most knowledgeable about E-pills and the pharmacists were the least. The correct prescribed dose of E-pill was known only to 32% of the providers while 49% knew about its right time of intake. Misconceptions and apprehensions for promoting its use were very much prevalent even among medical officers as majority felt that open access to E-pills would increase promiscuity. The dispensing practice of providers was found positively ( P < 0.05 correlated with their knowledge. Training resulted a significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in knowledge, attitude and dispensing practice of the providers. Knowledge and training combined together contributed 35% to the dispensing practice (R 2 = 0.35. Conclusion: Besides knowledge, behavior change communication strategies should form a part of the training curricula of health care providers that would help to improve the dispensing practice of E-pills.

  19. Mechanized applicator for large-scale field deployment of paraffin-wax dispensers of pheromone for mating disruption in tree fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelinski, L L; Miller, J R; Ledebuhr, R; Gut, L J

    2006-10-01

    A tractor-mounted mechanized applicator was developed for large-scale deployment of paraffin-wax dispensers of pheromone for mating disruption of oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck). The wax formulation was mostly water and emulsified paraffin wax containing 5% (by weight) pheromone [93:6:1 blend of (Z)-8-dodecen-1-yl-acetate:(E)-8-dodecen-1-yl-acetate: (Z)-8-dodecen-1-ol]. Ten milliliters of wax was applied per tree as approximately 160 deposits (0.04 ml of wax per drop). An average of 23 min was required to treat 1 ha of crop. Disruption efficacy of mechanically applied wax was measured relative to an untreated control in replicated 0.4-ha blocks within a recently abandoned apple orchard. From 6 May to 27 June, 100% disruption of tethered virgin females and 97% inhibition of pheromone traps was achieved for 52 d with two applications of wax. However, during mid- to late summer (July-August), this level of efficacy was maintained for only approximately 1 wk after each of two applications. Higher temperatures later in the season may have accounted for abbreviated efficacy of the applied small drops. Mechanically applied paraffin-wax technology may increase adoption of mating disruption given that a higher level of efficacy was achieved despite deploying less active ingredient per hectare relative to that used with reservoir dispensers. The savings in labor by not requiring hand application of reservoir dispensers could be directed toward cost of machinery. However, the short duration of efficacy obtained with the current wax formulation and mechanical applicator is judged uneconomical given the eight or more applications that would have been required for high-performance disruption over the full season. Larger drops with lower surface area-to-volume ratios are expected to prolong pheromone release for extended efficacy and desirable overall economics.

  20. Developing portfolios of water supply transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characklis, Gregory W.; Kirsch, Brian R.; Ramsey, Jocelyn; Dillard, Karen E. M.; Kelley, C. T.

    2006-05-01

    Most cities rely on firm water supply capacity to meet demand, but increasing scarcity and supply costs are encouraging greater use of temporary transfers (e.g., spot leases, options). This raises questions regarding how best to coordinate the use of these transfers in meeting cost and reliability objectives. This paper combines a hydrologic-water market simulation with an optimization approach to identify portfolios of permanent rights, options, and leases that minimize the expected costs of meeting a city's annual demand with a specified reliability. Spot market prices are linked to hydrologic conditions and described by monthly lease price distributions which are used to price options via a risk-neutral approach. Monthly choices regarding when and how much water to acquire through temporary transfers are made on the basis of anticipatory decision rules related to the ratio of expected supply to expected demand. The simulation is linked with an algorithm that uses an implicit filtering search method designed for solution surfaces that exhibit high-frequency, low-amplitude noise. This simulation-optimization approach is applied to a region that currently supports an active water market, with results suggesting that temporary transfers can reduce expected water supply costs substantially, while still maintaining high reliability. Also evaluated are trade-offs between expected costs and cost variability that occur with variation in a portfolio's distribution of rights, options, and leases.

  1. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  2. Drugs via enteral feeding tubes in inpatients: dispersion analysis and safe use of dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beserra, Milena Pontes Portela; De Oliveira, Cristiani Lopes Capistrano Gonçalves; Portela, Mileyde Ponte; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Fonteles, Marta Maria de França

    2017-03-30

    This study aimed to improve knowledge about drug administration through enteral feeding tubes (EFTs) in order to minimize efficacy and safety problems. The study was performed in a public secondary care hospital with level II accreditation by the National Accreditation Organization (Organização Nacional de Acreditação ONA), in Fortaleza, Ceará, north-eastern Brazil. One hundred and eight oral solid medications that could be administered through EFTs and were not available in liquid forms were evaluated via transformation of their solid dosage forms into liquid forms. Dispersion times and conditions were assessed to determine which medications should be crushed. We compared the use of dispensers and syringes and their connections to enteral feeding tubes and intravenous devices. Medications whose dispersion occurred within 20 minutes and could be visually perceived and whose content could be expelled without occluding the oral syringe were considered "satisfactory". The dispersion was "satisfactory" in 82 (75.9%) of the medications; they were classified as capable of being dispersed in water in the oral syringe for further administration via EFTs without the need for crushing. Use the dispenser instead of the syringe for drug administration was safer because the dispenser apparatus did not fit into equipment for intravenous drug administration.

  3. Water infrastructure for human and economic development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available need for all of us to adopt new, prudent and respectful ways of valuing, using and managing our fragile and vulnerable water resources for the greatest long-term good of our society and the southern African region as a whole. I urge everyone who... rivers. High nitrate concentrations in groundwater pose elevated levels of risk of methaemoglobanaemia (so-called blue baby syndrome) to infants that drink formula feed made up with water drawn from these groundwater sources in certain areas of South...

  4. Construction of a Smart Medication Dispenser with High Degree of Scalability and Remote Manageability

    OpenAIRE

    JuGeon Pak; KeeHyun Park

    2012-01-01

    We propose a smart medication dispenser having a high degree of scalability and remote manageability. We construct the dispenser to have extensible hardware architecture for achieving scalability, and we install an agent program in it for achieving remote manageability. The dispenser operates as follows: when the real-time clock reaches the predetermined medication time and the user presses the dispense button at that time, the predetermined medication is dispensed from the medication dispens...

  5. Investigating water meter performance in developing countries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High levels of water losses in distribution systems are the main challenge that water utilities in developing countries currently face. The water meter is an essential tool for both the utility and the customers to measure and monitor consumption. When metering is inefficient and coupled with low tariffs, the financial ...

  6. The Development of Water Management Institutions and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... management of water and associated issues in the country. Rather, four major ministries are involved in water management in the country: the Ministry of Energy and Water. Resources, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Ministry of Environment and. Nature Protection, and Ministry of Health.

  7. Measuring global water security towards sustainable development goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Gain, A.K.; Giupponi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Water plays an important role in underpinning equitable, stable and productive societies and ecosystems. Hence, United Nations recognized ensuring water security as one (Goal 6) of the seventeen sustainable development goals(SDGs). Many international river basins are likely to experience ‘low water

  8. Development and Testing of Infrared Water Current Meter | Ezenne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous monitoring of the river flow is essential for assessing water availability. River flow velocity is crucial to simulate discharge hydrographs of water in the hydrological system.This study developed a digital water current meter with infrared. The infrared current meter was tested using Ebonyi River at Obollo-Etiti and ...

  9. Raw Milk Hygiene at Local Markets and Automatic Milk Dispenser Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Şteţca; Arghir Ilea; Lenuţa Şuteu; Teodora Coldea

    2014-01-01

    In Romania, direct sales of raw milk to the final consumer is developed based on the local regulations. These are in accordance to European Regulation that must meet some quality requirements for the total number of germs, somatic cells, without antibiotics, coming from healthy animals who did not suffer from diseases that can be transmitted to humans through milk. Raw milk is sold in Romania in local markets and by automatic milk dispenser machines. Based on these regulations, a study regard...

  10. Evaluation of medicines dispensing pattern of private pharmacies in Rajshahi, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Shuvashis; Hossain, Md. Tawhid

    2017-01-01

    Background In developing country like BANGLADESH, people depend more on pharmacies due to expediency, shorter waiting time, cost reduction, availability of credit and flexible opening hours. The aim of this study was to investigate medicines dispensing patterns of the pharmacies in RAJSHAHI, BANGLADESH and to identify and analyze contribution of drugsellers and quacks in irrational drug use. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2016 - April, 2016 in 75 randomly sele...

  11. Divining Jordan's desert waters | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    To most people, a desert — by definition — is a place where water is practically nonexistent. But a team of researchers studying Jordan's badia — a large desert in the country's northwest corner — has uncovered a secret moving slowly beneath the area's vast arid expanses. Using satellite photos, knowledge of the local ...

  12. Microbiological evaluation of hot beverages dispensed by vending machines from the Army barracks of Brigata Meccanizzata Aosta located in Messina

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Beninati; Daniele Muscolino; Antonio Panebianco; Alessandro Giuffrida; Filippo Giarratana; Attilio Longo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of hot beverages dispensed by vending machines (VMs). The study was carried out on 203 samples from 15 VMs located in 5 Army barracks in Messina. The samples included: water used for preparation of beverages, swab of water tank, swab of blender machine, chocolate powder, milk powder, cappuccino and chocolate drink (29 samples for each types). All samples were examined for total bacterial count (TBC), coliforms, Escherich...

  13. Development of functional geopolymers for water purification, and construction purposes

    OpenAIRE

    M. Alshaaer; El-Eswed, B.; Yousef, R.I.; Khalili, F.; Rahier, H

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of functional geopolymers based on local resources such as kaolinitic soil and zeolitic tuff for the construction of water storage containers and water transfer channels. The effect of water content on the mechanical performance and physical properties of synthesized geopolymers was evaluated. The results confirmed that the optimum ratio of water is 28% of clay fraction, which revealed observable improvements of physical, mechanical, and adsorption proper...

  14. Prototype of a Questionnaire and Quiz System for Supporting Increase of Health Awareness During Wait Time in Dispensing Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Takeshi; Chen, Poa-Min; Ozaki, Shinya; Ideguchi, Naoko; Miyaki, Tomoko; Nanbu, Keiko; Ikeda, Keiko

    For quit-smoking clinic and its campaign, there was a need for pharmacists to investigate pediatric patient's parent consciousness to tobacco harm utilizing wait time in a pediatric dispensing pharmacy. In this research, we developed the questionnaire and quiz total system using the tablet for user interface, in which people can easily answer the questionnaire/quiz and quickly see the total results on the spot in order to enhance their consciousness to the tobacco harm. The system also provides their tobacco dependence level based on the questionnaire results and some advice for their health and dietary habits due to the tobacco dependence level. From a field trial with one hundred four examinees in the pediatric dispensing pharmacy, the user interface was useful compared to conventional questionnaire form. The system could enhance their consciousness to tobacco harm and make their beneficial use of waiting time in dispensing pharmacy. Some interesting suggestions for improvement and new services were also obtained.

  15. Identification of risks associated with the prescribing and dispensing of oral anticancer medicines in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hammond, Lisa

    2012-09-09

    Background Oral anticancer medicines (OAM) facilitate transfer of cancer care into the community, where safeguards developed in hospitals that control their prescribing, dispensing and administration may not exist. Objective To determine if the systems of prescribing and dispensing OAM in Ireland facilitate clinical verification of the prescription, thereby ensuring treatment is tailored and appropriate for the patient. Setting Randomly selected community pharmacies in Ireland and all Irish hospitals with cancer services. Method A questionnaire was sent to a random selection of Irish community pharmacists. A different questionnaire was sent to all Irish hospitals treating cancer patients. One hundred OAM prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed, to assess the information presented and the potential barriers to a community pharmacist performing a clinical verification of the prescription. Main outcome measure Community pharmacist survey: problems experienced when dispensing OAM and risk factors identified with the current system. Hospital pharmacist survey: proportion of hospitals that clinically verify prescriptions for parenteral versus oral anticancer medicines and associated policies. OAM prescription review: proportion of OAM prescriptions that contained sufficient information for a community pharmacist to clinically verify the prescription and safely dispense the medication. Results Sixty-four percent of community pharmacist respondents felt they did not have enough information available to them to safely dispense these prescriptions, and 74 % felt that patients are at risk with the current Irish system of prescribing and dispensing OAM. Irish hospitals do not have systems to ensure that all OAM prescriptions are clinically verified by a pharmacist. Seventeen different agents were prescribed on the prescriptions reviewed. The information provided to the community pharmacist would have allowed them to clinically verify 7 % of the OAM prescriptions

  16. Water, job creation, industrial development and the implementation of sustainable development goals in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simalabwi, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available and climate change impacts (industrial) development Water is key for societal development- livelihoods, job creation Water Security for sustainable and climate-resilient industrial development towards Africa’s overall societal development Water, Jobs... to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable End poverty in all its forms everywhere Water Energy Land Ensure sustainable consumption and production...

  17. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  18. Development of a mobile water maker, a sustainable way to produce safe drinking water in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groendijk, L.; Vries, de H.E.

    2009-01-01

    Moreover, there is a growing demand for a simple, low capacity drinking water treatment used by local people in developing countries to reduce mortality caused by water born diseases. To solve this problem a small portable water treatment unit with a production capacity of approximately 500 L/day

  19. Measurement of Low Workfunction Cesiated Metals for Use in Dispenser Photocathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Moody, N A; O'Shea, P G

    2005-01-01

    Photoinjector performance is a limiting factor in the continued development of high powered FELs. Presently available photocathodes have limited efficiency and short lifetime in an RF-gun environment, due to contamination or evaporation of a photosensitive surface layer. An ideal photocathode should have high efficiency at visible wavelengths, long lifetime in practical vacuum environments, and prompt emission. High efficiency cathodes typically have limited lifetime, and the needs of the photocathode are generally at odds with those of the drive laser. A potential solution is the low work function dispenser cathode, where short lifetimes are overcome by periodic in situ regeneration that restores the photosensitive surface layer, analogous to methods used in the power tube industry. This work reports on the fabrication techniques and performance of cesiated metal photocathodes and cesiated dispenser cathodes, with a focus on understanding and improving quantum efficiency and lifetime, analyzing issues of emi...

  20. Coevolution of water security in a developing city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.

    2013-11-01

    The world is rapidly urbanizing. One of the challenges associated with this growth will be to supply water to rapidly growing, developing-world cities. While there is a long history of interdisciplinary research in water resources management, relatively few water studies attempts to explain why water systems evolve the way they do; why some regions develop sustainable, secure well-functioning water systems while others do not and which feedbacks force the transition from one trajectory to the other. This paper attempts to tackle this question by examining the historical evolution of one city in Southern India. A key contribution of this paper is the co-evolutionary modelling approach adopted. The paper presents a "socio-hydrologic" model that simulates the feedbacks between the human, engineered and hydrologic system for Chennai, India over a forty year period and evaluates the implications for water security. This study offers some interesting insights on urban water security in developing country water systems. First, the Chennai case study argues that urban water security goes beyond piped water supply. When piped supply fails users first depend on their own wells. When the aquifer is depleted, a tanker market develops. When consumers are forced to purchase expensive tanker water, they are water insecure. Second, different initial conditions result in different water security trajectories. However, initial advantages in infrastructure are eroded if the utility's management is weak and it is unable to expand or maintain the piped system to keep up with growth. Both infrastructure and management decisions are necessary to achieving water security. Third, the effects of mismanagement do not manifest right away. Instead, in the manner of a "frog in a pot of boiling water", the system gradually deteriorates. The impacts of bad policy may not manifest till much later when the population has grown and a major multi-year drought hits.

  1. Ecology, water and enterprise development in selected rural South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's imperatives for rural development and job creation raise the question whether water abundance in a region results in improved enterprise development in rural towns. The enterprise assemblages of 2 groups of towns, a river group from water-abundant areas and a Great Karoo group from the arid heartland of ...

  2. Investigating water meter performance in developing countries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-07

    Oct 7, 2011 ... High levels of water losses in distribution systems are the main challenge that water utilities in developing countries cur- rently face. ... industry, especially in developing countries, to make appropriate metering and sub-metering decisions. ... the case study, followed by the research methodology used in.

  3. Parenteral medication prescriptions, dispensing and administration habits in Mongolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gereltuya Dorj

    Full Text Available High levels of injection prescribing were reported in Mongolia. Understanding the factors influencing the injection prescribing is essential to reduce their inappropriate use. The study evaluated the views, experiences and attitudes of community members associated with the prescribing of injections in Mongolia. A structured questionnaire focusing on respondents' characteristics, experiences and views about injections was developed and administered face-to-face to community members in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Standard descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic data and responses to the questionnaires. Dependent variables were compared using Kruskal-Wallis Tests for independence. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Version 21.0. Six hundred participants were approached and the response rate was 79% (n = 474. Almost half of the respondents were aged between 31 and 50 (n = 228, 48.1% and 40.9% of respondents were male (n = 194. Most respondents were from Ulaanbaatar city (n = 407, 85.7%. All respondents had received injections in the past and 268 (56.5% had received injection in the past year. The most common reason for having an injection in the past year was reported as treatment of a disease (n = 163, 60.8%, or for administration of vitamins (n = 70, 26.1%. Injections were prescribed by a doctor (n = 353, 74.9%, dispensed by a pharmacist (n = 283, 59.7% and administered by a nurse (n = 277, 54.9%. Only 16% of all respondents had the expectation of receiving injections when they visited a doctor (n = 77. An important perception regarding injections was that they hastened the recovery process (n = 269, 56.8%. When asked their opinion about therapeutic injections, 40% of all respondents agreed that injections were a better medicine (n = 190 than oral medications, with older respondents strongly agreeing (p<0.001. Based on this total sample, approximately 1891 injections per 1000 patients were administered. The excessive

  4. Electrolytic production and dispensing of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) is undoubtedly the only option that can meet both the California zero emission vehicle (ZEV) standard and the President`s goal of tripling automobile efficiency without sacrificing performance in a standard 5-passenger vehicle. The three major automobile companies are designing and developing FCEVs powered directly by hydrogen under cost-shared contracts with the Department of Energy. Once developed, these vehicles will need a reliable and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Steam reforming of natural gas would produce the least expensive hydrogen, but funding may not be sufficient initially to build both large steam reforming plants and the transportation infrastructure necessary to deliver that hydrogen to geographically scattered FCEV fleets or individual drivers. This analysis evaluates the economic feasibility of using small scale water electrolysis to provide widely dispersed but cost-effective hydrogen for early FCEV demonstrations. We estimate the cost of manufacturing a complete electrolysis system in large quantities, including compression and storage, and show that electrolytic hydrogen could be cost competitive with fully taxed gasoline, using existing residential off-peak electricity rates.

  5. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A. S.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mubako, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Great Lakes basin hosts the world's most abundant surface fresh water reserve. Historically an industrial and natural resource powerhouse, the region has suffered economic stagnation in recent decades. Meanwhile, growing water resource scarcity around the world is creating pressure on water-intensive human activities. This situation creates the potential for the Great Lakes region to sustainably utilize its relative water wealth for economic benefit. We combine economic production and trade datasets with water consumption data and models of surface water depletion in the region. We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts if they are developed in the wrong locations. Water uses drawing on deep groundwater or the Great Lakes themselves are unlikely to create a significant depletion, and discharge of groundwater withdrawals to surface waters offsets most surface water depletion. This relative abundance of surface water means that science-based management of large water uses to avoid accidentally creating "hotspots" is likely to be successful in avoiding future impacts, even if water use is significantly increased. Commercial water uses are the most productive, with thermoelectric, mining, and agricultural water uses in the lowest tier of water productivity. Surprisingly for such a water-abundant economy, the region is a net importer of water-derived goods and services. This, combined with the abundance of surface water, suggests that the region's water-based economy has room to grow in the 21st century.

  6. Water Education: An e-learning platform for water-related competence development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Arvin, Erik; Ucendo, Inmaculada Maria Buendia

    2011-01-01

    The Danish water sector is in dire need for competence development to accommodate the changes in Danish water governance (decentralisation,privatisation and larger entities) and the implementation of relevant EuropeanUnion (EU) directives. In parallel, the number of international students enrolle......, DTUEnvironment has created an e-learning platform called Water Education (WatEdu) scheduled to be operational in 2011....

  7. Water Availability for Shale Gas Development in Sichuan Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengjun; Weinthal, Erika; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Deshusses, Marc A; Zou, Caineng; Ni, Yunyan; Vengosh, Avner

    2016-03-15

    Unconventional shale gas development holds promise for reducing the predominant consumption of coal and increasing the utilization of natural gas in China. While China possesses some of the most abundant technically recoverable shale gas resources in the world, water availability could still be a limiting factor for hydraulic fracturing operations, in addition to geological, infrastructural, and technological barriers. Here, we project the baseline water availability for the next 15 years in Sichuan Basin, one of the most promising shale gas basins in China. Our projection shows that continued water demand for the domestic sector in Sichuan Basin could result in high to extremely high water stress in certain areas. By simulating shale gas development and using information from current water use for hydraulic fracturing in Sichuan Basin (20,000-30,000 m(3) per well), we project that during the next decade water use for shale gas development could reach 20-30 million m(3)/year, when shale gas well development is projected to be most active. While this volume is negligible relative to the projected overall domestic water use of ∼36 billion m(3)/year, we posit that intensification of hydraulic fracturing and water use might compete with other water utilization in local water-stress areas in Sichuan Basin.

  8. The K-1 Active Dispenser for Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, G.; Cochran, D.; Curtis, R.

    2002-01-01

    Kistler Aerospace Corporation is building the K-1, the world's first fully reusable launch vehicle. The two-stage K- 1 is designed primarily to service the market for low-earth orbit (LEO) missions, due to Kistler's need to recover both stages. For customers requiring payload delivery to high-energy orbits, Kistler can outfit the payload with a K- 1 Active Dispenser (an expendable third stage). The K-1 second stage will deploy the Active Dispenser mated with its payload into a 200 km circular LEO parking orbit. From this orbit, the Active Dispenser would use its own propulsion to place its payload into the final desired drop-off orbit or earth-escape trajectory. This approach allows Kistler to combine the low-cost launch services offered by the reusable two-stage K-1 with the versatility of a restartable, expendable upper stage. Enhanced with an Active Dispenser, the K-1 will be capable of delivering 1,500 kg to a geosynchronous transfer orbit or up to approximately 1,000 kg into a Mars rendezvous trajectory. The list price of a K-1 Active Dispenser launch is 25 million (plus the price of mission unique integration services) significantly less than the price of any launch vehicle service in the world with comparable capability.

  9. The Community Water Model (CWATM) / Development of a community driven global water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Peter; Satoh, Yusuke; Greve, Peter; Kahil, Taher; Wada, Yoshihide

    2017-04-01

    With a growing population and economic development, it is expected that water demands will increase significantly in the future, especially in developing regions. At the same time, climate change is expected to alter spatial patterns of hydrological cycle and will have global, regional and local impacts on water availability. Thus, it is important to assess water supply, water demand and environmental needs over time to identify the populations and locations that will be most affected by these changes linked to water scarcity, droughts and floods. The Community Water Model (CWATM) will be designed for this purpose in that it includes an accounting of how future water demands will evolve in response to socioeconomic change and how water availability will change in response to climate. CWATM represents one of the new key elements of IIASA's Water program. It has been developed to work flexibly at both global and regional level at different spatial resolutions. The model is open source and community-driven to promote our work amongst the wider water community worldwide and is flexible enough linking to further planned developments such as water quality and hydro-economic modules. CWATM will be a basis to develop a next-generation global hydro-economic modeling framework that represents the economic trade-offs among different water management options over a basin looking at water supply infrastructure and demand managements. The integrated modeling framework will consider water demand from agriculture, domestic, energy, industry and environment, investment needs to alleviate future water scarcity, and will provide a portfolio of economically optimal solutions for achieving future water management options under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) for example. In addition, it will be able to track the energy requirements associated with the water supply system e.g., pumping, desalination and interbasin transfer to realize the linkage with the water-energy economy. In

  10. Use of simulated patients to evaluate combined oral contraceptive dispensing practices of community pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roque Obreli-Neto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combined oral contraceptive (COC use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs (with counseled audio recording visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21(® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg. The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients' medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. RESULTS: Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2% agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional, and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., "do you smoke?" (n = 2 and "what is your age?" (n = 1. None of the CPs measured the patient's blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs, and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. CONCLUSION: The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure.

  11. GEOINFORMATION-CARTOGRAPHIC MODELING OF WATER AVAILABILITY FOR WATER SECURITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Rybkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of problem associated with water availability and its mapping is due to the need to solve urgent water problems of the Russian regions for their sustainable development. At the same time, sustainability is understood as rational use of water resources and their conservation to maintain the ecological balance of territories, and water security of regions is evaluated from the standpoint of water supply to municipalities. The shortage of water resources in Russia is perceived skeptically since our country is rich in water resources and the scarcity of fresh water threatens only a small part of its territory. However, the experts consider [Danilov-Danilyan, Galfan, 2015] that such a myopic point of view can lead in the long term to emergencies. The potential danger and risk of water use are already typical for the areas, which experience water stress. These are the territories with extremely low water availability per capita, less than 1.0-2.0 thousand m3/person/year [Shiklomanov, 2000; Danilov-Danilyan, Losev, 2006]. Geoinformation-cartographic modeling allows to differentiate the area under study according to water resource potential, to identify municipalities with low water availability and to estimate the population living in the area of potential danger and risk of water use.

  12. Development of the Next Generation Type Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Tachihara, Satoru; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Ueoka, Terumi; Soejima, Fujito; Teranishi, Hiromitsu

    According to NASA, an astronaut living on the International Space Station (ISS) requires approximately 7 kg of water per day. This includes 2 kg of drinking water as well as sanitary fresh water for hand washing, gargling, etc. This water is carried to the space station from the earth, so when more people are staying on the space station, or staying for a longer period of time, the cost of transporting water increases. Accordingly, water is a valuable commodity, and restrictions are applied to such activities as brushing teeth, washing hair, and washing clothes. The life of an astronaut in space is not necessarily a healthy one. JAXA has experience in the research of water recovery systems. Today, utilizing knowledge learned through experiences living on the space station and space shuttles, and taking advantage of the development of new materials for device construction, it is possible to construct a new water recovery system. Therefore, JAXA and New Medican Tech Corporation (NMT) have created a system for collaborative development. Based on the technologies of both companies, we are proceeding to develop the next generation of water recovery devices in order to contribute to safe, comfortable, and healthy daily life for astronauts in space. The goal of this development is to achieve a water purification system based on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that can perform the following functions. • Preprocessing that removes ammonia and breaks down organic matter contained in urine. • Post-processing that adds minerals and sterilizes the water. • Online TOC measurement for monitoring water quality. • Functions for measuring harmful substances. The RO membrane is an ultra-low-pressure type membrane with a 0.0001 micron (0.1 nanometer) pore size and an operating pressure of 0.4 to 0.6 MPa. During processing with the RO membrane, nearly all of the minerals contained in the cleaned water are removed, resulting in water that is near the quality of deionized water

  13. Sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duić, Neven; Guzović, Zvonimir; Kafarov, Vyatcheslav

    2013-01-01

    The 6th Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES Conference), attended by 418 scientists from 55 countries representing six continents. It was held in 2011 and dedicated to the improvement and dissemination of knowledge on methods, policies...... and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development, taking into account its economic, environmental and social pillars, as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of development, regarding energy, transport, water and environment systems and their many combinations....

  14. Do Pregnant Women Report Use of Dispensed Medications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Charlotte; Thrane, Nana

    2001-01-01

    Surveillance of drug safety in pregnancy often draws on administrative prescription registries. Noncompliance in the use of prescribed medication may be frequent among pregnant women owing to their fear of fetotoxic side effects. To estimate compliance in the use of prescription drugs dispensed...... during pregnancy, we compared prescription data from the North Jutland Prescription Database with information on drug use provided by pregnant women to the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), which is a health interview survey. We used the North Jutland Prescription Database to identify all prescription...... drugs dispensed during pregnancy for the 2,041 women who were enrolled in the DNBC in the County of North Jutland, Denmark. Compliance was defined as the probability of reporting drug use in DNBC after purchasing a dispensed prescription drug. The overall compliance to drugs purchased within 120 days...

  15. Development of method for the mineral water catalase activity determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena М. Nikipelova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological effects of mineral water depend not only on the chemical composition but also on the metabolic products of microbial cenosis. Among numerous microorganisms constituting the autochthonous microflora of mineral waters, we do evolve the saprophytic organisms producing the catalase, the saprophytes’ physiological and biological role being proven a long ago. The research aim was to develop a method for determination of mineral water catalase activity. Analyzed are various methods to determine the catalase activity in biological objects. Developed is a spectrophotometric method for determination of mineral water catalase activity. The method is efficiently tested with series of Ukrainian mineral waters. Calculated are the relative standard deviations which are significantly below normal errors, admitted at spectroscopic analysis and at the optic density range. The given method provides sufficient accuracy and convergence when estimating the mineral waters catalase activity, allowing to introduce a new index to assess the quality and biological value.

  16. People, Land and Water: Participatory Development Communication ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Used increasingly widely in resource management, this process is known as participatory development communication (PDC). ... IDRC's support of BetterEvaluation, an international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory, has resulted in an online guide for an often overlooked group of people who greatly.

  17. Development of method for the mineral water catalase activity determination

    OpenAIRE

    Olena М. Nikipelova; Аlena Yu. Kisilevskaya; Lyudmyla B. Solodova

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of mineral water depend not only on the chemical composition but also on the metabolic products of microbial cenosis. Among numerous microorganisms constituting the autochthonous microflora of mineral waters, we do evolve the saprophytic organisms producing the catalase, the saprophytes’ physiological and biological role being proven a long ago. The research aim was to develop a method for determination of mineral water catalase activity. Analyzed are various methods to det...

  18. Packaged water: optimizing local processes for sustainable water delivery in developing nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada Ayokunle C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With so much global attention and commitment towards making the Water and Sanitation targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs a reality, available figures seem to speak on the contrary as they reveal a large disparity between the expected and what currently obtains especially in developing countries. As studies have shown that the standard industrialized world model for delivery of safe drinking water technology may not be affordable in much of the developing world, packaged water is suggested as a low cost, readily available alternative water provision that could help bridge the gap. Despite the established roles that this drinking water source plays in developing nations, its importance is however significantly underestimated, and the source considered unimproved going by 'international standards'. Rather than simply disqualifying water from this source, focus should be on identifying means of improvement. The need for intervening global communities and developmental organizations to learn from and build on the local processes that already operate in the developing world is also emphasized. Identifying packaged water case studies of some developing nations, the implication of a tenacious focus on imported policies, standards and regulatory approaches on drinking water access for residents of the developing world is also discussed.

  19. Barriers and Solutions to Smart Water Grid Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, So-Min; Choi, Gye-Woon; Lee, Ho-Sun

    2016-03-01

    This limited review of smart water grid (SWG) development, challenges, and solutions provides an initial assessment of early attempts at operating SWGs. Though the cost and adoption issues are critical, potential benefits of SWGs such as efficient water conservation and distribution sustain the development of SWGs around the world. The review finds that the keys to success are the new regulations concerning data access and ownership to solve problems of security and privacy; consumer literacy to accept and use SWGs; active private sector involvement to coordinate SWG development; government-funded pilot projects and trial centers; and integration with sustainable water management.

  20. Guidelines to Develop Efficient Photocatalysts for Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia Esparza, Angel T.

    2016-04-03

    Photocatalytic overall water splitting is the only viable solar-to-fuel conversion technology. The research discloses an investigation process wherein by dissecting the photocatalytic water splitting device, electrocatalysts, and semiconductor photocatalysts can be independently studied, developed and optimized. The assumption of perfect catalysts leads to the realization that semiconductors are the limiting factor in photocatalysis. This dissertation presents a guideline for efficient photocatalysis using semiconductor particles developed from idealized theoretical simulations. No perfect catalysts exist; then the discussion focus on the development of efficient non-noble metal electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution from water reduction. Tungsten carbide (WC) is selective for the catalysis of hydrogen without the introduction of the reverse reaction of water formation, which is critical to achieving photocatalytic overall water splitting as demonstrated in this work. Finally, photoelectrochemistry is used to characterize thoroughly Cu-based p-type semiconductors with potential for large-scale manufacture. Artificial photosynthesis may be achieved by following the recommendations herein presented.

  1. Dispensing of non-prescribed antibiotics in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaaytah A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ammar Almaaytah,1 Tareq L Mukattash,2 Julia Hajaj2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Objective: Current regulations in Jordan state that antibiotics cannot be sold without a medical prescription. This study aimed to assess the percentage of pharmacies that dispense antibiotics without a medical prescription in the Kingdom of Jordan and identify and highlight the extent and seriousness of such practices among Jordanian pharmacies. Methods: A prospective study was performed, and five different clinical scenarios were simulated at pharmacies investigated including sore throat, otitis media, acute sinusitis, diarrhea, and urinary tract infection in childbearing-aged women. Three levels of demand were used to convince the pharmacists to sell an antibiotic. Results: A total of 202 total pharmacies in Jordan were visited in the present study. The majority of pharmacies (74.3% dispensed antibiotics without prescription with three different levels of demand. The percentage of pharmacies dispensing antibiotics without a prescription for the sore throat scenario was 97.6%, followed by urinary tract infection (83.3%, diarrhea (83%, and otitis media (68.4%. The lowest percentage of antibiotic dispensing was for the acute sinusitis simulation at 48.5%. Among the pharmacies that dispensed antibiotics, the pharmacists provided an explanation as the number of times per day the drug should be taken in 95.3% of the cases, explained the duration of treatment in 25.7%, and inquired about allergies prior to the sale of the antibiotic in only 17.3%. Only 52 pharmacies (25.7% refused to dispense any kind of antibiotics, the majority (61.5% of this refusal response came from acute sinusitis cases, while the minority (2.4% came from the sore throat cases. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that antibiotics continue to be dispensed

  2. ELECTROSPUN MESOFIBERS, A NOVEL BIODEGRADABLE PHEROMONE DISPENSER TECHNOLOGY, ARE COMBINED WITH MECHANICAL DEPLOYMENT FOR EFFICIENT IPM OF LOBESIA BOTRANA IN VINEYARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Hans E; Langner, S S; Breuer, M

    2015-01-01

    Behaviour modifying pheromones are well known agents for disrupting mating communication of pest insects. For optimal activity, they must be dispensed in time and space at a quantitatively measurable, predetermined release rate covering the flight period of the target species. Pheromones appeal to environmentally conscientious entomologists for their biodegradability, non-toxicity and ecological compatibility. In attempts of combining the virtues of pheromones, suitable slow release dispensers, and their mechanical deployment, an ecologically sensible, reasonably priced and patented procedure was developed and tested with the vineyard pest Lobesia botrana (Lep.: Tortricidae). It is characterized by (1) Electrospun mesofibers with diameters ranging from 0.6 to 3.5 micrometres, containing disruptants and dispensing it by slow release diffusion into the crop, (2) simultaneous application of the fully biodegradable combination of pheromone with Ecoflex polyester mesofiber, (3) combination of mechanical deployment by multi-purpose cultivators of the prefabricated pheromone dispensers with other simultaneous cultivation measures, and thus further reducing labour time and treatment costs. The dispensers are biodegradable within half a year without leaving any objectionable residues. In the standard eco-toxicology tests pheromone dispensers are harmless to non-target organisms. The disruptive effect of one treatment lasts for seven weeks which covers well one of several flight periods of L. botrana.

  3. 9 CFR 3.30 - Watering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... consumed by guinea pigs or hamsters supply them with their normal water requirements, potable water shall... containers used for dispensing water to guinea pigs or hamsters shall be so placed in or attached to the...

  4. Research and Development Roadmap for Water Heating Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Gagne, Claire [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Lutz, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Merrigan, Tim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2011-10-01

    Although water heating is an important energy end-use in residential and commercial buildings, efficiency improvements in recent years have been relatively modest. However, significant advancements related to higher efficiency equipment, as well as improved distribution systems, are now viable. DOE support for water heating research, development and demonstration (RD&D) could provide the impetus for commercialization of these advancements.

  5. Sustainability of water resources development in the Komadugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainability of water resources development in the Komadugu Yobe River basin of Nigeria. ... Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology ... Results show that about 2,619 million cubic meters (MCM) of surface water is available annually upstream of Wudil (HS 1), 658 MCM is available between Wudil and ...

  6. Multiple-purpose development of water resources | Worki | Zede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full and complete utilization of water resources is an economic and social advantage to all members of a society. The water resources potential of Ethiopia is practically untouched, and their systematic and wise development is of paramount importance for enjoying the maximum possible benefits. This paper indicates that, ...

  7. Developing the Water Supply System for Travel to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.; Fisher, John W.; Delzeit, Lance D.; Flynn, Michael T.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    What water supply method should be used on a trip to Mars? Two alternate approaches are using fuel cell and stored water, as was done for short missions such as Apollo and the Space Shuttle, or recycling most of the water, as on long missions including the International Space Station (ISS). Stored water is inexpensive for brief missions but its launch mass and cost become very large for long missions. Recycling systems have much lower total mass and cost for long missions, but they have high development cost and are more expensive to operate than storage. A Mars transit mission would have an intermediate duration of about 450 days out and back. Since Mars transit is about ten times longer than a brief mission but probably less than one-tenth as long as ISS, it is not clear if stored or recycled water would be best. Recycling system design is complicated because water is used for different purposes, drinking, food preparation, washing, and flushing the urinal, and because wastewater has different forms, humidity condensate, dirty wash water, and urine and flush water. The uses have different requirements and the wastewater resources have different contaminants and processing requirements. The most cost-effective water supply system may recycle some wastewater sources and also provide safety reserve water from storage. Different water supply technologies are compared using mass, cost, reliability, and other factors.

  8. Construction of a smart medication dispenser with high degree of scalability and remote manageability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, JuGeon; Park, KeeHyun

    2012-01-01

    We propose a smart medication dispenser having a high degree of scalability and remote manageability. We construct the dispenser to have extensible hardware architecture for achieving scalability, and we install an agent program in it for achieving remote manageability. The dispenser operates as follows: when the real-time clock reaches the predetermined medication time and the user presses the dispense button at that time, the predetermined medication is dispensed from the medication dispensing tray (MDT). In the proposed dispenser, the medication for each patient is stored in an MDT. One smart medication dispenser contains mainly one MDT; however, the dispenser can be extended to include more MDTs in order to support multiple users using one dispenser. For remote management, the proposed dispenser transmits the medication status and the system configurations to the monitoring server. In the case of a specific event such as a shortage of medication, memory overload, software error, or non-adherence, the event is transmitted immediately. All these operations are performed automatically without the intervention of patients, through the agent program installed in the dispenser. Results of implementation and verification show that the proposed dispenser operates normally and performs the management operations from the medication monitoring server suitably.

  9. Construction of a Smart Medication Dispenser with High Degree of Scalability and Remote Manageability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JuGeon Pak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a smart medication dispenser having a high degree of scalability and remote manageability. We construct the dispenser to have extensible hardware architecture for achieving scalability, and we install an agent program in it for achieving remote manageability. The dispenser operates as follows: when the real-time clock reaches the predetermined medication time and the user presses the dispense button at that time, the predetermined medication is dispensed from the medication dispensing tray (MDT. In the proposed dispenser, the medication for each patient is stored in an MDT. One smart medication dispenser contains mainly one MDT; however, the dispenser can be extended to include more MDTs in order to support multiple users using one dispenser. For remote management, the proposed dispenser transmits the medication status and the system configurations to the monitoring server. In the case of a specific event such as a shortage of medication, memory overload, software error, or non-adherence, the event is transmitted immediately. All these operations are performed automatically without the intervention of patients, through the agent program installed in the dispenser. Results of implementation and verification show that the proposed dispenser operates normally and performs the management operations from the medication monitoring server suitably.

  10. Regulation of water resources for sustaining global future socioeconomic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; SHI, H.; Sivakumar, B.

    2016-12-01

    With population projections indicating continued growth during this century, socio-economic problems (e.g., water, food, and energy shortages) will be most likely to occur, especially if proper planning, development, and management strategies are not adopted. In the present study, firstly, we explore the vital role of dams in promoting economic growth through analyzing the relationship between dams and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at both global and national scales. Secondly, we analyze the current situation of global water scarcity based on the data representing water resources availability, dam development, and the level of economic development. Third, with comprehensive consideration of population growth as the major driving force, water resources availability as the basic supporting factor, and topography as the important constraint, this study addresses the question of dam development in the future and predicts the locations of future dams around the world.

  11. Measuring global water security towards sustainable development goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gain, Animesh K.; Giupponi, Carlo; Wada, Yoshihide

    2016-12-01

    Water plays an important role in underpinning equitable, stable and productive societies and ecosystems. Hence, United Nations recognized ensuring water security as one (Goal 6) of the seventeen sustainable development goals (SDGs). Many international river basins are likely to experience ‘low water security’ over the coming decades. Water security is rooted not only in the physical availability of freshwater resources relative to water demand, but also on social and economic factors (e.g. sound water planning and management approaches, institutional capacity to provide water services, sustainable economic policies). Until recently, advanced tools and methods are available for the assessment of water scarcity. However, quantitative and integrated—physical and socio-economic—approaches for spatial analysis of water security at global level are not available yet. In this study, we present a spatial multi-criteria analysis framework to provide a global assessment of water security. The selected indicators are based on Goal 6 of SDGs. The term ‘security’ is conceptualized as a function of ‘availability’, ‘accessibility to services’, ‘safety and quality’, and ‘management’. The proposed global water security index (GWSI) is calculated by aggregating indicator values on a pixel-by-pixel basis, using the ordered weighted average method, which allows for the exploration of the sensitivity of final maps to different attitudes of hypothetical policy makers. Our assessment suggests that countries of Africa, South Asia and Middle East experience very low water security. Other areas of high water scarcity, such as some parts of United States, Australia and Southern Europe, show better GWSI values, due to good performance of management, safety and quality, and accessibility. The GWSI maps show the areas of the world in which integrated strategies are needed to achieve water related targets of the SDGs particularly in the African and Asian continents.

  12. Measuring Global Water Security Towards Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gain, Animesh K.; Giupponi, Carlo; Wada, Yoshihide

    2016-01-01

    Water plays an important role in underpinning equitable, stable and productive societies and ecosystems. Hence, United Nations recognized ensuring water security as one (Goal 6) of the seventeen sustainable development goals (SDGs). Many international river basins are likely to experience 'low water security' over the coming decades. Water security is rooted not only in the physical availability of freshwater resources relative to water demand, but also on social and economic factors (e.g. sound water planning and management approaches, institutional capacity to provide water services, sustainable economic policies). Until recently, advanced tools and methods are available for the assessment of water scarcity. However, quantitative and integrated-physical and socio-economic-approaches for spatial analysis of water security at global level are not available yet. In this study, we present a spatial multi-criteria analysis framework to provide a global assessment of water security. The selected indicators are based on Goal 6 of SDGs. The term 'security' is conceptualized as a function of 'availability', 'accessibility to services', 'safety and quality', and 'management'. The proposed global water security index (GWSI) is calculated by aggregating indicator values on a pixel-by-pixel basis, using the ordered weighted average method, which allows for the exploration of the sensitivity of final maps to different attitudes of hypothetical policy makers. Our assessment suggests that countries of Africa, South Asia and Middle East experience very low water security. Other areas of high water scarcity, such as some parts of United States, Australia and Southern Europe, show better GWSI values, due to good performance of management, safety and quality, and accessibility. The GWSI maps show the areas of the world in which integrated strategies are needed to achieve water related targets of the SDGs particularly in the African and Asian continents.

  13. COEGA special economic zone: Water for industrial development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water for Industrial Development 06 October 2017 Index 4 5 1 2 3 9 The Coega SEZ Overview The Package of Plans Approach Water Demand Planning Conclusion 6 Coega Overview: Ownership & Control Coega Overview: current status 43....8 billion, making Coega IDZ the No 1 IDZ in Africa” - Dr Ayanda Vilakazi, Coega’s Head of Marketing Coega Wins Top Performance Award. (left to right) Coega CEO - Pepi Silinga; MEC for EC Economic Development - Sakhumzi Somyo, Environmental Affairs...

  14. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  15. Feasibility study of a biocompatible pneumatic dispensing system using mouse 3T3-J2 fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Hojin; Kim, Joonwon

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents results for dispensing living cells using a pneumatic dispensing system to verify the feasibility of using this system to fabricate biomaterials. Living cells (i.e., mouse 3T3-J2 fibroblast) were dispensed with different dispensing pressures in order to evaluate the effect of dispensing process on cell viability and proliferation. Based on the results of a live-dead assay, more than 80% of cell viability has been confirmed which was reasonably similar to that in the control group. Furthermore, measurement of cell metabolic activity after dispensing confirmed that the dispensed cell proliferated at a rate comparable to that of the control group. These results demonstrate that the pneumatic dispensing system is a promising tool for fabrication of biomaterials.

  16. Integrated management of water resources in urban water system: Water Sensitive Urban Development as a strategic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Joaquín Suárez López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The urban environment has to be concerned with the integrated water resources management, which necessarily includes the concept of basin unity and governance.  The traditional urban water cycle framework, which includes water supply, sewerage and wastewater treatment services, is being replaced by a holistic and systemic concept, where water is associated with urbanism and sustainability policies. This global point of view cannot be ignored as new regulations demand systemic and environmental approaches to the administrations, for instance, in the management of urban drainage and sewerage systems. The practical expression of this whole cluster interactions is beginning to take shape in several countries, with the definition of Low Impact Development and Water Sensitivity Urban Design concepts. Intends to integrate this new strategic approach under the name: “Water Sensitive Urban Development” (WSUD. With WSUD approach, the current urban water systems (originally conceived under the traditional concept of urban water cycle can be transformed, conceptual and physically, for an integrated management of the urban water system in new models of sustainable urban development. A WSUD implementing new approach to the management of pollution associated with stormwater in the urban water system is also presented, including advances in environmental regulations and incorporation of several techniques in Spain.

  17. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  18. Qualification, knowledge and experience of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacies are managed by a variety of dispensers in terms of qualification, knowledge and experience in Pakistan.Objective: The study aimed to document the state of knowledge, experience and qualification of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan.Methods: A comparative cross sectional study was conducted at a randomly selected sample of 371 pharmacies in the three cities of Pakistan. A structured questionnaire for data collection was developed and finalized by focused group discussions and pilot testing. The data was coded, entered and analyzed by using SPSS Version 16. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p=0.05 were performed to find out differences.Results: Out of total sample of 371 pharmacies, 31.8 % (118 were in Islamabad, 32.4 % (120 in Peshawar and 35.8 % (133 were in Lahore. Fifty percent of the respondents had correct knowledge of range of room temperature at which medicines should be stored. Only 11.1% (41 of the respondents knew about OTC (over the counter drugs which can be sold without prescription while 5.9 % (22 of the respondents were aware of POM (prescription only medicines which can be only sold on a valid prescription. While 87.6% (325, 88.1% (327, 58.7% (318 and 95.7 % (355 of the respondents did not know the meaning of the dispensing abbreviations such as ‘h.s’, ‘q.d’, ‘sos’ and ‘p.r.n’. The respondents did not know correctly the status of Deltacortil® (Prednisolone, Septran® (Sulfamethoxazole and Fansidar® (Pyrimethamine and Sulfadoxine either as OTC or POM in 26.7% (99, 64.2% (238, and 44.5 % (165 of the cases, respectively. There was a significant difference (p=0.05 in knowledge of dispensers regarding storage temperature, prescription terminologies and status of medicines having different level of qualification and experience.Conclusions: The overall knowledge and training of dispensers working at community pharmacies is inadequate in Pakistan. However, pharmacists had relatively

  19. Qualification, knowledge and experience of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azhar; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham M

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacies are managed by a variety of dispensers in terms of qualification, knowledge and experience in Pakistan. The study aimed to document the state of knowledge, experience and qualification of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan. A comparative cross sectional study was conducted at a randomly selected sample of 371 pharmacies in the three cities of Pakistan. A structured questionnaire for data collection was developed and finalized by focused group discussions and pilot testing. The data was coded, entered and analyzed by using SPSS Version 16. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p≤0.05) were performed to find out differences. Out of total sample of 371 pharmacies, 31.8 % (118) were in Islamabad, 32.4 % (120) in Peshawar and 35.8 % (133) were in Lahore. Fifty percent of the respondents had correct knowledge of range of room temperature at which medicines should be stored. Only 11.1% (41) of the respondents knew about OTC (over the counter drugs) which can be sold without prescription while 5.9 % (22) of the respondents were aware of POM (prescription only medicines) which can be only sold on a valid prescription. While 87.6% (325), 88.1% (327), 58.7% (318) and 95.7 % (355) of the respondents did not know the meaning of the dispensing abbreviations such as 'h.s', 'q.d', 'sos' and 'p.r.n'. The respondents did not know correctly the status of Deltacortil® (Prednisolone), Septran® (Sulfamethoxazole) and Fansidar® (Pyrimethamine and Sulfadoxine) either as OTC or POM in 26.7% (99), 64.2% (238), and 44.5 % (165) of the cases, respectively. There was a significant difference (p≤0.05) in knowledge of dispensers regarding storage temperature, prescription terminologies and status of medicines having different level of qualification and experience. The overall knowledge and training of dispensers working at community pharmacies is inadequate in Pakistan. However, pharmacists had relatively better knowledge regarding storage temperature

  20. Increasing Access to Subsidized Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy through Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabra Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, many people seek malaria treatment from retail drug sellers. The National Malaria Control Program identified the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO program as a private sector mechanism to supplement the distribution of subsidized artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs from public facilities and increase access to the first-line antimalarial in rural and underserved areas. The ADDO program strengthens private sector pharmaceutical services by improving regulatory and supervisory support, dispenser training, and record keeping practices. Methods The government's pilot program made subsidized ACTs available through ADDOs in 10 districts in the Morogoro and Ruvuma regions, covering about 2.9 million people. The program established a supply of subsidized ACTs, created a price system with a cost recovery plan, developed a plan to distribute the subsidized products to the ADDOs, trained dispensers, and strengthened the adverse drug reactions reporting system. As part of the evaluation, 448 ADDO dispensers brought their records to central locations for analysis, representing nearly 70% of ADDOs operating in the two regions. ADDO drug register data were available from July 2007-June 2008 for Morogoro and from July 2007-September 2008 for Ruvuma. This intervention was implemented from 2007-2008. Results During the pilot, over 300,000 people received treatment for malaria at the 448 ADDOs. The percentage of ADDOs that dispensed at least one course of ACT rose from 26.2% during July-September 2007 to 72.6% during April-June 2008. The number of malaria patients treated with ACTs gradually increased after the start of the pilot, while the use of non-ACT antimalarials declined; ACTs went from 3% of all antimalarials sold in July 2007 to 26% in June 2008. District-specific data showed substantial variation among the districts in ACT uptake through ADDOs, ranging from ACTs representing 10% of all antimalarial sales

  1. Refusals by pharmacists to dispense emergency contraception: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, L Lewis; Brown, Douglas

    2006-05-01

    Over the past several months, numerous instances have been reported in the United States media of pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions written for emergency postcoital contraceptives. These pharmacists have asserted a "professional right of conscience" not to participate in what they interpret as an immoral act. In this commentary, we examine this assertion and conclude that it is not justifiable, for the following reasons: 1) postcoital contraception does not interfere with an implanted pregnancy and, therefore, does not cause an abortion; 2) because pharmacists do not control the therapeutic decision to prescribe medication but only exercise supervisory control over its dispensation, they do not possess the "professional right" to refuse to fill a legitimate prescription; 3) even if one were to grant pharmacists the "professional right" not to dispense prescriptions based on their own personal values and opinions, pharmacists "at the counter" lack the fundamental prerequisites necessary for making clinically sound ethical decisions, that is, they do not have access to the patient's complete medical background or the patient's own ethical preferences, have not discussed relevant quality-of-life issues with the patient, and do not understand the context in which the patient's clinical problem is occurring. We conclude that a policy that allows pharmacists to dispense or not dispense medications to patients on the basis of their personal values and opinions is inimical to the public welfare and should not be permitted.

  2. Dispensing of drugs with and without a prescription from private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is little literature available on dispensing patterns and unsupervised sale of medicines from pharmacies in Tanzania. The present study assessed the patterns of drug acquisition from pharmacies by customers: whether by prescription, recommended by pharmacist, or requested by a customer without a prescription.

  3. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. 866.2500 Section 866.2500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500...

  4. Aspects of microbial contamination of tablets dispensed in hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: A research was carried out to investigate the incidence of microflora in tablets dispensed from large container packages used in hospitals and community pharmacies. It was designed to provide base-line data on the common biodegrading microorganisms associated with tablets in retail containers and to highlight ...

  5. 40 CFR 86.146-96 - Fuel dispensing spitback procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.146-96 Fuel dispensing spitback procedure. (a) The vehicle is fueled at a rate of 10 gal/min to test for fuel spitback emissions. All liquid fuel spitback... collecting spitback emissions to the nearest 0.01 gram. (d) Drain the fuel tank(s) and fill with test fuel...

  6. Exploring Some Issues In Commercial Drug Dispensing In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Responses to a self-report questionnaire of 85 Commercial drug dispensers in Uyo township of South-Eastern Nigeria were used to analyze some issues in drug abuse control in Nigeria. Among other things, the findings revealed that; (1) self medication is reported to be widespread among clients;(2) over and under dose of ...

  7. Antiprotozoal dispensing patterns in South Africa, with the focus on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary aim was to determine the dispensing patterns of antimalarial medicine in a community pharmacy patient population in South Africa. A retrospective, cross-sectional drug utilisation study was conducted on a 2013 pharmacy database. Medicines reimbursed by private medical aid schemes and private purchases ...

  8. Do pregnant women report use of dispensed medications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, C; Sondergaard, C; Thrane, N; Nielsen, GL; de Jong-van den Berg, L; Olsen, J

    Surveillance of drug safety in pregnancy often draws on administrative prescription registries. Noncompliance in the use of prescribed medication may be frequent among pregnant women owing to their fear of fetotoxic side effects. To estimate compliance in the use of prescription drugs dispensed

  9. Dispensing of vitamin products by retail pharmacies in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse the dispensing patterns of vitamins (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) group A11) over a one-year period in a group of community pharmacies in South Africa. Design and setting: A retrospective drug utilisation study was conducted on community pharmacy ...

  10. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Yarbrough, John A.; Burden, Carole B.; Garrett, R.B.; Emett, D.C.; Thiros, Susan A.; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W

    1988-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.This report includes individual discussions of selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1987. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described from the spring of 1987 to the spring of 1988. Much of the data used in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  11. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James L.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Jensen, V.L.; Wilberg, Dale E.; Burden, Carole B.; Garrett, R.B.; Emett, D.C.; Duncanson, Susan; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W; Herbert, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.This report includes individual discussions of selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1985. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described from the spring of 1985 to the spring of 1986. Much of the data used in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  12. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberg, Dale E.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Jensen, V.L.; Cordy, Gail E.; Burden, Carole B.; Enright, Michael; Emett, D.C.; Thiros, Susan A.; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W; Herbert, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a Series of annual reports that describe ground-water Conditions in Utah. Reports in the series, prepared cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well Construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, Water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of Water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.The report includes individual discussions of Selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1986. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described for spring 1986 to spring 1987. Much of the data used in the report were collected by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  13. Safe and Affordable Drinking Water for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2008-09-01

    Safe drinking water remains inaccessible for about 1.2 billion people in the world, and the hourly toll from biological contamination of drinking water is 200 deaths mostly among children under five years of age. This chapter summarizes the need for safe drinking water, the scale of the global problem, and various methods tried to address it. Then it gives the history and current status of an innovation ("UV Waterworks™") developed to address this major public health challenge. It reviews water disinfection technologies applicable to achieve the desired quality of drinking water in developing countries, and specifically, the limitations overcome by one particular invention: UV Waterworks. It then briefly describes the business model and financing option than is accelerating its implementation for affordable access to safe drinking water to the unserved populations in these countries. Thus this chapter describes not only the innovation in design of a UV water disinfection system, but also innovation in the delivery model for safe drinking water, with potential for long term growth and sustainability.

  14. Identification of water quality degradation hotspots in developing countries by applying large scale water quality modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsy, Marcus; Reder, Klara; Flörke, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Decreasing water quality is one of the main global issues which poses risks to food security, economy, and public health and is consequently crucial for ensuring environmental sustainability. During the last decades access to clean drinking water increased, but 2.5 billion people still do not have access to basic sanitation, especially in Africa and parts of Asia. In this context not only connection to sewage system is of high importance, but also treatment, as an increasing connection rate will lead to higher loadings and therefore higher pressure on water resources. Furthermore, poor people in developing countries use local surface waters for daily activities, e.g. bathing and washing. It is thus clear that water utilization and water sewerage are indispensable connected. In this study, large scale water quality modelling is used to point out hotspots of water pollution to get an insight on potential environmental impacts, in particular, in regions with a low observation density and data gaps in measured water quality parameters. We applied the global water quality model WorldQual to calculate biological oxygen demand (BOD) loadings from point and diffuse sources, as well as in-stream concentrations. Regional focus in this study is on developing countries i.e. Africa, Asia, and South America, as they are most affected by water pollution. Hereby, model runs were conducted for the year 2010 to draw a picture of recent status of surface waters quality and to figure out hotspots and main causes of pollution. First results show that hotspots mainly occur in highly agglomerated regions where population density is high. Large urban areas are initially loading hotspots and pollution prevention and control become increasingly important as point sources are subject to connection rates and treatment levels. Furthermore, river discharge plays a crucial role due to dilution potential, especially in terms of seasonal variability. Highly varying shares of BOD sources across

  15. Options for water-level control in developed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. R.; Laubhan, M. K.; Reid, F. A.; Wortham, J. S.; Fredrickson, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    Wetland habitats in the United States currently are lost at a rate of 260,000 acres/year (105,218 ha/year). Consequently, water birds concentrate in fewer and smaller areas. Such concentrations may deplete food supplies and influence behavior, physiology, and survival. Continued losses increase the importance of sound management of the remaining wetlands because water birds depend on them. Human activities modified the natural hydrology of most remaining wetlands in the conterminous United States, and such hydrologic alterations frequently reduce wetland productivity. The restoration of original wetland functions and productivity often requires the development of water distribution and discharge systems to emulate natural hydrologic regimes. Construction of levees and correct placement of control structures and water-delivery and water-discharge systems are necessary to (1) create soil and water conditions for the germination of desirable plants, (2) control nuisance vegetation, (3) promote the production of invertebrates, and (4) make foods available for wildlife that depends of wetlands (Leaflets 13.2.1 and 13.4.6). This paper provides basic guidelines for the design of wetlands that benefit wildlife. If biological considerations are not incorporated into such designs, the capability of managing wetlands for water birds is reduced and costs often are greater. Although we address the development of palustrine wetlands in migration and wintering areas, many of the discussed principles are applicable to the development of other wetland types and in other locations.

  16. Evaluating dispensers loaded with codlemone and pear ester for disruption of codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyvinyl chloride polymer (pvc) dispensers loaded with ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) plus the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone) of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), were compared with similar dispensers and a commercial dispenser (Isomate®-C Plus) loaded with codle...

  17. 40 CFR 165.82 - Scope of pesticide dispensing areas included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... liquid pesticide or equal to or greater than 4,000 pounds (1,818 kilograms) of dry pesticide for any purpose, including refilling or emptying for cleaning. This applies when pesticide is dispensed from the...) The pesticide dispensing area is used solely for dispensing pesticide from a rail car which does not...

  18. Water resources protection technology: a handbook of measures to protect water resources in land development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tourbier, J. Toby; Westmacot, Richard

    1981-01-01

    This report consists of a description of measures that can be integrated into urban development to prevent, reduce, or ameliorate potential problems which would otherwise adversely affect water resources...

  19. Development of specific water quality index for water supply in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiwat Prakirake

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the specific water quality index for assessing water quality in terms of water supply (WSI usage has been developed by using Delphi technique and its application in Thai rivers is proposed. The thirteen parameters including turbidity, DO, pH, NO3-N, TDS, FCB, Fe, color, BOD, Mn, NH3-N, hardness, and total PO4-P are employed for the estimation of water quality. The sub-index transformation curves are established for each variable to assess the variation in water quality level. An appropriate function to aggregate overall sub-indices was weighted Solway function that provided reasonableresults for reducing ambiguous and eclipsing effects for high and slightly polluted samples. The developed WSI couldbe applied to measure water quality into 5 levels - very good (85-100; good (80-<85; average (65-<80; poor (40-<65and very poor (<40. The proposed WSI could be used for evaluating water quality in terms of water supply. In addition, it could be used for analyzing long-term trait analysis and comparing water quality among different reaches of rivers or between different watersheds.

  20. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  1. Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

    2012-08-01

    The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

  2. Development of functional geopolymers for water purification, and construction purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alshaaer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of functional geopolymers based on local resources such as kaolinitic soil and zeolitic tuff for the construction of water storage containers and water transfer channels. The effect of water content on the mechanical performance and physical properties of synthesized geopolymers was evaluated. The results confirmed that the optimum ratio of water is 28% of clay fraction, which revealed observable improvements of physical, mechanical, and adsorption properties of the geopolymeric products. Such geopolymers showed the highest compressive strength, density, and maximum adsorption capacity toward cadmium among the products and precursors tested. The residual soluble salts in produced geopolymers were markedly reduced by using this optimum water content.

  3. Toward sustainability: soil and water research priorities for developing countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1991-01-01

    ... Research and Development Water Science and Technology Board Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems Board on Science and Technology for International Development Office of International Affairs National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1991 Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however...

  4. Monitoring Water Targets in the Post-2015 Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Water Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) provides a comprehensive approach to developing water services in a way that ensures social equity, health, well-being and sustainability for all. In particular, the water goal includes targets related to sanitation, wastewater, water quality, water efficiency, integrated water management and ecosystems (details to be finalized in September 2015). As part of its implementation, methods to monitor target indicators must be developed. National governments will be responsible for reporting on progress toward these targets using national data sets and possibly information from global data sets that applies to their countries. Oversight of this process through the use of global data sets is desirable for encouraging the use of standardized information for comparison purposes. Disparities in monitoring due to very sparse data networks in some countries can be addressed by using geospatially consistent data products from space-based remote sensing. However, to fully exploit these data, capabilities will be needed to downscale information, to interpolate and assimilate data both in time and space, and to integrate these data with socio-economic data sets, model outputs and survey data in a geographical information system framework. Citizen data and other non-standard data types may also supplement national data systems. A comprehensive and integrated analysis and dissemination system is needed to enable the important contributions that satellites could make to achieving Water SDG targets. This presentation will outline the progress made in assessing the needs for information to track progress on the Water SDG, options for meeting these needs using existing data infrastructure, and pathways for expanding the role of Earth observations in SDG monitoring. It will also discuss the potential roles of Future Earth's Sustainable Water Futures Programme (SWFP) and the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in coordinating these efforts.

  5. Environmental control on cold-water carbonate mounds development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Raddatz, J.; Flögel, S.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Exp. 307 Scientific Party, Iodp

    2009-04-01

    Cold-water coral reefs are very abundant along the European continental margin in intermediate water depths and are able to build up large mound structures. These carbonate mounds particularly occur in distinct mound provinces on the Irish and British continental margins. Previous investigations resulted in a better understanding of the cold-water coral ecology and the development of conceptual models to explain carbonate mound build-up. Two different hypotheses were evoked to explain the origin and development of carbonate mounds, external versus internal control (e.g., Freiwald et al. 2004 versus e.g. Hovland 1990). Several short sediment cores have been obtained from Propeller Mound, Northern Porcupine Seabight, indicating that cold-water corals grew during interglacial and warm interstadial periods of the Late Pleistocene controlled by environmental and climatic variability supporting the external control hypothesis (e.g. Dorschel et al. 2005, R

  6. Development of a Water Recovery System Resource Tracking Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Joe; Stambaugh, Imelda; Sargusingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah; Moore, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed to track water resources in an exploration vehicle using Regenerative Life Support (RLS) systems. The Resource Tracking Model (RTM) integrates the functions of all the vehicle components that affect the processing and recovery of water during simulated missions. The approach used in developing the RTM enables its use as part of a complete vehicle simulation for real time mission studies. Performance data for the components in the RTM is focused on water processing. The data provided to the model has been based on the most recent information available regarding the technology of the component. This paper will describe the process of defining the RLS system to be modeled, the way the modeling environment was selected, and how the model has been implemented. Results showing how the RLS components exchange water are provided in a set of test cases.

  7. Enhancing water security in a rapidly developing shale gas region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Holding

    2017-06-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Initiatives and tools enhancing water security in the region include strategic partnerships and stakeholder collaborations, policy and regulation development, and data collection and distribution efforts. The contributions and limitations of each of these are discussed. A vulnerability mapping framework is presented which addresses data gaps and provides a tool for decision-making surrounding risk to water quality from various hazards. An example vulnerability assessment was conducted for wastewater transport along pipeline and trucking corridors.

  8. Thriving with water: Developments in amphibious architecture in North America

    OpenAIRE

    English Elizabeth; Klink Natasha; Turner Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing awareness worldwide that traditional flood-mitigation strategies that attempt to control the flow of water only increase the likelihood of catastrophic consequences in the long run, when failure inevitably occurs after years of complacency and development behind flood barriers. Amphibious architecture is a non-defensive flood mitigation and climate change adaptation strategy that works in synchrony with a floodprone region’s natural cycles of flooding, allowing water to fl...

  9. Are US jurisdictions prepared to dispense medical countermeasures through open points of dispensing? Findings from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Swick, Zachary; Dolgin, Harlan; Reddick, David; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Communities will rely on open points of dispensing (PODs) for mass dispensing of medical countermeasures following a bioterrorism attack or a pandemic. US Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) open POD preparedness is assessed using the Technical Assistance Review (TAR) but focuses on oral prophylaxis dispensing; mass vaccination readiness is not well measured. Non-CRI preparedness had not been studied. In 2013 an online questionnaire was sent to all 456 CRIs and a random sample of 500 non-CRIs to measure open POD preparedness and exercise participation. Hierarchical linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher POD preparedness and exercise participation scores. In total, 257 subjects participated, for a 41% response rate. Almost all open PODs have existing written plans and/or a layout for each site (93.4%, n=240, and 87.0%, n=220). Only half (46.7%, n=120) have an alternative dispensing modality in place, and even fewer (42.6%, n=104) report having adequate staffing. Determinants of open POD preparedness were perceived preparedness, participation in more POD exercises, and more closed POD coverage. Most jurisdictions conducted a full-scale exercise and a staff notification drill (83.7%, n=215 for both). Fewer than half (40.5%, n=104) have conducted a vaccination clinic exercise. Determinants of increased POD exercises were perceived preparedness, years of work experience, community type (nontribal), and larger population. Because successful open POD deployment is critical, jurisdictions need to plan for mass vaccination, use of alternative dispensing modalities, and recruitment strategies to increase POD staffing.

  10. What drives inappropriate antibiotic dispensing? A mixed-methods study of pharmacy employee perspectives in Haryana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna K; Brown, Kelli; Ahsan, Muneeb; Sengupta, Sharmila; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-03-02

    There are only 0.70 licensed physicians per 1000 people in India. Thus, pharmacies are a primary source of healthcare and patients often seek their services directly, especially in village settings. However, there is wide variability in a pharmacy employee's training, which contributes to inappropriate antibiotic dispensing and misuse. These practices increase the risk of antibiotic resistance and poor patient outcomes. This study seeks to better understand the factors that drive inappropriate antibiotic dispensing among pharmacy employees in India's village communities. We conducted a mixed-methods study of the antibiotic dispensing practices, including semistructured interviews and a pilot cross-sectional Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice survey. All data were transcribed, translated from Hindi into English, and coded for themes. Community pharmacies in villages in Haryana, India. We recruited 24 community pharmacy employees (all male) by convenience sampling. Participants have a range of characteristics regarding village location, monthly income, baseline antibiotic knowledge, formal education and licensure. 75% of pharmacy employees in our study were unlicensed practitioners, and the majority had very limited understanding of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, only half could correctly define the term antibiotics. All reported that at times they dispensed antibiotics without a prescription. This practice was more common when treating patients who had limited access to a licensed physician because of economic or logistic reasons. Many pharmacy workers also felt pressure to provide shortened medication courses to poorer clientele, and often dispensed only 1 or 2 days' worth of antibiotics. Such patients rarely returned to the pharmacy for the complete course. This study highlights the need for short-term, intensive training programmes on antibiotic prescribing and resistance that can be disseminated to village pharmacies. Programme development should take into

  11. Methodology of water quality index (WQI) development for filtrated water using irradiated basic filter elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Nuraslinda; Muhamad Pauzi, Anas; Abu Bakar, Asyraf Arif

    2017-01-01

    Clean water production can be achieved by using common simple water filtration system that consists of an empty bottle and the filter elements such as cotton/coffee filter, sands, and gravels, which can be easily assembled and used. To reduce the time to get an acceptably clean water using the common water filtration, this paper will discuss on a solution to increase the filtration effectiveness of the filter elements by irradiating gossypium (or commonly known as cotton), and silica oxide which is the main composition material for sand and gravel from various scale based on the Wentworth scale. There were few studies regarding gamma and neutron irradiation of silica based materials that proves that gamma and neutron irradiation introduce defects, hence, we expect that it may lead to the formation of micropores and alter the water filtration effectiveness. It was established that higher amount of irradiation results in higher concentration of defects. This paper will firstly review literatures on the effect of gamma and neutron irradiation effect on filter elements such as sands and papers, and then develops a water quality index (WQI) that reflects the water appearance quality of the filtrated water. The WQI focuses on the physical appearance such as smells and color of the filtered water.

  12. Automating a precision braze paste dispensing operation using non- contact sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D; Novak, J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J; Thiele, A [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between Sandia National Laboratories and the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation to develop an automated braze paste dispensing system for rocket engine nozzle manufacturing. The motivation for automating this manufacturing process is to reduce the amount of labor and excess material required. A critical requirement for this system is the automatic location of key nozzle features using non-contact sensors. Sandia has demonstrated that the low-cost Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) capacitive sensor can be used to accurately locate the nozzle surface and tube gaps.

  13. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  14. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny, E-mail: grishnjaev@mail.ru; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-21

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft–Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  15. Dispensing practice in the community pharmacies in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcekus, Laika; Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Demirdamar, Rumeysa; Gumusel, Bulent

    2012-04-01

    Good pharmacy practice is the process of supplying the accurate drug to the right patient for an adequate period of time with the lowest cost to the patient and the community. Pharmacist have a crucial role in promoting good pharmacy practice. To assess the dispensing practice of the community pharmacists in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) regarding RDU and to evaluate the quality of dispensing. Setting Community pharmacies in TRNC. Method The study consists of two parts: a face to face interview and a simulated patient visit to these pharmacies. Rationality indicators (average dispensing time, stock availability and adequate labelling), presence of the pharmacist on the premises, dispenser characteristics, prescription checking, and the provided patient information. The majority of the prescriptions (73.3%) were dispensed by the pharmacists. None of the pharmacy employees had pharmacy based training. Eighty nine percent of the pharmacists believed that their employees could very well dispense drugs on their own. The declared average dispensing time for a prescription of a single drug was 233 s while the measured one was 149 s. Few dispensers in reality warned the patient about potential interactions. The difference between the average dispensing scores of the pharmacists and the non-pharmacist dispensers was not significant. The dispensing practice in the community pharmacies in the Turkish part of Cyprus seems inadequate in terms of GPP.

  16. Effect of varying dispenser point source density on mating disruption of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lame, Frédérique M; Epstein, David; Gut, Larry J; Goldfarb, Heidi; Miller, James R

    2010-08-01

    Hand-applied dispensers are successfully used in mating disruption programs, but cost of labor to apply these dispensers limits their adoption. Creating hand-applied dispensers that release larger amounts of pheromone and that can be applied at lower densities per hectare could reduce the cost of mating disruption and increase its use. The effect of reducing the number of point sources per hectare while keeping the amount of pheromone applied per hectare constant on the success of Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) mating disruption was investigated with Confuse-OFM, paraffin disk, and Isomate-M Rosso dispensers. For all dispensers, as point source density decreased, numbers of moths captured increased, percentage of orientation disruption to traps decreased, and variability in these measures increased. Decreasing point source density, even while keeping the amount of pheromone applied per hectare constant is not a viable option for reducing the cost of G. molesta mating disruption with hand-applied dispensers. Puffers (aerosol dispensers) are applied at 2.5-5 dispensers per ha for G. molesta control. However, hand-applied dispensers fail when clumped at such low numbers of release sites. Potential explanations for the success of Puffers and the failure of hand-applied dispensers at very low point source densities are presented. The utility of paraffin disk dispensers as experimental devices also is discussed.

  17. Fast turn-on characteristics of tungsten-based dispenser cathodes following gas exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrian, C. R. K.; Haas, G. A.; Shih, A.

    The problems associated with the reactivation following shelf storage of different types of tungsten-based dispenser cathodes have been investigated. Reactivation times were found to be severely limited by repoisoning processes, which have been isolated and identified. Data are presented, indicating the finite times (in the absence of repoisoning), which are required to reactivate the cathodes following exposure to various gases. Of the gases studied, exposure to oxygen and water vapour caused the slowest reactivations. Water vapour was the component of the vacuum system ambient responsible for the poisoning caused by exposure to the ambient. Following exposure to each of the gases studied, the "M" type cathode reactivated slower than the "B" type cathode. The results have shown that both the choice of cathode and the design of the microwave tube are important if a fast turn-on following shelf storage is to be achieved.

  18. Modelling raw water quality: development of a drinking water management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübeck, Ch; van Berk, W; Bergmann, A

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring future drinking water supply requires a tough management of groundwater resources. However, recent practices of economic resource control often does not involve aspects of the hydrogeochemical and geohydraulical groundwater system. In respect of analysing the available quantity and quality of future raw water, an effective resource management requires a full understanding of the hydrogeochemical and geohydraulical processes within the aquifer. For example, the knowledge of raw water quality development within the time helps to work out strategies of water treatment as well as planning finance resources. On the other hand, the effectiveness of planed measurements reducing the infiltration of harmful substances such as nitrate can be checked and optimized by using hydrogeochemical modelling. Thus, within the framework of the InnoNet program funded by Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology, a network of research institutes and water suppliers work in close cooperation developing a planning and management tool particularly oriented on water management problems. The tool involves an innovative material flux model that calculates the hydrogeochemical processes under consideration of the dynamics in agricultural land use. The program integrated graphical data evaluation is aligned on the needs of water suppliers.

  19. Development of Ensemble Model Based Water Demand Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun-Han; So, Byung-Jin; Kim, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Byung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, Smart Water Grid (SWG) concept has globally emerged over the last decade and also gained significant recognition in South Korea. Especially, there has been growing interest in water demand forecast and optimal pump operation and this has led to various studies regarding energy saving and improvement of water supply reliability. Existing water demand forecasting models are categorized into two groups in view of modeling and predicting their behavior in time series. One is to consider embedded patterns such as seasonality, periodicity and trends, and the other one is an autoregressive model that is using short memory Markovian processes (Emmanuel et al., 2012). The main disadvantage of the abovementioned model is that there is a limit to predictability of water demands of about sub-daily scale because the system is nonlinear. In this regard, this study aims to develop a nonlinear ensemble model for hourly water demand forecasting which allow us to estimate uncertainties across different model classes. The proposed model is consist of two parts. One is a multi-model scheme that is based on combination of independent prediction model. The other one is a cross validation scheme named Bagging approach introduced by Brieman (1996) to derive weighting factors corresponding to individual models. Individual forecasting models that used in this study are linear regression analysis model, polynomial regression, multivariate adaptive regression splines(MARS), SVM(support vector machine). The concepts are demonstrated through application to observed from water plant at several locations in the South Korea. Keywords: water demand, non-linear model, the ensemble forecasting model, uncertainty. Acknowledgements This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Projects for Developing Eco-Innovation Technologies (GT-11-G-02-001-6)

  20. Effect of pheromone dispenser density on timing and duration of approaches by peachtree borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luís A F; Grieshop, Matthew J; Gut, Larry J

    2010-10-01

    The timing and duration of approaches by male peachtree borer Synanthedon exitiosa Say (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) to commercial pheromone dispensers placed singly or at high density in peach orchards was determined by using field-deployed video cameras and digital video recorders. Cameras were trained on one dispenser, and one standard lure was placed in a peach orchard, and on 12 dispensers in a separate orchard where dispensers for mating disruption had been placed at 371 per hectare. Male moth approaches were video recorded at the peak of peachtree borer annual flight, from 13 to 18 August 2009. The mean approach timing (h:min:sec±SD) during the study period was 11:33:12 ± 00:46:43, 11:43:52 ± 00:45:58, and 11:41:21 ± 00:45:54 AM with the single dispenser, high-density dispensers, and lure, respectively. Day-to-day variability in approach timings suggested that there were no biologically significant differences among treatments. The frequency distribution of approach durations varied among treatments, as the high-density dispensers had mostly short approaches, while the distribution of approaches to the single dispenser and lure was wider. The median (interquartile range) approach duration was 3 (2-4), 1 (1-2), and 4 (2-6) seconds with the single dispenser, high-density dispensers, and lure, respectively. The relative rank of median approach durations was constant throughout the period, indicating differences among treatments. This study showed that the presence of pheromone dispensers for mating disruption did not cause an advancement of peachtree borer diel rhythm of response. Shorter approaches to dispensers placed at high density than singly suggest that dispenser retentiveness is not constant with peachtree borer, which may bias estimates of disruption activity as a function of dispenser density.

  1. Water, Politics and Development: Framing a Political Sociology of Water Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. Mollinga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The first issue of Water Alternatives presents a set of papers that investigates the inherently political nature of water resources management. A Water, Politics and Development initiative was started at ZEF (Center for Development Research, Bonn, Germany in 2004/2005 in the context of a national-level discussion on the role of social science in global (environmental change research. In April 2005 a roundtable workshop with this title was held at ZEF, sponsored by the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft/German Research Foundation and supported by the NKGCF (Nationales Komitee für Global Change Forschung/German National Committee on Global Change Research, aiming to design a research programme in the German context. In 2006 it was decided to design a publication project on a broader, European and international basis. The Irrigation and Water Engineering Group at Wageningen University, the Netherlands joined as a co-organiser and co-sponsor. The collection of papers published in this issue of Water Alternatives is one of the products of the publication project. As part of the initiative a session on Water, Politics and Development was organised at the Stockholm World Water Week in August 2007, where most of the papers in this collection were presented and discussed. Through this publication, the Water, Politics and Development initiative links up with other initiatives simultaneously ongoing, for instance the 'Water governance – challenging the consensus' project of the Bradford Centre for International Development at Bradford University, UK. At this point in time, the initiative has formulated its thrust as 'framing a political sociology of water resources management'. This, no doubt, is an ambitious project, methodologically, theoretically as well as practically. Through the compilation of this collection we have started to explore whether and how such an endeavour might make sense. The participants in the initiative think it does, are quite

  2. Development of soil water regime under spruce stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tužinský Ladislav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the water regime of soils under spruce ecosystems in relation to long-lasting humid and drought periods in the growing seasons 1991-2013. The dominant interval humidity in observing growing seasons is semiuvidic interval with soil moisture between hydro-limits maximal capillary capacity (MCC and point of diminished availability (PDA. Gravitationally seepage concentrated from accumulated winter season, water from melting snow and existing atmospheric precipitation occurs in the soil only at the beginning of the growing season. The supplies of soil water are significantly decreasing in the warm climate and precipitant deficient days. The greatest danger from drought threatens Norway spruce during the summer months and it depends on the duration of dry days, water supply at the beginning of the dry days, air temperature and the intensity of evapotranspiration. In the surface layers of the soil, with the maximum occurrence of active roots, the water in semiarid interval area between hydro-limits PDA and wilting point (WP decreases during the summer months. In the culminating phase occurs the drying to moisture state with capillary stationary and the insufficient supply of available water for the plants. Physiological weakening of Norway spruce caused by set of outlay components of the water balance is partially reduced by delivering of water by capillary action from deeper horizons. In extremely dry periods, soil moisture is decreasing also throughout the soil profile (0-100 cm into the bottom third of the variation margin hydro-limits MCC-PDA in the category of capillary less moving and for plants of low supply of usable water (60-90 mm. The issue of deteriorated health state of spruce ecosystems is considered to be actual. Changes and developments of hydropedological conditions which interfere the mountain forests represent the increasing danger of the drought for the spruce.

  3. Justice dispensation through the alternative dispute resolution system in India

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    The Law Commission of India in its 222nd report emphasized the need for Alternative Disputes Resolution (ADR) for the dispensation of justice, because the courts are inaccessible owing to various factors, e.g., poverty, social and political backwardness, illiteracy, ignorance, procedural formalities and inordinate delay in judgments. During the ancient period the disputes were resolved in an informal manner by neutral third persons or people’s court in villages and it continued till the middl...

  4. [Design and piloting of a structured service medication dispensing process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurre, Raquel; García-Delgado, Pilar; Maurandi, M Dolores; Arrebola, Cristóbal; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to design and pilot a protocol for the dispensing of medications service. Using the requirements proposed in the Ministry of Health Pharmaceutical Care Consensus, a literature search was made applying qualitative consensus techniques. An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted from March to June 2009. A total of 53 community pharmacies from 24 Spanish counties. Patients who requested one or more particular medications with or without medical prescription for their own use or for someone in their care. The personalised medication information (IPM), the problems associated with the medications (PRM), and the negative results associated with the medication (RNM), detected by the pharmacist each time medication was dispensed, as well as the perception of the pharmacist on the operability of the protocol were recorded. A total of 870 medications were dispensed, with 423 (48.6%) cases of lack of personalised medication information (IPM) being detected. PRM were detected in 10.11% of the dispensed medications, as well as 68 (7.81%) suspected RNM: safety (n = 35; 51.5%), effectiveness (n = 29; 42.6%) and necessity (n = 4; 5.8%). Almost two-thirds (65.21%) of the pharmacists said that the protocol is in operation. The designed protocol helped to detect deficiencies in the information to the patients about their medications, as well as the PRM and RNM, and is shown to be tool that is easy to use and apply. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing Africa's natural resource endowments: new dispensations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing a nation's extractive natural resource endowments can advance national development if done meaningfully. Unfortunately, across Africa, the apparent mismanagement of such resources, poor growth rates, social tensions, and civil strife in resource-rich countries have thrown up a great deal of literature on what is ...

  6. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    -up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

  7. [Dispensing antibiotics to outpatients in a Colombian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge E; González-Santos, Diana M

    2009-10-01

    Analysing how systemic antibiotic agents were dispensed to outpatients in a Colombian population between January 2005 and December 2006 and assessing their economic cost as antibiotic use and abuse have been related to serious bacterial resistance. This was a descriptive observational study of antibiotic drug use; a database was compiled from medication usage records maintained by dispensing pharmacies in 10 Colombian cities regarding the total of users who had received some type of antibiotic. The defined daily dose (DDD) and cost per 1,000 inhabitants/day were assessed. The commonly used antibiotic associations were analysed. DDD was 1.58 per 1,000 inhabitants per day. The antibiotics most frequently prescribed were penicillin (amoxiciline; dicloxaciline), followed by first-generation cephalosporines and sulphonamides. Injectable antibiotic use was 10.4 % in 2005 and 9.3 % in 2006; an association of anti-bacterial agents was used for 11 % of the patients. Total antibiotic dispensation cost in 2005 was US$ 1,708,350 and cost per 1,000 inhabitants per day was US$ 1.13 in 2005 and US$ 1 in 2006. DDD per 1,000 inhabitants per day and cost per inhabitant per day was low compared to other countries.

  8. Experimental characterization of droplet dispensing in electrowetting-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Khorsand; Shokoohi, Mehrdad; Passandideh-Fard, Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the effect of various parameters on the dispensed droplet size in microchannels based on the electrowetting on dielectric technique is experimentally investigated. A printed circuit board (PCB)-based microfluidic chip is used as a platform for the experiments. A crescent configuration for the channel electrodes is fabricated, which leads to a higher electrowetting force which improves the motion of the droplet. In addition, two electrode designs are proposed, which provide a nearly constant overlapping length on the reservoir electrode. The focus of this paper is on the geometry of the reservoir and the channel electrode; therefore, the channel dimensions, surface conditions, and applied voltage are kept constant. The experiments are performed for various reservoir liquid volumes and different electrode shapes of the reservoir and the microchannel. The results show that decreasing the length of the small reservoir electrode reduces the size of the dispensed droplet. It is also observed that using a channel electrode curved in the opposite direction of the droplet motion leads to a smaller dispensed droplet.

  9. Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweidan, Michelle; Reeve, James F; Brien, Jo-anne E; Jayasuriya, Pradeep; Martin, Jennifer H; Vernon, Graeme M

    2009-03-02

    To investigate the quality of drug interaction decision support in selected prescribing and dispensing software systems, and to compare this information with that found in a range of reference sources. A comparative study, conducted between June 2006 and February 2007, of the support provided for making decisions about 20 major and 20 minor drug interactions in six prescribing and three dispensing software systems used in primary care in Australia. Five electronic reference sources were evaluated for comparison. Sensitivity, specificity and quality of information; for major interactions: whether information on clinical effects, timeframe and pharmacological mechanism was included, whether management advice was helpful, and succinctness. Six of the nine software systems had a sensitivity rate > or = 90%, detecting most of the major interactions. Only 3/9 systems had a specificity rate of > or = 80%, with other systems providing inappropriate or unhelpful alerts for many minor interactions. Only 2/9 systems provided adequate information about clinical effects for more than half the major drug interactions, and 1/9 provided useful management advice for more than half of these. The reference sources had high sensitivity and in general provided more comprehensive clinical information than the software systems. Drug interaction decision support in commonly used prescribing and dispensing software has significant shortcomings.

  10. Managed groundwater development for water-supply security in Sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    because of demographic pressure, climate change and economic transformation. Two new policy ... and for direct in situ water supply, be best channelled to maximise the benefits whilst minimising the risks? ... Keywords: Sub-Saharan Africa, groundwater development, groundwater management, groundwater governance.

  11. Policies to Encourage the Development of Water Sanitation Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euverink, G.J.W.; Temmink, B.G.; Rozendal, R.A.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines innovations in water technology, policies to develop technologies that will contribute to a sustainalbe economy, and the introduction of the new concepts to society. We discuss our views on how wastewater treatment may be performed in the future in such a way that the WFD

  12. SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SELECTED EPA PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) evaluated for five compounds: acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, pyridine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (methyl ester). inetic models were developed for acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and pyridine. he test compounds were e...

  13. Sustainable development indicators for urban water systems: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the light of the increasing pressures on the world's freshwater resources, changes in the present and future urban water systems are called for in order to achieve sustainable development. The transformation from unsustainable practices demands tools that measure progress and can warn of future trends. Sustainable ...

  14. Implications of water pollution for aquacultural development in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common water-polluting substances induced by population growth, urbanisation and industrialization and their effects on the aquatic ecosystem were reviewed. The consequences of continuous presence of these pollutants on the development of aquaculture in Nigeria were discussed based on literature reviewed with the ...

  15. Water supply arrangements in developing countries: A case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Malawi. B.U.G. Mughogho, I.B.M. Kosamu. Abstract. The provision of potable water in the cities of developing countries has been of concern for a long time. Most of the urban population, especially in unplanned settlements, relies on ...

  16. Development and application of 2-parameters monthly water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A monthly water batance model which can be used to generate runoff with few parameters is developed. The model is particularly useful for simulating runoff in cases of limited hydrometeorological and physical data, and where climatic conditions lead to low or large rainfall variations, like in temperate ,or semi-arid regions ...

  17. Priority water research questions for South Africa developed through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Priority water research questions for South Africa developed through participatory processes. RM Siebrits, K Winter, J Barnes, MC Dent, M Ginster, J Harrison, B Jackson, I Jacobs, A Jordaan, HC Kasan, W Kloppers, R le Roux, J Maree, MNB Momba, AV Munnik, J O'Keeffe, R Schulze, M Silberbauer, D Still, JE van Zyl ...

  18. Sustainable energy development and water supply security in Kamojang Geothermal Field: The Energy-Water Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Kamojang Geothermal Field (KGF) is a typical vapor dominated hydrothermal system in West Java, Indonesia. This geothermal field is the oldest exploited geothermal field in Indonesia. From 1983 to 2005, more than 160 million tons of steam have been exploited from the KGF and more than 30 million tons of water were injected into the reservoir system. The injected water come from condensed water, local river and ground water. Sustainable production in the geothermal energy development is the ability of the production system applied to sustain the stable production level over long times and to manage the mass balance between production, injection and natural recharge in the geothermal reservoir during exploitation. Mass balance in the reservoir system can be monitored by using time lapse gravity monitoring. Mass variation of hydrodynamic in the reservoir of KGF from 1999 to 2005 is about -3.34 Mt/year while is about -3.78 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Another period between 2009 and 2010, mass variation decreased about -8.24 Mt. According to the history of production and injection, natural recharge to the KGF's reservoir is estimated at about 2.77 Mt/year from 1999 to 2005 and 2.75 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Between 2009 and 2010, KGF has a bigger mass deficiency rate throughout 200 MWe maintain production. Large amount of fresh water is needed for sustainable geothermal energy production, while the domestic water supply need is also increased. Natural recharge, about 50% of injected water, cooling system, drilling and other production activities in KGF spend large amounts of fresh water. Water consumption for local people around KGF is about 1.46 MT/year. The water volume around KGF of total runoff is the range between dry season 0.07 MT/month and rainy season 4.4 MT/month. The water demands for sustainable geothermal production of KGF and for local people's consumption will increase in the future. Integrated planning between the energy and water sectors in KGF

  19. Can formalizing links among community health workers, accredited drug dispensing outlet dispensers, and health facility staff increase their collaboration to improve prompt access to maternal and child care? A qualitative study in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillip, Angel; Kimatta, Suleiman; Embrey, Martha; Chalker, John C; Valimba, Richard; Malliwah, Mariam; Meena, John; Lieber, Rachel; Johnson, Keith

    2017-06-19

    In Tanzania, progress toward achieving the 2015 Millennium Development Goals for maternal and newborn health was slow. An intervention brought together community health workers, health facility staff, and accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO) dispensers to improve maternal and newborn health through a mechanism of collaboration and referral. This study explored barriers, successes, and promising approaches to increasing timely access to care by linking the three levels of health care provision. The study was conducted in the Kibaha district, where we applied qualitative approaches with in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. In-depth interview participants included retail drug shop dispensers (36), community health workers (45), and health facility staff members (15). We conducted one focus group discussion with district officials and four with mothers of newborns and children under 5 years old. Relationships among the three levels of care improved after the linkage intervention, especially for ADDO dispensers and health facility staff who previously had no formal communication pathway. The study participants perceptions of success included improved knowledge of case management and relationships among the three levels of care, more timely access to care, increased numbers of patients/customers, more meetings between community health workers and health facility staff, and a decrease in child and maternal mortality. Reported challenges included stock-outs of medicines at the health facility, participating ADDO dispensers who left to work in other regions, documentation of referrals, and lack of treatment available at health facilities on the weekend. The primary issue that threatens the sustainability of the intervention is that local council health management team members, who are responsible for facilitating the linkage, had not made any supervision visits and were therefore unaware of how the program was running. The study highlights the benefits of

  20. Achieving Sustainable Development Goals from a Water Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Bhaduri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to meet human water needs only at local scales may cause negative environmental externality and stress on the water system at regional and global scales. Hence, assessing SDG targets requires a broad and in-depth knowledge of the global to local dynamics of water availability and use. Further, Interconnection and trade-offs between different SDG targets may lead to sub-optimal or even adverse outcome if the set of actions are not properly pre-designed considering such interlinkages. Thus scientific research and evidence have a role to play in facilitating the implementation of SDGs through assessments and policy engagement from global to local scales. The paper addresses some of these challenges related to implementation and monitoring the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals from a water perspective, based on the key findings of a conference organised in 2015 with the focus on three essential aspects of SDGs- indicators, interlinkages and implementation. The paper discusses that indicators should not be too simple but ultimately deliver sustainability measures. The paper finds that remote sensing and earth observation technologies can play a key role in supporting the monitoring of water targets. It also recognises that implementing SDGs is a societal process of development, and there is need to link how SDGs relate to public benefits and communicate this to the broader public.

  1. Water erosion and soil water infiltration in different stages of corn development and tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study evaluated soil and water losses, soil water infiltration and infiltration rate models in soil tillage systems and corn (Zea mays, L. development stages under simulated rainfall. The treatments were: cultivation along contour lines, cultivation down the slope and exposed soil. Soil losses and infiltration in each treatment were quantified for rains applied using a portable simulator, at 0, 30, 60 and 75 days after planting. Infiltration rates were estimated using the models of Kostiakov-Lewis, Horton and Philip. Based on the obtained results, the combination of effects between soil tillage system and corn development stages reduces soil and water losses. The contour tillage system promoted improvements in soil physical properties, favoring the reduction of erosion in 59.7% (water loss and 86.6% (soil loss at 75 days after planting, and the increase in the stable infiltration rate in 223.3%, compared with the exposed soil. Associated to soil cover, contour cultivation reduces soil and water losses, and the former is more influenced by management. Horton model is the most adequate to represent soil water infiltration rate under the evaluated conditions.

  2. A model for drug dispensing service based on the care process in the Brazilian health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Soares

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to medication emphasizes the availability of the product at the expense of providing a service. The goal of this paper is to propose a theoretical model for a drug dispensing service, beginning with a reflection on the current realities of the Unified Health System and drug dispensation in Brazil. A conceptual analytical research made by a methodological course called disciplined imagination was mainly the approach applied to develop the model. The drug dispensing service is part of the care process, which considers access as an attribute; reception, connection and accountability, management, and clinical pharmaceutical aspects as components; and the rational use of drugs as the purpose. The proposed model addresses access to the dispensing service and demands a reorientation of routines, instruments, and practices.O acesso a medicamentos enfatiza a disponibilidade do produto em detrimento da provisão de um serviço. O objetivo deste trabalho é propor um modelo teórico para um serviço de dispensação de medicamentos, iniciando com uma reflexão sobre a realidade atual do Sistema Único de Saúde e a dispensação de medicamentos no Brasil. Uma pesquisa analítica conceitual realizada por meio de um percurso metodológico chamado de imaginação disciplinada constituiu a estratégia principal para o desenvolvimento do modelo. O serviço de dispensação é parte do processo de cuidado, o qual considera o acesso como um atributo; os aspectos acolhimento, vínculo e responsabilização, gestão e clínica farmacêutica como componentes e o uso racional de medicamentos como o propósito. O modelo proposto direciona o acesso para o serviço de dispensação e demanda a reorientação de rotinas, instrumentos e práticas.

  3. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Sheila M; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J

    2013-03-26

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl(-)) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl(-) concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl(-) concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases.

  4. Robust principal component analysis in water quality index development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zalina Mohd; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Mengersen, Kerrie; Shitan, Mahendran; Juahir, Hafizan

    2014-06-01

    Some statistical procedures already available in literature are employed in developing the water quality index, WQI. The nature of complexity and interdependency that occur in physical and chemical processes of water could be easier explained if statistical approaches were applied to water quality indexing. The most popular statistical method used in developing WQI is the principal component analysis (PCA). In literature, the WQI development based on the classical PCA mostly used water quality data that have been transformed and normalized. Outliers may be considered in or eliminated from the analysis. However, the classical mean and sample covariance matrix used in classical PCA methodology is not reliable if the outliers exist in the data. Since the presence of outliers may affect the computation of the principal component, robust principal component analysis, RPCA should be used. Focusing in Langat River, the RPCA-WQI was introduced for the first time in this study to re-calculate the DOE-WQI. Results show that the RPCA-WQI is capable to capture similar distribution in the existing DOE-WQI.

  5. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  6. Hydrologic and Water Quality Model Development Using Simulink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Bowen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A stormwater runoff model based on the Soil Conservation Service (SCS method and a finite-volume based water quality model have been developed to investigate the use of Simulink for use in teaching and research. Simulink, a MATLAB extension, is a graphically based model development environment for system modeling and simulation. Widely used for mechanical and electrical systems, Simulink has had less use for modeling of hydrologic systems. The watershed model is being considered for use in teaching graduate-level courses in hydrology and/or stormwater modeling. Simulink’s block (data process and arrow (data transfer object model, the copy and paste user interface, the large number of existing blocks, and the absence of computer code allows students to become model developers almost immediately. The visual depiction of systems, their component subsystems, and the flow of data through the systems are ideal attributes for hands-on teaching of hydrologic and mass balance processes to today’s computer-savvy visual learners. Model development with Simulink for research purposes is also investigated. A finite volume, multi-layer pond model using the water quality kinetics present in CE-QUAL-W2 has been developed using Simulink. The model is one of the first uses of Simulink for modeling eutrophication dynamics in stratified natural systems. The model structure and a test case are presented. One use of the model for teaching a graduate-level water quality modeling class is also described.

  7. Development of Hydrogen Electrodes for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjartansdóttir, Cecilía Kristín

    will be needed. Producing hydrogen via water electrolysis using surplus, low cost, power from renewables offers the possibility of increased production capacity and load management with no greenhouse emissions. Hydrogen is a valuable energy carrier, which is able to contribute to various forms of energy, such as...... infrastructure. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is the current standard (stat of the art) for industrial large-scale water electrolysis systems. One of the main criteria for industrial AWE is efficient and durable electrodes. The aim of the present PhD study was to develop electrode materials for hydrogen...... production in order to improve the efficiency and durability, and decrease the costs associated with industrial AWE. The primary effort was reserved to the hydrogen electrodes. Additionally, a new test setup for efficiency and durability measurements was to be designed and constructed. During the present Ph...

  8. Development of a 5-Component Balance for Water Tunnel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.

    1999-01-01

    The principal objective of this research/development effort was to develop a multi-component strain gage balance to measure both static and dynamic forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. A balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The balance mounts internally in the model and is used in a manner typical of wind tunnel balances. The key differences between a water tunnel balance and a wind tunnel balance are the requirement for very high sensitivity since the loads are very low (typical normal force is 90 grams or 0.2 lbs), the need for water proofing the gage elements, and the small size required to fit into typical water tunnel models. The five-component balance was calibrated and demonstrated linearity in the responses of the primary components to applied loads, very low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and F/A-18 models. The data were compared to forces and moments from wind tunnel tests of the same or similar configurations. The comparison showed very good agreement, providing confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multi-component internal balance. The success of the static experiments encouraged the use of the balance for dynamic experiments. Among the advantages of conducting dynamic tests in a water tunnel are less demanding motion and data acquisition rates than in a wind tunnel test (because of the low-speed flow) and the capability of performing flow visualization and force/moment (F/M) measurements simultaneously with relative simplicity. This capability of simultaneous flow visualization and for F/M measurements proved extremely useful to explain the results obtained during these dynamic tests. In general, the development of this balance should encourage the use of water tunnels for a

  9. Developing index maps of water-harvest potential in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The food security problem in Africa is tied to the small farmer, whose subsistence farming relies heavily on rain-fed agriculture. A dry spell lasting two to three weeks can cause a significant yield reduction. A small-scale irrigation scheme from small-capacity ponds can alleviate this problem. This solution would require a water harvest mechanism at a farm level. In this study, we looked at the feasibility of implementing such a water harvest mechanism in drought prone parts of Africa. A water balance study was conducted at different watershed levels. Runoff (watershed yield) was estimated using the SCS curve number technique and satellite derived rainfall estimates (RFE). Watersheds were delineated from the Africa-wide HYDRO-1K digital elevation model (DEM) data set in a GIS environment. Annual runoff volumes that can potentially be stored in a pond during storm events were estimated as the product of the watershed area and runoff excess estimated from the SCS Curve Number method. Estimates were made for seepage and net evaporation losses. A series of water harvest index maps were developed based on a combination of factors that took into account the availability of runoff, evaporation losses, population density, and the required watershed size needed to fill a small storage reservoir that can be used to alleviate water stress during a crop growing season. This study presents Africa-wide water-harvest index maps that could be used for conducting feasibility studies at a regional scale in assessing the relative differences in runoff potential between regions for the possibility of using ponds as a water management tool. ?? 2004 American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  10. Engaging Students in Water Resources Issues in Developing Countries (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.; Lutz, A.

    2010-12-01

    When all is said and done, what does it mean to work in the developing world? The need for access to clean water and sanitation and the desire to end poverty and disease cannot be disputed. But as engineers and physical scientists, we often step into a scenario with a problem-identification-and-solving approach. However, to successfully apply engineering and science in developing countries, we should also consider questions such as: how the problems have come to be; have our approaches been appropriate; and what have the effects of projects been on local populations? A short course to help us better address critical needs begins with readings that cover the history of development, development theories, review of “players” in development, case studies, and possibilities on the road ahead. It is also important to include key guest speakers with experience in developing countries as part of an international course curriculum. Within this overall course context, discussion of case studies provides an opportunity to critically assess positive, negative, and a combination of outcomes for communities. These case studies are building blocks for solving some of the most important water and sanitation issues in developing countries.

  11. A Native American View of Western Water Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloria, Sam

    1985-11-01

    This paper presents an individual Native American, or American Indian, view of western water development and not necessarily the view of a particular tribe or its government. A disclaimer of this kind is necessary because there has been a historical tendency in this society to look for a single Indian spokesman and search for that spokesman among the Indians who says what society wants to hear. However, the Indian community, while sharing many characteristics and problems, is culturally and politically diverse, and there are no real shortcuts to dealing with it in all its diversity. Indian water rights, as they relate to western water development, must be seen against the backdrop of the history of the hemisphere. Ever since the arrival of the Europeans on the continent, an important current in the development of the legal system has been to define Indian rights and then develop an orderly process for taking them away. From the formulation of the doctrine of discovery itself, this two-step exercise has served the humanitarian purpose of attempting to accord some fairness to the Indians while providing discipline to the competition among non-Indians for the right to use Indian resources. Recognition of full and natural rights of Indian sovereignty and ownership in the hemisphere is commonly viewed as having been a historical impossibility, just as denying them all rights was not practically and morally feasible. The problem then, was and is to balance the two historical necessities appropriately.

  12. Thriving with water: Developments in amphibious architecture in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing awareness worldwide that traditional flood-mitigation strategies that attempt to control the flow of water only increase the likelihood of catastrophic consequences in the long run, when failure inevitably occurs after years of complacency and development behind flood barriers. Amphibious architecture is a non-defensive flood mitigation and climate change adaptation strategy that works in synchrony with a floodprone region’s natural cycles of flooding, allowing water to flow rather than creating an obstruction. Since the height to which an amphibious building rises is not necessarily fixed but adapts to the variable depth of flood water, amphibiation can accommodate rising sea levels and land subsidence as well. Amphibious retrofitting can provide measurable cost savings compared to other flood mitigation strategies, performing well in loss avoidance studies for both flood and wind damage. An amphibious approach to planning and construction recognizes the beneficial aspects of seasonal and occasional flooding, allowing us not merely to live with water, but to thrive with it. This paper reviews case studies of both existing and proposed amphibious buildings, with discussion of their systems and components. It also discusses the limitations of amphibious construction, some of the regulatory obstacles that have discouraged its development, and possible paths forward. The first International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering, ICAADE 2015, was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in August 2015. The second, ICAADE 2017, will convene at the University of Waterloo in Canada in June 2017.

  13. The development of membrane based high purity oily water separators for use in Arctic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Tremblay, A.Y. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Membrane Centre; Veinot, D.E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    With increased exploration and industrial activity in the Canadian Arctic, interest in the Northwest Passage as a shipping route has also increased. The oily wastewater produced by ships must be treated prior to discharge, particularly in the sensitive Arctic environment where biodegradation of organics is very slow due to cold climatic conditions and low sunlight. As such, safe techniques are needed for the treatment of oily wastewater released from ships. However, bilge water is difficult to treat because it contains seawater, particulates, used oils and detergents. Membrane based oily water separators (OWS) are considered to be a key technology for the treatment of bilge water onboard ships. The issues that must be taken into account in the ship-born use of membrane based OWS include the proper treatment of the oily brine before discharge; the substantial reduction in volume that is required; the complexity of the technology; labour associated with the operation of the system due to filter changes and cleaning; and, system automation to simplify its operation. In this study, a membrane-based process for treating bilge water was developed to meet stringent discharge regulations for discharge in Arctic waters. Currently, this discharge limit is set at 0 ppm. A pilot scale membrane cascade system was designed and evaluated. Multilumen ceramic membranes were used in the first stage and Sepa{sup R} test cells were used in the second stage. Optimal membrane pore size was determined. The study investigated the separation of oil and grease using different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes. The study revealed that through proper membrane design, it is possible to remove oil and grease from bilge water to a level permitting its discharge to Arctic waters. However, it was recommended that low level aromatic diesel fuels be used in ships operating in Arctic waters since the presence of soluble aromatics in diesel fuel increases the technical difficulty of reaching

  14. [Food protective property of new liquid food container PID (Pouch in Dispenser) for microbes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominari, Keita; Tanaka, Asato; Shinoda, Yuma; Futase, Katsunori; Nei, Daisuke; Isshiki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We examined the content protection characteristics of the PID (Pouch in Dispenser) when it was used in the usual manner and when it was polluted artificially. When the PID was used in the usual manner, the nozzle was opened, and experiments were carried out with and without air-blowing. The invasion of bacteria into the PID was not detected. Also, no bacteria were detected in the material poured from the nozzle of the PID. When 3 strains of bacteria suspensions were intentionally smeared on the nozzle of the PID, invasion of bacteria was observed. When the PID was wiped with a dirty cloth, no invasion of bacteria into the PID was detected. It may be necessary to label the PID with the instruction that the nozzle should not be touched. The effected of changes in the water activity and pH, and the preservatives used, may also need to be considered, depending on the contents in the PID.

  15. A new long-life trimedlure dispenser for Mediterranean fruit fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Ruiz, Javier; Sanchis, Juan; Navarro-Llopis, Vicente; Primo, Jaime

    2008-08-01

    New agricultural techniques are attempting to reduce the application of synthesized pesticides and replace them with new environmentally friendly methods such as mass trapping, mating disruption, or chemosterilization techniques. All these methods are based on the release of a lure for insect attraction or confusion. The success of the chosen method depends on the quality of the attractant emission from the dispenser. Currently, used dispensers with a polymeric matrix and new dispensers with mesoporous inorganic materials were evaluated to obtain more efficient emission kinetics. In this study, the selected pest was the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and the lure used was trimedlure (TML). The dispensers were validated by means of a field study comparing insect catches with attractant release values. As a result, we have demonstrated that mesoporous dispensers have a clearly longer lifetime than the polymeric plug. Furthermore, the attractant release rate is less dependent on temperature in mesoporous than in polymeric dispensers.

  16. Method and apparatus for producing drops using a drop-on-demand dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin U.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dispensing fluid from a drop-on-demand (DOD) fluid dispenser. The method involves withdrawing fluid in the dispenser for a first duration of time, followed by a second duration of time during which the fluid is propelled toward the orifice of the dispenser. Following the period during which the fluid is propelled, there is a second withdrawing of the fluid into the dispenser. The duration of the propelling period is shorter than the duration of either the first withdrawing or the second withdrawing. The propelling of the fluid results in the extension of a small tongue of fluid from the meniscus of the fluid. The second withdrawing of the fluid results in a retraction of the meniscus into the passageway such that only the small tongue of fluid separates and is ejected from the dispenser.

  17. Water resources assessment, irrigation and agricultural developments in Tajikistan

    OpenAIRE

    TODERICH, Kristina; Tsukatani, Tsuneo; Abbdusamatov, Munimjon

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a description of current state of water resources assessment in Tajikistan, their use for the agriculture development and maintenance of irrigation infrastructures. The Vakhsh and Pyandzh River Basins and its tributaries in Tajikistan were directly surveyed during an expedition within the framework of a Joint Research Project: Investigation of natural resources of Central Asia and reconstruction of agriculture in Afghanistan, that is supported by the Ministry of Education ...

  18. Development of water oak stump sprouts under a partial overstory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile S. Gardiner; Lisa M. Helmig

    1997-01-01

    A 28-year-old water oak (Quercus nigra L.) plantation was thinned from below to either 254 or 462 stems per hectare to determine the influence of a partial canopy on oak stump sprout development. Sprout clump survival, number of living sprouts in a clump, and height and DBH of the dominant sprout in a clump were measured in years l-5 and 7 after harvest. By year 7,...

  19. Unlocking the Potential of High-Throughput Drug Combination Assays Using Acoustic Dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace Ka Yan; Wilson, Stacy; Schmidt, Stephen; Moffat, John G

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of synergistic effects of drug combinations in vitro is a critical part of anticancer drug research. However, the complexities of dosing and analyzing two drugs over the appropriate range of doses have generally led to compromises in experimental design that restrict the quality and robustness of the data. In particular, the use of a single dose response of combined drugs, rather than a full two-way matrix of varying doses, has predominated in higher-throughput studies. Acoustic dispensing unlocks the potential of high-throughput dose matrix analysis. We have developed acoustic dispensing protocols that enable compound synergy assays in a 384-well format. This experimental design is considerably more efficient and flexible with respect to time, reagent usage, and labware than is achievable using traditional serial-dilution approaches. Data analysis tools integrated in Genedata Screener were used to efficiently deconvolute the combination compound mapping scheme and calculate compound potency and synergy metrics. We have applied this workflow to evaluate interactions among drugs targeting different nodes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a panel of cancer cell lines. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  20. WEB-GIS SOLUTIONS DEVELOPMENT FOR CITIZENS AND WATER COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Şercăianu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a web-GIS solution in which urban residents, from Buzau City, could be involved in decision-support process of water companies, in order to reduce water losses, by collecting information directly from citizens. In recent years, reducing material and economic losses, recorded in the entire municipal networks management process has become the main focus of public companies in Romania. Due to problems complexity that arise in collecting information from citizens and issues identified in urban areas, more analyzes were required related to web-GIS solutions used in areas such as local government, public utilities, environmental protection or financial management. Another important problem is the poor infrastructure development of spatial databases founded in public companies, and connection to web platforms. Developing the entire communication process between residents and municipal companies has required the use of concept "citizen-sensor" in the entire reporting process. Reported problems are related to water distribution networks with the possibility of covering the entire public utilities infrastructure.

  1. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain A; Ibrahim MI; Malik M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of training of dispensers on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in context to storage temperature, prescription terminologies and status of medicines in Islamabad, Pakistan. Methods A randomized, controlled, blinded intervention study was designed and implemented. Before the implementation of intervention, a baseline study was performed to assess the knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies. The study population included all...

  2. An automatic pellet dispenser for precise control of feeding topography in granivorous birds

    OpenAIRE

    Berkhoudt, H.; Van Der Reijden, D.; Heijmans, M.

    1987-01-01

    Design and construction of an automatic pellet dispenser for granivorous birds are described. The dispenser permits rapid pneumatic delivery of pellets (five pellets per second maximum) to one controlled position and does not interfere with simultaneous electrophysiological recording. In addition, the device continuously indicates presence or absence of a pellet in the delivery position. This automatic dispenser proved very effective in our studies of stereotyped topographies of feeding in gr...

  3. Effect of dispenser location on taking free condoms in an outpatient cocaine abuse treatment clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Danielle R.; Kirby, Kimberly C.; Marlowe, Douglas B.

    1995-01-01

    Crack cocaine use increases risky sexual behavior and HIV exposure; therefore, safe sexual practices should be encouraged during cocaine addiction treatment. Research indicates that placing condom dispensers in private restrooms increases taking free condoms. We investigated two other dispenser locations (a day room vs. counselors' offices) and found that substantially more condoms were taken when dispensers were in the day room. This is an important issue for public health facilities without private restrooms. PMID:16795876

  4. Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) Template for California Hydrogen Dispensing Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C.; Blake, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.; Post, M.

    2012-11-01

    This report explains the Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) requirements for hydrogen dispensing stations in the State of California. The reports shows the basic components of a hydrogen dispensing station in a simple schematic drawing; the permits and approvals that would typically be required for the construction and operation of a hydrogen dispensing station; and a basic permit that might be employed by an Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

  5. The impact of automation on workload and dispensing errors in a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K Lynette; Barlow, Dave; Bithell, Anne; Hiom, Sarah; Lord, Sue; Pollard, Mike; Roberts, Dave; Way, Cheryl; Whittlesea, Cate

    2013-04-01

    To determine the effect of installing an original-pack automated dispensing system (ADS) on dispensary workload and prevented dispensing incidents in a hospital pharmacy. Data on dispensary workload and prevented dispensing incidents, defined as dispensing errors detected and reported before medication had left the pharmacy, were collected over 6 weeks at a National Health Service hospital in Wales before and after the installation of an ADS. Workload was measured by non-participant observation using the event recording technique. Prevented dispensing incidents were self-reported by pharmacy staff on standardised forms. Median workloads (measured as items dispensed/person/hour) were compared using Mann-Whitney U tests and rate of prevented dispensing incidents were compared using Chi-square test. Spearman's rank correlation was used to examine the association between workload and prevented dispensing incidents. A P value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Median dispensary workload was significantly lower pre-automation (9.20 items/person/h) compared to post-automation (13.17 items/person/h, P automation (0.28%) than pre-automation (0.64%, P automation (ρ = 0.23, P automation improves dispensing efficiency and reduces the rate of prevented dispensing incidents. It is proposed that prevented dispensing incidents frequently occurred during periods of high workload due to involuntary automaticity. Prevented dispensing incidents occurring after a busy period were attributed to staff experiencing fatigue after-effects. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Ethanol distribution, dispensing, and use: analysis of a portion of the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain using system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J; Bush, Brian; Peterson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and

  7. Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J.; Bush, Brian; Peterson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain–represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner’s decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer’s choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and

  8. Ethanol distribution, dispensing, and use: analysis of a portion of the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain using system dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Vimmerstedt

    Full Text Available The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets include the need for infrastructure for distribution and

  9. Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovska, Natasa; Duić, Neven; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2016-01-01

    The Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES) in 2015 returned to its hometown, Dubrovnik, and once again served as a significant venue for scientists and specialists in different areas of sustainable development from all over the world to initiate...... traditionally cover a range of energy issues - higher renewables penetration and various technologies and fuels assessments at energy supply side, as well as, energy efficiency in various sectors, buildings, district heating, electric vehicles and demand modelling at energy demand side. Also, a review paper...

  10. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five...... opportunities for error were identified; error rate of 1.85 errors per 100 opportunities for error (95% CI 1.54-2.20). Omission of a dose was the predominant type of error while vitamins and minerals, drugs for acid-related diseases and antipsychotic drugs were the drugs most frequently affected by errors...

  11. Definitionen af CFC-indkomst og adgangen til dispensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Peter Koerver

    2014-01-01

    I artiklen kommenteres to nyere afgørelser omhandlende CFC-reglerne for selskaber. Først behandles Skatterådets afgørelse i SKM2013.649.SR, der bl.a. angik, hvorvidt et udenlandsk datterselskabs indkomst udgjorde CFC-indkomst i form af vederlag for anvendelse af immaterielle aktiver. Derpå omtale...... kendelsen SKM2014.280.LSR, hvori Landsskatteretten - modsat Skatterådet - kom frem til, at betingelserne for dispensation fra CFC-reglerne var opfyldt....

  12. Prevalence of medication administration errors in two medical units with automated prescription and dispensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Carmen Guadalupe; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Martin-Barbero, Maria Luisa; Duran-Garcia, Esther; Durango-Limarquez, Maria Isabel; Hernández-Sampelayo, Paloma; Sanjurjo-Saez, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To identify the frequency of medication administration errors and their potential risk factors in units using a computerized prescription order entry program and profiled automated dispensing cabinets...

  13. Assessing water reservoirs management and development in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castelletti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries water is a key renewable resource to complement carbon-emitting energy production and support food security in the face of demand pressure from fast-growing industrial production and urbanization. To cope with undergoing changes, water resources development and management have to be reconsidered by enlarging their scope across sectors and adopting effective tools to analyze current and projected infrastructure potential and operation strategies. In this paper we use multi-objective deterministic and stochastic optimization to assess the current reservoir operation and planned capacity expansion in the Red River Basin (Northern Vietnam, and to evaluate the potential improvement by the adoption of a more sophisticated information system. To reach this goal we analyze the historical operation of the major controllable infrastructure in the basin, the HoaBinh reservoir on the Da River, explore re-operation options corresponding to different tradeoffs among the three main objectives (hydropower production, flood control and water supply, using multi-objective optimization techniques, namely Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm. Finally, we assess the structural system potential and the need for capacity expansion by application of Deterministic Dynamic Programming. Results show that the current operation can only be relatively improved by advanced optimization techniques, while investment should be put into enlarging the system storage capacity and exploiting additional information to inform the operation.

  14. Economics of Renewable Energy for Water Desalination in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R. Shouman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the economics of renewable energy- powered desalination, as applied to water supply for remote coastal and desert communities in developing countries. In this paper, the issue of integration of desalination technologies and renewable energy from specified sources is addressed. The features of Photovoltaic (PV system combined with reverse osmosis desalination technology, which represents the most commonly applied integration between renewable energy and desalination technology, are analyzed. Further, a case study for conceptual seawater reverse osmosis (SW-RO desalination plant with 1000 m3 /d capacity is presented, based on PV and conventional generators powered with fossil fuel to be installed in a remote coastal area in Egypt, as a typical developing country. The estimated water cost for desalination with PV/ SW-RO system is about $1.25 m3 , while ranging between $1.22-1.59 for SW-RO powered with conventional generator powered with fossil fuel. Analysis of the economical, technical and environmental factors depicts the merits of using large scale integrated PV/RO system as an economically feasible water supply relying upon a renewable energy source.

  15. Analysing inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dondeynaz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The "Integrated Water Resources Management" principle was formally laid down at the International Conference on Water and Sustainable development in Dublin 1992. One of the main results of this conference is that improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS, being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation. These sectors influence or are influenced by the access to WSS. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission (EC has developed a new database (WatSan4Dev database containing 42 indicators (called variables in this paper from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data in developing countries. This paper describes the development of the WatSan4Dev dataset, the statistical processes needed to improve the data quality, and finally, the analysis to verify the database coherence is presented. Based on 25 relevant variables, the relationships between variables are described and organised into five factors (HDP – Human Development against Poverty, AP – Human Activity Pressure on water resources, WR – Water Resources, ODA – Official Development Aid, CEC – Country Environmental Concern. Linear regression methods are used to identify key variables having influence on water supply and sanitation. First analysis indicates that the informal urbanisation development is an important factor negatively influencing the percentage of the population having access to WSS. Health, and in particular children's health, benefits from the improvement of WSS. Irrigation is also enhancing Water Supply service thanks to multi-purpose infrastructure. Five country profiles are also created to deeper understand and synthetize the amount of information gathered

  16. Analysing inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondeynaz, C.; Carmona Moreno, C.; Céspedes Lorente, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    The "Integrated Water Resources Management" principle was formally laid down at the International Conference on Water and Sustainable development in Dublin 1992. One of the main results of this conference is that improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS), being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation). These sectors influence or are influenced by the access to WSS. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC) has developed a new database (WatSan4Dev database) containing 42 indicators (called variables in this paper) from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data in developing countries. This paper describes the development of the WatSan4Dev dataset, the statistical processes needed to improve the data quality, and finally, the analysis to verify the database coherence is presented. Based on 25 relevant variables, the relationships between variables are described and organised into five factors (HDP - Human Development against Poverty, AP - Human Activity Pressure on water resources, WR - Water Resources, ODA - Official Development Aid, CEC - Country Environmental Concern). Linear regression methods are used to identify key variables having influence on water supply and sanitation. First analysis indicates that the informal urbanisation development is an important factor negatively influencing the percentage of the population having access to WSS. Health, and in particular children's health, benefits from the improvement of WSS. Irrigation is also enhancing Water Supply service thanks to multi-purpose infrastructure. Five country profiles are also created to deeper understand and synthetize the amount of information gathered. This new

  17. Field development. Concept selection in deep water environment offshore Angola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenot, A.; Berger, J.C.; Limet, N. [TotalFinaElf, la Defense 6, Rosa-Lirio Project Group, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2002-10-01

    The significant oil discoveries made at the end of the 90's in the deep water environment offshore the coast of Angola, has led to a considerable amount of development activities. The first field in production was the turnkey development of the Kuito field on the Block 14 operated by Chevron. More recently the Girassol field has been put successfully in production on the Block 17, operated by TotalFinaElf. Both developments are making use of sub-sea wells connected to a moored dedicated FPSO. On the western side of the Girassol field, several discoveries have been made. They are known as the Rosa Lirio pole, from the names of two of the main channels. Values for water depth are in the same range than on Girassol (1300- 1400 m). A project group has been established in 1999 to evaluate the development of these discoveries. The purpose of this paper is to present the conceptual work which as been carried out, and in particular to show that even if many different concepts have been evaluated, the final choice has been also to make use of sub-sea trees. (authors)

  18. An overview of water disinfection in developing countries and the potential for solar thermal water pasteurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, J.; Thomas, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    This study originated within the Solar Buildings Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to assess the potential for solar thermal water disinfection in developing countries. In order to assess solar thermal potential, the alternatives must be clearly understood and compared. The objectives of the study are to: (a) characterize the developing world disinfection needs and market; (b) identify competing technologies, both traditional and emerging; (c) analyze and characterize solar thermal pasteurization; (d) compare technologies on cost-effectiveness and appropriateness; and (e) identify research opportunities. Natural consequences of the study beyond these objectives include a broad knowledge of water disinfection problems and technologies, introduction of solar thermal pasteurization technologies to a broad audience, and general identification of disinfection opportunities for renewable technologies.

  19. Aptasensor development for detection of virus in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Julie

    Contamination of water by waterborne viruses causes serious health issues worldwide. The current virus detection methods are expensive and time-consuming and require access to well-equipped laboratories. This thesis describes the development of an impedimetric all-polymer aptasensor for detection...... and finally an impedimetric electrical characterisation of the sensor. The sample preparation of the rotavirus was based on purification and biotinylation of the virus to meet the requirements of the aptamer selection process. The selection process, performed by an external collaborator, was based...... was stable in the measured pH range, which corresponds to the expected pH range of water samples.. The stability of the aptasensor chip was tested over a 2 week period in continuous flow. It was found that the electrodes were not damaged or degraded during the time period, as a constant impedance signal...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A REFERENCE MATERIAL FOR WATER INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. . Mazanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to develop and evaluate a homogenised material for the new IONEX resin reference material for NORM industries. The IONEX resin is a material from water purification filters. This work is a part of the European Research Project MetroNORM "Metrology for Processing Materials with High Natural Radioactivity", contract identifier JRPIND57. The current research resulted from the necessity of installing the technology for removing uranium from water in some areas in Europe [1, 2]. The European project JRP IND57 MetroNORM is perfectly suited for an accurate and precise determination of hazardous NORM materials. Proper evaluation of NORM materials is highly needed for the protection of health and minimization of economic and ecological burdens.

  1. Possibilities and Conditions for water tourism-development in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Němečková, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focused on water tourism in the Czech Republic. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibilities and conditions for the development of water tourism in the Czech Republic. There were conducted analyses of water tours, water tourism development opportunities, own research, which focuses on the behavior of water tourism in the Czech Republic.Water tourism in the Czech Republic lags behind its potential and has potential for the future development.

  2. Water and Urban Development. Zapopan Jal. MÉXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R. M., Sr.; Rosas-Elguera, J.; Pena, L. E.; Lucia, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Recently there is a need to make a land management project for the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (GDL), the objective is the momentum of an "orderly growth" however there are a number of problems associated with urban growth, one of which is the provision of Water. There is not an adequate exploration of our resources, nor an adequate record of the minimum parameters that can be measured in the case of groundwater, such as the level of infiltration and extraction volume. The extraction is carried out in the northwest of the GDL (currently the area is more urban development), is approximately greater than 658 l / s (SIAPA 2016), beyond the capacity of natural recharge since precipitation of an average of 850 mm. Besides which currently anthropically waterproof. There is a record of more than 40 existing in this sector of the GDL wells, wells and springs are not accounted for, the production areas varies from 14.45 to 180.55 m depth In the study area (approximately 80km2), there are urban uses, industries, airports, agricultural areas in transition to residential areas and a protected natural area. cracks have already appeared in different years and places, some authors propose that are associated with geological structures and others say it is by massive extraction of water. Mitigation measures or water injection wells to recharge aquifers is poor, not considered as a priority for the territorial urban planning element. Which leads to a significant lowering of the aquifers that is up to 67.2 m in a span of two years in some cases. Some urban developments with golf course, contribute significantly to the purification of waste water and recharge of aquifers for irrigation they do, what should force by the state or municipality to issue a series of fiscal stimulus.

  3. Cell dispensing in low-volume range with the immediate drop-on-demand technology (I-DOT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Lena; Büttner, Evy; Laske, Christopher; Traube, Andrea; Brode, Tobias; Traube, Andreas Florian; Bauernhansl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Handling and dosing of cells comprise the most critical step in the microfabrication of cell-based assay systems for screening and toxicity testing. Therefore, the immediate drop-on-demand technology (I-DOT) was developed to provide a flexible noncontact liquid handling system enabling dispensing of cells and liquid without the risk of cross-contamination down to a precise volume in the nanoliter range. Liquid is dispensed from a source plate within nozzles at the bottom by a short compressed air pulse that is given through a quick release valve into the well, thus exceeding the capillary pressure in the nozzle. Droplets of a defined volume can be spotted directly onto microplates or other cell culture devices. We present a study on the performance and biological impact of this technology by applying the cell line MCF-7, human fibroblasts, and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For all cell types tested, viability after dispensing is comparable to the control and exhibits similar proliferation rates in the absence of apoptotic cells, and the differentiation potential of hMSCs is not impaired. The immediate drop-on-demand technology enables accurate cell dosage and offers promising potential for single-cell applications. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  4. Inkjet metrology: high-accuracy mass measurements of microdroplets produced by a drop-on-demand dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkouteren, R Michael; Verkouteren, Jennifer R

    2009-10-15

    We describe gravimetric methods for measuring the mass of droplets generated by a drop-on-demand (DOD) microdispenser. Droplets are deposited, either continuously at a known frequency or as a burst of known number, into a cylinder positioned on a submicrogram balance. Mass measurements are acquired precisely by computer, and results are corrected for evaporation. Capabilities are demonstrated using isobutyl alcohol droplets. For ejection rates greater than 100 Hz, the repeatability of droplet mass measurements was 0.2%, while the combined relative standard uncertainty (u(c)) was 0.9%. When bursts of droplets were dispensed, the limit of quantitation was 72 microg (1490 droplets) with u(c) = 1.0%. Individual droplet size in a burst was evaluated by high-speed videography. Diameters were consistent from the tenth droplet onward, and the mass of an individual droplet was best estimated by the average droplet mass with a combined uncertainty of about 1%. Diameters of the first several droplets were anomalous, but their contribution was accounted for when dispensing bursts. Above the limits of quantitation, the gravimetric methods provided statistically equivalent results and permit detailed study of operational factors that influence droplet mass during dispensing, including the development of reliable microassays and standard materials using DOD technologies.

  5. Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, O; Leaper, D J; Kramer, A; Ousey, K J

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (Pcontamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (Pcontamination. This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of an interdisciplinary model cluster for tidal water environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Stephan; Winterscheid, Axel; Jens, Wyrwa; Hartmut, Hein; Birte, Hein; Stefan, Vollmer; Andreas, Schöl

    2013-04-01

    Global climate change has a high potential to influence both the persistence and the transport pathways of water masses and its constituents in tidal waters and estuaries. These processes are linked through dispersion processes, thus directly influencing the sediment and solid suspend matter budgets, and thus the river morphology. Furthermore, the hydrologic regime has an impact on the transport of nutrients, phytoplankton, suspended matter, and temperature that determine the oxygen content within water masses, which is a major parameter describing the water quality. This project aims at the implementation of a so-called (numerical) model cluster in tidal waters, which includes the model compartments hydrodynamics, morphology and ecology. For the implementation of this cluster it is required to continue with the integration of different models that work in a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The model cluster is thus suggested to lead to a more precise knowledge of the feedback processes between the single interdisciplinary model compartments. In addition to field measurements this model cluster will provide a complementary scientific basis required to address a spectrum of research questions concerning the integral management of estuaries within the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG, Germany). This will in particular include aspects like sediment and water quality management as well as adaptation strategies to climate change. The core of the model cluster will consist of the 3D-hydrodynamic model Delft3D (Roelvink and van Banning, 1994), long-term hydrodynamics in the estuaries are simulated with the Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model HAMSOM (Backhaus, 1983; Hein et al., 2012). The simulation results will be compared with the unstructured grid based SELFE model (Zhang and Bapista, 2008). The additional coupling of the BfG-developed 1D-water quality model QSim (Kirchesch and Schöl, 1999; Hein et al., 2011) with the morphological/hydrodynamic models is an

  7. An assessment of dispensing practices in private pharmacies in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagashe, Godeliver A B; Minzi, Omary; Matowe, Lloyd

    2011-02-01

    To assess medicine dispensing practices in private pharmacies in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania and recommend interventions to improve practice. A cross-sectional survey and observational study of dispensing practices among 70 pharmacies in metropolitan Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. There were 1479 dispensing encounters recorded across the 70 pharmacies. This translated to 1573 medicines dispensed. Of the medicines dispensed, 16% were anti-infectives; 45% of the dispensed medicines were requested by the client, 32% were recommended by the dispenser and only 23% were on prescriptions. The main reasons for pharmacy consultations were coughs (62%), general pain (62%) and 'flu and colds. Malaria constituted 21% of the private pharmacy visits. Of the cough encounters, 30% received antibiotics. In addition, oral antibiotics were given to 81% of the clients with diarrhoea and to 95% of those with eye and ear problems. Of the 628 clients who requested specific medicines without a prescription, only 29% were asked questions on why the medicines were required. Of the clients who bought antibiotics, 20% bought incomplete doses. In total, 1180 clients were interviewed. Of these, 35% could not repeat the instructions given to them by the dispenser. Of the 70 dispensers who gave dosage instructions, only 20% gave them according to guidelines. In Tanzania, an overwhelming proportion of medicines sold in pharmacies are dispensed without a prescription. The majority of medicines dispensed without a prescription are either requested by the client or recommended by the dispenser. When dispensing medicines, dispensers seldom give dosage instructions; when they do, the instructions are often not consistent with guidelines. A high proportion of clients seeking management of coughs and colds or for diarrhoea from private pharmacies receive antibiotics. Interventions that build the capacity of dispensers, improve the rational use of antibiotics and the management of diarrhoea in private pharmacies in

  8. The challenge of responsible dispensing: formal education versus professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Judith Bezzegh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the education of Pharmaceutical Technicians for the activity of responsible dispensing. Based on a questionnaire with open and closed questions, the study sought to characterize the students, identify knowledge and attitudes regarding the Rational Use of Medications while addressing the limits and possibilities of professional and ethical dispensing in practice. In addition, a group dynamics session - focus group - was held as a forum for debate on responsible dispensing. The results showed that students tended to be mature, currently employed and were predominately women. Displaying adequate knowledge on Rational Use of Medications and of the corresponding legislation, the students reported difficulties exercising compatible practice. While the diagnosis pointed to the need for student preparation to enable ethical dispensing, the Focus Group highlighted the possibility for inclusion of a forum for reflection and debate on the ethics of dispensing as part of the Pharmaceutical Technician training.O presente trabalho tem como proposta avaliar a formação do Técnico em Farmácia para o exercício da dispensação responsável. A partir de um questionário com perguntas fechadas e abertas, o estudo envolveu a caracterização dos alunos, a identificação de conhecimentos e atitudes em relação ao Uso Racional dos Medicamentos com vistas ao delineamento dos limites e possibilidades do exercício profissional ético na dispensação. Além disso, foi realizada uma dinâmica grupal - grupo focal - com o objetivo de apreciar a constituição de um espaço de reflexão sobre a dispensação responsável. Os resultados evidenciaram um alunato de maior idade, inserido no mercado de trabalho e predominância de mulheres. Dispondo de conhecimento adequado sobre o Uso Racional dos Medicamentos e da legislação correspondente os alunos fazem referência às dificuldades no exercício de uma pr

  9. Pharmacists' role in opioid overdose: Kentucky pharmacists' willingness to participate in naloxone dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Patricia R; Goodin, Amie; Troske, SuZanne; Strahl, Audra; Fallin, Amanda; Green, Traci C

    To assess pharmacists' willingness to initiate the dispensing of naloxone. As of 2015, Kentucky law permits certified pharmacists to dispense naloxone under a physician-approved protocol. Electronic survey (e-mail) gauging perception of pharmacists' role in opioid overdose and attitudes toward, and barriers to, naloxone dispensing. All Kentucky pharmacists with active licenses in 2015. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the impact of pharmacist characteristics and attitudes on willingness to initiate naloxone dispensing, where the dependent variable was operationalized as a Likert-type question on a scale of 1 (not at all willing) to 6 (very willing). Of 4699 practicing Kentucky pharmacists, 1282 responded, of which 834 were community practitioners (response rate 27.3%). Pharmacists reported varying willingness to initiate naloxone dispensing, with 37.3% very willing (score 5 or 6) and 27.9% not willing (score 1 or 2). However, a majority of pharmacists reported willingness to dispense naloxone with a valid prescription (54.0%, score 5 or 6). Women pharmacists were 1.3 times more likely than men to be willing to initiate naloxone dispensing (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.6). Those who reported confidence in identifying individuals at risk for overdose were 1.2 times more likely to initiate dispensing, and those who reported confidence in ability to educate patients about overdose were 1.6 times more likely to express willingness to initiate naloxone dispensing (95% CIs, respectively, 1.0-1.3 and 1.4-1.8). Community pharmacists reported barriers to naloxone access at higher rates than pharmacists from other practice settings. Kentucky pharmacists are divided in their willingness to initiate naloxone dispensing; however, those who are confident in their ability to identify overdose risks are more willing. Increasing pharmacist confidence through appropriately designed education programs could facilitate pharmacist participation in naloxone

  10. Development of a pressurized bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves Junior, Newton Pimenta; Pinto, Edgar A. de Godoi Rodrigues; Silva, Ennio Peres da; Rapelli, Rubia; Pinto, Cristiano da Silva [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DFA/ IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada], Email: nevesjr@unicamp.br; Marin Neto, Antonio Jose; Lopes, Daniel Gabriel; Camargo, Joao Carlos; Ferreira, Paulo F.P. [Hydrogen Technology (HyTron), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Furlan, Andre Luis [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DE/FEC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the actual development status of a bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer with maximum production capacity of 1 m3/h of hydrogen and controlled by a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), which also interfaces the electrolytic system with operators and other equipment, such as gas storage tanks, fuel cells and photovoltaic panels. The project also includes the construction of an electrolysis test bench to record electrical parameters (cathode, anode, separator and electrolyte potentials), the amount of produced gases and gas quality determined by gas chromatography. (author)

  11. Development of a Portable Water Turbidimeter Based on NIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Turbidity of water is a very important parameter in the aquaculture. An integrated portable optical detector was developed based Near Infrared Spectrum spectroscopy to measure turbidity of water body rapidly and accurately. And the integrated absorbance measuring approach was proposed in this paper. The detector used AT89S52 microcontroller as its control chip and consisted of the light emission unit, detection unit and control unit. Wherein, the light emission unit comprised two sets of 860 nm LED light source and the corresponding collimating lens; the detection unit comprised two photoelectric sensors; the control unit included the light source driving circuit, two-stage amplification circuit and A/D conversion circuit. The integrated detector was calibrated in laboratory and carried out field experiments. The experiment results showed that the water turbidity detector achieved a high accuracy, its calibration R2 was 0.994 and validation R2 was 0.999. With the resolution of 0.01 NTU and the error of ± 2 %, the turbidimeter reached the practical level.

  12. Arsenic removal methods for drinking water in the developing countries: technological developments and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Fayzul; Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2017-11-01

    Arsenic pollution of drinking water is a concern, particularly in the developing countries. Removal of arsenic from drinking water is strongly recommended. Despite the availability of efficient technologies for arsenic removal, the small and rural communities in the developing countries are not capable of employing most of these technologies due to their high cost and technical complexity. There is a need for the "low-cost" and "easy to use" technologies to protect the humans in the arsenic affected developing countries. In this study, arsenic removal technologies were summarized and the low-cost technologies were reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of these technologies were identified and their scopes of applications and improvements were investigated. The costs were compared in context to the capacity of the low-income populations in the developing countries. Finally, future research directions were proposed to protect the low-income populations in the developing countries.

  13. Development and Optimum Composition of Locally Developed Potable Water Treatment Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiah Oladele BABATOLA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Current high level of energy cost and operational cost of membrane technologies and couple with difficulties in obtaining chemicals for potable water treatment give rooms for development of local substance and low cost adsorbents for water treatment. This paper presents a follow-up study on an earlier work in which some water treatment Tablets were produced and tested. The current work was directed at establishing the optimum composition of the tablets. Alum, calcium hypochlorite and lime were combined in proportion and made into pastes and tablets. Residual chlorine contents of the tablets were determined. The quality of stream water samples treated with the tablets was measured by chlorine content, pH and turbidity removal. It is concluded that the best composition is one part alum, two parts hypochlorite and three parts lime and this produced treated water pH of 7.8, chlorine residual of 5.0 mg/l and settled water turbidity 3.0 NTU. The product is aimed for use in rural communities to reduce rampaging death from water borne diseases.

  14. Water poverty and rural development: Evidence from South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matshe, I

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available link between household water and economic poverty of rural households, with households’ total monthly income used as an indicator of economic poverty. An adaptation of a comprehensive water poverty index, which considers water access, quality, use...

  15. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  16. WATER, DEVELOPMENT AND CONFLICT IN THE PLAN PUEBLA PANAMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Isabel Martínez Fuentes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the negative factors of development in the region where was placed the precedent Puebla Panama Plan (PPP, in particular issues around the geostrategic factor of water, as an important part of the current Project of Integration and Development of Mesoamerica in connection with the Sistema de Interconexión Eléctrica de los Países de América Central (SIEPAC, hydroelectric connection from Central America to Colombia. Currently, the enterprise viability catches tensions between the local and global wills, in the context of the appropriation of natural - resources and the resistance of communities opposite to adverse effects that result of the modification of the environment, in addition to the regional and local dynamics not served in the PPP and in the current PIDM.

  17. Developing Capacities for Implementing the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czunyi Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The novelty of the W-E-F nexus approach, given that it requires new coordination mechanisms within and between institutions and disciplines, requires new forms and types of capacities in order to be effective. This paper identifies some of the existing capacity gaps and measures to address those gaps, in order to ensure a successful implementation of the W-E-F nexus approach. Capacity development for the nexus requires a variety of mechanisms from the individual to institutional levels. To successfully put the W-E-F nexus into practice we should build on the strengths of existing mechanisms, while also improving coordination and integration of seemingly divergent approaches in the water, energy, and food sectors. Capacity development within and between sectors will be key to a successful implementation of the W-E-F nexus approach.

  18. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled substances by means of the Internet. 1304.50 Section 1304... that dispense controlled substances by means of the Internet. For a Web site to identify itself as being exempt from the definition of an online pharmacy by virtue of section 102(52)(B)(ii) of the Act...

  19. 21 CFR 866.2440 - Automated medium dispensing and stacking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2440... stacking device is a device intended for medical purposes to dispense a microbiological culture medium into... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated medium dispensing and stacking device...

  20. MANUAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE DISPENSING EQUIPMENT. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NO. 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THIS STANDARD COVERS THE SANITATION REQUIREMENTS FOR EQUIPMENT AND DEVICES WHICH DISPENSE FOOD OR BEVERAGE EITHER IN BULK OR PORTIONS. VENDING MACHINES OR BULK MILK DISPENSING EQUIPMENT ARE NOT COVERED IN THIS STANDARD. ITEMS COVERED INCLUDE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, FOOD PROTECTION AND FREEDOM FROM HARBORAGES. MINIMUM…

  1. 21 CFR 1307.11 - Distribution by dispenser to another practitioner or reverse distributor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution by dispenser to another practitioner or reverse distributor. 1307.11 Section 1307.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1307.11 Distribution by dispenser to another practitioner or reverse distributor. (a) A...

  2. Development Characteristics of PMMA in alternative alcohol:water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2015-03-01

    The most widely used resist in electron beam lithography is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The standard developers used are solution mixtures of isopropanol (IPA) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in a ratio of 3:1 and mixtures of IPA and water (H2O) in a ratio of 7:3. The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) classification entry for IPA includes: Specific target organ toxicity - single exposure (Category 3). MIBK is much more hazardous than IPA. The only GHS classification entry for Ethanol is: Flammable liquids (Category 2), i.e. more environmentally safe. Using Ethanol/H2O as a developer will therefore enable lower hazardous waste disposal costs to cleanrooms. We find Ethanol/H2O at 85% volume (2:1 molar) exhibits excellent lithography results as good as with IPA/H2O, and better contrast and sensitivity than IPA/H2O and MIBK/IPA developers. Lithographic data shows trends similar to published cosolvency data, but differ too much to be explained by it. In addition, unusual development at 50% volume concentrations for both IPA and Ethanol in H2O show dramatic pothole formation instead of uniform thickness loss found in standard contrast curve exposures. We believe local pockets of concentrated alcohol water molar mixtures are responsible for such behavior. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Cluster randomized trial of text message reminders to retail staff in tanzanian drug shops dispensing artemether-lumefantrine: effect on dispenser knowledge and patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Festo, Charles; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Cairns, Matthew; Lyaruu, Peter; Kenani, Mitya; Kachur, S Patrick; Goodman, Catherine; Schellenberg, David

    2014-10-01

    Artemisinin combination therapies are available in private outlets, but patient adherence might be compromised by poor advice from dispensers. In this cluster randomized trial in drug shops in Tanzania, 42 of 82 selected shops were randomized to receive text message reminders about what advice to provide when dispensing artemether-lumefantrine (AL). Eligible patients purchasing AL at shops in both arms were followed up at home and questioned about each dose taken. Dispensers were interviewed regarding knowledge of AL dispensing practices and receipt of the malaria-related text messages. We interviewed 904 patients and 110 dispensers from 77 shops. Although there was some improvement in dispenser knowledge, there was no difference between arms in adherence measured as completion of all doses (intervention 68.3%, control 69.8%, p [adjusted] = 0.6), or as completion of each dose at the correct time (intervention 33.1%, control 32.6%, p [adjusted] = 0.9). Further studies on the potential of text messages to improve adherence are needed. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Development of innovative computer software to facilitate the setup and computation of water quality index

    OpenAIRE

    Nabizadeh, Ramin; Valadi Amin, Maryam; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Naddafi, Kazem; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Yousefzadeh, Samira

    2013-01-01

    Background Developing a water quality index which is used to convert the water quality dataset into a single number is the most important task of most water quality monitoring programmes. As the water quality index setup is based on different local obstacles, it is not feasible to introduce a definite water quality index to reveal the water quality level. Findings In this study, an innovative software application, the Iranian Water Quality Index Software (IWQIS), is presented in order to faci...

  5. Implementation of the national desalination and water purification technology roadmap : structuring and directing the development of water supply solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Kevin M.; Dorsey, Zachary; Miller, G. Wade; Brady, Patrick Vane; Mulligan, Conrad; Rayburn, Chris

    2006-06-01

    In the United States, economic growth increasingly requires that greater volumes of freshwater be made available for new users, yet supplies of freshwater are already allocated to existing users. Currently, water for new users is made available through re-allocation of xisting water supplies-for example, by cities purchasing agricultural water rights. Water may also be made available through conservation efforts and, in some locales, through the development of ''new'' water from non-traditional sources such as the oceans, deep aquifer rackish groundwater, and water reuse.

  6. A single-step lithography system based on an enhanced robotic adhesive dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiyao; Rong, Weibin; Sun, Ding; Wang, Lefeng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, we present a single-step lithography system whereby the robotically controlled micro-extrusion of resist adhesive onto a substrate surface to directly create resist adhesive patterns of interest. This system is modified from a robotic adhesive dispenser by shrinking the aperture of the nozzle to a few micrometers aiming to realize patterns at microscale. From experimental investigation, it is found that working factors including writing speed, working time, and applied pressure can be adopted to conveniently regulate the feature size (the width of the line features and the diameter of the dot features). To test its functionality, the system was used to pattern line features on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and generate an array of square-like silicon microstructure by combining with wet etching. It provides a simple and flexible alternative tool to facilitate the development of microfabrication.

  7. The Development of Water Management Institutions and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... for adequate water delivery in the country, the West Cameroon Urban Water Authority. Law of 15th March 1971 established the Urban Water Authority in western Cameroon province to provide ... defined the rights and royalties relating to the exploration and exploitation of springs, spa and thermal waters ...

  8. The development of a municipal water conservation and demand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEFINITIONS. The DWA has adopted the generic term of 'Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WC/WDM)' although these terms have been defined independently in the Water Services. Sector Strategy (DWAF, 2004) as: • WC is the minimisation of loss or waste, the care and protection of water resources ...

  9. Development of regulations for water care works and process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that South Africa is a water scarce country and that return of high quality effluents to the water resources is essential. In terms of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) the National Government has public trusteeship of the nation's water resources and therefore, acting through the Minister, must ensure ...

  10. The Development of a Roof Integrated Solar Hot Water System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Infrastructure and DER Dept.; Moss, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solar Technologies Dept.; Palomino, G. Ernest [Salt River Project (SRP), Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The Salt River Project (SRP), in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Energy Laboratories, Inc. (ELI), collaborated to develop, test, and evaluate an advanced solar water-heating product for new homes. SRP and SNL collaborated under a Department of Energy Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), with ELI as SRP's industry partner. The project has resulted in the design and development of the Roof Integrated Thermal Siphon (RITH) system, an innovative product that features complete roof integration, a storage tank in the back of the collector and below the roofline, easy installation by homebuilders, and a low installed cost. SRP's market research guided the design, and the laboratory tests conducted at SNL provided information used to refine the design of field test units and indicated that the RITH concept is viable. ELI provided design and construction expertise and is currently configured to manufacture the units. This final report for the project provides all of the pertinent and available materials connected to the project including market research studies, the design features and development of the system, and the testing and evaluation conducted at SNL and at a model home test site in Phoenix, Arizona.

  11. 30 CFR 402.7 - Water-Resources Technology Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Technology Development Program. 402.7 Section 402.7 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources...

  12. Interstate dispensing: a case for uniform, intuitive legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaitis, Nijole L; King, Michelle A; Hope, Denise L

    2014-09-01

    Australian health practitioner registration is national, whereas legislation regarding the handling of medicines is governed by individual States and Territories. To align with the July 2010 national registration scheme some legislative modifications were made concerning scheduled drugs and poisons, but many differences between jurisdictions remain. In Queensland, the Health (Drugs and Poisons) Regulation 1996 (Qld) allows for dispensing of controlled drugs written by interstate prescribers but not lower scheduled specified restricted and regulated restricted drugs. The aim of this study was to assess awareness of seemingly counterintuitive legislation by pharmacists practising in South-East Queensland. Of 125 Gold Coast pharmacies contacted, 54 (43.2%) agreed to participate. The majority of pharmacists (88.9%) had good knowledge regarding controlled drugs. In contrast, they demonstrated confusion regarding specified restricted and regulated restricted drugs (51.9% correct awareness). Uniform legislation between jurisdictions or more intuitive legislation would ease practitioner confusion.

  13. Pheromone dispensers, including organic polymer fibers, described in the crop protection literature: comparison of their innovation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Hans E; Langner, S S; Eisinger, M-T

    2013-01-01

    Pheromone dispensers, although known in a variety of different designs, are one of the few remaining technical bottlenecks along the way to a sustainable pheromone based strategy in integrated pest management (IPM). Mating disruption with synthetic pheromones is a viable pest management approach. Suitable pheromone dispensers for these mating disruption schemes, however, are lagging behind the general availability of pheromones. Specifically, there is a need for matching the properties of the synthetic pheromones, the release rates suitable for certain insect species, and the environmental requirements of specific crop management. The "ideal" dispenser should release pheromones at a constant but pre-adjustable rate, should be mechanically applicable, completely biodegradable and thus save the costs for recovering spent dispensers. These should be made from renewable, cheap organic material, be economically inexpensive, and be toxicologically and eco-toxicologically inert to provide satisfactory solutions for the needs of practicing growers. In favourable cases, they will be economically competitive with conventional pesticide treatments and by far superior in terms of environmental and eco-toxicological suitability. In the course of the last 40 years, mating disruption, a non-toxicological approach, provided proof for its potential in dozens of pest insects of various orders and families. Applications for IPM in many countries of the industrialized and developing world have been reported. While some dispensers have reached wide circulation, only few of the key performing parameters fit the above requirements ideally and must be approximated with some sacrifice in performance. A fair comparison of the innovation potential of currently available pheromone dispensers is attempted. The authors advance here the use of innovative electrospun organic fibers with dimensions in the "meso" (high nano- to low micrometer) region. Due to their unique multitude of adjustable

  14. Development of fuzzy logic algorithm for water purification plant

    OpenAIRE

    SUDESH SINGH RANA; SUDESH SINGH RANA

    2015-01-01

    This paper propose the design of FLC algorithm for industrial application such application is water purification plant. In the water purification plant raw water or ground water is promptly purified by injecting chemical at rates related to water quality. The feed of chemical rates judged and determined by the skilled operator. Yagishita et al.[1] structured a system based on fuzzy logic so that the feed rate of the coagulant can be judged automatically without any skilled operator. We perfor...

  15. Senate working on reauthorization of water resources development bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    Although the details are not even written for forthcoming legislation to reauthorize the U.S. federal Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), three broad themes emerged during a 20 September hearing by the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW). First, passage of the WRDA bill, which would authorize water projects around the country, already appears to have bipartisan support, as well as support from conservation, industry, and labor groups. WRDA was last reauthorized in 2007 when the Senate voted 79-14 in broad bipartisan support to override President George W. Bush's veto of the $23 billion bill. Second, although the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers—which manages, operates, and maintains a vast water resources infrastructure including more than 600 dams, 926 harbors, and 12,000 miles of commercial inland navigation channels—received some praise for its projects, it was also criticized as being a bureaucracy in need of repair. Third, WRDA legislation is operating under different ground rules than in the past. EPW committee chair Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) said that she has been working with Republicans on WRDA legislation and that she hopes to move forward with a bill later this year—possibly bringing it up for a markup during Congress's lame duck session following the national election in November. She said that would be a way to set a marker for leadership on both sides of the congressional aisle to move forward with the bill. Boxer said she would "get my dream bill in place" and then provide it to committee ranking member James Inhofe (R-Okla.) and other Republicans for their comments.

  16. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  17. Development of an integrated membrane process for water reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, C H; Hu, J Y; Song, L F; Lee, L Y; Ong, S L; Ng, W J; Seah, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated membrane process (IMP) comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a reverse osmosis (RO) process was developed for water reclamation. Wastewater was treated by an MBR operated at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 20 days and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5.5 h. The IMP had an overall recovery efficiency of 80%. A unique feature of the IMP was the recycling of a fraction of RO concentrate back to the MBR. Experimental results revealed that a portion of the slow- and hard-to-degrade organic constituents in the recycle stream could be degraded by an acclimated biomass leading to an improved MBR treatment efficiency. Although recycling concentrated constituents could impose an inhibitory effect on the biomass and suppress their respiratory activities, results obtained suggested that operating MBR (in the novel IMP) at an F/M ratio below 0.03 g TOC/g VSS.day could yield an effluent quality comparable to that achievable without concentrate recycling. It is noted in this study that the novel IMP could achieve an average overall TOC removal efficiency of 88.940% and it consistently produced product water usable for high value reuse applications.

  18. Progress in the development of shallow-water mapping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, E.; Worley, C.R.; O'Brien, T.

    2007-01-01

    The USGS (US Geological Survey) Coastal and Marine Geology has deployed an advance autonomous shallow-draft robotic vehicle, Iris, for shallow-water mapping in Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The vehicle incorporates a side scan sonar system, seismic-reflection profiler, single-beam echosounder, and global positioning system (GPS) navigation. It is equipped with an onboard microprocessor-based motor controller, delivering signals for speed and steering to hull-mounted brushless direct-current thrusters. An onboard motion sensor in the Sea Robotics vehicle control system enclosure has been integrated in the vehicle to measure the vehicle heave, pitch, roll, and heading. Three water-tight enclosures are mounted along the vehicle axis for the Edgetech computer and electronics system including the Sea Robotics computer, a control and wireless communications system, and a Thales ZXW real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS receiver. The vehicle has resulted in producing high-quality seismic reflection and side scan sonar data, which will help in developing the baseline oyster habitat maps.

  19. Recommendations and requirements for soap and hand rub dispensers in healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel; Christiansen, Bärbel; Exner, Martin; Martiny, Heike; Sorger, Arno; Suchomel, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Hand hygiene is one of the most important measures to prevent transmission of infectious agents and plays a major role in prevention of infection in any type of healthcare setting. While requirements for the efficacy of hand disinfectants are defined in European testing norms such as the EN 1500 for hygienic hand disinfection or EN 12791 for surgical hand preparation, no specific recommendations for hand rub dispensers and liquid soap dispensers have been given yet. Therefore, the intention of the present recommendation on soap and hand rub dispensers in healthcare facilities is to close this gap and to enhance future improvement of dispenser functionality and design. Regardless of manufacture and design of a hand rub or liquid soap dispensers the following requirements shall be met in healthcare facilities:Triggering the dispenser must be possible without using hands. Sensor- or elbow-operated dispensers both fulfill this requirement. Dispensers must be only refillable in a modality where the content, be it a hand rub or liquid soap, cannot be contaminated. This is achieved best by using replaceable cartridge systems. Refilling through "top-up" must not be possible. The disperser should allow usage of different types of cartridges made by different manufacturers. Dispensers must be operated and maintained such that a microbial contamination of the pump nozzle may easily be avoided. It must be possible to identify the products used in a dispenser easily and without any manipulation. Identifying the type of product, be it a hand rub or a liquid soap, as well as reading the product's name and critical manufacturers' warnings must be possible at any time. The disperser must allow identification of the level of the used product without any further manipulation at any time. The design of the dispenser must allow easy cleaning and disinfection the outside and inside of the dispenser. The manufacturer of the dispenser must provide the user with information on applicable

  20. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at higher temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report describes efforts in developing new solid polymer electrolytes that will enable operation of proton exchange membrane electrolyzers at higher temperatures than are currently possible. Several ionomers have been prepared from polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyethersulfone (PES), and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) by employing various sulfonation procedures. By controlling the extent of sulfonation, a range of proton conductivities could be achieved, whose upper limit actually exceeded that of commercially available perfluoralkyl sulfonates. Thermoconductimetric analysis of samples at various degrees of sulfonation showed an inverse relationship between conductivity and maximum operating temperature. This was attributed to the dual effect of adding sulfonate groups to the polymer: more acid groups produce more protons for increased conductivity, but they also increase water uptake, which mechanically weakens the membrane. This situation was exacerbated by the limited acidity of the aromatic sulfonic acids (pK{sub A} {approx} 2-3). The possibility of using partial fluorination to raise the acid dissociation constant is discussed.

  1. Handling test of eye drop dispenser--comparison of unit-dose pipettes with conventional eye drop bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkari, Minna; Latvala, Terho; Ropo, Auli

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate how elderly people handle single-use eye drop dispensers (unit-dose pipettes) and to compare the performance with conventional eye drop bottles. In this open-label study, the handling of unit-dose pipettes and conventional eye drop bottles was compared in 41 elderly people who had little or no prior regular use of eye drop dispensers. The participants tested both types of dispenser once, and the following 7 variables were studied: ease/difficulty of opening the dispenser; influence of the size for handling of the dispenser; influence of the shape for handling of the dispenser; observation of the contents in the dispenser; the feeling of the dispenser in the hand; ease/difficulty of drop instillation on the eye from the dispenser; and overall performance of the eye drop dispenser. The dispensers contained isotonic saline, and a visual analog scale was used for assessment of each of the above variables. The mean age of the participants was 73 years. A statistically significant difference in favor of the unit-dose pipettes was found with respect to observation of the contents in the dispenser, ease of administration, and the overall performance. Women regarded the unit-dose pipettes generally better than the bottles, but such a difference was not seen in men. The study participants managed the unit-dose pipettes at least as well as the conventional eye drop bottles. If anything, the unit-dose pipettes appeared to be easier to use.

  2. Hydraulic modeling development and application in water resources engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Francisco J.; Yang, Chih Ted; Wang, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling has become widespread in water resources engineering and science to study rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. For example, computer models are commonly used to forecast anthropogenic effects on the environment, and to help provide advanced mitigation measures against catastrophic events such as natural and dam-break floods. Linking hydraulic models to vegetation and habitat models has expanded their use in multidisciplinary applications to the riparian corridor. Implementation of these models in software packages on personal desktop computers has made them accessible to the general engineering community, and their use has been popularized by the need of minimal training due to intuitive graphical user interface front ends. Models are, however, complex and nontrivial, to the extent that even common terminology is sometimes ambiguous and often applied incorrectly. In fact, many efforts are currently under way in order to standardize terminology and offer guidelines for good practice, but none has yet reached unanimous acceptance. This chapter provides a view of the elements involved in modeling surface flows for the application in environmental water resources engineering. It presents the concepts and steps necessary for rational model development and use by starting with the exploration of the ideas involved in defining a model. Tangible form of those ideas is provided by the development of a mathematical and corresponding numerical hydraulic model, which is given with a substantial amount of detail. The issues of model deployment in a practical and productive work environment are also addressed. The chapter ends by presenting a few model applications highlighting the need for good quality control in model validation.

  3. Modelling Inter-relationships among water, governance, human development variables in developing countries with Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondeynaz, C.; Lopez-Puga, J.; Carmona-Moreno, C.

    2012-04-01

    Improving Water and Sanitation Services (WSS), being a complex and interdisciplinary issue, passes through collaboration and coordination of different sectors (environment, health, economic activities, governance, and international cooperation). This inter-dependency has been recognised with the adoption of the "Integrated Water Resources Management" principles that push for the integration of these various dimensions involved in WSS delivery to ensure an efficient and sustainable management. The understanding of these interrelations appears as crucial for decision makers in the water sector in particular in developing countries where WSS still represent an important leverage for livelihood improvement. In this framework, the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has developed a coherent database (WatSan4Dev database) containing 29 indicators from environmental, socio-economic, governance and financial aid flows data focusing on developing countries (Celine et al, 2011 under publication). The aim of this work is to model the WatSan4Dev dataset using probabilistic models to identify the key variables influencing or being influenced by the water supply and sanitation access levels. Bayesian Network Models are suitable to map the conditional dependencies between variables and also allows ordering variables by level of influence on the dependent variable. Separated models have been built for water supply and for sanitation because of different behaviour. The models are validated if complying with statistical criteria but either with scientific knowledge and literature. A two steps approach has been adopted to build the structure of the model; Bayesian network is first built for each thematic cluster of variables (e.g governance, agricultural pressure, or human development) keeping a detailed level for interpretation later one. A global model is then built based on significant indicators of each cluster being previously modelled. The structure of the

  4. Water developments and canids in two North American deserts: a test of the indirect effect of water hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas K Hall

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic modifications to landscapes intended to benefit wildlife may negatively influence wildlife communities. Anthropogenic provisioning of free water (water developments to enhance abundance and distribution of wildlife is a common management practice in arid regions where water is limiting. Despite the long-term and widespread use of water developments, little is known about how they influence native species. Water developments may negatively influence arid-adapted species (e.g., kit fox, Vulpes macrotis by enabling water-dependent competitors (e.g., coyote, Canis latrans to expand distribution in arid landscapes (i.e., indirect effect of water hypothesis. We tested the two predictions of the indirect effect of water hypothesis (i.e., coyotes will visit areas with free water more frequently and kit foxes will spatially and temporally avoid coyotes and evaluated relative use of free water by canids in the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts from 2010 to 2012. We established scent stations in areas with (wet and without (dry free water and monitored visitation by canids to these sites and visitation to water sources using infrared-triggered cameras. There was no difference in the proportions of visits to scent stations in wet or dry areas by coyotes or kit foxes at either study area. We did not detect spatial (no negative correlation between visits to scent stations or temporal (no difference between times when stations were visited segregation between coyotes and kit foxes. Visitation to water sources was not different for coyotes between study areas, but kit foxes visited water sources more in Mojave than Great Basin. Our results did not support the indirect effect of water hypothesis in the Great Basin or Mojave Deserts for these two canids.

  5. Water Developments and Canids in Two North American Deserts: A Test of the Indirect Effect of Water Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lucas K.; Larsen, Randy T.; Knight, Robert N.; Bunnell, Kevin D.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic modifications to landscapes intended to benefit wildlife may negatively influence wildlife communities. Anthropogenic provisioning of free water (water developments) to enhance abundance and distribution of wildlife is a common management practice in arid regions where water is limiting. Despite the long-term and widespread use of water developments, little is known about how they influence native species. Water developments may negatively influence arid-adapted species (e.g., kit fox, Vulpes macrotis) by enabling water-dependent competitors (e.g., coyote, Canis latrans) to expand distribution in arid landscapes (i.e., indirect effect of water hypothesis). We tested the two predictions of the indirect effect of water hypothesis (i.e., coyotes will visit areas with free water more frequently and kit foxes will spatially and temporally avoid coyotes) and evaluated relative use of free water by canids in the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts from 2010 to 2012. We established scent stations in areas with (wet) and without (dry) free water and monitored visitation by canids to these sites and visitation to water sources using infrared-triggered cameras. There was no difference in the proportions of visits to scent stations in wet or dry areas by coyotes or kit foxes at either study area. We did not detect spatial (no negative correlation between visits to scent stations) or temporal (no difference between times when stations were visited) segregation between coyotes and kit foxes. Visitation to water sources was not different for coyotes between study areas, but kit foxes visited water sources more in Mojave than Great Basin. Our results did not support the indirect effect of water hypothesis in the Great Basin or Mojave Deserts for these two canids. PMID:23844097

  6. "Doi moi" and private pharmacies: a case study on dispensing and financial issues in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuc, N T; Tomson, G

    1999-06-01

    Vietnam, a developing country, has had comparatively good health and human survival at low cost. The economic reform changed the health care system, and private pharmacies during the last 5 years have taken over a majority of the drug distribution. Problems include weaknesses in drug regulation and reported increases in antibiotic resistance. This case study, a purposive sample of two private pharmacies in Hanoi, explored management, including dispensing, inventory and financing, using the concept of triangulation. Observations and interviews of customers were complemented by stock inventory and interviews of the pharmacy staff. Drugs were classified according to the ATC code and the essential drug list of Vietnam. Pretested protocols were used. In all 1833 encounters were studied during the 2 weeks, out of which 286 were children. Less than 1% of customers came with prescriptions and 94.9% decided by themselves which drugs to buy. Antibiotics represented 17%, of which 90% were broad spectrum. Ampicillin dominated, both in children and adults. Some 50% of the antibiotics were given for 2.5 days or less. Less than 50% of the drugs were essential drugs (ED) on dispensing and even less on inventory. Antibiotics and vitamins were the most commonly sold drugs and, overall, brand names dominated. Little if any drug information was observed. Antibiotics were said to represent the most profitable drugs, according to the pharmacy staff. More than 20% of all products were combination drugs, including irrational and popular products with antibiotics and corticosteroids and combinations of aspirin, phenacetin and caffeine. This study shows an unexpectedly high proportion of customers, being "Tu Lam Bac Sy" (their own doctors), deciding themselves which drugs to buy. Although the "Doi moi" renovation has led to much improved drug availability, at least in urban setting, our case study highlights major problems in need of urgent actions. In particular the prevailing practices

  7. Water You Engineering? An Activity to Develop Water-Quality Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody; Todd, Carrie Davis

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of our most precious resources. However, for many in the United States, having fresh, safe drinking water is taken for granted, and due to this perceived lack of relevance, students may not fully appreciate the luxury of having safe running water--in the home. One approach to resolving water-quality issues in the United States may…

  8. The impact of water scarcity on economic development initiatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's unallocated water resources have dwindled to precariously low levels. Furthermore, it is generally recognised by the authorities and specialists alike that it is likely that water demand will outstrip water supply within the next decade. Macro-economically and strategically speaking, the question therefore is how ...

  9. Coping with water crisis in Cuba | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-14

    Jul 14, 2011 ... Over the past ten years, Cuba's economic decline has led to a slow but steady deterioration of water supplies and sanitation services — and a resulting increase in water-borne disease. When water shortages in parts of Cuba reached crisis proportions last year, two communities solved the problem by ...

  10. The impact of water scarcity on economic development initiatives#

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-29

    Jun 29, 2009 ... South Africa's unallocated water resources have dwindled to precariously low levels. Furthermore, it is generally recognised by the authorities and specialists alike that it is likely that water demand will outstrip water supply within the next decade. Macro-economically and strategically speaking, the question ...

  11. Fair access to water | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-03-19

    Mar 19, 2013 ... As the world observes World Water Day (March 22) and the International Year of Water Cooperation, IDRC asked researchers: How do we ensure fair and equitable access to water? The quotes below represent a range of views on this important issue. The opinions expressed reflect those of the speaker, ...

  12. Coping with water crisis in Cuba | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over the past ten years, Cuba's economic decline has led to a slow but steady deterioration of water supplies and sanitation services — and a resulting increase in water-borne disease. When water shortages in parts of Cuba reached crisis proportions last year, two communities solved the problem by taking matters in their ...

  13. Studies on water deficits on apical development and panicle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf primordium production was severely inhibited by periods of water deficit, with apparent cessation occurring around a dawn water potential of -1.0 MPa. Panicle initiation was delayed according to the duration of water deficit and the period of cessation of leaf primordium production. The duration of growth stages two ...

  14. Development of regulations for water care works and process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    and controlled in a sustainable and equitable manner, for the benefit of all persons and in accordance with its constitutional .... training happen. The proposed regulation. Water care works. Schedules I and II deal with the classification of Water Care Works which are defined as both potable water and wastewater treatment.

  15. Bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A; Campbell, Esther J; Maxwell, Sheri L; Gerba, Charles P; Dolan, Michael J; Arbogast, James W; Macinga, David R

    2011-05-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log(10) CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log(10) CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log(10) CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log(10) CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log(10) CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log(10) CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log(10) CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings.

  16. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain A

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of training of dispensers on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in context to storage temperature, prescription terminologies and status of medicines in Islamabad, Pakistan.Method: A randomized, controlled, blinded intervention study was designed and implemented. Before the implementation of intervention, a baseline study was performed to assess the knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies. The study population included all community pharmacy outlets in Islamabad. Pharmacies of Islamabad which were visited in pre intervention phase (n=118 were divided into two geographical regions: A (intervention and B (control. Thirty pharmacies were randomly selected from each region. Keeping in view the results of the baseline study an educational intervention was designed to improve the knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan.Results: A significant difference in the overall knowledge of dispensers was observed between the pre-post intervention groups. Knowledge of dispensers regarding storage of drugs, prescription terminologies and status of drugs was improved after the training. On the other hand no significant difference was observed between the pre-post control groups.Conclusion: The study has highlighted that improvements in knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies are possible through suitable interventions. But, results of interventions can only be sustainable through continuous monitoring and reinforcement of the training.

  17. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azhar; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Malik, Madeeha

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of training of dispensers on knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in context to storage temperature, prescription terminologies and status of medicines in Islamabad, Pakistan. A randomized, controlled, blinded intervention study was designed and implemented. Before the implementation of intervention, a baseline study was performed to assess the knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies. The study population included all community pharmacy outlets in Islamabad. Pharmacies of Islamabad which were visited in pre intervention phase (n=118) were divided into two geographical regions: A (intervention) and B (control). Thirty pharmacies were randomly selected from each region. Keeping in view the results of the baseline study an educational intervention was designed to improve the knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies in Pakistan. A significant difference in the overall knowledge of dispensers was observed between the pre-post intervention groups. Knowledge of dispensers regarding storage of drugs, prescription terminologies and status of drugs was improved after the training. On the other hand no significant difference was observed between the pre-post control groups. The study has highlighted that improvements in knowledge of dispensers working at community pharmacies are possible through suitable interventions. But, results of interventions can only be sustainable through continuous monitoring and reinforcement of the training.

  18. The accuracy and timeliness of neuraminidase inhibitor dispensing data for predicting laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenburg, J; Charland, K M; DE Serres, G; Buckeridge, D L

    2016-06-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitor (NI) dispensing has emerged as a possible automated data source for influenza surveillance. We aimed to evaluate its timeliness, correlation, and predictive accuracy in relation to influenza activity in Quebec, Canada, 2010-2013. Our secondary objective was to use the same metrics to compare NI dispensing to visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) in emergency departments (EDs). Provincial weekly counts of positive influenza laboratory tests were used as a reference measure for the level of influenza circulation. We applied ARIMA models to account for serial correlation. We computed cross-correlations to measure the strengths of association and lead-lag relationships between NI dispensing, ILI ED visits, and our reference indicator. Finally, using an ARIMA model, we evaluated the ability of NI dispensing and ILI ED visits to predict laboratory-confirmed influenza. NI dispensing was significantly correlated (R = 0·68) with influenza activity with no lag. The maximal correlation of ILI ED visits was not as strong (R = 0·50). Both NI dispensing and ILI ED visits were significant predictors of laboratory-confirmed influenza in a multivariable model; predictive potential was greatest when NI counts were lagged to precede laboratory surveillance by 2 weeks. We conclude that NI dispensing data provides timely and valuable information for influenza surveillance.

  19. Dispensing processes impact apparent biological activity as determined by computational and statistical analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    Full Text Available Dispensing and dilution processes may profoundly influence estimates of biological activity of compounds. Published data show Ephrin type-B receptor 4 IC50 values obtained via tip-based serial dilution and dispensing versus acoustic dispensing with direct dilution differ by orders of magnitude with no correlation or ranking of datasets. We generated computational 3D pharmacophores based on data derived by both acoustic and tip-based transfer. The computed pharmacophores differ significantly depending upon dispensing and dilution methods. The acoustic dispensing-derived pharmacophore correctly identified active compounds in a subsequent test set where the tip-based method failed. Data from acoustic dispensing generates a pharmacophore containing two hydrophobic features, one hydrogen bond donor and one hydrogen bond acceptor. This is consistent with X-ray crystallography studies of ligand-protein interactions and automatically generated pharmacophores derived from this structural data. In contrast, the tip-based data suggest a pharmacophore with two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrogen bond donor and no hydrophobic features. This pharmacophore is inconsistent with the X-ray crystallographic studies and automatically generated pharmacophores. In short, traditional dispensing processes are another important source of error in high-throughput screening that impacts computational and statistical analyses. These findings have far-reaching implications in biological research.

  20. Sex pheromone dispenser type and trap design affect capture of dogwood borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aijun; Leskey, Tracy C; Bergh, J Christopher; Walgenbach, James F

    2013-03-01

    Using a ternary sex pheromone blend [86:6:6 v:v:v (Z,Z)-3,13-octadecadienyl acetate: (E,Z)-2,13-octadecadienyl acetate: (Z,E)-3,13-octadecadienyl acetate], we tested the effect of dispenser type and trap design for capture of dogwood borer (DWB), Synanthedon scitula Harris (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in apple orchards in West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina. Wing-style sticky traps baited with polyethylene vial pheromone dispensers captured more male DWB over the first 2 months than traps baited with rubber septum pheromone dispensers. However, catches in vial-baited traps decreased considerably after the first 2 months, possibly due to the antagonistic effect of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy acetophenone that diffused from the polyethylene vials. By contrast, traps baited with rubber septum dispensers captured DWB males for at least 6 months; over the last four months of the flight season, catches in traps baited with a rubber septum were greater than those in traps baited with a vial dispenser. Therefore, the rubber septum dispenser is recommended for season-long monitoring of DWB. A release-rate study, using laboratory and field-aged dispensers, demonstrated that desorption of DWB sex pheromone from polyethylene vial or rubber septum dispensers followed first order kinetics, with half-lives of 1.6 and 10.7 months, respectively. Several trap designs, including wing-and delta-style sticky traps, and white and green "bucket-style" traps, baited with rubber septum dispensers were compared in commercial apple orchards for catch of DWB. Bucket traps caught more moths when moth populations were high, because the sticky surfaces of the 1C and delta traps likely became saturated. However, among the commercially available traps tested, no particular design gave consistently higher catches. Further work is needed to explore capture mechanisms and maintenance needs of different trap types.

  1. Temporal patterns of medications dispensed to children and adolescents in a national insured population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Olson

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: This study aimed to comprehensively describe prevalence and temporal dispensing patterns for medications prescribed to children and adolescents in the United States. Participants were 1.6 million children (49% female under 18 years old enrolled in a nation-wide, employer-provided insurance plan. All medication claims from 1999-2006 were reviewed retrospectively. Drugs were assigned to 16 broad therapeutic categories. Effects of trend over time, seasonality, age and gender on overall and within category prevalence were examined. RESULTS: Mean monthly prevalence for dispensed medications was 23.5% (range 19.4-27.5, with highest rates in winter and lowest in July. The age group with the highest prevalence was one-year-old children. On average each month, 17.1% of all children were dispensed a single drug and 6.4% were dispensed two or more. Over time, prevalence for two or more drugs did not change, but the proportion of children dispensed a single drug decreased (slope -.02%, p= .001. Overall, boys had higher monthly rates than girls (average difference 0.9%, p= .002. However, differences by gender were greatest during middle childhood, especially for respiratory and central nervous system agents. Contraceptives accounted for a large proportion of dispensed medication to older teenage girls. Rates for the drugs with the highest prevalence in this study were moderately correlated (average Pearson r.66 with those from a previously published national survey. CONCLUSION: On average, nearly one quarter of a population of insured children in the United States was dispensed medication each month. This rate decreased somewhat over time, primarily because proportionally fewer children were dispensed a single medication. The rate for two or more drugs dispensed simultaneously remained steady.

  2. Microbiological evaluation of hot beverages dispensed by vending machines from the Army barracks of Brigata Meccanizzata Aosta located in Messina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Beninati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of hot beverages dispensed by vending machines (VMs. The study was carried out on 203 samples from 15 VMs located in 5 Army barracks in Messina. The samples included: water used for preparation of beverages, swab of water tank, swab of blender machine, chocolate powder, milk powder, cappuccino and chocolate drink (29 samples for each types. All samples were examined for total bacterial count (TBC, coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostri - dium perfringens, Aeromonas spp., Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. For the water samples the colony count (CC at 22°C and at 37°C was made. The average values of CC at 22°C and at 37°C were of 10.86x10²±8.72x10² CFU/mL and of 21.72x10²±16.44x10² CFU/mL, respectively. P. aeruginosa, coliform bacteria, S. aureus, E. coli and molds were detected from water. The TBC ranged from 176 CFU/g (±275.2 for chocolate powder to 294.8±69.4 CFU/g for milk powder. S. aureus and molds were isolated from milk powder, while coliforms, E. coli and S. aureus were observed in chocolate powder. The average TBC for hot beverages ranged from 34.32x10³±97.77x10³ CFU/mL for cappuccino to 36.59x10³±10.47x104 CFU/mL for chocolate drink. Coliforms, E. coli, enterococci and molds were detected from cappuccino, while enterococci and molds were observed in chocolate drink. The microbiological characteristics of the water and powders, hygiene, and the periodic cleaning of machines, influenced the microbiological quality of the hot beverages dispensed by VMs.

  3. Coordinating and Negotiating Blue Nile Water Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geressu, R. T.; Harou, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Many countries are proposing new reservoirs in transboundary river basins world-wide that impact downstream regions. Failure to consider and incorporate multiple stakeholder interests in system design and decision making could contribute to regional disputes. Negotiated introduction of new assets and associated coordination strategies (e.g. cost and power sharing arrangements) could reduce conflict and help achieve consensus. In multi-stakeholders problems, parties are likely to prioritize performance targets differently and hence will often prefer different water system designs, stalling negotiations. An ideal solution is where individual and group benefits are maximized by allocating (exchanging) resources according to the relative preferences of stakeholders. Hence, a negotiation support mechanism should be able to incorporate stakeholder preference information. In this paper, we propose a three-step search & deliberate, elicit preferences, and search & negotiate approach for supporting negotiations in complex infrastructure-environmental systems. The approach seeks to find designs and coordination mechanisms that are more beneficial than non-cooperative actions. The proposed approach is applied to a stylized Blue Nile reservoir design problem in Ethiopia seeking to set reservoir capacity and operating rules. We consider cost and energy performance metrics for Ethiopia and energy and irrigation water supply in Sudan. We use example stakeholder (i.e., Ethiopian and Sudanese) priorities for demonstration purpose. The result is an agreed system design and coordination schemes (co-financing and power trade). The application results demonstrate that incorporating coordination strategies, such as energy trade, cost sharing, and financing in assessing transboundary reservoir development options could help find compromise designs that different parties can support.

  4. An Analysis of Historical Impacts of Water Resources Development on Water Levels of the Mekong River (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, T. A.; Arias, M. E.; Piman, T.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid rate of water resources development in the Mekong basin of Southeast Asia is a cause for concern due to potential impacts on highly valued fisheries and natural ecosystems. Historical water levels of the Mekong were analyzed by comparing pre and post 1991 daily data of 6 stations along the mainstream from Chiang Sean, in northern Lao PDR and Thailand, to Stung Treng, in Cambodia, and the Pre Kdam station near the Tonle Sap Lake in the lower Mekong floodplain using the Indicators of Hydrological Alteration (IHA) software. The year 1991 marks a turning point in the rate of development in the basin, with the start of development of mainstream dams in the upper Mekong and accelerated hydropower and irrigation development in key tributaries. Observed changes in water level patterns along the Mekong were linked to temporal and spatial water resources development from 1960 to 2010. Variations in climate were accounted for and are important, but they were not observed to be the main causes of changes in key hydrological indicators related to ecosystem productivity. The development of mainstream dams in the upper Mekong basin in the post 1991 period resulted in a significant change of seasonal water levels, raise rates, fall rates, and the number of water level fluctuations at Chiang Sean. This effect diminishes downstream until it becomes negligible at the Mukdahan monitoring station in Thailand, which represents a drainage area of over 50% of the total Mekong Basin. Further downstream at Pakse station in Southern Lao PDR, changes in hydrological indicators post 1991 were observed to be significant again, which can be directly attributed to water resource development in the Chi and Mun River basins in Northeastern Thailand. A reduction of 23% and 11% in water level raising rates and fall rates, respectively at Prek Kdam, provides clear evidence of a diminished flood pulse of the Tonle Sap Lake in the post 1991 period. Given the observed water level alterations

  5. Development of Policies, Institutions and Procedures for Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demouche, L.; Pfiefer, J.; Hanson, A.; Skaggs, R.

    2009-12-01

    In the arid, water scarce region of New Mexico and West Texas there is growing interest in the potential for water reuse to extend existing supplies and mitigate drought shortage impacts. There are no new sources of water in New Mexico, except reclaimed water. Communities and individuals are uncertain about and have many unanswered questions about polices, institutions involved (agencies), legal and regulatory requirements, and procedures governing water reuse. Issues to be addressed by this project include: the legal ability to reuse water, ownership of water rights, downstream or third party impacts, regulatory and procedural requirements, water quality concerns, state and local agency involvement, and cost effectiveness of water reuse compared to alternative sources. Presently, there is very little implementation or directives in New Mexico policy that addresses reuse, reclamation, or recycled water. The only regulations pertaining to reuse is New Mexico Environmental Department currently allows the use of reclaimed domestic wastewater for irrigation of golf courses and green spaces, which is listed in the Policy for the Above Ground Use of Reclaimed Domestic Wastewater (NMED, 2003). This document identifies the various reclaimed quality classifications that are required for specific applications and the permits required for application. This document does not identify or address policy applications on the distribution, ownership, or trading of reclaimed water. Even though reclaimed water reuse projects are currently being implemented in many cities in the U.S., mainly for commercial and municipal irrigation (golf courses and green space), its potential has not yet been exploited. A policy analysis matrix (PAM) is being designed to identify and examine the policy framework and consequences of non-policy implementation for decision makers and interest groups and assist them in understanding the consequences of policy actions and project outcomes if no laws or

  6. Water resources thesaurus: A vocabulary for indexing and retrieving the literature of water resources research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1980-01-01

    This Water Resources Thesaurus encompasses such broad research areas as the hydrologic cycle, supply of and demand for water, conservation and best use of available supplies of water, methods of increasing supplies, and the economic, legal, social, engineering, recreational, biological, geographical, ecological, and qualitative aspects of water resources. This volume represents a major revision of the previous edition of the Thesaurus, published in 1971. The principal source of terms for this edition has been the indexing used in Selected Water Resources Abstracts (SWRA). Since its inception in 1968, SWRA has indexed tens of thousands of publications. Its indexing terminology has been developed by expert abstracters and researchers, and represents the range of disciplines related to research, development, and management of water resources.

  7. Development of device producing electrolyzed water for home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umimoto, K.; Nagata, S.; Yanagida, J.

    2013-06-01

    When water containing ionic substances is electrolyzed, electrolyzed water with strong bactericidal ability due to the available chlorine(AC) is generated on the anode side. Slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water (pH 6.5 to 7.5) is physiological pH and is suitable for biological applications. For producing slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water simply, a vertical-type electrolytic tank with an asymmetric structure was made. As a result, a small amount of strongly alkaline water was generated in the upper cathodic small chamber, and a large amount of weakly acidic water generated in the lower anodic large chamber. The pH and AC concentration in solutin mixed with both electrolyzed water were 6.3 and 39.5 ppm, respectively, This solution was slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water and had strong bactericidal activity. This device is useful for producing slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water as a disinfectant to employ at home care, when considering economic and environmental factors, since it returns to ordinary water after use.

  8. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayer, Alex; Mubako, Stanley; Ruddell, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    .... We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts...

  9. The proline-histidine-rich CDK2/CDK4 interaction region of C/EBPalpha is dispensable for C/EBPalpha-mediated growth regulation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Bo Torben; Pedersen, Thomas Askov; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd

    2006-01-01

    The C/EBPalpha transcription factor regulates growth and differentiation of several tissues during embryonic development. Several hypotheses as to how C/EBPalpha inhibits cellular growth in vivo have been derived, mainly from studies of tissue culture cells. In fetal liver it has been proposed th...... is dispensable for proper embryonic development of, and cell cycle control in, the liver. Surprisingly, control experiments performed in C/EBPalpha null fetal livers yielded similar results....

  10. Water Resources Development in the Mbuluzi River Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mbuluzi river basin originates in Swaziland and exits in Mozambique. The mean annual runoff is estimated to be 372x10 m. The highest recorded flow is 68m/s while the lowest flow is 1.1m/s. The current water demand is estimated to be 8.14m/s while the projected water demand excluding irrigation water demand is ...

  11. Development of Pelvic Abscess Following Water-Skiing Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pearlman, Mark D.; Lauren Zoschnick

    1993-01-01

    Several descriptions of hydrostatic injuries while water-skilng have been described, including lacerations of the perineum, vagina, and cervix. Salpingitis or pelvic abscess resulting from water-skiing injuries are rare but important complications. A case of a pelvic abscess following a fall while water-skiing is described. The abscess was drained laparoscopically, resulting in a good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury and recommendations for prevention are also presented. Upper genita...

  12. Recent Developments for Remediating Acidic Mine Waters Using Sulfidogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, José A. P.; Sahoo, Prafulla K.; Alves, Joner Oliveira; Siqueira, José O.

    2017-01-01

    Acidic mine drainage (AMD) is regarded as a pollutant and considered as potential source of valuable metals. With diminishing metal resources and ever-increasing demand on industry, recovering AMD metals is a sustainable initiative, despite facing major challenges. AMD refers to effluents draining from abandoned mines and mine wastes usually highly acidic that contain a variety of dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn) in much greater concentration than what is found in natural water bodies. There are numerous remediation treatments including chemical (lime treatment) or biological methods (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors) used for metal precipitation and removal from AMD. However, controlled biomineralization and selective recovering of metals using sulfidogenic bacteria are advantageous, reducing costs and environmental risks of sludge disposal. The increased understanding of the microbiology of acid-tolerant sulfidogenic bacteria will lead to the development of novel approaches to AMD treatment. We present and discuss several important recent approaches using low sulfidogenic bioreactors to both remediate and selectively recover metal sulfides from AMD. This work also highlights the efficiency and drawbacks of these types of treatments for metal recovery and points to future research for enhancing the use of novel acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfidogenic microorganisms in AMD treatment. PMID:29119111

  13. Recent Developments for Remediating Acidic Mine Waters Using Sulfidogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nancucheo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidic mine drainage (AMD is regarded as a pollutant and considered as potential source of valuable metals. With diminishing metal resources and ever-increasing demand on industry, recovering AMD metals is a sustainable initiative, despite facing major challenges. AMD refers to effluents draining from abandoned mines and mine wastes usually highly acidic that contain a variety of dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Zn in much greater concentration than what is found in natural water bodies. There are numerous remediation treatments including chemical (lime treatment or biological methods (aerobic wetlands and compost bioreactors used for metal precipitation and removal from AMD. However, controlled biomineralization and selective recovering of metals using sulfidogenic bacteria are advantageous, reducing costs and environmental risks of sludge disposal. The increased understanding of the microbiology of acid-tolerant sulfidogenic bacteria will lead to the development of novel approaches to AMD treatment. We present and discuss several important recent approaches using low sulfidogenic bioreactors to both remediate and selectively recover metal sulfides from AMD. This work also highlights the efficiency and drawbacks of these types of treatments for metal recovery and points to future research for enhancing the use of novel acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfidogenic microorganisms in AMD treatment.

  14. Development and validation of a drinking water temperature model in domestic drinking water supply systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanovic, Ljiljana; Moerman, Andreas; Hoek, van der Jan Peter; Vreeburg, Jan; Blokker, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Domestic drinking water supply systems (DDWSs) are the final step in the delivery of drinking water to consumers. Temperature is one of the rate-controlling parameters for many chemical and microbiological processes and is, therefore, considered as a surrogate parameter for water quality

  15. Four degree of freedom liquid dispenser for direct write capillary self-assembly with sub-nanoliter precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroz, Justin; Bedewy, Mostafa; Reinker, Michael; Chhajer, Vipul; Awtar, Shorya; Hart, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Capillary forces provide a ubiquitous means of organizing micro- and nanoscale structures on substrates. In order to investigate the mechanism of capillary self-assembly and to fabricate complex ordered structures, precise control of the meniscus shape is needed. We present a precision instrument that enables deposition of liquid droplets spanning from 2 nl to 300 μl, in concert with mechanical manipulation of the liquid-substrate interface with four degrees of freedom. The substrate has sub-100 nm positioning resolution in three axes of translation, and its temperature is controlled using thermoelectric modules. The capillary tip can rotate about the vertical axis while simultaneously dispensing liquid onto the substrate. Liquid is displaced using a custom bidirectional diaphragm pump, in which an elastic membrane is hydraulically actuated by a stainless steel syringe. The syringe is driven by a piezoelectric actuator, enabling nanoliter volume and rate control. A quantitative model of the liquid dispenser is verified experimentally, and suggests that compressibility in the hydraulic line deamplifies the syringe stroke, enabling sub-nanoliter resolution control of liquid displacement at the capillary tip. We use this system to contact-print water and oil droplets by mechanical manipulation of a liquid bridge between the capillary and the substrate. Finally, we study the effect of droplet volume and substrate temperature on the evaporative self-assembly of monodisperse polymer microspheres from sessile droplets, and demonstrate the formation of 3D chiral assemblies of micro-rods by rotation of the capillary tip during evaporative assembly.

  16. Four degree of freedom liquid dispenser for direct write capillary self-assembly with sub-nanoliter precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroz, Justin; Bedewy, Mostafa; Reinker, Michael; Chhajer, Vipul; Awtar, Shorya; Hart, A John

    2012-01-01

    Capillary forces provide a ubiquitous means of organizing micro- and nanoscale structures on substrates. In order to investigate the mechanism of capillary self-assembly and to fabricate complex ordered structures, precise control of the meniscus shape is needed. We present a precision instrument that enables deposition of liquid droplets spanning from 2 nl to 300 μl, in concert with mechanical manipulation of the liquid-substrate interface with four degrees of freedom. The substrate has sub-100 nm positioning resolution in three axes of translation, and its temperature is controlled using thermoelectric modules. The capillary tip can rotate about the vertical axis while simultaneously dispensing liquid onto the substrate. Liquid is displaced using a custom bidirectional diaphragm pump, in which an elastic membrane is hydraulically actuated by a stainless steel syringe. The syringe is driven by a piezoelectric actuator, enabling nanoliter volume and rate control. A quantitative model of the liquid dispenser is verified experimentally, and suggests that compressibility in the hydraulic line deamplifies the syringe stroke, enabling sub-nanoliter resolution control of liquid displacement at the capillary tip. We use this system to contact-print water and oil droplets by mechanical manipulation of a liquid bridge between the capillary and the substrate. Finally, we study the effect of droplet volume and substrate temperature on the evaporative self-assembly of monodisperse polymer microspheres from sessile droplets, and demonstrate the formation of 3D chiral assemblies of micro-rods by rotation of the capillary tip during evaporative assembly.

  17. Water Treatment Systems Make a Big Splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In the 1960s, NASA's Manned Space Center (now known as Johnson Space Center) and the Garrett Corporation, Air Research Division, conducted a research program to develop a small, lightweight water purifier for the Apollo spacecraft that would require minimal power and would not need to be monitored around-the-clock by astronauts in orbit. The 9-ounce purifier, slightly larger than a cigarette pack and completely chlorine-free, dispensed silver ions into the spacecraft s water supply to successfully kill off bacteria. A NASA Technical Brief released around the time of the research reported that the silver ions did not impart an unpleasant taste to the water. NASA s ingenuity to control microbial contamination in space caught on quickly, opening the doors for safer methods of controlling water pollutants on Earth.

  18. Towards more reliable automated multi-dose dispensing: retrospective follow-up study on medication dose errors and product defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palttala, Iida; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Honkanen, Outi; Suominen, Risto; Antikainen, Osmo; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    To date, little is known on applicability of different types of pharmaceutical dosage forms in an automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. The purpose of the present study was to identify and further investigate various process-induced and/or product-related limitations associated with multi-dose dispensing process. The rates of product defects and dose dispensing errors in automated multi-dose dispensing were retrospectively investigated during a 6-months follow-up period. The study was based on the analysis of process data of totally nine automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing systems. Special attention was paid to the dependence of multi-dose dispensing errors/product defects and pharmaceutical tablet properties (such as shape, dimensions, weight, scored lines, coatings, etc.) to profile the most suitable forms of tablets for automated dose dispensing systems. The relationship between the risk of errors in dose dispensing and tablet characteristics were visualized by creating a principal component analysis (PCA) model for the outcome of dispensed tablets. The two most common process-induced failures identified in the multi-dose dispensing are predisposal of tablet defects and unexpected product transitions in the medication cassette (dose dispensing error). The tablet defects are product-dependent failures, while the tablet transitions are dependent on automated multi-dose dispensing systems used. The occurrence of tablet defects is approximately twice as common as tablet transitions. Optimal tablet preparation for the high-speed multi-dose dispensing would be a round-shaped, relatively small/middle-sized, film-coated tablet without any scored line. Commercial tablet products can be profiled and classified based on their suitability to a high-speed multi-dose dispensing process.

  19. Perceptions of Nongovernmental Organization (NGO Staff about Water Privatization in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis A. Adams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Almost a billion people globally lack access to potable water. In the early 1990’s, attempts to improve potable water access in the global south included a massive push for water services privatization, often involving the transfer of public water services to private companies. Critics of water privatization claim it rarely improves access to water, and in most cases, unfairly affect poor people. Proponents on the other hand argue that it is necessary for efficient management and capital investment in the water sector. Although development NGOs play an important role in developing country water provision, hardly any studies have sought to understand their perceptions about the potential role of water privatization towards improving access to potable water in developing countries. We interviewed the key staff among 28 international and national NGO staff about water privatization, its opportunities and constraints. Their perceptions were mixed. While most criticized water privatization as increasing water costs to the poor, some noted that privatization is necessary for improving water access through increased capital investment. We present the findings and discuss larger implications for water policies and reforms in developing countries.

  20. A simple low-cost of liquid I-131 dispenser for routine radiopharmaceutical dispensing at nuclear medicine department, Institut Kanser Negara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said, M. A.; Suhaimi, N. E. F. [Fakulti Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi Selangor (Malaysia); Ashhar, Z. N., E-mail: aminhpj@gmail.com [Institut Kanser Negara, No 4, Jalan P7, Presint 7, 62250 Putrajaya (Malaysia); Zainon, R. [Advanced Medical & Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Bertam, 13200, Kepala Batas, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In routine radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) dispensing, the amount of radiation dose received by the personnel depends on the distance between the personnel and the source, the time spent manipulating the source and the amount of shielding used to reduce the dose rate from the source. The novel iRAD-I131 dispenser using recycle {sup 131}I liquid lead pot will lead into low cost production, less maintenance and low dose received by the personnel that prepared the {sup 131}I. The new fabricated of low cost {sup 131}I dispenser was tested and the dose received by personnel were evaluated. The body of lead material is made from 2.5 cm lead shielded coated with epoxy paint to absorb the radiation dose up to 7.4 GBq of {sup 131} I. The lead pot was supported with two stainless steel rod. The Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) nanodot was used in this study to measure the dose rate at both extremities for every personnel who prepared the {sup 131}I. Each OSL nanodot was attached at the fingertip. Three different personnel (experienced between one to ten years above in preparing the radiopharmaceuticals) were participated in this study. The average equivalent dose at right and left hand were 122.694 ± 121.637 µSv/GBq and 77.281 ± 62.146 µSv/GBq respectively. This study found that the dose exposure received using iRAD-I131 was less up to seven times compared to the conventional method. The comparison of experimental data using iRAD-I131 and established radiopharmaceutical dispenser was also discussed. The innovation of {sup 131}I dispenser is highly recommended in a small radiopharmaceutical facility with limited budget. The novel iRAD-I131 enables implementation of higher output liquid dispensing with low radiation dose to the personnel.

  1. Piwi genes are dispensable for normal hematopoiesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona J Nolde

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC must engage in a life-long balance between self-renewal and differentiation to sustain hematopoiesis. The highly conserved PIWI protein family regulates proliferative states of stem cells and their progeny in diverse organisms. A Human piwi gene (for clarity, the non-italicized "piwi" refers to the gene subfamily, HIWI (PIWIL1, is expressed in CD34⁺ stem/progenitor cells and transient expression of HIWI in a human leukemia cell line drastically reduces cell proliferation, implying the potential function of these proteins in hematopoiesis. Here, we report that one of the three piwi genes in mice, Miwi2 (Piwil4, is expressed in primitive hematopoetic cell types within the bone marrow. Mice with a global deletion of all three piwi genes, Miwi, Mili, and Miwi2, are able to maintain long-term hematopoiesis with no observable effect on the homeostatic HSC compartment in adult mice. The PIWI-deficient hematopoetic cells are capable of normal lineage reconstitution after competitive transplantation. We further show that the three piwi genes are dispensable during hematopoietic recovery after myeloablative stress by 5-FU. Collectively, our data suggest that the function of the piwi gene subfamily is not required for normal adult hematopoiesis.

  2. Implementation of Advanced Inventory Management Functionality in Automated Dispensing Cabinets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Russell; Webb, Aaron; Lund, Jim

    2015-07-01

    Automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) are an integral component of distribution models in pharmacy departments across the country. There are significant challenges to optimizing ADC inventory management while minimizing use of labor and capital resources. The role of enhanced inventory control functionality is not fully defined. The aim of this project is to improve ADC inventory management by leveraging dynamic inventory standards and a low inventory alert platform. Two interventional groups and 1 historical control were included in the study. Each intervention group consisted of 6 ADCs that tested enhanced inventory management functionality. Interventions included dynamic inventory standards and a low inventory alert messaging system. Following separate implementation of each platform, dynamic inventory and low inventory alert systems were applied concurrently to all 12 ADCs. Outcome measures included number and duration of daily stockouts, ADC inventory turns, and number of phone calls related to stockouts received by pharmacy staff. Low inventory alerts reduced both the number and duration of stockouts. Dynamic inventory standards reduced the number of daily stockouts without changing the inventory turns and duration of stockouts. No change was observed in number of calls related to stockouts made to pharmacy staff. Low inventory alerts and dynamic inventory standards are feasible mechanisms to help optimize ADC inventory management while minimizing labor and capital resources.

  3. Continued Dispensing: what medications do patients believe should be available?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Hasn Abukres

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Continued Dispensing (CD is a new medication supply method for certain medications in Australia. It aims to prevent treatment interruption as a result of patients’ inability to obtain a new valid prescription. The only currently eligible patients for this service are statin and/or oral contraceptives users who have been using these medications for 6 months or more, have not utilized the CD method during the last 12 months, and cannot obtain an immediate appointment with the prescriber in order to get a new prescription. This study aimed to investigate patients’ attitudes towards potential extension and expansion of this medication supply method.Methods. A randomly selected 301 users of these medications from all Australian States were recruited using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI.Result. The response rate was 79%. The majority of the participants (73.3% did not agree with current restriction on CD utilization frequency. They also supported, to varying degrees, inclusion of all the proposed medications (support ranged from 44.2–78.4%. In this regard, participants who suffered from a specific disease did not differ significantly from those without the disease except in case of patients with depression (p = 0.001.Conclusions. Participants of this study strongly supported both CD extension and expansion. A future critical review of the current version of CD is highly recommended in order to enhance CD capability to achieve its goals.

  4. A new microfluidics-based droplet dispenser for ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboket, Pascal E; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S

    2014-06-17

    In this work, a novel droplet microfluidic sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is proposed and characterized. The cheap and disposable microfluidic chip generates droplets of an aqueous sample in a stream of perfluorohexane (PFH), which is also used to eject them as a liquid jet. The aqueous droplets remain intact during the ejection and can be transported into the ICP with >50% efficiency. The transport is realized via a custom-built system, which includes a membrane desolvator necessary for the PFH vapor removal. The introduction system presented here can generate highly monodisperse droplets in the size range of 40-60 μm at frequencies from 90 to 300 Hz. These droplets produced very stable signals with a relative standard deviation (RSD) comparable to the one achieved with a commercial droplet dispenser. Using the current system, samples with a total volume of <1 μL can be analyzed. Moreover, the capabilities of the setup for introduction and quantitative elemental analysis of single cells were described using a test system of bovine red blood cells. In the future, other modules of the modern microfludics can be integrated in the chip, such as on-chip sample pretreatment or parallel introduction of different samples.

  5. Patterning of dispenser cathode surfaces to a controlled porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.; Gibson, John; Thomas, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A process to pattern slots approximately 1.25 microns in width into 25-micron-thick W films that have been deposited onto flat or concave surfaces is discussed. A 25-micron-thick W film with a high degree of (100) orientation is chemically vapor deposited (CVD) onto a flat or concave Mo mandrel. A 5-micron-thick Al film is deposited onto the CVD W, followed by 2 microns of photoresist. On concave cathodes, XeCl2 laser ablation or X-ray lithography is used to pattern the photoresist, whereas on flat cathodes deep UV lithography can be used. The patterned photoresist serves as the mask in a Cl ion-beam-assisted etching (IBAE) process to pattern the Al. An alternative process is to deposit Al2O3 films onto the W and pattern the Al2O3 using laser ablation. The W film is then patterned to 3-6-micron slot widths using IBAE + ClF3 with the patterned Al or Al2O3 as the mask. Finally, a sputter deposition step is required to close up the slots to approximately 1 micron. The process described is capable of patterning concave dispenser cathodes to a controlled and precise porosity.

  6. All-printed capacitors with continuous solution dispensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Plötner, Matthias; Berndt, Andreas; Kumar, Amit; Voit, Brigitte; Pospiech, Doris; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Printed electronics have been introduced into the commercial markets in recent years. Various printing technologies have emerged aiming to process printed electronic devices with low cost, environmental friendliness, and compatibility with large areas and flexible substrates. The aim of this study is to propose a continuous solution dispensing technology for processing all-printed thin-film capacitors on glass substrates using a leading-edge printing instrument. Among all printing technologies, this study provides concrete proof of the following outstanding advantages of this technology: high tolerance to inks, high throughput, low cost, and precise pattern transfers. Ag nanoparticle ink based on glycol ethers was used to print the electrodes. To obtain dielectric ink, a copolymer powder of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-benzoylphenyl methacrylate) containing crosslinkable side groups was dissolved in anisole. Various layouts were designed to support multiple electronic applications. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the all-printed capacitor layers formed using the proposed process. Additionally, the printed capacitors were electrically characterized under direct current and alternating current. The measured electrical properties of the printed capacitors were consistent with the theoretical results.

  7. Enhanced Adherence in Patients Using an Automated Home Medication Dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Charles; Schweighardt, Anne; Conn, Kelly M; Nelson, Dallas; Barbano, Richard; Marshall, Frederick; Brown, Jack

    2017-07-24

    Many factors contribute to medication nonadherence including psychological and memory disorders, aging, and pill burden. The Automated Home Medication Dispenser (AHMD) is a medication management system intended to help solve unintentional medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to determine if use of the AHMD improved medication adherence. We conducted a 6-month prospective, feasibility study assessing use of the AHMD in 21 patient-caregiver dyads. Patients were referred by their physician because of poor medication adherence and included if they resided in Rochester, NY and on at least two medications in pill form. Pill counts were performed at baseline to assess previous adherence. Prospective medication adherence was assessed using AHMD recorded dosing information. A paired t-test was used to compare previous and prospective adherence. The mean age of patients was 75.1 years. Fifteen patients (71.4%) and eight caregivers (38.1%) were women; half (47.6%) of caregivers lived with the patient. The most common patient comorbidities were hypertension (76.2%) and memory disorder (61.9%). Mean adherence increased from 49.0% at baseline to 96.8% after 6 months of AHMD use (p < .001). In a cohort of unintentionally nonadherent patients, use of the AHMD for 6 months significantly improved medication adherence.

  8. Managed groundwater development for water-supply security in Sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What is the scope for promoting much increased groundwater use for irrigated agriculture, and how might the investment risks be reduced and sustainable outcomes ensured? • How can the demand to expand urban groundwater use, for both further supplementing municipal water-supply systems and for direct in situ water ...

  9. Recent developments in solar H 2 generation from water splitting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen production from water and sunlight through photocatalysis could become one of the channels, in the not-so-distant future, to meet a part of ever growing energy demands. However, accomplishing solar water splitting through semiconductor particulate photocatalysis seems to be the 'Holy Grail' problem of science.

  10. Water resource co-management and sustainable regional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, C.L.; Bressers, Johannes T.A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Given the importance of multi-stakeholder processes in managing water resources, this paper aims to shed light on various project management strategies being used in The Netherlands to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of implementing multifunctional water projects.

  11. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ers through emergencies as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural disasters, inappropri- ate or poor design and planning, system neglect or poor main- tenance, poor operations and intentional acts (e.g. vandalism).

  12. Unwillingness to pay for urban water development in the Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unwillingness to pay (UNWTP) findings have been ignored in a number of willingness to pay studies. UNWTP explains the limited access to potable water by UNWTP, 70% of the sampled households mentioned the high level of water price as the main reason for UNWTP. It also addresses gender implications on payment of ...

  13. Technological developments in Zimbabwe's rural water supply and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of standpipe fitted with a tap. A quarter million people take their water from about 35 000 family owned "upgraded" wells, with some 55 000 people taking water from springs. All these sources are relatively safe and impose a minimal health risk. The Zimbabwe Science News Volume 33(1) January-March 1999, pp. 20-25 ...

  14. Developments in Biotechnology of Relevance to Drinking Water Preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Witholt, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies to increase the feasibility of microorganisms for the removal of toxic xenobiotics from waste water and drinking water. Based on the principles of adaptational mutations and genetic exchange of catabolic activities, it becomes possible to select and engineer

  15. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... among other causes, natural disasters, equipment failure, human error and intentional acts (e.g. vandalism). Simply put, an ERP prepares the organisation for emergencies and gives specific instructions about what to do if there is an emergency situation that may affect the water system. To assist water services institutions ...

  16. development of an automated batch-process solar water disinfection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    (Joules) preset at the beginning of the experiment/disinfection process. Fig. 2: Schematic diagram of the automated batch- process solar water disinfection system. Fig. 3: Pictorial view of the automated batch-process solar water disinfection system. Figure 4: Circuitry of Arduino® microcontroller with the different sensors ...

  17. Development of predictive equations for total body water using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... techniques. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been used, where affordable. Impedance is proportional to total body water. It is measured by ... body water that was obtained from deuterium-dilution method as a gold standard. .... (FTIR) instrument subtracts the background from the reading that is.

  18. Impact of development and urbanization on variation of water quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and high incidence of micro-organisms associated with oligosaprobic waters, such as Ulothrix, Phiodina rotifer, Gyrosigma and Navicula species. The upstream section of the creek could be described as comparatively unpolluted sections with good quality water. The middle and downstream sections covering the densely ...

  19. Priority water research questions for South Africa developed through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-28

    Feb 28, 2014 ... 11Resource Protection, Western Cape Department of Water Affairs, Private Bag X16, Sanlamhof, Cape Town, 7532, South Africa. 12Breede Overberg Catchment Management Agency, 51 Baring Street, Worcester, 6849, South Africa. 14Independent Research for Water, Climate and Environmental Justice, ...

  20. Nano- and pico-dispensing of fluids on planar substrates using SAW

    OpenAIRE

    Wixforth, Achim

    2004-01-01

    Nano- and pico-dispensing of fluids on planar substrates using SAW / C. J. Strobl, Z. von Guttenberg, A. Wixforth. – In: IEEE transactions on ultrasonics ferroelectrics and frequency control. 51. 2004. S. 1432-1436

  1. Linking community pharmacy dispensing data to prescribing data of general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Souverein, P.C.; Griens, F.A.M.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Heerdink, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Databases are frequently used for pharmacoepidemiological research. However, most of these databases consist either of prescribing, dispensing or administrative data and therefore lack insight in the interaction between the several health professionals around the patient. METHODS: To

  2. Developing and applying water security metrics in China: Experience and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, F.; Staddon, C.; Chen, M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the ‘water security’ concept has gained both increased public profile and also traction in policy-making circles in China. Moreover its strategic significance for the country has been more frequently addressed by central government. Indicators characterizing the major components of water security, such as socio-economic conditions, water resources, water environment, and aquatic ecosystems, have been used to develop composite metrics and measure China’s progress towards water ...

  3. THE BUFFER ROLE OF GROUNDWATER WHEN SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES ARE UNCERTAIN: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Tsur, Yacov

    1988-01-01

    When used in conjunction with surface water for irrigation, groundwater serves two roles: to increase water supply; and to mitigate fluctuations in the supply of water. The later is the buffer role. This paper identifies and evaluates the economic benefit associated with the buffer role of ground water. Implications for the development of groundwater resources are investigated. An estimate is given of the buffer benefit to wheat growers of the fossil water aquifer underlying the Israeli Negev...

  4. A Method to Develop Sustainable Water Management Strategies for an Uncertain Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, M.; Middelkoop, H.; Beek, E. van; Deursen, W.P.A. van

    2011-01-01

    Development of sustainable water management strategies involves identifi cation of vulnerability and adaptation possibilities, followed by an effect analysis of these adaptation strategies under different possible futures. Recent scenario studies on water management were mainly ‘what-if’

  5. *Environmental mycobacteriosis and drinking water: an emerging problem for developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Objective: Rates ofpulmonary environmental mycobacteriosis (EM) appear to be increasing among developed countries during the past 20 years. EM is caused by multiple species of pathogenic mycobacteria that have been recovered from soil, water, water aerosols, biofil...

  6. The association between lifting an administrative restriction on antidepressant dispensing and treatment patterns in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thengilsdottir, G; Gardarsdottir, H; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2013-01-01

    On March 1st 2009, restrictions on the dispensing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in Iceland were lifted. Incident rates and changes in early discontinuation and switching before and after the change were investigated.......On March 1st 2009, restrictions on the dispensing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in Iceland were lifted. Incident rates and changes in early discontinuation and switching before and after the change were investigated....

  7. Multi-dose drug dispensing is a challenge across the primary-secondary care interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuther, Lene Orskov; Lysen, Charlotte; Faxholm, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Multi-dose drug dispensing (MDDD) signifies that the patient's medicine is packed in disposable bags corresponding to the dose that should be taken. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how a hospital MDDD instruction was followed.......Multi-dose drug dispensing (MDDD) signifies that the patient's medicine is packed in disposable bags corresponding to the dose that should be taken. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how a hospital MDDD instruction was followed....

  8. Chemical Degradation of TMR Multilure Dispensers for Fruit Fly Detection Weathered Under California Climatic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Morse, Joseph G; Grafton-Cardwell, Elizabeth E; Haviland, David R; Kabashima, John N; Faber, Ben A; Mackey, Bruce; Nkomo, Eddie; Cook, Peter J; Stark, John D

    2017-08-01

    Degradation models for multilure fruit fly trap dispensers were analyzed to determine their potential for use in large California detection programs. Solid three-component male lure TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) dispensers impregnated with DDVP (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) insecticide placed inside Jackson traps were weathered during summer (8 wk) and winter (12 wk) in five citrus-growing areas. Additionally, TMR wafers without DDVP, but with an insecticidal strip, were compared to TMR dispensers with DDVP. Weathered dispensers were sampled weekly and chemically analyzed. Percent loss of TML, the male lure for Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) Mediterranean fruit fly; ME, the male lure for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), oriental fruit fly; RK, the male lure for Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), melon fly; and DDVP was measured. Based on regression analyses for the male lures, TML degraded the fastest followed by ME. Degradation of the more chemically stable RK was discontinuous, did not fit a regression model, but followed similar seasonal patterns. There were few location differences for all three male lures and DDVP. Dispensers degraded faster during summer than winter. An asymptotic regression model provided a good fit for % loss (ME, TML, and DDVP) for summer data. Degradation of DDVP in TMR dispensers was similar to degradation of DDVP in insecticidal strips. Based on these chemical analyses and prior bioassay results with wild flies, TMR dispensers could potentially be used in place of three individual male lure traps, reducing costs of fruit fly survey programs. Use of an insecticidal tape would not require TMR dispensers without DDVP to be registered with US-EPA. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruple, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Keiter, Robert [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  10. Tiger Teams Technical Assistance: Reliable, Universal Open Architecture for Card Access to Dispense Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-03-01

    Report discusses the dilemma of incorporating consistent, convenient, universal card access (or ''pay-at-the-pump'') systems into alternative fueling stations across the country. The state of California continues to be in the forefront of implementing alternative fuels for transportation applications. Aggressive efforts to deploy alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in California have highlighted the need to provide adequate fueling stations and develop appropriate, user-friendly means to purchase fuel at the pump. Since these fuels are not typically provided by petroleum companies at conventional fueling stations, and acceptance of cash is often not an option, a payment method must be developed that is consistent with the way individual AFV operators are accustomed to purchasing automotive fuels--with a credit card. At the same time, large fleets like the California Department of General Services must be able to use a single fuel card that offers comprehensive fleet management services. The Gas Technology Institute's Infrastructure Working Group (IWG) and its stakeholders have identified the lack of a common card reader system as a hurdle to wider deployment of AFVs in California and the United States. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Clean Cities Program, the IWG has outlined a multi-phased strategy to systematically address the barriers to develop a more ''open'' architecture that's similar to the way gasoline and diesel are currently dispensed. Under the auspices of the IWG, survey results were gathered (circa 1999) from certain fuel providers, as a means to more carefully study card reader issues and their potential solutions. Pilot programs featuring card reader systems capable of accepting wider payment options have been attempted in several regions of the United States with mixed success. In early 2001, DOE joined the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the

  11. Long term biological developments in water Cherenkov detector media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Filevich, A., E-mail: filevich@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pizarro, R.; Ibanez, J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bauleo, P. [Fort Collins, CO (United States); Rodriguez Martino, J. [Pierre Auger Observatory, Malarguee, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2011-12-11

    Fourteen years ago, studies on bacteria growing in clean water were made in order to assess the hazard imposed by a possible expansion of bacteria population in the water tanks of the Pierre Auger Observatory Cherenkov detectors. In 1999 TANGO Array, a reduced-size unitary cell, composed of four water Cherenkov detectors, was constructed at the TANDAR campus of the Atomic Energy Commission, in Buenos Aires, to be used as a working model of the proposed surface array. TANGO Array ran for one year observing energy, intensity, and arrival directions of cosmic rays at sea level. Nine years after it was decommissioned, the water tanks configuring the Cherenkov detectors are still kept closed. In May 2009 water and liner samples from these tanks were collected to determine eventual long term bacteria growth in the internal detector environment, which is very similar to those of the detectors installed in the Malarguee Site. In the present note we report the results of the bacteriological study performed on the samples obtained from the TANGO Array detector tanks. Cultivable, long time surviving, bacterial species were identified, both in the water mass and on the liner surface, and the light transmission in water at the relevant Cherenkov wavelength was studied. An upper limit of possible interferences caused by bacteria is estimated.

  12. Business model innovation in the water sector in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Heiko; Saul, Caroline Jennings

    2014-08-01

    Various technologies have been deployed in household devices or micro-water treatment plants for mitigating fluoride and arsenic, and thereby provide safe and affordable drinking water in low-income countries. While the technologies have improved considerably, organizations still face challenges in making them financially sustainable. Financial sustainability questions the business models behind these water technologies. This article makes three contributions to business models in the context of fluoride and arsenic mitigation. Firstly, we describe four business models: A) low-value devices given away to people living in extreme poverty, B) high-value devices sold to low-income customers, C) communities as beneficiaries of micro-water treatment plants and D) entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services and highlight the emergence of hybrid business models. Secondly, we show current business model innovations such as cost transparency & cost reductions, secured & extended water payments, business diversification and distribution channels. Thirdly, we describe skills and competencies as part of capacity building for creating even more business model innovations. Together, these three contributions will create more awareness of the role of business models in scaling-up water treatment technologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Productive performance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus fed at different frequencies and periods with automatic dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.R. Sousa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus raised in cages furnished with an automatic dispenser, supplied at different frequencies (once per hour and once every two hours and periods (daytime, nighttime and both was evaluated. Eighteen 1.0m³ cages were placed into a 2000m² pond, two meters deep with a 5% water exchange. One hundred and seventy tilapias, with initial weight of 16.0±4.9g, were dispersed into each 1m³ cage and the feed ration was adjusted every 21 days with biometry. Data was collected from March to July (autumn and winter. Significant difference to final weight (P<0.05 among treatments was observed. The increase in feeding frequency improves the productive performance of Nile tilapias in cages and permitted better management of the food. The better feed conversion rate for high feeding frequency (24 times day-1 can result in saving up to 360kg of food for each ton of fish produced, increasing the economic sustenance for tilapia culture and suggesting less environmental pollution.

  14. Development of neutron measurement techniques in reactor diagnostics and determination of water content and water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdic, Senada

    2000-09-01

    only be performed at a reactor. The measurement technique based on a stationary neutron generated has not been exploited yet. The purpose of the present measurements was the investigation of the accuracy of the neutron generator based method. The results of measurement and calculation show the suitability of the method applied for the determination of the volume porosity. Yet another interesting non-intrusive nuclear technique, based on the pulsed neutron activation for the measurement of mass flow of water (the FlowAct method), constitutes the third subject of this thesis. High accuracy of the FlowAct method demands a detailed understanding of the turbulent flow, and the analysis of a FlowAct measurement is a complex problem. In order to obtain high precision measurement of water flow, the effect of different parameters in the experimental set-up has to be understood. The following particular problems were investigated in detail: (a) the effect of collimation of a neutron source and detector on the time-resolved detector signals; (b) the behaviour of the background time distribution signal to expedite optimum elimination from the measured signals; and, (c) the properties of water mixing, by measuring the geometrical asymmetry of the activated volume as a function of distance from the source as well as flow velocity. The current results are promising for the further development of the method towards a high-precision flow rate measurement.

  15. ARAS: an automated radioactivity aliquoting system for dispensing solutions containing positron-emitting radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A; Carroll, Lewis; Collins, Jeffrey; van Dam, R Michael; Chatziioannou, Arion F

    2016-12-01

    Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing a safe environment for radiation workers but also to ensure accuracy of dispensed radioactivity and an efficient workflow. For this purpose, we have designed ARAS, an automated radioactivity aliquoting system for dispensing solutions containing positron-emitting radioisotopes with particular focus on fluorine-18 ((18)F). The key to the system is the combination of a radiation detector measuring radioactivity concentration, in line with a peristaltic pump dispensing known volumes. The combined system demonstrates volume variation to be within 5 % for dispensing volumes of 20 μL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 μL or greater, the delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested amount as measured independently with a dose calibrator to within 2 % on average. The integration of the detector and pump in an in-line system leads to a flexible and compact approach that can accurately dispense solutions containing radioactivity concentrations ranging from the high values typical of [(18)F]fluoride directly produced from a cyclotron (~0.1-1 mCi μL(-1)) to the low values typical of batches of [(18)F]fluoride-labeled radiotracers intended for preclinical mouse scans (~1-10 μCi μL(-1)).

  16. Linking community pharmacy dispensing data to prescribing data of general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leufkens Hubert GM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Databases are frequently used for pharmacoepidemiological research. However, most of these databases consist either of prescribing, dispensing or administrative data and therefore lack insight in the interaction between the several health professionals around the patient. Methods To determine the success rate of linking records from the dispensing database of the Foundation for Pharmaceutical Statistics to the prescribing database of the second Dutch national survey of general practice, conducted by NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, a deterministic record linkage approach was used with patient and prescription characteristics as matching variables between the two databases. Results The catchment area included 123 community pharmacies, 90 GP practices and approximately 170,000 unique patients. Overall 110,102 (64.8% unique patients were linked using the matching variables patient's gender, year of birth, the 4-digit part of the postal code, date of dispensing/prescribing and ATC-code. The final database contains of the 110,102 both prescribing data from 83 GP practices and dispensing data of 112 community pharmacies. Conclusion This study shows that linkage of dispensing to prescribing data is feasible with a combination of patient characteristics, such as gender, year of birth and postal code, and prescription characteristics like prescription date and ATC-code. We obtained a linkage proportion of 64.8% resulting in complete prescribing and dispensing history of 110,102 patients. This offers an opportunity to gain insight in the mechanisms and factors influencing drug utilisation in general practice.

  17. Efficiency in the loading of a sodium magneto-optical trap from alkali metal dispensers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, R.; Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Magalhães, K. M. F.; Paiva, R.; Shiozaki, R.; Weiner, J.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-10-01

    We study the loading of sodium atoms into a magneto-optical trap from current-controlled sodium metal dispensers. Contrary to what was previously reported [V. Wippel, C. Binder, W. Huber, L. Windholz, M. Allegrini, F. Fuso, E. Arimondo, Eur. Phys. J. D 17 (2001) 285] we demonstrate a significantly higher number of trapped atoms that make Na dispensers a feasible source of atoms for cold-atom studies. The inherent rise in pressure that naturally arises from metal dispensers as they are heated to release atoms is partially controlled by placing the metal dispensers near the pumping port where an ion pump is connected. We also study the effects of placing the sodium dispensers at different distances from the main vacuum chamber where the atoms are trapped and the effectiveness of using a Zeeman slower to cool the atoms as they emerge from the dispensers. We observe trapping of up to 1.9 × 10 8 atoms, which is significantly higher by almost three orders of magnitude than previously reported experiments.

  18. Understanding private retail drug outlet dispenser knowledge and practices in tuberculosis care in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutta, E; Tarimo, A; Delmotte, E; James, I; Mwakisu, S; Kasembe, D; Konduri, N; Silumbe, R; Kakanda, K; Valimba, R

    2014-09-01

    Private sector accredited drug dispensing outlets in Morogoro and pharmacies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. To assess 1) the level of knowledge about tuberculosis (TB) among dispensers in Tanzania's retail pharmaceutical sector; 2) practices related to identification of patients with suspected TB; 3) the availability of educational materials and training; and 4) the availability of first- and second-line anti-tuberculosis treatment in retail drug outlets. A cross-sectional descriptive study involving the administration of a structured questionnaire among drug dispensers in 122 pharmacies and 173 accredited drug dispensing outlets. Private retail drug outlets are convenient; most are open at least 12 h per day, 7 days/week. Although 95% of dispensers identified persistent cough as a symptom of TB, only 1% had received TB-related training in the previous 3 years; 8% of outlets stocked first-line anti-tuberculosis medicines, which are legally prohibited from being sold at retail outlets. The majority of respondents reported seeing clients with TB-like symptoms, and of these 95% reported frequently referring clients to nearby health facilities. Private retail pharmaceutical outlets can potentially contribute to TB case detection and treatment; however, a coordinated effort is needed to train dispensers and implement appropriate referral procedures.

  19. A framework for assessing water and proppant use and flowback water extraction associated with development of continuous petroleum resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Cook, Troy; Thamke, Joanna N.; Davis, Kyle W.; Long, Andrew J.; Healy, Richard W.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Engle, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing approaches for the quantitative assessment of water and proppant involved with possible future production of continuous petroleum deposits. The assessment approach is an extension of existing U.S. Geological Survey petroleum-assessment methods, and it aims to provide objective information that helps decision makers understand the tradeoffs inherent in resource-development decisions. This fact sheet provides an overview of U.S. Geological Survey assessments for quantities of water and proppant required for drilling and hydraulic fracturing and for flowback water extracted with petroleum; the report also presents the form of the intended assessment output information.

  20. Potential of Nanotechnology based water treatment solutions for the improvement of drinking water supplies in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades explosive population growth in the world has led to water scarcity across the globe putting additional pressure already scarce ground water resources and is pushing scientists and researchers to come up with new alternatives to monitor and treat water for use by mankind and for food security. Nearly 4 billion people around the world are known to lack access to clean water supply. Systematic water quality data is important for the assessment of health risks as well as for developing appropriate and affordable technologies for waste and drinking water treatments, and long-term decision making policy against water quality management. Traditional water treatment technologies are generally chemical-intensive processes requiring extremely large infrastructural support thus limiting their effective applications in developing nations which creates an artificial barrier to the application of technological solutions for the provision of clean water. Nanotechnology-based systems are in retrospect, smaller, energy and resource efficient. Economic impact assessment of the implementation of nanotechnology in water treatment and studies on cost-effectiveness and environmental and social impacts is of key importance prior to its wide spread acceptance. Government agencies and inter-governmental bodies driving research and development activities need to measure the effective potential of nanotechnology as a solution to global water challenges in order to effectively engage in fiscal, economic and social issues at national and international levels for different types of source waters with new national and international initiatives on nanotechnology and water need to be launched. Environmental pollution and industrialization in global scale is further leading to pollution of available water sources and thus hygienically friendly purification technologies are the need of the hour. Thus cost-effective treatment of pollutants for the transformation of hazardous

  1. Water governance: learning by developing adaptive capacity to incorporate climate variability and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, A

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that global climate variability and change is affecting the quality and availability of water supplies. Integrated water resources development, use, and management strategies, represent an effective approach to achieve sustainable development of water resources in a changing environment with competing demands. It is also a key to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. It is critical that integrated water management strategies must incorporate the impacts of climate variability and change to reduce vulnerability of the poor, strengthen sustainable livelihoods and support national sustainable development. UNDP's strategy focuses on developing adaptation in the water governance sector as an entry point within the framework of poverty reduction and national sustainable development. This strategy aims to strengthen the capacity of governments and civil society organizations to have access to early warning systems, ability to assess the impact of climate variability and change on integrated water resources management, and developing adaptation intervention through hands-on learning by undertaking pilot activities.

  2. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  3. A high performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting and ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry chemical profiling approach to rapidly find characteristic chemical markers for quality evaluation of dispensing granules, a case study on Chuanxiong Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Li-Fang; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Bai, Ying-Jia; Mao, Qian; Li, Song-Lin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) fingerprinting and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS) based chemical profiling approach was developed to rapidly find characteristic chemical markers for quality control of dispensing granules, taking Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR) as a model herb. Firstly, CR crude drugs, their traditional decoctions and CR dispensing granules were analyzed by HPLC-PDA to rapidly establish the fingerprints and thereby generate the simulative median chromatograms of CR crude drugs, decoctions and dispensing granules, and by comparing the simulative median chromatograms, major characteristic peaks of CR decoctions and dispensing granules could be determined. Secondary, UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS was used to identify the major characteristic peaks of CR decoctions and dispensing granules. The identities of three major peaks were elucidated and confirmed to be ferulic acid (1), senkyunolide I (2) and senkyunolide H (3) by comparing the mass/UV spectra and retention times with that of the reference compounds. Thirdly, an HPLC-PDA method was validated to quantify the three characteristic components in commercial CR dispensing granules. The average contents of ferulic acid and senkyunolide H were found to be less than 1.0mg/g, whereas that of senkyunolide I was 4.40mg/g in CR dispensing granules, which indicated that senkyunolide I might be chosen as a suitable quantitative marker, while ferulic acid and senkyunolide H as qualitative markers for the quality evaluation of CR dispensing granules. It is suggested that this newly established approach could be used to practically and rapidly find suitable marker compounds for quality control of dispensing granules derived from other medicinal herbs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prescribed 3-D Direct Writing of Suspended Micron/Sub-micron Scale Fiber Structures via a Robotic Dispensing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hanwen; Cambron, Scott D; Keynton, Robert S

    2015-06-12

    A 3-axis dispensing system is utilized to control the initiating and terminating fiber positions and trajectory via the dispensing software. The polymer fiber length and orientation is defined by the spatial positioning of the dispensing system 3-axis stages. The fiber diameter is defined by the prescribed dispense time of the dispensing system valve, the feed rate (the speed at which the stage traverses from an initiating to a terminating position), the gauge diameter of the dispensing tip, the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution, and the programmed drawing length. The stage feed rate affects the polymer solution's evaporation rate and capillary breakup of the filaments. The dispensing system consists of a pneumatic valve controller, a droplet-dispensing valve and a dispensing tip. Characterization of the direct write process to determine the optimum combination of factors leads to repeatedly acquiring the desired range of fiber diameters. The advantage of this robotic dispensing system is the ease of obtaining a precise range of micron/sub-micron fibers onto a desired, programmed location via automated process control. Here, the discussed self-assembled micron/sub-micron scale 3D structures have been employed to fabricate suspended structures to create micron/sub-micron fluidic devices and bioengineered scaffolds.

  5. Development of Chengdu and sustainable utilization of the ancient Dujiangyan Water-Conservancy Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Dujiangyan Water-Conservancy Project is a great water irrigation works in Chinese cultural history, which led the Min River water to the vast Chengdu Plain, and created fertile and pretty "land of abundance". Now Chengdu is facing increased water demand stress due mainly to rapid urbanization. This paper first analyses the available water resources of Chengdu based on historical hydrological data from 1964 to 2008. The results show that the average annual water resources were 8.9 billion m3 in 1986 and 7.9 billion m3 in 2008 under various environmental conditions. The future tendency of water demand in city development planning is predicted by the Policy Dialogue Model (PODIUM. Finally, the strategies for water resources exploitation accompanying the sustainable development pattern are studied. The result illustrates that rational and careful management are required to balance the gap between water supply and demand

  6. Effects of reservoir dispenser height on efficacy of mating disruption of codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, David L; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Miller, James R; Grieshop, Matthew J; Gut, Larry J

    2011-08-01

    The effect of varying the height of reservoir dispensers for mating disruption of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), was investigated. The goal was to improve the effectiveness of C. pomonella mating disruption through improved understanding of adult distribution within the tree canopy and the impact of pheromone dispenser placement on disruption. Two dispensers per tree were placed at 2 m and 4 m and/or one dispenser at each height on the tree at a label rate of 1000 units ha(-1) . Monitoring traps and tethered female moths were deployed in plots at 2 and 4 m heights to assess treatment effects by catches or matings respectively. Fewest male moths were captured with all dispensers placed at 4 m. Female mating was lowest, and with least variation between females tethered at 2 and 4 m, when dispensers were placed simultaneously at 2 and 4 m (28% mated). Mating was 32% with both dispensers at 4 m, 38% with both dispensers at 2 m and 46% in the no disruption control. Mating was highest across treatments when females were tethered at 2 m and dispensers placed at 4 m (40%), and when females were tethered at 4 m with dispensers placed at 2 m (46%). Traps at 4 m in trees captured more male moths than traps at 2 m, regardless of disruption dispenser positioning. Female mating was lowest when dispensers were placed simultaneously at 2 and 4 m, suggesting that current recommendations for placement of reservoir dispensers in tree crowns may be suboptimal. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Development and sensitivity analysis of a global drinking water quality index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickwood, C J; Carr, G M

    2009-09-01

    The UNEP GEMS/Water Programme is the leading international agency responsible for the development of water quality indicators and maintains the only global database of water quality for inland waters (GEMStat). The protection of source water quality for domestic use (drinking water, abstraction etc) was identified by GEMS/Water as a priority for assessment. A composite index was developed to assess source water quality across a range of inland water types, globally, and over time. The approach for development was three-fold: (1) Select guidelines from the World Health Organisation that are appropriate in assessing global water quality for human health, (2) Select variables from GEMStat that have an appropriate guideline and reasonable global coverage, and (3) determine, on an annual basis, an overall index rating for each station using the water quality index equation endorsed by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The index allowed measurements of the frequency and extent to which variables exceeded their respective WHO guidelines, at each individual monitoring station included within GEMStat, allowing both spatial and temporal assessment of global water quality. Development of the index was followed by preliminary sensitivity analysis and verification of the index against real water quality data.

  8. Whose waters? Large-scale agricultural development and water grabbing in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia van Eeden

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In Tanzania like in other parts of the global South, in the name of 'development' and 'poverty eradication' vast tracts of land have been earmarked by the government to be developed by investors for different commercial agricultural projects, giving rise to the contested land grab phenomenon. In parallel, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM has been promoted in the country and globally as the governance framework that seeks to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable manner. This article asks how IWRM manages the competing interests as well as the diverse priorities of both large and small water users in the midst of foreign direct investment. By focusing on two commercial sugar companies operating in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin in Tanzania and their impacts on the water and land rights of the surrounding villages, the article asks whether institutional and capacity weaknesses around IWRM implementation can be exploited by powerful actors that seek to meet their own interests, thus allowing water grabbing to take place. The paper thus highlights the power, interests and alliances of the various actors involved in the governance of water resources. By drawing on recent conceptual insights from the water grabbing literature, the empirical findings suggest that the IWRM framework indirectly and directly facilitates the phenomenon of water grabbing to take place in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin in Tanzania.

  9. Development of aquatic biomonitoring models for surface waters used for drinking water supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penders, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Given the need for continued quality control of surface waters used for the production of drinking water by state-of-the-art bioassays and biological early warning systems, the objective of the present thesis was to validate and improve some of the bioassays and biological early warning systems used

  10. Development, application, and sensitivity analysis of a water quality index for drinking water management in small systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheili, A; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a drinking water assessment tool for operators of small distribution systems. A drinking water quality index (DWQI) was developed and applied to small systems based on the water quality index of the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment. The drinking water quality index was adapted to specific needs by creating four drinking water quality scenarios. First, the temporal and spatial dimensions of drinking water quality variability were taken into account. The DWQI was designed to express global drinking water quality according to different monitoring frequencies. Daily, monthly, and seasonal assessment was also considered. With the data made available, it was possible to use the index as a spatial monitoring tool and express water quality in different points in the distribution system. Moreover, adjustments were made to prioritize the type of contaminant to monitor. For instance, monitoring contaminants with acute health effects led to a scenario based on daily measures, including easily accessible and affordable water quality parameters. On the other hand, contaminants with chronic effects, especially disinfection by-products, were considered in a seasonal monitoring scenario where disinfection by-product reference values were redefined according to their seasonal variability. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out to validate the index. Globally, the DWQI developed is adapted to the needs of small systems. In fact, expressing drinking water quality using the DWQI contributes to the identification of problematic periods and segments in the distribution system. Further work may include this index in the development of a customized decision-making tool for small-system operators and managers.

  11. Development of a water purifier for radioactive cesium removal from contaminated natural water by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Noriaki; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Saiki, Seiichi; Ueki, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    Six years after the Fukushima-nuclear accident, the dissolved radioactive cesium (Cs) is now hardly detected in environmental natural waters. These natural waters are directly used as source of drinking and domestic waters in disaster-stricken areas in Fukushima. However, the possibility that some radioactive Cs adsorbed on soil or leaves will contaminate these natural waters during heavy rains or typhoon is always present. In order for the returning residents to live with peace of mind, it is important to demonstrate the safety of the domestic waters that they will use for their daily life. For this purpose, we have synthesized a material for selective removal of radioactive Cs by introducing ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP) onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric through radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization technique. Water purifiers filled with the grafted Cs adsorbent were installed in selected houses in Fukushima. The capability of the grafted adsorbent to remove Cs from domestic waters was evaluated for a whole year. The results showed that the tap water filtered through the developed water purifier contained no radioactive Cs, signifying the very effective adsorption performance of the developed grafted adsorbent. From several demonstrations, we have commercialized the water purifier named "KranCsair®". Furthermore, we have also developed a method for the mass production of the grafted nonwoven fabric. Using a 30 L grafting reactor, it was possible to produce the grafted nonwoven fabric with a suitable range of degree of grafting. When an irradiated roll of nonwoven trunk fabric with a length of 10 m and a width of 30 cm was set in the reactor filled with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), AMP, Tween 80 monomer emulsion solution at 40 °C for 1 h, the difference of Dgs in the length and the width on roll of fabrics was negligible.

  12. Justice Dispensation through the Alternative Dispute Resolution System in India

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    Krishna Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Law Commission of India in its 222nd report emphasized the need for Alternative Disputes Resolution (ADR for the dispensation of justice, because the courts are inaccessible owing to various factors, e.g., poverty, social and political backwardness, illiteracy, ignorance, procedural formalities and inordinate delay in judgments. During the ancient period the disputes were resolved in an informal manner by neutral third persons or people’s court in villages and it continued till the middle of the 20th century. Unfortunately, after the Independence of India in 1947, this system was dissuaded and the government permitted to continue the adversarial system of justice. In 1980, a committee was set up. It recommended Lok Adalats (People’s Courts. In 1987, the Legal Services Authorities Act was enacted. This Act obligates the states to provide free legal aid to poor persons. Besides this, the Act provides for the establishment of permanent Lok Adalats.This is one of the important modes of ADR. Lok Adalats have been established in all the districts of the country. They bring conciliatory settlement in complicated cases arising out of matrimonial, landlord-tenants, property, insurance and commercial disputes. There are four methods of ADR, viz., negotiation, mediation, conciliation and arbitration. Mediation and arbitration are widely preferred. They are alternatives to litigation. The Arbitration Act for the first time was enacted in 1889 and it was subsequently amended many times. On the objections raised by the Supreme Court of India and also on the adoption of UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, in 1996 Arbitration and Conciliation Act was enacted. This law is almost the same as is almost in all the countries.Further, the Government of India established International Centre for Alternative Disputes Resolution (CADR with the objectives of promotion, propagation, and popularizing the settlement of domestic and

  13. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bakr

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The back bombardment (BB effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB_{6} thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6  μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB_{6}, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  14. Type I IFN Signaling Is Dispensable during Secondary Viral Infection.

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    Martin P Hosking

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses in general, and type I interferons (T1IFNs in particular, play an important and often essential role during primary viral infections, by directly combatting the virus and by maximizing the primary adaptive immune response. Several studies have suggested that T1IFNs also contribute very substantially to the secondary (recall response; they are thought (i to be required to drive the early attrition of memory T cells, (ii to support the subsequent expansion of surviving virus-specific memory cells, and (iii to assist in the suppression and clearance of the infectious agent. However, many of these observations were predicated upon models in which T1IFN signaling was interrupted prior to a primary immune response, raising the possibility that the resulting memory cells might be intrinsically abnormal. We have directly addressed this by using an inducible-Cre model system in which the host remains genetically-intact during the primary response to infection, and in which T1IFN signaling can be effectively ablated prior to secondary viral challenge. We report that, in stark contrast to primary infection, T1IFN signaling is not required during the recall response. IFNαβR-deficient memory CD8+ and CD4+ memory T cells undergo attrition and expansion with kinetics that are indistinguishable from those of receptor-sufficient cells. Moreover, even in the absence of functional T1IFN signaling, the host's immune capacity to rapidly suppress, and then to eradicate, a secondary infection remains intact. Thus, this study shows that T1IFN signaling is dispensable during the recall response to a virus infection. Moreover, two broader implications may be drawn. First, a T cell's requirement for a cytokine is highly dependent on the cell's maturation / differentiation status. Consequently, second, these data underscore the importance of evaluating a gene's impact by modulating its expression or function in a temporally-controllable manner.

  15. Developing scenarios for the water sector institutional landscape to develop effective responses to water quality challenges in a semi-arid region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claassen, Marius

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available South Africa faces particular challenges in balancing the pressing need for social and economic development, while also protecting water resources to secure viable options for future generations. These challenges are also expressed in the area...

  16. Novel Photocatalytic Reactor Development for Removal of Hydrocarbons from Water

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    Morgan Adams

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons contamination of the marine environment generated by the offshore oil and gas industry is generated from a number of sources including oil contaminated drill cuttings and produced waters. The removal of hydrocarbons from both these sources is one of the most significant challenges facing this sector as it moves towards zero emissions. The application of a number of techniques which have been used to successfully destroy hydrocarbons in produced water and waste water effluents has previously been reported. This paper reports the application of semiconductor photocatalysis as a final polishing step for the removal of hydrocarbons from two waste effluent sources. Two reactor concepts were considered: a simple flat plate immobilised film unit, and a new rotating drum photocatalytic reactor. Both units proved to be effective in removing residual hydrocarbons from the effluent with the drum reactor reducing the hydrocarbon content by 90% under 10 minutes.

  17. Development of a Water Treatment Plant Operation Manual Using an Algorithmic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, Cary A.

    This document describes the steps to be followed in the development of a prescription manual for training of water treatment plant operators. Suggestions on how to prepare both flow and narrative prescriptions are provided for a variety of water treatment systems, including: raw water, flocculation, rapid sand filter, caustic soda feed, alum feed,…

  18. Are Water-Related Leadership Development Programs Designed to Be Effective? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Floress, Kristin; Kaufman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Water resource professionals and others involved in managing water resources face increasingly complex challenges. Effective leadership development programs are needed to produce water leaders who can address these challenges. Leadership programs must be designed not simply to increase participants' environmental and leadership knowledge but to…

  19. Advancing Water Footprint Assessment Research: Challenges in Monitoring Progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Y. Hoekstra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is a collection of recent papers in the field of Water Footprint Assessment (WFA, an emerging area of research focused on the analysis of freshwater use, scarcity, and pollution in relation to consumption, production, and trade. As increasing freshwater scarcity forms a major risk to the global economy, sustainable management of water resources is a prerequisite to development. We introduce the papers in this special issue by relating them to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG number 6 of the United Nations, the goal on water. We will particularly articulate how each paper drives the understanding needed to achieve target 6.3 on water quality and pollution and target 6.4 on water-use efficiency and water scarcity. Regarding SDG 6, we conclude that it lacks any target on using green water more efficiently, and while addressing efficiency and sustainability of water use, it lacks a target on equitable sharing of water. The latter issue is receiving limited attention in research as well. By primarily focusing on water-use efficiency in farming and industries at the local level, to a lesser extent to using water sustainably at the level of total water systems (like drainage basins, aquifers, and largely ignoring issues around equitable water use, understanding of our water problems and proposed solutions will likely remain unbalanced.

  20. Developing a cost effective environmental solution for produced water and creating a ''new'' water resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Glenn; Leong, Lawrence Y.C.

    2000-05-01

    The project goal is to convert a currently usable by-product of oil production, produced water, into a valuable drinking water resource. The project was located at the Placate Oil Field in Santa Clarita, California, approximately 25 miles north of Los Angeles. The project included a literature review of treatment technologies; preliminary bench-scale studies to refine a planning level cost estimate; and a 10-100 gpm pilot study to develop the conceptual design and cost estimate for a 44,000 bpd treatment facility. A reverse osmosis system was constructed, pilot tested, and the data used to develop a conceptual design and operation of four operational scenarios, two industrial waters levels and two irrigation/potable water.