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Sample records for water damaged building

  1. Chaetomium and Stachybotrys in water-damaged buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Lewinska, Anna Malgorzata; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    Fungal growth occurs when parts of the building envelope get very wet due to unfortunate combinations of factors, e.g. thermal bridges/lack of ventilation, shoddy foundations/flooding or leaks in build-in pipes. Chaetomium and Stachybotrys are not as abundant as Penicillium and Aspergillus (Table 1......), however, they may produce volatiles and microparticles that can cause health problems. They are common in wet walls constructed of wood fibre board (OSB/plywood) and gypsum board....

  2. Decision Tree Analysis Of Processes Generating Water-Related Building Damage : A Case Study In Rotterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekkers, M.H.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.; ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Piasecki, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the main failure mechanisms behind water-related building damage and to investigate to what extent these processes are related to characteristics of buildings and rainfall events. Results are based on the mining of property level insurance damage data, for

  3. The relationship between measured moisture conditions and fungal concentrations in water-damaged building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, A L; Rautiala, S; Kasanen, J P; Raunio, P; Rantamäki, J; Kalliokoski, P

    2000-06-01

    We determined the moisture levels, relative humidity (RH) or moisture content (MC) of materials, and concentrations of culturable fungi, actinomycetes and total spores as well as a composition of fungal flora in 122 building material samples collected from 18 moisture problem buildings. The purpose of this work was to clarify if the is any correlation between the moisture parameters and microbial levels or generic composition depending on the type of materials and the time passed after a water damage. The results showed an agreement between the concentrations of total spores and culturable fungi for the wood, wood-based and gypsum board samples (r > 0.47). The concentrations of total spores and/or culturable fungi correlated with RH of materials particularly among the wood and insulation materials (r > 0.79), but not usually with MC (r fungi (r > 0.51), while such a relationship could not be observed for the samples taken from dry damage. A wide range of fungal species were found in the samples from ongoing damage, whereas Penicillia and in some cases yeasts dominated the fungal flora in the dry samples. This study indicates that fungal contamination can be evaluated on the basis of moisture measurements of constructions in ongoing damage, but the measurements are not solely adequate for estimation of possible microbial growth in dry damage.

  4. Hydrophilic fungi and ergosterol associated with respiratory illness in a water-damaged building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M; Kreiss, Kathleen; White, Sandra K; Rao, Carol Y

    2008-01-01

    Damp building-related respiratory illnesses are an important public health issue. We compared three respiratory case groups defined by questionnaire responses [200 respiratory cases, 123 of the respiratory cases who met the epidemiologic asthma definition, and 49 of the epidemiologic asthma cases who had current physician-diagnosed asthma with post-occupancy onset] to a comparison group of 152 asymptomatic employees in an office building with a history of water damage. We analyzed dust samples collected from floors and chairs of 323 cases and comparisons for culturable fungi, ergosterol, endotoxin, and cat and dog allergens. We examined associations of total fungi, hydrophilic fungi (requiring water activity > or = 0.9), and ergosterol with the health outcomes using logistic regression models. In models adjusted for demographics, respiratory illnesses showed significant linear exposure-response relationships to total culturable fungi [interquartile range odds ratios (IQR-OR) = 1.37-1.72], hydrophilic fungi (IQR-OR = 1.45-2.19), and ergosterol (IQR-OR = 1.54-1.60) in floor and chair dusts. Of three outcomes analyzed, current asthma with postoccupancy physician diagnosis was most strongly associated with exposure to hydrophilic fungi in models adjusted for ergosterol, endotoxin, and demographics (IQR-OR = 2.09 for floor and 1.79 for chair dusts). Ergosterol levels in floor dust were significantly associated with epidemiologic asthma independent of culturable fungi (IQR-OR = 1.54-1.55). Our findings extend the 2004 conclusions of the Institute of Medicine [Human health effects associated with damp indoor environments. In: Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington DC:National Academies Press, 183-269] by showing that mold levels in dust were associated with new-onset asthma in this damp indoor environment. Hydrophilic fungi and ergosterol as measures of fungal biomass may have promise as markers of risk of building-related respiratory diseases in damp indoor

  5. Rhinosinusitis and mold as risk factors for asthma symptoms in occupants of a water-damaged building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J-H; Kreiss, K; Cox-Ganser, J M

    2012-10-01

    Mold exposure in damp buildings is associated with both nasal symptoms and asthma development, but the progression of building-related (BR) rhinosinusitis symptoms to asthma is unstudied. We examined the risk of developing BR-asthma symptoms in relation to prior BR-rhinosinusitis symptoms and microbial exposure among occupants of a damp building. We conducted four cross-sectional health and environmental surveys among occupants of a 20-story water-damaged office building. We defined BR-rhinosinusitis symptom (N=131) and comparison (N=361) groups from participants' first questionnaire responses. We compared the odds for the development of BR-asthma symptoms between these two groups over the subsequent surveys, using logistic regression models adjusted for demographics, smoking, building tenure, and first-survey exposures to fungi, endotoxin, and ergosterol. The BR-rhinosinusitis symptom group had higher odds for developing BR-asthma symptoms [odds ratio (OR)=2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.3-3.6] in any subsequent survey compared to those without BR-rhinosinusitis symptoms. The BR-rhinosinusitis symptom group with higher fungal exposure within the building had an OR of 7.4 (95% CI=2.8-19.9) for developing BR-asthma symptoms, compared to the lower fungal exposure group without BR-rhinosinusitis symptoms. Our findings suggest that rhinosinusitis associated with occupancy of water-damaged buildings may be a sentinel for increased risk for asthma onset in such buildings. Exposure to mold is associated with the development of asthma in damp building occupants, and rhinitis is known to be a risk factor for asthma. However, there is little information about the degree of risk for the progression of rhinosinusitis to asthma owing to mold exposures in damp buildings. Our study of damp building occupants demonstrates that building-related (BR) rhinosinusitis symptoms were a risk factor for the development of BR asthma symptoms and that exposure to mold (fungi) or other

  6. Sick building syndrome (SBS) and exposure to water-damaged buildings: time series study, clinical trial and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; House, Dennis E

    2006-01-01

    Occupants of water-damaged buildings (WDBs) with evidence of microbial amplification often describe a syndrome involving multiple organ systems, commonly referred to as "sick building syndrome" (SBS), following chronic exposure to the indoor air. Studies have demonstrated that the indoor air of WDBs often contains a complex mixture of fungi, mycotoxins, bacteria, endotoxins, antigens, lipopolysaccharides, and biologically produced volatile compounds. A case-series study with medical assessments at five time points was conducted to characterize the syndrome after a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among a group of study participants investigated the efficacy of cholestyramine (CSM) therapy. The general hypothesis of the time series study was that chronic exposure to the indoor air of WDBs is associated with SBS. Consecutive clinical patients were screened for diagnosis of SBS using criteria of exposure potential, symptoms involving at least five organ systems, and the absence of confounding factors. Twenty-eight cases signed voluntary consent forms for participation in the time-series study and provided samples of microbial contaminants from water-damaged areas in the buildings they occupied. Twenty-six participants with a group-mean duration of illness of 11 months completed examinations at all five study time points. Thirteen of those participants also agreed to complete a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Data from Time Point 1 indicated a group-mean of 23 out of 37 symptoms evaluated; and visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), an indicator of neurological function, was abnormally low in all participants. Measurements of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), leptin, alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), immunoglobulin E (IgE), and pulmonary function were abnormal in 22, 13, 25, 14, 1, and 7 participants, respectively. Following 2 weeks of CSM therapy to enhance toxin elimination

  7. Metabolite profiles of Stachybotrys isolates from water-damaged buildings and their induction of inflammatory mediators and cytotoxicity in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Huttunen, K.; Hyvarinen, A.

    2002-01-01

    cells were studied. The 11 isolates belonging to the satratoxin-producing chemotype were highly cytotoxic to the macrophages. The isolates inducing inflammatory mediators all belonged to the atranone-producing chemotype, but pure atranones B, and D did not elicit a response in the bioassay. Altogether......The metabolite profiles of 20 Stachybotrys spp. isolates from Finnish water-damaged buildings were compared with their biological activities. Effects of purified compounds on cytotoxicity and production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, IL-6 and TNFalpha in murine RAW264.7 macrophage......, cytotoxicity of Stachybotrys sp. isolates appear to be related to satratoxin production whereas the specific component inducing inflammatory responses in atranone-producing isolates remains obscure....

  8. Estimation uncertainty of direct monetary flood damage to buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional flood design methods are increasingly supplemented or replaced by risk-oriented methods which are based on comprehensive risk analyses. Besides meteorological, hydrological and hydraulic investigations such analyses require the estimation of flood impacts. Flood impact assessments mainly focus on direct economic losses using damage functions which relate property damage to damage-causing factors. Although the flood damage of a building is influenced by many factors, usually only inundation depth and building use are considered as damage-causing factors. In this paper a data set of approximately 4000 damage records is analysed. Each record represents the direct monetary damage to an inundated building. The data set covers nine flood events in Germany from 1978 to 1994. It is shown that the damage data follow a Lognormal distribution with a large variability, even when stratified according to the building use and to water depth categories. Absolute depth-damage functions which relate the total damage to the water depth are not very helpful in explaining the variability of the damage data, because damage is determined by various parameters besides the water depth. Because of this limitation it has to be expected that flood damage assessments are associated with large uncertainties. It is shown that the uncertainty of damage estimates depends on the number of flooded buildings and on the distribution of building use within the flooded area. The results are exemplified by a damage assessment for a rural area in southwest Germany, for which damage estimates and uncertainty bounds are quantified for a 100-year flood event. The estimates are compared to reported flood damages of a severe flood in 1993. Given the enormous uncertainty of flood damage estimates the refinement of flood damage data collection and modelling are major issues for further empirical and methodological improvements.

  9. A time-series study of sick building syndrome: chronic, biotoxin-associated illness from exposure to water-damaged buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; House, Dennis E

    2005-01-01

    The human health risk for chronic illnesses involving multiple body systems following inhalation exposure to the indoor environments of water-damaged buildings (WDBs) has remained poorly characterized and the subject of intense controversy. The current study assessed the hypothesis that exposure to the indoor environments of WDBs with visible microbial colonization was associated with illness. The study used a cross-sectional design with assessments at five time points, and the interventions of cholestyramine (CSM) therapy, exposure avoidance following therapy, and reexposure to the buildings after illness resolution. The methodological approach included oral administration of questionnaires, medical examinations, laboratory analyses, pulmonary function testing, and measurements of visual function. Of the 21 study volunteers, 19 completed assessment at each of the five time points. Data at Time Point 1 indicated multiple symptoms involving at least four organ systems in all study participants, a restrictive respiratory condition in four participants, and abnormally low visual contrast sensitivity (VCS) in 18 participants. Serum leptin levels were abnormally high and alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) levels were abnormally low. Assessments at Time Point 2, following 2 weeks of CSM therapy, indicated a highly significant improvement in health status. Improvement was maintained at Time Point 3, which followed exposure avoidance without therapy. Reexposure to the WDBs resulted in illness reacquisition in all participants within 1 to 7 days. Following another round of CSM therapy, assessments at Time Point 5 indicated a highly significant improvement in health status. The group-mean number of symptoms decreased from 14.9+/-0.8 S.E.M. at Time Point 1 to 1.2+/-0.3 S.E.M., and the VCS deficit of approximately 50% at Time Point 1 was fully resolved. Leptin and MSH levels showed statistically significant improvement. The results indicated that CSM was an effective

  10. Sodium chloride damage to porous building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    This research studied sodium chloride (NaCl) damage to porous building materials with the aim of: i) gaining a better understanding of the damage process and ii) developing an effective crystallization test. It has been definitely proven that NaCl modifies the hygric dilation of a material

  11. Association of airborne moisture-indicating microorganisms withbuilding-related symptoms and water damage in 100 U.S. office buildings:Analyses of the U.S. EPA BASE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Lei, Quanhong; Cozen, Myrna O.; Shendell, DerekG.; Macher, Janet M.; Tsai, Feng C.

    2003-10-01

    Metrics of culturable airborne microorganisms for either total organisms or suspected harmful subgroups have generally not been associated with symptoms among building occupants. However, the visible presence of moisture damage or mold in residences and other buildings has consistently been associated with respiratory symptoms and other health effects. This relationship is presumably caused by adverse but uncharacterized exposures to moisture-related microbiological growth. In order to assess this hypothesis, we studied relationships in U.S. office buildings between the prevalence of respiratory and irritant symptoms, the concentrations of airborne microorganisms that require moist surfaces on which to grow, and the presence of visible water damage. For these analyses we used data on buildings, indoor environments, and occupants collected from a representative sample of 100 U.S. office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (EPA BASE) study. We created 19 alternate metrics, using scales ranging from 3-10 units, that summarized the concentrations of airborne moisture-indicating microorganisms (AMIMOs) as indicators of moisture in buildings. Two were constructed to resemble a metric previously reported to be associated with lung function changes in building occupants; the others were based on another metric from the same group of Finnish researchers, concentration cutpoints from other studies, and professional judgment. We assessed three types of associations: between AMIMO metrics and symptoms in office workers, between evidence of water damage and symptoms, and between water damage and AMIMO metrics. We estimated (as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals) the unadjusted and adjusted associations between the 19 metrics and two types of weekly, work-related symptoms--lower respiratory and mucous membrane--using logistic regression models. Analyses used the original AMIMO metrics and were

  12. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  13. Salt Damage and Rising Damp Treatment in Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. P. Q. Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt damage can affect the service life of numerous building structures, both historical and contemporary, in a significant way. In this review, various damage mechanisms to porous building materials induced by salt action are analyzed. The importance of pretreatment investigations is discussed as well; in combination with the knowledge of salt and moisture transport mechanisms they can give useful indications regarding treatment options. The methods of salt damage treatment are assessed then, including both passive techniques based on environmental control, reduction of water transport, or conversion to less soluble salts and active procedures resulting in the removal of salts from deterioration zones. It is concluded that cellulose can still be considered as the favorite material presently used in desalination poultices but hydrophilic mineral wool can serve as its prospective alternative in future applications. Another important cause of building pathologies is the rising damp and, in this phenomenon, it is particularly severe considering the presence of salts in water. The treatment of rising damp in historic building walls is a very complex procedure and at Laboratory of Building Physics (LFC-FEUP a wall base hygroregulated ventilation system was developed and patented.

  14. Facade Classification For Detection of Building Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, M.

    For rescue management after natural desasters, information about severe building damages is important for two purposes: to know where help is needed, and to find out how rescue forces can get there. The building damages could be detected automat- ically by means of image analysis. As final goal, the information could directly flow to a GIS-based desaster management system. An approach of object-oriented multispectral segmentation, based on previous explicit knowledge, is used to classify facade elements, like windows, walls, visible storey borders etc. Between the found elements, represented by their central point or line, geometric relations can be examined. The results can be used for several purposes: Assuming that an intact facade has some geometrical properties like flatness and rect- angularity, one single oblique image can already be rectified, and scattered deviations from the constraints can be determined. With a couple of images, the elements found in each of them can be matched to give identical points for a general threedimensional reconstruction of the scene. Using such coarse object structures promises to be more robust in finding suitable initial values than using image edges and corners, which may be used to refine the first result. Furthermore, if applied to endagered areas, some parameters can be derived that are of interest for robustness assessment, like relative window size and distance.

  15. A Review of the Mechanism of Injury and Treatment Approaches for Illness Resulting from Exposure to Water-Damaged Buildings, Mold, and Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Hope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are increasingly being asked to diagnose and treat people made ill by exposure to water-damaged environments, mold, and mycotoxins. In addition to avoidance of further exposure to these environments and to items contaminated by these environments, a number of approaches have been used to help persons affected by exposure to restore their health. Illness results from a combination of factors present in water-damaged indoor environments including, mold spores and hyphal fragments, mycotoxins, bacteria, bacterial endotoxins, and cell wall components as well as other factors. Mechanisms of illness include inflammation, oxidative stress, toxicity, infection, allergy, and irritant effects of exposure. This paper reviews the scientific literature as it relates to commonly used treatments such as glutathione, antioxidants, antifungals, and sequestering agents such as Cholestyramine, charcoal, clay and chlorella, antioxidants, probiotics, and induced sweating.

  16. A Review of the Mechanism of Injury and Treatment Approaches for Illness Resulting from Exposure to Water-Damaged Buildings, Mold, and Mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly being asked to diagnose and treat people made ill by exposure to water-damaged environments, mold, and mycotoxins. In addition to avoidance of further exposure to these environments and to items contaminated by these environments, a number of approaches have been used to help persons affected by exposure to restore their health. Illness results from a combination of factors present in water-damaged indoor environments including, mold spores and hyphal fragments, mycotoxins, bacteria, bacterial endotoxins, and cell wall components as well as other factors. Mechanisms of illness include inflammation, oxidative stress, toxicity, infection, allergy, and irritant effects of exposure. This paper reviews the scientific literature as it relates to commonly used treatments such as glutathione, antioxidants, antifungals, and sequestering agents such as Cholestyramine, charcoal, clay and chlorella, antioxidants, probiotics, and induced sweating. PMID:23710148

  17. [Moisture and mold damages of buildings in relation to health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Juha; Lampi, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Moisture damages of buildings increase respiratory symptoms and the risk of development of new cases of asthma. Scientific evidence of possible other health effects of moisture damages is scanty but they cause plenty of concern. The management of indoor air problems is further hampered by the lack of health-based limit values. Patients having symptoms from indoor air present a challenge to the doctor, because our ability to apply scientific data to an individual building or patient is very limited Although the factors increasing asthma and respiratory symptoms in buildings with moisture damage are not known in detail, every attempt should be made to prevent and correct the moisture damages.

  18. Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

    2012-08-26

    This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual

  19. Bilding (Kay) Ki Damaje PSA (:60) (Damaged Buildings)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    An important public health announcement about your safety when entering damaged buildings. Language: Haitian Creole.  Created: 2/18/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  20. Simulating past droughts and associated building damages in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Corti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Droughts can induce important building damages due to shrinking and swelling of soils, leading to costs as large as for floods in some regions. Previous studies have focused on damage data analysis, geological or constructional aspects. Here, a study investigating the climatic aspects of soil subsidence damage is presented for the first time. We develop a simple model to examine if the meteorology has a considerable impact on the interannual variability of damages from soil subsidence in France. We find that the model is capable of reproducing yearly drought-induced building damages for the time period 1989–2002, thus suggesting a strong meteorological influence. Furthermore, our results reveal a doubling of damages in these years compared to 1961–1990, mainly as a consequence of increasing temperatures. This indicates a link to climate change. We also apply the model to the extreme summer of 2003, which caused a further increase in damage by a factor four, according to a preliminary damage estimate. The simulation result for that year shows strong damage underestimation, pointing to additional sources of vulnerability. Damage data suggest a higher sensitivity to soil subsidence of regions first affected by drought in the 2003 summer, possibly due to a lack of preparedness and adaptation. This is of strong concern in the context of climate change, as densely populated regions in Central Europe and North America are expected to become newly affected by drought in the future.

  1. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Seung Hoon; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not.

  2. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Seung Hun; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not.

  3. Tsunami damages assessment: vulnerability functions on buildings based on field and earth observation survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauraz, A. L.; Valencia, N.; Koscielny, M.; Guillande, R.; Gardi, A.; Leone, F.; Salaun, T.

    2009-04-01

    The assessment of damages caused by tsunami scenarios on coastal buildings requires using vulnerability matrixes or functions to carry out a relation between the magnitude of the phenomena and the damage expected. These functions represent the probability for a building belonging to a class of vulnerability to suffer from a mean damage level. The physical vulnerability of buildings depends on two parameters: the solicitation level applied by the tsunami on buildings and their resistance capacity. According to the authors after post-tsunami observations (Reese et al. 2007; Ruangrassamee et al. 2006; Leone et al. 2006; Peiris 2006), the level of damage is clearly linked to the water elevation of the inundated areas and the type of observed buildings. Very few works propose relations based on velocity or hydrodynamic pressure of the waves. An approach developed for the estimation of the building vulnerability consists in deriving empirical damage functions starting from field observations. As part of the SCHEMA European Project on the vulnerability assessment for tsunami hazards in the Atlantic and Mediterranean area, vulnerability functions have been elaborated for different classes of buildings in order to produce vulnerability maps for exposed areas with emphasis on extraction of building characteristics using remote sensing data. The damage detection has been carried out by field data collected after the 24 December 2006 tsunami event on the southwest area of Banda Aceh (Sumatra, Thailand) completed by photo-interpretation of satellite images to get representative functions with large population of samples. The building classes consist in several categories depending mainly on the type of construction material (timber/bamboo, traditional brick, reinforced concrete …), the type of structure (beam, pillars, etc) and the number of storeys. The level of damage has been also classified in five categories, from D0 (no damage) to D5 (total destruction). Vulnerability

  4. Seismic damage assessment of waffled slabs RC buildings of Barcelona

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno González, Rosángel; Bairán García, Jesús Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The seismic damage of waffled-slabs reinforced concrete buildings in the city of Barcelona (Spain) is evaluated using Risk-UE methodology, which enables obtaining fragility curves of the structure in a simplified manner through capacity curves. The seismic hazard is described by means of the reduced 5%-damped elastic response spectrum specific to Barcelona. Capacity curves are obtained using a non-linear static analysis and are used to obtain the performance point and probability damage matri...

  5. Building damage scale proposal from VHR satellite image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Constantin; Giulio Tonolo, Fabio; Cotrufo, Silvana; Boccardo, Piero

    2017-04-01

    Natural hazards have a huge impact in terms of economic losses, affected and killed people. Current exploitation of remote sensed images play a fundamental role in the delineation of damages generated by catastrophic events. Institutions like the United Nations and the European Commission designed services that provide information about the impact of disasters rapidly. One of the approach currently used to carry out the damage assessment is based on very high resolution remote sensing imagery (including both aerial and satellite platforms). One of the main focus of the responders, especially in case of events like earthquakes, is on buildings and infrastructures. As far as the buildings are concerned, to date international standard guidelines that provide essential information on how to assess building damages using VHR images still does not exist. The aim of this study is to develop a building damage scale tailored for analyses based on VHR vertical imagery and to propose a standard for the related interpretation guidelines. The task is carried out by comparing the current scales used for damage assessment by the main satellite based emergency mapping services. The study will analyze the datasets produced after the Ecuador (April 2016) and Central Italy(August and October 2016) earthquakes. The results suggest that by using VHR remotely sensed images it is not possible to directly use damage classification scales addressing structural damages (e.g the 5 grades proposed by EMS-98). A fine-tuning of existing damage classes is therefore required and the adoption of an internationally agreed standard should be encouraged, to streamline the use of SEM products generated by different services.

  6. Bilding (Kay) Ki Damaje PSA (:30) (Damaged Buildings)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    An important public health announcement about safety precautions for potential physical and chemical hazards found in damaged buildings. Language: Haitian Creole.  Created: 2/18/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  7. Lessons learned from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake: Building damages and behavior of seismically isolated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Keiko; Takayama, Mineo

    2017-10-01

    Powerful earthquakes stuck Kumamoto and Oita Prefectures in Kyushu, Japan. It began with the Magnitude 6.5 foreshock at 21:26 JST 14 April, followed by the Magnitude 7.3 mainshock at 1:25 JST 16 April, 2016. The sequence earthquakes also involved more than 1700 perceptible earthquakes as of 13 June. The entire sequence was named the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Thousands of buildings and many roads were damaged, and landslides occurred. The Japanese building standard law is revised in 1981. Structural damages were concentrated on buildings constructed prior to 1981. The area of Mashiki and Southern Aso were most badly affected, especially wooden houses extremely damaged. In Japan, Prof. Hideyuki Tada (title at the time) undertook research on laminated rubber bearings in 1978, and put it into practical use in 1981. The single family house at Yachiyodai, Chiba Prefecture is completed in 1983, it's the first seismically isolated building which is installed laminated rubber bearings in Japan. Afterward, this system is gradually adopted to mainly office buildings, like a research laboratory, a hospital, a computer center and other offices. In the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the 1995 Kobe earthquake and 2011 Tohoku earthquake, seismically isolated buildings improve these good performances, and recently number of the buildings have increased, mainly high risk area of earthquakes. Many people believed that Kumamoto was a low risk area. But there were 24 seismically isolated buildings in Kumamoto Prefecture at the time. The seismically isolated buildings indicated excellent performances during the earthquakes. They protected people, buildings and other important facilities from damages caused by the earthquake. The purpose of this paper is to discuss lessons learned from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and behavior of seismically isolated buildings in the earthquake.

  8. Building America Case Study: Solar Water Heating in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Aldrich and J. Williamson

    2016-05-01

    Solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems have been installed on buildings for decades, but because of relatively high costs they have not achieved significant market penetration in most of the country. As more buildings move towards zero net energy consumption, however, many designers and developers are looking more closely at SDHW. In multifamily buildings especially, SDHW may be more practical for several reasons: (1) When designing for zero net energy consumption, solar water heating may be part of the lowest cost approach to meet water heating loads. (2.) Because of better scale, SDHW systems in multifamily buildings cost significantly less per dwelling than in single-family homes. (3) Many low-load buildings are moving away from fossil fuels entirely. SDHW savings are substantially greater when displacing electric resistance water heating. (4) In addition to federal tax incentives, some states have substantial financial incentives that dramatically reduce the costs (or increase the benefits) of SDHW systems in multifamily buildings. With support form the U.S. DOE Building America program, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with a developer in western Massachusetts to evaluate a SDHW system on a 12-unit apartment building. Olive Street Development completed construction in spring of 2014, and CARB has been monitoring performance of the water heating systems since May 2014.

  9. Enhancement of global flood damage assessments using building material based vulnerability curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englhardt, Johanna; de Ruiter, Marleen; de Moel, Hans; Aerts, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    This study discusses the development of an enhanced approach for flood damage and risk assessments using vulnerability curves that are based on building material information. The approach draws upon common practices in earthquake vulnerability assessments, and is an alternative for land-use or building occupancy approach in flood risk assessment models. The approach is of particular importance for studies where there is a large variation in building material, such as large scale studies or studies in developing countries. A case study of Ethiopia is used to demonstrate the impact of the different methodological approaches on direct damage assessments due to flooding. Generally, flood damage assessments use damage curves for different land-use or occupancy types (i.e. urban or residential and commercial classes). However, these categories do not necessarily relate directly to vulnerability of damage by flood waters. For this, the construction type and building material may be more important, as is used in earthquake risk assessments. For this study, we use building material classification data of the PAGER1 project to define new building material based vulnerability classes for flood damage. This approach will be compared to the widely applied land-use based vulnerability curves such as used by De Moel et al. (2011). The case of Ethiopia demonstrates and compares the feasibility of this novel flood vulnerability method on a country level which holds the potential to be scaled up to a global level. The study shows that flood vulnerability based on building material also allows for better differentiation between flood damage in urban and rural settings, opening doors to better link to poverty studies when such exposure data is available. Furthermore, this new approach paves the road to the enhancement of multi-risk assessments as the method enables the comparison of vulnerability across different natural hazard types that also use material-based vulnerability curves

  10. Building Damage Assessment Using Scenario Based Tsunami Numerical Analysis and Fragility Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawar Rehman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A combination of a deterministic approach and fragility analysis is applied to assess tsunami damage caused to buildings. The area selected to validate the model is Imwon Port in Korea. The deterministic approach includes numerical modeling of tsunami propagation in the East Sea following an earthquake on the western coast of Japan. The model is based on the linear shallow-water equations (LSWE augmented with Boussinesq approximation to account for dispersion effects in wave propagation, and coastal wave run-up is modeled by non-linear shallow-water equations (NLSWE. The output from the deterministic model comprises inundation depth. The numerical output is used to perform fragility analysis for buildings vulnerable to flooding by tsunamis in the port area. Recently developed fragility curves—based on the ordinal regression method—are used for damage probability estimates. The extent of structural damage in the areas under a tsunami hazard is identified by the numerical modeling of tsunami features. Our numerical model offers high bathymetric resolution, which enables us to capture flow features at the individual structure level and results in improved estimation of damage probability. This approach can serve as a measure of assessing structure vulnerability for areas with little or no records of tsunami damage and provide planners with a better understanding of structure behavior when a tsunami strikes.

  11. Ice crystallization in porous building materials: assessing damage using real-time 3D monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Maxim; De Kock, Tim; De Schutter, Geert; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-04-01

    Frost action is one of the main causes of deterioration of porous building materials in regions at middle to high latitudes. Damage will occur when the internal stresses due to ice formation become larger than the strength of the material. Hence, the sensitivity of the material to frost damage is partly defined by the structure of the solid body. On the other hand, the size, shape and interconnection of pores manages the water distribution in the building material and, therefore, the characteristics of the pore space control potential to form ice crystals (Ruedrich et al., 2011). In order to assess the damage to building materials by ice crystallization, lot of effort was put into identifying the mechanisms behind the stress build up. First of all, volumetric expansion of 9% (Hirschwald, 1908) during the transition of water to ice should be mentioned. Under natural circumstances, however, water saturation degrees within natural rocks or concrete cannot reach a damaging value. Therefore, linear growth pressure (Scherer, 1999), as well as several mechanisms triggered by water redistribution during freezing (Powers and Helmuth, 1953; Everett, 1961) are more likely responsible for damage due to freezing. Nevertheless, these theories are based on indirect observations and models and, thus, direct evidence that reveals the exact damage mechanism under certain conditions is still lacking. To obtain this proof, in-situ information needs to be acquired while a freezing process is performed. X-ray computed tomography has proven to be of great value in material research. Recent advances at the Ghent University Centre for Tomography (UGCT) have already allowed to dynamically 3D image crack growth in natural rock during freeze-thaw cycles (De Kock et al., 2015). A great potential to evaluate the different stress build-up mechanisms can be found in this imaging technique consequently. It is required to cover a range of materials with different petrophysical properties to achieve

  12. Forecasting Frost Damage: Follow the Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Frost damage takes place when the pressure exerted against pore walls exceeds the cohesive strength of water-infiltrated rock and causes cracks to extend. Elegant theoretical treatments supported by meticulous field and laboratory observations have combined to unravel the basic mechanical and thermodynamic controls in idealized systems. Frost damage is most vigorous when conditions are cold enough that the net pressure exerted against the pore walls can cause crack extension, yet warm enough to enable the flow that supplies further ice growth in the newly opened space. This insight is applied here to develop practical geomorphic process laws for the effects of frost damage at the larger scales that are relevant for describing the evolution of landscapes. To this end, a direct connection is made between the intensity of frost damage and the porosity increase that results from gradients in water flux under conditions that are cold enough for ice-rock interactions to propagate cracks. This implies that the annual temperature variation at the ground surface can be combined with considerations of heat and mass transport to derive rigorous forecasts of the potential for frost damage that are tied to the increases in water mass that accompany solidification in porous rock. As an example, the image shows the depth-integrated porosity change λ promoted by crack growth at temperatures colder than -ΔTc over an annual cycle for different choices of mean annual temperature MAT and surface amplitude A (assuming a thermal diffusivity of 1 mm2/s and a power-law relationship between permeability and undercooling with exponent α=4, such that a base value of 10-14m2 is reached at a reference undercooling of 0.1 ºC). The abrupt onset in cracking once MAT decreases below a threshold is produced by the requirement that undercooling surpass ΔTc in order to generate sufficient pressures to propagate cracks. The eventual reduction and gradual tail in λ at colder MAT is produced by

  13. Applicability of Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced-Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building N00244-09-G-OO 14 Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM...Professional 7.0 Applicability of Linear Analysis in Probabilistic Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures By Timothy...Estimation of Seismic Building Damage to Reinforced- Concrete Structures By Timothy P. James Submitted to the Department of Civil and

  14. Comparison of Work-related Symptoms and Visual Contrast Sensitivity between Employees at a Severely Water-damaged School and a School without Significant Water Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIOSH received a request for a health hazard evaluation at a water-damaged school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Employees submitted the request because of concerns about exposure to mold in their school building. We administered a work history and health symptom questionnaire. We al...

  15. Earthquake response analysis of 11-story RC building that suffered damage in 2011 East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akenori; Masuno, Hidemasa

    2017-10-01

    An eleven-story RC apartment building suffered medium damage in the 2011 East Japan earthquake and was retrofitted for re-use. Strong motion records were obtained near the building. This paper discusses the inelastic earthquake response analysis of the building using the equivalent single-degree-of-freedom (1-DOF) system to account for the features of damage. The method of converting the building frame into 1-DOF system with tri-linear reducing-stiffness restoring force characteristics was given. The inelastic response analysis of the building against the earthquake using the inelastic 1-DOF equivalent system could interpret well the level of actual damage.

  16. BUILDING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AFTER EARTHQUAKE USING POST-EVENT LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rastiveis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After an earthquake, damage assessment plays an important role in leading rescue team to help people and decrease the number of mortality. Damage map is a map that demonstrates collapsed buildings with their degree of damage. With this map, finding destructive buildings can be quickly possible. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for automatic damage map generation after an earthquake using post-event LiDAR Data and pre-event vector map. The framework of the proposed approach has four main steps. To find the location of all buildings on LiDAR data, in the first step, LiDAR data and vector map are registered by using a few number of ground control points. Then, building layer, selected from vector map, are mapped on the LiDAR data and all pixels which belong to the buildings are extracted. After that, through a powerful classifier all the extracted pixels are classified into three classes of “debris”, “intact building” and “unclassified”. Since textural information make better difference between “debris” and “intact building” classes, different textural features are applied during the classification. After that, damage degree for each candidate building is estimated based on the relation between the numbers of pixels labelled as “debris” class to the whole building area. Calculating the damage degree for each candidate building, finally, building damage map is generated. To evaluate the ability proposed method in generating damage map, a data set from Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital after the 2010 Haiti earthquake was used. In this case, after calculating of all buildings in the test area using the proposed method, the results were compared to the damage degree which estimated through visual interpretation of post-event satellite image. Obtained results were proved the reliability of the proposed method in damage map generation using LiDAR data.

  17. Flood vulnerability assessment of residential buildings by explicit damage process modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custer, Rocco; Nishijima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    contact. Damage processes are modelled at a building component level, utilising engineering models where possible. The modelling approach is presented in general terms, which should be applicable to a large variety of building types. The paper illustrates the implementation of the approach for a 2-storey...... masonry building. Results are presented in terms of a parameter study for several building parameters and hazard characteristics, as well as, in terms of a comparison with damage data and literature vulnerability models. The parameter study indicates that hazard characteristics and building...

  18. Simulating vulnerability functions and seismic damage probability matrix for reinforced concrete frame buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Maldonado Rondón

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines vulnerability functions and seismic damage probability matrixes being constructed for reinforced concrete frame buildings. These functions and matrixes were based on simulation techniques and experts’ opinion. The proposed functions and matrixes relate a building’s vulnerability to the level of damage which might be incurred, depending on an earthquake’s motion. Vulnerability was defined by estimating an index proposed by expert opinion. Damage was defined by means of a da-mage index depending on nonlinear static analysis. Simulation techniques were used for constructing hypothetical buildings and thereby to building the functions and matrixes. Such buildings represented the typical characteristics of Colombian cities’ reinforced concrete frame system (Bucaramanga for example. A set of tools was made for constructing and applying these functions and matrixes, allowing us to determine the level of seismic damage by using the buildings’ characteristics for specific seismic action.

  19. Assessment of Seismic Damage on The Exist Buildings Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pınar, USTA; Nihat, MOROVA; EVCİ, Ahmet; ERGÜN, Serap

    2018-01-01

    Earthquake as a natural disaster could damage the lives of many people and buildings all over the world. These is micvulnerability of the buildings needs to be evaluated. Accurate evaluation of damage sustained by buildings during natural disaster events is critical to determine the buildings safety and their suitability for future occupancy. The earthquake is one of the disasters that structures face the most. There fore, there is a need to evaluate seismic damage and vulnerability of the buildings to protect them. These days fuzzy systems have been widely used in different fields of science because of its simpli city and efficiency. Fuzzy logic provides a suitable framework for reasoning, deduction, and decision making in fuzzy conditions. In this paper, studies on earthquake hazard evaluation of buildings by fuzzy logic modeling concepts in the literature have been investigated and evaluated, as a whole.

  20. SPECIFIC MOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH ASTHMA IN WATER-DAMAGED HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: We sought to determine if specific molds were found in significantly higher concentrations in the water-damaged homes of asthmatic children compared to homes with no visible water damage. Methods: The mold concentrations in the dust in asthmatic children's bedrooms i...

  1. Developing Dynamic Digital Image Correlation Technique to Monitor Structural Damage of Old Buildings under External Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of buildings to resist external excitation is an important factor to consider for the structural design of buildings. When subject to external excitation, a building may suffer a certain degree of damages, and its residual capacity to resist external excitation cannot be evaluated. In this research, dynamic digital image correlation method combined with parameter evaluation available in system identification is used to evaluate the structural capacity to resist external excitation. The results reveal possible building latent safety problems so that timely structural reinforcement or dismantling of the building can be initiated to alleviate further damages. The results of experiments using the proposed method conform to the results obtained using the conventional method, but this method is more convenient and rapid than the latter in the subsequent procedure of data processing. If only the frequency change is used, the damages suffered by the building can be detected, but the damage location is not revealed. The interstory drift mode shape (IDMS based on the characteristic of story drift has higher sensitivity than the approximate story damage index (ADSI method based on modal frequency and vibration type; however, both indices can be used to determine the degree and location of building damages.

  2. Contour Cluster Shape Analysis for Building Damage Detection from Post-earthquake Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Meizhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of the damaged building is the obligatory step prior to evaluate earthquake casualty and economic losses. It's very difficult to detect damaged buildings accurately based on the assumption that intact roofs appear in laser data as large planar segments whereas collapsed roofs are characterized by many small segments. This paper presents a contour cluster shape similarity analysis algorithm for reliable building damage detection from the post-earthquake airborne LiDAR point cloud. First we evaluate the entropies of shape similarities between all the combinations of two contour lines within a building cluster, which quantitatively describe the shape diversity. Then the maximum entropy model is employed to divide all the clusters into intact and damaged classes. The tests on the LiDAR data at El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture prove the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method.

  3. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS CAUSING WATER DAMAGE TO LOESS DOUBLE-ARCHED TUNNEL BASED ON TFN-AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Zheng-jun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to analysis the factors causing water damage to loess double-arched tunnel, this paper conducts field investigation on water damage to tunnels on Lishi-Jundu Expressway in Shanxi, China, confirms its development characteristics, builds an index system (covering 36 evaluation indexes for construction condition, design stage, construction stage, and operation stage for the factors causing water damage to loess double-arched tunnel, applies TFN-AHP (triangular fuzzy number-analytic hierarchy process in calculating the weight of indexes at different levels, and obtains the final sequence of weight of the factors causing water seepage to loess double-arched tunnel. It is found out that water damage to loess double-arched tunnel always develops in construction joints, expansion joints, settlement joints, and lining joints of tunnel and even around them; there is dotted water seepage, linear water seepage, and planar water seepage according to the trace and scope of water damage to tunnel lining. The result shows that water damage to loess double-arched tunnel mainly refers to linear water seepage, planar water seepage is also developed well, and partition and equipment box at the entrance and exit of tunnel are prone to water seepage; construction stage is crucial for controlling water damage to loess double-arched tunnel, atmospheric precipitation is the main water source, and the structure defect of double-arched tunnel increases the possibility of water seepage; the final sequence for weight of various factors is similar to the actual result.

  4. Evaluation of Water Efficiency in Green Building in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Li Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon policies, including those aimed at increasing water efficiency, have been adopted as a crucial strategy for combating global warming and climate change. The green building evaluation system used in Taiwan was first applied in 1999 and initially utilized a building’s water efficiency as the threshold index for determining the building’s environmental impact. Since 1999, more than a thousand buildings have been certified as green buildings using this evaluation system. The quantitative effects of water conservation efforts should be provided to policy makers as a form of positive feedback. To that end, the present study offers a calculation process for estimating the quantitative volume of water saved by practical green buildings. The baseline water usage for all kinds of buildings was determined to serve as the criterion for determining the water-saving efficiency of individual buildings. An investigation of the average water-saving rate from 2000 to 2013 for 1320 buildings certified as green buildings was also conducted to validate the estimation results and found that these green buildings saved an average of approximately 37.6% compared to the baseline water usage rate for all buildings. Water savings will inevitably follow from the use of water-saving appliances or water-saving designs for buildings. The proposed calculation process can be used to clarify the relationships between specific water-saving concepts and the real water usage efficiency of green buildings.

  5. Oblique Aerial Photography Tool for Building Inspection and Damage Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Remondino, F.; Rupnik, E.; Nex, F.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerial photography has a long history of being employed for mapping purposes due to some of its main advantages, including large area imaging from above and minimization of field work. Since few years multi-camera aerial systems are becoming a practical sensor technology across a growing geospatial market, as complementary to the traditional vertical views. Multi-camera aerial systems capture not only the conventional nadir views, but also tilted images at the same time. In this paper, a particular use of such imagery in the field of building inspection as well as disaster assessment is addressed. The main idea is to inspect a building from four cardinal directions by using monoplotting functionalities. The developed application allows to measure building height and distances and to digitize man-made structures, creating 3D surfaces and building models. The realized GUI is capable of identifying a building from several oblique points of views, as well as calculates the approximate height of buildings, ground distances and basic vectorization. The geometric accuracy of the results remains a function of several parameters, namely image resolution, quality of available parameters (DEM, calibration and orientation values), user expertise and measuring capability.

  6. Analysis of a school building damaged by the 2015 Ranau earthquake Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shugo; Saito, Taiki

    2017-10-01

    On June 5th, 2015 a severe earthquake with a moment Magnitude of 6.0 occurred in Ranau, Malaysia. Depth of the epicenter is 10 km. Due to the earthquake, many facilities were damaged and 18 people were killed due to rockfalls [1]. Because the British Standard (BS) is adopted as a regulation for built buildings in Malaysia, the seismic force is not considered in the structural design. Therefore, the seismic resistance of Malaysian buildings is unclear. To secure the human life and building safety, it is important to grasp seismic resistance of the building. The objective of this study is to evaluate the seismic resistance of the existing buildings in Malaysia built by the British Standard. A school building that was damaged at the Ranau earthquake is selected as the target building. The building is a four story building and the ground floor is designed to be a parking space for the staff. The structural types are infill masonries where main frame is configured by reinforced concrete columns and beams and brick is installed inside the frame as walls. Analysis is performed using the STERA_3D software that is the software to analyze the seismic performance of buildings developed by one of the authors. Firstly, the natural period of the building is calculated and compared with the result of micro-tremor measurement. Secondly, the nonlinear push-over analysis was conducted to evaluate the horizontal load bearing capacity of the building. Thirdly, the earthquake response analysis was conducted using the time history acceleration data measured at the Ranau earthquake by the seismograph installed at Kota Kinabalu. By comparing the results of earthquake response analysis and the actual damage of the building, the reason that caused damage to the building is clarified.

  7. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED BUILDING DAMAGE DETECTION WITH OBJECT-BASED IMAGE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sabuncu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are the most destructive natural disasters, which result in massive loss of life, infrastructure damages and financial losses. Earthquake-induced building damage detection is a very important step after earthquakes since earthquake-induced building damage is one of the most critical threats to cities and countries in terms of the area of damage, rate of collapsed buildings, the damage grade near the epicenters and also building damage types for all constructions. Van-Ercis (Turkey earthquake (Mw= 7.1 was occurred on October 23th, 2011; at 10:41 UTC (13:41 local time centered at 38.75 N 43.36 E that places the epicenter about 30 kilometers northern part of the city of Van. It is recorded that, 604 people died and approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or seriously damaged by the earthquake. In this study, high-resolution satellite images of Van-Ercis, acquired by Quickbird-2 (© Digital Globe Inc. after the earthquake, were used to detect the debris areas using an object-based image classification. Two different land surfaces, having homogeneous and heterogeneous land covers, were selected as case study areas. As a first step of the object-based image processing, segmentation was applied with a convenient scale parameter and homogeneity criterion parameters. As a next step, condition based classification was used. In the final step of this preliminary study, outputs were compared with streetview/ortophotos for the verification and evaluation of the classification accuracy.

  8. How the Build Up of Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve How the Build Up of Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve Most, but not all, forms of ... name. Phone (office) Sign Up Join us in the fight to end brain and eye disease 3 ...

  9. Salt damage and RH changes: The case of the Waag Building in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the air MM can cause damage to building materials contaminated with hygroscopic saus, even in the absence of any other moishwe source. This phenomenon has been observed in the case of the iflag build ing in Amsterdam, affècted by severe salt decay. The investigation, canied out by means

  10. Example Building Damage Caused by Mining Exploitation in Disturbed Rock Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowska, Lucyna

    2013-06-01

    Issues concerning protection of buildings against the impact of underground coal mining pose significant scientific and engineering challenges. In Poland, where mining is a potent and prominent industry assuring domestic energy security, regions within reach of mining influences are plenty. Moreover, due to their industrial character they are also densely built-up areas. Because minerals have been extracted on an industrial scale in majority of those areas for many years, the rock mass structure has been significantly disturbed. Hence, exploitation of successive layers of multi-seam deposits might cause considerable damage - both in terms of surface and existing infrastructure networks. In the light of those facts, the means of mining and building prevention have to be improved on a regular basis. Moreover, they have to be underpinned by reliable analyses holistically capturing the comprehensive picture of the mining, geotechnical and constructional situation of structures. Scientific research conducted based on observations and measurements of mining-induced strain in buildings is deployed to do just that. Presented in this paper examples of damage sustained by buildings armed with protection against mining influences give an account of impact the mining exploitation in disturbed rock mass can have. This paper is based on analyses of mining damage to church and Nursing Home owned by Evangelical Augsburg Parish in Bytom-Miechowice. Neighbouring buildings differ in the date they were built, construction, building technology, geometry of the building body and fitted protection against mining damage. Both the buildings, however, have sustained lately significant deformation and damage caused by repeated mining exploitation. Selected damage has been discussed hereunder. The structures have been characterised, their current situation and mining history have been outlined, which have taken their toll on character and magnitude of damage. Description has been supplemented

  11. A fuzzy decision making system for building damage map creation using high resolution satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastiveis, H.; Samadzadegan, F.; Reinartz, P.

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have shown high resolution satellite imagery to be a powerful data source for post-earthquake damage assessment of buildings. Manual interpretation of these images, while being a reliable method for finding damaged buildings, is a subjective and time-consuming endeavor, rendering it unviable at times of emergency. The present research, proposes a new state-of-the-art method for automatic damage assessment of buildings using high resolution satellite imagery. In this method, at the first step a set of pre-processing algorithms are performed on the images. Then, extracting a candidate building from both pre- and post-event images, the intact roof part after an earthquake is found. Afterwards, by considering the shape and other structural properties of this roof part with its pre-event condition in a fuzzy inference system, the rate of damage for each candidate building is estimated. The results obtained from evaluation of this algorithm using QuickBird images of the December 2003 Bam, Iran, earthquake prove the ability of this method for post-earthquake damage assessment of buildings.

  12. Intelligent Monitoring System on Prediction of Building Damage Index using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Suryanita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An earthquake potentially destroys a tall building. The building damage can be indexed by FEMA into three categories namely Immediate Occupancy (IO, Life Safety (LS, and Collapse Prevention (CP. To determine the damage index, the building model has been simulated into structure analysis software. Acceleration data has been analyzed using non linear method in structure analysis program. The earthquake load is time history at surface, PGA=0105g. This work proposes an intelligent monitoring system utilizing Artificial Neural Network to predict the building damage index. The system also provides an alert system and notification to inform the status of the damage. Data learning is trained on ANN utilizing feed forward and back propagation algorithm. The alert system is designed to be able to activate the alarm sound, view the alert bar or text, and send notification via email to the security or management. The system is tested using sample data represented in three conditions involving IO, LS, and CP. The results show that the proposed intelligent monitoring system could provide prediction of up to 92% rate of accuracy and activate the alert. Implementation of the system in building monitoring would allow for rapid, intelligent and accurate prediction of the building damage index due to earthquake.

  13. Correlation between damage detection and observed damage for a full-scale four-story steel building during the collapse test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liu; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    A full-scale four-story steel building was tested on the shaking table of the E-defense project on September, 2007. During the shaking table tests, the building was damaged progressively through various levels of seismic excitations, and finally collapsed on the first floor. To evaluate the modal parameters, low-amplitude white noise excitations were applied to the building and the response of the building was measured at various levels of damage due to the seismic excitations. The subspace identification method is then applied to identify the modal parameters of the building based on the measured data. This paper focuses on detecting damage of this building based on changes in identified modal parameters. A finite element model updating strategy is applied to identify (detect, localize and quantify) the damage in the building at each damage state considered. The residuals used in the updating procedure are based on the identified natural frequencies and mode shapes for the first two X direction and Y direction vibration modes of the building. At last the correlation between the damage detection results and the actual damage observed in the building is carefully examined. They do not exactly coincide but the concentration regions of damage are highly consistent with each other.

  14. Infrared camera-proven water-damaged homes are associated with the severity of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, SungChul; Han, Youngshin; Kim, Jihyun; Choung, Ji Tae; Kim, Beom Joon; Ahn, Kangmo

    2014-11-01

    Moisture problems in dwellings have been linked to respiratory symptoms, but little is known about their association with symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD). Moreover, the questionnaire-based survey or visual inspection for water damage does not use a standardized approach for assessing dampness. To determine water damage in the houses of children with AD by assessing variations in surface temperature with an infrared camera, an interview-led questionnaire, and evaluation of the relation between the presence of water damage and the severity of AD. Fifty-two homes of patients with AD were visited, and air samples were obtained from the living room and a child's bedroom. Water damage was determined by thermal assessments using an infrared camera and by the presence of visible mold or water stains. The effect of water damage on the severity of AD was analyzed by comparing the presence or absence of water damage and other aggravating factors between water-damaged and undamaged homes. Water damage was observed in 31 of 52 homes (59.6%), and the concentrations of airborne mold were significantly higher in water-damaged homes than in undamaged homes (P = .0013). However, there was no difference in airborne mold levels between homes with and those without visible mold or water stains. Logistic regression analyses showed that water-damaged homes were significantly related to moderate to severe AD (adjusted odds ratio 14.52, 95% confidence interval 1.75-121.13, P = .0025). Water-damaged homes affect the severity of AD in children. Infrared camera-driven assessment is a promising tool for determining moisture problems in buildings. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Drinking Water Quality in Hospitals and Other Buildings ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water quality entering large buildings is generally adequately controlled by the water utility, but localized problems may occur within building or “premise” plumbing. Particular concerns are loss of disinfectant residual and temperature variability, which may enhance pathogen activity and metallic corrosion. Disinfection systems are available to building managers and are being installed in a variety of commercial buildings (hospitals, hotels, office buildings.) Yet our understanding of such additional treatment and of how to monitor end water quality at these buildings is limited. This class lecture will discuss challenges in maintaining acceptable water quality in hospitals, schools and other buildings. To give a lecture to a class of graduate students (ENVE 6054: Physical/Chemical Processes for Water Quality Control) at the University of Cincinnati, by presenting past research projects.

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF MINING IMPACTS ON THE INTENSITY OF DAMAGE TO MASONRY BUILDING STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol FIREK

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the analysis of the extent of damage to building structures subjected to mining impacts in the form of tremors and continuous surface deformation. The two methods which were used included the multiple regression analysis and the Support Vector Machine – SVM, which belongs to the so-called Machine Learning. The study used the database of the design, technical condition and potential causes of damage to 199 non-renovated buildings, up to the age of 20 years, of a traditional brick construction, located in the mining area of Legnica-Głogów Copper District (LGOM. The conducted analysis allowed for the qualitative assessment of the influence of mining impacts on the extent of damage to the studied buildings.

  17. Populations of some molds in water-damaged homes may ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the 1940s, gypsum drywall began replacing plaster and lathe in the U.S. home construction industry. Our goal was to evaluate whether some mold populations differ in water- damaged homes primarily constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster. The dust samples from the 2006 Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) American Health Homes Survey (AHHS) were the subject of this analysis. The concentrations of the 36 Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) molds were compared in homes of different ages. The homes (n = 301) were built between 1878 and 2005. Homes with ERMI values > 5 (n = 126) were defined as water-damaged. Homes with ERMI values > 5 were divided in the years 1976 to 1977 into two groups, i.e., older (n = 61) and newer (n = 65). Newer water-damaged homes had significantly (p = 0.002) higher mean ERMI values than older water-damaged homes, 11.18 and 8.86, respectively. The Group 1 molds Aspergillus flavus, Ammophilus fumigatus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum and Trichoderma viride were found in significantly higher concentrations in newer compared to older high-ERMI homes. Some mold populations in water-damaged homes may have changed after the introduction of gypsum drywall. This research provides insight into the asthma epidemic in the US.

  18. Building damage assessment after the earthquake in Haiti using two postevent satellite stereo imagery and DSMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jiaojiao; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Reinartz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    shelters. The proposed method contains three basic steps. The first step is to focus on the DSMs and orthorectified images preparation. The second step is to segment the panchromatic images in obtaining small homogeneous regions. In the last step, a rule-based classification is built on the change......In this article, a novel after-disaster building damage monitoring method is presented. This method combines the multispectral imagery and digital surface models (DSMs) from stereo matching of two dates to obtain three kinds of changes: collapsed buildings, newly built buildings and temporary...

  19. Building America Top Innovations 2012: EEBA Water Management Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Water Management Guide, which identifies durability issues and solutions for high-performance homes. The Water Management Guide has sold 15,000 copies since its first printing.

  20. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzsch, M.; Sulyok, M.; Täubel, M.; Vishwanath, V.; Krop, E.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30482383X; Borràs-Santos, A.; Hyvärinen, A.; Nevalainen, A.; Krska, R.; Larsson, L.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of

  1. Nonstructural damages of reinforced concrete buildings due to 2015 Ranau earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyanto, Mohd Irwan; Majid, Taksiah A.; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    On 15th June 2016 a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mw5.9 was occurred in Sabah, Malaysia. Specifically, the epicentre was located at 16 km northwest of Ranau. Less than two days after the first event, a reconnaissance mission took action to investigate the damages on buildings. Since the reinforced concrete buildings in Ranau were designed based on gravity and wind load only, a lot of minor to severe damages was occurred. This paper presents the damages on the nonstructural elements of reinforced concrete buildings due to Ranau earthquake. The assessment was conducted via in-situ field investigation covering the visual observation, taking photo, and interview with local resident. Based on in-situ field investigation, there was a lot of damages occurred on the nonstructural elements like the brick walls. Such damages cannot be neglected since it can cause injury and fatality to the victims. Therefore, it can be concluded that the installation of nonstructural elements should be reviewed for the sake of safety.

  2. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Sulyok, Michael; Täubel, Martin; Vishwanath, Vinay; Krop, Esmeralda; Borràs-Santos, Alicia; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Krska, Rudolf; Larsson, Lennart

    2012-08-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of these compounds in relation to moisture damage and dampness in buildings. This study conducted in the context of the HITEA project (Health Effects of Indoor Pollutants: Integrating microbial, toxicological and epidemiological approaches) aimed at providing systematic information on the prevalence of microbial secondary metabolites in a large number of school buildings in three European countries, considering both buildings with and without moisture damage and/or dampness observations. In order to address the multitude and diversity of secondary metabolites a large number of more than 180 analytes was targeted in settled dust and surface swab samples using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) based methodology. While 42%, 58% and 44% of all samples collected in Spanish, Dutch and Finnish schools, respectively, were positive for at least one of the metabolites analyzed, frequency of detection for the individual microbial secondary metabolites - with the exceptions of emodin, certain enniatins and physcion - was low, typically in the range of and below 10% of positive samples. In total, 30 different fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites were found in the samples. Some differences in the metabolite profiles were observed between countries and between index and reference school buildings. A major finding in this study was that settled dust derived from moisture damaged, damp schools contained larger numbers of microbial secondary metabolites at higher levels compared to respective dust samples from schools not affected by moisture damage and dampness. This observation was true for schools in each of the three countries, but became statistically significant only

  3. Prevention of tissue damage by water jet during cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Miller, Jason; Friedman, Menahem; Strauss, Moshe

    2003-08-01

    Cavitation bubbles accompany explosive vaporization of water following pulsed energy deposition in liquid media. Bubbles collapsing at the tip of a surgical endoprobe produce a powerful and damaging water jet propagating forward in the axial direction of the probe. We studied interaction of such jet with tissue using fast flash photography and modeled the flow dynamics using a two-dimensional Rayleigh-type hydrodynamic simulation. Maximal velocity of the jet generated at pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was about 80 m/s. The jet can produce tissue damage at a distance exceeding the radius of the cavitation bubble by a factor of 4. We demonstrate that formation of this flow and associated tissue damage can be prevented by application of the concave endoprobes that slow down the propagation of the back boundary of the bubble. Similar effect can be achieved by positioning an obstacle to the flow, such as a ring behind the tip.

  4. Damage mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water during chlorine and solar disinfection using a simple plating method. The well-known bacterial model Escherichia coli was used as pathogenic bacteria for the experiments. The damage mechanisms of E. coli were ...

  5. A case study on the structural assessment of fire damaged building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M. H.; Sarbini, N. N.; Ibrahim, I. S.; Ma, C. K.; Ismail, M.; Mohd, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a case study on the structural assessment of building damaged by fire and discussed on the site investigations and test results prior to determine the existing condition of the building. The building was on fire for about one hour before it was extinguished. In order to ascertain the integrity of the building, a visual inspection was conducted for all elements (truss, beam, column and wall), followed by non-destructive, load and material tests. The load test was conducted to determine the ability of truss to resist service load, while the material test to determine the residual strength of the material. At the end of the investigation, a structural analysis was carried out to determine the new factor of safety by considering the residual strength. The highlighted was on the truss element due to steel behaviour that is hardly been predicted. Meanwhile, reinforced concrete elements (beam, column and wall) were found externally affected and caused its strength to be considered as sufficient for further used of building. The new factor of safety is equal to 2, considered as the minimum calculated value for the truss member. Therefore, this fire damaged building was found safe and can be used for further application.

  6. Ensuring the long service life of unheated buildings. Evaluation methods to avoid moisture damage in unheated buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viljanen, M.; Bergman, J.; Grabko, S.; Lu Xiaoshu; Yrjoelae, R.

    1999-07-01

    Buildings are normally designed according to an indoor temperature level of +20 deg C and to a certain ventilation rate, which depends on the activities in the building. When normal use has been interrupted and the building is left totally unheated, the indoor conditions will follow the outdoor conditions with a certain lag depending on the structures of the building and the amount of ventilation. The lowering of a room temperature increases the risk of mould and damage to structures. The research work was divided into the theoretical part and the field measurements. The objective of the research was to increase our knowledge of the thermal and moisture technical behaviour of unheated buildings, to determine the suitable methods for ensuring the preservation of buildings and their efficiency, and to develop guidelines for selecting different methods and maintenance of buildings. In the theoretical part of the research both analytical and numerical calculation programs were developed. The analytical method is based on the thermostability theory of a room and the numerical method on heat and moisture balance equations of the building. In the numerical calculation program HMTB finite difference and element methods were exploited. The accuracy of the calculation methods was compared with the field measurement results. The field measurements were carried out in eight buildings, which consisted of heated office buildings and unheated farm houses and museum buildings. The measurements were carried out during 1997 and 1998. The annual temperature range indoors in the unheated buildings was from -15 deg C to 27 deg C and the relative humidity range from 30% to 98%. In the heated buildings relative humidity was lower. The highest levels of relative humidity in the unheated buildings were in winter and in the heated buildings in autumn. The climatic differences between districts were great. Heavy rain periods increased the moisture level of indoor air by about 10 %. The risk

  7. Building America Case Study: Solar Water Heating in Multifamily Buildings, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-05-01

    Solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems have been installed on buildings for decades, but because of relatively high costs they have not achieved significant market penetration in most of the country. As more buildings move towards zero net energy consumption, however, many designers and developers are looking more closely at SDHW. In multifamily buildings especially, SDHW may be more practical for several reasons: (1) When designing for zero net energy consumption, solar water heating may be part of the lowest cost approach to meet water heating loads. (2) Because of better scale, SDHW systems in multifamily buildings cost significantly less per dwelling than in single-family homes. (3) Many low-load buildings are moving away from fossil fuels entirely. SDHW savings are substantially greater when displacing electric resistance water heating. (4) In addition to federal tax incentives, some states have substantial financial incentives that dramatically reduce the costs (or increase the benefits) of SDHW systems in multifamily buildings. With support from the U.S. DOE Building America program, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with a developer in western Massachusetts to evaluate a SDHW system on a 12-unit apartment building. Olive Street Development completed construction in spring of 2014, and CARB has been monitoring performance of the water heating systems since May 2014.

  8. Seismic response and damage detection analyses of an instrumented steel moment-framed building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, J.E.; Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The seismic performance of steel moment-framed buildings has been of particular interest since brittle fractures were discovered at the beam-column connections in a number of buildings following the M 6.7 Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994. A case study of the seismic behavior of an extensively instrumented 13-story steel moment frame building located in the greater Los Angeles area of California is described herein. Response studies using frequency domain, joint time-frequency, system identification, and simple damage detection analyses are performed using an extensive strong motion dataset dating from 1971 to the present, supported by engineering drawings and results of postearthquake inspections. These studies show that the building's response is more complex than would be expected from its highly symmetrical geometry. The response is characterized by low damping in the fundamental mode, larger accelerations in the middle and lower stories than at the roof and base, extended periods of vibration after the cessation of strong input shaking, beating in the response, elliptical particle motion, and significant torsion during strong shaking at the top of the concrete piers which extend from the basement to the second floor. The analyses conducted indicate that the response of the structure was elastic in all recorded earthquakes to date, including Northridge. Also, several simple damage detection methods employed did not indicate any structural damage or connection fractures. The combination of a large, real structure and low instrumentation density precluded the application of many recently proposed advanced damage detection methods in this case study. Overall, however, the findings of this study are consistent with the limited code-compliant postearthquake intrusive inspections conducted after the Northridge earthquake, which found no connection fractures or other structural damage. ?? ASCE.

  9. Building Damage Estimation by Integration of Seismic Intensity Information and Satellite L-band SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuoto Nojima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For a quick and stable estimation of earthquake damaged buildings worldwide, using Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR loaded on the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS satellite, a model combining the usage of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA-scale seismic intensity is proposed. In order to expand the existing C-band SAR based damage estimation model into L-band SAR, this paper rebuilds a likelihood function for severe damage ratio, on the basis of dataset from Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1 (JERS-1/SAR (L-band SAR images observed during the 1995 Kobe earthquake and its detailed ground truth data. The model which integrates the fragility functions of building damage in terms of seismic intensity and the proposed likelihood function is then applied to PALSAR images taken over the areas affected by the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru. The accuracy of the proposed damage estimation model is examined by comparing the results of the analyses with field investigations and/or interpretation of high-resolution satellite images.

  10. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, J. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Varshney, K. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Henderson, H. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-10-01

    In this project, the ARIES Building America team collected apartment temperature data from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. Data was analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating in an effort to answer the question, "What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?" This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort.

  11. Molecular profiling of fungal communities in moisture damaged buildings before and after remediation - a comparison of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinen Petri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor microbial contamination due to excess moisture is an important contributor to human illness in both residential and occupational settings. However, the census of microorganisms in the indoor environment is limited by the use of selective, culture-based detection techniques. By using clone library sequencing of full-length internal transcribed spacer region combined with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for 69 fungal species or assay groups and cultivation, we have been able to generate a more comprehensive description of the total indoor mycoflora. Using this suite of methods, we assessed the impact of moisture damage on the fungal community composition of settled dust and building material samples (n = 8 and 16, correspondingly. Water-damaged buildings (n = 2 were examined pre- and post- remediation, and compared with undamaged reference buildings (n = 2. Results Culture-dependent and independent methods were consistent in the dominant fungal taxa in dust, but sequencing revealed a five to ten times higher diversity at the genus level than culture or qPCR. Previously unknown, verified fungal phylotypes were detected in dust, accounting for 12% of all diversity. Fungal diversity, especially within classes Dothideomycetes and Agaricomycetes tended to be higher in the water damaged buildings. Fungal phylotypes detected in building materials were present in dust samples, but their proportion of total fungi was similar for damaged and reference buildings. The quantitative correlation between clone library phylotype frequencies and qPCR counts was moderate (r = 0.59, p Conclusions We examined a small number of target buildings and found indications of elevated fungal diversity associated with water damage. Some of the fungi in dust were attributable to building growth, but more information on the material-associated communities is needed in order to understand the dynamics of microbial communities between

  12. Seismic damage diagnosis of a masonry building using short-term damping measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Leonidas Alexandros S.; Penna, Andrea; Magenes, Guido

    2017-04-01

    It is of considerable importance to perform dynamic identification and detect damage in existing structures. This paper describes a new and practical method for damage diagnosis of masonry buildings requiring minimum computational effort. The method is based on the relative variation of modal damping and validated against experimental data from a full scale two storey shake table test. The experiment involves a building subjected to uniaxial vibrations of progressively increasing intensity at the facilities of EUCENTRE laboratory (Pavia, Italy) up to a near collapse damage state. Five time-histories are applied scaling the Montenegro (1979) accelerogram. These strong motion tests are preceded by random vibration tests (RVT's) which are used to perform modal analysis. Two deterministic methods are applied: the single degree of freedom (SDOF) assumption together with the peak-picking method in the discrete frequency domain and the Eigen realisation algorithm with data correlations (ERA-DC) in the discrete time domain. Regarding the former procedure, some improvements are incorporated to locate rigorously the natural frequencies and estimate the modal damping. The progressive evolution of the modal damping is used as a key indicator to characterise damage on the building. Modal damping is connected to the structural mass and stiffness. A square integrated but only with two components expression for proportional (classical) damping is proposed to fit better with the experimental measurements of modal damping ratios. Using this Rayleigh order formulation the contribution of each of the damping components is evaluated. The stiffness component coefficient is proposed as an effective index to detect damage and quantify its intensity.

  13. Allegheny County Municipal Building Energy and Water Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains energy and water use information from 2010 to 2014 for 144 County-operated buildings. Metrics include: kBtu (thousand British thermal units),...

  14. Mechatronic thermostatic water mixer for building automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mauro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of sanitary water is a main aspect of comfort and healthiness within a house or a public environment as gyms or beauty farms. At the same time, water waste should be limited to a minimum in order to preserve both water and the energy required to warm it. To obtain these results, it is necessary to rule quickly and in a precise way the temperature. It is also necessary to check the presence of possible contemporary flow requested by different users in order to optimize distribution in the house network. This work describes a mechatronic water mixer that was developed to ensure fast and precise control of flow and temperature of delivered water. The flow control is based on modulating digital valves driven in pulse code modulation and on a microcontroller board. The electronic unit is designed to interface with a domotic network for remote control and total consumption monitoring and optimization.

  15. Permeability recovery of damaged water sensitive core using ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir; Pu, Chunsheng; Li, Xu; He, Yanlong; Zhang, Lei; Jing, Cheng

    2017-09-01

    It is imperative to recover the well productivity lose due to formation damage nearby wellbore during variant well operations. Some indispensable issues in conventional techniques make ultrasonic technology more attractive due to simple, reliable, favorable, cost-effective, and environment friendly nature. This study proposes the independent and combined use of ultrasonic waves and chemical agents for the treatment of already damaged core samples caused by exposure to distilled water. Results elucidate that ultrasonic waves with optimum (20kHz, 1000W) instead of maximum frequency and power worked well in the recovery owing to peristaltic transport caused by matching of natural frequency with acoustic waves frequency. In addition, hundred minutes was investigated as optimum irradiation time which provided ample time span to detach fine loosely suspended particles. However, further irradiation adversely affected the damaged permeability recovery. Moreover, permeability improvement attributes to cavitation due to ultrasonic waves propagation through fluid contained in porous medium and thermal energy generated by three different ways. Eventually, experimental outcomes indicated that maximum (25.3%) damaged permeability recovery was witnessed by applying ultrasonic waves with transducer #2 (20kHz and 1000W) and optimum irradiation timeframe (100min). This recovery was further increased to 45.8% by applying chemical agent and optimum ultrasonic waves simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01

    Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

  17. Detecting Damaged Building Regions Based on Semantic Scene Change from Multi-Temporal High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Tu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of damaged building regions is crucial to emergency response actions and rescue work after a disaster. Change detection methods using multi-temporal remote sensing images are widely used for this purpose. Differing from traditional methods based on change detection for damaged building regions, semantic scene change can provide a new point of view since it can indicate the land-use variation at the semantic level. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for detecting damaged building regions based on semantic scene change in a visual Bag-of-Words model. Pre- and post-disaster scene change in building regions are represented by a uniform visual codebook frequency. The scene change of damaged and non-damaged building regions is discriminated using the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier. An evaluation of experimental results, for a selected study site of the Longtou hill town of Yunnan, China, which was heavily damaged in the Ludian earthquake of 14 March 2013, shows that this method is feasible and effective for detecting damaged building regions. For the experiments, WorldView-2 optical imagery and aerial imagery is used.

  18. GPS on Every Roof, GPS Sensor Network for Post-Seismic Building-Wise Damage Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Oguni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of wireless sensor network equipped with GPS for post-seismic building-wise damage identification is presented in this paper. This system is called GPS on Every Roof. Sensor node equipped with GPS antenna and receiver is installed on the top of the roof of each and every building. The position of this sensor node is measured before and after earthquake. The final goal of this system is to i identify the displacement of the roof of each house and ii collect the information of displacement of the roof of the houses through wireless communication. Superposing this information on GIS, building-wise damage distribution due to earthquake can be obtained. The system overview, hardware and some of the key components of the system such as on-board GPS relative positioning algorithm to achieve the accuracy in the order of several centimeters are described in detail. Also, the results from a field experiment using a wireless sensor network with 39 sensor nodes are presented.

  19. Optimization of water distribution systems in high-rise buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loh, Han Tong; Chew, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    The scarcity of land in Singapore has led to a rapid escalation of land prices in recent years. This has resulted in developers building taller and taller buildings in order to maximize their return on building projects. Due to the height involved, the water distribution system in such buildings is a multi-stage one. Hence the problem of deciding the number of stages and the location of each stage arises. In this paper, we will describe the design decisions to be taken in the preliminary design of a multi-stage water distribution system in a high-rise building and pose it as an optimization problem to minimize the overall cost of implementation. The variable costcomponents are the cost of pumps, the floor space cost and the operational cost of the water distribution system. We will describe a study on a 66-story building and highlight the major findings. Interesting results are observed when the cost components are taken one at a time. The strategy for finding the optimum or near optimum for other high-rise buildings will be discussed.

  20. Recognition of materials and damage on historical buildings using digital image classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Merono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, techniques in digital image processing make it possible to detect damage, such as moisture or biological changes, on the surfaces of historical buildings. Digital classification techniques can be used to identify damages in construction materials in a non-destructive way. In this study, we evaluate the application of the object-oriented classification technique using photographs taken with a Fujifilm IS-Pro digital single lens reflex camera and the integration of the classified images in a three-dimensional model obtained through terrestrial laser scanning data in order to detect and locate damage affecting biocalcarenite stone employed in the construction of the Santa Marina Church (Córdoba, Spain. The Fujifilm IS-Pro camera captures spectral information in an extra-visible range, generating a wide spectral image with wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to infrared. Techniques of object-oriented classification were applied, taking into account the shapes, textures, background information and spectral information in the image. This type of classification requires prior segmentation, defined as the search for homogeneous regions in an image. The second step is the classification process of these regions based on examples. The output data were classified according to the kind of damage that affects the biocalcarenite stone, reaching an overall classification accuracy of 92% and an excellent kappa statistic (85.7%. We have shown that multispectral classification with visible and near-infrared bands increased the degree of recognition among different damages. Post-analysis of these data integrated in a three-dimensional model allows us to obtain thematic maps with the size and position of the damage.

  1. Relationship between the spatial distribution of SMS messages reporting needs and building damage in 2010 Haiti disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corbane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Just 4 days after the M = 7.1 earthquake on 12 January 2010, Haitians could send SMS messages about their location and urgent needs through the on-line mapping platform Ushahidi. This real-time crowdsourcing of crisis information provided direct support to key humanitarian resources on the ground, including Search and Rescue teams. In addition to its use as a knowledge base for rescue operations and aid provision, the spatial distribution of geolocated SMS messages may represent an early indicator on the spatial distribution and on the intensity of building damage.

    This work explores the relationship between the spatial patterns of SMS messages and building damage. The latter is derived from the detailed damage assessment of individual buildings interpreted in post-earthquake airborne photos. The interaction between SMS messages and building damage is studied by analyzing the spatial structure of the corresponding bivariate patterns.

    The analysis is performed through the implementation of cross Ripley's K-function which is suitable for characterizing the spatial structure of a bivariate pattern, and more precisely the spatial relationship between two types of point sets located in the same study area.

    The results show a strong attraction between the patterns exhibited by SMS messages and building damages. The interactions identified between the two patterns suggest that the geolocated SMS can be used as early indicators of the spatial distribution of building damage pattern. Accordingly, a statistical model has been developed to map the distribution of building damage from the geolocated SMS pattern.

    The study presented in this paper is the first attempt to derive quantitative estimates on the spatial patterns of novel crowdsourced information and correlate these to established methods in damage assessment using remote sensing data. The consequences of the study findings for rapid damage detection in

  2. Potential Damage to Modern Building Materials from 21st Century Air Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of damage to building materials has been estimated for the 21st century, with a particular focus on aluminum, zinc, copper, plastic, paint, and rubber in urban areas. We set idealized air pollution and climates to represent London and Prague across the period 1950–2100. Environmental parameters were used to estimate future recession, corrosion, and loss of properties through published damage or dose-response functions. The 21st century seems to provide a less aggressive environment for stone and metals than recent times. Improvements in air quality are the most relevant drivers for this amelioration. Changes in climate predicted for the 21st century do not alter this picture. On the other hand, polymeric materials, plastic, paint, and rubber might show slightly increased rates of degradation, to some extent the result of enhanced oxidant concentrations, but also the possibility of contributions from more solar radiation.

  3. Entropy Analysis for Damage Quantification of Hysteretic Dampers Used as Seismic Protection of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Suarez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Relative wavelet energy entropy (RWEE is proposed to detect and quantify damage to hysteretic dampers used for the passive seismic control of building structures. Hysteretic dampers have the role of dissipating most of the energy input of an earthquake. Minor or moderate earthquakes do not exhaust the energy dissipation capacity of the dampers, yet they damage them. For this reason, continuous or periodic damper-health evaluation is required to decide if they need to be replaced. Such evaluation calls for the application of efficient structural health monitoring techniques (SHM. This paper focuses on the well-known vibration technique, which is applied to a particular type of hysteretic damper called Web Plastifying Damper (WPD, patented by the University of Granada. Vibration signals, properly recorded by piezoelectric sensors attached around the damaged area of the dampers, are decomposed by means of wavelet packet analysis. Then, the relative wavelet energy entropy of these decompositions is used to calculate the proposed index. Validation of RWEE for this particular application involved dampers installed in two different specimens of reinforced concrete structures subjected to earthquake sequences of increasing intensity. When compared with a well-established mechanical energy-based damage index, results demonstrate that RWEE is a successful and low-cost technique for reliable in-situ monitoring of dampers.

  4. Building vulnerability to hydro-geomorphic hazards: Estimating damage probability from qualitative vulnerability assessment using logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Susanne; Mounaud, Loïc; Magill, Christina; Yao-Lafourcade, Anne-Françoise; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Manville, Vern; Negulescu, Caterina; Zuccaro, Giulio; De Gregorio, Daniela; Nardone, Stefano; Uchuchoque, Juan Alexis Luque; Arguedas, Anita; Macedo, Luisa; Manrique Llerena, Nélida

    2016-10-01

    The focus of this study is an analysis of building vulnerability through investigating impacts from the 8 February 2013 flash flood event along the Avenida Venezuela channel in the city of Arequipa, Peru. On this day, 124.5 mm of rain fell within 3 h (monthly mean: 29.3 mm) triggering a flash flood that inundated at least 0.4 km2 of urban settlements along the channel, affecting more than 280 buildings, 23 of a total of 53 bridges (pedestrian, vehicle and railway), and leading to the partial collapse of sections of the main road, paralyzing central parts of the city for more than one week. This study assesses the aspects of building design and site specific environmental characteristics that render a building vulnerable by considering the example of a flash flood event in February 2013. A statistical methodology is developed that enables estimation of damage probability for buildings. The applied method uses observed inundation height as a hazard proxy in areas where more detailed hydrodynamic modeling data is not available. Building design and site-specific environmental conditions determine the physical vulnerability. The mathematical approach considers both physical vulnerability and hazard related parameters and helps to reduce uncertainty in the determination of descriptive parameters, parameter interdependency and respective contributions to damage. This study aims to (1) enable the estimation of damage probability for a certain hazard intensity, and (2) obtain data to visualize variations in damage susceptibility for buildings in flood prone areas. Data collection is based on a post-flood event field survey and the analysis of high (sub-metric) spatial resolution images (Pléiades 2012, 2013). An inventory of 30 city blocks was collated in a GIS database in order to estimate the physical vulnerability of buildings. As many as 1103 buildings were surveyed along the affected drainage and 898 buildings were included in the statistical analysis. Univariate and

  5. Survey, Hbim and Conservation Plan of a Monumental Building Damaged by Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreni, D.; Brumana, R.; Della Torre, S.; Banfi, F.

    2017-05-01

    Surveying a monumental building damaged by the earthquake means to analyse its geometries, the structural elements, the connection still exist between the different parts, in order to define its state of conservation, to make structural analysis and to plan a proper project of restoration, consolidation, seismic improvement or addition of new elements. The survey of structural geometry represents the first necessary moment of building' knowledge investigation, to be performed after the securing of the building by the Firefighters or Civil Protection. How and by which instruments the geometric analysis are conducted depends on many factors, not always exclusively on the will of the experts involved in the restoration project, but more often dictated by political, technical, social or economic needs. The accurate geometrical survey is referred as fundamental operation even by national Directive for evaluation and earthquake risk reduction of cultural heritage (GU n. 24 - 29/01/2008 and 2011 updates), which defines guidelines for preventive interventions on built heritage in order to make the structures less vulnerable in case of earthquake. Nowadays, the wide use of tools and accurate surveying techniques makes it possible to achieve an adequate level of accuracy of information related to the buildings, overcoming the difficulties due to accessibility of the damaged structures. The geometrical survey of the Basilica of Santa Maria di Collemaggio in L'Aquila, was made by Politecnico di Milano starting from 2013, within the project "Ripartire da Collemaggio" (http://www.ungiornoacollemaggio.it/content/2027), financed by Eniservizi. The basilica, an important symbol for the community of L'Aquila, was gravely damaged by the earthquake of 6th April 2009. The objective of Eni was to turn the restoration of the building in a re-birth moment for all the community. The knowledge step was aimed to plan a restoration project able of returning the basilica to a safe and full use

  6. Estimation of human damage and economic loss of buildings for the worst-credible scenario of tsunami inundation in the city of Augusta, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The city of Augusta is located in the southern part of the eastern coast of Sicily. Italian tsunami catalogue and paleo-tsunami surveys indicate that at least 7 events of tsunami affected the bay of Augusta in the last 4,000 years, two of which are associated with earthquakes (1169 and 1693) that destroyed the city. For these reasons Augusta has been chosen in the project ASTARTE as a test site for the study of issues related to tsunami hazard and risk. In last two years we studied hazard through the approach of the worst-case credible scenario and carried out vulnerability and damage analysis for buildings. In this work, we integrate that research, and estimate the damage to people and the economic loss of buildings due to structural damage. As regards inundation, we assume both uniform inundation levels (bath-tub hypothesis) and inundation data resulting from the worst-case scenario elaborated for the area by Armigliato et al. (2015). Human damage is calculated in three steps using the method introduced by Pagnoni et al. (2016) following the work by Terrier et al. (2012) and by Koshimura et al. (2009). First, we use census data to estimate the number of people present in each residential building affected by inundation; second, based on water column depth and building type, we evaluate the level of damage to people; third, we provide an estimate of fatalities. The economic loss is computed for two types of buildings (residential and trade-industrial) by using data on inundation and data from the real estate market. This study was funded by the EU Project ASTARTE - "Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe", Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3)

  7. DEPENDENCE OF DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF COMMERCIAL DAMAGES DUE TO POSSIBLE EARTHQUAKES ON THE CLASS OF SEISMIC RESISTANCE OF A BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanzada R. Zajnulabidova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives To determine the damage probability of earthquakes of different intensities on the example of a real projected railway station building having a framework design scheme based on the density function of damage distribution. Methods Uncertainty, always existing in nature, invalidates a deterministic approach to the assessment of territorial seismic hazards and, consequently, seismic risk. In this case, seismic risk assessment can be carried out on a probabilistic basis. Thus, the risk will always be there, but it must be minimised. The task of optimising the reinforcement costs is solved by using the density distribution function for seismic effects of varying intensity, taking into account the degree of building responsibility. Results The distribution functions of the expected damage for a building with a reinforced concrete frame located in a highly seismic region with a repetition of 9-point shocks every 500 years and 10-point shocks once every 5000 years are constructed. A significant effect of the seismic resistance class of a building on the form of the distribution functions is shown. For structures of a high seismic resistance class, not only is the seismic risk reduced, but also the variance of the expected damage. From the graphs obtained, it can be seen that the seismic resistance class significantly affects the damage distribution. At a probability of 0.997, the expected damage for a non-reinforced building will exceed 43%; for a reinforced one it is only 10%. It also follows from the graphs that the variance of the damage magnitude decreases with the growth of the seismic resistance class of the building. This fact is an additional incentive for investing in antiseismic reinforcement of buildings. Conclusion The study shows the expediency of working with the damage density distribution function when managing seismic risk. In this case, it becomes possible to strengthen the building with a specified probability of

  8. IMPLEMENTATION OF KRIGING METHODS IN MOBILE GIS TO ESTIMATE DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS IN CRISIS SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper an example for the application of kriging methods to estimate damage to buildings in crisis scenarios is introduced. Furthermore, the Java implementations for Ordinary and Universal Kriging on mobile GIS are presented. As variogram models an exponential, a Gaussian and a spherical variogram are tested in detail. Different test constellations are introduced with various information densities. As test data set, public data from the analysis of the 2010 Haiti earthquake by satellite images are pre-processed and visualized in a Geographic Information System. As buildings, topography and other external influences cannot be seen as being constant for the whole area under investigation, semi variograms are calculated by consulting neighboured classified buildings using the so called moving window method. The evaluation of the methods shows that the underlying variogram model is the determining factor for the quality of the interpolation rather than the choice of the kriging method or increasing the information density of a random sample. The implementation is completely realized with the programming language Java. Thereafter, the implemented software component is integrated into GeoTech Mobile, a mobile GIS Android application based on the processing of standardized spatial data representations defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC. As a result the implemented methods can be used on mobile devices, i.e. they may be transferred to other application fields. That is why we finally point out further research with new applications in the Dubai region.

  9. Implementation of Kriging Methods in Mobile GIS to Estimate Damage to Buildings in Crisis Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, S.; Rösch, N.; Breunig, M.; Doori, M. Al

    2016-06-01

    In the paper an example for the application of kriging methods to estimate damage to buildings in crisis scenarios is introduced. Furthermore, the Java implementations for Ordinary and Universal Kriging on mobile GIS are presented. As variogram models an exponential, a Gaussian and a spherical variogram are tested in detail. Different test constellations are introduced with various information densities. As test data set, public data from the analysis of the 2010 Haiti earthquake by satellite images are pre-processed and visualized in a Geographic Information System. As buildings, topography and other external influences cannot be seen as being constant for the whole area under investigation, semi variograms are calculated by consulting neighboured classified buildings using the so called moving window method. The evaluation of the methods shows that the underlying variogram model is the determining factor for the quality of the interpolation rather than the choice of the kriging method or increasing the information density of a random sample. The implementation is completely realized with the programming language Java. Thereafter, the implemented software component is integrated into GeoTech Mobile, a mobile GIS Android application based on the processing of standardized spatial data representations defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). As a result the implemented methods can be used on mobile devices, i.e. they may be transferred to other application fields. That is why we finally point out further research with new applications in the Dubai region.

  10. Inventory of uncertainties associated with the process of tsunami damage assessment on buildings (SCHEMA FP6 EC co-funded project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gardi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the SCHEMA FP6 EC co-funded project (http://www.schemaproject.org, we have identified the sources of errors/uncertainties that can be introduced at several steps of the damage assessment process, from post-disaster field measures up to hazard and damages maps production. Errors, for instance, are introduced when collecting post-disaster observations owing to different types of instruments/methods, water marks considered, tide correction, etc.: in extreme cases, differences of meters can be found between water heights data published by different teams for the same locations. Much uncertainty comes from difficulties in identifying and characterizing the potential tsunami sources and from numerical modelling. Moreover, the resolution of the employed Digital Terrain Models can noticeably affect the predicted inundation extent. We have also verified that the consistency of the computations on the long term varies sensitively depending on the code, raising the problem of results reliability for emergency management in dangerous coasts exposed to repeated waves. In addition, damage assessment is performed using damage functions linking the mean damage level on buildings with the maximum water elevation measured in the field without considering other tsunami parameters such as stream velocity. Finally, we examined uncertainties introduced in hazard and vulnerability mapping due to cartographic processing.

  11. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building. Volume VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1984-02-01

    Thermal damage to susceptible materials in accessible regions shows damage-distribution patterns that indicate nonuniform intensity of exposure. No clear explanation for nonuniformity is found in existing evidence; e.g., in some regions a lack of thermally susceptible materials frustrates analysis. Elsewhere, burned materials are present next to materials that seem similar but appear unscathed - leading to conjecture that the latter materials preferentially absorb water vapor during periods of high local steam concentration. Most of the polar crane pendant shows heavy burns on one half of its circumferential surface. This evidence suggests that the polar crane pendant side that experienced heaviest burn damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Tests and simple heat-transfer calculations based on pressure and temperature records from the accident show that the atmosphere inside the reactor building was probably 8% hydrogen in air, a value not inconsistent with the extent of burn damage. Burn-pattern geography indicates uniform thermal exposure in the dome volume to the 406-ft level (about 6 ft below the polar crane girder), partial thermal exposure in the volume between the 406- and 347-ft levels as indicated by the polar crane cable, and lack of damage to most thermally susceptible materials in the west quadrant of the reactor building; some evidence of thermal exposure is seen in the free volume between the 305- and 347-ft levels.

  12. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands. The Asian Highlands, including the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, are the source of most major rivers in Asia and sustain nearly three billion people living downstream. Global warming and related climatic changes are predicted to impact river flows, soil moisture ...

  13. NORTH PORTAL-HOT WATER CALCULATION-SHOP BUILDING #5006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Blackstone

    2006-01-25

    The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for domestic cold water and to size the supply main for the Shop Building No.5006 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) (Section 4.4.1) and the U.S. Department of Energy, Order 6430.1A-1540 (Section 4.4.2).

  14. Size distributions of airborne microbes in moisture-damaged and reference school buildings of two construction types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meklin, T.; Reponen, T.; Toivola, M.; Koponen, V.; Husman, T.; Hyvärinen, A.; Nevalainen, A.

    Any risk assessment of moisture-damaged buildings requires an accurate characterization of the factors contributing to the human exposure. In this study, the size distributions of indoor air viable fungi and bacteria and average mean diameters of the most common fungi in school buildings were determined. One special focus was to analyze how the microbial size distributions are affected by the building frame (either wooden or concrete) and moisture damage in the building. The study was performed in 32 school buildings classified as moisture-damaged (index) and non-damaged (reference) schools according to technical building investigations. Sampling for indoor air microbes was carried out using a cascade impactor that collects particles on six stages (range from 0.65 to >7 μm) according to their aerodynamic diameters. Both wooden and concrete schools had their highest fungal levels in the size range of 1.1-4.7 μm. However, the concentrations of fungi in all size classes were higher in wooden schools than in concrete schools. Moisture damage-associated differences in size distribution, in the particle size range of 1.1-2.1 μm, were seen in concrete schools but not in wooden schools. In general, the average geometric mean diameter ( dg,ave) of total viable fungi was smaller in wooden schools than in concrete schools, and smaller in index schools of both construction types than in their reference schools. Variation in particle size, however, by genus was observed. No differences in particle size distributions of viable airborne bacteria were found. Our results on the dependency of the particle size on the building type and presence of moisture damage provide an interesting point to be considered in assessing the complex issue of indoor-related bioaerosol exposures.

  15. Efficient solar water heating system for a public building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, P.E.; Lange, M.

    1986-01-01

    In the municipality of Roedovre, West of Copenhagen, an 18 m/sup 2/ solar water heating system has been installed at a building for municipal employers working with maintenance of roads, snow clearing etc. The hot water system for the building originally consisted of a 1500 l domestic hot water (DHW) tank, heated from an oilfired boiler serving both space heating and DHW production. The performance of the system has been monitored for almost one year. The results of the measurements indicates an output from the solar system at app. 375 kWh/m/sup 2/ pr. year (total app. 6760 kWh). In adition to this a considerably reduction in the oil consumption has been obtained by turning off the oilfired boiler in the summer period. The total reduction in oilconsumption in the first year is measured to app. 38,700 kWh and the extra use of electricity has been 4486 kWh.

  16. Shock vibration and damage responses of primary auxiliary buildings from aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Shup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daeduk-daero, Dukjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-303 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Daegi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daeduk-daero, Dukjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-303 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Taehyo, E-mail: cepark@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Aircraft impact analyses of PABs were performed using both the force-time history method and missile-target interaction method. • The jet fuel was considered by using the added mass modeling method and SPH method, respectively. • The FRS and the structural integrity of the external wall of the PABs against an aircraft impact were analyzed. - Abstract: Safety assessments on nuclear power plants (NPPs) subjected to an aircraft impact (AI) caused by terrorists are pivotal focuses for amelioration of present. To date, most studies have mainly focused on structure responses and the integrity of the containment building at a nuclear island (NI) subjected to AI. However, the safety assessment of internal equipment and components by shock vibration as well as the structure damage induced by AI are also important. In this study, aircraft impact analyses (AIA) of primary auxiliary buildings (PABs) were carried out using both the force–time history method and the missile–target interaction method. For the AIA, the jet fuel was taken into account by using the added mass modeling method and the smooth particles hydrodynamics (SPH) method, respectively. In addition, the floor response spectra (FRS) and the structural integrity of the external wall of the PAB against an AI were analyzed. Finally, the difference in the FRS at the location of the components on both sides of the bay was analyzed.

  17. Post-Earthquake Damage Inspection of Wood-Frame Buildings by a Polarimetric GB-SAR System

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Liu; Christian Koyama; Jinfeng Zhu; Qinghuo Liu; Motoyuki Sato

    2016-01-01

    Structural damage inspection after an earthquake is essential for safety assessment of the affected wood-frame buildings and for making knowledgeable decision regarding their repair, renovation, or replacement. We present a polarimetric radar system for sensing the concealed wood-frames damaged by earthquakes. This system employs an antenna array consisting of four linearly polarized Vivaldi antennas recording full-polarimetric radar echoes in an ultra-wideband ranging from 1 to 20 GHz. The d...

  18. SURVEY, HBIM AND CONSERVATION PLAN OF A MONUMENTAL BUILDING DAMAGED BY EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Oreni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Surveying a monumental building damaged by the earthquake means to analyse its geometries, the structural elements, the connection still exist between the different parts, in order to define its state of conservation, to make structural analysis and to plan a proper project of restoration, consolidation, seismic improvement or addition of new elements. The survey of structural geometry represents the first necessary moment of building’ knowledge investigation, to be performed after the securing of the building by the Firefighters or Civil Protection. How and by which instruments the geometric analysis are conducted depends on many factors, not always exclusively on the will of the experts involved in the restoration project, but more often dictated by political, technical, social or economic needs. The accurate geometrical survey is referred as fundamental operation even by national Directive for evaluation and earthquake risk reduction of cultural heritage (GU n. 24 – 29/01/2008 and 2011 updates, which defines guidelines for preventive interventions on built heritage in order to make the structures less vulnerable in case of earthquake. Nowadays, the wide use of tools and accurate surveying techniques makes it possible to achieve an adequate level of accuracy of information related to the buildings, overcoming the difficulties due to accessibility of the damaged structures. The geometrical survey of the Basilica of Santa Maria di Collemaggio in L'Aquila, was made by Politecnico di Milano starting from 2013, within the project "Ripartire da Collemaggio" (http://www.ungiornoacollemaggio.it/content/2027, financed by Eniservizi. The basilica, an important symbol for the community of L'Aquila, was gravely damaged by the earthquake of 6th April 2009. The objective of Eni was to turn the restoration of the building in a re-birth moment for all the community. The knowledge step was aimed to plan a restoration project able of returning the basilica

  19. A water-damaged home and health of occupants: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R; Kilburn, Kaye H; Dennis, Donald P; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings.

  20. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Dwayne Thrasher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter. RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings.

  1. Surface water floods in Switzerland: what insurance claim records tell us about the damage in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Daniel B.; Prasuhn, Volker; Weingartner, Rolf

    2017-09-01

    Surface water floods (SWFs) have received increasing attention in the recent years. Nevertheless, we still know relatively little about where, when and why such floods occur and cause damage, largely due to a lack of data but to some degree also because of terminological ambiguities. Therefore, in a preparatory step, we summarize related terms and identify the need for unequivocal terminology across disciplines and international boundaries in order to bring the science together. Thereafter, we introduce a large (n = 63 117), long (10-33 years) and representative (48 % of all Swiss buildings covered) data set of spatially explicit Swiss insurance flood claims. Based on registered flood damage to buildings, the main aims of this study are twofold: First, we introduce a method to differentiate damage caused by SWFs and fluvial floods based on the geographical location of each damaged object in relation to flood hazard maps and the hydrological network. Second, we analyze the data with respect to their spatial and temporal distributions aimed at quantitatively answering the fundamental questions of how relevant SWF damage really is, as well as where and when it occurs in space and time. This study reveals that SWFs are responsible for at least 45 % of the flood damage to buildings and 23 % of the associated direct tangible losses, whereas lower losses per claim are responsible for the lower loss share. The Swiss lowlands are affected more heavily by SWFs than the alpine regions. At the same time, the results show that the damage claims and associated losses are not evenly distributed within each region either. Damage caused by SWFs occurs by far most frequently in summer in almost all regions. The normalized SWF damage of all regions shows no significant upward trend between 1993 and 2013. We conclude that SWFs are in fact a highly relevant process in Switzerland that should receive similar attention like fluvial flood hazards. Moreover, as SWF damage almost always

  2. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Kashiwagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200 μM induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW.

  3. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Sale Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God...

  4. Case study: Fixture water use and drinking water quality in a new residential green building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Maryam; Abouali, Mohammad; Wang, Mian; Zhou, Zhi; Nejadhashemi, Amir Pouyan; Mitchell, Jade; Caskey, Stephen; Whelton, Andrew J

    2018-03-01

    Residential plumbing is critical for the health and safety of populations worldwide. A case study was conducted to understand fixture water use, drinking water quality and their possible link, in a newly plumbed residential green building. Water use and water quality were monitored at four in-building locations from September 2015 through December 2015. Once the home was fully inhabited average water stagnation periods were shortest at the 2nd floor hot fixture (90 percentile of 0.6-1.2 h). The maximum water stagnation time was 72.0 h. Bacteria and organic carbon levels increased inside the plumbing system compared to the municipal tap water entering the building. A greater amount of bacteria was detected in hot water samples (6-74,002 gene copy number/mL) compared to cold water (2-597 gene copy number/mL). This suggested that hot water plumbing promoted greater microbial growth. The basement fixture brass needle valve may have caused maximum Zn (5.9 mg/L), Fe (4.1 mg/L), and Pb (23 μg/L) levels compared to other fixture water samples (Zn ≤ 2.1 mg/L, Fe ≤ 0.5 mg/L and Pb ≤ 8 μg/L). At the basement fixture, where the least amount of water use events occurred (cold: 60-105, hot: 21-69 event/month) compared to the other fixtures in the building (cold: 145-856, hot: 326-2230 event/month), greater organic carbon, bacteria, and heavy metal levels were detected. Different fixture use patterns resulted in disparate water quality within a single-family home. The greatest drinking water quality changes were detected at the least frequently used fixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variability in wood-frame building damage using broad-band synthetic ground motions: a comparative numerical study with recorded motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shiling; van de Lindt, John W.; Hartzell, Stephen; Luco, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake damage to light-frame wood buildings is a major concern for North America because of the volume of this construction type. In order to estimate wood building damage using synthetic ground motions, we need to verify the ability of synthetically generated ground motions to simulate realistic damage for this structure type. Through a calibrated damage potential indicator, four different synthetic ground motion models are compared with the historically recorded ground motions at corresponding sites. We conclude that damage for sites farther from the fault (>20 km) is under-predicted on average and damage at closer sites is sometimes over-predicted.

  6. Water sorption and solubility of core build-up materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zankuli, M A; Devlin, H; Silikas, N

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the variation in water sorption and solubility across a range of different core build-up materials. Five materials were tested, four of which are resin-based materials (Grandio Core, Core.X Flow, Bright Flow Core, Speedee) and one resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC). All specimens (n=10) were immersed in 10ml distilled water in individual glass containers and weighed at one week, 14 and 28 days. After a total immersion time of 28 days, 7 specimens were dried to a constant mass, in a desiccator for 28 days. Three samples of each material were not dried, but were left in distilled water for 1 year, to determine the long-term water sorption properties. Specimens were weighed at monthly intervals until 6 months and then at the 9th and 12th months. Each specimen was measured using a digital electronic caliper (Mitutoyo Corporation, Japan). After 28 days immersion, the change in water sorption and solubility of the materials ranged from 12.9 to 67.1μg/mm(3) (P<0.001) and 0.9-6.4μg/mm(3) respectively (P<0.001). Except for Fuji II LC, an independent T-test showed significantly higher water sorption and solubility for the other materials after 1-year total immersion in water compared to 1 month (P<0.05). Using repeated measures ANOVA, all materials showed mass changes over time (1 month) (P<0.001). Grandio Core had the lowest water sorption and solubility among the tested materials. According to the ISO 4049 standards, all the tested materials showed acceptable water sorption and solubility, apart from the water sorption behavior of Fuji II LC. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy efficient space and water heating in a university building

    OpenAIRE

    Schnurr, Birte

    2013-01-01

    The building Norra Djurgården 43:12 on the main campus of the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)  in Stockholm will be retrofitted as students from the exter- nal campus Haninge will be moved there. This occasion is supposed to be used to improve the facility’s energy efficiency. Potential for this exists for both the space and the water heating system. The effect of decreasing the supply temperature to the radiators was examined  based on equations for the heat transfer. It was calcu- lated...

  8. Building damage assessment after the earthquake in Haiti using two post-event satellite stereo imagery and DSMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinartz, Peter; Tian, Jiaojiao; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel disaster building damage monitoring method is presented. This method combines the multispectral imagery and DSMs from stereo matching to obtain three kinds of changes. The proposed method contains three basic steps. The first step is to segment the panchromatic images to get...... the smallest possible homogeneous regions. In the second step, based on a rule based classification using change information from Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD) and height, the changes are classified to ruined buildings, new buildings, and changes without height change...... (mainly temporary residential area, etc. tents). In the last step, a region based grey level co-occurrence matrix texture measurement is used to refine the third change class. The method is applied to building change detection after the Haiti earthquake....

  9. Adapting ecological risk valuation for natural resource damage assessment in water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuzhen; Wu, Desheng

    2018-02-23

    Ecological risk assessment can address requirements of natural resource damage assessment by quantifying the magnitude of possible damages to the ecosystem. This paper investigates an approach to assess water damages from pollution incident on the basis of concentrations of contaminants. The baseline of water pollution is determined with not-to-exceed concentration of contaminants required by water quality standards. The values of damage cost to water quality are estimated through sewage treatment cost. To get a reliable estimate of treatment cost, DEA is employed to classify samples of sewage plants based on their efficiency of sewage treatment. And exponential fitting is adopted to determine the relation between treatment cost and the decrease of COCs. The range of damage costs is determined through the fitting curves respectively based on efficient and inefficient samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydraulic logic gates: building a digital water computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberlet, Nicolas; Marsal, Quentin; Ferrand, Jérémy; Plihon, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we propose an easy-to-build hydraulic machine which serves as a digital binary computer. We first explain how an elementary adder can be built from test tubes and pipes (a cup filled with water representing a 1, and empty cup a 0). Using a siphon and a slow drain, the proposed setup combines AND and XOR logical gates in a single device which can add two binary digits. We then show how these elementary units can be combined to construct a full 4-bit adder. The sequencing of the computation is discussed and a water clock can be incorporated so that the machine can run without any exterior intervention.

  11. Kinetics of water sorption of damaged bean grains: Thermodynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Corrêa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aims to determine the thermodynamic properties of damaged beans. Grains with initial moisture content of 53.85% (d.b. were used. A part of the grains was used to obtain the desorption isotherms, while another part was subjected to drying until a moisture content of 5.26% (d.b. was achieved; therefore, it was subjected to the adsorption process. To induce damage, a Stein breakage tester was used. To obtain the equilibrium moisture content, grains were placed in a climatic chamber whose temperatures were 20, 30, 40, and 50 ± 1 °C combined with a relative humidity of 30, 40, 50, 70, and 90 ± 3%. Although in the desorption process, damaged grains had a lower differential enthalpy compared with the control, the reverse behavior was observed in the adsorption process. Mechanical damage caused the formation of a greater number of available adsorption sites, resulting in higher differential entropy values in adsorption and lower values in desorption compared with the control. The mechanical damage had no effect on the Gibbs free energy.

  12. Application of BIM Technology in Building Water Supply and Drainage Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tianyun; Chen, Guiqing; Wang, Junde

    2017-12-01

    Through the application of BIM technology, the idea of building water supply and drainage designers can be related to the model, the various influencing factors to affect water supply and drainage design can be considered more comprehensively. BIM(Building information model) technology assist in improving the design process of building water supply and drainage, promoting the building water supply and drainage planning, enriching the building water supply and drainage design method, improving the water supply and drainage system design level and building quality. Combined with fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to analyze the advantages of BIM technology in building water supply and drainage design. Therefore, application prospects of BIM technology are very worthy of promotion.

  13. An Automatic System to Detect Thermal Leakages and Damages on Building Facade Using Thermal Images

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmacek, Beril; Hoegner, Ludwig; Stilla, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, very high energy consumption is the major problem of the big cities. Most of the energy of the cities are disbursed to warm and cool buildings. Thus, detecting heat leakages on building walls is a new research problem. In this study, we propose a novel system to detect thermal leakages automatically from thermal camera images. To this end, we use sequential thermal images of buildings. First, we start with fusing thermal image sequences to obtain rectified building facade wit...

  14. Possibility of heat recovery from gray water in residential building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Aleksandra; Słyś, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Recovery of waste heat from gray water can be an interesting alternative to other energy saving systems in a building, including alternative energy sources. Mainly, due to a number of advantages including independence from weather conditions, small investment outlay, lack of user support, or a slight interference with the installation system. The purpose of this article is to present the financial effectiveness of installations which provide hot, usable water to a detached house, using a Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) system depending on the number of system users and the various combinations of bathing time in the shower, which has an influence on the daily warm water demand in each of the considered options. The economic analysis of the adopted installation variants is based on the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) method, which is characterized by the fact that it also includes the operating costs in addition to the capital expenditure during the entire analysis period. For each case, the necessary devices were selected and the cost of their installation was estimated.

  15. Residual capacity of a damaged water mist system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, R. van der; Rahm, M.; Hiltz, J.; Claesson, A.; Boonacker, B.

    2013-01-01

    Navies have been facing budget reductions over the past decade. Since crew size is a major cost driver, this has led to efforts to reduce manning on board naval ships. Traditionally, damage control and firefighting were manpower intensive operations. To enable crewing level reductions without

  16. Land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction and building damage level assessment - a case study of Datun, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi-yan Feng; Gang-jun Liu; Lei Meng; Er-jiang Fu; Hai-rong Zhang; Ke-fei Zhang [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Engineering

    2008-12-15

    As in many parts of the world, long-term excessive extraction of groundwater has caused significant land-surface subsidence in the residential areas of Datun coal mining district in East China. The recorded maximum level of subsidence in the area since 1976 to 2006 is 863 mm, and the area with an accumulative subsidence more than 200 mm reached 33.1 km{sup 2} by the end of 2006. Over ten cases of building crack due to ground subsidence have already been observed. Spatial variation in ground subsidence often leads to a corresponding pattern of ground deformation. Buildings and underground infrastructures have been under a higher risk of damage in locations with greater differential ground deformation. Governmental guideline in China classifies building damages into four different levels, based on the observable measures such as the width of wall crack, the degree of door and window deformation, the degree of wall inclination and the degree of structural destruction. Building damage level (BDL) is estimated by means of ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient and curvature. Ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient has shown that the areas of BDL III and BDL II sites account for about 0.013 km{sup 2} and 0.284 km{sup 2} respectively in 2006, and the predicted areas of BDL (define this first) III and II sites will be about 0.029 km{sup 2} and 0.423 km{sup 2} respectively by 2010. The situation is getting worse as subsidence continues. That calls for effective strategies for subsidence mitigation and damage reduction, in terms of sustainable groundwater extraction, enhanced monitoring and the establishment of early warning systems. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Multi-Directional Seismic Assessment of Historical Masonry Buildings by Means of Macro-Element Modelling: Application to a Building Damaged during the L’Aquila Earthquake (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cannizzaro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The experience of the recent earthquakes in Italy caused a shocking impact in terms of loss of human life and damage in buildings. In particular, when it comes to ancient constructions, their cultural and historical value overlaps with the economic and social one. Among the historical structures, churches have been the object of several studies which identified the main characteristics of the seismic response and the most probable collapse mechanisms. More rarely, academic studies have been devoted to ancient palaces, since they often exhibit irregular and complicated arrangement of the resisting elements, which makes their response very difficult to predict. In this paper, a palace located in L’Aquila, severely damaged by the seismic event of 2009 is the object of an accurate study. A historical reconstruction of the past strengthening interventions as well as a detailed geometric relief is performed to implement detailed numerical models of the structure. Both global and local models are considered and static nonlinear analyses are performed considering the influence of the input direction on the seismic vulnerability of the building. The damage pattern predicted by the numerical models is compared with that observed after the earthquake. The seismic vulnerability assessments are performed in terms of ultimate peak ground acceleration (PGA using capacity curves and the Italian code spectrum. The results are compared in terms of ultimate ductility demand evaluated performing nonlinear dynamic analyses considering the actual registered seismic input of L’Aquila earthquake.

  18. Magnesium-oxide boards cause moisture damage inside facades in new Danish buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Bunch-Nielsen, Tommy; Grelk, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium oxide board, “MgO-board”, is a factory-made sheathing board product, which has been widely used in the last 5 years in ventilated facades on new or renovated buildings in Denmark. In winter 2014/15, a number of problems began to appear with these boards since the boards and adjoining...... in periods with high outdoor humidity (90-100% RH) and form water drops on the surfaces. The drops contain a high amount of soluble chloride ions and appear on the surfaces of the boards and may often run down the boards and to adjacent structures. Metal fixtures for the MgO-and siding boards may corrode...... heavily within a few years. The binder in MgO-boards is formed by chemical reaction between MgO and MgCl2, known as magnesium oxychloride cement or Sorel cement. Also organic matter can be found in the material. The paper presents results of investigations of properties for moisture ab- and desorption...

  19. Mould growth on building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog Nielsen, K.

    Mould growth in buildings is associated with adverse health effects among the occupants of the building. However actual growth only occurs in damp and water-damaged materials, and is an increasing problem in Denmark, due to less robust constructions, inadequate maintenance, and too little...... ventilation. This project was started to determine if mycotoxins are produced in damp and water-damaged buildings as well investigating the influence of environmental conditions (humidity and temperature) on the production of fungal growth and secondary metabolism....

  20. Public Assistance Worksheets for Damage from 2010 Floods to the East Valley Water District

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Valley Water District (EVWD) in San Bernardino, California had significant damage due to flooding in December 2010. There was a presidentially-declared disaster. EVWD applied to FEMA under the Public Assistance Grant Program.

  1. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  2. A revised (PTVA model for assessing the vulnerability of buildings to tsunami damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dall'Osso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment (PTVA Model (Papathoma, 2003 was developed in the absence of robust, well-constructed and validated building fragility models for assessing the vulnerability of buildings to tsunami. It has proven to be a useful tool for providing assessments of building vulnerability. We present an enhanced version (PTVA-3 of the model that takes account of new understanding of the factors that influence building vulnerability and significantly, introduce the use of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP for weighting the various attributes in order to limit concerns about subjective ranking of attributes in the original model. We successfully test PTVA-3 using building data from Maroubra, Sydney, Australia.

  3. Evidence on dynamic effects in the water content – water potential relation of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    a series of adsorption and desorption processes. The data provides clear evidence that the water content – water potential relationship is not only dependent on the process history, but also on the process dynamics. The higher moisture potential gradients were induced, the larger was the deviation between...... static and dynamic moisture storage data and the more pronounced was the corresponding dynamic hysteresis. The paper thus provides clear experimental evidence on dynamic effects in the water content – water potential relation of building materials. By that, data published by previous authors as Topp et...... the required material functions, i.e. the moisture storage characteristic and the liquid water conductivity, from measured basic properties. The current state of the art in material modelling as well as the corresponding transport theory implies that the moisture transport function is unique...

  4. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  5. Structural health and dynamic behavior of residential buildings: field challenges in the rehab of damaged reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalhoub M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete buildings require special consideration under dynamic excitations due to their anisotropic material properties. Strain compatibility equations are used in concrete analysis and design with assumptions about the stress and strain field across member section and member length. However, these assumptions fall short of describing real life behavior when concrete elements deteriorate, age or undergo cyclic loading. This paper addresses the structural health of reinforced concrete buildings and proposes an analytical model to account for concrete damage through loss of bond. The proposed model relates steel loading that causes bond distress to design parameters such as development length and bar properties, and therefore could be complemented by field measurement. The paper proposes a diagnosis method and discusses the sustainability of the structure by assisting in a simplistic decision rule as to whether to perform minor fixes, major rehabilitation, or disposal. Emphasis is placed on the difference between reversible and irreversible effects of cyclic loading on structural behaviour, and draws a distinction between damage to the girder and damage to the column in the overall structural system. The model is compared to empirical results to address field challenges faced when the structure is subjected to severe conditions in its ambient environment, or to unusual loading. Deterioration in concrete causes alteration in its composite behavior with the reinforcing steel. This affects the fundamental period of the structure, and its response to seismic loading.

  6. Post-Earthquake Damage Inspection of Wood-Frame Buildings by a Polarimetric GB-SAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Structural damage inspection after an earthquake is essential for safety assessment of the affected wood-frame buildings and for making knowledgeable decision regarding their repair, renovation, or replacement. We present a polarimetric radar system for sensing the concealed wood-frames damaged by earthquakes. This system employs an antenna array consisting of four linearly polarized Vivaldi antennas recording full-polarimetric radar echoes in an ultra-wideband ranging from 1 to 20 GHz. The detailed design of the system and the signal processing algorithms for high-resolution 3D imaging are introduced. We conducted a number of surveys on damaged wooden wall specimens in laboratory. The experiment results indicate that the high-frequency radar waves can penetrate the wooden walls. Deformations of wooden structures (about 2 cm displacement inside the wall, as well as the concealed small metal nails (about 3 mm in diameter and less than 2 cm in length and bolts can be clearly imaged. The shape and orientation of the wooden members have shown a great sensitivity to the radar polarization. It is concluded that radar polarimetry can provide much richer information on the condition of concealed building structures than the conventional single-polarization subsurface penetrating radar.

  7. Colonization by Legionella spp. of water networks in residential buildings of the Province of Pisa, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggiani, A; Casini, B; Totaro, M; Aquino, F; Valentini, P; Bruni, B; Porretta, A; Casalini, F; Miccoli, M; Privitera, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increase of community acquired cases of legionellosis in Italy over the last years, the Italian guidelines do not give indications for prevention and control of Legionella in the hot water networks (or centralized conditioning systems) of residential buildings. We performed a survey on eight medium sized apartment buildings in the Pisa district to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in the water network and the respondance to drinking water requisites at the point of use, according to the Italian norms. For each building two hot water and three cold water samples (located at water entrance from the aqueduct network into the building pipework, at the exit from pressure autoclave, and at a remote tap) were collected. Legionella was detected in 20% of residential buildings, mostly in those with a central hot water production system. The study highlights a condition of potential risk for susceptible population subgroups and supports the need for measures of risk assessment and control.

  8. Fire flow water consumption in sprinklered and unsprinklered buildings an assessment of community impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Code Consultants, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Fire Flow Water Consumption in Sprinklered and Unsprinklered Buildings offers a detailed analysis for calculating the fire water demand required in buildings with existing and non-existant sprinkler systems. The installation of automatic sprinkler systems can significantly reduce the amount of water needed during a fire, but it requires water for commissioning, inspection, testing, and maintenance (CITM). This book provides an estimate of fire water used under both fire conditions, including CITM, to allow communities to develop fire water fees for both sprinklered and unsprinklered buildings that are proportional to the anticipated fire water usage. The types of buildings analyzed include residential (family dwellings as well as those up to four stories in height), business, assembly, institutional, mercantile, and storage facilities. Water volume was studied using guidelines from the International Code Council, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Insurance Services Office. Fire Flow Water Cons...

  9. LOSS OF WATER IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS (ON THE EXAMPLE OF MGSU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Any public building is a consumer of water resources. A huge amount of clean drinking water is used for various needs especially in buildings where there are a large number of people, for example, institutions of higher education. It should be noted that today all buildings must meet requirements for water conservation. This is because a large amount of drinking water is wasted. The author considers the problems characteristic of public buildings, because of which losses of water in the inner water supply systems happen. The variants are offered how to reduce wasteful expenses by installing contactless water intake devices, wastewater intake as well as water-saving headers and waterless urinals. The use of polymer materials and copper pipelines during reconstruction of the system in order to reduce water losses is justified.

  10. Bound water in soybean seed and its relation to respiration and imbibitional damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertucci, C W; Leopold, A C

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the initial stage of seed imbibition-the wetting stage-we have examined water binding in dry soybean cotyledon tissue using water sorption isotherm curves. The sorption isotherms show three levels of water affinity: a region of strongly bound water at moisture contents below 8%, a region of weakly bound water at moisture contents between 8 and 24%, and a region of very loosely bound water at contents greater than 24%. The enthalpies of the water binding for the three sectors were -6 to -12.5, about -2.5, and about -0.5 kilocalories per mole water, respectively.The degree of physiological activity in the tissue reflects the level of water binding. O(2) consumption is first detectable in the second region of water affinity (8-24% water), and increases dramatically with increasing water content above about 24%. Damage due to imbibing water is greatest when initial seed moisure contents are in the region of strongest water binding. Damage is lessened and finally absent when seed moisture contents are increased to the second and then to the third level of water affinity.

  11. Water scarcity and economic damage in Europe: regionally relevant simulations from 2000 to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Jeroen; de Roo, Ad; Bisselink, Bernard; Gelati, Emiliano; Karssenberg, Derek; de Jong, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Water availability is unequally distributed across Europe. Where certain regions experience a surplus of water, other areas have limited water availability which causes economic damage to the water using sectors such as households, industries or agriculture. Future changes in climatic and socio-economic conditions are expected to further increase the competition for available water that is already present in Europe. This means there is an increasing need for models that are able to simulate this multi-sectorial system of water availability and demand and incorporate the socio-economic component required for robust decisions and policy support. We present our modelling study which is focused at providing regionally relevant pan-European water scarcity and economic damage simulations. First we developed regionally relevant pan-European water demand simulations for the household and industry sector from 2000 up to 2050. For the household sector we developed a model to simulate water use based on water price, income and several other relevant variables at NUTS-3 level (over 1200 regions in Europe). Alternatively, we modelled industrial water use based on regionally downscaled water productivity values at the national level for ten sub-sections of the NACE (Nomenclature of Economic Activities) classification for economic activities. Subsequently we used scenario projections of our explanatory variables to make scenario simulations of water demand from 2000 up to 2050 at pan-European scale with unprecedented spatial and sub-sectorial detail. In order to analyze the European water use system we integrated these water demand scenarios into the hydrological rainfall-runoff model called LISFLOOD (Distributed Water Balance and Flood Simulation Model), which incorporates a vegetation module for the simulation of crop yield and irrigation water demand of the agriculture sector. We simulated river discharge and groundwater availability for abstractions of water using sectors

  12. Experimental damage localization in a full-scale 7 story benchmark building under seismic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovino, C.; Ditommaso, R.; Limongelli, M. P.; Ponzo, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper two methods of damage localization previously proposed by the authors are combined to smooth the possible drawbacks and boost the advantages each of them. The Modal Interpolation Method (IM), recently proposed, is based on a damage feature defined in terms of the loss of smoothness (that is local increases of curvature) of the modal shapes induced by a local reduction of stiffness. Herein the combination of the IM with the Curvature Evolution Methods (CEM) is proposed. The CEM is based on the use of a Band-Variable Filter able to extract from recorded responses the nonlinear response of one mode of vibration enabling the detection of possible changes of a properly defined damage feature, during a single earthquake. In the CEM the modal curvature is assumed as damage feature. The combination of the two methods CEM and IM is carried out using the Band-Variable Filter to extract the nonlinear response of the structure and assuming as a damage feature the variation of the interpolation error computed at different times during the strong motion. The validation of the combined approach, named Interpolation Evolution Method (IEM), is carried out on a full scale experimental benchmark tested on the UCSD-NEES shake table.

  13. Effects of the mechanical damage on the water absorption process by corn kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mendes Botelho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the water absorption process by corn kernels with different levels of mechanical damage Corn kernels of AG 1510 variety with moisture content of 14.2 (% d.b. were used. Different mechanical damage levels were indirectly evaluated by electrical conductivity measurements. The absorption process was based on the industrial corn wet milling process, in which the product was soaked with a 0.2% sulfur dioxide (SO2 solution and 0.55% lactic acid (C3H6O3 in distilled water, under controlled temperatures of 40, 50, 60, and 70 ºC and different mechanical damage levels. The Peleg model was used for the analysis and modeling of water absorption process. The conclusion is that the structural changes caused by the mechanical damage to the corn kernels influenced the initial rates of water absorption, which were higher for the most damaged kernels, and they also changed the equilibrium moisture contents of the kernels. The Peleg model was well adjusted to the experimental data presenting satisfactory values for the analyzed statistic parameters for all temperatures regardless of the damage level of the corn kernels.

  14. Quality investigation of building structure using ground penetrating radar (GPR) as an early study to prevent severe structural damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumai, M. Fariz; Fernando, Stephen; Nugroho, Gatot; Natania, Kana; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Many infrastructures in Indonesia suffered damage in a short period of time. It proves that there are still many buildings in Indonesia which have questionable quality so a method is needed for checking the quality of the building. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a method used to describe the structure of the building on the inside that cannot be seen from the outside in this case Parahyangan Reksa Raga (PASAGA) Bridge was examined with 19.7 m × 3.3 m × 1.5 m dimension. Thismethod uses propagation of electromagnetic wave, which will give Radargram response inside a building based on the characteristics of the medium such as magnetic permeability, electric permittivity and electrical conductivity. GPR method is one of geophysical method which is effective, efficient, and environmentally friendly. The measurements were carried out using MALA RAMAC X3M device with frequency 800 MHz. The results show thatindication of fractures was found at less than 1 m depth in the structure from the Radargram display of PASAGA Bridge and supported by the observation data on the surface.

  15. A procedure for damage detection and localization of framed buildings based on curvature variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Rocco; Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Auletta, Gianluca; Iacovino, Chiara; Mossucca, Antonello; Nigro, Domenico; Nigro, Antonella

    2014-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring and Damage Detection are topics of current interest in civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering. Damage Detection approach based on dynamic monitoring of structural properties over time has received a considerable attention in recent scientific literature of the last years. The basic idea arises from the observation that spectral properties, described in terms of the so-called modal parameters (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping), are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, energy dissipation mechanisms and stiffness). Structural damage exhibits its main effects in terms of stiffness and damping variation. As a consequence, a permanent dynamic monitoring system makes it possible to detect and, if suitably concentrated on the structure, to localize structural and non-structural damage occurred on the structure during a strong earthquake. In the last years many researchers are working to set-up new methodologies for Non-destructive Damage Evaluation (NDE) based on the variation of the dynamic behaviour of structures under seismic loads. Pandey et al. (1991) highlighted on the possibility to use the structural mode shapes to extract useful information for structural damage localization. In this paper a new procedure for damage detection on framed structures based on changes in modal curvature is proposed. The proposed approach is based on the use of Stockwell Transform, a special kind of integral transformation that become a powerful tool for nonlinear signal analysis and then to analyse the nonlinear behaviour of a general structure. Using this kind of approach, it is possible to use a band-variable filter (Ditommaso et al., 2012) to extract from a signal recorded on a structure (excited by an earthquake) the response related to a single mode of vibration for which the related frequency changes over time (if the structure is being damaged). İn general, by acting simultaneously in both frequency and

  16. Deformations and damage to buildings adjacent to deep excavations in soft soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korff, M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to gain insight into mechanisms of soil-structure interaction for buildings adjacent to deep excavations and to find a reliable method to design and monitor deep excavations in urban areas with soft soil conditions. The research focuses on typical Dutch conditions. The

  17. Consequence analysis methodology for building damage prediction due tot external blast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, B.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Weerheijm, J.

    2014-01-01

    Safety evaluation, risk assessment and decisions on prevention and protection measures require simple fast running methods. It is a challenge to develop a consequence analysis method that is relatively simple, but still has the ability to discern between different cases, scenarios and buildings. In

  18. New solution for anistropic formation damage due to produced water re-injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojarad, R.S.; Settari, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    A velocity damage model (VDM) was used to relate damage to the amount of particle-carrying water passing through a porous medium. The transport phenomenon was treated as a miscible displacement of in situ water with injected water. Permeability reductions were assumed to be a function of the cumulative volume of contaminated fluid flow passing through each cross section. The VDM was validated with field data. Hagen-Poiseuille equations were used to determine fluid flow through a single pore. A series of core flood tests on Masila Block samples from a water injection project in Yemen were then matched with data from a deep bed filtration (DBF) model. Results showed that the VDM model successfully matched the block core mean particle and pore size. The model was also used to consider an XZ cross-section of anisotropic media of a horizontal injection well. Results of the analysis suggested that traditional assumptions for constant damage ratios are often inaccurate. Results were then used to develop an anistropic permeability damage formulation which was further extended to create a dynamic alpha to recompute damage parameters for time steps in simulation tools. The anistropic formulations were validated with data from a horizontal well. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  19. Stingless bees damage broccoli inflorescences when collecting fibers for nest building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Jorge Nunes dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stingless bee Trigona spinipes (Fabricius, 1793 (Hymenoptera: Apidae is an important pollinator for various crops, but constitutes an occasional pest of other plant species since it causes injury to leaves, stems, flowers and fruits while collecting nest materials. The aim of the present study was to determine the damage caused by T. spinipes to a broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica, Brassicaceae growing on an organic farm. A significant number of plants (72.5 % presented damaged inflorescences, while 39% of all of the inflorescences suffered some degree of injury. The activities of T. spinipes caused scarifications on the stems of the inflorescences, and these typically evolved to epidermal cicatrices up to 10 mm wide. In some cases, the lesions were sufficiently deep to cause partial destruction of the vascular tissues, and this lead to thinner (< 5 mm diameter floral stems that may collapse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report concerning the attack of broccoli plants by T. spinipes. The results obtained should serve to highlight the possibility that stingless bees could be responsible for direct and/or indirect damage to vegetable crops, and to stimulate the development of control strategies for these incidental pests.

  20. Earthquake damage scenario simulation of a water supply system in Taipei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ji-Hao; Chen, Walter W.

    2008-10-01

    Taiwan is located in the Circum-Pacific Belt and at the junction of the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian Plate. The island is squeezed over a long period of time, so the frequency of the occurrence of earthquakes is very high. Changes of terrain due to seismic forces such as fault ruptures and surface uplifts could cause extensive damage to water pipeline networks. The 921 Ji-Ji earthquake was one of the most serious disasters in recent years in Taiwan, and it indeed resulted in the most severe damage of water supply systems. The urban water supply network is very important for municipal water management in Taiwan. If the water supply systems break down, hospitals and fire stations will not have enough water to carry out the rescue work, and the results may worsen the disasters. This study took the water supply system of the West District in Taipei City as an example. First, the metro-Taipei area was split into three hundred and twenty-seven 1 km by 1 km cells. Second, the location of a simulated earthquake was determined. Third, the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) value of each cell was calculated by an empirical formula. Fourth, the Repair Rate (RR) of each cell was calculated based on its PGA value. Fifth, using the GIRAFFE software developed by Cornell University, the Monte Carlo simulation method was used to simulate the possible damage to the water supply system. And finally, the EPANET program developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency was applied to compute the distribution of flow volumes and water pressures of the damaged water supply system. Results of the pipeline network under different scenarios of earthquake magnitudes are shown in this study, and they provide an evaluation basis to decision makers to improve the pipeline infrastructures for fire protection after major earthquakes.

  1. RAINWATER AS A ALTERNATIVE SOURCE OF WATER SUPPLY IN BUILDING – MEASUREMENTS AND EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel MARKOVIČ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many water sources available on building sites that can be use as a alternative water sources for supplement the more traditional water sources. These water sources are usually suitable for non-potable purposes and vary greatly in quality so that the most of the on-site water resources have limited application and of course are never suitable for human consumption. Rainwater harvesting appears to be one of the most promising alternatives for supplying freshwater in the face of increasing water scarcity and escalating demand. Advantage of the rainwater harvesting is availability in the most places over the world and that rainwater usually is one of the purest waters available of all the alternate water sources. Submitted paper contains an overview of the possible rain water use for non-potable purposes in one school buildings as well as a possibility of the rainwater harvesting for buildings in TUKE campus as a planned concept for rainwater management.

  2. Economizer water-wall damages initiated by feedwater impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojković Sonja M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main causes of efficiency loss in thermal power plants are boiler tube failures that diminish unit reliability and availability, and raise the cost of the electric energy. For that reason, regular examination of boiler tubes is indispensable measure for prevention future malfunctions of power units. Microscopic examination of economizer inner wall microstructure, analysis of chemical composition of deposit using x-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS has been performed in a subcritical power plant. Stress corrosion cracking, pitting corrosion, destroyed protective magnetite layer, presence of magnetite and hematite in deposit and corrosive impurities within the cracks were indicated the effect of inadequate quality of feedwater that can not entirely ensure reliable operation of the boiler. It may be stated that maintenance of present boiler does not provide its reliable operation. Extensive chemical control of water/steam cycle was recommended. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43009 i br. III 45012

  3. How to build a small ferro-cement water tank: technical guide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sadzik, P

    1988-05-01

    Full Text Available This guide will assist on how to build a small water tank which can be used to store spring water, rainwater or water pumped from a stream or dam. Small water tanks can be constructed from many different materials such as corrugated iron, bricks...

  4. Research projects and capacity building | Breen | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A World Bank long-term perspective study on Sub-Saharan Africa highlighted the need to build human and institutional capacity in virtually all sectors and countries. In South Africa, establishment of a democratic government in 1994 saw increased emphasis placed on capacity building. This led to the revision of policies and ...

  5. Construction and design defects in the residential buildings and observed earthquake damage types in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogurcu, M. T.

    2015-04-01

    Turkey is situated in a very active earthquake region. In the last century, several earthquakes resulted in thousands of deaths and enormous economic losses. In 1999, the Kocaeli earthquake had an approximate death toll of more than 20 000, and in 2011 the Van earthquake killed 604 people. In general, Turkish residential buildings have reinforced concrete structural systems. These reinforced concrete structures have several deficiencies, such as low concrete quality, non-seismic steel detailing and inappropriate structural systems including several architectural irregularities. In this study, the general characteristics of Turkish building stock and the deficiencies observed in structural systems are explained, and illustrative figures are given with reference to the Turkish Earthquake Code 2007. The poor concrete quality, lack of lateral or transverse reinforcement in beam-column joints and column confinement zones, high stirrup spacings, under-reinforced columns and over-reinforced beams are the primary causes of failures. Other deficiencies include weak-column-stronger-beam formations, insufficient seismic joint separations, soft-story or weak-story irregularities and short columns. Similar construction and design mistakes are also observed in other countries situated on active earthquake belts. Existing buildings still have these undesirable characteristics, and so to prepare for future earthquakes they must be rehabilitated.

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL HIT-OR-MISS TRANSFORM BASED APPROACH FOR BUILDING DAMAGE ESTIMATION FROM VHR AIRBORNE IMAGERY IN 2011 PACIFIC COAST OF TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. K. Parape

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The very high resolution (VHR airborne images offer the opportunity to recognize features such as road, vegetation, buildings and other kind of infrastructures. The advantage of remote sensing and its applications made it possible to extract damaged, undamaged building and vulnerability assessment of wide urban areas due to a natural disaster. In this paper, we focus on an automatic building detection method which is helpful to optimizing, recognizing, rescuing, recovery and management tasks in the event of a disaster. Objective of this study is to develop techniques for tsunami damaged building extraction, based on very high resolution (VHR airborne images acquired before and after the 2011 East coastline of Japan among Tohoku area and to carry out a damage assessment of building and vulnerable area mapping. This paper presents a methodology and results of evaluating damaged buildings detection algorithm using an object recognition task based on Mathematical Morphological (MM operators for Very High Resolution (VHR remotely sensed airborne images. The proposed approach involves several advanced morphological operators among which an adaptive hit-or-miss transform with varying size and shape of the structuring elements. VHR airborne images consisting of pre and post 2011 Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake and Tsunami site of the Ishinomaki, Miyagi area in Japan were used. The extracted results of building were compared with ground truth data giving 76% and 88% in accuracy before and after the Tsunami event.

  7. Potential for HEPA filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fretthold, J.K. [Rocky Flats Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Slawski, J.W. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for BEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. A fire in a four-stage, BEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of BEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenums, additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk. 22 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Potential for Hepa filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawsld, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for HEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. Afire in a four-stage, HEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of HEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenum , additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk.

  9. Air Emissions Damages from Municipal Drinking Water Treatment Under Current and Proposed Regulatory Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-09-19

    Water treatment processes present intersectoral and cross-media risk trade-offs that are not presently considered in Safe Drinking Water Act regulatory analyses. This paper develops a method for assessing the air emission implications of common municipal water treatment processes used to comply with recently promulgated and proposed regulatory standards, including concentration limits for, lead and copper, disinfection byproducts, chromium(VI), strontium, and PFOA/PFOS. Life-cycle models of electricity and chemical consumption for individual drinking water unit processes are used to estimate embedded NO x , SO 2 , PM 2.5 , and CO 2 emissions on a cubic meter basis. We estimate air emission damages from currently installed treatment processes at U.S. drinking water facilities to be on the order of $500 million USD annually. Fully complying with six promulgated and proposed rules would increase baseline air emission damages by approximately 50%, with three-quarters of these damages originating from chemical manufacturing. Despite the magnitude of these air emission damages, the net benefit of currently implemented rules remains positive. For some proposed rules, however, the promise of net benefits remains contingent on technology choice.

  10. Inferring Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) from observed building damage and EO-derived exposure development to develop rapid loss estimates following the April 2015 Nepal earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyck, C. K.

    2016-12-01

    The April 25th 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal occurred in an area with very few seismic stations. Ground motions were estimated primarily by Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) over a very large region, with a very high degree of uncertainty. Accordingly, initial fatality estimates and their distribution was highly uncertain, with a 65% chance of fatalities ranging from 1,000 to 100,000. With an aim to developing estimates of: 1) the number of buildings damaged by category (slight, moderate, extensive, complete), 2) fatalities and their distribution, and 3) rebuilding costs, researchers at ImageCat have developed a preliminary inferred Peak Ground Acceleration product in %g (PGA). The inferred PGA is determined by using observations of building collapse from the National Geospatial Agency and building exposure estimates derived from EO data to determine the percentage of buildings collapsed in key locations. The percentage of building collapse is adjusted for accuracy and cross referenced with composite building damage functions for 4 development patterns in Nepal: 1) sparsely populated, 2) rural, 3) dense development, and 4) urban development to yield an inferred PGA. Composite damage functions are derived from USGS Pager collapse fragility functions (Jaiswal et al., 2011) and are weighted by building type frequencies developed by ImageCat. The PGA is interpolated to yield a surface. An initial estimate of the fatalities based on ATC 13 (Rojan and Sharpe, 1985) using these PGA yields an estimate of: Extensively damaged or destroyed buildings: 225,000 to 450,000 Fatalities: 8,700 to 22,000, with a mean estimate of 15,700. The total number of displaced persons is estimated between 1 and 2 million. Rebuilding costs for building damage only are estimated to be between 2 and 3 billion USD. The inferred PGA product is recommended for use solely in loss estimation processes.

  11. Rational designing of the internal water supply system in reconstructed residential buildings of mass standard series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of water supply system reconstruction in mass series buildings are reviewed with consideration of water- and resource saving. Principal points for location of plumbing cells in apartments, arrangement of water devices and wastewater receivers, selection of pipelines for reconstructed water line are described. Comparative analysis of design variants of inner water line before and following reconstruction are given. It was found that applying the developed system design approaches the head losses in the inner water supply line will be significantly decreased as well as the water mains length will be decreased with material and installation saving. Based on the data the conclusions on necessity to review standard arrangement solutions of water supply systems in the reconstructed buildings were made. Recommendations on water loss reduction in the system by installation of special water saving fittings on water devices and touchless faucets.

  12. Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Post-Event Sub-Meter VHR TerraSAR-X Staring Spotlight Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Compared with optical sensors, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR can provide important damage information due to its ability to map areas affected by earthquakes independently from weather conditions and solar illumination. In 2013, a new TerraSAR-X mode named staring spotlight (ST, whose azimuth resolution was improved to 0.24 m, was introduced for various applications. This data source made it possible to extract detailed information from individual buildings. In this paper, we present a new concept for individual building damage assessment using a post-event sub-meter very high resolution (VHR SAR image and a building footprint map. With the building footprint map, the original footprints of buildings can be located in the SAR image. Based on the building imaging analysis of a building in the SAR image, the features in the building footprint can be extracted to identify standing and collapsed buildings. Three machine learning classifiers, including random forest (RF, support vector machine (SVM and K-nearest neighbor (K-NN, are used in the experiments. The results show that the proposed method can obtain good overall accuracy, which is above 80% with the three classifiers. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated based on samples of buildings using descending and ascending sub-meter VHR ST images, which were all acquired from the same area in old Beichuan County, China.

  13. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...... found to reflect prehydration barrier damage. It is suggested that this simple model may be elaborated to provide a rapid, economical screening tool for potential skin irritants....

  14. Differential Allergy Induction by Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: We compared the allergy induction potential of high concentration molds found in water-damaged homes and molds found more universally to house dust mite (HDM) in our mouse allergy/asthma model. Female BALB/c mice received 1 or 4 exposures by intratracheal aspiration of ...

  15. The Allergenic Potential of Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold's role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, certain molds categorized as Group 1 were associated with asthmatics' water-damaged homes in Cleveland, while others were found more univer...

  16. Occupational sensitization to storage mites in the personnel of a water-damaged grocery store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Tiina; Ruoppi, Pirkko; Putus, Tuula; Pennanen, Sirpa; Harju, Anu; Nuutinen, Juhani

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the occupational exposure and sensitization to storage mites (SM) in sales staff working in a moisture-damaged and three healthy reference buildings. The study population consisted of the entire personnel (n=12) in the moisture-damaged grocery store. They all suffered from persistent upper respiratory tract symptoms. Twelve (in results 11) symptom-free controls working in three healthy reference groceries were matched with age, sex and occupation. Dust samples from each building were examined for mites. The clinical study consisted of otorhinolaryngological examination and determination of IgE reactivity. Specific serum IgE antibodies were measured against three SMs and two house dust mites (HDM). Skin prick tests (SPT) were made to the same five mites and to five common aeroallergens. If sensitization to any of the SMs was detected, a nasal provocation test (NPT) was performed. SMs were found in all buildings. In all, seven cases and four control subjects showed IgE-mediated reactivity. Sensitization to mites was detected in six cases and in three controls and in 2/12 and 3/11 this was the only IgE antibody response observed. In addition, one case and one control subject were sensitized to common aeroallergens. NPT with SMs was positive in four cases and in one control. In grocery stores, the personnel are exposed to SMs. The risk of sensitization to mites is obvious and an IgE response can occur without any reactivity to common aeroallergens. SM allergy may in some cases explain the chronic rhinitis related to moisture-damaged buildings.

  17. Towards sustainable urban water governance in Denmark: collective building of capabilities in local authorities

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2016-01-01

    To address the climate adaptation of cities, today’s water managers need more than technical skills to drive sustainable urban water projects, which also stimulate demand for post-graduate education so that professionalisation of integrated sustainable water management in the public sector can be achieved. The ‘urban water platform’ was tested and is hereby presented as a course concept for building collective capabilities for integrated sustainable water design among local authorities in Den...

  18. Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non-Residential Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This manual demonstrates how drinking water in schools and non-residential buildings can be tested for lead and how contamination problems can be corrected when found. The manual also provides background information concerning the sources and health effects of lead, how lead gets into drinking water, how lead in drinking water is regulated, and…

  19. Workshops capacity building for agricultural water demand management; final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehmeijer, P.W.; Wolters, W.

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural Water Demand Management (AWDM) is at the core of the Water for Food Programme launched as a result of a pledge by the Netherlands' Minister for Agriculture at the 2nd World Water Forum in March 2000, The Hague. One of the projects that was started after the March 2000 pledge was

  20. Nest-building behavior of Monk Parakeets and insights into potential mechanisms for reducing damage to utility poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Kevin R; Rubega, Margaret A; Sustaita, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) commonly uses utility poles as a substrate for building large, bulky nests. These nests often cause fires and electric power outages, creating public safety risks and increasing liability and maintenance costs for electric companies. Previous research has focused on lethal methods and chemical contraception to prevent nesting on utility poles and electrical substations. However, implementation of lethal methods has led to public protests and lawsuits, while chemical contraception may affect other than the targeted species, and must be continually reapplied for effectiveness. One non-lethal alternative, nest removal, is costly and may not be a sustainable measure if Monk Parakeet populations continue to grow. In order to identify cost-effective non-lethal solutions to problems caused by Monk Parakeet nesting, we studied their behavior as they built nests on utility poles. Monk Parakeets initiate nests by attaching sticks at the intersection of the pole and electric lines. We found that parakeets use the electric lines exclusively to gain access to the intersection of lines and pole during nest initiation, and continue to use the lines intensively throughout construction. Monk Parakeets also have more difficulty attaching sticks during the early stages of nest construction than when the nest is nearing completion. These findings suggest that intervention during the earlier stages of nest building, by excluding Monk Parakeets from electric lines adjacent to poles, may be an effective, non-lethal method of reducing or eliminating parakeets nesting on, and damaging, utility poles.

  1. Nest-building behavior of Monk Parakeets and insights into potential mechanisms for reducing damage to utility poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Burgio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus commonly uses utility poles as a substrate for building large, bulky nests. These nests often cause fires and electric power outages, creating public safety risks and increasing liability and maintenance costs for electric companies. Previous research has focused on lethal methods and chemical contraception to prevent nesting on utility poles and electrical substations. However, implementation of lethal methods has led to public protests and lawsuits, while chemical contraception may affect other than the targeted species, and must be continually reapplied for effectiveness. One non-lethal alternative, nest removal, is costly and may not be a sustainable measure if Monk Parakeet populations continue to grow. In order to identify cost-effective non-lethal solutions to problems caused by Monk Parakeet nesting, we studied their behavior as they built nests on utility poles. Monk Parakeets initiate nests by attaching sticks at the intersection of the pole and electric lines. We found that parakeets use the electric lines exclusively to gain access to the intersection of lines and pole during nest initiation, and continue to use the lines intensively throughout construction. Monk Parakeets also have more difficulty attaching sticks during the early stages of nest construction than when the nest is nearing completion. These findings suggest that intervention during the earlier stages of nest building, by excluding Monk Parakeets from electric lines adjacent to poles, may be an effective, non-lethal method of reducing or eliminating parakeets nesting on, and damaging, utility poles.

  2. Evaluating the Life Cycle Environmental Benefits and Trade-Offs of Water Reuse Systems for Net-Zero Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasik, Vaclav; Anderson, Naomi E; Collinge, William O; Thiel, Cassandra L; Khanna, Vikas; Wirick, Jason; Piacentini, Richard; Landis, Amy E; Bilec, Melissa M

    2017-02-07

    Aging water infrastructure and increased water scarcity have resulted in higher interest in water reuse and decentralization. Rating systems for high-performance buildings implicitly promote the use of building-scale, decentralized water supply and treatment technologies. It is important to recognize the potential benefits and trade-offs of decentralized and centralized water systems in the context of high-performance buildings. For this reason and to fill a gap in the current literature, we completed a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the decentralized water system of a high-performance, net-zero energy, net-zero water building (NZB) that received multiple green building certifications and compared the results with two modeled buildings (conventional and water efficient) using centralized water systems. We investigated the NZB's impacts over varying lifetimes, conducted a break-even analysis, and included Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. The results show that, although the NZB performs better in most categories than the conventional building, the water efficient building generally outperforms the NZB. The lifetime of the NZB, septic tank aeration, and use of solar energy have been found to be important factors in the NZB's impacts. While these findings are specific to the case study building, location, and treatment technologies, the framework for comparison of water and wastewater impacts of various buildings can be applied during building design to aid decision making. As we design and operate high-performance buildings, the potential trade-offs of advanced decentralized water treatment systems should be considered.

  3. Building America Case Study: Addressing Multifamily Piping Losses with Solar Hot Water, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    Solar thermal water heating is most cost effective when applied to multifamily buildings and some states offer incentives or other inducements to install them. However, typical solar water heating designs do not allow the solar generated heat to be applied to recirculation losses, only to reduce the amount of gas or electric energy needed for hot water that is delivered to the fixtures. For good reasons, hot water that is recirculated through the building is returned to the water heater, not to the solar storage tank. The project described in this report investigated the effectiveness of using automatic valves to divert water that is normally returned through the recirculation piping to the gas or electric water heater instead to the solar storage tank. The valves can be controlled so that the flow is only diverted when the returning water is cooler than the water in the solar storage tank.

  4. Using Solar Hot Water to Address Piping Heat Losses in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Seitzler, Matt [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Backman, Christine [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Solar thermal water heating is most cost effective when applied to multifamily buildings and some states offer incentives or other inducements to install them. However, typical solar water heating designs do not allow the solar generated heat to be applied to recirculation losses, only to reduce the amount of gas or electric energy needed for hot water that is delivered to the fixtures. For good reasons, hot water that is recirculated through the building is returned to the water heater, not to the solar storage tank. The project described in this report investigated the effectiveness of using automatic valves to divert water that is normally returned through the recirculation piping to the gas or electric water heater instead to the solar storage tank. The valves can be controlled so that the flow is only diverted when the returning water is cooler than the water in the solar storage tank.

  5. Building Regulations Related to Energy and Water in Indian Hill Towns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwani Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy and water are the two major concerns which humanity is presently facing at large, and many concerns are being expressed at the international, national and local level related to these critical issues. Optimizing the use of energy and water in buildings are significant challenges faced by architects and designers in developing countries like India while planning of townships and designing of buildings and their surrounding environments. Different building regulations are formulated in various Indian cities to optimize the use of energy and water in built environment. But, these regulations are not efficiently enforced and followed. As a result, the problem related to insufficient supply and inappropriate use of energy and water persists, which leads to excessive pressure on already scarce energy and water resources. Environmentally sensitive in hill towns of India are facing most of the issues, where provision and improvement of infrastructural facilities is a tedious task and may lead to enormous impacts on the environment. In this paper, an attempt is made to understand their issues and problems of different building regulations related to energy and water enforced in Indian hill towns. Valuable lessons are outlined related to formulation and implementation of building relations imposed on development in hilly areas in other countries. This paper also includes various interventions required to incorporate regulations related to energy and water in existing building regulations of Indian hill towns.

  6. Salinization effects on the water sorption of porous building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Rook, W.; Adan, O.C.G.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of salt transport and moisture transport plays a crucial role in some deterioration mechanisms of porous building materials. For this reason it has been an important research subject for mant' years. Yet most research was still complicated by the lack of experimental techniques

  7. Building Rehabilitation with Dry and Wet Systems – Embodied Water Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Macieira Mónica; Mendonça Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Fresh water is a scarce resource. Its availability, essential for life, is being conditioned by several menaces, mostly from human origin. Studies on water saving strategies in building construction and what procedures should be adopted for its efficient use can respond to part of these problems, taking into account the relevance of construction activities, responsible for almost 40% of the overall environmental impact in Europe. Buildings rehabilitation assumes an important role in the const...

  8. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These case studies, coupled with climate data and an analysis of water policies, customary rights, and water management practices, will form the basis for local and regional ... Outputs. Journal articles. Integrating local hybrid knowledge and state support for climate change adaptation in the Asian Highlands. Download PDF ...

  9. Global water risks and national security: Building resilience (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The UN defines water security as the capacity of a population to safeguard sustainable access to adequate quantities of acceptable quality water for sustaining livelihoods, human well-being, and socio-economic development, for ensuring protection against water-borne pollution and water-related disasters, and for preserving ecosystems in a climate of peace and political stability. This definition highlights complex and interconnected challenges and underscores the centrality of water for environmental services and human aactivities. Global risks are expressed at the national level. The 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review and the 2010 National Security Strategy identify climate change as likely to trigger outcomes that will threaten U.S. security including how freshwater resources can become a security issue. Impacts will be felt on the National Security interest through water, food and energy security, and critical infrastructure. This recognition focuses the need to consider the rates of change in climate extremes, in the context of more traditional political, economic, and social indicators that inform security analyses. There is a long-standing academic debate over the extent to which resource constraints and environmental challenges lead to inter-state conflict. It is generally recognized that water resources as a security issue to date exists mainly at the substate level and has not led to physical conflict between nation states. In conflict and disaster zones, threats to water security increase through inequitable and difficult access to water supply and related services, which may aggravate existing social fragility, tensions, violence, and conflict. This paper will (1) Outline the dimensions of water security and its links to national security (2) Analyze water footprints and management risks for key basins in the US and around the world, (3) map the link between global water security and national concerns, drawing lessons from the drought of 2012 and elsewhere

  10. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1991-10-01

    Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Pumping bottom water to prevent Korean red tide damage caused by Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seob; Moon, Seong Yong; Shu, Young Sang; Hwang, Jae Dong; Youn, Seok Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef produces annual massive blooms in Korean coastal waters which cause great damage to aquaculture and fisheries. Although various methods have been developed to remove the red tide of C. polykrikoides, release of yellow loess has been regarded as the most desirable technique for mitigation for over 10 years. Each August, strong irradiation generates water column stratification separating warm surface from colder bottom waters. Water from a distance of 0 (St. 1), 5 (St. 2), 10 (St. 3), and 15 m (St. 4) was pumped by running a pump for 0, 10, 30 and 90 min and characterized water temperature, salinity collected, suspended solids, Chl-a, and phytoplankton including C. polykrikoides. After running for 30 min, was temperature and salinity in surface water was similar to those of bottom water, and water column stratification completely reversed after 90 min. Likewise, suspended solids, Chl-a, and total phytoplankton cell density decreased after 30 min, but C. polykrikoides did not show strong removal because of low cell density during sampling. However, the number of C. polykrikoides was significantly diluted (80%) after 90 min. These results suggested that pumping device was as an environmentally-friendly method convenient to be install in fish cages and effective to remove C. polykrikoides stratified water column conditions.

  12. Modeling Reservoir Formation Damage due to Water Injection for Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao

    2010-01-01

    The elliptic equation for non-Fickian transport of suspension in porous media is applied to simulate the reservoir formation damage due to water injection for oil recovery. The deposition release (erosion of reservoir formation) and the suspension deposition (pore plugging) are both taken...... into account. 1-D numerical simulations are carried out to reveal the erosion of reservoir formation due to water injection. 2-D numerical simulations are carried out to obtain the suspension and deposition profiles around the injection wells. These preliminary results indicate the non-Fickian behaviors...

  13. Identity and biodegradability of organic compounds migrating from PEX pipes used in water installations in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.

    2012-01-01

    Migration of organic compounds from PEX pipes used in water installations in buildings was investigated by batch set ups. Several compounds were identified and quantified. The organic compounds released to the water phase could support microbial growth and a few of the identified compounds...

  14. 8 March 2010 Elazığ-Kovancilar (Turkey) Earthquake: observations on ground motions and building damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkar, Sinan; Aldemir, A.; Askan, A.; Bakir, S.; Canbay, E.; Demirel, I.O.; Erberik, M.A.; Gulerce, Z.; Gulkan, Polat; Kalkan, Erol; Prakash, S.; Sandikkaya, M.A.; Sevilgen, V.; Ugurhan, B.; Yenier, E.

    2011-01-01

    An earthquake of MW = 6.1 occurred in the Elazığ region of eastern Turkey on 8 March 2010 at 02:32:34 UTC. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported the epicenter of the earthquake as 38.873°N-39.981°E with a focal depth of 12 km. Forty-two people lost their lives and 137 were injured during the event. The earthquake was reported to be on the left-lateral strike-slip east Anatolian fault (EAF), which is one of the two major active fault systems in Turkey. Teams from the Earthquake Engineering Research Center of the Middle East Technical University (EERC-METU) visited the earthquake area in the aftermath of the mainshock. Their reconnaissance observations were combined with interpretations of recorded ground motions for completeness. This article summarizes observations on building and ground damage in the area and provides a discussion of the recorded motions. No significant observations in terms of geotechnical engineering were made.

  15. Solar Heating of Buildings and Domestic Hot Water. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    double (80%-100%) the selling price. 120 3. 10 Additional Costs - Worksheet G Worksheet G is a convenient checklist to collect costs associated with...Washington, D .C., Oct 1975. Energy Research and Development Administration (1976). An economic analysis of solar water and space heating. DSE -2322-1

  16. Building an Interdisciplinary Research Program in Water Conservation: Approach, preliminary findings, and next steps

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, David E.; Endter-Wada, Joanna; Caplan, Arthur; Glenn, Diana T.; Ballard, Guy; Henderson, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Effective urban water conservation programs must harness a synergy of new technologies, public policies, social cost pricing, information dissemination, citizen engagement, and coordinated actions across decision making scales. Together, these factors affect the volume of water an individual user ultimately saves and the overall success of a conservation program or programs. Over the past 18 months, we have started building an interdisciplinary research program in urban water conservation to ...

  17. Sustainable water demand management in the face of rapid urbanization and ground water depletion for social–ecological resilience building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arfanuzzaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Necessity of Sustainable water demand management (SWDM is immensely higher in the rapidly urbanized mega cities of the world where groundwater depletion and water deficit are taking place perilously. This paper focuses on the present condition of water demand, supply, system loss, pricing strategy, groundwater level, and per capita water consumption of Dhaka city, Bangladesh. The study founds population growth has a large influence on water demand to rise and demand of water is not responsive to the existing pricing rule adopted by DWASA. It emerges that, water demand is increasing at 4% rate an average in the Dhaka city since 1990 and groundwater table goes more than 70 m down in central capital due to extensive withdrawal of water. The study suggests an integrated SWDM approach, which incorporates optimum pricing, ground and surface water regulation, water conservation, sustainable water consumption and less water foot print to ease groundwater depletion. In order to attain sustainability in water demand management (WDM the study recommends certain criteria under economic, social and environmental segment to administer the increasing water demand of growing population and conserve the fresh water resources of the world’s mega cities for social–ecological resilience building.

  18. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Rempel, Alan W.; Alexandra R. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recent...

  19. Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

  20. Diurnal variations in depth profiles of UV-induced DNA damage and inhibition of bacterioplankton production in tropical coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, PM; Poos, JJ; Scheper, BB; Boelen, P; van Duyl, FC

    2002-01-01

    In this study, diurnal changes in bacterial production and DNA damage in bacterio-plankton (measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs) incubated in bags at different depths in tropical coastal waters were investigated. The DNA damage and inhibition of the bacterial production was highest at

  1. Bore pile foundation tall buildings closed in the heritage building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triastuti, Nusa Setiani

    2017-11-01

    Bore pile foundation for high building surroundings heritage building should be not damage. Construction proses must good, no necking, no mixed deep water, no sliding soil, nonporous concrete. Objective the execution of bore pile so that heritage buildings and neighboring buildings that are old do not experience cracks, damage and tilting. The survey methodology was observe the process of the implementation of the dominant silt, clay soil, in addition a limited space and to analyze the results of loading tests, investigations of soil and daily reports. Construction process determines the success of the structure bore pile in high building structure bearing, without damaging a heritage building. Attainment the hard soil depth, density concrete, observable clean reinforcement in the implementation. Monitoring the implementation of, among others, the face of the ground water little reduce in the area and outside the footprint of the building, no impact of vibration drilling equipment, watching the mud content on the water coming out at the time of drilling, concrete volume was monitored each 2 m bore depth of pile, The result researched heritage building was not damage. The test results bore pile axial, lateral analyzed the results have the appropriate force design required.

  2. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating on cooling system is described which is designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1,596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glyco water solution through the collectors into a hot water system exchanger. The water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2,300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described.

  3. The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A; Siqueira, A F; Ferreira-Junior, J B; do Carmo, J; Durigan, J L Q; Blazevich, A; Bottaro, M

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of 5 and 15°C cold-water immersion on recovery from exercise resulting in exercise-induced muscle damage. 42 college-aged men performed 5×20 drop-jumps and were randomly allocated into one of 3 groups: (1) 5°C; (2) 15°C; or (3) control. After exercise, individuals from the cold-water immersion groups had their lower limbs immerged in iced water for 20 min. Isometric knee extensor torque, countermovement jump, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h post-exercise. There was no between-group difference in isometric strength recovery (p=0.73). However, countermovement jump recovered quicker in cold-water immersion groups compared to control group (pcold-water immersion promote recovery of stretch-shortening cycle performance, but not influence the recovery of maximal contractile force. Immersion at warmer temperature may be more effective than colder temperatures promoting recovery from strenuous exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Reconstruction of War Damaged Buildings - A Problem that Still Stands. The Case of the National Economy Bank in Warsaw Restored During the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łotysz, Sławomir

    2016-12-01

    The Polish national historiography remains silent on the reconstruction of damaged towns and cities that was undertaken by the German administration after capturing Poland in September 1939. This paper, on the war-time restoration of the National Economy Bank's headquarters in Warsaw, is an attempt to at least partially fill the gap. Designed by celebrated architect Rudolf Świerczyński in the late 1920s in accordance with contemporary air raid defence regulations, it was bombed and nevertheless seriously damaged during the September Campaign. Under the German management of the bank, the building was reconstructed and even modernized by commissioned Polish engineers.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE COLD WATER IMMERSIONS ON INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Howatson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersions (CWI in the recovery of exercise induced muscle damage. A randomised group consisting of eighteen males, mean ± s age, height and body mass were 24 ± 5 years, 1.82 ± 0.06 m and 85.7 ± 16.6 kg respectively, completed a bout of 100 drop jumps. Following the bout of damaging exercise, participants were randomly but equally assigned to either a 12 min CWI (15 ± 1 °C; n = 9 group who experienced immersions immediately post-exercise and every 24 h thereafter for the following 3 days, or a control group (no treatment; n = 9. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC of the knee extensors, creatine kinase activity (CK, muscle soreness (DOMS, range of motion (ROM and limb girth were measured pre-exercise and then for the following 96 h at 24 h increments. In addition MVC was also recorded immediately post-exercise. Significant time effects were seen for MVC, CK, DOMS and limb girth (p 0.05. These results suggest that repeated CWI do not enhance recovery from a bout of damaging eccentric contractions

  6. Building a Data Science capability for USGS water research and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appling, A.; Read, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting and communicating water issues in an era of exponentially increasing information requires a blend of domain expertise, computational proficiency, and communication skills. The USGS Office of Water Information has established a Data Science team to meet these needs, providing challenging careers for diverse domain scientists and innovators in the fields of information technology and data visualization. Here, we detail the experience of building a Data Science capability as a bridging element between traditional water resources analyses and modern computing tools and data management techniques. This approach includes four major components: 1) building reusable research tools, 2) documenting data-intensive research approaches in peer reviewed journals, 3) communicating complex water resources issues with interactive web visualizations, and 4) offering training programs for our peers in scientific computing. These components collectively improve the efficiency, transparency, and reproducibility of USGS data analyses and scientific workflows.

  7. Evaluating the potential of improving residential water balance at building scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M; Keesman, Karel J; Mels, Adriaan R; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-12-15

    Earlier results indicated that, for an average household, self-sufficiency in water supply can be achieved by following the Urban harvest Approach (UHA), in a combination of demand minimization, cascading and multi-sourcing. To achieve these results, it was assumed that all available local resources can be harvested. In reality, however, temporal, spatial and location-bound factors pose limitations to this harvest and, thus, to self-sufficiency. This article investigates potential spatial and temporal limitations to harvest local water resources at building level for the Netherlands, with a focus on indoor demand. Two building types were studied, a free standing house (one four-people household) and a mid-rise apartment flat (28 two-person households). To be able to model yearly water balances, daily patterns considering household occupancy and presence of water using appliances were defined per building type. Three strategies were defined. The strategies include demand minimization, light grey water (LGW) recycling, and rainwater harvesting (multi-sourcing). Recycling and multi-sourcing cater for toilet flushing and laundry machine. Results showed that water saving devices may reduce 30% of the conventional demand. Recycling of LGW can supply 100% of second quality water (DQ2) which represents 36% of the conventional demand or up to 20% of the minimized demand. Rainwater harvesting may supply approximately 80% of the minimized demand in case of the apartment flat and 60% in case of the free standing house. To harvest these potentials, different system specifications, related to the household type, are required. Two constraints to recycle and multi-source were identified, namely i) limitations in the grey water production and available rainfall; and ii) the potential to harvest water as determined by the temporal pattern in water availability, water use, and storage and treatment capacities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interior insulation – Experimental investigation of hygrothermal conditions and damage evaluation of solid masonry façades in a listed building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Tommy; Bjarløv, Søren Peter; Rode, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    % on the outside, while the insulated wall showed uniformly distributed values around 80%. The risk of moisture-induced damage was evaluated based on mathematical models for mould and decay of wood, visual inspection for frost and mould, and on-site measurements for presence of mould spores. The damage evaluation......Exterior walls in historic multi-storey buildings compared to walls in modern buildings have low thermal resistance, resulting in high energy loss and cold surfaces/floors in cold climates. When restrictions regarding alteration of the exterior appearance exist, interior insulation might...... be the only possibility to increase occupant comfort. This paper describes an investigation of the hygrothermal influence when applying 100 mm of diffusion open interior insulation to a historic multi-storey solid masonry spandrel. The dormitory room with the insulated spandrel had a normal indoor climate...

  9. Towards sustainable urban water governance in Denmark: collective building of capabilities in local authorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2016-01-01

    To address the climate adaptation of cities, today’s water managers need more than technical skills to drive sustainable urban water projects, which also stimulate demand for post-graduate education so that professionalisation of integrated sustainable water management in the public sector can...... be achieved. The ‘urban water platform’ was tested and is hereby presented as a course concept for building collective capabilities for integrated sustainable water design among local authorities in Denmark. The course is an innovation because: 1) it invites urban planners, road and park managers and sewage...... managers to take part in a dialogue about sustainable urban water projects, while collectively exploring new design solutions; 2) it facilitates an appreciative communication between several disciplines; 3) it promotes careful planning in the early stages of an urban water construction project....

  10. Treatment and Analysis of a Paint Chip from "Water Lilies": A Fire Damaged Monet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Tollis, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A museum fire in 1958 severely damaged a Monet 'Water Lilies' (1916-1926) painting that was on display. The surface of the painting is very dark with areas of blistering and charring. Over the years, traditional techniques have been found to be ineffective at removal of the soot and char from the surface. The painting, which is now in the care of the New York University (NYU) Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, was the subject of a study to determine if atomic oxygen treatment could remove the soot and char without damaging the fragile painting underneath. For test purposes, a small chip of paint was removed from the edge of the painting by a conservator at NYU and supplied to NASA Glenn Research Center for atomic oxygen treatment and analysis. The diffuse spectral reflectance, at three locations on the paint chip, was monitored at intervals during the atomic oxygen treatment process. Photo documentation of the chip during treatment was also performed. The color contrast was calculated from the spectral reflectance data as a function of treatment duration. Results of the testing indicated that the contrast improved as a result of the treatment, and the differentiation of colors on the surface was significantly improved. Soot and char could be removed without visibly affecting the gross surface features such as impasto areas. These results indicate the feasibility for the treatment of the 'Water Lilies' painting.

  11. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  12. Fluid-Solid Interactive Methodology for Prognosis of Passenger Jet Structural Damage in Water Crash Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayandor, Javid

    2010-11-01

    Today, crashworthiness studies constitute a major part of modern aerospace design and certification processes. Of important consideration is the assessment of structural damage tolerance in terms of the extent of progressive damage and failure caused by aircraft emergency ditching on soft terrain or on water. Although a certification requirement, full scale crash landings are rarely tested using fully functional prototypes due to their high associated costs. This constraint makes it difficult for all crashworthy features of the design to be identified and fine-tuned before the commencement of the manufacturing phase. The current study presents aspects of a numerical methodology that can drastically subside the dependency of the certification assessments to full scale field trials. Interactive, fully nonlinear, solid-structure and fluid- structure analyses have been proposed using coupled Lagrangian- Eulerian and independent meshless Lagrangian approaches that run on a combined finite element-computational fluid dynamics platform. Detailed analysis of a key landing scenario pertaining to a large passenger jet will be provided to determine the relevance and accuracy of the proposed method. The work further identifies state-of-the-art computational approaches for modeling fluid-solid interactive systems that can help improve aircraft structural responses to soft impact and water ditching.

  13. Hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris induced DNA damage and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Anum Mohd Yusof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris on hepatoma cell line HepG2. INTRODUCTION: The search for food and spices that can induce apoptosis in cancer cells has been a major study interest in the last decade. Chlorella vulgaris, a unicellular green algae, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-cancer properties. However, its chemopreventive effects in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells have not been studied in great detail. METHODS: HepG2 liver cancer cells and WRL68 normal liver cells were treated with various concentrations (0-4 mg/ml of hot water extract of C. vulgaris after 24 hours incubation. Apoptosis rate was evaluated by TUNEL assay while DNA damage was assessed by Comet assay. Apoptosis proteins were evaluated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Chlorella vulgaris decreased the number of viable HepG2 cells in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05, with an IC50 of 1.6 mg/ml. DNA damage as measured by Comet assay was increased in HepG2 cells at all concentrations of Chlorella vulgaris tested. Evaluation of apoptosis by TUNEL assay showed that Chlorella vulgaris induced a higher apoptotic rate (70% in HepG2 cells compared to normal liver cells, WRL68 (15%. Western blot analysis showed increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins P53, Bax and caspase-3 in the HepG2 cells compared to normal liver cells WRL68, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. CONCLUSIONS: Chlorella vulgaris may have anti-cancer effects by inducing apoptosis signaling cascades via an increased expression of P53, Bax and caspase-3 proteins and through a reduction of Bcl-2 protein, which subsequently lead to increased DNA damage and apoptosis.

  14. The Use of Solar Energy for Preparing Domestic Hot Water in a Multi-Storey Building

    OpenAIRE

    Giedrius Šiupšinskas; Solveiga Adomėnaitė

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the possibilities of solar collectors used for a domestic hot water system and installed on the roofs of modernized multi-storey buildings under the existing climate conditions. A number of combinations of flat plate and vacuum solar collectors with accumulation tank systems of various sizes have been examined. Heat from the district heating system is used as an additional heat source for preparing domestic hot water. The paper compares calculation results of energy and e...

  15. Research on Building Technology of Aquaculture Water Quality Real-Time Monitoring Software Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yinchi; Ding, Wen; Li, Wentong

    2014-01-01

    International audience; At present, the information level of the aquaculture water quality monitoring is relatively backward in China. Building a digital, networked, intelligent real-time dynamic aquaculture water quality monitoring system by the modern electronic information technology, communications technology and wireless sensor network technology will have an important significance for the factory aquaculture technological innovation. The system is not only able to detect the main indica...

  16. Critical reflections on building a community of conversation about water governance in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Rubenstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water governance has emerged as a field of research endeavour in response to failures of current and historical management approaches to adequately address persistent decline in ecological health of many river catchments and pressures on associated communities. Attention to situational framing is a key aspect of emerging approaches to water governance research, including innovations that build capacity and confidence to experiment with approaches capable of transforming situations usefully framed as 'wicked'. Despite international investment in water governance research, a national research agenda on water governance was lacking in Australia in the late 2000s as were mechanisms to build the capacity of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research and collaborative policy practice. Through a two-year Water Governance Research Initiative (WGRI, we designed and facilitated the development of a community of conversation between researchers concerned with the dynamics of human-ecological systems from the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, policy, economics, law and philosophy. The WGRI was designed as a learning system, with the intention that it would provide opportunities for conversations, learning and reflection to emerge. In this paper we outline the starting conditions and design of the WGRI, critically reflect on new narratives that arose from this initiative, and evaluate its effectiveness as a boundary organisation that contributed to knowledge co-production in water governance. Our findings point to the importance of investment in institutions that can act as integrative and facilitative governance mechanisms, to build capacity to work with and between research, policy, local stakeholders and practitioners.

  17. Building Rehabilitation with Dry and Wet Systems – Embodied Water Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macieira Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh water is a scarce resource. Its availability, essential for life, is being conditioned by several menaces, mostly from human origin. Studies on water saving strategies in building construction and what procedures should be adopted for its efficient use can respond to part of these problems, taking into account the relevance of construction activities, responsible for almost 40% of the overall environmental impact in Europe. Buildings rehabilitation assumes an important role in the construction activities of many European countries. The aim of this paper is to compare the water demand between dry and wet construction systems used in interior partition wall technologies existing in south European climates, specifically on Portuguese territory. This paper focus on the advantages of the dry and lightweight partition walls and it is expected that it may contribute for the reduction of water use in the construction industry. The evolution of interior partition walls, namely by its weight and embodied water analysis, is presented and discussed. Apart from the conclusion that dry construction systems, used in the rehabilitation of existing buildings, can contribute to a significant reduction of water demand, this analysis intends to also reveal on how much these systems can reduce other environmental impact indicators in relation to the wet conventional solutions. Dry construction strategies allows saving material and energetic resources, increasing flexibility and reducing wastes, what constitutes a relevant response to the growing concerns over environmental issues and incertitude on economic development.

  18. Economic Model Predictive Control for Hot Water Based Heating Systems in Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadelrahman, M. A. Ahmed; Zong, Yi; Li, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study to optimize the heating energy costs in a residential building with varying electricity price signals based on an Economic Model Predictive Controller (EMPC). The investigated heating system consists of an air source heat pump (ASHP) incorporated with a hot water tank...

  19. Capacity building in water demand management as a key component for attaining millennium development goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Forster, Laura; Arntzen, Jaap

    Successful water demand management (WDM) implementation as a component of integrated water resource management (IWRM) can play a significant role in the alleviation of poverty through more efficient use of available water resources. The urban population in Southern African cities is characterised by so-called ‘water poor’ communities who typically expend a high percentage of their household income on poor quality water. Usually they have no access to an affordable alternative source. Although WDM as a component of IWRM is not a panacea for poverty, it can help alleviate poverty by facilitating water services management by municipal water supply agencies (MWSAs) in the region. WDM is a key strategy for achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs) and, as such, should be given due attention in the preparation of national IWRM and water efficiency plans. Various studies in the Southern African region have indicated that capacity building is necessary for nations to develop IWRM and water-use efficiency plans to meet the targets set out in the MDGs. WDM education and training of water professionals and end-users is particularly important in developing countries, which are resource and information-access poor. In response to these findings, The World Conservation Union (IUCN) and its consulting partners, the Training and Instructional Design Academy of South Africa (TIDASA), and Centre for Applied Research (CAR) designed, developed and presented a pilot WDM Guideline Training Module for MWSAs as part of Phase II of IUCN’s Southern Africa regional WDM project. Pilot training was conducted in July 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia for a group of 36 participants involved in municipal water supply from nine Southern African countries. This paper looks at the links between building the capacity of professionals, operational staff and other role-players in the municipal water supply chain to implement WDM as part of broader IWRM strategies, and the subsequent potential for

  20. Changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in occupants of a large office building over a period of moisture damage remediation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Sook Ja; White, Sandra K; Cox-Ganser, Jean M

    2018-01-01

    There is limited information on the natural history of building occupants' health in relation to attempts to remediate moisture damage. We examined changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in 1,175 office building occupants over seven years with multiple remediation attempts. During each of four surveys, we categorized participants using a severity score: 0 = asymptomatic; 1 = mild, symptomatic in the last 12 months, but not frequently in the last 4 weeks; 2 = severe, symptomatic at least once weekly in the last 4 weeks. Building-related symptoms were defined as improving away from the building. We used random intercept models adjusted for demographics, smoking, building tenure, and microbial exposures to estimate temporal changes in the odds of building-related symptoms or severity scores independent of the effect of microbial exposures. Trend analyses of combined mild/severe symptoms showed no changes in the odds of respiratory symptoms but significant improvement in non-respiratory symptoms over time. Separate analyses showed increases in the odds of severe respiratory symptoms (odds ratio/year = 1.15‒1.16, p-valuesrespiratory symptoms, we found no changes in the odds of severe symptoms but improvement in severity scores (-0.04‒-0.01/year, p-valuesrespiratory and severe non-respiratory symptoms associated with dampness/mold, remediation efforts might not be effective in improving occupants' health.

  1. Core damage severity evaluation for pressurized water reactors by artificial intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidis, Anastasios Pantelis

    1998-12-01

    During the course of nuclear power evolution, accidents have occurred. However, in the western world, none of them had a severe impact on the public because of the design features of nuclear plants. In nuclear reactors, barriers constitute physical obstacles to uncontrolled fission product releases. These barriers are an important factor in safety analysis. During an accident, reactor safety systems become actuated to prevent the barriers from been breached. In addition, operators are required to take specified actions, meticulously depicted in emergency response procedures. In an accident, on-the-spot knowledge regarding the condition of the core is necessary. In order to make the right decisions toward mitigating the accident severity and its consequences, we need to know the status of the core [1, 3]. However, power plant instrumentation that can provide a direct indication of the status of the core during the time when core damage is a potential outcome, does not exist. Moreover, the information from instruments may have large uncertainty of various types. Thus, a very strong potential for misinterpreting incoming information exists. This research endeavor addresses the problem of evaluating the core damage severity of a Pressurized Water Reactor during a transient or an accident. An expert system has been constructed, that incorporates knowledge and reasoning of human experts. The expert system's inference engine receives incoming plant data that originate in the plethora of core-related instruments. Its knowledge base relies on several massive, multivariate fuzzy logic rule-sets, coupled with several artificial neural networks. These mathematical models have encoded information that defines possible core states, based on correlations of parameter values. The inference process classifies the core as intact, or as experiencing clad damage and/or core melting. If the system detects a form of core damage, a quantification procedure will provide a numerical

  2. Optimizing the Design of Chilled Water Plants in Large Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Dante'E.

    The design of chilled water plants has a very large impact on building energy use and energy operating costs. This thesis proposes procedures and analysis techniques for energy efficiency design of chilled water plants. The approach that leads to optimal design variables can achieve a significant saving in cooling cost. The optimal variables include piping sizing, chilled water temperature difference, and chilled water supply temperature. The objective function is the total cooling energy cost. The proposed design method depends on detailed cooling load analysis, head and energy calculations, and an optimization solver. The pump head calculations including piping, all fittings, valves, and devices are achieved by using the Darcy-Weisbach Equation and given flow parameters. The energy calculations are done by using generic chiller, fan, and pump models. The method is tested on an existing four-story building located in Greensboro, NC, equipped with a packaged water-cooled chiller. A whole building energy simulation model is used to generate the hourly cooling loads and then the optimal design variables are found to minimize the total energy cost. The testing results show this approach will achieve better results than rules-of-thumb or traditional design procedures. The cooling energy saving could be up to 10% depending on particular projects.

  3. Evaluation of exposure to lead from drinking water in large buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshommes, Elise; Andrews, Robert C; Gagnon, Graham; McCluskey, Tim; McIlwain, Brad; Doré, Evelyne; Nour, Shokoufeh; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Lead results from 78,971 water samples collected in four Canadian provinces from elementary schools, daycares, and other large buildings using regulatory and investigative sampling protocols were analyzed to provide lead concentration distributions. Maximum concentrations reached 13,200 and 3890 μg/L following long and short stagnation periods respectively. High lead levels were persistent in some large buildings, reflected by high median values considering all taps, or specific to a few taps in the building. Simulations using the Integrated Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and lead concentrations after 30 min of stagnation in the dataset showed that, for most buildings, exposure to lead at the tap does not increase children's blood lead levels (BLLs). However, buildings or taps with extreme concentrations represent a significant health risk to young children attending school or daycare, as the estimated BLL far exceeded the 5 μg/dL threshold. Ingestion of water from specific taps could lead to acute exposure. Finally, for a few taps, the total daily lead intake reached the former World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable level for adults, suggesting potential health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic buffer capacity model building for the purpose of water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vooren, L; Van de Steene, M; Ottoy, J P; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, buffer capacity profiles are used in the framework of automatic monitoring of water quality. The aim of the proposed methodology is to automatically and stepwise build buffer capacity models for each particular titrated sample, and to quantify the individual buffer systems that constitute the total buffer capacity. An automatic and robust model building algorithm has been developed and applied to many titration curves of effluent and river water samples. It is illustrated that the application of automatically built buffer capacity models mostly results in similar or better estimations of ammonium and ortho-phosphate in the samples compared to a priori fixed buffer capacity models. The automatic modelling approach is also advantageous for alarm generating purposes on e.g. river waters, because unexpected buffers are easily detected.

  5. Ontario’s Clean Water Act and Capacity Building: Implications for Serviced Rural Municipalities

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Minnes

    2017-01-01

    This research explores Ontario’s Clean Water Act (S.O. 2006, c. 22) and its contribution to capacity building for rural municipalities impacted by source protection plans created under the Act. Source water protection (SWP) under the Clean Water Act (S.O. 2006, c. 22) is explored drawing from a capacity framework. A nested case study approach has been employed to allow for in depth exploration of the experience within the Cataraqui Source Protection Area and the North Bay-Mattawa Source Prote...

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Water Use Efficiency in Urban and Domestic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Santiago-Fandiño

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the potential of water savings at property, household and urban levels, through the application of environmentally sound technologies (ESTs, as well as their quantification using the software Wise Water. Household centered measures are identified that allow for significant reduction of drinking water consumption with comparatively small effort, and without limitation of comfort. Furthermore, a method for the estimation of water recycling, for rainwater harvesting and for the utilization potential as locally available renewable freshwater is presented. Based on this study, the average drinking water consumption in urban households of industrialized countries could be reduced by approximately one third, without significant investment costs, either within the framework of new constructions or by the remodeling of water and sanitation systems in residential buildings. By using a secondary water quality, the drinking water demand could even be reduced by 50%. In the case of an area-wide application, the overall fresh water demand of cities and the exploitation of fresh water resources could be significantly reduced. Due to the comparability of the domestic water use of the investigated households, the findings are internationally transferable, for example to countries in Europe, Asia, and also the USA.

  7. Flood monitoring and damage assessment using water indices: A case study of Pakistan flood-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Ali Memon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI of McFeeters (1996, Water Index (WI introduced by Rogers and Kearney (2004, referred to as Red and Short Wave Infra-Red (RSWIR and WI suggested as the best by Ji et al. (2009, referred to as Green and Short Wave Infra-Red (GSWIR for delineating and mapping of surface water using MODIS (Terra near real time images during 2012 floods in Pakistan. The results from above indices have been compared with Landsat ETM+ classified images aiming to assess the accuracy of the indices. Accuracy assessment has been performed using spatial statistical techniques and found NDWI, RSWIR and GSWIR with kappa coefficient (κ of 46.66%, 70.80% and 60.61% respectively. It has been observed using statistical analysis and visual interpretation (expert knowledge gained by past experience that the NDWI and GSWIR have tendencies to underestimate and overestimate respectively the inundated area. Keeping in view the above facts, RSWIR has proved to be the best of the three indices. In addition, assessment of the damages has been carried out considering accumulated flood extent obtained from RSWIR. The information derived proved to be essential and valuable for disaster management plan and rehabilitation.

  8. Contrast water therapy and exercise induced muscle damage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bieuzen

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effect of Contrast Water Therapy (CWT on recovery following exercise induced muscle damage. Controlled trials were identified from computerized literature searching and citation tracking performed up to February 2013. Eighteen trials met the inclusion criteria; all had a high risk of bias. Pooled data from 13 studies showed that CWT resulted in significantly greater improvements in muscle soreness at the five follow-up time points (<6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in comparison to passive recovery. Pooled data also showed that CWT significantly reduced muscle strength loss at each follow-up time (<6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in comparison to passive recovery. Despite comparing CWT to a large number of other recovery interventions, including cold water immersion, warm water immersion, compression, active recovery and stretching, there was little evidence for a superior treatment intervention. The current evidence base shows that CWT is superior to using passive recovery or rest after exercise; the magnitudes of these effects may be most relevant to an elite sporting population. There seems to be little difference in recovery outcome between CWT and other popular recovery interventions.

  9. Impact of Water Chemistry, Pipe Material and Stagnation on the Building Plumbing Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pan; Parks, Jeffrey; Edwards, Marc A; Pruden, Amy

    2015-01-01

    A unique microbiome establishes in the portion of the potable water distribution system within homes and other buildings (i.e., building plumbing). To examine its composition and the factors that shape it, standardized cold water plumbing rigs were deployed at the treatment plant and in the distribution system of five water utilities across the U.S. Three pipe materials (copper with lead solder, CPVC with brass fittings or copper/lead combined pipe) were compared, with 8 hour flush cycles of 10 minutes to simulate typical daily use patterns. High throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was employed to profile and compare the resident bulk water bacteria and archaea. The utility, location of the pipe rig, pipe material and stagnation all had a significant influence on the plumbing microbiome composition, but the utility source water and treatment practices were dominant factors. Examination of 21 water chemistry parameters suggested that the total chlorine concentration, pH, P, SO42- and Mg were associated with the most of the variation in bulk water microbiome composition. Disinfectant type exerted a notably low-magnitude impact on microbiome composition. At two utilities using the same source water, slight differences in treatment approaches were associated with differences in rare taxa in samples. For genera containing opportunistic pathogens, Utility C samples (highest pH of 9-10) had the highest frequency of detection for Legionella spp. and lowest relative abundance of Mycobacterium spp. Data were examined across utilities to identify a true universal core, special core, and peripheral organisms to deepen insight into the physical and chemical factors that shape the building plumbing microbiome.

  10. Impact of Water Chemistry, Pipe Material and Stagnation on the Building Plumbing Microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Ji

    Full Text Available A unique microbiome establishes in the portion of the potable water distribution system within homes and other buildings (i.e., building plumbing. To examine its composition and the factors that shape it, standardized cold water plumbing rigs were deployed at the treatment plant and in the distribution system of five water utilities across the U.S. Three pipe materials (copper with lead solder, CPVC with brass fittings or copper/lead combined pipe were compared, with 8 hour flush cycles of 10 minutes to simulate typical daily use patterns. High throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was employed to profile and compare the resident bulk water bacteria and archaea. The utility, location of the pipe rig, pipe material and stagnation all had a significant influence on the plumbing microbiome composition, but the utility source water and treatment practices were dominant factors. Examination of 21 water chemistry parameters suggested that the total chlorine concentration, pH, P, SO42- and Mg were associated with the most of the variation in bulk water microbiome composition. Disinfectant type exerted a notably low-magnitude impact on microbiome composition. At two utilities using the same source water, slight differences in treatment approaches were associated with differences in rare taxa in samples. For genera containing opportunistic pathogens, Utility C samples (highest pH of 9-10 had the highest frequency of detection for Legionella spp. and lowest relative abundance of Mycobacterium spp. Data were examined across utilities to identify a true universal core, special core, and peripheral organisms to deepen insight into the physical and chemical factors that shape the building plumbing microbiome.

  11. Biomarkers of oxidative damage in bacteria for the assessment of sanitation efficacy in lettuce wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Andrea; Dou, Fang; Young, Glenn M; Nitin, Nitin

    2017-07-01

    In the fresh produce industry, validation of sanitation efficacy is critical to prevent cross-contamination of produce. The current validation approaches are either based on time-consuming plate counting assays or indirect measurements of chemical properties of wash water. In the study, the focus was to identify biomarkers that can provide direct assessment of oxidative damage in bacteria upon exposure to sanitizers in the presence of fresh produce and correlation of these oxidative biomarkers with logarithmic inactivation of bacteria. Two endogenous bacterial biomarkers, protein carbonylation and thiol oxidation, were evaluated for assessing oxidative damage in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria innocua during sanitation of pre-cut lettuce leaves with NaOCl or H2O2. Results show that NaOCl treatment was more effective than H2O2 for oxidation of both the intracellular thiols and protein carbonylation in the selected strains. Statistical analysis of the measurements illustrates that oxidation of the intracellular thiol induced by NaOCl or H2O2 was correlated with logarithmic reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. innocua. In contrast, changes in the protein carbonylation content were not correlated with reduction in bacterial cell viability. In summary, these results provide a novel approach to validate sanitation efficacy for the fresh produce industry.

  12. Ten building blocks for sustainable water governance: an integrated method to assess the governance of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswick, M.; Edelenbos, J.; Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Kok, M.; Kuks, S.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    A three-step interdisciplinary method to assess approaches to water shortage, water quality and flood risks is presented. This method, based on water system analysis, economics, law and public administration, seeks to create common understanding based on newly developed concepts and definitions.

  13. Damage Assessment of a Full-Scale Six-Story wood-frame Building Following Triaxial shake Table Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. van de Lindt; Rakesh Gupta; Shiling Pei; Kazuki Tachibana; Yasuhiro Araki; Douglas Rammer; Hiroshi Isoda

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2009, a full-scale midrise wood-frame building was tested under a series of simulated earthquakes on the world's largest shake table in Miki City, Japan. The objective of this series of tests was to validate a performance-based seismic design approach by qualitatively and quantitatively examining the building's seismic performance in terms of...

  14. Hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris induced DNA damage and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd; Md. Saad, Suhana; Makpol, Suzana; Shamaan, Nor Aripin; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris on hepatoma cell line HepG2. INTRODUCTION: The search for food and spices that can induce apoptosis in cancer cells has been a major study interest in the last decade. Chlorella vulgaris, a unicellular green algae, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti‐cancer properties. However, its chemopreventive effects in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells have not been studied in great detail. METHODS: HepG2 liver cancer cells and WRL68 normal liver cells were treated with various concentrations (0‐4 mg/ml) of hot water extract of C. vulgaris after 24 hours incubation. Apoptosis rate was evaluated by TUNEL assay while DNA damage was assessed by Comet assay. Apoptosis proteins were evaluated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Chlorella vulgaris decreased the number of viable HepG2 cells in a dose dependent manner (p Chlorella vulgaris tested. Evaluation of apoptosis by TUNEL assay showed that Chlorella vulgaris induced a higher apoptotic rate (70%) in HepG2 cells compared to normal liver cells, WRL68 (15%). Western blot analysis showed increased expression of pro‐ apoptotic proteins P53, Bax and caspase‐3 in the HepG2 cells compared to normal liver cells WRL68, and decreased expression of the anti‐apoptotic protein Bcl‐2. CONCLUSIONS: Chlorella vulgaris may have anti‐cancer effects by inducing apoptosis signaling cascades via an increased expression of P53, Bax and caspase‐3 proteins and through a reduction of Bcl‐2 protein, which subsequently lead to increased DNA damage and apoptosis. PMID:21340229

  15. Monitoring of Water Content in Building Materials Using a Wireless Passive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Stojanović

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an innovative design of a wireless, passive LC sensor and its application for monitoring of water content in building materials. The sensor was embedded in test material samples so that the internal water content of the samples could be measured with an antenna by tracking the changes in the sensor’s resonant frequency. Since the dielectric constant of water was much higher compared with that of the test samples, the presence of water in the samples increased the capacitance of the LC circuit, thus decreasing the sensor’s resonant frequency. The sensor is made up of a printed circuit board in one metal layer and water content has been determined for clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete block, both widely used construction materials. Measurements were conducted at room temperature using a HP-4194A Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer instrument.

  16. Damage Simulation and Ultrasonic Detection of Asphalt Mixture under the Coupling Effects of Water-Temperature-Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-chun Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately simulate the performance changes of asphalt pavement in the hot rainy days, laboratory water-temperature-radiation cycle test is designed and carried out for the damage simulation of asphalt mixture under the environmental effect of rain, high temperatures, and sunshine. Ultrasonic detection method is used to determine the ultrasonic velocity of asphalt mixture specimen under different temperatures and water contents in the process of water-temperature-radiation cycles. Thus, we get the preliminary damage assessment. Splitting strength attenuation is defined as the damage parameter. In addition, the regression prediction models of the ultrasonic velocity and damage coefficient of asphalt mixture are constructed using the grey theory, neural network method, and support vector machine theory, respectively. We compare the prediction results of the three different models. It can be concluded that the model derived from the support vector machine possesses higher accuracy and stability, which can more satisfactorily reflect the relationship between ultrasonic velocity and damage coefficient. Therefore, the damage degree of the asphalt mixture can be obtained.

  17. Legionellosis prevention in building water and HVAC systems a practical guide for design, operation and maintenance to minimize the risk

    CERN Document Server

    Joppolo, Cesare Maria; Pitera, Luca Alberto; Angermann, Jean Pierre; Izard, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This Guidebook is a practical guide for design, operation and maintenance to minimize the risk of legionellosis in building water and HVAC systmes. It is devided into several themes such as: Air conditioning of the air (by water – humidification), Production of hot water for washing (fundamentally but not only hot water for washing) and Evaporative cooling tower.

  18. TMI-2 Reactor Building source term measurements: surfaces and basement water and sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C V; Keefer, D G

    1984-10-01

    Presented in this report are the results of radiochemical and elemental analyses performed on samples collected from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building from August 1979 to December 1983. The quantities of fission products and core materials that were measured on the external surfaces in the Reactor Building or in the water and sediment in its basement are summarized. Recent analysis results for access panels removed from the air cooling assembly and for liquid and particulate samples collected from the Reactor Building sump and reactor coolant drain tank are included in the report. Measurements show that 59% of the /sup 3/H, 2.7% of the /sup 90/Sr, 15% of the /sup 129/I, 20% of the /sup 131/I, and 42% of the /sup 137/Cs originally in the core at the time of the accident could be accounted for outside the core in the Reactor Building. With the exceptions of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 144/Ce, the vast majority of each radionuclide released was found dispersed in the water and sediment in the basement.

  19. Water pollution causes ultrastructural and functional damages in Pellia neesiana (Gottsche) Limpr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Adriana; Sorbo, Sergio; Lentini, Marco; Conte, Barbara; Esposito, Sergio

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of freshwater pollution in the heavily contaminated Sarno River (Campania, South Italy), using Pellia neesiana (Pelliaceae Metzgeriales) in order to propose this liverwort as a potential bioindicator, able to record the effects of water pollution, particularly the one related to metal (loid) contamination. Samples of P. neesiana in nylon bags were disposed floating for one week on the waters of Sarno River in three sites characterised by an increasing pollution. As control, some specimens were cultured in vitro in Cd- and Pb-added media, at the same pollutants' levels as measured in the most polluted site. P. neesiana cell ultrastructure was modified and severe alterations were observed in chloroplasts from samples exposed in the most polluted site, and Cd- and Pb-cultured samples. Concurrently, a strong increase in the occurrence of Heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70) was detected in gametophytes following the pollution gradient. In conclusion, ultrastructural damages can be directly related to HSP 70 occurrence in liverwort tissues, and proportional to the degree of pollution present in the river; thus our study suggests P. neesiana as an affordable bioindicator of freshwaters pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Building water bridges in air: Electrohydrodynamics of the floating water bridge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Marin, Alvaro; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of electrical fields and liquids can lead to a phenomenon that defies intuition. Some famous examples can be found in electrohydrodynamics as Taylor cones, whipping jets, or noncoalescing drops. A less famous example is the floating water bridge: a slender thread of water held

  1. Alternative Solution for Consumption Hot Water Recirculation for the Civil Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodor Mateescu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The sanitary comfort and the effective cost of maintenance in the civil buildings (block of flats are badly affected by the absence of the consumption hot water recirculation. From the technical point of view, the classical solution imposes the doubling of the transport and distribution pipes on the entire route, between the source and the consumption points. The materialization of the solution requires important financial investment, discouraging most of the time and the postponement of the problem solving with important consequences. This paper proposes an alternative technical solution which limits to a minimum the intervention, only in the interior hot water distribution system.

  2. Building America Case Study: Control Retrofits for Multifamily Domestic Hot Water Recirculation Systems, Brooklyn, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    Domestic hot water (DHW) heating is the second largest energy end use in U.S. buildings, exceeded only by space conditioning. Recirculation systems consisting of a pump and piping loop(s) are commonly used in multifamily buildings to reduce wait time for hot water at faucets; however, constant pumping increases energy consumption by exposing supply and return line piping to continuous heat loss, even during periods when there is no demand for hot water. In this study, ARIES installed and tested two types of recirculation controls in a pair of buildings in order to evaluate their energy savings potential. Demand control, temperature modulation controls, and the simultaneous operation of both were compared to the baseline case of constant recirculation. Additionally, interactive effects between DHW control fuel reductions and space conditioning (heating and cooling) were estimated in order to make more realistic predictions of the payback and financial viability of retrofitting DHW systems with these controls. Results showed that DHW fuel consumption reduced by 7 percent after implementing the demand control technique, 2 percent after implementing temperature modulation, and 15 percent after implementing demand control and temperature modulation techniques simultaneously; recirculation pump runtime was reduced to 14 minutes or less per day. With space heating and cooling interactions included, the estimated annual cost savings were 8 percent, 1 percent, and 14 percent for the respective control techniques. Possible complications in the installation, commissioning and operation of the controls were identified and solutions offered.

  3. Building America Case Study: Control Retrofits for Multifamily Domestic Hot Water Recirculation Systems, Brooklyn, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Dentz; E. Ansanelli, H. Henderson, Jr.; K. Varshney

    2016-12-01

    Domestic hot water (DHW) heating is the second largest energy end use in U.S. buildings, exceeded only by space conditioning. Recirculation systems consisting of a pump and piping loop(s) are commonly used in multifamily buildings to reduce wait time for hot water at faucets; however, constant pumping increases energy consumption by exposing supply and return line piping to continuous heat loss, even during periods when there is no demand for hot water. In this study, ARIES installed and tested two types of recirculation controls in a pair of buildings in order to evaluate their energy savings potential. Demand control, temperature modulation controls, and the simultaneous operation of both were compared to the baseline case of constant recirculation. Additionally, interactive effects between DHW control fuel reductions and space conditioning (heating and cooling) were estimated in order to make more realistic predictions of the payback and financial viability of retrofitting DHW systems with these controls. Results showed that DHW fuel consumption reduced by 7% after implementing the demand control technique, 2% after implementing temperature modulation, and 15% after implementing demand control and temperature modulation techniques simultaneously; recirculation pump runtime was reduced to 14 minutes or less per day. With space heating and cooling interactions included, the estimated annual cost savings were 8%, 1%, and 14% for the respective control techniques. Possible complications in the installation, commissioning and operation of the controls were identified and solutions offered.

  4. Environmental effects and building damage induced by the vertical component of ground motion during the August 24, 2016 Amatrice (Central Italy) earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carydis, Panayotis; Lekkas, Efthymios; Mavroulis, Spyridon

    2017-04-01

    On August 24, 2016 an Mw 6.0 earthquake struck central Italy resulting in 299 fatalities, 388 injuries and about 3000 homeless. The provided focal mechanisms demonstrated a NW-SE striking seismic normal fault which is consistent with the spatial distribution of the coseismic surface ruptures observed along the western slope of Mt Vettore. Based on our field reconnaissance in the affected area immediately after the earthquake, extensive secondary environmental effects including landslides, rockfalls and ground cracks were also observed. Most landslides were generated within the Amatrice intermontane basin, which, instead of a flat surface, comprises isolated flat hills and ridges with relatively high and steep slopes extending several meters above the low-lying part of the basin consisting of Quaternary deposits and with several villages founded at their top. Landslides generated along the steep slopes of Amatrice, Accumoli and Pescara del Tronto flat hills were due to topographical amplification of the earthquake motion derived from accelerometric recordings analysis along with the action of the vertical component of the ground motion and the already established instability conditions resulting from river incision and erosion at the base of the hills. Strong evidences of the effect of the vertical ground motion in reinforced concrete (RC) buildings are the symmetrical buckling of reinforcement, compression damage and crushing at midheight and in other parts of columns, undamaged windows and unbroken glass panels as well as partial collapse of the buildings that usually occur along the vertical axis within the plan of the building. On the contrary, high flexible structures such as castle and bell towers in Arcuata del Tronto and Amatrice respectively were not affected by the vertical ground motion. During the action of the vertical component of the ground motion in Amatrice affected area, stationary waves were formed vertically in the observed structures resulting

  5. Building better water models using the shape of the charge distribution of a water molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmawardhana, Chamila Chathuranga; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2017-11-01

    The unique properties of liquid water apparently arise from more than just the tetrahedral bond angle between the nuclei of a water molecule since simple three-site models of water are poor at mimicking these properties in computer simulations. Four- and five-site models add partial charges on dummy sites and are better at modeling these properties, which suggests that the shape of charge distribution is important. Since a multipole expansion of the electrostatic potential describes a charge distribution in an orthogonal basis set that is exact in the limit of infinite order, multipoles may be an even better way to model the charge distribution. In particular, molecular multipoles up to the octupole centered on the oxygen appear to describe the electrostatic potential from electronic structure calculations better than four- and five-site models, and molecular multipole models give better agreement with the temperature and pressure dependence of many liquid state properties of water while retaining the computational efficiency of three-site models. Here, the influence of the shape of the molecular charge distribution on liquid state properties is examined by correlating multipoles of non-polarizable water models with their liquid state properties in computer simulations. This will aid in the development of accurate water models for classical simulations as well as in determining the accuracy needed in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of water. More fundamentally, this will lead to a greater understanding of how the charge distribution of a water molecule leads to the unique properties of liquid water. In particular, these studies indicate that p-orbital charge out of the molecular plane is important.

  6. Rational Consumption of Water in Administrative Public Buildings: The Experience of the Bahia Administrative Center, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara Fernanda da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The government has to lead, by example, the effort for more rational water use. Nevertheless, public buildings in countries like Brazil lack the operational and maintenance organization necessary to induce better environmental practices. This paper presents the results of a five-year effort to control and reduce water use in governmental facilities in Salvador, Bahia. Seventeen state government headquarters in Bahia took part in this initiative. The basic actions taken include: daily monitoring and analysis of water consumption, inspections and adjustments of hydraulic equipment flow, rapid repair of leaks and layout improvements in toilets. All of these are part of the main initiative, which aims to implement water management in the facilities. Ecoteams were created and trained to conduct these efforts. Water control, consumption analysis and communication have been made using AGUAPURA VIANET, an Internet software designed by the Federal University of Bahia for this specific purpose. From June 2008, to December 2013, an estimated 270,000 m3 of potable water have been saved, which represents US$ 2.7 million in water and waste water costs. This represents a monthly savings of 31% in expenses compared to the practices before the program started.

  7. AP1000 Shield Building Dynamic Response for Different Water Levels of PCCWST Subjected to Seismic Loading considering FSI

    OpenAIRE

    Daogang Lu; Yu Liu; Xiaojia Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Huge water storage tank on the top of many buildings may affect the safety of the structure caused by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) under the earthquake. AP1000 passive containment cooling system water storage tank (PCCWST) placed at the top of shield building is a key component to ensure the safety of nuclear facilities. Under seismic loading, water will impact the wall of PCCWST, which may pose a threat to the integrity of the shield building. In the present study, an FE model of AP1000...

  8. Building leadership capacity to drive sustainable water management: the evaluation of a customised program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A C

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a customised, six-month, leadership development program (LDP) that was designed for emerging leaders in the Australian water industry who were promoting sustainable urban water management (SUWM). It also presents results from an evaluation of the program's benefits, costs and overall 'return on investment' (ROI). The program was designed to help build emergent leadership capacity in the water industry, given strong evidence that this form of leadership plays an important role in advancing SUWM. It involved '360-degree feedback' processes, training, individual leadership development plans, and coaching sessions. Its design was informed by a review of the literature, and its content was informed by local empirical research involving effective SUWM leaders. The evaluation used a seven-tier assessment framework that examined different dimensions of the program's performance using source and methodological triangulation. The results indicate that such LDPs can produce a range of positive outcomes, such as promoting desired leadership behaviours and generating a positive ROI estimate. Specifically, the program's estimated ROI was approximately 190% after only one year. The primary conclusion is that evidence-based LDPs which are highly customised for specific types of leaders in the water industry represent a promising type of intervention to build forms of leadership capacity which are needed to successfully promote SUWM.

  9. Toward city-scale water quality control: building a theory for smart stormwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkez, B.; Mullapudi, A. M.; Wong, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    Urban stormwater systems are rarely designed as actual systems. Rather, it is often assumed that individual Best Management Practices (BMPs) will add up to achieve desired watershed outcomes. Given the rise of BMPs and green infrastructure, we ask: does doing "best" at the local scale guarantee the "best" at the global scale? Existing studies suggest that the system-level performance of distributed stormwater practices may actually adversely impact watersheds by increasing downstream erosion and reducing water quality. Optimizing spatial placement may not be sufficient, however, since precipitation variability and other sources of uncertainty can drive the overall system into undesirable states. To that end, it is also important to control the temporal behavior of the system, which can be achieved by equipping stormwater elements (ponds, wetlands, basins, bioswales, etc.) with "smart" sensors and valves. Rather than building new infrastructure, this permits for existing assets to be repurposed and controlled to adapt to individual storm events. While we have learned how to build and deploy the necessary sensing and control technologies, we do not have a framework or theory that combines our knowledge of hydrology, hydraulics, water quality and control. We discuss the development of such a framework and investigate how existing water domain knowledge can be transferred into a system-theoretic context to enable real-time, city-scale stormwater control. We apply this framework to water quality control in an urban watershed in southeast Michigan, which has been heavily instrumented and retrofitted for control over the past year.

  10. Building America Case Study: Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-19

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the half-inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements. Simulations were completed under a 'peak day' sizing scenario with 183 gpd hot water loads in a Minnesota winter climate case. Full-year simulations were then completed in three climates (ranging from Phoenix to Minneapolis) for three hot water load scenarios (36, 57, and 96 gpd). Model projections indicate that the alternative hybrid offers an average 4.5% efficiency improvement relative to the 0.60 EF gas storage unit across all scenarios modeled. The alternative hybrid water heater evaluated does show promise, but the current low cost of natural gas across much of the country and the relatively small incremental efficiency improvement poses challenges in initially building a market demand for the product.

  11. Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in water distribution systems in hospitals and public buildings of the Lublin region of eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Sikora

    2015-05-01

    The water samples collected form the hot water supply system of hospitals and public buildings showed exceeded counts of L. pneumophila, indicating the risk of infection. The constant monitoring of water distribution systems is an important element of the control of infections caused by these organisms.

  12. Slope topography-induced spatial variation correlation with observed building damages in Corso during the May 21, 2003, M w 6.8, Boumerdes earthquake (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Akila; Laouami, Nasser; Mezouar, Nourredine

    2017-07-01

    During the May 21, 2003 M w 6.8 Boumerdes earthquake, in the "Cité des 102 Logements" built on a hilltop, in Corso, heavy damages were observed: near the crest, a four-story RC building collapsed while others experienced severe structural damage and far from the crest, slight damage was observed. In the present paper, we perform a 2D slope topography seismic analysis and investigate its effects on the response at the plateau as well as the correlation with the observed damage distribution. A site-specific seismic scenario is used involving seismological, geological, and geotechnical data. 2D finite element numerical seismic study of the idealized Corso site subjected to vertical SV wave propagation is carried out by the universal code FLUSH. The results highlighted the main factors that explain the causes of block collapse, located 8-26 m far from the crest. These are as follows: (i) a significant spatial variation of ground response along the plateau due to the topographic effect, (ii) this spatial variation presents high loss of coherence, (iii) the seismic ground responses (PGA and response spectra) reach their maxima, and (iv) the fundamental frequency of the collapsed blocks coincides with the frequency content of the topographic component. For distances far from the crest where slight damages were observed, the topographic contribution is found negligible. On the basis of these results, it is important to take into account the topographic effect and the induced spatial variability in the seismic design of structures sited near the crest of slope.

  13. Protecting buildings from bomb damage: transfer of blast-effects mitigation technologies from military to civilian applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feasibility of Applying Blast-Mitigating Technolog

    1995-01-01

    ... to Civilian Applications Committee on Feasibility of Applying Blast-Mitigating Technologies and Design Methodologies from Military Facilities to Civilian Buildings Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1995 Copyrightoriginal r...

  14. Sustainable Urban (re-Development with Building Integrated Energy, Water and Waste Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Goo Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The construction and service of urban infrastructure systems and buildings involves immense resource consumption. Cities are responsible for the largest component of global energy, water, and food consumption as well as related sewage and organic waste production. Due to ongoing global urbanization, in which the largest sector of the global population lives in cities which are already built, global level strategies need to be developed that facilitate both the sustainable construction of new cities and the re-development of existing urban environments. A very promising approach in this regard is the decentralization and building integration of environmentally sound infrastructure systems for integrated resource management. This paper discusses such new and innovative building services engineering systems, which could contribute to increased energy efficiency, resource productivity, and urban resilience. Applied research and development projects in Germany, which are based on integrated system approaches for the integrated and environmentally sound management of energy, water and organic waste, are used as examples. The findings are especially promising and can be used to stimulate further research and development, including economical aspects which are crucial for sustainable urban (re-development.

  15. Use of the water supply system of special purpose in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    Full Text Available A water supply system of a special purpose is a necessary element in hot and cold shops of the industrial enterprises, office buildings and the medical centers, and also other rooms. The water supply systems of a special purpose, which give subsalty, sparkling water and water sated with oxygen, allow people to prevent, for example, strong dehydration of an organism, which is possible at big losses of water, especially in case of the people working in hot shops. Various elements of special drinking water supply system are given in the article, their main functions are described. Different types of the water folding devices pumping water to consumers, one of which is drinking fountain, are considered. Possible systems of water filtration, which can be established for quality improvement, are transferred. Among them the great role is played by membrane technologies and the return osmosis, which is widely applied now. Today there is a possibility of construction, both the centralized water supply system of a special purpose, and local. Besides, the least is a more preferable option taking into account capital expenditure for construction and operation, and also it can lead to solid resource-saving as a result of the electric energy saving going for water heating in heaters. Automatic machines of drinking water for a local water supply system of a special purpose have indisputable advantages. They are capable to carry out several functions at the same time, and also to distribute water to consumers. It allows placing all the necessary equipment, which will be well in harmony with the environment in their small and compact case, and will fit into any difficult interior of the room. Also they are very easily connected to the systems of an internal water supply system by means of a propylene tube that allows to change their sposition in space and to transfer to any place of the room with fast installation of equipment. Also the ecological effect was

  16. Molds and mycotoxins in dust from water-damaged homes in New Orleans after hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, E; Grimsley, L F; Pehrson, C; Lewis, J; Larsson, L

    2009-04-01

    Dust collected in New Orleans homes mold-contaminated because of the flooding after hurricane Katrina was analyzed for molds and mycotoxins. The mycoflora was studied by cultivation and quantitative PCR for selected molds. The most commonly found mold taxa were Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium. Verrucarol, a hydrolysis product of macrocyclic trichothecenes predominately produced by Stachybotrys spp. was identified in three dust samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and sterigmatocystin (produced by various Aspergillus spp.) was found in two samples by high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This is the first demonstration of mycotoxins in Katrina-associated dust samples. The analytical methods used represent valuable tools in further studies on bioaerosol exposure and health risks. In the aftermath of natural disasters like hurricane Katrina water-damages on infrastructure and public and private property are often associated with health risks for remediation workers and returning residents. In the case of New Orleans evaluations of health hazards, health studies, and assessments of bioaerosol have been conducted previously. However, until now mycotoxins have not been addressed. Our study shows, for the first time, the presence of mycotoxins in dust collected in houses in New Orleans mold-contaminated because of the hurricane Katrina. The results may highlight the potential health threats posed by mold aerosols in post-disaster inhabited areas.

  17. THE SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM OF USING GROUND WATER TO COOL LIVESTOCK BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thay Ngok Shon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperature in the central part of Vietnam in summer can reach 32–35°C; in some places it can be more than 42°C. Hot climate strongly affects the animal organism alongside with the animal weight reduction and reduction the quantity of egg-laying in poultry. Therefore, air conditioning in livestock buildings is necessary. There are several ways to cool the temperature in such buildings, and each one has its own advantages and disadvantages. We propose to use underground water at the temperature of 24–25°C for this purpose. One of the methods of cooling sheds for livestock is sprinkler irrigation of water on the roof. For calculating the amount of heat, removed from the indoor air in the shed to the cooling water, in the first approximation specialists believe in some cases that an appropriate amount of heat being removed is determined mainly by heat transfer from the air inside the shed to the cooling water through the surface of the roof, represented by the lower part of the wave that form the surface of a metal tile, neglecting the influence of heat conduction on top of the wave of the tile surface. Consequentially, such a simplification leads to possible errors. Therefore, the authors solved the problem of cooling shed by irrigation of water on the roof by an analytical method. Specifically, we solved the problem of heat conductivity of the fin of the finite length of constant cross section, wherein different sides of the fin are conjugate with different environments. Additionally, the calculation considered the effect of solar radiation. For this purpose, the authors have created a heat balance equation at steady state for any infinitesimal element of the fin, and solved the differential equation afterwards. The authors applied the results for calculating practical problem of ground water irrigation of a roof of a livestock shed made of metal areas tiles. 

  18. Damage of lithium-disilicate all-ceramic restorations by an experimental self-adhesive resin cement used as core build-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzenbach, G; Karajouli, G; Tunjan, R; Spintig, T; Bitter, K; Naumann, M

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study aimed to predict the potential of fracture initiation after long-term incubation (LTI) of lithium-disilicate restorations due to a hygroscopic expansion of self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) used as core build-up material. Human maxillary central incisors were divided into four groups (n = 10). Teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated. Specimens were restored in a one-stage post-and-core procedure using experimental dual-curing SARC. Three application protocols to build up the core were compared as follows: I, auto-polymerisation; II, dual curing including 40 s light-initiated polymerisation; and III, an open matrix technique in a dual-curing mode. In group IV, a chemical-curing composite core build-up material served as control. For all specimens, a 2-mm ferrule design was ensured. Full anatomic lithium-disilicate crowns were adhesively luted. One-year LTI in 0.5 % chloramine solution at 37 °C was performed. Restorations were examined after 3, 6, 9 and 12 month of storage. Survival rates were calculated using log-rank statistics (p = 0.05). Fifty per cent of lithium-disilicate crowns of groups I and II showed visible crack propagation after 9 months of incubation, while one crown failed in group III. No failure was observed in group IV. The survival rates differed significantly (p = 0.017). SARC used to build up the core of severely damaged endodontically treated teeth does have the potential to cause fracture of lithium-disilicate crown restorations. Hygroscopic expansion of self-adhesive resin cements used as a core build-up material might have an adverse impact on longevity of glass-ceramic crowns.

  19. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Municipal Building complex, Abbeville, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Information on the solar energy system installed at the new municipal building for the City of Abbeville, SC is presented, including a description of solar energy system and buildings, lessons learned, and recommendations. The solar space heating system is a direct air heating system. The flat roof collector panel was sized to provide 75% of the heating requirement based on an average day in January. The collectors used are job-built with two layers of filon corrugated fiberglass FRP panels cross lapped make up the cover. The storage consists of a pit filled with washed 3/4 in - 1 1/2 in diameter crushed granite stone. The air handler includes the air handling mechanism, motorized dampers, air circulating blower, sensors, control relays and mode control unit. Solar heating of water is provided only those times when the hot air in the collector is exhausted to the outside.

  20. The damage to water biological resources in the reservoirs of the Volga-Kama cascade caused by hydro power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loginov Vladimir Vladimirovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydro structures on rivers adversely affects fisheries, disturbing the conditions of natural reproduction of fish. All hydro power plants cause enormous damage to aquatic biological resources (ABR, especially fish populations. Water works of Volga-Kama cascade of reservoirs are no exception. Therefore, the investigation of the impact of hydro power plants and other hydro structures on ABR in lowland reservoirs and especially the reservoirs of the Volga-Kama cascade is undoubtedly crucial. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the damage to ABR inflicted by HPP cascade mainly the Volga-Kama cascade on the basis of reported data and those of field observations.

  1. Windstorm damage in Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (Minnesota, USA): Evaluating landscape-level risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem management requires an understanding of disturbance processes and their influence on forests. One of these disturbances is damage due to severe wind events. In an ideal model, assessing risk of windstorm damage to a forested ecosystem entails defining tree-, stand-, and landscape-level factors that influence response and recovery. Data are not always...

  2. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recovery From Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: Cold-Water Immersion Versus Whole-Body Cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Lamblin, Julien; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; McCall, Alan; Nédélec, Mathieu; Dawson, Brian; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-03-01

    To compare the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI) and whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Ten physically active men performed single-leg hamstring eccentric exercise comprising 5 sets of 15 repetitions. Immediately postexercise, subjects were exposed in a randomized crossover design to CWI (10 min at 10°C) or WBC (3 min at -110°C) recovery. Creatine kinase concentrations, knee-flexor eccentric (60°/s) and posterior lower-limb isometric (60°) strength, single-leg and 2-leg countermovement jumps, muscle soreness, and perception of recovery were measured. The tests were performed before and immediately, 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Results showed a very likely moderate effect in favor of CWI for single-leg (effect size [ES] = 0.63; 90% confidence interval [CI] = -0.13 to 1.38) and 2-leg countermovement jump (ES = 0.68; 90% CI = -0.08 to 1.43) 72 h after exercise. Soreness was moderately lower 48 h after exercise after CWI (ES = -0.68; 90% CI = -1.44 to 0.07). Perception of recovery was moderately enhanced 24 h after exercise for CWI (ES = -0.62; 90% CI = -1.38 to 0.13). Trivial and small effects of condition were found for the other outcomes. CWI was more effective than WBC in accelerating recovery kinetics for countermovement-jump performance at 72 h postexercise. CWI also demonstrated lower soreness and higher perceived recovery levels across 24-48 h postexercise.

  4. Dynamic behaviour of a concrete building under a mainshock–aftershock seismic sequence with a concrete damage plasticity material model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Maria Dulinska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the dynamic response of a concrete structure subjected to a mainshock–aftershock seismic sequence. In the dynamic analysis, three components of the registered mainshock and aftershock were taken into account. The peak ground accelerations of about 0.5 g were assumed for both shocks. A one-storey shed was modelled with the ABAQUS software to represent a large concrete structure under the repeated earthquakes. For proper characterization of concrete structure behaviour under the sequence of shocks, a concrete damage plasticity model was assumed as a constitutive model of concrete. The obtained results indicate that aftershocks can have considerable effect on dynamic behaviour of concrete structures in terms of enlarging zones affected by irreversible strains or additional damage evolution. The analysis revealed that aftershocks, which are usually not as strong as mainshocks, may result even in total loss of concrete material strength while performing in mainshock–aftershock seismic sequences.

  5. The analysis of the hot water consumption and energy performance before and after renovation in multi-apartment buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanova, K.; Borodinecs, A.; Geikins, A.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the results of hot water supply system analysis. Taking into account that the current consumption of hot water differs from normative values, real measured data of hot water consumption in multi-apartment buildings from year 2013 until year 2015 have been analyzed. Also, the thermal energy consumption for hot water preparation has been analyzed. Based on aggregated data and taking into account the fact that renovated systems of hot water supply in existing multi-apartment buildings have same pipelines’ diameters, it was analyzed how these systems are economically and energy efficient. For the study, residential buildings in Riga, which have different architectural and engineering solutions for hot water supply systems, were selected. The study was based on thermal energy consumption measurements, which were taken at the individual heating system’s manifolds. This study was done in order to develop database on hot water consumption in civil buildings and define difference in key performance criteria in unclassified buildings. Obtained results allows to reach European Regional Development Fund project “NEARLY ZERO ENERGY SOLUTIONS FOR UNCLASSIFIED BUILDINGS” Nr. 1.1.1.116A048 main targets.

  6. DNA damage and oxidative stress in human liver cell L-02 caused by surface water extracts during drinking water treatment in a waterworks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Hui-Juan; Jin, Bang-Xiong; Lu, Wen-Hong; Li, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Because of the daily and life-long exposure to disinfection by-products formed during drinking water treatment, potential adverse human health risk of drinking water disinfection is of great concern. Toxicological studies have shown that drinking water treatment increases the genotoxicity of surface water. Drinking water treatment is comprised of different potabilization steps, which greatly influence the levels of genotoxic products in the surface water and thus may alter the toxicity and genotoxicity of surface water. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of specific steps on toxicity and genotoxicity during the treatment of surface water in a water treatment plant using liquid chlorine as the disinfectant in China. An integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays was used in the study, and the results showed that both the prechlorination and postchlorination steps increased DNA damage and oxidative stress caused by water extracts in human derived L-02 cells while the tube settling and filtration steps had the opposite effect. This research also highlighted the usefulness of an integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays in evaluating the genotoxicity of surface water during drinking water treatment. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, E. Weitzel

    2017-03-01

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  8. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-08

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  9. Ontario’s Clean Water Act and Capacity Building: Implications for Serviced Rural Municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Minnes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research explores Ontario’s Clean Water Act (S.O. 2006, c. 22 and its contribution to capacity building for rural municipalities impacted by source protection plans created under the Act. Source water protection (SWP under the Clean Water Act (S.O. 2006, c. 22 is explored drawing from a capacity framework. A nested case study approach has been employed to allow for in depth exploration of the experience within the Cataraqui Source Protection Area and the North Bay-Mattawa Source Protection Area, where key informant interviews were conducted. Findings are outlined looking at four elements of capacity for SWP: institutional, financial, social, and technical/human. It was found that the process was successful for building capacity in the serviced rural municipalities involved, but did not provide any meaningful protection for areas reliant on private drinking water systems such as wells. Several improvements to the legislated process were suggested including greater flexibility for local circumstance and better methods for engagement of First Nations and the general public. It is unknown if this capacity will be sustained as the program continues and provincial funding is reduced. Reduced funding will particularly impact rural communities that lack the internal human and financial capacity to implement SWP policies without the assistance of provincial funding and conservation authority staff (who also rely on provincial/municipal funding sources. Ultimately, it was found that SWP in rural areas requires enforceable mandatory legislation; sustainable provincial funding and municipal fiscal frameworks to support ongoing SWP planning and implementation; technical aid at the regional level; and support and commitment to SWP at the local level (e.g., municipalities, local health units, landowners, residents and watershed users.

  10. Thermal-hydraulics of PGV-4 water volume during damage of the feedwater collector nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logvinov, S.A.; Titov, V.F. [OKB Gidropress (Russian Federation); Notaros, U.; Lenkei, I. [NPP Paks (Hungary)

    1995-12-31

    A number of VVER-440 plants has experienced the distributing nozzles of feedwater collector being damaged due to corrosion-erosion wearing. Such phenomenon could result in feedwater redistribution within the SG inventory with undesirable consequences. The collector with damaged nozzles has to be replaced but a certain time is needed for the preparatory works. The main objective of the investigation conducted is to assess if the safe operation of SG is possible before collector replacement. It was shown that the nozzle damage as observed did not result in the dangerous disturbances of thermobydraulics as compared with the conditions existing at the initial period of operation. (orig.).

  11. Effects of both ethanol and water extracts of Buccholzia coriacea on Sodium arsenite induced liver damage in male albino rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakoya A. Adekunle Ajasin University

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The hepatoprotective effects of two extracts alcoholic extract and water extract obtained from the air dried seeds of Buccholzia coriacea were investigated. Sodium arsenite is shown to elicit strong mutagenic activity and hepatotoxicity. This work therefore seeks to induce liver damage in rats using a single dose 10 mgkg i.p of sodium arsenite and to evaluate the possible protective effects of oral administration of different doses of 100 200 300 and 400mgkg of both water and alcoholic extracts of Buccholzia coriacea seeds on sodium arsenite induced liver damage. Rats were pretreated with 100 200 300 and 400mgkg of the extracts for five days before a single dose of Na2AsO3 10mgkg on the sixth day. The alanine aminotranferase ALT aspartate aminotransferase AST alkaline phosphatase ALP and lactate dehydrogenase LDH activities were determined in serum and tissue of rats. Sodium arsenite caused liver damage as evident by statistically significant p 0.05 increased in serum and tissue activities of ALT AST ALP and LDH. However all the tested plant extracts elicited counter effect at dose dependent manner. The present results suggest that Buccholzia coriacea can act as hepatoprotective against liver damage.Keywords Hepatoprotective Mutagenic Hepatotoxicity Alcoholic.

  12. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recently, phase-change materials. While broadly similar, these substances absorb and release heat in unique patterns characteristic of their mineralogies, densities, fluidities, emissivities, and latent heats of fusion. Current architectural practice, however, shows little awareness of these differences and the resulting potential to match materials to desired thermal performance. This investigation explores that potential, illustrating the correspondence between physical parameters and thermal storage-and-release patterns in direct-, indirect-, and isolated-gain passive solar configurations. Focusing on heating applications, results demonstrate the superiority of water walls for daytime warmth, the tunability of granite and concrete for evening warmth, and the exceptional ability of phase-change materials to sustain near-constant heat delivery throughout the night.

  13. Building America Case Study: Indirect Solar Water Heating Systems in Single-Family Homes, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Solar water heating systems are not new, but they have not become prevalent in most of the U.S. Most of the country is cold enough that indirect solar thermal systems are required for freeze protection, and average installed cost of these systems is $9,000 to $10,000 for typical systems on single-family homes. These costs can vary significantly in different markets and with different contractors, and federal and regional incentives can reduce these up-front costs by 50% or more. In western Massachusetts, an affordable housing developer built a community of 20 homes with a goal of approaching zero net energy consumption. In addition to excellent thermal envelopes and PV systems, the developer installed a solar domestic water heating system (SDHW) on each home. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a research consortium funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program, commissioned some of the systems, and CARB was able to monitor detailed performance of one system for 28 months.

  14. Creation of Polyurethane Injection Materials, Their Pilot-industrial Production, Development and Industrial Introduction of the Technology of Strengthening and Restoring the Operability of Damaged Constructions and Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marukha, V.І.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane and foam polyurethane fluid injection materials not conceding foreign analogues and technology technology of restoration and strengthening the operability of concrete and reinforced concrete structures and buildings damaged by cracks were developed. Normative and technical documentation on the injection materials and technological processes was created. The diagnosticrestoring complex for implementing the above technologies was designed, installed and utilized at the construction sites. The equipment is designed and manufactured; the technology of the research and industrial production of «A» and «B» components of injecting polyurethane materials is designed and developed. The pilot-scale batch is manufactured. Technological processes of preparation and application of the «A» and «B» componentsof the injecting materials in industrial conditions are worked out and implemented.

  15. Building phenomenological models that relate proteolysis in pork muscles to temperature, water and salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkouss, Rami; Safa, Hassan; Gatellier, Philippe; Lebert, André; Mirade, Pierre-Sylvain

    2014-05-15

    Throughout dry-cured ham production, salt and water content, pH and temperature are key factors affecting proteolysis, one of the main biochemical processes influencing sensory properties and final quality of the product. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of these variables (except pH) on the time course of proteolysis in laboratory-prepared pork meat samples. Based on a Doehlert design, samples of five different types of pork muscle were prepared, salted, dried and placed at different temperatures, and sampled at different times for quantification of proteolysis. Statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the proteolysis index (PI) was correlated positively with temperature and water content, but negatively with salt content. Applying response surface methodology and multiple linear regressions enabled us to build phenomenological models relating PI to water and salt content, and to temperature. These models could then be integrated into a 3D numerical ham model, coupling salt and water transfers to proteolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  17. Building Damage and Business Continuity Management in the Event of Natural Hazards: Case Study of the 2004 Tsunami in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Sugiura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sumatra Earthquake and Indian Ocean Tsunami event on the 26 December 2004 has provided a unique and valuable opportunity to evaluate the performance of various structures, facilities and lifeline systems during the tsunami wave attacks. There are especially meaningful observations concerning the structural changes due to the tsunami forces, which open up a wide area of research to develop the mitigation procedure. The business restoration process of business companies in terms of buildings, facilities and lifelines have shown greater research interest. In this study, we investigated the restoration process of business sectors in East and South coastal region in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. A field survey was conducted in East and South coast of Sri Lanka, in order to study the affecting parameters to damage assessment in the restoration process of the business companies. The results of the questionnaire-based field survey are then compared with the statistical analysis results. Finally, the factors affecting the restoration process after the tsunami are identified. As a main conclusion, financial support could be the most important reason for delays in restoration. Moreover, it has been observed that the tsunami inundation level of higher than one meter may have had more effect concerning the damage to the structures and requires additional time for restoration than other areas.

  18. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  19. Moisture Accumulation and Its Impact on the Thermal Performance of Pipe Insulation for Chilled Water Pipes in High Performance Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Shanshan; Cremaschi, Lorenzo; Ghajar, Afshin J.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical pipe insulation systems are commonly applied to cold piping surfaces in most industrial and commercial buildings in order to limit the heat losses and prevent water vapor condensation on the pipe exterior surfaces. Due to the fact that the surface temperature of these pipelines is normally below the ambient dew point temperature, water vapor diffuses inside the pipe insulation systems and often condenses when it reaches the pipe exterior surfaces. The water droplets accumulated in ...

  20. AP1000 Shield Building Dynamic Response for Different Water Levels of PCCWST Subjected to Seismic Loading considering FSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daogang Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huge water storage tank on the top of many buildings may affect the safety of the structure caused by fluid-structure interaction (FSI under the earthquake. AP1000 passive containment cooling system water storage tank (PCCWST placed at the top of shield building is a key component to ensure the safety of nuclear facilities. Under seismic loading, water will impact the wall of PCCWST, which may pose a threat to the integrity of the shield building. In the present study, an FE model of AP1000 shield building is built for the modal and transient seismic analysis considering the FSI. Six different water levels in PCCWST were discussed by comparing the modal frequency, seismic acceleration response, and von Mises stress distribution. The results show the maximum von Mises stress emerges at the joint of shield building roof and water around the air inlet. However, the maximum von Mises stress is below the yield strength of reinforced concrete. The results may provide a reference for design of the AP1000 and CAP1400 in the future.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Mudstone's Creep Behavior During Water Injection and Its Effect on Casing Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. L.; Yang, C. H.; Liu, J. J.; He, X.; Xiong, J.

    2008-07-01

    During the process of water injection production in oilfield, when water cuts into the mudstone, as a result, large numbers of casings are damaged because of mudstone's creep characteristic. In order to analyze this phenomenon, the uniaxial compression experiments and creep experiments of mudstone from Daqing Oil Field under different saturation conditions were done, it was studied that how the mudstone's mechanical parameters and creep characteristic would change with the increment of water contents. The results indicate that the rock strength and elastic modulus are decreased rapidly with the increment of water contents, on the other hand, the creep strain and steady state creep strain rate are increased with the increment of water contents, and also the steady state creep strain rate is enhanced with the increment of deviatoric stress. Through the creep characteristic curves, a nonlinear creeping constitutive equation of mudstone considering the changes of water contents was established. In the deep stratum of the oilfield, the calculation model of casing-cement sheath-mudstone was built, based on the experiment results of mudstone and its creep constitutive equation, mudstone's creep pressure with time under different water contents was simulated. The simulation results show that the increasing water content accelerates the incremental rate of the creep pressure of mudstone, so the time of reaching yield state of casing will descend greatly, which means service time of casing becomes much shorter.

  2. Comparison Assessment of Water Use and Damage between Modern and Traditional Rice Irrigation Schemes: Case of Usangu Basin, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarius Mdemu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Water management and competition between users in water scarce river basins is a major challenge facing the human race. The inter dependence of users in such basins, necessitates a clear understanding of each user in relation to the location, the water demand, and the duration of water need. The understanding of these factors, together, is very important for the management of water resources in such basins without which, it is argued that, water is overused and wasted. As an example of this, the large modern and improved rice irrigation systems in Tanzania are believed to use water more efficient than the traditional irrigation systems. Yet, well-founded scientific analyses are a necessary part to quantify such beliefs as they can inform us whether the natural resource, in such systems, is properly utilized and managed or not. Likewise, such studies can allow us to quantify how much water is over used and thus the natural resource is unnecessarily degraded. This paper explores a study conducted in the Usangu basin, Tanzania, to investigate the gross and net needs for modern and traditional rice irrigation schemes, and the implications with regards to water resource management and damage. Problems relating to modernization of traditional smallholder irrigation systems and upstream - downstream water users are further discussed. The paper concludes from the study that modern irrigation schemes are inefficient compared to traditional irrigation schemes. Also modernization of traditional schemes in the study area have resulted into over abstraction and reduced productivity of water. Looking to the future, this study tells us that improvement or modernization of irrigation infrastructure should be balanced between negative impacts to available water resources albeit it's significant economic contribution to the community.

  3. Competence in water-borne heating systems in buildings; Kompetanse innen vannbaarene varmesystemer i bygg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarstein, Stig; Palm, Linn Therese; Naess, Bente Haukland; Nossum, Aase; Johnsen, Morten

    2009-01-15

    Trade participants in water-borne heating systems in buildings has experienced mistakes in all phases and of all participants of a project. When water-borne heating system functions, there is almost no follow up. This report is based on a qualitative survey where a several central participants, who on a daily basis are involved in projects with water-borne heating systems, are interviewed or have participated in focus group meetings. Following points illustrate experiences made by the operators in occasions where competence in trade is insufficiencies and mistakes occur: - Property developer lacks ordering competence and has problems in ordering quality. Consultant submit services of minor quality. Performance is of another quality than the supplier. Administration / maintenance lacks competence in how to run the system and without introduction and training in the heating system they take over a system that is over dimensioned and hard to regulate. The trade as a whole knows all the challenges, but the participants gives mainly the impression that the fault is lac of competence for all the other participants - not them self. This report points out measures and Enova can support competence improving measures which on long term will improve the quality from the participants. The trade is recommended to look into project execution, how competence is involved at the right moment, improving of control and documentation routines and at termination / hand over. (AG).14 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Potential for Potable Water Savings in Buildings by Using Stormwater Harvested from Porous Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Niehuns Antunes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about the scarcity of water resources due to population growth and increased demand for potable water. Thus, the rational use of water has become necessary for the conservation of such resources. The objective of this study is to estimate the potential for potable water savings in buildings of different sectors—residential, public and commercial—in the city of Florianópolis, southern Brazil, by using stormwater harvested from porous pavements. Models were constructed to assess infiltration and rainwater quality; samples of stormwater from a local road were collected to evaluate its quality; and computer simulation was performed to assess the potential for potable water savings and rainwater tank sizing. Draining asphalt concrete slabs with two types of modifiers were used, i.e., tire rubber and SBS polymer—styrene-butadiene-styrene. The Netuno computer programme was used to simulate the potential for potable water savings considering the use of rainwater for non-potable uses such as flushing toilets and urinals, cleaning external areas, and garden watering. Average stormwater infiltration was 85.4%. It was observed that stormwater is not completely pure. From the models, the pH was 5.4 and the concentrations of ammonia, phosphorus, nitrite, and dissolved oxygen were 0.41, 0.14, 0.002, and 9.0 mg/L, respectively. The results for the stormwater runoff of a paved road were 0.23, 0.11, 0.12, 0.08, 1.41, 2.11, 0.02, and 9.0 mg/L for the parameters aluminium, ammonia, copper, chromium, iron, phosphorus, nitrite, and dissolved oxygen, respectively; and the pH was 6.7. In the city of Florianópolis, which has a surface area of paved roads of approximately 11,044,216 m², the potential for potable water savings ranged from 1.2% to 19.4% in the residential sector, 2.1% to 75.7% in the public sector and 6.5% to 70.0% in the commercial sector.

  5. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  6. Genetic damage in the bivalve mollusk Corbicula fluminea induced by the water-soluble fraction of gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedato, R P; Simonato, J D; Martinez, C B R; Sofia, S H

    2010-07-19

    Although gasoline is an important contaminant of aquatic ecosystems, information concerning the potential effects of this petroleum derivative on the DNA of aquatic biota is lacking. The present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of acute exposures (6, 24, and 96h) to gasoline water-soluble fraction (GWSF), diluted to 5%, on the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The comet assay and the micronucleus (MN) test were performed on hemocytes and gill cells of C. fluminea. For the three different times tested, the comet assay indicated DNA damage in hemocytes and gill cells of C. fluminea exposed to GWSF. The MN test detected significant damage in the genetic material of the hemocytes only after 96h of exposure to GWSF. The recovery capacity of organisms previously exposed for 6h to GWSF was also evaluated with the comet assay. The results revealed a great capacity of this species to repair DNA damage; following 6h of recovery, the comet score returned to that of the control groups. Overall, our findings indicate that GWSF has genotoxic and mutagenic effects on C. fluminea. In addition, the present results confirm the sensitivity of C. fluminea to damage caused by exposure to environmental contaminants, and, therefore, its suitability for use in environmental monitoring studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Water vapor flow and high thermal resistance insulation systems for metal buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In response to increasing energy costs, high thermal resistance insulation systems are being marketed for pre-engineered metal buildings. Historically, blanket insulation has been installed between the skin and the structure of these buildings. The new insulation systems generally are installed inside the structure; thus the structure is colder and, unless an effective retarder is included, water vapor condensation problems can result. While the vapor permeance of various insulation facing materials is documented, the effect of such field conditions as seams and penetrations is less well known. Permeance tests were performed on samples of foil-kraft paper insulation facing with two seams and two penetration configurations. The tests show that seams can multiply the permeance of the vapor retarder by factors of 1.2 or more and penetrations can multiply the permeance by 3 or more. The theory of vapor flow analysis is reviewed and compared with the test results and presented graphically. Possible applications and suggestions for further investigation are discussed.

  8. Water vapor flow and high thermal resistance insulation systems for metal buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    In response to increasing energy costs, high thermal resistance insulation systems are being marketed for pre-engineered metal buildings. Historically, blanket insulation has been installed between the skin and the structure of these buildings. The new insulation systems generally are installed inside the structure; thus the structure is colder and, unless an effective retarder is included, water vapor condensation problems can result. While the vapor permeance of various insulation facing materials is documented, the effect of such field conditions as seams and penetrations is less well known. Permeance tests were performed on samples of foil-kraft paper insulation facing with two seams and two penetration configurations. The tests show that seams can multiply the permeance of the vapor retarder by factors of 1.2 or more and penetrations can multiply the permeance by 3 or more. The theory of vapor flow analysis is reviewed and compared with the test results and presented graphically. Possible applications and suggestions for further investigation are discussed.

  9. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  10. Presence of Legionella spp. in Hot Water Networks of Different Italian Residential Buildings: A Three-Year Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Totaro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the European reports highlight an increase in community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease cases, the risk of Legionella spp. in private houses is underestimated. In Pisa (Italy we performed a three-year survey on Legionella presence in 121 buildings with an independent hot water production (IB; 64 buildings with a central hot water production (CB; and 35 buildings with a solar thermal system for hot water production (TB. From all the 220 buildings Legionella spp. was researched in two hot water samples collected either at the recirculation point or on the first floor and on the last floor, while the potable water quality was analysed in three cold water samples collected at the inlet from the aqueduct network, at the exit from the autoclave, and at the most remote tap. Legionella pneumophila sg1, Legionella pneumophila sg2–16, and non-pneumophila Legionella species were detected in 26% of the hot water networks, mostly in CB and TB. In these buildings we detected correlations between the presence of Legionella and the total chlorine concentration decrease and/or the increase of the temperature. Cold water resulted free from microbiological hazards, with the exception of Serratia liquefaciens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated at the exit from two different autoclaves. We observed an increase in total microbial counts at 22 °C and 37 °C between the samples collected at the most remote taps compared to the ones collected at the inlet from the aqueduct. The study highlights a condition of potential risk for susceptible categories of population and supports the need for measures of risk assessment and control.

  11. State-of-the-art review revealing a roadmap for public building water and energy efficiency retrofit projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Bertone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Governments occupy a significant proportion of building stock and their associated annual water and energy costs can be substantive. Research has shown that significant reductions in energy and water consumption as well as carbon emissions can be achieved through retrofitting public buildings. However, in most countries the current retrofitting rate is very low due to a number of barriers, including a lack of supportive legislation, regulations, guidelines, industry capacity and financial mechanisms. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the barriers as well as the best international practices covering numerous aspects of public building retrofits. Among others, the most important barriers identified were a lack of consideration of the water-energy nexus, and the limited availability of effective financing mechanisms. With a particular focus on the Australian context, a strategic roadmap, as well as a number of recommendations, such as the use of revolving loan fund financing and energy performance procurement, have been developed that aim to foster a greater rate of implementation of energy and water retrofit projects for public buildings. Achievement of such an aim will not only reduce ongoing operational costs of public buildings, but also lower their environmental impact and generate new employment opportunities.

  12. Evaluation and demonstration of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized services for new and rehabilitated multifamily buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkus, P. [Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Tuluca, A. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)

    1993-06-01

    The general objective of this research was aimed at developing sufficient technical and economic know-how to convince the building and design communities of the appropriateness and energy advantages of decentralized space and water heating for multifamily buildings. Two main goals were established to guide this research. First, the research sought to determine the cost-benefit advantages of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized systems for multifamily applications based on innovative gas piping and appliance technologies. The second goal was to ensure that this information is made available to the design community.

  13. Existence and control of Legionella bacteria in building water systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, John P; Yocavitch, Liana

    2017-02-01

    Legionellae are waterborne bacteria which are capable of causing potentially fatal Legionnaires' disease (LD), as well as Pontiac Fever. Public concern about Legionella exploded following the 1976 outbreak at the American Legion conference in Philadelphia, where 221 attendees contracted pneumonia and 34 died. Since that time, a variety of different control methods and strategies have been developed and implemented in an effort to eradicate Legionella from building water systems. Despite these efforts, the incidence of LD has been steadily increasing in the U.S. for more than a decade. Public health and occupational hygiene professionals have maintained an active debate regarding best practices for management and control of Legionella. Professional opinion remains divided with respect to the relative merits of performing routine sampling for Legionella, vs. the passive, reactive approach that has been largely embraced by public health officials and facility owners. Given the potential risks and ramifications associated with waiting to assess systems for Legionella until after disease has been identified and confirmed, a proactive approach of periodic testing for Legionella, along with proper water treatment, is the best approach to avoiding large-scale disease outbreaks.

  14. The Use of Solar Energy for Preparing Domestic Hot Water in a Multi-Storey Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrius Šiupšinskas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the possibilities of solar collectors used for a domestic hot water system and installed on the roofs of modernized multi-storey buildings under the existing climate conditions. A number of combinations of flat plate and vacuum solar collectors with accumulation tank systems of various sizes have been examined. Heat from the district heating system is used as an additional heat source for preparing domestic hot water. The paper compares calculation results of energy and economy regarding the combinations of flat plate and vacuum solar collectors and the size of the accumulation tank. The influence of variations in the main indicators on the final economic results has also been evaluated. Research has been supported applying EC FP7 CONCERTO program (‘‘Sustainable Zero Carbon ECO-Town Developments Improving Quality of Life across EU - ECO-Life’’ (ECO-Life Project Contract No. TREN/FP7EN/239497/”ECOLIFE”.Article in Lithuanian

  15. A comparison of experimental methods for measuring water permeability of porous building rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan, S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares different experimental methods for measuring water permeability in 17 different porous building rocks. Both commercial apparatus and specially made designed permeameters are used for characterising intrinsic permeability and hydraulic conductivity, k, of rocks in the range of 10−12 to 10−4 m/s (~ 10−19−10−11 m2 or ~ 10−4−104 mD. We use both falling head and constant head permeameter methods including the triaxial and modified triaxial tests and a classical constant head permeameter. Results showed that for very low and low permeability samples (k−6 m/s, triaxial conditions were found the most accurate procedures and they provided similar or slightly lower permeability values than constant and falling head methods. The latter techniques were highly recommended for permeable and high permeable porous building materials. Water permeability values were also linked to effective porosity and interpreted in terms of interparticle and vugs porosity. Finally, some modifications in the apparatus and procedures were carried out in order to assess water permeability in soft materials, which involve the use of non-saturated samples.Se comparan diferentes métodos experimentales para la medida de la permeabilidad al agua en rocas porosas usadas como material de construcción. Se usaron diferentes permeabilímetros, (comerciales y desarrollados específicamente empleando los métodos triaxial, triaxial modificado, carga constante y carga variable. Se caracterizó la permeabilidad intrínseca y conductividad hidráulica, k, con valores que var.an desde 10−12 a 10−4 m/s (~ 10−19−10−11 m2 or ~ 10−4−104 mD. Para muestras poco y muy poco permeables el ensayo con célula triaxial fue el mas reproducible. Los ensayos de carga constante son muy recomendables para rocas porosas de construcción permeables y muy permeables. Además, se definen los parámetros experimentales más apropiados para caracterizar la

  16. Study and Optimization of Design Parameters in Water Loop Heat Pump Systems for Office Buildings in the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Fernández

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Water loop heat pump (WLHP air conditioning systems use heat pumps connected to a common water circuit to fulfill the energy demands of different thermal zones in a building. In this study, the energy consumption was analyzed for the air conditioning of an office building in the typical climate of four important cities of the Iberian Peninsula. The energy consumption of one water loop heat pump system was compared with a conventional water system. Two design parameters, the range in the control temperatures and the water loop thermal storage size, were tested. Energy redistribution is an important advantage of the WLHP system, but significant savings came from high efficiency parameters in the heat pumps and minor air flow rates in the cooling tower. The low thermal level in the water loop makes this technology appropriate to combine with renewable sources. Using natural gas as the thermal energy source, a mean decrease in CO2 emissions of 8.1% was reached. Simulations showed that the installation of big thermal storage tanks generated small energy savings. Besides, the total annual consumption in buildings with high internal loads can be reduced by keeping the water loop as cool as possible.

  17. Visualization and quantification of weathering effects on capillary water uptake of natural building stones by using neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raneri, Simona; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo [University of Catania, Department of Biological, Geological and Environment Sciences, Catania (Italy); Rabot, Eva [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CNRS/CEA), Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-15

    Building stones are frequently subjected to very intense degradation due to salt crystallization, often responsible for strong modifications of their pore network. These effects have a great influence on the mechanical properties and durability of the materials, and on the penetration of water. Therefore, the quantification and visualization of water absorption into the pore network of degraded stones could provide useful information to better understand the weathering process. In this study, neutron radiography has been used (1) to monitor and visualize in two dimensions the capillary water uptake in a Sicilian calcarenite widely used as building and replace stone (namely Sabucina stone) and (2) to quantify the water content distribution, as a function of time and weathering degree. Additionally, traditional experiments based on gravimetric methods have been performed, following the standard recommendations. Results demonstrated a change in the physical properties of Sabucina stones with the intensification of the degradation process, with severe effects on the capillary imbibition dynamics. The water penetration depth at the end of the experiment was substantially higher in the fresh than in the weathered stones. The water absorption kinetics was faster in the weathered samples, and the amount of water absorbed increased with the number of weathering cycles. Good agreement between classical and neutron imaging data has also been evidenced. However, neutron radiography has allowed retrieving additional spatial information on the water absorption process, and to better understand how salt weathering affects the petrophysical properties of the studied stone and how it influences then the stone response against water. (orig.)

  18. Waste water ducts in high-rise buildings. Pressure compensation in the downpipe; Schmutzwasserleitungen in Hochhaeusern. Druckausgleich im Fallrohr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishorst, B. [Informationszentrum Entwaesserungstechnik Guss e.V. (IZEG) (Germany); Guetegemeinschaft Entwaesserungstechnik Guss e.V. (GEG) (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Ventilation is a key aspect for correct function of a waste water system. In order to enable pressure compensation and ensure that sewer gases are led outside, downpipes in high-rise buildings must have at least one main ventilation duct. The author presents examples to illustrate how downpipes should be constructed for optimum flow conditions and reliable function. (orig.)

  19. Antigenotoxic effect of kefir and ayran supernatants on fecal water-induced DNA damage in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, Anna; Kulikova, Irina; Alieva, Ludmila; Dodson, Andrew; Rowland, Ian; Jin, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Fermented dairy products and their component bacteria have been shown to possess health-promoting functions in consumers and recently have been suggested to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Kefir and ayran are two popular fermented milk drinks that have their origins in the Caucasus region of Russia. The present study aimed to evaluate their potential anticancer properties in colon cells in vitro. The comet assay and transepithelial resistance assay were used to assess the effect of kefir and ayran supernatants on genotoxicity of fecal water samples and on intestinal tight junction integrity. Their antioxidant capacity was measured by trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay and compared with that of unfermented milk. The results showed that DNA damage induced by 2 of 4 fecal water samples was significantly decreased by kefir and ayran supernatants and with ayran the effect was dose-dependent. However no effect on intestinal tight junctions was observed. The supernatants of kefir and ayran contained high amounts of acetic and lactic acid but only a very small quantity of caproic and butyric acid, and they showed significantly greater antioxidant capacity than milk. These findings suggest kefir and ayran can reduce DNA damage, which might be due to their antioxidant capacities.

  20. Comparison of Damage from Hydrocode Simulations of an Asteroid Airburst or Impact on Land, in Deep, or in Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2017-01-01

    If an asteroid is discovered to be on a collision course with Earth and there is insufficient time for a deflection effort to make it miss Earth completely, should it be redirected to a land or ocean impact? While distance from densely populated areas should obviously be maximized, the differing ability of air blast, seismic waves, and tsunami waves to cause damage at distance does not make the choice between land and ocean impacts an immediately obvious one. More broadly this work is a step towards improving damage models from asteroid impacts. This extended abstract follows the hypothetical scenario of the 2017 IAA Planetary Defense Conference where a 100-250m diameter asteroid is on a potential impact course with Earth. A hydrocode was used to simulate impacts into the most sparsely populated areas along the eastern end of the hypothetical impact corridor- specifically in the Gobi Desert, in the shallow waters of the Sea of Japan, and in the deep waters of the Japan Trench in the Pacific Ocean.

  1. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study: Summarized Data - Test Space Pollutant Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    information collected regarding sources that may have potential impact on the building in terms of indoor air quality including sources such as past or current water damage, pesticide application practices, special use spaces, etc.

  2. Using air-conditioning waste water and stormwater as supply management in a commercial building, case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Silva Bastos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of rational use as applied to water conservation consists in managing water supply and demand by trying to meet lesser quality water demands with alternative or reused water supply. This project attempts to demonstrate the application of a system that uses water drained from air conditioning system evaporators and rainwater as alternative sources. Given that each evaporator produces 4.80 liters of water per hour and considering the average use of an air conditioning system to be approximately 10 hours per day, the daily total of a single evaporator would be 48 liters. This would implicate a daily volume of 4,298 liters for the whole 137 units spread throughout the building, which in time would represent 77.72% of the daily demand of wastewater (5,53 liter/day. For the rainwater collection system, the total accumulated volume corresponds to 10% of the site area multiplied by a factor of 0.05, for a retention time of 1 hour, which will produce a total volume 14.8m³ of water. This system´s primary objective is to significantly reduce the consumption of potable water, which nowadays is used for every single activity, thus contributing to a more sustainable building and minimizing the environmental impact caused by the construction.

  3. Nitric oxide reduces oxidative damage induced by water stress in sunflower plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cechin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main environmental constraints that can reduce plant yield. Nitric oxide (NO is a signal molecule involved in plant responses to several environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective effect of a single foliar application of 0, 1, 10 or 100 µM of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP in sunflower plants under water stress. Water stressed plants treated with 1μM SNP showed an increase in the relative water content compared with 0 μM SNP. Drought reduced the shoot dry weight but SNP applications did not result in alleviation of drought effects. Neither drought nor water stress plus SNP applications altered the content of photosynthetic pigments. Stomatal conductance was reduced by drought and this reduction was accompanied by a significant reduction in intercellular CO2 concentration and photosynthesis. Treatment with SNP did not reverse the effect of drought on the gas exchange characteristics. Drought increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and proline and reduced pirogalol peroxidase (PG-POD activity, but did not affect the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD. When the water stressed plants were treated with 10 μM SNP, the activity of PG-POD and the content of proline were increased and the level of MDA was decreased. The results show that the adverse effects of water stress on sunflower plants are dependent on the external NO concentration. The action of NO may be explained by its ability to increase the levels of antioxidant compounds and the activity of ROS-scavenging enzymes.

  4. The influence of water/air cooling on collateral tissue damage using a diode laser with an innovative pulse design (micropulsed mode)-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, F; Körpert, W; Buchmair, A G; Passow, H; Meinl, A; Heimel, P; Moritz, A

    2013-05-01

    Since the diode laser is a good compromise for the daily use in dental offices, finding usage in numerous dental indications (e.g., surgery, periodontics, and endodontics), the minimization of the collateral damage in laser surgery is important to improve the therapeutical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of water/air cooling on the collateral thermal soft tissue damage of 980-nm diode laser incisions. A total of 36 mechanically executed laser cuts in pork liver were made with a 980-nm diode laser in micropulsed mode with three different settings of water/air cooling and examined by histological assessment to determine the area and size of carbonization, necrosis, and reversible tissue damage as well as incision depth and width. In our study, clearly the incision depth increased significantly under water/air cooling (270.9 versus 502.3 μm-test group 3) without significant changes of incision width. In test group 2, the total area of damage was significantly smaller than in the control group (in this group, the incision depth increases by 65 %). In test group 3, the total area of damage was significantly higher (incision depth increased by 85 %), but the bigger part of it represented a reversible tissue alteration leaving the amount of irreversible damage almost the same as in the control group. This first pilot study clearly shows that water/air cooling in vitro has an effect on collateral tissue damage. Further studies will have to verify, if the reduced collateral damage we have proved in this study can lead to accelerated wound healing. Reduction of collateral thermal damage after diode laser incisions is clinically relevant for promoted wound healing.

  5. Technical, economic and environmental investigation of using district heating to prepare domestic hot water in Chinese multi-storey buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Jianjun; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2016-01-01

    utilizes the industrial waste heat to prepare DHW via the DH network. A building model of a multi-storey building in Beijing was developed to investigate the technical feasibility. An economic evaluation was made using net present value to compare the annualized cost for individual water heaters and flat......-effective issues of the centralized DHW systems. From the perspective of long-term development, DHW produced via DH systems would be more sustainable because DH is an important precondition for an environmental safe use of domestic waste fuels. This paper presents an approach that uses flat stations meanwhile...

  6. GIS UTILITY FOR HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT EVALUATION CAUSED BY DAMAGES OF WATER SUPPLY NETWORK IN RURAL AREAS. APPLICATIONS IN BAIA MARE DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    RADU ALEXANDRU MARIAN; IONEL HAIDU; AUGUSTIN IONUŢ CRĂCIUN; BOGDAN VĂDUVA

    2012-01-01

    GIS utility for hydrological impact evaluation caused by damages of water supply network in rural areas. Applications in Baia Mare Depression. Occurrence of a failure within the water supply network is an element of risk with important hydrological implications. Although at first glance you might think that a pipe diameter of only 20 cm can generate large effects, however, in case of significant damage or even burst pipe, a good part of high water flow in the pipe (approx. 25 m3/h on average ...

  7. Review of health hazards and prevention measures for response and recovery workers and volunteers after natural disasters, flooding, and water damage: mold and dampness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanning, Eckardt; Auger, Pierre; Morey, Philip R; Yang, Chin S; Olmsted, Ed

    2014-03-01

    Health problems and illnesses encountered by unprotected workers, first-responders, home-owners, and volunteers in recovery and restoration of moldy indoor environments after hurricanes, typhoons, tropical storms, and flooding damage are a growing concern for healthcare providers and disaster medicine throughout the world. Damp building materials, particularly cellulose-containing substrates, are prone to fungal (mold) and bacterial infestation. During remediation and demolition work, the airborne concentrations of such microbes and their by-products can rise significantly and result in an exposure risk. Symptoms reported by unprotected workers and volunteers may relate to reactions of the airways, skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. Dampness-related fungi are primarily associated with allergies, respiratory symptoms or diseases such as dermatitis, rhinosinusitis, bronchitis, and asthma, as well as changes of the immunological system. Also, cognitive, endocrine, or rheumatological changes have been reported. Based on the consensus among experts at a recent scientific conference and a literature review, it is generally recommended to avoid and minimize unnecessary fungal exposure and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) in disaster response and recovery work. Mycologists recommend addressing any moisture or water intrusion rapidly, since significant mold growth can occur within 48 h. Systematic source removal, cleaning with "soap and water," and "bulk removal" followed by high-efficiency particulate air vacuuming is recommended in most cases; use of "biocides" should be avoided in occupied areas. Public health agencies recommend use of adequate respiratory, skin, and eye protection. Workers can be protected against these diseases by use of dust control measures and appropriate personal protective equipment. At a minimum, a facial dust mask such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved N95 respirator should

  8. Influence of Water with Modified Isotope Structure on Development of Radiation Damage in Experimental Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakov, D. V.; Fedorenko, B. S.; Sinyak, Yu. E.

    begin table htbp begin center begin tabular p 442pt hline As the duration of space missions increases the problem of durability of space crews and their resistivity to space flight factors becomes more important The purpose of the present work was to study the radioprotective effects of lowered deuterium content water in experimental animals after repeated exposures to low doses of gamma radiation Both male and female adult mice of NAAoN57Al6 F1 and BALB c lines were exposed to 0 25 0 5 and 1 0 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays by multiple fractions The dose rate was 0 32 Gy min Starting from one month prior to the first irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment the animals were only supplied with lowered deuterium content water ad libitum The control group of mice consumed tap water only The mice were sacrificed by means of cervical dislocation within one month after finishing the last irradiation fraction The following parameters were registered the weight of body thymus and spleen number of leucocytes blood formula number of caryocytes in femur bone marrow cytogenetic lesions in nucleated bone marrow cells The water with lowered deuterium content was produced by means of electrolysis with a special device in the Institute for Biomedical Problems par A long-term consumption of water with lowered deuterium content by irradiated mice was found to result in lower levels of depletion of peripheral blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells in a decrease in the yield of cytogenetic aberrations and in a less intensive reduction of the mass

  9. Federal Existing Buildings Handbook for Net Zero Energy, Water, and Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-14

    In 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defined zero energy buildings as "an energy-efficient building where, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy." This handbook is focused on applying the EERE definition of zero energy buildings to existing buildings in the federal sector. However, it is not intended to replace, substitute, or modify any statutory or regulatory requirements and mandates.

  10. Federal New Buildings Handbook for Net Zero Energy, Water, and Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-14

    In 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defined zero energy buildings as "an energy-efficient building where, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy." This document is focused on applying EERE’s definition of zero energy buildings to federal sector new buildings. However, it is not intended to replace, substitute, or modify any statutory or regulatory requirements and mandates.

  11. Building damage concentrated in Longtoushan town during the 2014 Ms. 6.5 Ludian earthquake, Yunnan, China: examination of cause and implications based on ground motion and vulnerability analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Kurahashi, Susumu; Wu, Hao; Si, Hongjun; Ma, Qiang; Dang, Ji; Tao, Dongwang; Feng, Jiwei; Irikura, Kojiro

    2017-09-01

    Though the 2014 Ludian Earthquake had only a moderate magnitude (Ms 6.5), high-level ground motions of almost 1 g occurred at Longtoushan Town (seismic station 53LLT), which located near the intersection of a conjugate-shaped seismogenic fault. The building damages on the pluvial fan and the river terrace at Longtoushan was clearly different. In order to examine the generation of the large acceleration at 53LLT, the focal mechanisms and the rupture processes of the conjugate-shaped seismogenic fault were determined. We found that there were two continuous impulsive waves in the records of 53LLT that were generated from two different faults, the Baogunao fault and the Xiaohe fault, respectively. Site effects on the pluvial fan and the river terrace at Longtoushan Town and their relations to different building damages were examined. We found that the predominant period at the pluvial fan was about 0.25 s, close to the fundamental natural period of multi-story confined masonry buildings. Ground motions on the pluvial fan and the river terrace were simulated through convolving synthesized bedrock motions with the transfer functions, which were analyzed using the one-dimensional underground velocity structures identified from H/V spectral ratios of ambient noise. Building collapse ratios (CRs) are estimated based on the vulnerability function of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake and are compared with the observed values. We found that the observed building CRs on the pluvial fan are much higher than the estimated values. High-level ground shaking that is far beyond the design level was a reason for serious building damage.

  12. The Piezo Actuator-Driven Pulsed Water Jet System for Minimizing Renal Damage after Off-Clamp Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Fujii, Shinji; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Ito, Akihiro; Abe, Takaaki; Tominaga, Teiji; Arai, Yoichi

    2017-09-01

    In the setting of partial nephrectomy (PN) for renal cell carcinoma, postoperative renal dysfunction might be caused by surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to clarify the technical safety and renal damage after off-clamp laparoscopic PN (LPN) with a piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system. Eight swine underwent off-clamp LPN with this surgical device, while off-clamp open PN was also performed with radio knife or soft coagulation. The length of the removed kidney was 40 mm, and the renal parenchyma was dissected until the renal calyx became clearly visible. The degree of renal degeneration from the resection surface was compared by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining and immunostaining for 1-methyladenosine, a sensitive marker for the ischemic tissue damage. The mRNA levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (Ngal), a biomarker for acute kidney injury, were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Off-clamp LPN with ADPJ system was successfully performed while preserving fine blood vessels and the renal calix with little bleeding. In contrast to other devices, the resection surface obtained with the ADPJ system showed only marginal degree of ischemic changes. Indeed, the expression level of Ngal mRNA was lower in the resection surface obtained with the ADPJ system than that with soft coagulation (p = 0.02). Furthermore, using the excised specimens of renal cell carcinoma, we measured the breaking strength at each site of the human kidney, suggesting the applicability of this ADPJ to clinical trials. In conclusion, off-clamp LPN with the ADPJ system could be safely performed with attenuated renal damage.

  13. Terpenoid trans-caryophyllene inhibits weed germination and induces plant water status alteration and oxidative damage in adult Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araniti, F; Sánchez-Moreiras, A M; Graña, E; Reigosa, M J; Abenavoli, M R

    2017-01-01

    trans-Caryophyllene (TC) is a sesquiterpene commonly found as volatile component in many different aromatic plants. Although the phytotoxic effects of trans-caryophyllene on seedling growth are relatively explored, not many information is available regarding the phytotoxicity of this sesquiterpenes on weed germination and on adult plants. The phytotoxic potential of TC was assayed in vitro on weed germination and seedling growth to validate its phytotoxic potential on weed species. Moreover, it was assayed on the metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana adult plants, through two different application ways, spraying and watering, in order to establish the primary affected organ and to deal with the unknown mobility of the compound. The results clearly indicated that TC inhibited both seed germination and root growth, as demonstrated by comparison of the ED50 values. Moreover, although trans-caryophyllene-sprayed adult Arabidopsis plants did not show any effect, trans-caryophyllene-watered plants became strongly affected. The results suggested that root uptake was a key step for the effectiveness of this natural compound and its phytotoxicity on adult plants was mainly due to the alteration of plant water status accompanied by oxidative damage. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Indoor Heating Drives Water Bacterial Growth and Community Metabolic Profile Changes in Building Tap Pipes during the Winter Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Han Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the bacterial community harbored in indoor drinking water taps is regulated by external environmental factors, such as indoor temperature. However, the effect of indoor heating on bacterial regrowth associated with indoor drinking water taps is poorly understood. In the present work, flow cytometry and community-level sole-carbon-source utilization techniques were combined to explore the effects of indoor heating on water bacterial cell concentrations and community carbon metabolic profiles in building tap pipes during the winter season. The results showed that the temperature of water stagnated overnight (“before” in the indoor water pipes was 15–17 °C, and the water temperature decreased to 4–6 °C after flushing for 10 min (“flushed”. The highest bacterial cell number was observed in water stagnated overnight, and was 5–11 times higher than that of flushed water. Meanwhile, a significantly higher bacterial community metabolic activity (AWCD590nm was also found in overnight stagnation water samples. The significant “flushed” and “taps” values indicated that the AWCD590nm, and bacterial cell number varied among the taps within the flushed group (p < 0.01. Heatmap fingerprints and principle component analyses (PCA revealed a significant discrimination bacterial community functional metabolic profiles in the water stagnated overnight and flushed water. Serine, threonine, glucose-phosphate, ketobutyric acid, phenylethylamine, glycerol, putrescine were significantly used by “before” water samples. The results suggested that water stagnated at higher temperature should be treated before drinking because of bacterial regrowth. The data from this work provides useful information on reasonable utilization of drinking water after stagnation in indoor pipes during indoor heating periods.

  15. Legionella control in the water system of antiquated hospital buildings by shock and continuous hyperchlorination: 5 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Giovanni Battista; Vitali, Matteo; Marinelli, Lucia; Ciorba, Veronica; Tufi, Daniela; Del Cimmuto, Angela; Ursillo, Paolo; Fabiani, Massimo; De Santis, Susi; Protano, Carmela; Marzuillo, Carolina; De Giusti, Maria

    2014-07-16

    To control the presence of Legionella in an old hospital water system, an integrated strategy of water disinfection-filtration was implemented in the university hospital Umberto I in Rome. Due to antiquated buildings, hospital water system design and hospital extension (38 buildings), shock hyperchlorination (sodium hypochlorite, 20-50 ppm of free chlorine at distal points for 1-2 h) followed by continuous hyperchlorination (0.5-1.0 mg/L at distal points) were adopted, and microbiological and chemical monitoring of the water supply was carried out in the university hospital (December 2006-December 2011). Overall, 1308 samples of cold 37.7%) and hot >45°C (17.8%) water were collected, determining residual free chlorine (0.43 ± 0.44 mg/L), pH (7.43 ± 0.29) and trihalomethanes (8.97 ± 18.56 μg/L). Legionella was isolated in 102 (9.8%) out of 1.041 water samples without filters (L. pneumophila sg 1 17.6%, L. pneumophila sg 2-14 28.4%, L. non pneumophila 53.9%), and in none of the 267 samples with filters. Legionella was recovered in 23 buildings out of 38 and 29 samples (28.4%) exceeded 103 cfu/L. When considering the disinfection treatment Legionella was isolated: before shock hyperchlorination (21.1%), 15 days after shock hyperchlorination (7.8%), 30 days after shock hyperchlorination (3.5%), during continuous hyperchlorination (5.5%) and without continuous hyperchlorination (27.3%). Continuous hyperchlorination following the shock treatment achieved >70% reduction of positive samples, whereas no continuous hyperchlorination after shock treatment was more frequently associated to Legionella isolation (OR 6.41; 95% CI 3.10-13.26; p chlorine 37 - 123.2; p chlorine levels (>0.5 < 1.0 mg/L) deteriorated water quality (organoleptic and chemical). However, shock and continuous hyperchlorination remains a valid-term option in old buildings with no water system rational design, managing problems due to hospital extension and absence of a proper hot water recirculation

  16. Legionella control in the water system of antiquated hospital buildings by shock and continuous hyperchlorination: 5 years experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To control the presence of Legionella in an old hospital water system, an integrated strategy of water disinfection-filtration was implemented in the university hospital Umberto I in Rome. Methods Due to antiquated buildings, hospital water system design and hospital extension (38 buildings), shock hyperchlorination (sodium hypochlorite, 20–50 ppm of free chlorine at distal points for 1–2 h) followed by continuous hyperchlorination (0.5-1.0 mg/L at distal points) were adopted, and microbiological and chemical monitoring of the water supply was carried out in the university hospital (December 2006-December 2011). Results Overall, 1308 samples of cold 45°C (17.8%) water were collected, determining residual free chlorine (0.43 ± 0.44 mg/L), pH (7.43 ± 0.29) and trihalomethanes (8.97 ± 18.56 μg/L). Legionella was isolated in 102 (9.8%) out of 1.041 water samples without filters (L. pneumophila sg 1 17.6%, L. pneumophila sg 2–14 28.4%, L. non pneumophila 53.9%), and in none of the 267 samples with filters. Legionella was recovered in 23 buildings out of 38 and 29 samples (28.4%) exceeded 103 cfu/L. When considering the disinfection treatment Legionella was isolated: before shock hyperchlorination (21.1%), 15 days after shock hyperchlorination (7.8%), 30 days after shock hyperchlorination (3.5%), during continuous hyperchlorination (5.5%) and without continuous hyperchlorination (27.3%). Continuous hyperchlorination following the shock treatment achieved >70% reduction of positive samples, whereas no continuous hyperchlorination after shock treatment was more frequently associated to Legionella isolation (OR 6.41; 95% CI 3.10–13.26; p Legionella isolation were: residual free chlorine Legionella reduction, but effective chlorine levels (>0.5 < 1.0 mg/L) deteriorated water quality (organoleptic and chemical). However, shock and continuous hyperchlorination remains a valid-term option in old buildings with no water system rational design, managing

  17. Optimization of Energy Efficiency and Conservation in Green Building Design Using Duelist, Killer-Whale and Rain-Water Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyanto, T. R.; Matradji; Syamsi, M. N.; Fibrianto, H. Y.; Afdanny, N.; Rahman, A. H.; Gunawan, K. S.; Pratama, J. A. D.; Malwindasari, A.; Abdillah, A. I.; Bethiana, T. N.; Putra, Y. A.

    2017-11-01

    The development of green building has been growing in both design and quality. The development of green building was limited by the issue of expensive investment. Actually, green building can reduce the energy usage inside the building especially in utilization of cooling system. External load plays major role in reducing the usage of cooling system. External load is affected by type of wall sheathing, glass and roof. The proper selection of wall, type of glass and roof material are very important to reduce external load. Hence, the optimization of energy efficiency and conservation in green building design is required. Since this optimization consist of integer and non-linear equations, this problem falls into Mixed-Integer-Non-Linear-Programming (MINLP) that required global optimization technique such as stochastic optimization algorithms. In this paper the optimized variables i.e. type of glass and roof were chosen using Duelist, Killer-Whale and Rain-Water Algorithms to obtain the optimum energy and considering the minimal investment. The optimization results exhibited the single glass Planibel-G with the 3.2 mm thickness and glass wool insulation provided maximum ROI of 36.8486%, EUI reduction of 54 kWh/m2·year, CO2 emission reduction of 486.8971 tons/year and reduce investment of 4,078,905,465 IDR.

  18. Case study of odor and indoor air quality assessment in the dewatering building at the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manju; O'Connell, Susan; Garelli, Brett; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Moschandreas, Demetrios; Pagilla, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) and odors were determined using sampling/monitoring, measurement, and modeling methods in a large dewatering building at a very large water reclamation plant. The ultimate goal was to determine control strategies to reduce the sensory impacts on the workforce and achieve odor reduction within the building. Study approaches included: (1) investigation of air mixing by using CO(2) as an indicator, (2) measurement of airflow capacity of ventilation fans, (3) measurement of odors and odorants, (4) development of statistical and IAQ models, and (5) recommendation of control strategies. The results showed that air quality in the building complies with occupational safety and health guidelines; however, nuisance odors that can increase stress and productivity loss still persist. Excess roof fan capacity induced odor dispersion to the upper levels. Lack of a local air exhaust system of sufficient capacity and optimum design was found to be the contributor to occasional less than adequate indoor air quality and odors. Overall, air ventilation rate in the building has less effect on persistence of odors in the building. Odor/odorant emission rates from centrifuge drops were approximately 100 times higher than those from the open conveyors. Based on measurements and modeling, the key control strategies recommended include increasing local air exhaust system capacity and relocation of exhaust hoods closer to the centrifuge drops.

  19. Indoor Heating Drives Water Bacterial Growth and Community Metabolic Profile Changes in Building Tap Pipes during the Winter Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Han; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Ting-Lin; Shang, Pan-Lu; Yang, Xiao; Ma, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-27

    The growth of the bacterial community harbored in indoor drinking water taps is regulated by external environmental factors, such as indoor temperature. However, the effect of indoor heating on bacterial regrowth associated with indoor drinking water taps is poorly understood. In the present work, flow cytometry and community-level sole-carbon-source utilization techniques were combined to explore the effects of indoor heating on water bacterial cell concentrations and community carbon metabolic profiles in building tap pipes during the winter season. The results showed that the temperature of water stagnated overnight ("before") in the indoor water pipes was 15-17 °C, and the water temperature decreased to 4-6 °C after flushing for 10 min ("flushed"). The highest bacterial cell number was observed in water stagnated overnight, and was 5-11 times higher than that of flushed water. Meanwhile, a significantly higher bacterial community metabolic activity (AWCD590nm) was also found in overnight stagnation water samples. The significant "flushed" and "taps" values indicated that the AWCD590nm, and bacterial cell number varied among the taps within the flushed group (p heating periods.

  20. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Paul-Yann [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chiayi, Chang Gung University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Wen, E-mail: ywlss@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  1. Hydrodynamic Performances of Air-Water Flows in Gullies with and without Swirl Generation Vanes for Drainage Systems of Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Der-Chang Lo; Jin-Shuen Liou; Shyy Woei Chang

    2015-01-01

    As an attempt to improve the performances of multi-entry gullies with applications to drainage system of a building, the hydrodynamic characteristics of air-water flows through the gullies with and without swirl generation vanes (SGV) are experimentally and numerically examined. With the aid of present Charge Coupled Device (CCD) image and optical systems for experimental study, the mechanism of air entrainment by vortex, the temporal variations of airflow pressure, the trajectories of drifti...

  2. Power generation by high head water in a building using micro hydro turbine-a greener approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M M S R S, Bhargav; V, Ratna Kishore; S P, Anbuudayasankar; K, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Demand for green energy production is arising all over the world. A lot of emphasis is laid in making the buildings green. Even a small amount of energy savings made contribute to saving the environment. In this study, an idea is proposed and studied to extract power from the high head water in the pipelines of a building. A building of height 15 m is considered for this study. Water flowing in the pipe has sufficient energy to run a micro hydro turbine. The feasibility of producing electrical energy from the energy of pipe water is found. The motivation is to find the feasibility of generating power using a low-cost turbine. The experimental setup consists of micro turbine of 135 mm diameter coupled to a 12-V DC generator; LEDs and resistors are employed to validate the results. The theoretical calculations were presented using the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics. The theoretical results are validated using experimental and numerical results using CFD simulation. In addition, exergy analysis has been carried out to quantify the irreversibilities during the process in the system.

  3. The influence of multifamily apartment building occupants on energy and water consumption - the preliminary results of monitoring and survey campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, Karol; Hamerla, Miłosz; Szulc, Jowita; Koczyk, Halina

    2017-11-01

    Occupants' attitudes and behavior have a significant influence on energy and water consumption in buildings. To provide more robust solutions, energy efficient applications should consider occupant-building interaction. However, there is a question to be answered: which aspects of lodging and occupant behavior cause the most substantial increase in consumption of these mediums. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of household characteristics and occupants' behavior on level and variability in utilities consumption. The study uses the results of a measuring campaign and the questionnaire. The measuring campaign was carried out to monitor the consumption of energy used for space heating and domestic hot water, as well as electricity, gas and water. The questionnaire specifically focused on household characteristics and occupants' behavior. The research was carried out in four apartment buildings, all consisting of more than 100 apartments. Data from approximately 100 households was gathered and analyzed; the survey's respond rate was almost 50%. A quantitative analysis of the results confirms the assumption that both household characteristics and occupants' behavior (e.g. the use of heating control) are important factors for utilities consumption. Further work with the obtained data is planned in terms of including of greater number of apartments, assessment of ventilation effectiveness, as well as analysis of heat transfer between the apartments.

  4. Normalization of water flow rate for external fire fighting of the buildings in settlements with zone water supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deryushev Leonid Georgievich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the requirements for fire safety assurance are justified for the objects, in which water is supplied with account for serial and parallel area zoning. In the process of zoning the district is segregated into such parts, for which head rate in any point of selection of water from network will not exceed 6 bar. In the current regulatory rules the requirements for the calculation of the costs of water points are stated, as well as in case of extinguishing fires at the sites with water-supply systems zones. It is recommended to analyze each zone of the system of water-supply separately, without interrelation with the common water feeders, water consumers and services of fire extinguishing. Such an approach to assign water discharge for fire extinguishing results in the decrease of fire safety of an object, deforms calculation technique of outside systems of water-supply of the similar-type objects located in different parts of the terrain. Taking the number of fires and water consumption for fire suppression by the number of residents in each zone, we thus underestimate the capacity of the pipeline system. It is offered to make changes in Norms and Standards in force on fire safety of settlements. The recommendations on regulation of the number of fires and water flow for fire fighting in residential objects with zoned systems of water-supply are formulated.

  5. 24 CFR 200.950 - Building product standards and certification program for solar water heating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... certification program for solar water heating system. 200.950 Section 200.950 Housing and Urban Development... solar water heating system. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All solar water heating systems shall be...) Document OG-300-93, Operating Guidelines and Minimum Standards for Certifying Solar Water Heating Systems...

  6. Crocin improves spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze via attenuating cortical oxidative damage in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M; Rajaei, Z; Hadjzadeh, M A; Nemati, H; Hosseini, M

    2017-03-06

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of crocin on improving spatial memory deficits and cerebral oxidative damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Crocin was administered intraperitoneally daily at doses of 15, 30 and 60mg/kg for 6 weeks. Spatial memory performance was measured in rats by the Morris water maze paradigm. Lipid peroxidation and total thiol levels as parameters of oxidative stress were assessed in the cerebral cortex at the end of week 6. Diabetic rats showed spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze which was accompanied by increased lipid peroxidation levels in the cerebral cortex. By contrast, chronic treatment with crocin (15, 30 and 60mg/kg, ip, 6 weeks) improved cognitive performance and lowered hyperglycaemia and oxidative stress in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the results suggest that beneficial effects of crocin on streptozotocin-induced memory dysfunction may be attributed to its antidiabetic and antioxidant activity, which could find clinical use in treating cognitive dysfunction in diabetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recriticality in a BWR (boiling water reactor) following a core damage event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.B.; Harrison, D.G.; Libby, R.A.; Tokarz, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wooton, R.D.; Denning, R.S.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr. (Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the results of a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating the potential for recriticality in boiling water reactors (BWRs) during certain low probability severe accidents. Based on a conservative bounding analysis, this report concludes that there is a potential for recriticality in BWRs if core reflood occurs after control blade melting has begun but prior to significant fuel rod melting. However, a recriticality event will most likely not generate a pressure pulse significant enough to fail the vessel. Instead, a quasi-steady power level would result and the containment pressure and temperature would increase until the containment failure pressure is reached, unless actions are taken to terminate the event. Two strategies are identified that would aid in regaining control of the reactor and terminate the recriticality event before containment failure pressures are reached. The first strategy involves initiating boration injection at or before the time of core reflood if the potential for control blade melting exists. The second strategy involves initiating residual heat removal suppression pool cooling to remove the heat load generated by the recriticality event and thus extend the time available for boration. 31 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Bridging the floods - The role of social learning for resilience building in urban water services

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, Åse

    2017-01-01

    The development of cities is increasingly threatened by a worldwide water crisis. Urban water services (including drinking water, sanitation and drainage) are facing complex and multiple pressures, which are becoming increasingly frequent and severe. These pressures include floods, and the depletion, pollution and degradation of water resources and their associated ecosystems. These diverse pressures fall mainly within the domains of flood risk and water resources management: two working fiel...

  9. Intermittent use of copper-silver ionization for Legionella control in water distribution systems: a potential option in buildings housing individuals at low risk of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Stout, J E; Boldin, M; Rugh, J; Diven, W F; Yu, V L

    1998-01-01

    One copper-silver ionization system was sequentially installed onto the hot-water recirculation lines of two hospital buildings colonized with Legionella pneumophila, serogroup 1. A third building with the same water supply and also colonized with Legionella served as a control. Four weeks after activation of the system, distal site positivity for Legionella in the first test building dropped to zero. After operating for 16 weeks, the system was disconnected and installed onto the second test building. Twelve weeks of disinfection reduced the distal site positivity for Legionella in the second test building to zero. Legionella recolonization did not occur in the first test building for 6-12 weeks and in the second test building for 8-12 weeks after inactivation of the system. The control building remained Legionella-positive throughout the experimental period. A significantly higher copper concentration was found in the biofilm taken from a sampling device than in that from water. This is likely to be the reason that the copper-silver ionization system had the residual effect of preventing early recolonization. Our study raises the possibility that one copper-silver unit could be rotated among several buildings to maintain a Legionella-free environment. Such an approach may be cost-effective for buildings housing individuals at low risk for contracting legionnaires' disease.

  10. Water extracts of cabbage and kale inhibit ex vivo H2O2-induced DNA damage but not rat hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Horst

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemopreventive potential of water extracts of the Brassica vegetables cabbage and kale was evaluated by administering their aqueous extracts in drinking water ad libitum to Wistar rats submitted to Ito’s hepatocarcinogenesis model (CB group and K group, respectively - 14 rats per group. Animals submitted to this same model and treated with water were used as controls (W group - 15 rats. Treatment with the vegetable extracts did not inhibit (P > 0.05 placental glutathione S-transferase-positive preneoplastic lesions (PNL. The number of apoptotic bodies did not differ (P > 0.05 among the experimental groups. Ex vivo hydrogen peroxide treatment of rat livers resulted in lower (P < 0.05 DNA strand breakage in cabbage- (107.6 ± 7.8 µm and kale- (110.8 ± 10.0 µm treated animals compared with control (120.9 ± 12.7 µm, as evaluated by the single cell gel (comet assay. Treatment with cabbage (2 ± 0.3 µg/g or kale (4 ± 0.2 µg/g resulted in increased (P < 0.05 hepatic lutein concentration compared with control (0.5 ± 0.07 µg/g. Despite the absence of inhibitory effects of cabbage and kale aqueous extracts on PNL, these Brassica vegetables presented protection against DNA damage, an effect possibly related to increased hepatic lutein concentrations. However, it must be pointed out that the cause-effect relationship between lutein levels and protection is hypothetical and remains to be demonstrated.

  11. Flood damage estimation of companies: A comparison of Stage-Damage-Functions and Random Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Tobias; Kreibich, Heidi; Vogel, Kristin; Merz, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The development of appropriate flood damage models plays an important role not only for the damage assessment after an event but also to develop adaptation and risk mitigation strategies. So called Stage-Damage-Functions (SDFs) are often applied as a standard approach to estimate flood damage. These functions assign a certain damage to the water depth depending on the use or other characteristics of the exposed objects. Recent studies apply machine learning algorithms like Random Forests (RFs) to model flood damage. These algorithms usually consider more influencing variables and promise to depict a more detailed insight into the damage processes. In addition they provide an inherent validation scheme. Our study focuses on direct, tangible damage of single companies. The objective is to model and validate the flood damage suffered by single companies with SDFs and RFs. The data sets used are taken from two surveys conducted after the floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in the years 2002 and 2013 in Germany. Damage to buildings (n = 430), equipment (n = 651) as well as goods and stock (n = 530) are taken into account. The model outputs are validated via a comparison with the actual flood damage acquired by the surveys and subsequently compared with each other. This study investigates the gain in model performance with the use of additional data and the advantages and disadvantages of the RFs compared to SDFs. RFs show an increase in model performance with an increasing amount of data records over a comparatively large range, while the model performance of the SDFs is already saturated for a small set of records. In addition, the RFs are able to identify damage influencing variables, which improves the understanding of damage processes. Hence, RFs can slightly improve flood damage predictions and provide additional insight into the underlying mechanisms compared to SDFs.

  12. Monitoring the accumulated water soluble airborne compounds deposited on surfaces of showcases and walls in museums, archives and historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Svensmark, Bo

    2017-01-01

    to implement by curators and conservators, who can the send the flush water to specialized laboratories. Brief summary: A new methodology capable of monitoring the accumulated airborne deposits on surfaces in showcases and historic buildings is presented and tested. The method is cheap and is easy to implement...... themselves. This might make the compounds seem absent from analyses of indoor air samples. Context and purpose of the study: A new method of detecting water soluble pollutants without taking samples from the interior walls or from the CH objects themselves has been developed. The method involves sampling...... the pollutants accumulated on a surface near the CH object, e.g. a nearby wall or an interior glass surface of a showcase. The samples were obtained by gently flushing the surface with deionised water to collect the ions readily removed from the surface. The method was tested on a variety of surfaces. Results...

  13. 75 FR 78231 - Management of Energy and Water Efficiency in Federal Buildings: Availability of Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Management of Energy and Water Efficiency in Federal... implementation of energy and water efficiency requirements. The draft Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities (per 42 U.S.C. 8253...

  14. GIS UTILITY FOR HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT EVALUATION CAUSED BY DAMAGES OF WATER SUPPLY NETWORK IN RURAL AREAS. APPLICATIONS IN BAIA MARE DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADU ALEXANDRU MARIAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available GIS utility for hydrological impact evaluation caused by damages of water supply network in rural areas. Applications in Baia Mare Depression. Occurrence of a failure within the water supply network is an element of risk with important hydrological implications. Although at first glance you might think that a pipe diameter of only 20 cm can generate large effects, however, in case of significant damage or even burst pipe, a good part of high water flow in the pipe (approx. 25 m3/h on average in the Baia Mare associated with a long duration of failure (several hours may be in the drain area, impact on the local community. Regarding rural settlements, surface drainage allow a quantity of water retention tank underground infiltration but in many cases lack of a sewage system effectively contribute to increased negative consequences related to such damage (flooding farms, roads, crops compromise of flooding or drought in the event of damage to the hot water supply pipe and so on. This paper focuses on the role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS to assess the impact of runoff induced by damages in rural areas. The study therefore spatial aspect, through GIS, on the one hand runoff along the flow path with the start point of the network fault location and view previous hydrological conditions of the terrain, and on the other hand the impact of runoff the rural community. Study area Dumbrăviţa settlement located in Baia Mare Depression. This village is part of water supply system to the south and southeast of Baia Mare.

  15. Populations of some molds in water-damaged homes may differ if the home was constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the 1940s, gypsum drywall began replacing plaster and lathe in the U.S. home construction industry. Our goal was to evaluate whether some mold populations differ in water- damaged homes primarily constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster. The dust samples fr...

  16. Shallow Water Measurements Using a Single Green Laser Corrected by Building a Near Water Surface Penetration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhu Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the size and cost of an integrated infrared (IR and green airborne LiDAR bathymetry (ALB system, and improve the accuracy of the green ALB system, this study proposes a method to accurately determine water surface and water bottom heights using a single green laser corrected by the near water surface penetration (NWSP model. The factors that influence the NWSP of green laser are likewise analyzed. In addition, an NWSP modeling method is proposed to determine the relationship between NWSP and the suspended sediment concentration (SSC of the surface layer, scanning angle of a laser beam and sensor height. The water surface and water bottom height models are deduced by considering NWSP and using only green laser based on the measurement principle of the IR laser and green laser, as well as employing the relationship between NWSP and the time delay of the surface return of the green laser. Lastly, these methods and models are applied to a practical ALB measurement. Standard deviations of 3.0, 5.3, and 1.3 cm are obtained by the NWSP, water-surface height, and water-bottom height models, respectively. Several beneficial conclusions and recommendations are drawn through the experiments and discussions.

  17. Time-series water temperature and salinity at the Hatfield Marine Science Center's in-building seawater system, July 2002 - February 2003 (NODC Accession 0001119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water characteristics of Yaquina Bay and Hatfield Marine Science Center's in-building seawater system, measured every six minutes since 1988. Tide height data is...

  18. Time-series water temperature and salinity at the Hatfield Marine Science Center's in-building seawater system, January - August 2000 (NODC Accession 0001135)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water characteristics of Yaquina Bay and Hatfield Marine Science Center's in-building seawater system, measured every six minutes since 1988. Tide height data is...

  19. Effects of cold water immersion on the recovery of physical performance and muscle damage following a one-off soccer match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascensão, António; Leite, Marco; Rebelo, António N; Magalhäes, Sérgio; Magalhäes, José

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a single session of cold or thermoneutral water immersion after a one-off match on muscular dysfunction and damage in soccer players. Twenty-male soccer players completed one match and were randomly divided into cryotherapy (10 min cold water immersion, 10°C, n = 10) and thermoneutral (10 min thermoneutral water immersion, 35°C, n = 10) groups. Muscle damage (creatine kinase, myoglobin), inflammation (C-reactive protein), neuromuscular function (jump and sprint abilities and maximal isometric quadriceps strength), and delayed-onset muscle soreness were evaluated before, within 30 min of the end, and 24 and 48 h after the match. After the match, the players in both groups showed increased plasma creatine kinase activity (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min) and C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h) concentrations. Peak jump ability and maximal strength were decreased and delayed-onset muscle soreness increased in both groups. However, differential alterations were observed between thermoneutral water and cold water immersion groups in creatine kinase (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min), C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), quadriceps strength (24 h), and quadriceps (24 h), calf (24 h) and adductor (30 min) delayed-onset muscle soreness. The results suggest that cold water immersion immediately after a one-off soccer match reduces muscle damage and discomfort, possibly contributing to a faster recovery of neuromuscular function.

  20. Building a Course on Global Sustainability using the grand challenges of Energy-Water-Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources is a lower division integrated science course at the University of Wyoming that fulfills the university's science requirement. Course content and context has been developed using the grand challenge nexus of energy-water-and climate (EWC). The interconnection of these issues, their social relevance and timeliness has provided a framework that gives students an opportunity to recognize why STEM is relevant to their lives regardless of their ultimate professional career choices. The EWC nexus provides the filter to sieve the course's STEM content. It also provides an ideal mechanism by which the non-STEM perspectives important in grand challenge solutions can be seamlessly incorporated in the course. Through a combination of content and context, the relevance of these issues engage students in their own learning. Development of the course followed the Grand Challenge Scientific Literacy (GCSL) model independently developed by the author and two colleagues at the University of Wyoming. This course model stresses science principles centered on the nature of science (e.g., fundamental premises, habits of mind, critical thinking) and unifying scientific concepts (e.g., methods and tools, experimentation, modeling). Grand challenge principles identify the STEM and non-STEM concepts needed to understand the grand challenges, drawing on multiple STEM and non-STEM disciplines and subjects (i.e., economics, politics, unintended consequences, roles of stakeholders). Using the EWC nexus filter and building on the Grand Challenge Principles, specific content included in the course is selected is that most relevant to understanding the Grand Challenges, thereby stressing content depth over breadth. Because quantitative data and reasoning is critical to effectively evaluating challenge solutions, QR is a component of nearly all class activities, while engineering and technology aspects of grand challenges are

  1. A road damage and life-cycle greenhouse gas comparison of trucking and pipeline water delivery systems for hydraulically fractured oil and gas field development in Colorado.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray C Duthu

    Full Text Available The process of hydraulic fracturing for recovery of oil and natural gas uses large amounts of fresh water and produces a comparable amount of wastewater, much of which is typically transported by truck. Truck transport of water is an expensive and energy-intensive process with significant external costs including roads damages, and pollution. The integrated development plan (IDP is the industry nomenclature for an integrated oil and gas infrastructure system incorporating pipeline-based transport of water and wastewater, centralized water treatment, and high rates of wastewater recycling. These IDP have been proposed as an alternative to truck transport systems so as to mitigate many of the economic and environmental problems associated with natural gas production, but the economic and environmental performance of these systems have not been analyzed to date. This study presents a quantification of lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and road damages of a generic oil and gas field, and of an oil and gas development sited in the Denver-Julesburg basin in the northern Colorado region of the US. Results demonstrate that a reduction in economic and environmental externalities can be derived from the development of these IDP-based pipeline water transportation systems. IDPs have marginal utility in reducing GHG emissions and road damage when they are used to replace in-field water transport, but can reduce GHG emissions and road damage by factors of as much as 6 and 7 respectively, when used to replace fresh water transport and waste-disposal routes for exemplar Northern Colorado oil and gas fields.

  2. Contamination of shallow ground water in the area of building 95, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, 1985-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, B.P.; Storck, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of contaminated ground water at Picatinny Arsenal has resulted from the operation of a metal- plating facility in building 95 during 1960-81, and the wastewater-treatment system that is in and adjacent to the building. Thirty-two monitoring wells were installed in 1989 to supplement 12 previously installed wells. All wells were sampled in 1989 and 1990 for analysis of ground water for inorganic constituents, trace elements, volatile organic compounds, and nutrients. Four wells also were sampled for analysis for base/neutral- and acid-extractable compounds and pesticides, and soil gas from the unsaturated zone at eight sites was analyzed for volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate in the study area were consistently above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's secondary drinking-water regulations. The areal distribution of sulfate differed from that of the volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of trace elements were not elevated downgradient from the source. The estimated average velocity of contaminant movement is 0.1 to 1.1 feet per day. The major organic contaminants identified in the study area are trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Trichloroethylene was detected in wells upgradient from the wastewater- treatment site. Tetrachloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane might originate at tanks in the basement of building 95 rather than at the adjacent wastewater-treatment system. The pre- dominant gas-phase contaminant, 1,1,1- trichloroethane, was detected at a maximum con- centration of 15.7 micrograms per liter. Both trichoroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were detected in concentrations greater than 0.10 micrograms per liter in five of the eight soil- gas samples, indicating that volatilization and diffusion through the unsaturated zone could be a significant mechanism of contaminant loss from the aquifer.

  3. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, M E

    2000-01-01

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  4. Building Resiliency to Water Risks in Power Production in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, J.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation covers the drivers and mechanisms to address water risks in power generation in the face of growing population, long term climate change and short term climate variability, and initiatives to promote renewable and low carbon energy. The projected impacts of climate change will amplify seasonal energy use patterns and increase water risks that threaten the security of energy supply. Water issues are becoming an increasingly critical factors in energy production operations and development plans. Aquatic species protection efforts have resulted in the proposal of new cooling regulations on both freshwater and seawater. Droughts pose problems for hydroelectric power and cooling operations in thermal power plants. During droughts or heat waves, surface water temperature can increase sufficiently to prevent the plant from discharging the water back into waterways in compliance with regulatory temperature limits. And, when river, lake or reservoir water levels fall near or below the plant's water intake level, operations must be curtailed. The need for resiliency to water risks in energy production is exemplified in recent challenges to power plant siting and incidents at existing power production facilities. Water concerns in new operations' permitting and in power production interruptions are prevalent worldwide. Examples of power plant siting and operations impacted by water issues in the past five years will be presented. Actions to adapt to the physical changes and demographic trends are warranted to secure energy supply and promote resiliency in power production. Adaptation measures can cost-effectively reduce risks and prospects of negative consequences for energy supply and use. Examples of adaptation actions will be presented for the key water challenges in climate resilient power production.

  5. Green Building Tools for Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal green building tools and funding information to support tribal building code adoption, healthy building, siting, energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, green building materials, recycling and adaptation and resilience.

  6. Combining Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping with Automatic Zero Reference (QSM0) and Myelin Water Fraction Imaging to Quantify Iron-Related Myelin Damage in Chronic Active MS Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y; Nguyen, T D; Pandya, S; Zhang, Y; Hurtado Rúa, S; Kovanlikaya, I; Kuceyeski, A; Liu, Z; Wang, Y; Gauthier, S A

    2018-02-01

    A hyperintense rim on susceptibility in chronic MS lesions is consistent with iron deposition, and the purpose of this study was to quantify iron-related myelin damage within these lesions as compared with those without rim. Forty-six patients had 2 longitudinal quantitative susceptibility mapping with automatic zero reference scans with a mean interval of 28.9 ± 11.4 months. Myelin water fraction mapping by using fast acquisition with spiral trajectory and T2 prep was obtained at the second time point to measure myelin damage. Mixed-effects models were used to assess lesion quantitative susceptibility mapping and myelin water fraction values. Quantitative susceptibility mapping scans were on average 6.8 parts per billion higher in 116 rim-positive lesions compared with 441 rim-negative lesions ( P quantitative susceptibility mapping values of both the rim and core regions ( P Quantitative susceptibility mapping scans and myelin water fraction in rim-positive lesions decreased from rim to core, which is consistent with rim iron deposition. Whole lesion myelin water fractions for rim-positive and rim-negative lesions were 0.055 ± 0.07 and 0.066 ± 0.04, respectively. In the mixed-effects model, rim-positive lesions had on average 0.01 lower myelin water fraction compared with rim-negative lesions ( P quantitative susceptibility mapping scan was negatively associated with follow-up myelin water fraction ( P Quantitative susceptibility mapping rim-positive lesions maintained a hyperintense rim, increased in susceptibility, and had more myelin damage compared with rim-negative lesions. Our results are consistent with the identification of chronic active MS lesions and may provide a target for therapeutic interventions to reduce myelin damage. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. The accumulation of brain water-free sodium is associated with ischemic damage independent of the blood pressure in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Manabu; Kitazato, Keiko T; Yagi, Kenji; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kurashiki, Yoshitaka; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Kinouchi, Tomoya; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Satomi, Junichiro; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-08-07

    Estrogen deficiency worsens ischemic stroke outcomes. In ovariectomized (OVX(+)) rats fed a high-salt diet (HSD), an increase in the body Na(+)/water ratio, which characterizes water-free Na(+) accumulation, was associated with detrimental vascular effects independent of the blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that an increase in brain water-free Na(+) accumulation is associated with ischemic brain damage in OVX(+)/HSD rats. To test our hypothesis we divided female Wistar rats into 4 groups, OVX(+) and OVX(-) rats fed HSD or a normal diet (ND), and subjected them to transient cerebral ischemia. The brain Na(+)/water ratio was increased even in OVX(+)/ND rats and augmented in OVX(+)/HSD rats. The increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio was positively correlated with expansion of the cortical infarct volume without affecting the BP. Interestingly, OVX(+) was associated with the decreased expression of ATP1α3, a subtype of the Na(+) efflux pump. HSD increased the expression of brain Na(+) influx-related molecules and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). The pretreatment of OVX(+)/HSD rats with the MR antagonist eplerenone reduced brain water-free Na(+) accumulation, up-regulated ATP1α3, down-regulated MR, and reduced the cortical infarct volume. Our findings show that the increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio elicited by estrogen deficiency or HSD is associated with ischemic brain damage BP-independently, suggesting the importance of regulating the accumulation of brain water-free Na(+). The up-regulation of ATP1α3 and the down-regulation of MR may provide a promising therapeutic strategy to attenuate ischemic brain damage in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Seismic Response Characteristics of Subsurface Ground to Damage of Low-rise RC Building in the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuji, Kazuya; Maeda, Masaki; Matsukawa, Kazuto; Nakagami, Hiromasa

    This paper discusses the difference of the damage level of the three schoolhouses in the vicinity of the epicenter of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake with respect to ground response characteristics. We conducted microtremor measurements and aftershock observation at the site of Kaminome. One-dimensional equivalent linear analysis of the ground and three-dimensional seismic response analysis of the schoolhouse indicate that damage level of the schoolhouse of Kaminome meets good agreement with phenomenon considering non-linearity of the fill.

  9. Hydrodynamic Performances of Air-Water Flows in Gullies with and without Swirl Generation Vanes for Drainage Systems of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Chang Lo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As an attempt to improve the performances of multi-entry gullies with applications to drainage system of a building, the hydrodynamic characteristics of air-water flows through the gullies with and without swirl generation vanes (SGV are experimentally and numerically examined. With the aid of present Charge Coupled Device (CCD image and optical systems for experimental study, the mechanism of air entrainment by vortex, the temporal variations of airflow pressure, the trajectories of drifting air bubbles and the self-depuration process for the gullies with and without SGV are disclosed. The numerical simulations adopt Flow-3D commercial code to attack the unsteady two-phase bubbly flows for resolving the transient fields of fluid velocity, vorticity and pressure in the gullies with and without SGV. In the twin-entry gully without SGV, air bubbles entrained by the entry vortex interact chaotically in the agitating bubbly flow region. With SGV to trip near-wall flows that stratify the drifting trajectories of the air bubbles, the air-bubble interactions are stabilized with the discharge rate increasing more than 7%. The reduction of the self-depuration period by increasing discharge rate is observed for the test gullies without and with SGV. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the characteristic hydrodynamic properties of the air-water flows through the test gullies with and without SGV are disclosed to assist the design applications of a modern drainage system in a building.

  10. Development of a method to relate the moisture content of a building material to its water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macher, J M; Mendell, M J; Chen, W; Kumagai, K

    2017-05-01

    Subjective indicators of building dampness consistently have been linked to health, but they are, at best, semi-quantitative, and objective and quantitative assessments of dampness are also needed to study dampness-related health effects. Investigators can readily and non-destructively measure the "moisture content" (MC) of building materials with hand-held moisture meters. However, MC does not indicate the amount of the water in a material that is available to microorganisms for growth, that is, the "water activity" (Aw ). Unfortunately, Aw has not been readily measurable in the field and is not relatable to MC unless previously determined experimentally, because for the same moisture meter reading, Aw can differ across materials as well as during moisture adsorption vs desorption. To determine the Aw s that correspond to MC levels, stable air relative humidities were generated in a glove box above saturated, aqueous salt solutions, and the Aw of gypsum board and the relative humidity of the chamber air were tracked until they reached equilibrium. Strong correlations were observed between meter readings and gravimetrically determined MC (r=.91-1.00), among readings with three moisture meters (r=.87-.98), and between meter readings and gypsum board Aw (r=.77-.99). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Building America Case Study: Assessment of a Hybrid Retrofit Gas Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, E. Weitzel, C. Backman

    2017-06-01

    This project completed a modeling evaluation of a hybrid gas water heater that combines a reduced capacity tankless unit with a downsized storage tank. This product would meet a significant market need by providing a higher efficiency gas water heater solution for retrofit applications while maintaining compatibility with the half-inch gas lines and standard B vents found in most homes. The TRNSYS simulation tool was used to model a base case 0.60 EF atmospheric gas storage water, a 0.82 EF non-condensing gas tankless water heater, an existing (high capacity) hybrid unit on the market, and an alternative hybrid unit with lower storage volume and reduced gas input requirements.

  12. FREEWAT: an HORIZON 2020 project to build open source tools for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Rossetto, R.; Borsi, I.; Mehl, S.; Velasco Mansilla, V.

    2015-12-01

    FREEWAT is an HORIZON 2020 EU project. FREEWAT main result will be an open source and public domain GIS integrated modelling environment for the simulation of water quantity and quality in surface water and groundwater with an integrated water management and planning module. FREEWAT aims at promoting water resource management by simplifying the application of the Water Framework Directive and related Directives. Specific objectives of the project are: to coordinate previous EU and national funded research to integrate existing software modules for water management in a single environment into the GIS based FREEWAT and to support the FREEWAT application in an innovative participatory approach gathering technical staff and relevant stakeholders (policy and decision makers) in designing scenarios for application of water policies. The open source characteristics of the platform allow to consider this an initiative "ad includendum", as further institutions or developers may contribute to the development. Core of the platform is the SID&GRID framework (GIS integrated physically-based distributed numerical hydrological model based on a modified version of MODFLOW 2005; Rossetto et al. 2013) in its version ported to QGIS desktop. Activities are carried out on two lines: (i) integration of modules to fulfill the end-users requirements, including tools for producing feasibility and management plans; (ii) a set of activities to fix bugs and to provide a well-integrated interface for the different tools implemented. Further capabilities to be integrated are: - module for water management and planning; - calibration, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis; - module for solute transport in unsaturated zone; - module for crop growth and water requirements in agriculture; - tools for groundwater quality issues and for the analysis, interpretation and visualization of hydrogeological data. Through creating a common environment among water research/professionals, policy makers and

  13. How should we build a generic open-source water management simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, M.; Meier, P.; Rheinheimer, D. E.; Padula, S.; Matrosov, E.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Harou, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing water needs for agriculture, industry and cities mean effective and flexible water resource system management tools will remain in high demand. Currently many regions or countries use simulators that have been adapted over time to their unique system properties and water management rules and realities. Most regions operate with a preferred short-list of water management and planning decision support systems. Is there scope for a simulator, shared within the water management community, that could be adapted to different contexts, integrate community contributions, and connect to generic data and model management software? What role could open-source play in such a project? How could a genericuser-interface and data/model management software sustainably be attached to this model or suite of models? Finally, how could such a system effectively leverage existing model formulations, modeling technologies and software? These questions are addressed by the initial work presented here. We introduce a generic water resource simulation formulation that enables and integrates both rule-based and optimization driven technologies. We suggest how it could be linked to other sub-models allowing for detailed agent-based simulation of water management behaviours. An early formulation is applied as an example to the Thames water resource system in the UK. The model uses centralised optimisation to calculate allocations but allows for rule-based operations as well in an effort to represent observed behaviours and rules with fidelity. The model is linked through import/export commands to a generic network model platform named Hydra. Benefits and limitations of the approach are discussed and planned work and potential use cases are outlined.

  14. Managing water with better institutions: Building flexibility, innovation and lessons of best practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msangi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Changing socio-economic conditions and global environmental change continue to put pressure on critical natural resources necessary for sustaining ecosystems and human well-being - including water. Increasing variability in water availability, deepening droughts and continuing demands and consumptive use have posed problems for resource managers and policy makers in many regions. While in some regions it is still possible to enhance supply, such as in under-exploited water basins in Africa - the majority of the world's heaviest water users are facing situations that call for more demand-side adjustments. This necessitates a change from engineering-focused solutions to more economic ones, especially where the costs of increasing supply (such as through de-salinization) are prohibitively expensive, or have unacceptable consequences for environmental sustainability. Despite many years and decades of studying water resource management problems, there is still too little guidance as to what institutional best-practices should be followed. Water resources tend to touch on a number of areas managed by different government departments and ministries (agriculture, aquaculture & fisheries, industry, natural resources, etc) - but there is still no common understanding of what the best governance arrangements are that lead to improved sectoral performance (however that is measured). Given the continuing efforts to invest in water resources management and development by major multi-lateral organizations such as the World Bank and the African Development Bank - this kind of institutional guidance is critical, if countries are to make the most of these investments. In this presentation, we review a number of cases in which previously supply-side oriented approaches have to be dealt with from the demand side, and why institutional flexibility and innovation is so important. We draw from examples of community-based groundwater management in India, groundwater overdraft management

  15. Building a framework to explore water-human interaction for sustainable agro ecosystems in US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Ding, D.; Rapolu, U.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity is intricately linked to the quality and quantity of water resources. Although many studies have examined water-human interaction, the complexity of such coupled systems is not well understood largely because of gaps in our knowledge of water-cycle processes which are heavily influenced by socio-economic drivers. On this context, this team has investigated connections among agriculture, policy, climate, land use/land cover, and water quality in Iowa over the past couple of years. To help explore these connections the team is developing a variety of cyber infrastructure tools that facilitate the collection, analysis and visualization of data, and the simulation of system dynamics. In an ongoing effort, the prototype system is applied to Clear Creek watershed, an agricultural dominating catchment in Iowa in the US Midwest, to understand water-human processes relevant to management decisions by farmers regarding agro ecosystems. The primary aim of this research is to understand the connections that exist among the agricultural and biofuel economy, land use/land cover change, and water quality. To help explore these connections an agent-based model (ABM) of land use change has been developed that simulates the decisions made by farmers given alternative assumptions about market forces, farmer characteristics, and water quality regulations. The SWAT model was used to simulate the impact of these decisions on the movement of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus across the landscape. The paper also demonstrate how through the use of this system researchers can, for example, search for scenarios that lead to desirable socio-economic outcomes as well as preserve water quantity and quality.

  16. Optimal Pile Arrangement for Minimizing Excess Pore Water Pressure Build-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Saadati, Meysam; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical analysis of pile group in a liquefiable soil was considered to investigate the influence of pile spacing on excess pore pressure distribution and liquefaction potential. The analysis is conducted using a two-dimensional plain strain finite difference program considering a nonlinear...... constitutive model for sandy soil, strength and stiffness reduction, and pile-soil interaction. The Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model coupled with Byrne pore pressure build-up model have been employed in the analysis. Numerical analysis results show that pile groups have significant influence on the dynamic...

  17. Estimating water consumption of potential natural vegetation on global dry lands: building an LCA framework for green water flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Montserrat; Pfister, Stephan; Roux, Philippe; Antón, Assumpció

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to provide a framework for assessing direct soil-water consumption, also termed green water in the literature, in life cycle assessment (LCA). This was an issue that LCA had not tackled before. The approach, which is applied during the life cycle inventory phase (LCI), consists of quantifying the net change in the evapo(transpi)ration of the production system compared to the natural reference situation. Potential natural vegetation (PNV) is used as the natural reference situation. In order to apply the method, we estimated PNV evapotranspiration adapted to local biogeographic conditions, on global dry lands, where soil-water consumption impacts can be critical. Values are reported at different spatial aggregation levels: 10-arcmin global grid, ecoregions (501 units), biomes (14 units), countries (124 units), continents, and a global average, to facilitate the assessment for different spatial information detail levels available in the LCI. The method is intended to be used in rain-fed agriculture and rainwater harvesting contexts, which includes direct soil moisture uptake by plants and rainwater harvested and then reused in production systems. The paper provides the necessary LCI method and data for further development of impact assessment models and characterization factors to evaluate the environmental effects of the net change in evapo(transpi)ration.

  18. Public Participation in Water Planning in the Ebro River Basin (Spain and Tucson Basin (U.S., Arizona: Impact on Water Policy and Adaptive Capacity Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ballester

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of public participation in water management are recognized by governments, scholars, and stakeholders. These benefits, however, do not result from all engagement endeavors. This leads to the question: What are the determinants for effective public participation? Given a list of criteria for achieving the transformational capacity of participation, we analyze the benefits (including the influence on public policies gained through public participation and the determinant factors for obtaining these benefits in the Ebro River Basin in Spain and in the Tucson Basin in Arizona (U.S.. Furthermore, and considering that droughts and floods are major water management challenges in both case studies, we focus on the potential of participation to build adaptive capacity. Our analysis of these case studies concludes that influence on public policies is determined more by the context of the participatory process, i.e., legal framework, political leadership, and social awareness, whereas influence on adaptive capacity building depends more on the characteristics of the participatory process, particularly the existence of active on-site consultation and deliberation.

  19. Engaging the creative to better build science into water resource solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, P. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Psychological thought suggests that social engagement with an environmental problem requires 1) cognitive understanding of the problem, 2) emotional engagement with the problem, and 3) perceived efficacy that there is something we can do to solve the problem. Within the water sciences, we form problem-focused, cross-disciplinary teams to help address complex water resource problems, but often we only seek teammates from other disciplines within the realms of engineering and the natural/social sciences. Here I argue that this science-centric focus fails to fully solve these water resource problems, and often the science goes unheard because it is heavily cognitive and lacks the ability to effectively engage the audience through crucial social-psychological aspects of emotion and efficacy. To solve this, future cross-disciplinary collaborations that seek to include creative actors from the worlds of art, humanities, and design can begin to provide a much stronger overlap of the cognition, emotion, and efficacy needed to communicate the science, engage the audience, and create the solutions needed to solve or world's most complex water resource problems. Disciplines across the arts, sciences, and engineering all bring unique strengths that, through collaboration, allow for uniquely creative modes of art-science overlap that can engage people through additions of emotion and efficacy that compliment the science and go beyond the traditional cognitive approach. I highlight examples of this art-science overlap in action and argue that water resource collaborations like these will be more likely to have their hydrologic science accepted and applied by those who decide on water resource solutions. For this Pop-up Talk session, I aim to share the details of this proposed framework in the context of my own research and the work of others. I hope to incite discussion regarding the utility and relevance of this framework as a future option for other water resource

  20. From Risks to Shared Value? Corporate Strategies in Building a Global Water Accounting and Disclosure Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The current debate on water accounting and accountability among transnational actors such as corporations and NGOs is likely to contribute to the emergence of a global water governance regime. Corporations within the food and beverage sector (F-B are especially vulnerable to water risks; therefore, in this article we analyse motivations and strategies of the major F-B corporations participating in the debate and developing different water accounting, disclosure and risk-assessment tools. Neo-institutionalism and neo-Gramscian regime theory provide the basis for our framework to analyse the discursive, material and organisational corporate water strategies. Findings based on an analysis of the chosen F-B corporations’ sustainability reports and interviews with key informants suggest that the corporations share similar goals and values with regard to the emerging regime. They seek a standardisation that is practical and supportive in improving their water efficiency and communication with stakeholders. This indicates that some harmonisation has taken place over time and new actors have been pursuing the path of the pioneering companies, but the lead corporations are also differentiating their strategies, thus engaging in hegemonic positioning. However, so far the plethora of NGO-driven accountability initiatives and tools has fragmented the field more than 'war of position' amongst the corporations. Furthermore, several companies claim to have proceeded from internal water-risk management to reducing risks throughout their value chains and watersheds. As a result they are 'creating shared value' with stakeholders, and potentially manifesting an emergent paradigm that goes beyond a private regime framework. Nevertheless, in the absence of verification schemes, questions of sustainability and legitimacy of such actions on the ground prevail and remain a topic for further research.

  1. More than 6,500 Buildings Face Off in EPAs Sixth Annual Energy Star Battle of the Buildings Competition/U.S. commercial buildings in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. race to save energy, water and reduce greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the 2015 Energy Star Battle of the Buildings. Nationwide, more than 6,500 buildings and 125 teams are competing to reduce their energy and water use. In support of President

  2. Evaluation of a new monochloramine generation system for controlling Legionella in building hot water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Scott; Kandiah, Sheena; Stout, Janet E; Baron, Julianne L; Yassin, Mohamed; Fabrizio, Marie; Ferrelli, Juliet; Hariri, Rahman; Wagener, Marilyn M; Goepfert, John; Bond, James; Hannigan, Joseph; Rogers, Denzil

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a new monochloramine generation system for control of Legionella in a hospital hot water distribution system. A 495-bed tertiary care hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The hospital has 12 floors covering approximately 78,000 m(2). The hospital hot water system was monitored for a total of 29 months, including a 5-month baseline sampling period prior to installation of the monochloramine system and 24 months of surveillance after system installation (postdisinfection period). Water samples were collected for microbiological analysis (Legionella species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Acinetobacter species, nitrifying bacteria, heterotrophic plate count [HPC] bacteria, and nontuberculous mycobacteria). Chemical parameters monitored during the investigation included monochloramine, chlorine (free and total), nitrate, nitrite, total ammonia, copper, silver, lead, and pH. A significant reduction in Legionella distal site positivity was observed between the pre- and postdisinfection periods, with positivity decreasing from an average of 53% (baseline) to an average of 9% after monochloramine application (Pevaluation in the United States of a commercially available monochloramine system installed on a hospital hot water system for Legionella disinfection, and it demonstrated a significant reduction in Legionella colonization. Significant increases in microbial populations or other negative effects previously associated with monochloramine use in large municipal cold water systems were not observed.

  3. PROPOSAL FOR BUILD A TEST STAND TO THE STUDY WATER RAM BASED ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz GRYGO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article was developed of a test stand to a study physics phenomena accruing at work in a ram water based on the construction recommendations. The experience gained by a number of attempts allowed to the developed construction recommendations that allowed to adjust the test stand to perform various studies of physics phenomena occurring at the work of water ram and easy adaptions to the new requirements. The article includes: the review of the test stands on which performed the study in the history and in the present times, description of the construction recommendations of the universal test stand and the proposal of the test stand developed based on the construction recommendations. Motivation to take up this issue follows from the interest of devices that work in an unconventional way, devices used a renewable energy that can be used in household e.g. to improve their energy balance, delivery water to houses, drinking water for animals, fields irrigation, etc. Analysis of the literature of the water ram, test stands and their performance shown that it is small and typically old development in popular science form. In times of intensive search new sources of renewable energy reactivation of this type equipment may be highly probable.

  4. Kinetics of membrane damage to high (HNA) and low (LNA) nucleic acid bacterial clusters in drinking water by ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Maaike K; von Gunten, Urs; Freihofer, Pietro; Hammes, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water was treated with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate to investigate the kinetics of membrane damage of native drinking water bacterial cells. Membrane damage was measured by flow cytometry using a combination of SYBR Green I and propidium iodide (SGI+PI) staining as indicator for cells with permeabilized membranes and SGI alone to measure total cell concentration. SGI+PI staining revealed that the cells were permeabilized upon relatively low oxidant exposures of all tested oxidants without a detectable lag phase. However, only ozonation resulted in a decrease of the total cell concentrations for the investigated reaction times. Rate constants for the membrane damage reaction varied over seven orders of magnitude in the following order: ozone > chlorine > chlorine dioxide ≈ ferrate > permanganate > chloramine. The rate constants were compared to literature data and were in general smaller than previously measured rate constants. This confirmed that membrane integrity is a conservative and therefore safe parameter for disinfection control. Interestingly, the cell membranes of high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria were damaged much faster than those of low nucleic acid (LNA) content bacteria during treatment with chlorine dioxide and permanganate. However, only small differences were observed during treatment with chlorine and chloramine, and no difference was observed for ferrate treatment. Based on the different reactivity of these oxidants it was suggested that HNA and LNA bacterial cell membranes have a different chemical constitution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems in Buildings Supplied by Low-Temperature District Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Marek

    District heating (DH) systems supplied by renewable energy sources are one of the main solutions for achieving a fossil-free heating sector in Denmark by 2035. To reach this goal, the medium temperature DH used until now needs to transform to a new concept reflecting the requirement for lower heat...... loss from DH networks required by the reduced heating demand of low-energy and refurbished buildings combined with the lower supply temperatures required by using renewable heat sources. Both these needs meet in the recently developed concept of low-temperature DH designed with supply....../return temperatures as low as 50°C/25°C and highly insulated pipes with reduced inner diameter. With this design, the heat loss from the DH networks can be reduced to one quarter of the value for traditional DH designed and operated for temperatures of 80°C/40°C. However, such low temperatures bring challenges...

  6. Building a foundation for knowledge co-creation in collaborative water governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Wietske; Adamowski, Jan; Orr, Christopher; Furber, Alison; Wals, Arjen; Milot, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The sustainable governance of water resources relies on processes of multi-stakeholder collaborations and interactions that facilitate the sharing and integration of diverse sources and types of knowledge. In this context, it is essential to fully recognize the importance of fostering and

  7. Nephroprotective effect of electrolyzed reduced water against cisplatin-induced kidney toxicity and oxidative damage in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Chou Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: ERW exhibits potent nephroprotective effects on cisplatin-induced kidney damage in mice, likely due to both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  8. A new direction for water management? Indigenous nation building as a strategy for river health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Hemming

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous involvement in Australian water management is conventionally driven by a top-down approach by nonIndigenous government agencies, that asks "how do we engage Indigenous people?" and has culminated in the ineffective "consult" and "service delivery" processes evident in mainstream water management planning. This is a hopeful paper that identifies the critical importance of a "nation-based" approach for effective Indigenous engagement in water planning and policy through the work undertaken by the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority (NRA in the Murray Futures program. The NRA is an Indigenous government in the "settled-south" of Australia. Over past decades, the NRA has developed a range of political technologies that act as tools for redeveloping Ngarrindjeri Nationhood after colonial disempowerment and dispossession. These tools enable better collaboration with nonIndigenous governments, especially in natural resource management policy and practice. In turn, this has better enabled the NRA to exercise a decision-making and planning authority over the lands and waters in its jurisdiction, therefore, more effectively exercising its ongoing duty of care as Country. This paper presents a case study of the Sugar Shack Complex Management Plan, codeveloped by the NRA and the South Australian Government in 2015, to demonstrate the benefits that accrue when Indigenous nations are resourced as authorities responsible for reframing water management and planning approaches to facilitate the equitable collaboration of Indigenous and nonIndigenous worldviews. As a marker of the success of this strategy, the Ngarrindjeri Yarluwar-Ruwe Program, in partnership with the South Australian government, recently won the Australian Riverprize 2015 for delivering excellence in Australian river management.

  9. Water-soluble compounds of lettuce inhibit DNA damage and lipid peroxidation induced by glucose/serum deprivation in N2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Elham; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadeghnia, Hamid R

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, increase of lipid peroxidation and resultant DNA damage are associated with pathophysiology of many human diseases such as acute and chronic CNS injuries and diseases, cancer, and also aging. This work was done to investigate whether water fraction from the hydroalcoholic extract of green leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) can protect N2a cells against glucose/serum deprivation (GSD)-induced lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. The cells were cultivated for 12 h in GSD condition in the absence or presence of the lettuce fraction. The total antioxidant ability of the lettuce water fraction was determined using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The intracellular lipid peroxidation was evaluated by malondialdehyde (MDA) level. DNA damage was determined using single cell gel electrophoresis. Using FRAP assay, the antioxidant activity of lettuce water fraction was found to be 574 micromol/g, which is equivalent to 64.1 mg of pure ascorbic acid. Exposure of the cells to GSD condition led to a significant increase of MDA level and DNA fragmentation. Lettuce extract at 400 microg/mL could decrease the elevated intracellular lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The present study demonstrates that lettuce exerts genoprotective effect through inhibition of oxidative stress.

  10. PROVING EXPERIMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF ROOFTOP HEAT SHIELD EXPERIMENT WITH WATER CONTAIN CONCRETE BOAD THAT USES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akinori; 日根, 隆夫; Okuda, Yoshio; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hada, Yuuichi

    In this study, the reduction effect of the heat inflow on the rooftop and the indoor thermal environment was measured by using the elementary school building, the rooftop of the bilding was covered with the water contain concrete boards. And, conserve energy effect and effectiveness for the indoor thermal environment improvement were evaluated. The effect of the decrease of the surface temperature and the slab side temperature at water contain concrete boad plot remarkably from the measurement result during the July-September of 2010, the temperatures decrease 22°C at the surface, 15°C at the waterproof layer surface that was caused compared with the gravel covered roof. The water contain concrete boards plot always drove the ceiling side temperature and the indoor temperature low as a result of comparing with the indoor condition of the control plot. The temperature fluctuate was small at time that opened the window and ventilated, and ventilation was discontinued, it became big temperatures fluctuate. The effect of the decrease of 0.5°C in PMV and 0.5 in WBGT was caused while the room had sealed up, and the effect of the decrease of 0.3 in WBGT was caused while the ventilated state.

  11. Companion Modeling, Conflict Resolution, and Institution Building: Sharing Irrigation Water in the Lingmuteychu Watershed, Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayan Raj. Gurung

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We used multi-agent systems (MAS, following the companion modeling method, to facilitate water management negotiations in Bhutan. We show how this methodology helped resolve a conflict over the sharing of water resources by establishing a concrete agreement and creating an institution for collective watershed management. The conceptual model begins with a role-playing game (RPG. The stakeholders play the game, thus validating the proposed environment, the behavioral rules, and the emergent properties of the game. It is then relatively easy to translate the RPG into computerized MAS that allow different scenarios to be explored. After this first step in the MAS model, stakeholders then create an institution. A second model is developed to facilitate this process. We conclude by discussing the relationship between the models and reality, as well as the use of MAS as a mediation tool and the social process.

  12. Construction of a new waste-water treatment plant, building 676, route Maxwell

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    A new waste-water treatment plant is being constructed on Route Maxwell to treat the effluents from the TS/MME/CCS surface treatment workshops. For this purpose, excavation work is being performed in two separate locations along Route Maxwell, causing a slight disruption to traffic in these areas. Site access through Gate C should, however, be maintained. The work is scheduled to continue until February 2009.

  13. Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

  14. RS-BASED WATER RESOURCES INVENTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES: CAPACITY BUILDING EFFORTS FOR NATIONWIDE IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. C. Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the Philippines is archipelagic in nature and is exposed to disasters accentuated by climate change, water resource monitoring and management has been an important concern in the country. The design and implementation of an effective management scheme relies heavily on accurate, complete, and updated water resource inventories, usually in the form of maps and geodatabases. With the aim of developing a detailed and comprehensive database of all water resources in the Philippines, a 3-year project entitled “Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys”, has been initiated by the University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST. Various workflows has been developed to extract inland hydrologic features in the Philippines using accurate Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and LiDAR point cloud data obtained through other government-funded programs, supplemented with other remotely-sensed imageries and ancillary information. Since the project covers national-scale mapping and inventory, the implementation was structured to be a collaborative effort between fifteen (15 State Universities/Colleges (SUCs and Higher Education Institutes (HEIs, along with multiple National Government Agencies (NGAs and Local Government Units (LGUs. This paper presents the project’s general structure, focusing mainly on its attempts and accomplishments in strengthening individual capacities of all involved SUCs, HEIs, and stakeholders utilizing hydrologic data for different applications.

  15. Development of methods for assessing the vulnerability of Australian residential building stock to severe wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Martin; Ginger, John; Holmes, John; Sandland, Carl; Edwards, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Knowledge of the degree of damage to residential structures expected from severe wind is used to study the benefits from adaptation strategies developed in response to expected changes in wind severity due to climate change. This study will inform government, the insurance industry and provide emergency services with estimates of expected damage. A series of heuristic wind vulnerability curves for Australian residential structures has been developed. In order to provide rigor to the heuristic curves and to enable quantitative assessment to be made of adaptation strategies, work has commenced to produce a simulation tool to quantitatively assess damage to buildings from severe wind. The simulation tool accounts for variability in wind profile, shielding, structural strength, pressure coefficients, building orientation, component self weights, debris damage and water ingress via a Monte Carlo approach. The software takes a component-based approach to modelling building vulnerability. It is based on the premise that overall building damage is strongly related to the failure of key components (i.e. connections). If these failures can be ascertained, and associated damage from debris and water penetration reliably estimated, scenarios of complete building damage can be assessed. This approach has been developed with varying degrees of rigor by researchers around the world and is best practice for the insurance industry.

  16. Domestic Hot Water Production with Ground Source Heat Pump in Apartment Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Yrjölä

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Producing domestic hot water (DHW with a ground source heat pump (GSHP is challenging due to the high temperature (HT of DHW. There are many studies proving the better performance of cascade heat pumps compared to single-stage heat pumps when the difference between the condensing and the evaporation temperature is large. In this system approach study, different GSHP arrangements are described and computationally compared. A two-stage heat pump arrangement is introduced in which water tanks of the heating system are utilized for warming up the DHW in two stages. It is shown that the electricity consumption with this two-stage system is approximately 31% less than with the single-stage heat pump and 12% less than with the cascade system. Further, both low temperature (LT and HT heat pumps can run alone, which is not common in cascade or other two-stage heat pumps. This is advantageous because the high loads of the space heating and DHW production are not simultaneous. Proper insulation of the DHW and recirculation pipe network is essential, and drying towel rails or other heating coils should be avoided when aiming for a high efficiency. The refrigerants in the calculations are R407C for the LT heat pump and R134a for the HT heat pump. Investment costs are excluded from calculations.

  17. Future Residential Water Heating Prospects in Brazil: A Scenario Building Ground Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Albuquerque Sgarbi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, electricity is the prime energy carrier for bath shower heating purposes. However, since analyses indicate that expansion of the country´s electricity generation capacity shall spruce from an increased non-renewable sources’ stake in detriment to that of hydroelectricity, high electricity consumption rates that spring from home end uses of the kind have drawn the attention of those who are involved with local energy planning. Furthermore, massive use of electric showers in a short timeframe largely drive electricity demands to culminate in peak loads. For water heating purposes, this context has favoured an alternative to electricity, deemed feasible from both an efficiency and energy infrastructure standpoint: promote fuel gas consumption (liquefied petroleum gas and natural gas in particular. A scenario methodology is herein employed to map electric shower use related variables and players and assess the future behaviour of the core elements that condition resorting to this technology. Thereafter, strategies and opportunities to promote the rational consumption of the country´s power sources ground on the increased use of fuel gases for residential water heating purposes are discussed.

  18. Building an understanding of water use innovation adoption processes through farmer-driven experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdy, Jody D.; Jewitt, Graham P. W.; Lorentz, Simon A.

    Smallholder farmers in Southern Africa are faced with the challenge of securing their livelihoods within the context of a wide variety of biophysical and socio-economic constraints. Agriculture is inherently risky, particularly in regions prone to drought or dry spells, and risk-averse farmers may be viewed by researchers or extension agents as reluctant to invest in agricultural innovations that have potential to improve their livelihoods. However, farmers themselves are more interested in personal livelihood security than any other stakeholder and it is the farmers’ perceptions of needs, investment options and risks that drive their decision-making process. A holistic approach to agricultural innovation development and extension is needed to address both socio-economic and biophysical dynamics that influence adoption and dissemination of innovations. This paper, presents a methodology for involving farmers from the Bergville district of South Africa in the process of innovation development through facilitation of farmer-driven gardening experiments. Facilitating farmer-driven experimentation allows farmers to methodically assess the value of innovations they choose to study while providing researchers with a venue for learning about socio-economic as well as biophysical influences on farmers’ decisions. With this knowledge, researchers can focus on developing innovations that are socially and economically appropriate and therefore, more readily adoptable. The participatory process gave farmers the tools they needed to make informed decisions through critical thinking and analysis and improved their confidence in explaining the function of innovations to others. Researchers were able to use farmers’ manually collected data and observations to supplement laboratory generated and electronically recorded information about soil water dynamics to understand water balances associated with different garden bed designs, and to investigate whether trench beds, drip

  19. Advanced DInSAR analysis for building damage assessment in large urban areas: an application to the city of Roma, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aranno, Peppe J. V.; Marsella, Maria; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Bonano, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing data play an important role for the environmental monitoring because they allow to provide systematic information on very large areas and for a long period of time. Such information must be analyzed, validated and incorporated into proper modeling tools in order to become useful for performing risk assessment analysis. These approaches has been already applied in the field of natural hazard evaluation (i.e. for monitoring seismic, volcanic areas and landslides). However, not enough attention has been devoted to the development of validated methods for implementing quantitative analysis on civil structures. This work is dedicated to the comprehensive utilization of ERS / ENVISAT data store ESA SAR used to detect deformation trends and perform back-analysis of the investigated structures useful to calibrate the damage assessment models. After this preliminary analysis, SAR data of the new satellite mission (ie Cosmo SkyMed) were adopted to monitor the evolution of existent surface deformation processes and to detect new occurrence. The specific objective was to set up a data processing and data analysis chain tailored on a service that sustains the safe maintenance of the built-up environment, including critical construction such as public (schools, hospital, etc), strategic (dam, highways, etc) and also the cultural heritage sites. The analysis of the test area, in the southeastern sector of Roma, has provided three different levels and sub-levels of products from metropolitan area scale (territorial analysis), settlement scale (aggregated analysis) to single structure scale (damage degree associated to the structure).

  20. Measurements and simulations of microscopic damage to DNA in water by 30 keV electrons: A general approach applicable to other radiation sources and biological targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Meyer, Susann; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Solomun, Tihomir; Sturm, Heinz

    2017-05-01

    The determination of the microscopic dose-damage relationship for DNA in an aqueous environment is of a fundamental interest for dosimetry and applications in radiation therapy and protection. We combine geant4 particle-scattering simulations in water with calculations concerning the movement of biomolecules to obtain the energy deposit in the biologically relevant nanoscopic volume. We juxtaposition these results to the experimentally determined damage to obtain the dose-damage relationship at a molecular level. This approach is tested for an experimentally challenging system concerning the direct irradiation of plasmid DNA (pUC19) in water with electrons as primary particles. Here a microscopic target model for the plasmid DNA based on the relation of lineal energy and radiation quality is used to calculate the effective target volume. It was found that on average fewer than two ionizations within a 7.5-nm radius around the sugar-phosphate backbone are sufficient to cause a single strand break, with a corresponding median lethal energy deposit being E1 /2=6 ±4 eV. The presented method is applicable for ionizing radiation (e.g., γ rays, x rays, and electrons) and a variety of targets, such as DNA, proteins, or cells.

  1. eWaterCycle: Building an operational global Hydrological forecasting system based on standards and open source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Niels; Bierkens, Marc; Donchyts, Gennadii; van de Giesen, Nick; Hummel, Stef; Hut, Rolf; Kockx, Arno; van Meersbergen, Maarten; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Verlaan, Martin; Weerts, Albrecht; Winsemius, Hessel

    2015-04-01

    At EGU 2015, the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org) will launch an operational high-resolution Hydrological global model, including 14 day ensemble forecasts. Within the eWaterCycle project we aim to use standards and open source software as much as possible. This ensures the sustainability of the software created, and the ability to swap out components as newer technologies and solutions become available. It also allows us to build the system much faster than would otherwise be the case. At the heart of the eWaterCycle system is the PCRGLOB-WB Global Hydrological model (www.globalhydrology.nl) developed at Utrecht University. Version 2.0 of this model is implemented in Python, and models a wide range of Hydrological processes at 10 x 10km (and potentially higher) resolution. To assimilate near-real time satellite data into the model, and run an ensemble forecast we use the OpenDA system (www.openda.org). This allows us to make use of different data assimilation techniques without the need to implement these from scratch. As a data assimilation technique we currently use (variant of) an Ensemble Kalman Filter, specifically optimized for High Performance Computing environments. Coupling of the model with the DA is done with the Basic Model Interface (BMI), developed in the framework of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) (csdms.colorado.edu). We have added support for BMI to PCRGLOB-WB, and developed a BMI adapter for OpenDA, allowing OpenDA to use any BMI compatible model. We currently use multiple different BMI models with OpenDA, already showing the benefits of using this standard. Throughout the system, all file based input and output is done via NetCDF files. We use several standard tools to be used for pre- and post-processing data. Finally we use ncWMS, an NetCDF based implementation of the Web Map Service (WMS) protocol to serve the forecasting result. We have build a 3D web application based on Cesium.js to visualize the output. In

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Damage by Loss of Auxiliary Feed Water during the Extended Loss of All AC Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Woo Jae; Chung, Soon Il; Hwang, Su Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Duk Joo; Lee, Seung Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the reactor core damage time for OPR1000 type Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was analyzed to develop a strategy to handle ELAP and to apply to the EOP. The reactor core damage time in the ELAP condition was calculated according to the time of Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) loss. Fukushima accident was caused by long hours of Station Black Out (SBO) caused by natural disaster beyond Design Based Accident (DBA) criteria. It led to the reactor core damage. After the accident, the regulatory authorities of each country (Japan, US, EU, IAEA, and etc.) recommended developing the necessary systems and strategies in order to cover up the Extended Loss of All AC Power (ELAP) such as one occurred in the Fukushima accident. And the need of procedure or guideline to cope with ELAP has been raised through the stress test for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant unit 1. Current Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) used in domestic nuclear power plant are seemed to be insufficient to cope with ELAP. Therefore, it has been required to be improved. As the result, the time of AFW loss in the ELAP condition influences greatly on core damage time.

  3. Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Evaluation of Space and Water Heating in Urban Residential Buildings of the Hot Summer and Cold Winter Zone in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the urbanization process of the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW zone in China, the energy consumption of space and water heating in urban residential buildings of the HSCW zone has increased rapidly. This study presents the energy efficiency and sustainability evaluation of various ways of space and water heating taking 10 typical cities in the HSCW zone as research cases. Two indicators, primary energy efficiency (PEE and sustainability index based on exergy efficiency, are adopted to perform the evaluation. Models for the energy and total exergy efficiencies of various space and water heating equipment/systems are developed. The evaluation results indicate that common uses of electricity for space and water heating are the most unsustainable ways of space and water heating. In terms of PEE and sustainability index, air-source heat pumps for space and water heating are suitable for the HSCW zone. The PEE and sustainability index of solar water heaters with auxiliary electric heaters are greatly influenced by local solar resources. Air-source heat pump assisted solar hot water systems are the most sustainable among all water heating equipment/systems investigated in this study. Our works suggest the key potential for improving the energy efficiency and the sustainability of space and water heating in urban residential buildings of the HSCW zone.

  4. The integration of solar power plants for domestic water services in buildings; Integracion de calderas y calentadores individuales en las instalaciones de ACS con energia solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J. V.; Garcia, R.; Lopez de Subijana, R.; Casado, J. M.

    2004-07-01

    The integration of solar power plants for domestic water services in buildings with individual heating and domestic water facilities has some problems which must be solved by the manufacturers of boilers and individual heaters; the most important is the water temperature in the entrance to the individual equipment because of solar heating. Therefore, we must care about materials in boilers and heaters, and temperature control systems of domestic water production. We analyse the technical conditions which appear in these equipment in the usual schemes: Centralized accumulation, distributed accumulation, serial heating, etc., and propose some elements which can be integrated in these facilities to obtain a better operation. (Author)

  5. Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlad, A. L.; Yeh, Y. J.; Salzano, F. J.; Hoppe, R. J.; Batey, J.

    1978-07-01

    On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

  6. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Tree-Based Models for Multi-Variate Flood Damage Assessment in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hasanzadeh Nafari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flood is a frequent natural hazard that has significant financial consequences for Australia. In Australia, physical losses caused by floods are commonly estimated by stage-damage functions. These methods usually consider only the depth of the water and the type of buildings at risk. However, flood damage is a complicated process, and it is dependent on a variety of factors which are rarely taken into account. This study explores the interaction, importance, and influence of water depth, flow velocity, water contamination, precautionary measures, emergency measures, flood experience, floor area, building value, building quality, and socioeconomic status. The study uses tree-based models (regression trees and bagging decision trees and a dataset collected from 2012 to 2013 flood events in Queensland, which includes information on structural damages, impact parameters, and resistance variables. The tree-based approaches show water depth, floor area, precautionary measures, building value, and building quality to be important damage-influencing parameters. Furthermore, the performance of the tree-based models is validated and contrasted with the outcomes of a multi-parameter loss function (FLFArs from Australia. The tree-based models are shown to be more accurate than the stage-damage function. Consequently, considering more parameters and taking advantage of tree-based models is recommended. The outcome is important for improving established Australian flood loss models and assisting decision-makers and insurance companies dealing with flood risk assessment.

  7. Homogenized approach for the non linear dynamic analysis of entire masonry buildings by means of rigid plate elements and damaging interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolesi, Elisa; Milani, Gabriele

    2017-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to the analysis of entire 3D masonry structures adopting a Rigid Body and Spring-Mass (HRBSM) model. A series of non linear static and dynamic analyses are conducted with respect to two structures with technical relevance. The elementary cell is discretized by means of three-noded plane stress elements and non-linear interfaces. At a structural level, the non-linear analyses are performed replacing the homogenized orthotropic continuum with a rigid element and non-linear spring assemblage (RBSM) by means of which both in and out of plane mechanisms are allowed. In order to validate the proposed model for the analyses of full scale structures subjected to seismic actions, two different examples are critically discussed, namely a church façade and an in-scale masonry building, both subjected to dynamic excitation. The results obtained are compared with experimental or numerical results available in literature.

  8. Natural Hazards Evaluation of Existing Buildings. Building Science Series 61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Charles G.; And Others

    A methodology is presented for survey and evaluation of existing buildings to determine the risk to life safety under natural hazard conditions and estimate the amount of expected damage. Damage to both structural and nonstructural building components resulting from the extreme natural environments encountered in earthquakes, hurricanes, and…

  9. Building capacity for water, sanitation, and hygiene programming: Training evaluation theory applied to CLTS management training in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Shields, Katherine F; Venkataramanan, Vidya; Saywell, Darren; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating training in WaSH by reviewing and adapting concepts from literature. Our framework includes three target outcomes: learning, individual performance, and improved programming; and two sets of influences: trainee and context factors. We applied the framework to evaluate a seven-month community-led total sanitation (CLTS) management training program delivered to 42 government officials in Kenya from September 2013 to May 2014. Trainees were given a pre-training questionnaire and were interviewed at two weeks and seven months after initial training. We qualitatively analyzed the data using our conceptual framework. The training program resulted in trainees learning the CLTS process and new skills, and improving their individual performance through application of advocacy, partnership, and supervision soft skills. The link from trainees' performance to improved programming was constrained by resource limitations and pre-existing rigidity of trainees' organizations. Training-over-time enhanced outcomes and enabled trainees to overcome constraints in their work. Training in soft skills is relevant to managing public health programs beyond WaSH. We make recommendations on how training programs can be targeted and adapted to improve outcomes. Our conceptual framework can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Driving Building Performance for Successful Participation in the Federal Green Challenge: Strategies for Energy/Water Conservation and Waste Diversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Burke, GSA Sustainability Program Manager for Region 2, will discuss program efforts to improve building performance at over 60 major facilities. Topics include implementing Guiding Principles for Sustainable Federal Buildings (EO 13693) and Re-TRAC.

  11. Effects of low-level laser therapy on performance, inflammatory markers, and muscle damage in young water polo athletes: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lira, Fábio Santos; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; de Paiva Carvalho, Rodrigo Leal

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of 5 days of 810-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) intervention on inflammatory and muscle damage markers and performance in young water polo players. Twenty young male water polo players participated in the study, which was designed as a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Active LLLT or an identical placebo LLLT were delivered to eight points on the adductor muscle region immediately after each training day. Performance was measured by a 200-m maximal swimming (P200) and a 30-s crossbar jump test (30CJ) which was performed every day before training, and blood samples were drawn pre and post the final LLLT intervention to measure interleukins (IL) and muscle damage markers. There was no significant change in the P200 exercise in the LLLT group compared with the placebo group but there was a moderate improvement in the 30CJ (8.7 ± 2.6 %). IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha presented increased (P < 0.016) concentration within group 48 h after the last LLLT intervention compared to pre, 0, and 24 h, but did not differ between groups. IL-10 increased over time in the placebo group and reached a moderate effect compared to the LLLT group. The creatine kinase decreased significantly (P = 0.049) over the time within the LLLT treatment group, but there was no significant change in lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.150). In conclusion, LLLT resulted in a non-significant, but small to moderate effect on inflammatory and muscle damage markers and a moderate effect on performance in water polo players. In addition, the lack of positive results could be due to the small area covered by irradiation and this should be considered in future studies.

  12. Thermal assessment of Shippingport pressurized water reactor blanket fuel assemblies within a multi-canister overpack within the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-09

    A series of analyses were performed to assess the thermal performance characteristics of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies as loaded within a Multi-Canister Overpack within the Canister Storage Building. A two-dimensional finite element was developed, with enough detail to model the individual fuel plates: including the fuel wafers, cladding, and flow channels.

  13. Protection of historic buildings against environmental pollution of vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historic buildings in Poland are largely neglected objects that small percentage is preserved in its original form. Unrelenting in the case of historic buildings is a time that brings with it the natural processes of aging of buildings, but also the history of the object which is often marked by military conflicts, fires or even incompetently carried out reconstruction. Nowadays historic buildings are also destroyed by the rapid development of infrastructure and residential construction. This development could lead to changes of water in the soil, make changes in the geologic al structure or cause exposure of the historic building to the new influences (eg. traffic vibrations, to which building has not been subjected so far. Vibrations are often omitted in environmental issues, although the protection against noise and vibration has its place in the Law on Environmental Protection. This article presents the methodology for the measurement and interpretation of vibration influence on historic buildings and the assessment methods of technical condition of historic building on the example of dynamic measurements made on St. Nicholas Church in Krakow. The importance of well-done crack-by-crack documentation and characterization of damages based on damage index is shown. Difficulties that can be encountered when determining the causes of technical condition of historic buildings are also shown. Based on the example of the Church in the article are also given the possible protection solutions of historic structures from vibrations.

  14. Does elevated CO2 protect photosynthesis from damage by high temperature via modifying leaf water status in maize seedlings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because high temperatures under field conditions are associated with high water vapor pressure deficits, often causing leaf desiccation, we hypothesized that decreased stomatal conductance at elevated carbon dioxide may increase leaf water potential and protect photosynthesis in C4 species from dama...

  15. Learning from and for rare floods in Dresden – how public officials interpret damage simulation results at the building type level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutter Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public officials in Dresden are concerned about learning from and for rare flood events like the Elbe river flood in August 2002. This is interesting because research on individual as well as organizational learning from rare events indicates that this kind of learning faces significant difficulties (e.g., overestimation of rare events for decision-making based on “emotionalized event experience”. Up to now, only little is known what and how public officials in Dresden specifically learn from and for rare floods. Therefore, the paper follows an exploratory purpose in line with principles of qualitative social research. Firstly, the paper explores dealing with rare floods with reference to a conceptual framework that highlights relations between regulative, normative, and cognitive institutions on the one hand and learning of public officials on the other. Secondly, it adopts a single case study design in Dresden with embedded sub-cases that are defined with reference to organizations of FRM. The case study shows, among others, that regulations like the Floods Directive are important for justifying FRM with regard to rare flood events which is less obvious than it sounds. However, public officials display different interpretations of the term “rare flood event”, for instance, in the context of analysing the consequences of floods on the building stock. Furthermore, the case study findings indicate that public officials may follow alternative approaches to sustain commitment in the context of rare flood events (systematic versus pragmatic approach.

  16. In situ growth experiments of reef-building cold-water corals: The good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartaud, F.; Meistertzheim, A. L.; Peru, E.; Le Bris, N.

    2017-03-01

    The ecological study of corals in their habitat is essential to determine the effects of global change and to develop strategies for reef conservation. Based on mark and recovery experiments, we investigated skeletal growth patterns of two reef-building cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, in the Lacaze-Duthiers canyon in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Coral fragments were collected, stained and deployed for short-term (2.5 months) and long-term (15 months) growth experiments at two sites located 4.5 km and 6.8 km from the canyon head. The analysis of distinct growth parameters (budding, new polyp growth and linear extension of the coral fragments) revealed that growth patterns are consistent among branches of different sizes, but discrepancies arose from the different types of staining used. Calcein appeared more suitable than alizarin red, which strongly limited growth by delaying coral recovery, for short-term experiments at least. Both species grew rapidly when redeployed in their habitat. Effects of long-term experiments could not be observed because corals were exposed to harmful environmental stress, particularly the lethal effect of sedimentation on the fragments. Despite limited in situ deployment, the growth analysis from the short-term experiment highlighted species-specific responses according to the location along a longitudinal gradient in the canyon and were likely related to the local environmental conditions. Consistent with the observed species distributions, M. oculata showed optimal growth at the site closer to the canyon head compared with L. pertusa, which had optimal growth at the deeper site. In situ experiments are difficult to conduct in deep-sea ecosystems, but with the use of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), such a simple approach may be of interest to managers of cold-water coral ecosystems.

  17. Effect of cold water immersion performed on successive days on physical performance, muscle damage, and inflammatory, hormonal, and oxidative stress markers in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Victor H; Ramos, Solange P; Bara-Filho, Maurício G; Freitas, Daniel G S; Coimbra, Danilo R; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of daily cold water immersion (CWI) on physical performance, muscle damage, and inflammatory, hormonal, and oxidative stress markers in volleyball. Six players were submitted to CWI and six players to a placebo, during 5 training days. Thigh circumference, squat jump, and agility were measured on the 1, 3 and 6 days. On the 1 and 6 days, blood and saliva were collected for analysis of oxidative stress, muscle damage, and inflammatory and hormonal levels. Muscle soreness and countermovement jump were quantified daily. The physical performance comparisons did not present differences and the only between group comparison with a large effect size (ES = -1.39) was in Δ% between day 1 and day 2 for CMJ. DOMS and creatine kinase increased in both groups and the ES of between group comparisons of Δ% between moments were not more than moderate. Thigh circumference increased only in the placebo group (P = 0.04) and the ES of the between group comparisons of Δ% between moments was large (1.53). No differences were found in oxidative stress, or inflammatory markers. Cortisol decreased only in the CWI-group (P muscle edema and hormonal status, the limited effects of CWI on performance, muscle damage, inflammation markers, and ROS mediators signal the unimportance of the daily practice of this recovery method in volleyball players.

  18. Characterization of oil and water accommodated fractions used to conduct aquatic toxicity testing in support of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill natural resource damage assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Heather P; Mitchelmore, Carys L; Morris, Jeffrey M; Lipton, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout resulted in the release of millions of barrels of crude oil. As part of the Trustees' Natural Resource Damage Assessment, a testing program was implemented to evaluate the toxicity of Deepwater Horizon oil and oil/dispersant mixtures to aquatic organisms from the Gulf of Mexico. Because of the variety of exposures that likely occurred, the program included 4 Deepwater Horizon oils, which encompassed a range of weathering states, and 3 different oil-in-water mixing methods, for a total of 12 unique water accommodated fractions (WAFs). The present study reports on the chemical characteristics of these 4 Deepwater Horizon oils and 12 WAFs. In addition, to better understand exposure chemistry, an examination was conducted of the effects of WAF preparation parameters-including mixing energy, starting oil composition, and oil-to-water mixing ratios-on the chemical profiles and final concentrations of these 12 WAFs. The results showed that the more weathered the starting oil, the lower the concentrations of the oil constituents in the WAF, with a shift in composition to the less soluble compounds. In addition, higher mixing energies increased the presence of insoluble oil constituents. Finally, at low to mid oil-to-water mixing ratios, the concentration and composition of the WAFs changed with changing mixing ratios; this change was not observed at higher mixing ratios (i.e., >1 g oil/L). Ultimately, the present study provides a basic characterization of the oils and WAFs used in the testing program, which helps to support interpretation of the more than 500 Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment toxicity testing results and to enable a comparison of these results with different tests and with the field. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1450-1459. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  19. Nanoscale analysis of unstained biological specimens in water without radiation damage using high-resolution frequency transmission electric-field system based on FE-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2015-04-10

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to examine biological specimens of bacteria, viruses and proteins. Until now, atmospheric and/or wet biological specimens have been examined using various atmospheric holders or special equipment involving SEM. Unfortunately, they undergo heavy radiation damage by the direct electron beam. In addition, images of unstained biological samples in water yield poor contrast. We recently developed a new analytical technology involving a frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method based on thermionic SEM. This method is suitable for high-contrast imaging of unstained biological specimens. Our aim was to optimise the method. Here we describe a high-resolution FTE system based on field-emission SEM; it allows for imaging and nanoscale examination of various biological specimens in water without radiation damage. The spatial resolution is 8 nm, which is higher than 41 nm of the existing FTE system. Our new method can be easily utilised for examination of unstained biological specimens including bacteria, viruses and protein complexes. Furthermore, our high-resolution FTE system can be used for diverse liquid samples across a broad range of scientific fields, e.g. nanoparticles, nanotubes and organic and catalytic materials. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of [i]Legionella pneumophila[/i] in water distribution systems in hospitals and public buildings of the Lublin region of eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Sikora

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of [i]L. pneumophila[/i] in water supply systems, hospitals and public buildings in the Lublin region of eastern Poland. Material and methods. The study was carried out in 26 different objects in the Lublin region. The number of [i]Legionella[/i] bacteria in water samples was determined by the membrane filtration method and/or by surface inoculation in accordance with the standards. Results. The study showed the presence of[i] L. pneumophila[/i] in 166 hot water samples (74.77%. In 34.33% (n=57 of water samples the count of tested bacteria exceeded the acceptable level of >100 CFU/100 ml. Of the samples where an acceptable level of bacteria was exceeded, 49 samples had an average level of [i]L. pneumophila[/i] (100–1,000 CFU/100 ml, and the level in 8 samples was high (>1,000 CFU/100 ml. Conclusions. The water samples collected form the hot water supply system of hospitals and public buildings showed exceeded counts of[i] L. pneumophila[/i], indicating the risk of infection. The constant monitoring of water distribution systems is an important element of the control of infections caused by these organisms.

  1. Drinking water quality and formation of biofilms in an office building during its first year of operation, a full scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, Jenni; Kaunisto, Tuija; Pursiainen, Anna; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Riihinen, Kalle; Keinänen-Toivola, Minna M

    2014-02-01

    Complex interactions existing between water distribution systems' materials and water can cause a reduction in water quality and unwanted changes in materials, aging or corrosion of materials and formation of biofilms on surfaces. Substances leaching from pipe materials and water fittings, as well as the microbiological quality of water and formation of biofilms were evaluated by applying a Living Lab theme i.e. a research in a real life setting using a full scale system during its first year of operation. The study site was a real office building with one part of the building lined with copper pipes, the other with cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipes thus enabling material comparison; also differences within the cold and hot water systems were analysed. It was found that operational conditions, such as flow conditions and temperature affected the amounts of metals leaching from the pipe network. In particular, brass components were considered to be a source of leaching; e. g. the lead concentration was highest during the first few weeks after the commissioning of the pipe network when the water was allowed to stagnate. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbially available phosphorus (MAP) were found to leach from PEX pipelines with minor effects on biomass of the biofilm. Cultivable and viable biomass (heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) levels in biofilms were higher in the cold than in the hot water system whereas total microbial biomass (total cell count (DAPI)) was similar with both systems. The type of pipeline material was not found to greatly affect the microbial biomass or Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria profiles (16s rRNA gene copies) after the first one year of operation. Also microbiological quality of water was found to deteriorate due to stagnation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of water-surface discharge on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis due to protein lysis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazunori; Sone, Toshifumi; Kamikozawa, Takashi; Takasu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satoru

    2009-09-01

    The effect of water-surface discharge on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633 in water was examined by using a very short high-voltage pulse generator. The surviving number of spore cells at 10(4) CFU/ml in initial concentration exponentially decreased with increasing discharge-treatment time. The input energy into the water-surface discharge under an O(2) gas flow for reduction in the survival number to 10% was lower than that under an air flow because many oxidation agents such as ozone and OH radical were produced under the O(2) gas flow. The input energy density for the one-tenth reduction depended not only on the spore state but also on the initial cell concentration. The input energy for the high-concentration spore cells (10(7) CFU/ml) was much higher than that for the low-concentration spore cells (10(4) CFU/ml). Cellular proteins and DNA were degraded by a 30-min discharge treatment of vegetative cells, whereas DNA of the high-concentration spore cells was relatively resistant.

  3. Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum Koidz. Water Extract and Its Bioactive Components Ameliorate Dermal Damage in UVB-Irradiated Skin Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Han Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermal photoaging is a condition of skin suffering inappropriate ultraviolet (UV exposure and exerts inflammation, tissue alterations, redness, swelling, and uncomfortable feelings. Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum Koidz. is a cereal food and its antioxidant and pigment constituents may provide skin protection from photoaging, but it still lacks proved experiments. In this study, protective effects of djulis extract (CFE on UVB-irradiated skin were explored. The results showed that HaCaT cells with 150 μg/mL CFE treatment had higher survival and less production of interleukin- (IL- 6, matrix metalloprotease- (MMP- 1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS in UVB-irradiated conditions. Subsequently, in animal studies, mice supplemented with CFE (100 mg/kg BW were under UVB irradiation and had thinner epidermis and lower IL-6 levels in skin layer. These data demonstrate that bioactive compounds possessing the potency of antiphotoaging exist in CFE. Following that, we found rutin and chlorogenic acid (10–100 μM could significantly increase cell viability and decrease the production of IL-6 in UVB models. Additionally, djulis pigment-betanin has no effect of increasing cell viability in this study. Our findings suggest CFE can protect skin against UV-induced damage and this protection is mainly from contributions of rutin and chlorogenic acid.

  4. Reduction of the DNA damages, Hepatoprotective Effect and Antioxidant Potential of the Coconut Water, ascorbic and Caffeic Acids in Oxidative Stress Mediated by Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANDERSON S. BISPO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hepatic disorders such as steatosis and alcoholic steatohepatitis are common diseases that affect thousands of people around the globe. This study aims to identify the main phenol compounds using a new HPLC-ESI+-MS/MS method, to evaluate some oxidative stress parameters and the hepatoprotective action of green dwarf coconut water, caffeic and ascorbic acids on the liver and serum of rats treated with ethanol. The results showed five polyphenols in the lyophilized coconut water spiked with standards: chlorogenic acid (0.18 µM, caffeic acid (1.1 µM, methyl caffeate (0.03 µM, quercetin (0.08 µM and ferulic acid (0.02 µM isomers. In the animals, the activity of the serum γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GT was reduced to 1.8 I.U/L in the coconut water group, 3.6 I.U/L in the ascorbic acid group and 2.9 I.U/L in the caffeic acid groups, when compared with the ethanol group (5.1 I.U/L, p<0.05. Still in liver, the DNA analysis demonstrated a decrease of oxidized bases compared to ethanol group of 36.2% and 48.0% for pretreated and post treated coconut water group respectively, 42.5% for the caffeic acid group, and 34.5% for the ascorbic acid group. The ascorbic acid was efficient in inhibiting the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS in the liver by 16.5% in comparison with the ethanol group. These data indicate that the green dwarf coconut water, caffeic and ascorbic acids have antioxidant, hepatoprotective and reduced DNA damage properties, thus decreasing the oxidative stress induced by ethanol metabolism.

  5. Why Buildings Fail: Are We Learning From Our Mistakes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kevin Parfitt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Most building professionals have investigated or performed remedial designs for at least one architectural or engineering system failure during their careers. Other practitioners, especially those who work for forensic consultants or firms specializing in disaster response and repair, are more familiar with the variety and extent of building failures as they assist their clients in restoring damaged or deficient buildings. The advent of social medial and twenty-four-hour news channels along with the general ease of finding more examples of failures in the Internet have made us realize that building failures in the broad sense are much more common than we may have realized.Relatively recent events leading to building failures such as the Christchurch, New Zealand earthquakes, the roof/parking deck of the Algo Centre mall in the northern Ontario, Canada city of Elliot Lake and the Indiana State Fairground stage collapse in the US are just a few reminders that much more work needs to be done on a variety of fronts to prevent building failures from a life safety standpoint. The need is compounded by economic concerns from what would be considered more mundane or common failures. Inspections by the author after Hurricane Katrina revealed a huge number of failures associated rain water alone as roofs, windows, flashing, mechanical penetrations etc. failed leading to interior water penetration often resulting in more damage from damp conditions and mold propagation than outright structural collapses.

  6. The role of free and bound water in irradiation preservation: Free radical damage as a function of the physical state of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Dollar, A.M.

    1964-01-01

    English sole fillets previously equilibrated with aqueous 0.1% cysteine were dehydrated by three methods to moisture levels ranging from 2 to 72%. Model systems using cellulose to replace the fish tissue were also used. The samples were irradiated at 1 Mrad in an air, nitrogen, or oxygen atmosphere. The destruction of −SH groups was measured and related to the amount and physical state of the tissue water. As free water was removed, destruction steadily increased, reaching a maximum at about 20% moisture. Destruction decreased markedly at moisture levels below 10%, and calorimetric measurements confirmed that 10% moisture was about the level of bound water in this species. These data suggest that dehydration favors the reaction of solute molecules with free radicals formed in the free water of muscle cells. At moisture levels greater than about 20%, simple free radical recombination is more likely than reaction with solute molecules, while below 20% moisture the reverse is true. The calculated α values support this conclusion, as do the results from model systems using cellulose.

  7. Multi-variable flood damage modelling with limited data using supervised learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wagenaar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flood damage assessment is usually done with damage curves only dependent on the water depth. Several recent studies have shown that supervised learning techniques applied to a multi-variable data set can produce significantly better flood damage estimates. However, creating and applying a multi-variable flood damage model requires an extensive data set, which is rarely available, and this is currently holding back the widespread application of these techniques. In this paper we enrich a data set of residential building and contents damage from the Meuse flood of 1993 in the Netherlands, to make it suitable for multi-variable flood damage assessment. Results from 2-D flood simulations are used to add information on flow velocity, flood duration and the return period to the data set, and cadastre data are used to add information on building characteristics. Next, several statistical approaches are used to create multi-variable flood damage models, including regression trees, bagging regression trees, random forest, and a Bayesian network. Validation on data points from a test set shows that the enriched data set in combination with the supervised learning techniques delivers a 20 % reduction in the mean absolute error, compared to a simple model only based on the water depth, despite several limitations of the enriched data set. We find that with our data set, the tree-based methods perform better than the Bayesian network.

  8. Multi-variable flood damage modelling with limited data using supervised learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Dennis; de Jong, Jurjen; Bouwer, Laurens M.

    2017-09-01

    Flood damage assessment is usually done with damage curves only dependent on the water depth. Several recent studies have shown that supervised learning techniques applied to a multi-variable data set can produce significantly better flood damage estimates. However, creating and applying a multi-variable flood damage model requires an extensive data set, which is rarely available, and this is currently holding back the widespread application of these techniques. In this paper we enrich a data set of residential building and contents damage from the Meuse flood of 1993 in the Netherlands, to make it suitable for multi-variable flood damage assessment. Results from 2-D flood simulations are used to add information on flow velocity, flood duration and the return period to the data set, and cadastre data are used to add information on building characteristics. Next, several statistical approaches are used to create multi-variable flood damage models, including regression trees, bagging regression trees, random forest, and a Bayesian network. Validation on data points from a test set shows that the enriched data set in combination with the supervised learning techniques delivers a 20 % reduction in the mean absolute error, compared to a simple model only based on the water depth, despite several limitations of the enriched data set. We find that with our data set, the tree-based methods perform better than the Bayesian network.

  9. Data-mining for multi-variate flood damage modelling with limited data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Dennis; Bouwer, Laurens

    2017-04-01

    Flood damage assessment is usually done with damage curves only dependent on the water depth. Recent studies have shown that data-mining techniques applied to a multi-dimensional dataset can produce significantly better flood damage estimates. However, creating and applying a multi-variate flood damage model requires an extensive dataset, which is rarely available and this can limit the application of these new techniques. In this paper we enrich a dataset of residential building and content damages from the Meuse flood of 1993 in the Netherlands, to make it suitable for multi-variate flood damage assessment. Results from 2D flood simulations are used to add information on flow velocity, flood duration and the return period to the dataset, and cadastre data is used to add information on building characteristics. Next, several statistical approaches are used to create multi-variate flood damage models, including regression trees, bagging regression trees, random forest, and a Bayesian network. Validation on data points from a test set shows that the enriched dataset in combination with the data-mining techniques delivers a significant improvement over a simple model only based on the water depth. We find that with our dataset, the trees based methods perform better than the Bayesian Network, which is in contrast to other studies.

  10. A Practical Approach for Formation Damage Control in Both Miscible and Immiscible CO2 Gas Flooding in Asphaltenic Crude Systems Using Water Slugs and Injection Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sergio Z.

    CO2 flooding has proven to be an effective technique for enhanced oil recovery. However, the application of CO2 flooding in the recovery process of asphaltenic crude systems is often avoided, as high asphaltene precipitation rates may occur. While the effects of asphaltene concetration and CO2 injection pressure on asphaltene precipitation rate have been the focus of many studies, asphaltene precipitation rate is not a reliable factor to predict the magnitude of asphaltene-induced formation damage. Wettability alteration is only caused by the immobile asphaltene deposits on the rock surface. The enternmaint of flocs may occur at high fluid velocity. Morover, the effective permeability reduction is only caused by the flocs, which have become large enough to block the pore throats. The dissociation of the flocs may occur under certain flow conditions. In this study, a compositional reservoir simulation was conducted using Eclipse 300 to investigate the injection practice, which avoids asphaltene-induced formation damage during both immiscible and miscible CO2 flooding in asphaltenic crude system. Without injection, at pressure above bubble point, slight precipitation occurred in the zone of the lowest pressure near the producing well. As pressure approached the bubble point, precipitation increased due to the change in the hydrocarbon composition, which suggested that the potential of asphaltene-induced formation damage is determined by the overall fluid composition. At very low pressure, precipitation decreased due to the increase in the density. As CO2 was injected below the minimum miscibility pressure, a slight precipitation occurred in the transition zone at the gas-oil interface due to the microscopic diffusion of the volatile hydrocarbon components caused by the local concentration gradients. The increase in CO2 injection rate did not significantly increase the precipitation rate. As CO2 was injected at pressure above the minimum miscibility pressure

  11. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  12. Building Adaptive Capacity with the Delphi Method and Mediated Modeling for Water Quality and Climate Change Adaptation in Lake Champlain Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, S.; Hurley, S.; Koliba, C.; Zia, A.; Exler, S.

    2014-12-01

    Eutrophication and nutrient pollution of surface waters occur within complex governance, social, hydrologic and biophysical basin contexts. The pervasive and perennial nutrient pollution in Lake Champlain Basin, despite decades of efforts, exemplifies problems found across the world's surface waters. Stakeholders with diverse values, interests, and forms of explicit and tacit knowledge determine water quality impacts through land use, agricultural and water resource decisions. Uncertainty, ambiguity and dynamic feedback further complicate the ability to promote the continual provision of water quality and ecosystem services. Adaptive management of water resources and land use requires mechanisms to allow for learning and integration of new information over time. The transdisciplinary Research on Adaptation to Climate Change (RACC) team is working to build regional adaptive capacity in Lake Champlain Basin while studying and integrating governance, land use, hydrological, and biophysical systems to evaluate implications for adaptive management. The RACC team has engaged stakeholders through mediated modeling workshops, online forums, surveys, focus groups and interviews. In March 2014, CSS2CC.org, an interactive online forum to source and identify adaptive interventions from a group of stakeholders across sectors was launched. The forum, based on the Delphi Method, brings forward the collective wisdom of stakeholders and experts to identify potential interventions and governance designs in response to scientific uncertainty and ambiguity surrounding the effectiveness of any strategy, climate change impacts, and the social and natural systems governing water quality and eutrophication. A Mediated Modeling Workshop followed the forum in May 2014, where participants refined and identified plausible interventions under different governance, policy and resource scenarios. Results from the online forum and workshop can identify emerging consensus across scales and sectors

  13. U.S. Geological Survey: Surface-Water Historical Instantaneous Data for the Nation: Build Time Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The USGS historical data base contains historical surface water discharge volume data for all 16,658 surface water sites that have current conditions. This dataset...

  14. 324 Building B-Cell Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Packaging & Shipment RL Readiness Assessment Final Report [SEC 1 Thru 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUMPHREYS, D C

    2002-08-01

    A parallel readiness assessment (RA) was conducted by independent Fluor Hanford (FH) and U. S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) team to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for activities associated with the packaging and shipping of pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies from B-Cell in the 324 Building to the interim storage area at the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The RL review was conducted in parallel with the FH review in accordance with the Joint RL/FH Implementation Plan (Appendix B). The RL RA Team members were assigned a FH RA Team counterpart for the review. With this one-on-one approach, the RL RA Team was able to assess the FH Team's performance, competence, and adherence to the implementation plan and evaluate the level of facility readiness. The RL RA Team agrees with the FH determination that startup of the 324 Building B-Cell pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel packaging and shipping operations can safely proceed, pending completion of the identified pre-start items in the FH final report (see Appendix A), completion of the manageable list of open items included in the facility's declaration of readiness, and execution of the startup plan to operations.

  15. Building America Case Study: Indoor Heat Pump Water Heaters During Summer in a Hot-Dry Climate, Redding, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, M. Seitzler

    2017-06-01

    Heat pump water heaters offer a significant opportunity to improve water heating performance for the over 40% of U.S. households that heat domestic hot water using electric resistance storage water heaters. Numerous field studies have also been completed documenting performance in a variety of climates and applications. More recent evaluation efforts have focused attention on the performance of May through September 2014, with ongoing winter monitoring being sponsored by California utility partners.

  16. Building America Case Study: Indoor Heat Pump Water Heaters During Summer in a Hot-Dry Climate, Redding, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-15

    Heat pump water heaters offer a significant opportunity to improve water heating performance for the over 40% of U.S. households that heat domestic hot water using electric resistance storage water heaters. Numerous field studies have also been completed documenting performance in a variety of climates and applications. More recent evaluation efforts have focused attention on the performance of May through September 2014, with ongoing winter monitoring being sponsored by California utility partners. Summer results show favorable system performance with extrapolated annual water heating savings of 1,466 to 2,300 kWh per year, based on the observed hot water loads. Additional summer space cooling benefits savings of 121 to 135 kWh per year were projected, further increasing the water heating savings by 5-9%. Given the project schedule for 2014 completion, no heating season impacts were able to be monitored. May through September 2014, with ongoing winter monitoring being sponsored by California utility partners. Summer results show favorable system performance with extrapolated annual water heating savings of 1,466 to 2,300 kWh per year, based on the observed hot water loads. Additional summer space cooling benefits savings of 121 to 135 kWh per year were projected, further increasing the water heating savings by 5-9%. Given the project schedule for 2014 completion, no heating season impacts were able to be monitored.

  17. Assessment the Economic Damage of Inter-Basin Water Transfer on Cropping Pattern and Farmers’ Income Situation in the Origin Basin (Case Study: Water Transfer of Alamoutrood to Qazvin Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parhizkari

    2016-03-01

    building the dam, canals, streams and aqueducts. Even today, many projects are implemented in Iran that water transfer project of Alamoutrood to Qazvin plain is one of the most important of these projects. According to reports of Regional Water Company of Qazvin province and the specifications of inter-basin water transfer project of Alamoutrood to Qazvin plain will be out from the farmers availability of Alamut region about 370 million cubic meters of irrigation water. This issue has the huge impacts on cropping pattern and farmers economic and livelihood condition in the origin basin (Alamout region. Therefore, in this study a hydrological-economic modeling system to analysis the effects of water transfer project of Alamoutrood to Qazvin plain on cropping pattern, farmers gross profit and economic value of irrigation water in the Alamut region (origin basin was used. Materials and Methods: Nowadays different methods to analysis of the issues related to the management of water resources and agriculture are used. One of the most important of these methods is mathematical programming that in recent years are in use to solve problems of water resource management sector and analysis of the agricultural policies. In this study a hydrological-economic modeling system consists of the Positive Mathematical Programming (PMP and product function with Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES to analysis of the effects of inter-basin water transfer on land use, farmers income situation and economic value of irrigation water in the origin basin (Alamout region was used. The first time PMP model developed by Howitt (1995 to calibrate agricultural supply models have been used to link biophysical and economic information in an integrated biophysical and economic modelling framework and to assess impacts of agricultural policies and scenarios. These models are also accepted for analysing the impact of water resources management policies and scenarios. PMP model used in this paper is a

  18. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  19. Building America Case Study: Simple Retrofit High-Efficiency Natural Gas Water Heater Field Test, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Schirber, B. Schoenbauer

    2017-06-01

    High-performance water heaters are typically more time consuming and costly to install in retrofit applications, making high-performance water heaters difficult to justify economically. However, recent advancements in high-performance water heaters have targeted the retrofit market, simplifying installations and reducing costs. Four high-efficiency natural gas water heaters designed specifically for retrofit applications were installed in single-family homes along with detailed monitoring systems to characterize their savings potential, their installed efficiencies, and their ability to meet household demands.

  20. STRUCTURAL DEFECTS OBSERVED AT STATE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KAPLAN

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Although, state buildings are designed with higher building importance factors with respect to other buildings, they are damaged and collapsed in medium and large scale earthquakes occurred throughout the 14 year period starting from 1992 Erzincan Earthquake. Buildings, used for medical, educational, governmental and security purposes, have to be non-damaged and they should satisfy immediate occupancy after design earthquakes. In this study, structural deficiencies in 105 state buildings, of which seismic vulnerability assessment has been done in recent years, are investigated. Examples of different problems, which are not observed in other buildings mostly, are given.

  1. Molecular and phenotypic description of Stachybotrys chlorohalonata sp. nov and two chemotypes of Stachybotrys chartarum found in water-damaged buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Thrane, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-five Stachybotrys isolates from two previous studies have been examined and compared, rising morphological, chemical and phylogenetic methods. The results show that S. chartarum sensu lato can be segregated into two chemotypes and one new species. The new species, S. chlorohalonata, differ...

  2. Water as Life, Death, and Power: Building an Integrated Interdisciplinary Course Combining Perspectives from Anthropology, Biology, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermet, Cathy; Mueller, Anja; Juris, Stephen J.; Drake, Eron; Upadhaya, Samik; Chhetri, Pratik

    2013-01-01

    In response to a request from a campus student organization, faculty from three fields came together to develop and teach an integrated interdisciplinary course on water issues and social activism. This course, "Water as Life, Death, and Power", brought together topics from the fields of anthropology, biology and chemistry to explore…

  3. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid and cold water immersion on post-exercise markers of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Stout, Jeffrey R; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Pruna, Gabriel J; Mangine, Gerald T; Scanlon, Tyler M; Bohner, Jonathan D; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) with and without the free acid form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB-FA) on markers of muscle damage following acute lower body resistance exercise. Forty recreationally resistance-trained men (22.3 ± 2.4 years) were randomly divided into one of the four groups: (1) Placebo (PL); (2) HMB-FA; (3) HMB-FA-CWI; (4) PL-CWI. HMB-FA groups ingested 3 g day(-1) and CWI groups submersed their lower body into 10-12 °C water for 10-min post-exercise. No differences between groups were observed for CK; however, PL-CWI had significantly greater elevations in myoglobin 30-min post-exercise compared to HMB-FA (p = 0.009) and PL (p = 0.005), and HMB-FA-CWI was significantly greater than HMB-FA (p = 0.046) and PL (p = 0.028). No differences between groups were observed for IL-6 and IL-10, although CRP was significantly greater 24-h post-exercise for PL-CWI compared to HMB-FA-CWI (p = 0.02) and HMB-FA (p = 0.046). Only HMB-FA-CWI showed significantly (p = 0.02) greater improvements in average power per repetition. CWI appeared to elevate myoglobin compared to other groups, while HMB-FA may have attenuated the increase in CRP when combined with CWI. Nevertheless, HMB-FA or CWI treatments did not appear to provide benefit over PL for recovery. Instead, the combination of CWI and HMB-FA improved performance recovery compared to other groups.

  4. Building America Case Study: Simple Retrofit High-Efficiency Natural Gas Water Heater Field Test, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-12

    High performance water heaters are typically more time consuming and costly to install in retrofit applications, making high performance water heaters difficult to justify economically. However, recent advancements in high performance water heaters have targeted the retrofit market, simplifying installations and reducing costs. Four high efficiency natural gas water heaters designed specifically for retrofit applications were installed in single-family homes along with detailed monitoring systems to characterize their savings potential, their installed efficiencies, and their ability to meet household demands. The water heaters tested for this project were designed to improve the cost-effectiveness and increase market penetration of high efficiency water heaters in the residential retrofit market. The retrofit high efficiency water heaters achieved their goal of reducing costs, maintaining savings potential and installed efficiency of other high efficiency water heaters, and meeting the necessary capacity in order to improve cost-effectiveness. However, the improvements were not sufficient to achieve simple paybacks of less than ten years for the incremental cost compared to a minimum efficiency heater. Significant changes would be necessary to reduce the simple payback to six years or less. Annual energy savings in the range of $200 would also reduce paybacks to less than six years. These energy savings would require either significantly higher fuel costs (greater than $1.50 per therm) or very high usage (around 120 gallons per day). For current incremental costs, the water heater efficiency would need to be similar to that of a heat pump water heater to deliver a six year payback.

  5. Recommended requirements to code officials for solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems. Model document for code officials on solar heating and cooling of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    These recommended requirements include provisions for electrical, building, mechanical, and plumbing installations for active and passive solar energy systems used for space or process heating and cooling, and domestic water heating. The provisions in these recommended requirements are intended to be used in conjunction with the existing building codes in each jurisdiction. Where a solar relevant provision is adequately covered in an existing model code, the section is referenced in the Appendix. Where a provision has been drafted because there is no counterpart in the existing model code, it is found in the body of these recommended requirements. Commentaries are included in the text explaining the coverage and intent of present model code requirements and suggesting alternatives that may, at the discretion of the building official, be considered as providing reasonable protection to the public health and safety. Also included is an Appendix which is divided into a model code cross reference section and a reference standards section. The model code cross references are a compilation of the sections in the text and their equivalent requirements in the applicable model codes. (MHR)

  6. Building capacity in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sigp1. Building capacity in. Benin. Training of technical staff of municipalities in the Okpara Basin of Benin in the use of GIS tools for water management, hydrological modeling and soil conservation. Introduction. A training workshop was ...

  7. Influence of pH, Oxygen, and Humic Substances on Ability of Sunlight To Damage Fecal Coliforms in Waste Stabilization Pond Water

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Thomas P.; Mara, D. Duncan; Silva, Salomao A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple beaker experiments established that light damages fecal coliforms in waste stabilization ponds by an oxygen-mediated exogenous photosensitization. Wavelengths of up to 700 nm were able to damage bacteria. The ability of wavelengths of >425 nm to damage fecal coliforms was dependent on the presence of dissolved sensitizers. The sensitizers were ubiquitous in raw sewage, unaffected by sewage treatment, not derivatives of bacteriochlorophyll or chlorophyll, absorbed well in UV light, and ...

  8. FAA Energy Order 1053.1A - Energy and Water Management Program For FAA Buildings and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-27

    This order provides Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) policies, procedures, and organizational responsibilities, in a focused and expanded agency energy and water planning and conservation program, for complying with the national mandates for the...

  9. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water...... evaporation. Two outdoor summer climates were simulated in the study, i.e. the design summer climate of Las Vegas and the extreme summer climate of Copenhagen represented hot/dry and warm/dry climates. The results showed that the flash evaporative cooling technology, a simple and green cooling technology......This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...

  10. AquaPedia: Building Intellectual Capacity Through Shared Learning and Open Access Platform to Resolve Water Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S.; Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Lin, C.; Gao, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Water promises to be the resource that determines the wealth, welfare, and stability of many countries in the 21st century. With burgeoning population pressure and competing needs, water resources are increasingly overused, water quality is often sub-optimal, and ecological integrity is excessively taxed. This problem occurs at various levels within the frameworks created by society and are exacerbated at political, physical, cultural, and economic boundaries. A key difficulty in addressing existing and emerging water conflicts is the scale discrepancy between conflicts and policies in place. Although significant local knowledge exists for a range of water conflicts across the globe, it is neither readily accessible nor easily transferable to other regions. We suggest that the origin of many water conflicts can be understood as a dynamic consequence of competition, interconnections, and feedback among variables in the natural and societal systems (NSSs). Within the natural system, the triple constraints on water (quantity (Q), quality (P), and ecological functions, goods, and services (E)) and their interconnections may lead to conflicts. Within the societal system, interdependencies and feedback among societal values, norms, and customs (V), economic costs and benefits derived from water resources (C), and governance (G) create intractable contextual differences. We argue that water issues can be framed and formulated within the NSSs comprised of these six variables (Q, P, E and V, C, G) and their dynamic interactions and feedbacks. As both sides of NSSs are porous, coupled, and interactive, we cannot explain - much less predict - the behavior of these systems without treating both sides as endogenous. The knowledge needed to address and manage contemporary and emerging water problems need to go beyond scientific assessment in which societal factors (C, G, and V) are treated as exogenous or largely ignored, and social science and policy research that does not

  11. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  12. [Identification of the party responsible for restoring the water quality according to the German Potable Water Act in buildings belonging to a semiautonomous condominium community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, R M

    2017-02-01

    When drinking water contaminations occur in installations belonging to a semiautonomous condominium community (Wohnungseigentumsgemeinschaft) and the water installation's final paths being owned by the various condominium owners, the German legal definition of the party responsible has a broad reach. Therefore, authorities should address the condominium community, the condominium owners and the community administrator (WEG-Verwalter). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the emission of heavy metals into water bodies from building materials derived from production waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugin Konstantin Georgievich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time industrial waste is considered to be an alternative to primary natural resources when producing construction materials and products. The use of industrial waste in the construction branch allows reducing ecological load on the environment and population as a result of reducing the amount of unrecyclable waste and reducing the use of primary natural resources. Though when involving waste products as raw material in the preparation of building materials there occur environmental risks of anthropogenic impact increase on the environment. These risks are related to possible emission of heavy metals from construction materials in use. The article describes a tool which allows predicting this issue, depending on the acidity of the medium, the residence time of the material in the environment. The experimental data obtained in determining the migration activity of metals from cement concretes to aqueous solutions served as the basis for the mathematical model. The proposed model allows us to make a prediction of anthropogenic impact on the environment and commensurate this impact with the possibility of assimilation of the environment area where the building materials are applied. This will allow conducting an effective assessment of the created and applied technologies of waste disposal, taking into account the operating conditions of the materials produced.

  14. Recent flood events in Germany - revealing damage influencing factors on residential property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, F.; Pech, I.; Thieken, A. H.; Kreibich, H.

    2009-04-01

    The trend of increasing damages due to floods can only be counteracted with effective flood management, based on reliable flood risk analysis. Better knowledge about the connections between flood losses and damage determining factors is necessary to improve damage estimation models. Thus extensive data about flood losses were collected at affected properties in Germany in the aftermath of floods in August 2002, August 2005 and April 2006. The data set contains more than 2100 residential damage cases. The data for the residential sector include information about building and content damages, evacuation, locations of the objects, people living at the sites and their socioeconomic situation, flood experience, precautionary measures undertaken before and during the event as well as flood information like maximum water level, flood duration, and flow velocity at the affected buildings. As first analyses showed significantly higher average damages caused by the extreme event in 2002 than by the 2005 and 2006 events the data sets were amended by adding site specific information about the recurrence interval of the event. Therefore, an estimation of the flood annuality was done for more than 120 gauges in the affected areas. The results were assigned to each damaged object to be able to analyze the influence of the magnitude on the flood damage. Thus, the data set enables a comparative analysis of multiple events of different severity that occurred over a couple of years in the same regions. Variables that contribute most to the explanation of damages are identified by multi-criteria analyses using data mining techniques and software, namely the WEKA-tool. In applying this routine to subsets (divided by region, by recurrence interval, by event) main differences in the contribution of single factors can be identified. The aim is to use the results for the improvement of existing flood damage estimation models.

  15. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. BUILDING CONCEPTUAL AND MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR WATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT KOSNICA SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanko Ružičić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual model of flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone at Kosnica site, which is the basis for modeling pollution migration through the unsaturated zone to groundwater, is set up. The main characteristics of the unsaturated zone of the Kosnica site are described. Detailed description of investigated profile of unsaturated zone, with all necessary analytical results performed and used in building of conceptual models, is presented. Experiments that are in progress and processes which are modeled are stated. Monitoring of parameters necessary for calibration of models is presented. The ultimate goal of research is risk assessment of groundwater contamination at Kosnica site that has its source in or on unsaturated zone.

  17. Consensus building on the development of a stress-based indicator for LCA-based impact assessment of water consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boulay, Anne Marie; Bare, Jane; Camillis, De Camillo; Döll, Petra; Gassert, Francis; Gerten, Dieter; Humbert, Sebastien; Inaba, Atsushi; Itsubo, Norihiro; Lemoine, Yann; Margni, Manuele; Motoshita, Masaharu; Núñez, Montse; Pastor, A.V.; Ridoutt, Brad; Schencker, Urs; Shirakawa, Naoki; Vionnet, Samuel; Worbe, Sebastien; Yoshikawa, Sayaka; Pfister, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The WULCA group, active since 2007 on Water Use in LCA, commenced the development of consensus-based indicators in January 2014. This activity is planned to last 2 years and covers human health, ecosystem quality, and a stress-based indicator. This latter encompasses potential

  18. Knowledge-building in adaptation management: concertación processes in transforming Lima water and climate change governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sara, L.; Baud, I.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, three processes were used to analyze the consequences of plausible climate change scenarios for urban water governance in Lima. The first process, led by a German-financed research team, developed climate change scenarios using innovative tools. The second, Chance2Sustain, brought spatial

  19. Monitoring the accumulated water soluble airborne compounds deposited on surfaces of showcases and walls in museums, archives and historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Svensmark, Bo

    2017-01-01

    of the surfaces have been analysed by XRF to clarify these more complex situations. Conclusions: Clear results appear from smooth or well defined surfaces, whereas more complex situations arise when the underlying surface itself contributes to the flush water. The method is working very well and is easy and cheap...

  20. Damage Detection and Deteriorating Structural Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Lijia; Thöns, Sebastian; Döhler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . The approach of the quantification the value of damage detection information builds upon the Bayesian decision theory facilitating the utilization of damage detection performance models, which describe the information and its precision on structural system level, facilitating actions to ensure the structural...... integrity and facilitating to describe the structural system performance and its functionality throughout the service life. The structural system performance is described with its functionality, its deterioration and its behavior under extreme loading. The structural system reliability given the damage...

  1. Water conservation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes water systems used in green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also outlines some calculations that can be used to design water systems in green buildings. Finally, aspects of green building...

  2. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  3. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Quantification of mold contamination in multi-level buildings using the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Stephen; Cox-Ganser, Jean M; Wymer, Larry; Park, Ju-Hyeong

    2017-10-20

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possible use of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) to quantify mold contamination in multi-level, office buildings. Settled-dust samples were collected in multi-level, office buildings and the ERMI value for each sample determined. In the first study, a comparison was made between two identical four-story buildings. There were health complaints in one building but none in the other building. In the second study, mold contamination was evaluated on levels 6 through 19 of an office building with a history of water problems and health complaints. In the first study, the average ERMI value in the building with health complaints was 5.33 which was significantly greater than the average ERMI value, 0.55, in the non-complaint building. In the second study, the average ERMI values ranged from a low of -0.58 on level 8 to a high of 5.66 on level 17, one of the top five ranked levels for medical symptoms or medication use. The mold populations of ten (six Group 1 and four Group 2) of the 36-ERMI molds were in significantly greater concentrations in the higher compared to lower ERMI environments. The ERMI metric may be useful in the quantification of water-damage and mold growth in multi-level buildings.

  5. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  6. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Residential Integrated Space/Water Heat Systems, Illinois and New York (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    This multi-unit field demonstration of combined space and water heating (combi) systems was conducted to help document combi system installation and performance issues that needed to be addressed through research. The objective of the project was to put commercialized forced-air tankless combi units into the field through local contractors that were trained by manufacturers and GTI staff under the auspices of utility-implemented Emerging Technology Programs. With support from PARR, NYSERDA and other partners, the project documented system performance and installations in Chicago and New York. Combi systems were found to save nearly 200 therms in cold climates at efficiencies between about 80% and 94%. Combi systems using third-party air handler units specially designed for condensing combi system operation performed better than the packaged integrated combi systems available for the project. Moreover, combi systems tended to perform poorly when the tankless water heaters operating at high turn-down ratios. Field tests for this study exposed installation deficiencies due to contractor unfamiliarity with the products and the complexity of field engineering and system tweaking to achieve high efficiencies. Widespread contractor education must be a key component to market expansion of combi systems. Installed costs for combi systems need to come down about 5% to 10% to satisfy total resource calculations for utility-administered energy efficiency programs. Greater sales volumes and contractor familiarity can drive costs down. More research is needed to determine how well heating systems such as traditional furnace/water heater, combis, and heat pumps compare in similar as-installed scenarios, but under controlled conditions.

  7. Water-soluble organo-building blocks of aminoclay as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Chul [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Jung [Advanced Biomass R and D Center, KAIST, 291 Daehakno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Dong Ah [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Ji-Won, E-mail: jiwonyang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program), KAIST, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Biomass R and D Center, KAIST, 291 Daehakno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclays have synthesized using centered metals with aminopropyl silane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developed aminoclay has unique nano-sized and water-soluble properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclay showed high heavy metal capacity with metal ions and its less toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoclay could be used to remediate heavy metals from soils an alternative soil-flushing agent. - Abstract: We demonstrated that water-soluble aminopropyl magnesium functionalized phyllosilicate could be used as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soils. Soil flushing has been an attractive means to remediate heavy metal contamination because it is less disruptive to the soil environment after the treatment was performed. However, development of efficient and non-toxic soil-flushing agents is still required. We have synthesized aminoclays with three different central metal ions such as magnesium, aluminum, and ferric ions and investigated applicability of aminoclays as soil flushing agents. Among them, magnesium (Mg)-centered aminoclay showed the smallest size distribution and superior water solubility, up to 100 mg/mL. Mg aminoclay exhibited cadmium and lead binding capacity of 26.50 and 91.31 mg/g of Mg clay, respectively, at near neutral pH, but it showed negligible binding affinity to metals in acidic conditions. For soil flushing with Mg clay at neutral pH showed cadmium and lead were efficiently extracted from soils by Mg clay, suggesting strong binding ability of Mg clay with cadmium and lead. As the organic matter and clay compositions increased in the soil, the removal efficiency by Mg clay decreased and the operation time increased.

  8. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  9. Basic Study on Term of Warranty Liability for Water Supply, Drainage, and Sanitation Arrangement Work Defect in Apartment Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junmo; Seo, DeokSeok

    2017-06-01

    The defect lawsuit of the apartment which is the representative residential style of Korea continues and becomes a social problem. In the defect lawsuit, the term of warranty liability is a period that can demand the defect repair according to defect occurrence, and the exclusion period of the exercise of rights. However, the term of warranty liability stipulated in relevant laws such as Enforcement Decree of the Housing Act is being changed arbitrarily, without any established grounds. Therefore, a reasonable standard for establishing the term of warranty liability is required. In this study, the defects of water supply, drainage and sanitation arrangement work were studied. As a result of analyzing the number of defect occurrence in the apartment, it was shown that the defects in water supply, drainage and sanitation arrangement work occurred more than 80% in the 1st ∼ 2nd year after completion. However, the occurrence of defects from the 3rd year was extremely slight. On the other hand, it was confirmed that the defect occurrence continued until fairly late point of time as the end point of time of the defects was in the 7th to 9th years.

  10. Use of Cold-Water Immersion to Reduce Muscle Damage and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Preserve Muscle Power in Jiu-Jitsu Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Líllian Beatriz; Brito, Ciro J; Silva, Roberto Jerônimo S; Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; da Silva, Walderi Monteiro; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-07-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) has been applied widely as a recovery method, but little evidence is available to support its effectiveness. To investigate the effects of CWI on muscle damage, perceived muscle soreness, and muscle power recovery of the upper and lower limbs after jiu-jitsu training. Crossover study. Laboratory and field. A total of 8 highly trained male athletes (age = 24.0 ± 3.6 years, mass = 78.4 ± 2.4 kg, percentage of body fat = 13.1% ± 3.6%) completed all study phases. We randomly selected half of the sample for recovery using CWI (6.0°C ± 0.5°C) for 19 minutes; the other participants were allocated to the control condition (passive recovery). Treatments were reversed in the second session (after 1 week). We measured serum levels of creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase enzymes; perceived muscle soreness; and recovery through visual analogue scales and muscle power of the upper and lower limbs at pretraining, postrecovery, 24 hours, and 48 hours. Athletes who underwent CWI showed better posttraining recovery measures because circulating LDH levels were lower at 24 hours postrecovery in the CWI condition (441.9 ± 81.4 IU/L) than in the control condition (493.6 ± 97.4 IU/L; P = .03). Estimated muscle power was higher in the CWI than in the control condition for both upper limbs (757.9 ± 125.1 W versus 695.9 ± 56.1 W) and lower limbs (53.7 ± 3.7 cm versus 35.5 ± 8.2 cm; both P values = .001). In addition, we observed less perceived muscle soreness (1.5 ± 1.1 arbitrary units [au] versus 3.1 ± 1.0 au; P = .004) and higher perceived recovery (8.8 ± 1.9 au versus 6.9 ± 1.7 au; P = .005) in the CWI than in the control condition at 24 hours postrecovery. Use of CWI can be beneficial to jiu-jitsu athletes because it reduces circulating LDH levels, results in less perceived muscle soreness, and helps muscle power recovery at 24 hours postrecovery.

  11. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  12. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  13. Building envelope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the way building envelopes can contribute to developing green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also proposes a number of approaches that can be used to help design green building envelopes...

  14. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  15. Effect of sub-lethal damage to juvenile colonies of massive Porites spp. under contrasting regimes of temperature and water flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Peter J; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, juvenile colonies of massive Porites spp. (a combination of P. lutea and P. lobata) from the lagoon of Moorea (W 149°50', S 17°30') were damaged and exposed to contrasting conditions of temperature and flow to evaluate how damage and abiotic conditions interact to affect growth, physiological performance, and recovery. The experiment was conducted in April and May 2008 and consisted of two treatments in which corals were either undamaged (controls) or damaged through gouging of tissue and skeleton in a discrete spot mimicking the effects of corallivorous fishes that utilize an excavating feeding mode. The two groups of corals were incubated for 10 days in microcosms that crossed levels of temperature (26.7 and 29.6°C) and flow (6 and 21 cm s-1), and the response assessed as overall colony growth (change in weight), dark-adapted quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm), and healing of the gouged areas. The influence of damage on growth was affected by temperature, but not by flow. When averaged across flow treatments, damage promoted growth by 25% at 26.7°C, but caused a 25% inhibition at 29.6°C. The damage also affected Fv/Fm in a pattern that differed between flow speeds, with a 10% reduction at 6 cm s-1, but a 4% increase at 21 cm s-1. Regardless of damage, Fv/Fm at 21 cm s-1 was 11% lower at 26.7°C than at 29.6°C, but was unaffected by temperature at 6 cm s-1. The lesions declined in area at similar rates (4-5% day-1) under all conditions, although the tissue within them regained a normal appearance most rapidly at 26.7°C and 6 cm s-1. These findings show that the response of poritid corals to sub-lethal damage is dependent partly on abiotic conditions, and they are consistent with the hypothesis that following damage, calcification and photosynthesis can compete for metabolites necessary for repair, with the outcome affected by flow-mediated mass transfer. These results may shed light upon the ways in which poritid corals respond to

  16. A numerical simulation method for analyzing the thermal improvement effect of super-hydrophilic photocatalyst-coated building surfaces with water film on the urban/built environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiang; Hoyano, Akira [Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-2 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    As an application of the super-hydrophilicity of a photocatalyst (TiO{sub 2}) coating, buildings are cooled by sprinkling water on their external surfaces coated with TiO{sub 2}. This is a new cooling technology that was recently developed in Japan. In order to make better use of this cooling system, quantitative prediction and evaluation of the cooling effect on the urban/built environment is required during design. In an attempt to provide a computer-aided simulation tool for supporting the above-mentioned design, we introduce a thermal simulation tool that was developed previously by the authors' group. The goal of the present study is to develop a numerical model by which to predict the temperature of a TiO{sub 2}-coated surface with a water film and integrate the calculation algorithm into the simulation tool. The availability of the proposed model was discussed in the present paper. Various urban districts in downtown Tokyo were selected for a discussion of the availability of the simulation tool in which the proposed model is integrated. Simulations were performed to quantify the thermal improvement effect of the cooling system in terms of surface temperature reduction, mean radiative temperature (MRT), heat island potential (HIP), indoor air temperature, and cooling load reduction. (author)

  17. Fusion of Multi-Temporal Interferometric Coherence and Optical Image Data for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Damage Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopphawan Tamkuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are one of the most devastating types of natural disasters, and happen with little to no warning. This study combined Landsat-8 and interferometric ALOS-2 coherence data without training area techniques by classifying the remote sensing ratios of specific features for damage assessment. Waterbodies and highly vegetated areas were extracted by the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, respectively, from after-earthquake images in order to improve the accuracy of damage maps. Urban areas were classified from pre-event interferometric coherence data. The affected areas from the earthquake were detected with the normalized difference (ND between the pre- and co-event interferometric coherence. The results presented three damage types; namely, damage to buildings caused by ground motion, liquefaction, and landslides. The overall accuracy (94% of the confusion matrix was excellent. Results for urban areas were divided into three damage levels (e.g., none–slight, slight–heavy, heavy–destructive at a high (90% overall accuracy level. Moreover, data on buildings damaged by liquefaction and landslides were in good agreement with field survey information. Overall, this study illustrates an effective damage assessment mapping approach that can support post-earthquake management activities for future events, especially in areas where geographical data are sparse.

  18. Patterns of bacteria-host associations suggest different ecological strategies between two reef building cold-water coral species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meistertzheim, Anne.-Leila; Lartaud, Franck; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Bessalam, Manon; Le Bris, Nadine; Galand, Pierre E.

    2016-08-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) are main ecosystem engineers of the deep sea, and their reefs constitute hot-spots of biodiversity. However, their ecology remains poorly understood, particularly, the nature of the holobiont formed by corals with their associated bacterial communities. Here, we analyzed Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa samples, collected from one location in a Mediterranean canyon in two different seasons (autumn and spring), in order to test for species specificity and temporal stability of the host-bacteria associations. The 16S rRNA sequencing revealed host-specific patterns of bacterial communities associated with L. pertusa and M. oculata, both in terms of community composition and diversity. All analyzed M. oculata polyps exhibited temporally and spatially similar bacterial communities dominated by haplotypes homologous to the known cnidarians-associated genus Endozoicomonas. In contrast, the bacterial communities associated with L. pertusa varied among polyps from the same colony, as well as among distinct colonies and between seasons. While the resilient consortium formed by M. oculata and its bacterial community fit the definition of holobiont, the versatility of the L. pertusa microbiome suggests that this association is more influenced by the environmental conditions or nutritional status. Our results thus highlight distinct host/microbes association strategies for these two closely related Scleractinians sharing the same habitat, suggesting distinct sensitivity to environmental change.

  19. Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, D; Zock, J-P; Plana, E; Heinrich, J; Tischer, C; Jacobsen Bertelsen, R; Sunyer, J; Künzli, N; Villani, S; Olivieri, M; Verlato, G; Soon, A; Schlünssen, V; Gunnbjörnsdottir, M I; Jarvis, D

    2017-09-01

    We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (Pbuilding age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Building Quantitative Hydrologic Storylines from Process-based Models for Managing Water Resources in the U.S. Under Climate-changed Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J.; Gutmann, E. D.; Clark, M. P.; Nijssen, B.; Vano, J. A.; Addor, N.; Wood, A.; Newman, A. J.; Mizukami, N.; Brekke, L. D.; Rasmussen, R.; Mendoza, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change narratives for water-resource applications must represent the change signals contextualized by hydroclimatic process variability and uncertainty at multiple scales. Building narratives of plausible change includes assessing uncertainties across GCM structure, internal climate variability, climate downscaling methods, and hydrologic models. Work with this linked modeling chain has dealt mostly with GCM sampling directed separately to either model fidelity (does the model correctly reproduce the physical processes in the world?) or sensitivity (of different model responses to CO2 forcings) or diversity (of model type, structure, and complexity). This leaves unaddressed any interactions among those measures and with other components in the modeling chain used to identify water-resource vulnerabilities to specific climate threats. However, time-sensitive, real-world vulnerability studies typically cannot accommodate a full uncertainty ensemble across the whole modeling chain, so a gap has opened between current scientific knowledge and most routine applications for climate-changed hydrology. To close that gap, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research are working on techniques to subsample uncertainties objectively across modeling chain components and to integrate results into quantitative hydrologic storylines of climate-changed futures. Importantly, these quantitative storylines are not drawn from a small sample of models or components. Rather, they stem from the more comprehensive characterization of the full uncertainty space for each component. Equally important from the perspective of water-resource practitioners, these quantitative hydrologic storylines are anchored in actual design and operations decisions potentially affected by climate change. This talk will describe part of our work characterizing variability and uncertainty across modeling chain components and their

  1. Damage Localization of Severely Damaged RC-Structures Based on Measured Eigenperiods from a Single Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    This paper deals with the estimation of the damage location of severely damaged Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures excited by earthquakes. It is assumed that the building is instrumented with a sensor measuring the earthquake acceleration signal at ground surface and a sensor measuring only...

  2. Plasma damage in floating metal-insulator-metal capacitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackaert, Jan; Wang, Zhichun; De Backer, E.; Coppens, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, charging induced damage (CID) to metal-insulator-metal capacitors (MIMCs), is reported. CID does not necessarily lead to direct yield loss, but may also induce latent damage leading to reliability losses. The damage is caused by the build up of a voltage potential difference between

  3. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods. While the unvented crawlspace retrofit was effective in reducing heat loss, and the majority of the bulk water drainage problems had been resolved, the important finding was that some of the wood joists embedded in masonry pockets behind the brick veneer were showing signs of moisture damage.

  4. Fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation in the air distribution system of a multi-story office building: VOC production and possible relationship to a sick building syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, D. G.; Crow, S. A.; Simmons, R. B.; Price, D. L.; Noble, J. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Complaints characteristic of those for sick building syndrome prompted mycological investigations of a modern multi-story office building on the Gulf coast in the Southeastern United States (Houston-Galveston area). The air handling units and fiberglass duct liner of the heating, ventilating and air conditioning system of the building, without a history of catastrophic or chronic water damage, demonstrated extensive colonization with Penicillium spp and Cladosporium herbarum. Although dense fungal growth was observed on surfaces within the heating-cooling system, most air samples yielded fewer than 200 CFU m-3. Several volatile compounds found in the building air were released also from colonized fiberglass. Removal of colonized insulation from the floor receiving the majority of complaints of mouldy air and continuous operation of the units supplying this floor resulted in a reduction in the number of complaints.

  5. Hanford site post NPH building inspection plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-12

    This plan establishes consistent post-NPH building inspection procedures and defines a procedure for prioritization of buildings for inspection to ensure the safety of facilities prior to reentry. Qualification of systems for restart of operation is not included. This plan takes advantage, where possible, of existing national procedures for post-NPH inspection of buildings, of existing structural design and evaluation documentation of Hanford facilities, and current and proposed seismic instrumentation located throughout the Hanford site. A list of buildings, prioritized according to current building safety function and building vulnerability (without regard for or information about a damaging natural forces event) is provided.

  6. Energy-efficient and cost-effective in-house substations bypass for improving thermal and DHW (domestic hot water) comfort in bathrooms in low-energy buildings supplied by low-temperature district heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Marek; Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Svendsen, Svend

    2014-01-01

    heating) to cool down further and thus reduce the heat lost from bypass operation while tempering the bathroom floor and guaranteeing fast provision of DHW (domestic hot water). We used the commercial software IDA-ICE to model a reference building where we implemented various solutions for controlling...... to improve comfort for customers at discounted price....

  7. Building a Foundation for Knowledge Co-Creation in Collaborative Water Governance: Dimensions of Stakeholder Networks Facilitated through Bridging Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietske Medema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable governance of water resources relies on processes of multi-stakeholder collaborations and interactions that facilitate the sharing and integration of diverse sources and types of knowledge. In this context, it is essential to fully recognize the importance of fostering and enhancing critical connections within and between networks of relationships between different government and non-government agencies, as well as the dynamics that are in support of the development of new knowledge and practices. In Quebec, a network of watershed organizations (WOs has been put in place to serve as bridging organizations (BOs for stakeholder groups in their watershed territories. Using the WOs as a case study, this research aims to contribute to a greater understanding of how stakeholder groups can be effectively connected to support knowledge co-creation through networked relationships facilitated by BOs. In line with this overall research aim, the following research objectives are proposed: (1 to assess the quality of the knowledge that is developed and shared through the WOs and their stakeholder networks; (2 to determine the characteristics of stakeholders participating in the WOs’ networks that either hinder or support collaborations and knowledge co-creation; (3 to describe the collaborative processes and mechanisms through which the WOs facilitate stakeholder interactions and knowledge co-creation; and (4 to assess the quality of the relationships and interactions between stakeholders participating in the WOs’ collaborative networks. A comprehensive literature review is provided of collaborative network dimensions that are in support of knowledge co-creation that forms the foundation of a research framework to assess knowledge co-creation processes that are facilitated through BOs and their collaborative networks. Documented experiences have been gathered through face-to-face semi-structured interviews, as well as a Quebec-wide survey

  8. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  9. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  10. Regional scenario building as a tool to support vulnerability assessment of food & water security and livelihood conditions under varying natural resources managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Julia; Liersch, Stefan; Dickens, Chris; Kabaseke, Clovis; Mulugeta Lemenih, Kassaye; Sghaier, Mongi; Hattermann, Fred

    2013-04-01

    Participatory regional scenario building was carried out with stakeholders and local researchers in four meso-scale case studies (CS) in Africa. In all CS the improvement of food and / or water security and livelihood conditions was identified as the focal issue. A major concern was to analyze the impacts of different plausible future developments on these issues. The process of scenario development is of special importance as it helps to identify main drivers, critical uncertainties and patterns of change. Opportunities and constraints of actors and actions become clearer and reveal adaptation capacities. Effective strategies must be furthermore reasonable and accepted by local stakeholders to be implemented. Hence, developing scenarios and generating strategies need the integration of local knowledge. The testing of strategies shows how they play out in different scenarios and how robust they are. Reasons and patterns of social and natural vulnerability can so be shown. The scenario building exercise applied in this study is inspired by the approach from Peter Schwartz. It aims at determining critical uncertainties and to identify the most important driving forces for a specific focal issue which are likely to shape future developments of a region. The most important and uncertain drivers were analyzed and systematized with ranking exercises during meetings with local researchers and stakeholders. Cause-effect relationships were drawn in the form of concept maps either during the meetings or by researchers based on available information. Past observations and the scenario building outcomes were used to conduct a trend analysis. Cross-comparisons were made to find similarities and differences between CS in terms of main driving forces, patterns of change, opportunities and constraints. Driving forces and trends which aroused consistently over scenarios and CS were identified. First results indicate that livelihood conditions of people rely often directly on the

  11. Building the green way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles

    2006-06-01

    Just five or six years ago, the term "green building" evoked visions of barefoot, tie-dyed, granola-munching denizens. There's been a large shift in perception. Of course, green buildings are still known for conserving natural resources by, for example, minimizing on-site grading, using alternative materials, and recycling construction waste. But people now see the financial advantages as well. Well-designed green buildings yield lower utility costs, greater employee productivity, less absenteeism, and stronger attraction and retention of workers than standard buildings do. Green materials, mechanical systems, and furnishings have become more widely available and considerably less expensive than they used to be-often cheaper than their standard counterparts. So building green is no longer a pricey experiment; just about any company can do it on a standard budget by following the ten rules outlined by the author. Reliable building-rating systems like the U.S. Green Building Council's rigorous Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program have done much to underscore the benefits of green construction. LEED evaluates buildings and awards points in several areas, such as water efficiency and indoor environmental quality. Other rating programs include the UK's BREEAM (Building Research Establishment's Environmental Assessment Method) and Australia's Green Star. Green construction is not simply getting more respect; it is rapidly becoming a necessity as corporations push it fully into the mainstream over the next five to ten years. In fact, the author says, the owners of standard buildings face massive obsolescence. To avoid this problem, they should carry out green renovations. Corporations no longer have an excuse for eschewing environmental and economic sustainability. They have at their disposal tools proven to lower overhead costs, improve productivity, and strengthen the bottom line.

  12. CHANGES IN TRANSPARENCY OF WATER AND REDUCTION OF BIOMASS OF BENTHIC COMMUNITIES DUE TO THE DAMAGE TO THE BANKS AND THE OVERALL POLLUTION IN WESTERN PART OF THE SOUTH CASPIAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Salmanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. As a result of fluctuations in water level, waves, circulation, rise and fall of the water levels there are constant partial erosion and leaching of soil banks in water bodies, with intensive ongoing pollution of the waters of the Caspian Sea, which we have seen in recent decades, and in the long run may dangerously affect the transparency of the water and reduction of biomass of the benthic community in the western part of the South Caspian Sea. The paper presents the results of the last 60 years of monitoring studies to determine the nature of transparency, depth of the euphotic layer, the primary production of phytoplankton photosynthesis, phytoand zoobentos biomass and destruction of organic matter in the coastal western shelf of the South Caspian. Methods. In the course of research, modern methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis were used, regulated by normative documents, duly approved for environmental monitoring of water bodies. Results. Studies have shown that since the second half of the 90’s, the mainland coast strip is strongly deformed, starting from the village of Shihva to Kura area, further from the south of the village of Narimanabada to Astara. Dozens of artificial coves, bays, islands were created with clay-soil mounds. Conclusions. A huge mass of clay and soil goes to the coastal waters of the western shelf as a result of the destruction of the structure of the coasts due to waves and wind, resulting in clastic particles in the water increased by 2.5 3 times, the transparency of the water in the area of 5-10 m depth contours is reduced by more than 2 fold, increasing the degradation 1.6 times. During this period, because of the intensity of sedimentation and the overall pollution in the study area, phytobenthos has almost disappeared and flowering has been reduced by 7580%. Zoobenthos has been badly damaged and biomass of bento detritivorous organisms has also been reduced. 

  13. Structural building screening and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawandy, Alex; Nakazawa, Shoji; Hendry, Andy; Ridwan, Firdaus, Rahmatul

    2017-10-01

    An earthquake is a disaster that can be harmful to the community, such as financial loss and also dead injuries. Pekanbaru is a city that located in the middle of Sumatera Island. Even though the city of Pekanbaru is a city that rarely occurs earthquake, but Pekanbaru has ever felt the impact of the big earthquake that occurred in West Sumatera on September 2009. As we know, Indonesia located between Eurasia plate, Pacific plate, and Indo-Australian plate. Particularly the Sumatera Island, It has the Semangko fault or the great Sumatra fault along the island from north to south due to the shift of Eurasia and Indo-Australian Plates. An earthquake is not killing people but the building around the people that could be killing them. The failure of the building can be early prevented by doing an evaluation. In this research, the methods of evaluation have used a guideline for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-154 and Applied Technology Council (ATC) 40. FEMA P-154 is a rapid visual screening of buildings for potential seismic hazards and ATC-40 is seismic evaluation and retrofit of Concrete Buildings. ATC-40 is a more complex evaluation rather than FEMA P-154. The samples to be evaluated are taken in the surroundings of Universitas Riau facility in Pekanbaru. There are four buildings as case study such as the rent student building, the building of mathematics and natural science faculty, the building teacher training and education faculty and the buildings in the faculty of Social political sciences. Vulnerability for every building facing an earthquake is different, this is depending on structural and non-structural components of the building. Among all of the samples, only the building of mathematics and the natural science faculty is in critical condition according to the FEMA P-154 evaluation. Furthermore, the results of evaluation using ATC-40 for the teacher training building are in damage control conditions, despite the other three buildings are

  14. Green commercial building insurance in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Xin Ou; Chew, Boon Cheong; Loo, Heoy Shin; Tan, Lay Hong

    2017-03-01

    Green building construction is growing tremendously globally even in Malaysia. Currently, there are approximate 636 buildings have registered and to be certified with Green Building Index. Among these buildings, 45 buildings have already fulfilled the requirements and fully certified. The other buildings still under provisional certification stage. Malaysia had adopted Green Building Index in 2009 to support a move to promote green building concept. Malaysia starts to move towards green building because Malaysian construction and building industry realizes that both energy consumed and waste produced are reduced without irreversible impacts to ecosystems. Consequently, insurance companies such as Fireman's Fund from America has started the green building insurance policies for their green building in the year of 2006, while Malaysia still remain the coverage for green buildings using conventional property insurance. There are lacks of efforts to be seen from insurance companies to propose green building insurance for these green buildings. There are a few factors which can take into consideration for insurance companies to start the very first green building insurance in Malaysia. Although there are challenges, some efficient strategies have been identified to overcome the problems. The methods used in this research topic is qualitative research. The results obtained shows that green commercial building insurance has a huge business opportunity in Malaysia because the number of green commercial buildings are increasing tremendously in Malaysia. It is a favor to implement green building insurance in Malaysia. Furthermore, insurance companies can consider to add in extra coverage in standard building policy to provide extra protection for non-certified green buildings which have the intention to rebuilt in green when damage happens. Generally, it is very important to introduce green commercial buildings insurance into Malaysia so that all of the green commercial

  15. Building sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mass Media

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available proactive,” Van Wyk says. “Demand for greener buildings is slowly beginning to increase among tenants. If asset managers do not take action, the value of assets will depreciate rapidly, and this will make the building obsolete within five years...

  16. Impact damage development in damaged composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Kiernan, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for predicting the nature of impact damage development based on the measured acousto-ultrasonic (AU) response of fiber reinforced crossply laminates with or without damage is described. Results of AU evaluation as well as penetrant enhanced radiographs of damaged laminates are presented.

  17. Busting the Baby Teeth Myth and Increasing Children's Consumption of Tap Water: Building Public Will for Children's Oral Health in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Wyatt C; Bailey, William; Braun, Patricia A; Weiss, Karl; Heichelbech, James

    2017-01-01

    Can a multifaceted statewide communications campaign motivate behavior change in low-income Colorado families to limit children's fruit juice consumption and increase children's consumption of tap water to prevent tooth decay? Caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting 40% of kindergartners and 55% of third graders in Colorado. Frequent consumption of 100% fruit juice is linked to childhood caries. The purpose of this campaign, "Cavities Get Around," was to motivate families to limit children's fruit juice consumption and increase consumption of tap water to protect baby teeth from caries, while also building public will for children's oral health. The campaign included targeted media, promotores/organizers, and family education. We focused on fruit juice because audience research showed many families view fruit juice as healthy, and it is also a common beverage among young children up to age of 6 years. We also focused on low-socioeconomic status families because data show higher childhood tooth decay rates in this population. To evaluate progress, we conducted identical pre- and post-surveys, each of 600 random low-income parents contacted by landline, mobile telephone, and Internet, allowing for comparative data. Significant progress was achieved compared to 2014 baseline results. Findings from a November 2015 statewide survey of parents included the following: (1) 22-point increase from 2014 in percentage of children regularly drinking tap water (from 41 to 63%). (2) 29-point decrease from 2014 in percentage of respondents who considered fruit juice consumption important to their child's health and nutritional needs (from 72 to 43%). (3) 19-point reduction in fruit juice consumption among young children (from 66% in 2014 to 47% in 2015). (4) 6-point reduction in percentage of parents considering baby teeth "less important" than adult teeth (from 21% in 2014 to 15% in 2015). The campaign also played a role in new state rules prohibiting

  18. Busting the Baby Teeth Myth and Increasing Children’s Consumption of Tap Water: Building Public Will for Children’s Oral Health in Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt C. Hornsby

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available QuestionCan a multifaceted statewide communications campaign motivate behavior change in low-income Colorado families to limit children’s fruit juice consumption and increase children’s consumption of tap water to prevent tooth decay?PurposeCaries is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting 40% of kindergartners and 55% of third graders in Colorado. Frequent consumption of 100% fruit juice is linked to childhood caries. The purpose of this campaign, “Cavities Get Around,” was to motivate families to limit children’s fruit juice consumption and increase consumption of tap water to protect baby teeth from caries, while also building public will for children’s oral health.MethodsThe campaign included targeted media, promotores/organizers, and family education. We focused on fruit juice because audience research showed many families view fruit juice as healthy, and it is also a common beverage among young children up to age of 6 years. We also focused on low-socioeconomic status families because data show higher childhood tooth decay rates in this population. To evaluate progress, we conducted identical pre- and post-surveys, each of 600 random low-income parents contacted by landline, mobile telephone, and Internet, allowing for comparative data.ResultsSignificant progress was achieved compared to 2014 baseline results. Findings from a November 2015 statewide survey of parents included the following: (1 22-point increase from 2014 in percentage of children regularly drinking tap water (from 41 to 63%. (2 29-point decrease from 2014 in percentage of respondents who considered fruit juice consumption important to their child’s health and nutritional needs (from 72 to 43%. (3 19-point reduction in fruit juice consumption among young children (from 66% in 2014 to 47% in 2015. (4 6-point reduction in percentage of parents considering baby teeth “less important” than adult teeth (from 21% in 2014 to 15% in 2015. The

  19. 5 case studies : boiler system increases availability of hot water in CAP REIT apartment buildings while saving energy : electric-to-gas retrofit drives down energy costs and improves building performance : Novitherm heat reflector panels saves 28 per cent in heating costs for apartment building : Novitherm heat reflector panel installation with system adjustment saves 33.2 per cent in energy costs : natural gas conversion saves over $315,000 a year for condominium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    These 5 case studies presented the details of new systems and retrofits conducted by Enbridge Gas Distribution and its partners to improve the energy efficiency of various public and residential buildings. System retrofits included the installation of boiler system installed to address tenant demands on the domestic hot water systems of properties purchased purchased by the CAP REIT organization. The comprehensive program used to address the problems included replacement of the systems with high efficiency heating boilers designed to integrate space, hot water, ramp, and pool heat. A centralized controller included setback control, trend-following processors, and the isolation of heating equipment. The second case study described an electric-to-gas conversion of a make-up air unit and boiler system at an all-electric apartment building. The system was designed to address excessive air handling and water heating costs. The gas conversion included new heating and hot water boilers, as well as a number of efficiency upgrades. The third and fourth case study described the installation of Novitherm heat reflector panels at apartment buildings in Toronto. The fifth case study described a natural gas conversion project conducted at a luxury condominium. Energy savings for all 5 projects were presented. 9 figs.

  20. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  1. Structural rehabilitation of old buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, João; Varum, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    The present book describes the different construction systems and structural materials and solutions within the main old buildings typologies, and it analyses the particularities of each of them, including mechanical properties, structural behaviour, typical damage patterns and collapse mechanisms. Common or pioneering intervention measures to repair and/or strengthen some of these structural elements are also reviewed.

  2. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaspoehler Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV. While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV. I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  3. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  4. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tap as described). 3. In all situations, drink or cook only with water that comes out of the tap cold. Water that comes out of the tap warm or hot can contain much higher levels of lead. Boiling ...

  5. COSTEAU - preheating and cooling by means of underground collectors with water circulation - case study (Perret building at Satigny, Geneva) and generalisation; COSTEAU. Prechauffage et rafraichissement par collecteurs souterrains a eau. Etude de cas (batiment Perret a Satigny, Geneve) et generalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmuller, P.; Lachal, B.

    2003-07-01

    Since a couple of years, underground collectors with air circulation have been becoming increasingly popular as a simple means for preheating (at winter time) and cooling (at summer time) of outdoor air ahead of a ventilation system for well insulated buildings. This report considers underground collectors with water circulation used for similar purposes. They are connected to the ventilation system via an air/water heat exchanger. Starting from a case study - one-year detailed in-situ measurements and data analysis from an air-heated office building near Geneva, Switzerland - computerised simulations have been performed as a sensitivity analysis tool as well as to establish recommendations and sizing rules for planners, including cost considerations. In the case study it turned out that the water-circulated underground collector, which is installed right under the basement of this well insulated building, is in thermal contact with the basement. Its main function is to damp the daily temperature oscillation of the inlet ventilation air, bringing the expected thermal comfort improvement in the summer time. However, this underground collector is unable to collect seasonally stored heat from the ground. Hence, in the winter time the main preheating contribution arises from the series-connected heat-recovery unit from the exit air. Numerical simulations show that optimal sizing of underground collectors is essential, and that both the underground collector and the well insulated building as a physical system with thermal inertia have to be simultaneously considered in the optimization process. Optimization also has to include parasitic energy (electricity) needed by fans and pumps. As outdoor air inlet can never be flooded in the case of underground collectors with water circulation the sanitary risk encountered with air-circulated underground collectors does not exist for them. Initial investment cost for water-circulated underground collectors is higher than for a

  6. Building on piles in floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harke, J.; van der Maarel, A.J.G.; Schielen, Ralph Mathias Johannes; Ribberink, Jan S.; Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; van Os, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Last year in the Netherlands 15 locations were allocated along the Rhine branches where – under strong restrictions - it was allowed to build in floodplains. Building in floodplains may lead to a water level rise during floods and moreover, the river bed morphology may be disturbed

  7. Afghan Ministry of Defense Headquarters: $154.7 Million Building Appears Well Built, but Has Several Construction Issues that Should Be Assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    that is expected to provide operation and maintenance for power generation , clean water treatment, wastewater treatment and facility maintenance for... electricity , and if the power is interrupted or the system is not well maintained, the basement could flood, potentially damaging the fire...suppression system and water supply pumps for the building, as well as servers and the switch control panel for the back-up power generators . The other six

  8. Economic measurement of environment damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.

    1980-05-01

    The densities, energy consumption, and economic development of the increasing population exacerbate environmental degradation. Air and water pollution is a major environmental problem affecting life and health, outdoor recreation, household soiling, vegetation, materials, and production. The literature review indicated that numerous studies have assessed the physical and monetary damage to populations at risk from excessive concentrations of major air and water pollutants-sulfur dioxide, total suspended particulate matter, oxidants, and carbon monoxide in air; and nutrients, oil, pesticides, and toxic metals and others in water. The measurement of the damages was one of the most controversial issues in pollution abatement. The methods that have been used to estimate the societal value of pollution abatement are: (1) chain of effects, (2) market approaches, and (3) surveys. National gross damages of air pollution of $20.2 billion and of water pollution of $11.1 billion for 1973 are substantial. These best estimates, updated for the economic and demographic conditions, could provide acceptable control totals for estimating and predicting benefits and costs of abating air and water pollution emissions. The major issues to be resolved are: (1) lack of available noneconomic data, (2) theoretical and empirical difficulties of placing a value on human life and health and on benefits such as aesthetics, and (3) lack of available demographic and economic data.

  9. Building Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — Explore real estate information about buildings in the Town of Cary.This file is created by the Town of Cary GIS Group. It contains data from both the Wake, Chatham...

  10. Wood-destroying Coleopteran species in the historical buildings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... The aim of this study is to identify the harmful insects causing damage in the historical wooden buildings of Kastamonu. Accordingly, 15 of those historical wooden buildings situated in the city were periodically controlled between the years 2002 and 2005. During those periodic controls, damages caused by ...

  11. Wood-destroying Coleopteran species in the historical buildings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to identify the harmful insects causing damage in the historical wooden buildings of Kastamonu. Accordingly, 15 of those historical wooden buildings situated in the city were periodically controlled between the years 2002 and 2005. During those periodic controls, damages caused by insects were ...

  12. The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Daniell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture database was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global databases; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes.

    Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss databases frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon.

    Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the database. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected, and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured.

    Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto ($214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>$300 billion USD at time of writing, 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing databases have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product, exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index, and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons.

    This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake database and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global

  13. Damage From the Nahrin, Afghanistan, Earthquake of 25 March, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, C. L.; Yeats, R. S.

    2002-12-01

    On 25 March, 2002, a destructive earthquake of mb = 6.1 struck the city of Nahrin and nearby villages in Baghlan Province in northeastern Afghanistan. The earthquake occurred on a southeast-dipping reverse fault that parallels the linear northeast-trending range front of the Hindu Kush Mountains, east of Nahrin. Field reconnaissance showed no disturbance of the ground by surface rupture, liquefaction, or lateral spreading, and virtually no evidence of landsliding or rockfall. United Nations and Afghan authorities estimate the death toll from the earthquake to be over 2000, with about 20,000 families impacted by the earthquake. We conducted a survey of damage in 68 villages affected by the earthquake and found that areas within 25 km of the epicenter experienced modified Mercalli intensities of between VI and VII. Shaking intensities were strong enough to cause complete building collapse in many villages. Site conditions were an important factor in the distribution of damage in the Nahrin area. Houses built on the narrow crests of ridges eroded in loess suffered major damage due to the focusing of near-surface seismic waves on ridge-tops. Houses on low fluvial terraces along the Nahrin River also suffered major damage, likely due to their close proximity to the water table. Structures built on metamorphic bedrock and alluvial fans along the range front of the Hindu Kush Mountains or on high terraces along the Nahrin River suffered comparatively less damage. Building failure was predominantly caused by the mud-block construction, characteristic of much of Afghanistan and adjacent countries. Most houses are built of mud blocks made from reworked loess, which contains a relatively low percentage of clay. The walls contain no bracing against lateral shear, and wall corners are not tied together, leading to failure at corners and roof collapse. In several villages, mosques were constructed to a higher standard and suffered significantly less damage than surrounding mud

  14. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE FROM POTASSIUM BROMATE EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RATS IS NOT ENHANCED BY A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disinfectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (DBPs) for which the relative toxicity of the mixtures needs to be characterized to accurately assess risk. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a by-product from ozonation of...

  15. A two-phase moisture transport model accounting for sorption hysteresis in layered porous building constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Janz, Mårten

    2009-01-01

    Building constructions most commonly consists of layered porous materials such as masonry on bricks. The moisture distribution and its variations due to change in surrounding environment is of special interest in such layered construction since materials adsorb different amounts of water and exhi......Building constructions most commonly consists of layered porous materials such as masonry on bricks. The moisture distribution and its variations due to change in surrounding environment is of special interest in such layered construction since materials adsorb different amounts of water...... and exhibits different transport properties. A successful model of such a case may shred light on the performance of different constructions with regards to, for example, mould growth and freeze thaw damages. For this purpose a model has been developed which is based on a two phase flow, vapor and liquid water...

  16. Optimization of transport thermal insulation and heat storage systems in consideration of thermal and hygric damage to the building. Pt. 2. Final report; Optimierung von TWD-Speichersystemen unter Beachtung der Bauschadensfreitheit (thermisch-hygrisch). T. 2. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U.; Mueller, K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal and hygric loads and damage of transparent thermal insulation systems were investigated using the FEM code Abaqus, which enables 2D calculations of thermal stresses and strains in layered structures (e.g. external walls). The influence of hygric swelling and shrinking had to be implemented separately. In addition to the calculations, two variants were investigated experimentally in order to validate the theoretical results. In the case of climate-induced thermal and hygromechanical loads, the dynamic heat and moisture transport processes must be taken into account. [German] Es war das Ziel des ausgefuehrten Forschungsprojektes, TWD-bestueckte Fassadenelemente hinsichtlich thermisch-hygrisch verursachter Belastungen und Schaeden zu untersuchen. Zu diesem Zweck fand das FEM-Programm Abaqus Verwendung. Es gestattet zweidimensionale thermisch verursachte Spannungs-Dehnungs-Berechnungen von geschichteten Strukturen (z.B. Fassaden). Der Einfluss des hygrischen Quellens und Schwindens musste allerdings gesondert implementiert werden. Neben den Berechnungen sind zwei Ausfuehrungsvarianten experimentell untersucht worden, um durch die Ergebnisse die Resultate der Berechnungen abzusichern. Fuer die klimatisch verursachten thermo- und hygromechanischen Belastungen muessen die dynamischen Waerme- und Feuchtetransportprozesse ins Blickfeld gerueckt werden. (orig.)

  17. Examining the impact of lahars on buildings using numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Stuart R.; Magill, Christina; Lemiale, Vincent; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Prakash, Mahesh

    2017-05-01

    Lahars are volcanic flows containing a mixture of fluid and sediment which have the potential to cause significant damage to buildings, critical infrastructure and human life. The extent of this damage is controlled by properties of the lahar, location of elements at risk and susceptibility of these elements to the lahar. Here we focus on understanding lahar-induced building damage. Quantification of building damage can be difficult due to the complexity of lahar behaviour (hazard), varying number and type of buildings exposed to the lahar (exposure) and the uncertain susceptibility of buildings to lahar impacts (vulnerability). In this paper, we quantify and examine the importance of lahar hazard, exposure and vulnerability in determining building damage with reference to a case study in the city of Arequipa, Peru. Numerical modelling is used to investigate lahar properties that are important in determining the inundation area and forces applied to buildings. Building vulnerability is quantified through the development of critical depth-pressure curves based on the ultimate bending moment of masonry structures. In the case study area, results suggest that building strength plays a minor role in determining overall building losses in comparison to the effects of building exposure and hydraulic characteristics of the lahar.

  18. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  19. Building Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    ‘The procurement of construction work is complex, and a successful outcome frequently elusive’. With this opening phrase of the book, the authors take on the challenging job of explaining the complexity of building procurement. Even though building procurement systems are, and will remain, complex...... despite this excellent book, the knowledge, expertise, well-articulated argument and collection of recent research efforts that are provided by the three authors will help to make project success less elusive. The book constitutes a thorough and comprehensive investigation of building procurement, which...... evolves from a simple establishment of a contractual relationship to a central and strategic part of construction. The authors relate to cultural, ethical and social and behavioural sciences as the fundamental basis for analysis and understanding of the complexity and dynamics of the procurement system...

  20. On the occurrence of rainstorm damage based on home insurance and weather data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekkers, M. H.; Clemens, F. H. L. R.; ten Veldhuis, J. A. E.

    2015-02-01

    Rainstorm damage caused by the malfunction of urban drainage systems and water intrusion due to defects in the building envelope can be considerable. Little research on this topic focused on the collection of damage data, the understanding of damage mechanisms and the deepening of data analysis methods. In this paper, the relative contribution of different failure mechanisms to the occurrence of rainstorm damage is investigated, as well as the extent to which these mechanisms relate to weather variables. For a case study in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, a property level home insurance database of around 3100 water-related damage claims was analysed. The records include comprehensive transcripts of communication between insurer, insured and damage assessment experts, which allowed claims to be classified according to their actual damage cause. The results show that roof and wall leakage is the most frequent failure mechanism causing precipitation-related claims, followed by blocked roof gutters, melting snow and sewer flooding. Claims related to sewer flooding were less present in the data, but are associated with significantly larger claim sizes than claims in the majority class, i.e. roof and wall leakages. Rare events logistic regression analysis revealed that maximum rainfall intensity and rainfall volume are significant predictors for the occurrence probability of precipitation-related claims. Moreover, it was found that claims associated with rainfall intensities smaller than 7-8 mm in a 60-min window are mainly related to failure processes in the private domain, such as roof and wall leakages. For rainfall events that exceed the 7-8 mm h-1 threshold, the failure of systems in the public domain, such as sewer systems, start to contribute considerably to the overall occurrence probability of claims. The communication transcripts, however, lacked information to be conclusive about to which extent sewer-related claims were caused by overloading of sewer systems or

  1. On the occurrence of rainstorm damage based on home insurance and weather data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Spekkers

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rainstorm damage caused by the malfunction of urban drainage systems and water intrusion due to defects in the building envelope can be considerable. Little research on this topic focused on the collection of damage data, the understanding of damage mechanisms and the deepening of data analysis methods. In this paper, the relative contribution of different failure mechanisms to the occurrence of rainstorm damage is investigated, as well as the extent to which these mechanisms relate to weather variables. For a case study in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, a property level home insurance database of around 3100 water-related damage claims was analysed. The records include comprehensive transcripts of communication between insurer, insured and damage assessment experts, which allowed claims to be classified according to their actual damage cause. The results show that roof and wall leakage is the most frequent failure mechanism causing precipitation-related claims, followed by blocked roof gutters, melting snow and sewer flooding. Claims related to sewer flooding were less present in the data, but are associated with significantly larger claim sizes than claims in the majority class, i.e. roof and wall leakages. Rare events logistic regression analysis revealed that maximum rainfall intensity and rainfall volume are significant predictors for the occurrence probability of precipitation-related claims. Moreover, it was found that claims associated with rainfall intensities smaller than 7–8 mm in a 60-min window are mainly related to failure processes in the private domain, such as roof and wall leakages. For rainfall events that exceed the 7–8 mm h−1 threshold, the failure of systems in the public domain, such as sewer systems, start to contribute considerably to the overall occurrence probability of claims. The communication transcripts, however, lacked information to be conclusive about to which extent sewer-related claims were caused by

  2. Bean grain hysteresis with induced mechanical damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mechanical damage on the hysteresis of beans with induced mechanical damage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. harvested manually with 35% water content (w.b. were used. Part of this product was subjected to induced mechanical damage by Stein Breakage Tester and controlled drying (damaged and control sample, for sorption processes. The sorption isotherms of water were analyzed for different temperature conditions: 20, 30, 40 and 50 oC; and relative humidity: 0.3; 0.4; 0.5; 0.7 and 0.9 (decimal. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated with six mathematical models, and the Modified Oswin model was the one that best fitted to the experimental data. According to the above mentioned isotherms, it was possible to observe the phenomenon of hysteresis of damaged and control samples, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in control ones.

  3. The NIST Green Building Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    For over 2 decades, NIST has been involved in energy conservation programs. NIST`s current programs broadly span the areas from waste minimization to air, soil, water, indoor air quality, ozone depletion, and global warming. The latest endeavor NIST is undertaking is the {open_quotes}Green Building Program{close_quotes} in which NIST is at the forefront of designing buildings using environmentally safe materials. NIST`s program has two components. The laboratory-based activities involve NIST staff working directly with manufacturers and designers to develop technologies conducive to energy efficiency. The second component, demonstration buildings, includes environmentally safe buildings which are monuments to green technologies. These buildings not only demonstrate cost effectiveness and evaluate green technologies, they also identify new technologies needed to develop an effective green building.

  4. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...

  5. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  6. Damage by radicals and photons during plasma cleaning of porous low-k SiOCH. II. Water uptake and change in dielectric constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoeb, Juline; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Porous dielectric materials provide lower capacitances that reduce RC time delays in integrated circuits. Typical low-k materials include porous SiOCH-silicon dioxide with carbon groups, principally CH{sub 3}, lining the pores. With a high porosity, internally connected pores provide pathways for reactive species to enter into the material. Fluorocarbon plasmas are often used to etch SiOCH, a process that leaves a fluorocarbon polymer on the surface that must later be removed. During cleaning using Ar/O{sub 2} or He/H{sub 2} plasmas, reactions of radicals that diffuse into the SiOCH and photons that penetrate into the SiOCH can remove -CH{sub 3} groups. Due to its higher reactivity, cleaning with Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas removes more -CH{sub 3} groups than He/H{sub 2} plasmas, and so produce more free radical sites, such as -SiO{sub 2} Bullet (a -SiO{sub 2}-CH{sub 3} site with the -CH{sub 3} group removed).Upon exposure to humid air, these free radical sites can chemisorb H{sub 2}O to form hydrophilic Si-OH which can further physisorb H{sub 2}O through hydrogen bonding to form Si-OH(H{sub 2}O). With the high dielectric constant of water, even a small percentage of water uptake can significantly increase the effective dielectric constant of SiOCH. In