WorldWideScience

Sample records for water balance modelling

  1. Water balance model for Kings Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.

    1990-01-01

    Particular attention is given to the spatial variability that affects the representation of water balance at the catchment scale in the context of macroscale water-balance modeling. Remotely sensed data are employed for parameterization, and the resulting model is developed so that subgrid spatial variability is preserved and therefore influences the grid-scale fluxes of the model. The model permits the quantitative evaluation of the surface-atmospheric interactions related to the large-scale hydrologic water balance.

  2. Monthly Water Balance Model Hydrology Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andy; Hay, Lauren E.; Markstrom, Steven; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2016-01-01

    A monthly water balance model (MWBM) was driven with precipitation and temperature using a station-based dataset for current conditions (1950 to 2010) and selected statistically-downscaled general circulation models (GCMs) for current and future conditions (1950 to 2099) across the conterminous United States (CONUS) using hydrologic response units from the Geospatial Fabric for National Hydrologic Modeling (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.5066/F7542KMD). Six MWBM output variables (actual evapotranspiration (AET), potential evapotranspiration (PET), runoff (RO), streamflow (STRM), soil moisture storage (SOIL), and snow water equivalent (SWE)) and the two MWBM input variables (atmospheric temperature (TAVE) and precipitation (PPT)) were summarized for hydrologic response units and aggregated at points of interest on a stream network. Results were then organized into the Monthly Water Balance Hydrology Futures database, an open-access database using netCDF format (http://cida-eros-mows1.er.usgs.gov/thredds/dodsC/nwb_pub/).  Methods used to calibrate and parameterize the MWBM are detailed in the Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS)  paper "Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States" by Bock and others (2016).  See the discussion paper link in the "Related External Resources" section for access.  Supplemental data files related to the plots and data analysis in Bock and others (2016) can be found in the HESS-2015-325.zip folder in the "Attached Files" section.  Detailed information on the files and data can be found in the ReadMe.txt contained within the zipped folder. Recommended citation of discussion paper:Bock, A.R., Hay, L.E., McCabe, G.J., Markstrom, S.L., and Atkinson, R.D., 2016, Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, v. 20, 2861-2876, doi:10.5194/hess-20-2861-2016, 2016

  3. Water balance modelling of a uranium mill effluent management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnes, Valérie; Schmid, Brad; Mitchell, Brett; Judd-Henrey, Ian

    2017-06-01

    A water balance model was developed to forecast the management strategy of a uranium mill effluent system, located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Mining and milling operations, such as pit dewatering or treated effluent release, can potentially influence the hydrology and the water quality downstream of the operations. This study presents the methodology used to predict water volumes and water quality discharging downstream in surface water bodies. A compartment model representing the three subsequent lakes included in the management system was set up using the software GoldSim®. The water balance allows predicting lake volumes at the daily time step. A mass balance model developed for conservative elements was also developed and allows validating the proportions of inputs and outputs issued from the water balance model. This model was then used as predictive tool to evaluate the impact of different scenarios of effluents management on volumes and chemistry of surface water for short and longer time periods. An additional significant benefit of this model is that it can be used as an input for geochemical modelling to predict the concentrations of all constituents of concern in the receiving surface water.

  4. Uncertainty in a monthly water balance model using the generalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uncertainty in a monthly water balance model using the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation methodology. Diego Rivera1,∗. , Yessica Rivas. 2 and Alex Godoy. 3. 1. Laboratory of Comparative Policy in Water Resources Management, University of Concepcion,. CONICYT/FONDAP 15130015, Concepcion, Chile. 2.

  5. Generation of river discharge using water balance computer model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents a study on river discharge generation using a water balance computer model. The results of the data generated shows that the computer program designed gave a good· prediction of the recorded discharge within 95% confidence interval. The model is therefore recommended for other catchments with ...

  6. Modelling raster-based monthly water balance components for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmen, C.

    2000-11-01

    The terrestrial runoff component is a comparatively small but sensitive and thus significant quantity in the global energy and water cycle at the interface between landmass and atmosphere. As opposed to soil moisture and evapotranspiration which critically determine water vapour fluxes and thus water and energy transport, it can be measured as an integrated quantity over a large area, i.e. the river basin. This peculiarity makes terrestrial runoff ideally suited for the calibration, verification and validation of general circulation models (GCMs). Gauging stations are not homogeneously distributed in space. Moreover, time series are not necessarily continuously measured nor do they in general have overlapping time periods. To overcome this problems with regard to regular grid spacing used in GCMs, different methods can be applied to transform irregular data to regular so called gridded runoff fields. The present work aims to directly compute the gridded components of the monthly water balance (including gridded runoff fields) for Europe by application of the well-established raster-based macro-scale water balance model WABIMON used at the Federal Institute of Hydrology, Germany. Model calibration and validation is performed by separated examination of 29 representative European catchments. Results indicate a general applicability of the model delivering reliable overall patterns and integrated quantities on a monthly basis. For time steps less then too weeks further research and structural improvements of the model are suggested. (orig.)

  7. Megacity project: Liwa, climate and water balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Alejandro; Bardossy, Andras

    2010-05-01

    Megacity project: Liwa, climate and water balance modeling Peru uses to face different natural phenomena such as El Nino and La Nina phenomena and, like many cities around the word, the climate change effects. Its capital Lima, located in a region where annual precipitation is about 9 mm, has a high hydrological cycle vulnerability which is demonstrated in periods of drought and extreme drought. Accurate and reliable methodology is requiring studying the impact of all these problems in the water supply of Lima. A statistical downscaling scheme (Bardossy, 2002) will be used to generate time series of different local climate scenarios in order to be applied in hydrological models. The conceptual model HBV (Bergström, 1995) is used to simulate water discharges at certain points of the catchments under study, water balance groundwater and for the estimation of storage volume in different reservoirs. As already mentioned, El Nino and La Nina currents influence the hydrological cycle. Previous studies have shown that these phenomena have serious impacts in Peru. In order to quantify these impacts in the area of interest we have analyzed the magnitude of the precipitation in several stations in years in which El Nino occurred, and in years where El Nino did not occurred. The next step is to increase the temporal resolution by incorporating new data. Due to the high vulnerability of the water supply system in Lima, potential new water sources are required. In particular, the catchment of Mantaro (including existing lakes) on the other side of Los Andes Mountains provides potential new alternatives for adding water to the current system. Alternatives for water transportation include using existing long tunnels which connect Mantaro with Rimac, where the majority of the lakes are located. Finally, the global climate models simulations for the coming years, considering different scenarios, will be used as an indicator and to estimate water availability for human use (city

  8. Mass-balance model for predicting nitrate in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpter, Michael H.; Donohue, John J.; Rapacz, Michael V.

    1990-01-01

    A mass-balance accounting model can be used to guide the management of septic systems and fertilizers to control the degradation of ground-water quality in zones of an aquifer that contribute water to public-supply wells. The nitrate concentration of the mixture in the well can be predicted for steady-state conditions by calculating the concentration that results from the total weight of nitrogen and total volume of water entering the zone of contribution to the well. These calculations will allow water-quality managers to predict the nitrate concentrations that would be produced by different types and levels of development, and to plan development accordingly. Computations for different development schemes provide a technical basis for planners and managers to compare water-quality effects and to select alternatives that limit nitrate concentration in wells.

  9. Increasing process integrity in global scale water balance models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöger, Lisa; Mewes, Benjamin; Oppel, Henning; Schumann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models on a global or continental scale are often used to model human impact on the water balance in data scarce regions. Therefore, they are not validated for a time series of runoff measured at gauges but for long term estimates. The simplistic model GlobWat was introduced by the FAO to predict irrigation water demand based on open source data for continental catchments. Originally, the model was not designed to process time series, but to estimate the water demand on long-time averages of precipitation and evapotranspiration. Therefore the emphasis of detail of GlobWat was focused on crop evapotranspiration and water availability in agricultural regions. In our study we wanted to enhance the modelling in detail to forest evapotranspiration on the one hand and to time series simulation on the other hand. Meanwhile, we tried to keep the amount of input data as small as possible or at least limit it to open source data. Our objectives derived from case studies in the forest dominated catchments of Danube and Mississippi. With the use of Penman-Montheith equation as fundamental equation within the original GlobWat model, evapotranspiration losses in these regions could not be simulated adequately. As this being the fact, the water availability of downstream regions dominated by agriculture might be overestimated and hence estimation of irrigation demands biased. Therefore, we implemented a Shuttleworth & Calder as well as a Priestly-Taylor approach for evapotranspiration calculation of forested areas. Both models are compared and evaluated based on monthly time series validation of the model with runoff series provided by GRDC (Global Runoff Data Center). For an additional extension of the model we added a simple one-parameter snow-routine. In our presentation we compare the different stages of modelling to demonstrate the options to extent and validate these models with observed data on an appropriate scale.

  10. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  11. Evaluation of a distributed catchment scale water balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troch, Peter A.; Mancini, Marco; Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The validity of some of the simplifying assumptions in a conceptual water balance model is investigated by comparing simulation results from the conceptual model with simulation results from a three-dimensional physically based numerical model and with field observations. We examine, in particular, assumptions and simplifications related to water table dynamics, vertical soil moisture and pressure head distributions, and subsurface flow contributions to stream discharge. The conceptual model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Richards equation describing flow in variably saturated porous media, and handles seepage face boundaries, infiltration excess and saturation excess runoff production, and soil driven and atmosphere driven surface fluxes. The study catchments (a 7.2 sq km catchment and a 0.64 sq km subcatchment) are located in the North Appalachian ridge and valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. Hydrologic data collected during the MACHYDRO 90 field experiment are used to calibrate the models and to evaluate simulation results. It is found that water table dynamics as predicted by the conceptual model are close to the observations in a shallow water well and therefore, that a linear relationship between a topographic index and the local water table depth is found to be a reasonable assumption for catchment scale modeling. However, the hydraulic equilibrium assumption is not valid for the upper 100 cm layer of the unsaturated zone and a conceptual model that incorporates a root zone is suggested. Furthermore, theoretical subsurface flow characteristics from the conceptual model are found to be different from field observations, numerical simulation results, and theoretical baseflow recession characteristics based on Boussinesq's groundwater equation.

  12. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steger, Christian R.; Reijmer, Carleen H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS) contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB) of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore

  13. GlobWat - a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faures, J.M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to assess water use in irrigated agriculture, the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed

  14. A Generic Water Balance Model for a Trench Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Choi, Hee Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To quantify the exposure dose rates from the nuclide release and transport through the various pathways possible in the near- and far-fields of the LILW repository system, various scenarios are to be conveniently simulated in a straightforward manner and extensively with this GoldSim model, as similarly developed for other various types of repositories in previous studies. Through this study, a result from four scenario cases, each of which is or is not associated with water balance, are compared to each other to see what happens in different cases in which an overflow over a trench rooftop, stochastic rainfall on the trench cover, and an unsaturated flow scheme under the trench bottom are combined. The other two latter elements vary periodically owing to stochastic behavior of the time series data for the past rain-fall records. This program is ready for a total system performance assessment and is able to deterministically and probabilistically evaluate the nuclide release from a repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various scenarios that can occur after a failure of waste packages with associated uncertainty. An illustration conducted through a study with a new water balance scheme shows the possibility of a stochastic evaluation associated with the stochastic behavior and various pathways that happen around the trench repository.

  15. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christian R.; Reijmer, Carleen H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS) contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB) of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore analyse a firn simulation conducted with the SNOWPACK model for the GrIS and over the period 1960-2014 with a special focus on the LWB and refreezing. Evaluations of the simulated refreezing climate with GRACE and firn temperature observations indicate a good model-observation agreement. Results of the LWB analysis reveal a spatially uniform increase in surface melt (0.16 m w.e. a-1) during 1990-2014. As a response, refreezing and run-off also indicate positive changes during this period (0.05 and 0.11 m w.e. a-1, respectively), where refreezing increases at only half the rate of run-off, implying that the majority of the additional liquid input runs off the ice sheet. This pattern of refreeze and run-off is spatially variable. For instance, in the south-eastern part of the GrIS, most of the additional liquid input is buffered in the firn layer due to relatively high snowfall rates. Modelled increase in refreezing leads to a decrease in firn air content and to a substantial increase in near-surface firn temperature. On the western side of the ice sheet, modelled firn temperature increases are highest in the lower accumulation zone and are primarily caused by the exceptional melt season of 2012. On the eastern side, simulated firn temperature increases are more gradual and are associated with the migration of firn aquifers to higher elevations.

  16. Assessing the urban water balance: the Urban Water Flow Model and its application in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Katerina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Lange, Manfred A

    2012-01-01

    Modelling the urban water balance enables the understanding of the interactions of water within an urban area and allows for better management of water resources. However, few models today provide a comprehensive overview of all water sources and uses. The objective of the current paper was to develop a user-friendly tool that quantifies and visualizes all water flows, losses and inefficiencies in urban environments. The Urban Water Flow Model was implemented in a spreadsheet and includes a water-savings application that computes the contributions of user-selected saving options to the overall water balance. The model was applied to the coastal town of Limassol, Cyprus, for the hydrologic years 2003/04-2008/09. Data were collected from the different authorities and hydrologic equations and estimations were added to complete the balance. Average precipitation was 363 mm/yr, amounting to 25.4 × 10(6)m(3)/yr, more than double the annual potable water supply to the town. Surface runoff constituted 29.6% of all outflows, while evapotranspiration from impervious areas was 21.6%. Possible potable water savings for 2008/09 were estimated at 5.3 × 10(3) m(3), which is 50% of the total potable water provided to the area. This saving would also result in a 6% reduction of surface runoff.

  17. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Steger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore analyse a firn simulation conducted with the SNOWPACK model for the GrIS and over the period 1960–2014 with a special focus on the LWB and refreezing. Evaluations of the simulated refreezing climate with GRACE and firn temperature observations indicate a good model–observation agreement. Results of the LWB analysis reveal a spatially uniform increase in surface melt (0.16 m w.e. a−1 during 1990–2014. As a response, refreezing and run-off also indicate positive changes during this period (0.05 and 0.11 m w.e. a−1, respectively, where refreezing increases at only half the rate of run-off, implying that the majority of the additional liquid input runs off the ice sheet. This pattern of refreeze and run-off is spatially variable. For instance, in the south-eastern part of the GrIS, most of the additional liquid input is buffered in the firn layer due to relatively high snowfall rates. Modelled increase in refreezing leads to a decrease in firn air content and to a substantial increase in near-surface firn temperature. On the western side of the ice sheet, modelled firn temperature increases are highest in the lower accumulation zone and are primarily caused by the exceptional melt season of 2012. On the eastern side, simulated firn temperature increases are more gradual and are associated with the migration of firn aquifers to higher elevations.

  18. Modeling Regional Soil Water Balance in Farmland of the Middle Reaches of Heihe River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Li; Xiaomin Mao; Songhao Shang; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying components of soil water balance in farmland of the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin is essential for efficiently scheduling and allocating limited water resources for irrigation in this arid region. A soil water balance model based on empirical assumptions in the vadose zone of farmland was developed and simulation results were compared/validated with results by the numerical model HYDRUS-1D. Results showed a good coherence between the simulated results of the water balance mo...

  19. Evaluating water conservation and reuse policies using a dynamic water balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Kamal; Ahmad, Sajjad; Johnson, Walter; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2013-02-01

    A dynamic water balance model is created to examine the effects of different water conservation policies and recycled water use on water demand and supply in a region faced with water shortages and significant population growth, the Las Vegas Valley (LVV). The model, developed using system dynamics approach, includes an unusual component of the water system, return flow credits, where credits are accrued for returning treated wastewater to the water supply source. In LVV, Lake Mead serves as, both the drinking water source and the receiving body for treated wastewater. LVV has a consumptive use allocation from Lake Mead but return flow credits allow the water agency to pull out additional water equal to the amount returned as treated wastewater. This backdrop results in a scenario in which conservation may cause a decline in the available water supply. Current water use in LVV is 945 lpcd (250 gpcd), which the water agency aims to reduce to 752 lpcd (199 gpcd) by 2035, mainly through water conservation. Different conservation policies focused on indoor and outdoor water use, along with different population growth scenarios, are modeled for their effects on the water demand and supply. Major contribution of this study is in highlighting the importance of outdoor water conservation and the effectiveness of reducing population growth rate in addressing the future water shortages. The water agency target to decrease consumption, if met completely through outdoor conservation, coupled with lower population growth rate, can potentially satisfy the Valley's water demands through 2035.

  20. Modeling Regional Soil Water Balance in Farmland of the Middle Reaches of Heihe River Basin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiang Li; Xiaomin Mao; Songhao Shang; Tammo S Steenhuis

    2017-01-01

    .... A soil water balance model based on empirical assumptions in the vadose zone of farmland was developed and simulation results were compared/validated with results by the numerical model HYDRUS-1D...

  1. A daily water balance model for representing streamflow generation process following land use change

    OpenAIRE

    Bari, M. A.; K. R. J. Smettem

    2005-01-01

    International audience; A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store (iii) a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important component of the model and characterize the dynamically varyi...

  2. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Bari, M. A.; K. R. J. Smettem

    2006-01-01

    A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store (iii) a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas resp...

  3. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Bari, M. A.; K. R. J. Smettem

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i) Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii) a transient Stream zone Store (iii) a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically vary...

  4. Modeling Regional Soil Water Balance in Farmland of the Middle Reaches of Heihe River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying components of soil water balance in farmland of the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin is essential for efficiently scheduling and allocating limited water resources for irrigation in this arid region. A soil water balance model based on empirical assumptions in the vadose zone of farmland was developed and simulation results were compared/validated with results by the numerical model HYDRUS-1D. Results showed a good coherence between the simulated results of the water balance models and the HYDRUS-1D model in soil water storage, evapotranspiration, deep percolation and groundwater recharge, which indicated that the water balance model was suitable for simulating soil water movement in the study area. Considering the spatial distribution of cropping patterns, groundwater depth and agricultural management, ArcGIS was applied for the pre-/post-processing of the water balance model to quantify the spatial distribution of components of soil water balance in the major cropland in middle reaches of Heihe River Basin. Then, distributions of components of soil water balance in the major cropland under different water-saving irrigation practices during the growing season were predicted and discussed. Simulation results demonstrated that evapotranspiration of the main crops would be more prominently influenced by irrigation quota under deep groundwater depth than that under shallow groundwater depth. Groundwater recharge would increase with the increase of irrigation quota and decrease with the increase of groundwater depth. In general, when groundwater depth reached 3 m, groundwater recharge from root zone was negligible for spring wheat. While when it reached 6 m, groundwater recharge was negligible for maize. Water-saving irrigation practices would help to reduce groundwater recharge with a slight decrease of crop water consumption.

  5. Global sensitivity analysis of a local water balance model predicting evaporation, water yield and drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, Matthias; Zappa, Massimiliano; Lischke, Heike

    2017-04-01

    Evaporation and transpiration affect both catchment water yield and the growing conditions for vegetation. They are driven by climate, but also depend on vegetation, soil and land surface properties. In hydrological and land surface models, these properties may be included as constant parameters, or as state variables. Often, little is known about the effect of these variables on model outputs. In the present study, the effect of surface properties on evaporation was assessed in a global sensitivity analysis. To this effect, we developed a simple local water balance model combining state-of-the-art process formulations for evaporation, transpiration and soil water balance. The model is vertically one-dimensional, and the relative simplicity of its process formulations makes it suitable for integration in a spatially distributed model at regional scale. The main model outputs are annual total evaporation (TE, i.e. the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and interception), and a drought index (DI), which is based on the ratio of actual and potential transpiration. This index represents the growing conditions for forest trees. The sensitivity analysis was conducted in two steps. First, a screening analysis was applied to identify unimportant parameters out of an initial set of 19 parameters. In a second step, a statistical meta-model was applied to a sample of 800 model runs, in which the values of the important parameters were varied. Parameter effect and interactions were analyzed with effects plots. The model was driven with forcing data from ten meteorological stations in Switzerland, representing a wide range of precipitation regimes across a strong temperature gradient. Of the 19 original parameters, eight were identified as important in the screening analysis. Both steps highlighted the importance of Plant Available Water Capacity (AWC) and Leaf Area Index (LAI). However, their effect varies greatly across stations. For example, while a transition from a

  6. LBA-ECO LC-14 Modeled Soil and Plant Water Balance, Amazon Basin, 1995-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A simple GIS soil-water balance model for the Amazon Basin, called RisQue (Risco de Queimadasa -- Fire Risk), was used to conduct an analysis of spatial and temporal...

  7. LBA-ECO LC-14 Modeled Soil and Plant Water Balance, Amazon Basin, 1995-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: A simple GIS soil-water balance model for the Amazon Basin, called RisQue (Risco de Queimadasa -- Fire Risk), was used to conduct an analysis of spatial...

  8. Skylab water balance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The water balance of the Skylab crew was analyzed. Evaporative water loss using a whole body input/output balance equation, water, body tissue, and energy balance was analyzed. The approach utilizes the results of several major Skylab medical experiments. Subsystems were designed for the use of the software necessary for the analysis. A partitional water balance that graphically depicts the changes due to water intake is presented. The energy balance analysis determines the net available energy to the individual crewman during any period. The balances produce a visual description of the total change of a particular body component during the course of the mission. The information is salvaged from metabolic balance data if certain techniques are used to reduce errors inherent in the balance method.

  9. Modeling the Monthly Water Balance of a First Order Coastal Forested Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. V. Harder; Devendra M. Amatya; T. J. Callahan; Carl C. Trettin

    2006-01-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate a spreadsheet-based conceptual Thornthwaite monthly water balance model and the process-based DRAINMOD model for their reliability in predicting monthly water budgets of a poorly drained, first order forested watershed at the Santee Experimental Forest located along the Lower Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Measured precipitation...

  10. A water balance model to estimate flow through the Old and Middle River corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Stephen W.; Gross, Edward S.; Hutton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    We applied a water balance model to predict tidally averaged (subtidal) flows through the Old River and Middle River corridor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. We reviewed the dynamics that govern subtidal flows and water levels and adopted a simplified representation. In this water balance approach, we estimated ungaged flows as linear functions of known (or specified) flows. We assumed that subtidal storage within the control volume varies because of fortnightly variation in subtidal water level, Delta inflow, and barometric pressure. The water balance model effectively predicts subtidal flows and approaches the accuracy of a 1–D Delta hydrodynamic model. We explore the potential to improve the approach by representing more complex dynamics and identify possible future improvements.

  11. Modeling and experimental validation of water mass balance in a PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Araya, Samuel Simon; Olesen, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    management in PEM fuel cell is crucial in order to avoid an imbalance between water production and water removal from the fuel cell. In the present study, a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model has been formulated for the water mass balance and hydration of a polymer electrolyte membrane. This model...... is validated against experimental data. In the results it is shown that the fuel cell water balance calculated by this model shows better fit with experimental data-points compared with model where only steady state operation were considered. We conclude that this discrepancy is due a different rate of water......Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells require good hydration in order to deliver high performance and ensure long life operation. Water is essential for proton conductivity in the membrane which increases by nearly six orders of magnitude from dry to fully hydrated. Adequate water...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF QUANTIFICATION OF FLOOD CONTROL AND WATER UTILIZATION EFFECT OF RAINFALL INFILTRATION FACILITY BY USING WATER BALANCE ANALYSIS MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    文, 勇起; BUN, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many flood damage and drought attributed to urbanization has occurred. At present infiltration facility is suggested for the solution of these problems. Based on this background, the purpose of this study is investigation of quantification of flood control and water utilization effect of rainfall infiltration facility by using water balance analysis model. Key Words : flood control, water utilization , rainfall infiltration facility

  13. GlobWat – a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faures, J.M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by FAO to assess water use in irrigated agriculture; the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed high resolution datasets that are

  14. Monthly water balance model for Ndarugu basin, Kenya | Nyadawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... model in Ndarugu river basin in Kenya. The model is slightly modified to suit hydrologic conditions in the basin. The study apart from establishing relevant model parameters has recommended optimum length of period for continuous simulation to reduce effect dynamic changes in the basin. Journal of Civil Engineering, ...

  15. A water balance simulation model for teaching and learning – WaS

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Tim M.; Counsell, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Developed by HR Wallingford and Cranfield University (with support from the UK Department for International Development), WaSim is a computer-based training package for the teaching and demonstration of issues involved in irrigation, drainage and salinity management. WaSim is a daily water balance model that simulates the soil water / salinity relationships in response to different management strategies (e.g. drainage designs and water management practices) and environmental...

  16. Assessment of the terrestrial water balance using the global water availability and use model WaterGAP - status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Döll, Petra

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of the World's water resources has a long tradition and numerous methods for quantification exists. The resulting numbers vary significantly, leaving room for improvement. Since some decades, global hydrological models (GHMs) are being used for large scale water budget assessments. GHMs are designed to represent the macro-scale hydrological processes and many of those models include human water management, e.g. irrigation or reservoir operation, making them currently the first choice for global scale assessments of the terrestrial water balance within the Anthropocene. The Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis (WaterGAP) is a model framework that comprises both the natural and human water dimension and is in development and application since the 1990s. In recent years, efforts were made to assess the sensitivity of water balance components to alternative climate forcing input data and, e.g., how this sensitivity is affected by WaterGAP's calibration scheme. This presentation shows the current best estimate of terrestrial water balance components as simulated with WaterGAP by 1) assessing global and continental water balance components for the climate period 1971-2000 and the IPCC reference period 1986-2005 for the most current WaterGAP version using a homogenized climate forcing data, 2) investigating variations of water balance components for a number of state-of-the-art climate forcing data and 3) discussing the benefit of the calibration approach for a better observation-data constrained global water budget. For the most current WaterGAP version 2.2b and a homogenized combination of the two WATCH Forcing Datasets, global scale (excluding Antarctica and Greenland) river discharge into oceans and inland sinks (Q) is assessed to be 40 000 km3 yr-1 for 1971-2000 and 39 200 km3 yr-1 for 1986-2005. Actual evapotranspiration (AET) is close to each other with around 70 600 (70 700) km3 yr-1 as well as water consumption with 1000 (1100) km3 yr-1. The

  17. Comparative Modeling Studies of Boreal Water and Carbon Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The coordination of the modeling and field efforts for an Intensive Field Campaign (IFC) may resemble the chicken and egg dilemma. This session's theme advocates that early and proactive involvement by modeling teams can produce a scientific and operational benefit for the IFC and Experiment. This talk will provide some examples and suggestions originating from the NASA funded IFC's of the FIFE First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment, Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) and predominately Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Experiments. In February 1994 and prior to the final selection of the BOREAS study sites, a group of funded BOREAS investigators agreed to run their models with data for five community types representing the proposed tower flux sites. All participating models were given identical initial values and boundary conditions and driven with identical climate data. The objectives of the intercomparison exercise were: 1) compare simulation results of participating terrestrial, hydrological, and atmospheric models over selected time frames; 2) learn about model behavior and sensitivity to estimated boreal site and vegetation definitions; 3) prioritize BOREAS field data collection efforts supporting modeling studies; 4) identify individual model deficiencies as early as possible. Out of these objectives evolved some important coordination and science issues for the BOREAS Experiment that can be generalized to IFCs and long term archiving of the data. Some problems are acceptable because they are endemic to maintaining fair and open competition prior to the peer review process. Others are logistical and addressable through application of planning, management, and information sciences. This investigator has identified one source of measurement and model incompatibility that is manifest in the IFC scaling approach. Although intuitively obvious, scaling problems are already more formally defined in

  18. Application of a water balance model for estimating deep infiltration in a karstic watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Calijuri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario of water scarcity evidences the need for an adequate management of water resources. In karstic regions, the water flow through fractures significantly increases the water infiltration rate, which explains the small number of rivers and the importance of groundwater for urban supply. Therefore, the water balance is necessary since it may aid decision making processes and guide water management projects. The objective of this paper was to perform the water balance of a watershed situated in a karstic region quantifying infiltration, runoff and evapotranspiration. The study area is located near the Tancredo Neves International Airport in Confins, in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Most of the area consists of forest formations (40.9%, and pastures (34.5%. In order to estimate deep infiltration, the BALSEQ model was used. BALSEQ is a numeric model of sequential water balance in which deep infiltration at the end of the day is given by the difference between daily precipitation and the sum of surface runoff, evapotranspiration and the variation of the amount of water stored in the soil. The results show that approximately 60% of total annual precipitation result in deep infiltration, considering the recharge period from September to March. After the dry period, the areas with no vegetal cover present higher deep infiltration. However, over the months, the contribution of the vegetated areas becomes greater, showing the importance of these areas to aquifer recharge.

  19. Effects of Water Management Strategies on Water Balance in a Water Scarce Region: A Case Study in Beijing by a Holistic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigong Peng; Baozhong Zhang; Xueliang Cai; Lei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Irrigation is facing increasing pressure from other competitive water users to reduce water consumption in a water scarce region. Based on the Basin-wide Holistic Integrated Water Assessment (BHIWA) model, the effects of water management strategies on water balance in the dry regions of North China were analyzed. The results show that, with the decrease of irrigation water supply reliability (IWSR) and the increase of irrigation water use efficiency (WUE), irrigation water use decreased signi...

  20. Suitability of the water balance model LARSIM to determine the impact of climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, K.

    2003-04-01

    The Large Area Runoff Simulation Model (LARSIM) was developed to simulate continuously the water balance of large river basins. Beside the runoff generation in the area and the translation and retention in river channels, LARSIM includes the processes of interception, evapo-transpiration and water storage in soils and aquifers. Snow accumulation and snow melt can be considered as well as artificial influences (e.g. storage basins, diversions or water transfer between different basins). LARSIM combines well-tried deterministic hydrological model components, which are as far as possible generally applicable and are based on accessible system data for the land surface. Emphasis is laid on the reliable determination of evapotranspiration by using the Penman-Monteith-equations. Evapotranspiration and the soil water budget are calculated separately for different land uses and field capacities of the soils. For the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg (SW-Germany, approx. 36.000 km2) water balance models were set up which are based on raster cells (square grid 1 km2). The model build up was done to a large extent computer-aided on the basis of extensive digital system data (elevation model, vectored river network, satellite classification of land use, field capacities of soils). For each raster cell up to 16 land use classes are considered separately. The models shall be used for the estimation of the effects of possible climatic modifications on the water regime (like discharge, infiltration, evaporation). The results of the regional hydrostatic atmospheric circulation model REMO will be applied as input data to the water balance models to define the impact of climate change on the hydrological processes. Especially for flood prevention, State officials and the administration expect reliable information on the expected changes. Prior to the use of the water balance model for climatic change calculations, the uncertainty of the model to simulate the actual hydrological conditions

  1. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large-scale ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goeller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no doubt about the existence of a widespread hydrological network under the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux–basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  2. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large scale ice sheet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeller, S.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Miller, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is currently no doubt about the existence of a wide-spread hydrological network under the Antarctic ice sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain inspired by the Gamburtsev Mountains, Antarctica. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux-basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out, that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  3. NIDWat: A Water Balance Model for the Niger Inland Delta (NID) Floodplain in Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, I.; Wisser, D.; Ali, A.; Seidou, O.; Mariko, A.; Afouda, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Niger river basin is characterized by hydro-climatic changes induced by land use and climate change that have significant impacts on local populations. The Niger Inland Delta (NID) is the single most important wetland conditioning the water availability downstream. A significant fraction of the river flow is lost through evaporation and water use in the NID and the conditions are likely to change with increasing population and changing inflow conditions. A comprehensive understanding of the NID's hydro-climatological functioning is therefore crucial for assessing the water resources in the basin under changing conditions in the future. Despite this significance, the components of the water balance in the NID are poorly quantified. We use optical and microwave remote sensing data to characterize the temporal flooding, and observations of river flow and spatially explicit information on water abstractions to develop NIDWat, a water balance model for the NID. Simulated evapotranspiration losses varied by ~ 50%, depending on flooded area map or climatic data. The combined effect of irrigation abstraction and climatic data generated a global water losses range of 16 to 33.04 km3 a-1. The model was validated against observed river discharge and water abstractions and shows a good performance. We then implemented the model as a module in a hydrological model to assess the water balance in the NID and the downstream water availability under changing conditions. We use a multi model approach using regional climate data from the CORDEX initiative. Results suggest, despite increasing runoff an increase in ET losses and changes in the temporal dynamics of flooding that impact water resources availability downstream.

  4. Estimation of Shallow Groundwater Recharge Using a Gis-Based Distributed Water Balance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Graf Renata; Przybyłek Jan

    2014-01-01

    In the paper we present the results of shallow groundwater recharge estimation using the WetSpass GISbased distributed water balance model. By taking into account WetSpass, which stands for Water an Energy Transfer between Soil, Plants and Atmosphere under quasi-Steady State, for average conditions during the period 1961–2000, we assessed the spatial conditions of the groundwater infiltration recharge process of shallow circulation systems in the Poznan Plateau area (the Great Pol...

  5. Water Balance Simulations of a PEM Fuel Cell Using a Two-Fluid Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    A previously published computational multi-phase model of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell has been extended in order to account for the anode side and the electrolyte membrane. The model has been applied to study the water balance of a fuel cell during operation under various humidificat...... net water transport coefficient. Thus we can reduce flooding at the cathode and may obtain improved cell performance due to a better humidified membrane. The results also suggest that membrane dehydration may occur at either anode or cathode depending on the net water transport....

  6. Modeling landscape evapotranspiration by integrating land surface phenology and a water balance algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an improved modeling technique called Vegetation ET (VegET) that integrates commonly used water balance algorithms with remotely sensed Land Surface Phenology (LSP) parameter to conduct operational vegetation water balance modeling of rainfed systems at the LSP’s spatial scale using readily available global data sets. Evaluation of the VegET model was conducted using Flux Tower data and two-year simulation for the conterminous US. The VegET model is capable of estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) of rainfed crops and other vegetation types at the spatial resolution of the LSP on a daily basis, replacing the need to estimate crop- and region-specific crop coefficients.

  7. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii a transient Stream zone Store (iii a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas responsible for surface runoff, interflow and deep percolation. The Subsurface Store describes the unsaturated soil moisture balance, extraction of percolated water by vegetation and groundwater recharge. The Groundwater Store controls the baseflow to stream (if any and the groundwater contribution to the stream zone saturated areas. The daily model was developed following a downward approach by analysing data from Ernies (control and Lemon (53% cleared catchments in Western Australia and elaborating a monthly model. The daily model performed very well in simulating daily flow generation processes for both catchments. Most of the model parameters were incorporated a priori from catchment attributes such as surface slope, soil depth, porosity, stream length and initial groundwater depth, and some were calibrated by matching the observed and predicted hydrographs. The predicted groundwater depth, and streamflow volumes across all time steps from daily to monthly to annual were in close agreement with observations for both catchments.

  8. Water balance at an arid site: a model validation study of bare soil evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.L.; Campbell, G.S.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report contains results of model validation studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The model validation tests consisted of using unsaturated water flow models to simulate water balance experiments conducted at the Buried Waste Test Facility (BWTF) located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site, near Richland, Washington. The BWTF is a lysimeter facility designed to collect field data on long-term water balance and radionuclide tracer movement. It has been operated by PNL for the NLLWMP since 1978. An experimental test case, developed from data collected at the BWTF, was used to evaluate predictions from different water flow models. The major focus of the validation study was to evaluate how the use of different evaporation models affected the accuracy of predictions of evaporation, storage, and drainage made by the whole model. Four evaporation models were tested including two empirical models and two mechanistic models. The empirical models estimate actual evaporation from potential evaporation; the mechanistic models describe water vapor diffusion within the soil profile and between the soil and the atmosphere in terms of fundamental soil properties, and transport processes. The water flow models that included the diffusion-type evaporation submodels performed best overall. The empirical models performed poorly in their description of evaporation and profile water storage during summer months. The predictions of drainage were supported quite well by the experimental data. This indicates that the method used to estimate hydraulic conductivity needed for the Darcian submodel was adequate. This important result supports recommendations for these procedures that were made previously based on laboratory results.

  9. Impact of microwave derived soil moisture on hydrologic simulations using a spatially distributed water balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. S.; Wood, E. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Mancini, M.

    1994-01-01

    Spatial distributions of soil moisture over an agricultural watershed with a drainage area of 60 ha were derived from two NASA microwave remote sensors, and then used as a feedback to determine the initial condition for a distributed water balance model. Simulated hydrologic fluxes over a period of twelve days were compared with field observations and with model predictions based on a streamflow derived initial condition. The results indicated that even the low resolution remotely sensed data can improve the hydrologic model's performance in simulating the dynamics of unsaturated zone soil moisture. For the particular watershed under study, the simulated water budget was not sensitive to the resolutions of the microwave sensors.

  10. Water balance model for polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ultrathin catalyst layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Karen; Eikerling, Michael

    2014-02-07

    We present a water balance model of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultrathin catalyst layers (UTCLs). The model treats the catalyst layers in an interface approximation and the gas diffusion layers as linear transmission lines of water fluxes. It relates current density, pressure distribution, and water fluxes in the different functional layers of the assembly. The optimal mode of operation of UTCLs is in a fully flooded state. The main challenge for MEAs with UTCLs is efficient liquid water removal, to avoid flooding of the gas diffusion layers. The model provides strategies for increasing the critical current density for the onset of flooding, via liquid permeabilities, vaporization areas, and gas pressure differentials. Finally, we discuss methods to identify regimes of transport via water flux measurements.

  11. The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Emmerich, Christopher; Talbert, Marian

    2017-05-03

    The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal (https://my.usgs.gov/mows/) is a user-friendly interface that summarizes monthly historical and simulated future conditions for seven hydrologic and meteorological variables (actual evapotranspiration, potential evapotranspiration, precipitation, runoff, snow water equivalent, atmospheric temperature, and streamflow) at locations across the conterminous United States (CONUS).The estimates of these hydrologic and meteorological variables were derived using a Monthly Water Balance Model (MWBM), a modular system that simulates monthly estimates of components of the hydrologic cycle using monthly precipitation and atmospheric temperature inputs. Precipitation and atmospheric temperature from 222 climate datasets spanning historical conditions (1952 through 2005) and simulated future conditions (2020 through 2099) were summarized for hydrographic features and used to drive the MWBM for the CONUS. The MWBM input and output variables were organized into an open-access database. An Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., Web Feature Service allows the querying and identification of hydrographic features across the CONUS. To connect the Web Feature Service to the open-access database, a user interface—the Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal—was developed to allow the dynamic generation of summary files and plots  based on plot type, geographic location, specific climate datasets, period of record, MWBM variable, and other options. Both the plots and the data files are made available to the user for download 

  12. Modelling the spatial and temporal variations of the water balance for the Weser catchment 1965 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Ulrich; Mauser, Wolfram

    2001-12-01

    This study describes the application of the physically based SVAT model PROMET (PRocess Oriented Model for EvapoTranspiration) in the mesoscale catchment of the Weser (Northern Germany, approx. 37,500 km 2) utilizing a 30 years time series of meteorological input data. To enable a representative analysis of the spatial and temporal variations of the water balance components, the modelization is performed continuously without re-initialization of the state variables or specific calibration. Therefore, PROMET is expanded with the one-layer snow model ESCIMO (Energy balance Snow Cover Integrated MOdel) to provide an integrated model structure for continuous simulations of the water cycle. All necessary input data fields are integrated in a four-dimensional GIS data structure with a raster grid spacing of 1 km: a DEM, soil texture information derived from digitized maps, landuse distribution computed by unmixing a time series of NOAA/AVHRR satellite images and meteorological input data fields which are spatially and temporally interpolated using data provided by the standard measurement network of the German Weather Service (DWD). Spatially non-distributed physical soil and plant parameters are either derived from measurements or taken from literature. The study presents the structure of ESCIMO and its validation at the point and the catchment scale. Then, the modelled mean annual evapotranspiration, aET, as obtained by application of the linked models PROMET/ESCIMO is compared with the corresponding term ET calculated by inserting the measured precipitation and gauged runoff into the water balance equation. It is started from the assumption that for the 30 years period, the overall underground storage change Δ S is negligible. The mean annual deviation aET-ET over the 30 years period is 10.9 mm, indicating that the results represent a valid long-term description of the water balance. The patterns of the simulated water balance components are discussed with respect to

  13. Water balance model for mean annual hydrogen and oxygen isotope distributions in surface waters of the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gabriel J.; Kennedy, Casey D.; Liu, Zhongfang; Stalker, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    The stable H and O isotope composition of river and stream water records information on runoff sources and land-atmosphere water fluxes within the catchment and is a potentially powerful tool for network-based monitoring of ecohydrological systems. Process-based hydrological models, however, have thus far shown limited power to replicate observed large-scale variation in U.S. surface water isotope ratios. Here we develop a geographic information system-based model to predict long-term annual average surface water isotope ratios across the contiguous United States. We use elevation-explicit, gridded precipitation isotope maps as model input and data from a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring program for validation. We find that models incorporating monthly variation in precipitation-evapotranspiration (P-E) amounts account for the majority (>89%) of isotopic variation and have reduced regional bias relative to models that do not consider intra-annual P-E effects on catchment water balance. Residuals from the water balance model exhibit strong spatial patterning and correlations that suggest model residuals isolate additional hydrological signal. We use interpolated model residuals to generate optimized prediction maps for U.S. surface water δ2H and δ18O values. We show that the modeled surface water values represent a relatively accurate and unbiased proxy for drinking water isotope ratios across the United States, making these data products useful in ecological and criminal forensics applications that require estimates of the local environmental water isotope variation across large geographic regions.

  14. A PCSWMM/GIS-based water balance model for the Reesor Creek watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.; Li, J.; Banting, D.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of a watershed experiencing the pressures of land-use change resulting from urban development. The study was undertaken to facilitate an understanding of the water balance of the watershed by developing and implementing watershed procedures that are to be addressed in a watershed plan. There were three components to the research: firstly, observation of the effects of spatially distributed rainfall measurements and their effect on modelling were assessed. Secondly, the model was then calibrated by observing how differing techniques can discretize both the landscape (e.g. land-use and soil type) and incoming precipitation. Finally, a modelling methodology was developed to integrate a Geographic Information System and a hydrologic model (e.g. Storm Water Management Model) in a water balance analysis on a watershed basis. Results show that, under certain conditions, kriging spatially distributed rainfall values can help predict rainfall at ungauged (virtual) sites. Discretization of a watershed was found to affect the differences between measured and generated runoff volumes; however, this can be refined with calibration. It was seen that a strong correlation between measured and predicted rainfall values did not always guarantee a strong relationship between measured and generated runoff Recommendations include the use of a longer time series of rainfall, streamflow and predicted rainfall to observe temporal variations, and the need to assess the differences in modelled rainfall values generated by various surface interpolation methods (e.g. Inverse Distance Weighting and other kriging options) currently available in GIS packages.

  15. A water balance model for Saxonian catchments - present state and projections up to 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Peter; Hauffe, Corina; Baldy, Agnes; Schwarze, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The impact of climate change on the regional water balance regime may have severe consequences for agriculture, forestry and water resources management. In this respect the following questions arise: Will extensive irrigation be necessary on Saxonian crop land in future? Which are the necessary adaptions in water resources management? Are new agricultural and forestry concepts necessary? Therefore, the project KliWES aims at modelling the present water balance regime for whole Saxonia (with the exception of the mining regions and the Elbe-corridor which is largely governed by flood events). Moreover, the effects of climate projections from the WetReg model (CEC) on the water balance regime have been investigated. The calibration strategy relies on splitting up the measured discharges into the major water balance components (evaporation, surface flow, subsurface flow and percolation) by a geometrical analysis of the hydrograph (DIFGA, Schwarze et al.). Thereafter, the water balance software ArcEGMO (Pfützner et al.) has been calibrated on these water balance components. Calibration parameters include correction factors for soil macroporosity, evapo-transpiration and the distribution factor between fast and slow groundwater components. Geological and Soil data have been drawn from official databases (LfULG). Subareas where no continuous gauge data are available have been parametrised by a regionalisation procedure relying on correlations between parameters and physical properties of the subareas considered. Possibilities and limitations of such a regionalisation procedure have been pointed out. Focal point of the present study is an investigation of water balance components in different spatial and temporal resolutions. The Results of the model for the climate projections show drastic increase of evaporation and decrease of groundwater recharge especially in the north-eastern parts of Saxonia (Lausitz). Here, this problem is worsened by the predominantly sandy soils

  16. Water Isotope framework for lake water balance monitoring and modelling in the Nam Co Basin, Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichang Kang

    2017-08-01

    New hydrological insights: A water isotope framework for the Nam Co basin, including the Local Meteoric Water Line, limiting isotopic composition of evaporation and two hypothetical evaporation trajectories, is established. We further applied the isotope mass balance model to estimate the overall isotopic composition of input water to the Nam Co, the evaporation over inputs ratios (E/I for three consecutive years, and the water yields (Wy, depth equivalent runoff at a basin scale. Our results clearly suggest a positive water budget (i.e., E/I < 1, providing another line of evidence that the subsurface leakage from Nam Co is likely. The discrepancy between isotope-based water yields estimations and field-based runoff observations suggest that, compared to the well-studied Nyainqentanglha Mountains and southwestern mountains, the ridge-and-valley landscape in the western highlands and northwestern hogbacks are possibly low yields area, which should draw more research attentions in future hydrological investigations.

  17. Infiltration and water balance modeling along a toposequence in a rubber tree plantation of NE Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammecker, Claude; Seltacho, Siwaporn; Suvanang, Nopmanee; Do, Frederic; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Northeast of Thailand, is a plateau at 200 m AMSL with a typical undulating landscape. Traditionally the lowlands were dedicated to paddy fields and the uplands covered by Dipterocarpus forest. However development of cash crops during the last decades has led to intensive land clearing in the uplands and to modifications at a regional scale of the water balance in the critical zone with increasing runoff and soil erosion. Recent international demand increase for natural rubber motivated many local farmers to shift from these cash crops towards rubber-tree (Heva Brasiliensis) plantations. However these land use changes have been undertaken without considering the climatic and edaphic specificity of the region, which are not well adapted to the growth of rubber tree (rainfall lower than recommended and sandy soils with low fertility). Therefore, in order to assess and try to predict the environmental consequences (water resources, water-table, ..) of the development of rubber tree plantations in this area, a small watershed in the region ok Khon Kaen has been selected to follow the infiltration and to monitor the different components of the water balance along a toposequence. A six years monitoring of the main components of water balance along a toposequence associated to numerical simulation were used to quantify and try to forecast the evolution of the water use and water resources. Unsaturated soil properties were determined at different depths, in various positions along the toposequence. Experimental results supported by modeling of 2D water flow with HYDRUS3D show clearly that infiltration is blocked by a clayey layer on top of the bedrock and conditioned the occurrence of a perched watertable during the rainy seasons. Most of the soil water flow was found to be directed laterally during the rainy season. The deep groundwater was found to be fed from the lower part of toposequence in the thalweg. The transpiration rate measured on the trees at this stage of

  18. Monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion (WBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion...

  19. Estimation of Shallow Groundwater Recharge Using a Gis-Based Distributed Water Balance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf Renata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we present the results of shallow groundwater recharge estimation using the WetSpass GISbased distributed water balance model. By taking into account WetSpass, which stands for Water an Energy Transfer between Soil, Plants and Atmosphere under quasi-Steady State, for average conditions during the period 1961-2000, we assessed the spatial conditions of the groundwater infiltration recharge process of shallow circulation systems in the Poznan Plateau area (the Great Poland Lowland in western Poland, which is classified as a region with observed water deficits. For three temporal variants, i.e. year, winter and summer half-years, we determined using the geological infiltration method by about 5-10% on average, marginally by 20%.

  20. Aedes aegypti Global Suitability Maps Using a Water Container Energy Balance Model for Dengue Risk Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue infections are estimated to total nearly 400 million per year worldwide, with both the geographic range and the magnitude of infections having increased in the past 50 years. The primary dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti is closely associated with humans. It lives exclusively in urban and semi-urban areas, preferentially bites humans, and spends its developmental stages in artificial water containers. Climate regulates the development of Ae. aegypti immature mosquitoes in artificial containers. Potential containers for Ae. aegypti immature development include, but are not limited to, small sundry items (e.g., bottles, cans, plastic containers), buckets, tires, barrels, tanks, and cisterns. Successful development of immature mosquitoes from eggs to larvae, pupae, and eventually adults is largely dependent on the availability of water and the thermal properties of the water in the containers. Recent work has shown that physics-based approaches toward modeling container water properties are promising for resolving the complexities of container water dynamics and the effects on immature mosquito development. An energy balance container model developed by the author, termed the Water Height And Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM), solves for water temperature and height for user-specified containers with readily available weather data. Here we use WHATCH'EM with NASA Earth Science products used as input to construct global suitability maps based on established water temperature ranges for immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. A proxy for dengue risk is provided from habitat suitability, but also population estimates, as Ae. aegypti is closely associated with human activity. NASA gridded Global Population of the World data is used to mask out rural areas with low dengue risk. Suitability maps are illustrated for a variety of containers (size, material, color) and shading scenarios.

  1. Simulation of the water balance of boreal watersheds of northeastern British Columbia, Canada using MIKE SHE, an integrated hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadzadesahraei, S.; Déry, S.; Rex, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Northeastern British Columbia (BC) is undergoing rapid development for oil and gas extraction, largely depending on subsurface hydraulic fracturing (fracking), which relies on available freshwater. Even though this industrial activity has made substantial contributions to regional and provincial economies, it is important to ensure that sufficient and sustainable water supplies are available for all those dependent on the resource, including ecological systems. Further, BC statistics predict that the northeastern region's population will increase by 30% over the next 25 years, thereby amplifying the demands of domestic and industrial water usage. Hence, given the increasing demands for surface water in the complex wetlands of northeastern BC, obtaining accurate long-term water balance information is of vital importance. Thus, this study aims to simulate the 1979-2014 water balance at two boreal watersheds using the MIKE SHE model. More specifically, this research intends to quantify the historical, and regional, water budgets and their associated hydrological processes at two boreal watersheds—the Coles Lake and Tsea Lake watersheds—in northeastern BC. The development of coupled groundwater and surface water model of these watersheds are discussed. The model setup, calibration process, and results are presented, focusing on the water balance of boreal watersheds. Hydrological components within these watersheds are quantified through a combination of intensive fieldwork, observational data, analysis and numerical modeling. The output from the model provides important information for decision makers to manage water resources in northeastern BC. Keywords: Northeastern BC; boreal watershed; water balance; MIKE SHE hydrological model.

  2. Global, continental and regional water balance estimates from HYPE catchment modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, Berit; Andersson, Jafet; Crochemore, Louise; Donnelly, Chantal; Gustafsson, David; Hasan, Abdoulghani; Isberg, Kristina; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Pimentel, Rafael; Pineda, Luis

    2017-04-01

    In the past, catchment modelling mainly focused on simulating the lumped hydrological cycle at local to regional domains with high precision in a specific point of a river. Today, the level of maturity in hydrological process descriptions, input data and methods for parameter constraints makes it possible to apply these models also for multi-basins over large domains, still using the catchment modellers approach with high demands on agreement with observed data. HYPE is a process-oriented, semi-distributed and open-source model concept that is developed and used operationally in Sweden since a decade. Its finest calculation unit is hydrological response units (HRUs) in a catchment and these are assumed to give the same rainfall-runoff response. HRUs are normally made up of similar land cover and management, combined with soil type or elevation. Water divides are retrieved from topography and calculations are integrated for catchments, which can be of different spatial resolution and are coupled along the river network. In each catchment, HYPE calculates the water balance of a given time-step separately for various hydrological storages, such glaciers, active soil, groundwater, river channels, wetlands, floodplains, and lakes. The model is calibrated in a step-wise manner (following the water path-ways) against various sources additional data sources, including in-situ observations, Earth Observation products, soft information and expert judgements (Arheimer et al., 2012; Donnelly et al, 2016; Pechlivanidis and Arheimer 2015). Both the HYPE code and the model set-ups (i.e. input data and parameter values) are frequently released in new versions as they are continuously improved and updated. This presentation will show the results of aggregated water-balance components over large domains, such as the Arctic basin, the European continent, the Indian subcontinent and the Niger River basin. These can easily be compared to results from other kind of large-scale modelling

  3. Impact of spatial data resolution on simulated catchment water balances and model performance of the multi-scale TOPLATS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bormann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the effect of spatial input data resolution on the simulated water balances and flow components using the multi-scale hydrological model TOPLATS. A data set of 25m resolution of the central German Dill catchment (693 km2 is used for investigation. After an aggregation of digital elevation model, soil map and land use classification to 50 m, 75 m, 100 m, 150 m, 200 m, 300 m, 500 m, 1000 m and 2000 m, water balances and water flow components are calculated for the entire Dill catchment as well as for 3 subcatchments without any recalibration. The study shows that model performance measures and simulated water balances almost remain constant for most of the aggregation steps for all investigated catchments. Slight differences in the simulated water balances and statistical quality measures occur for single catchments at the resolution of 50 m to 500 m (e.g. 0–3% for annual stream flow, significant differences at the resolution of 1000 m and 2000 m (e.g. 2–12% for annual stream flow. These differences can be explained by the fact that the statistics of certain input data (land use data in particular as well as soil physical characteristics changes significantly at these spatial resolutions. The impact of smoothing the relief by aggregation occurs continuously but is barely reflected by the simulation results. To study the effect of aggregation of land use data in detail, in addition to current land use the effect of aggregation on the water balance calculations based on three different land use scenarios is investigated. Land use scenarios were available aiming on economic optimisation of agricultural and forestry practices at different field sizes (0.5 ha, 1.5 ha and 5.0 ha. The changes in water balance terms, induced by aggregation of the land use scenarios, are comparable with respect to catchment water balances compared to the current land use. A correlation analysis between statistics of input data and simulated annual

  4. A land surface scheme for atmospheric and hydrologic models: SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Warrach, K.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    A soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme is presented here which solves the coupled system of the Surface Energy and Water Balance (SEWAB) equations considering partly vegetated surfaces. It is based on the one-layer concept for vegetation. In the soil the diffusion equations for heat and moisture are solved on a multi-layer grid. SEWAB has been developed to serve as a land-surface scheme for atmospheric circulation models. Being forced with atmospheric data from either simulations or measurements it calculates surface and subsurface runoff that can serve as input to hydrologic models. The model has been validated with field data from the FIFE experiment and has participated in the PILPS project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes. From these experiments we feel that SEWAB reasonably well partitions the radiation and precipitation into sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as into runoff and soil moisture Storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Landoberflaechenschema wird vorgestellt, das den Transport von Waerme und Wasser zwischen dem Erdboden, der Vegetation und der Atmosphaere unter Beruecksichtigung von teilweise bewachsenem Boden beschreibt. Im Erdboden werden die Diffusionsgleichungen fuer Waerme und Feuchte auf einem Gitter mit mehreren Schichten geloest. Das Schema SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance) beschreibt die Landoberflaechenprozesse in atmosphaerischen Modellen und berechnet den Oberflaechenabfluss und den Basisabfluss, die als Eingabedaten fuer hydrologische Modelle genutzt werden koennen. Das Modell wurde mit Daten des FIFE-Experiments kalibriert und hat an Vergleichsexperimenten fuer Landoberflaechen-Schemata im Rahmen des PILPS-Projektes teilgenommen. Dabei hat sich gezeigt, dass die Aufteilung der einfallenden Strahlung und des Niederschlages in den sensiblen und latenten Waermefluss und auch in Abfluss und Speicherung der Bodenfeuchte in SEWAB den beobachteten Daten recht gut entspricht. (orig.)

  5. How to constrain multi-objective calibrations using water balance components for an improved realism of model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannerstill, Matthias; Bieger, Katrin; Guse, Björn; Bosch, David; Fohrer, Nicola; Arnold, Jeffrey G.

    2017-04-01

    Accurate discharge simulation is one of the most common objectives of hydrological modeling studies. However, a good simulation of discharge is not necessarily the result of a realistic simulation of hydrological processes within the catchment. To enhance the realism of model results, we propose an evaluation framework that considers both discharge and water balance components as evaluation criteria for hydrological models. In this study, we integrated easily available expert knowledge such as average annual values of surface runoff, groundwater flow, and evapotranspiration in the model evaluation procedure to constrain the selection of good model runs. For evaluating water balance and discharge dynamics, the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) and percent bias (PBIAS) were used. In addition, the ratio of root mean square error and standard deviation of measured data (RSR) was calculated for individual segments of the flow duration curve to identify the best model runs in terms of discharge magnitude. Our results indicate that good statistics for discharge do not guarantee realistic simulations of individual water balance components. Therefore, we recommend constraining the ranges of water balance components to better capture internal and external fluxes of the hydrological system, even if trade-offs between good statistics for discharge simulations and reasonable amounts of the water balance components are unavoidable.

  6. An integrative water balance model framework for a changing glaciated catchment in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Seidel, Jochen; Muñoz Asmat, Randy

    2017-04-01

    In the Santa River catchment [SRC] (Cordillera Blanca, Andes of Peru), human livelihoods strongly depend on year-round streamflow from glaciers and reservoirs, particularly in the dry season and in adjacent arid lowlands. Perennial glacial streamflow represents a buffer to water shortages, annual discharge variability and river contamination levels. However, climate change impacts, consecutive glacier shrinkage as well as new irrigated agriculture and hydropower schemes, population growth and thus water allocation might increase water scarcity in several areas of the SRC. This situation exerts further pressure and conflict potential over water resources and stresses the need to analyze both water supply and demand trends in a multidisciplinary and interlinked manner. In this context, an integrative glacio-hydrological framework was developed based on the Glacier and Snow Melt (GSM) and SOil CONTribution (SOCONT) models using the semi-distributed free software RS MINERVE. This water balance model incorporates hydroclimatic, socioeconomic and hydraulic objects and data at daily scale (with several gaps) for the last 50 years (1965-2015). A particular challenge in this context represents the poor data availability both in quantity and quality. Therefore, the hydroclimatic dataset to be used had to be carefully selected and data gaps were filled applying a statistical copula-based approach. The socioeconomic dataset of water demand was elaborated using several assumptions based on further census information and experiences from other projects in the region. Reservoirs and hydropower models were linked with additional hydraulic data. In order to increase model performance within a complex topography of the 11660 km2 SRC, the area was divided into 22 glaciated (GSM) and 42 non-glaciated (SOCONT) subcatchment models. Additionally, 382 elevation bands at 300 m interval were created and grouped into 22 different calibration zones for the whole SRC. The model was calibrated

  7. Liquid water on Mars - An energy balance climate model for CO2/H2O atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Callegari, A. J.; Hsieh, C. T.; Ziegler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A simple climatic model is developed for a Mars atmosphere containing CO2 and sufficient liquid water to account for the observed hydrologic surface features by the existence of a CO2/H2O greenhouse effect. A latitude-resolved climate model originally devised for terrestrial climate studies is applied to Martian conditions, with the difference between absorbed solar flux and emitted long-wave flux to space per unit area attributed to the divergence of the meridional heat flux and the poleward heat flux assumed to equal the atmospheric eddy heat flux. The global mean energy balance is calculated as a function of atmospheric pressure to assess the CO2/H2O greenhouse liquid water hypothesis, and some latitude-resolved cases are examined in detail in order to clarify the role of atmospheric transport and temperature-albedo feedback. It is shown that the combined CO2/H2O greenhouse at plausible early surface pressures may account for climates hot enough to support a hydrological cycle and running water at present-day insolation and visible albedo levels.

  8. Water and nutrient balances in a large tile-drained agricultural catchment: a distributed modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and implementation of a distributed model of coupled water nutrient processes, based on the representative elementary watershed (REW approach, to the Upper Sangamon River Basin, a large, tile-drained agricultural basin located in central Illinois, mid-west of USA. Comparison of model predictions with the observed hydrological and biogeochemical data, as well as regional estimates from literature studies, shows that the model is capable of capturing the dynamics of water, sediment and nutrient cycles reasonably well. The model is then used as a tool to gain insights into the physical and chemical processes underlying the inter- and intra-annual variability of water and nutrient balances. Model predictions show that about 80% of annual runoff is contributed by tile drainage, while the remainder comes from surface runoff (mainly saturation excess flow and subsurface runoff. It is also found that, at the annual scale nitrogen storage in the soil is depleted during wet years, and is supplemented during dry years. This carryover of nitrogen storage from dry year to wet year is mainly caused by the lateral loading of nitrate. Phosphorus storage, on the other hand, is not affected much by wet/dry conditions simply because the leaching of it is very minor compared to the other mechanisms taking phosphorous out of the basin, such as crop harvest. The analysis then turned to the movement of nitrate with runoff. Model results suggested that nitrate loading from hillslope into the channel is preferentially carried by tile drainage. Once in the stream it is then subject to in-stream denitrification, the significant spatio-temporal variability of which can be related to the variation of the hydrologic and hydraulic conditions across the river network.

  9. The effect of water storage change in ET estimation in humid catchments based on water balance models and Budyko framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Sun, Fubao; Liu, Changming; Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Hong

    2017-04-01

    An accurate estimation of ET in humid catchments is essential in water-energy budget research and water resource management etc, while it remains a huge challenge and there is no well accepted explanation for the difficulty of annual ET estimation in humid catchments so far. Here we presents the ET estimation in 102 humid catchments over China based on the Budyko framework and two hydrological models: abcd model and Xin'anjiang mdoel, in comparison with ET calculated from the water balance equation (ETwb) on the ground that the ΔS is approximately zero at multiannual and annual time scale. We provides a possible explanation for this poorly annual ET estimation in humid catchments as well. The results show that at multi-annual timescale, the Budyko framework works fine in ET estimation in humid catchments, while at annual time scale, neither the Budyko framework nor the hydrological models can estimate ET well. The major cause for this poorly estimated annual ET in humid catchments is the neglecting of the ΔS in ETwb since it enlarge the variability of real actual evapotranspiration. Much improvement has been made when compared estimated ET + ΔS with those ETwb, and the bigger the catchment area is, the better this improvement is. It provides a reasonable explanation for the poorly estimated annual ET in humid catchments and reveals the important role of the ΔS in ET estimation and validation. We highlight that the annual ΔS shouldn't be taken as zero in water balance equation in humid catchments.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF EARLY SEASON AGRICULTURAL DROUGHT THROUGH LAND SURFACE WATER INDEX (LSWI AND SOIL WATER BALANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chandrasekar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to address the early season agriculture drought, by monitoring the surface soil wetness during 2010 cropping seasons in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Short Wave Infrared (SWIR based Land Surface Water Index (LSWI and Soil Water Balance (SWB model using inputs from remote sensing and ancillary data were used to monitor early season agriculture drought. During the crop season, investigation was made on LSWI characteristics and its response to the rainfall. It was observed that the Rate of Increase (RoI of LSWI was the highest during the fortnights when the onset of monsoon occurred. The study showed that LSWI is sensitive to the onset of monsoon and initiation of cropping season. The second part of this study attempted to develop a simple book keeping – bucket type – water tight soil water balance model to derive the top 30cm profile soil moisture using climatic, soil and crop parameters as the basic inputs. Soil moisture derived from the model was used to compute the Area Conducive for Sowing (ACS during the sowing window of the cropping season. The soil moisture was validated spatially and temporally with the ground observed soil moisture values. The ACS was compared with the RoI of LSWI. The results showed that the RoI was high during the sowing window whenever the ACS was greater than 50% of the district area. The observation was consistent in all the districts of the two states. Thus the analysis revealed the potential of LSWI for early season agricultural drought management.

  11. Development of a Water and Enthalpy Budget-based Glacier mass balance Model (WEB-GM) and its preliminary validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Baohong; Yang, Kun; Yang, Wei; He, Xiaobo; Chen, Yingying; Lazhu; Guo, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lei; Wu, Hui; Yao, Tandong

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a new water and energy budget-based glacier mass balance model. Enthalpy, rather than temperature, is used in the energy balance equations to simplify the computation of the energy transfers through the water phase change and the movement of liquid water in the snow. A new parameterization for albedo estimation and state-of-the-art parameterization schemes for rainfall/snowfall type identification and surface turbulent heat flux calculations are implemented in the model. This model was driven with meteorological data and evaluated using mass balance and turbulent flux data collected during a field experiment implemented in the ablation zone of the Parlung No. 4 Glacier on the Southeast Tibetan Plateau during 2009 and 2015-2016. The evaluation shows that the model can reproduce the observed glacier ablation depth, surface albedo, surface temperature, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux with high accuracy. Comparing with a traditional energy budget-based glacier mass balance model, this enthalpy-based model shows a superior capacity in simulation accuracy. Therefore, this model can reasonably simulate the energy budget and mass balance of glacier melting in this region and be used as a component of land surface models and hydrological models.

  12. The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andy

    2017-03-16

    Simulations of future climate suggest profiles of temperature and precipitation may differ significantly from those in the past. These changes in climate will likely lead to changes in the hydrologic cycle. As such, natural resource managers are in need of tools that can provide estimates of key components of the hydrologic cycle, uncertainty associated with the estimates, and limitations associated with the climate forcing data used to estimate these components. To help address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal (https://my.usgs.gov/mows/) provides a user friendly interface to deliver hydrologic and meteorological variables for monthly historic and potential future climatic conditions across the continental United States.

  13. Modeling seasonal changes in live fuel moisture and equivalent water thickness using a cumulative water balance index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip E. Dennison; Dar A. Roberts; Sommer R. Thorgusen; Jon C. Regelbrugge; David Weise; Christopher . Lee

    2003-01-01

    Live fuel moisture, an important determinant of fire danger in Mediterranean ecosystems, exhibits seasonal changes in response to soil water availability. Both drought stress indices based on meteorological data and remote sensing indices based on vegetation water absorption can be used to monitor live fuel moisture. In this study, a cumulative water balance index (...

  14. Vegetation water stress monitoring with remote sensing-based energy balance modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Andreu, Ana; Carpintero, Elisabet; Gómez-Giráldez, Pedro; José Polo, María

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the major hazards faced by agroforestry systems in southern Europe, and an increase in frequency is predicted under the conditions of climate change for the region. Timely and accurate monitoring of vegetation water stress using remote sensing time series may assist early-warning services, helping to assess drought impacts and the design of management actions leading to reduce the economic and environmental vulnerability of these systems. A holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is an agro-silvo-pastoral system occupying more than 3 million hectares the Iberian Peninsula and Greece. It consists of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus ilex L.), combined with crops, pasture and Mediterranean shrubs, and it is considered an example of sustainable land use, with great importance in the rural economy. Soil water dynamics is known to have a central role in current tree decline and the reduction of the forested area that is threatening its conservation. A two-source thermal-based evapotranspiration model (TSEB) has been applied to monitor the effect on vegetation water use of soil moisture stress in a dehesa located in southern Spain. The TSEB model separates the soil and canopy contributions to the radiative temperature and to the exchange of surface energy fluxes, so it is especially suited for partially vegetated landscapes. The integration of remotely sensed data in this model may support an evaluation of the whole ecosystem state at a large scale. During two consecutive summers, in 2012 and 2013, time series of optical and thermal MODIS images, with 250m and 1 km of spatial resolution respectively, have been combined with meteorological data provided by a ground station to monitor the evapotranspiration (ET) of the system. An eddy covariance tower (38°12' N; 4°17' W, 736 m a.s.l), equipped with instruments to measure all the components of the energy balance and 1 km of homogeneous fetch in the predominant wind

  15. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  16. Inferring Soil Moisture Memory from Streamflow Observations Using a Simple Water Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Koster, Randal Dean; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture is known for its integrative behavior and resulting memory characteristics. Soil moisture anomalies can persist for weeks or even months into the future, making initial soil moisture a potentially important contributor to skill in weather forecasting. A major difficulty when investigating soil moisture and its memory using observations is the sparse availability of long-term measurements and their limited spatial representativeness. In contrast, there is an abundance of long-term streamflow measurements for catchments of various sizes across the world. We investigate in this study whether such streamflow measurements can be used to infer and characterize soil moisture memory in respective catchments. Our approach uses a simple water balance model in which evapotranspiration and runoff ratios are expressed as simple functions of soil moisture; optimized functions for the model are determined using streamflow observations, and the optimized model in turn provides information on soil moisture memory on the catchment scale. The validity of the approach is demonstrated with data from three heavily monitored catchments. The approach is then applied to streamflow data in several small catchments across Switzerland to obtain a spatially distributed description of soil moisture memory and to show how memory varies, for example, with altitude and topography.

  17. Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2016-01-01

    A parameter regionalization scheme to transfer parameter values from gaged to ungaged areas for a monthly water balance model (MWBM) was developed and tested for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, a global-sensitivity algorithm, was implemented on a MWBM to generate parameter sensitivities on a set of 109 951 hydrologic response units (HRUs) across the CONUS. The HRUs were grouped into 110 calibration regions based on similar parameter sensitivities. Subsequently, measured runoff from 1575 streamgages within the calibration regions were used to calibrate the MWBM parameters to produce parameter sets for each calibration region. Measured and simulated runoff at the 1575 streamgages showed good correspondence for the majority of the CONUS, with a median computed Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient of 0.76 over all streamgages. These methods maximize the use of available runoff information, resulting in a calibrated CONUS-wide application of the MWBM suitable for providing estimates of water availability at the HRU resolution for both gaged and ungaged areas of the CONUS.

  18. How would peak rainfall intensity affect runoff predictions using conceptual water balance models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most hydrological models use continuous daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration for streamflow estimation. With the projected increase in mean surface temperature, hydrological processes are set to intensify irrespective of the underlying changes to the mean precipitation. The effect of an increase in rainfall intensity on the long-term water balance is, however, not adequately accounted for in the commonly used hydrological models. This study follows from a previous comparative analysis of a non-stationary daily series of stream flow of a forested watershed (River Rimbaud in the French Alps (area = 1.478 km2 (1966–2006. Non-stationarity in the recorded stream flow occurred as a result of a severe wild fire in 1990. Two daily models (AWBM and SimHyd were initially calibrated for each of three distinct phases in relation to the well documented land disturbance. At the daily and monthly time scales, both models performed satisfactorily with the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (NSE varying from 0.77 to 0.92. When aggregated to the annual time scale, both models underestimated the flow by about 22% with a reduced NSE at about 0.71. Exploratory data analysis was undertaken to relate daily peak hourly rainfall intensity to the discrepancy between the observed and modelled daily runoff amount. Preliminary results show that the effect of peak hourly rainfall intensity on runoff prediction is insignificant, and model performance is unlikely to improve when peak daily precipitation is included. Trend analysis indicated that the large decrease of precipitation when daily precipitation amount exceeded 10–20 mm may have contributed greatly to the decrease in stream flow of this forested watershed.

  19. A balanced calibration of water quantity and quality by multi-objective optimization for integrated water system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Taylor, John A.

    2016-07-01

    Due to the high interactions among multiple processes in integrated water system models, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to achieve reasonable solutions for all objectives by using the traditional step-by-step calibration. In many cases, water quantity and quality are equally important but their objectives in model calibration usually conflict with each other, so it is not a good practice to calibrate one after another. In this study, a combined auto-calibration multi-process approach was proposed for the integrated water system model (HEQM) using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. This ensures that the model performance among inseparable or interactive processes could be balanced by users based on the Pareto front. The Huai River Basin, a highly regulated and heavily polluted region of China, was selected as a case study. The hydrological and water quality parameters of HEQM were calibrated simultaneously based on the observed series of runoff and ammonia-nitrogen (NH4-N) concentrations. The results were compared with those of the step-by-step calibration to demonstrate the rationality and feasibility of the multi-objective approach. The results showed that a Pareto optimal front was formed and could be divided into three clear sections based on the elastic coefficient of model performance between NH4-N and runoff, i.e., the dominated section for NH4-N improvement, the trade-off section between NH4-N and runoff, and the dominated section for runoff improvement. The trade-off of model performance between runoff and NH4-N concentration was clear. The results of the step-by-step calibration fell in the dominated section for NH4-N improvement, where just the optimum of the runoff simulation was achieved with a large potential to improve NH4-N simulation without a significant degradation of the runoff simulation. The overall optimal solutions for all the simulations appeared in the trade-off section. Therefore, the Pareto front provided different

  20. Analysis of soil and vegetation patterns in semi-arid Mediterranean landscapes by way of a conceptual water balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Portoghese

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of various vegetation types on water balance variability in semi-arid Mediterranean landscapes, and the different strategies they may have developed to succeed in such water-limited environments. The existence of preferential associations between soil water holding capacity and vegetation species is assessed through an extensive soil geo-database focused on a study region in Southern Italy. Water balance constraints that dominate the organization of landscapes are investigated by a conceptual bucket approach. The temporal water balance dynamics are modelled, with vegetation water use efficiency being parameterized through the use of empirically obtained crop coefficients as surrogates of vegetation behavior in various developmental stages. Sensitivity analyses with respect to the root zone depth and soil water holding capacity are carried out with the aim of explaining the existence of preferential soil-vegetation associations and, hence, the spatial distribution of vegetation types within the study region. Based on these sensitivity analyses the degrees of suitability and adaptability of each vegetation type to parts of the study region are explored with respect of the soil water holding capacity, and the model results were found consistent with the observed affinity patterns.

  1. Fena Valley Reservoir watershed and water-balance model updates and expansion of watershed modeling to southern Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Sarah N.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2017-12-01

    In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, initiated a project to evaluate the potential impacts of projected climate-change on Department of Defense installations that rely on Guam’s water resources. A major task of that project was to develop a watershed model of southern Guam and a water-balance model for the Fena Valley Reservoir. The southern Guam watershed model provides a physically based tool to estimate surface-water availability in southern Guam. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Precipitation Runoff Modeling System, PRMS-IV, was used to construct the watershed model. The PRMS-IV code simulates different parts of the hydrologic cycle based on a set of user-defined modules. The southern Guam watershed model was constructed by updating a watershed model for the Fena Valley watersheds, and expanding the modeled area to include all of southern Guam. The Fena Valley watershed model was combined with a previously developed, but recently updated and recalibrated Fena Valley Reservoir water-balance model.Two important surface-water resources for the U.S. Navy and the citizens of Guam were modeled in this study; the extended model now includes the Ugum River watershed and improves upon the previous model of the Fena Valley watersheds. Surface water from the Ugum River watershed is diverted and treated for drinking water, and the Fena Valley watersheds feed the largest surface-water reservoir on Guam. The southern Guam watershed model performed “very good,” according to the criteria of Moriasi and others (2007), in the Ugum River watershed above Talofofo Falls with monthly Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency statistic values of 0.97 for the calibration period and 0.93 for the verification period (a value of 1.0 represents perfect model fit). In the Fena Valley watershed, monthly simulated streamflow volumes from the watershed model compared reasonably well with the

  2. Implementation and evaluation of a monthly water balance model over the US on an 800 m grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, S. W.; Alder, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We simulate the 1950-2010 water balance for the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) with a monthly water balance model (MWBM) using the 800 m Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data set as model input. We employed observed snow and streamflow data sets to guide modification of the snow and potential evapotranspiration components in the default model and to evaluate model performance. Based on various metrics and sensitivity tests, the modified model yields reasonably good simulations of seasonal snowpack in the West (range of bias of ±50 mm at 68% of 713 SNOTEL sites), the gradients and magnitudes of actual evapotranspiration, and runoff (median correlation of 0.83 and median Nash-Sutcliff efficiency of 0.6 between simulated and observed annual time series at 1427 USGS gage sites). The model generally performs well along the Pacific Coast, the high elevations of the Basin and Range and over the Midwest and East, but not as well over the dry areas of the Southwest and upper Plains regions due, in part, to the apportioning of direct versus delayed runoff. Sensitivity testing and application of the MWBM to simulate the future water balance at four National Parks when driven by 30 climate models from the Climate Model Intercomparison Program Phase 5 (CMIP5) demonstrate that the model is useful for evaluating first-order, climate driven hydrologic change on monthly and annual time scales.

  3. Implementation and evaluation of a monthly water balance model over the US on an 800 m grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Steven W.; Alder, Jay R.

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the 1950–2010 water balance for the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) with a monthly water balance model (MWBM) using the 800 m Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data set as model input. We employed observed snow and streamflow data sets to guide modification of the snow and potential evapotranspiration components in the default model and to evaluate model performance. Based on various metrics and sensitivity tests, the modified model yields reasonably good simulations of seasonal snowpack in the West (range of bias of ±50 mm at 68% of 713 SNOTEL sites), the gradients and magnitudes of actual evapotranspiration, and runoff (median correlation of 0.83 and median Nash-Sutcliff efficiency of 0.6 between simulated and observed annual time series at 1427 USGS gage sites). The model generally performs well along the Pacific Coast, the high elevations of the Basin and Range and over the Midwest and East, but not as well over the dry areas of the Southwest and upper Plains regions due, in part, to the apportioning of direct versus delayed runoff. Sensitivity testing and application of the MWBM to simulate the future water balance at four National Parks when driven by 30 climate models from the Climate Model Intercomparison Program Phase 5 (CMIP5) demonstrate that the model is useful for evaluating first-order, climate driven hydrologic change on monthly and annual time scales.

  4. Monthly water balance model for climate change analysis in agriculture with R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicz, Péter; Herceg, András; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    For Hungary regional climate models projections suggest a warmer climate and some changes in annual precipitation distribution. These changes force the whole agrarian sector to consider the traditional cropping technologies. This situation is more serious in forestry because some forest populations are on their xeric distributional limits (Gálos et. al, 2014). Additionally, a decision has an impact sometimes longer than one hundred years. To support the stakeholder there is a project which develops a GIS (Geographic Information System) based decision support system. Hydrology plays significant role in this system because water is often one of the most important limiting factor in Hungary. A modified Thorntwaite-type monthly water balance model was choosen to produce hydrological estimations for the GIS modules. This model is calibrated with the available data between 2000 and 2008. Beside other meteorological data we used mainly an actual evapotranspiration map in the calibration phase, which was derived with the Complementary-relationship-based evapotranspiration mapping (CREMAP; Szilágyi and Kovács, 2011) technique. The calibration process is pixel based and it has several stochastic steps. We try to find a flexible solution for the model implementation which easy to automatize and can be integrate in GIS systems. The open source R programming language was selected which well satisfied these demands. The result of this development is summarized as an R package. This publication has been supported by AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project. References Gálos B., Antal V., Czimber K., Mátyás Cs. (2014) Forest ecosystems, sewage works and droughts - possibilities for climate change adaptation. In: Santamarta J.C., Hernandez-Gutiérrez L.E., Arraiza M.P. (eds) 2014. Natural Hazards and Climate Change/Riesgos Naturales y Cambio Climático. Madrid: Colegio de Ingenieros de Montes. ISBN 978-84-617-1060-7, D.L. TF 565-2014, 91-104 pp Szilágyi J., Kovács Á. (2011

  5. A water balance model of the Natura 2000 protected area “Nestos delta”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myronidis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop the water balance of the Natura 2000 protected area “Nestos delta” on a monthly time step. The most significant ecosystem of the delta is the aquatic forest (dominated by Salix alba and Populus alba which remains along the river course near the mount and the poplar plantation. During the last decade two large dams have been constructed upstream of the study area for hydropower generation and irrigation, resulting in the dramatic modification of the hydrologic regime of the site. The research is based on the analysis of the available geographical and hydrological data of the study area for the period 1985-2006. Through the integration of Geographical Information Systems (G.I.S. and computational hydrology techniques, the water balance of the study area is constructed and the need of decision making has raised in order to prevent further deterioration of the unique aquatic forest.

  6. Modelling the water balance of irrigated fields in tropical floodplain soils using Hydrus-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Abebech; Frankl, Amaury; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Tilahun, Seifu; Alamirew, Tena; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimation of evaporation, transpiration and deep percolation is crucial in irrigated agriculture and the sustainable management of water resources. Here, the Hydrus-1D process-based numerical model was used to estimate the actual transpiration, soil evaporation and deep percolation from irrigated fields of floodplain soils. Field experiments were conducted from Dec 2015 to May 2016 in a small irrigation scheme (50 ha) called 'Shina' located in the Lake Tana floodplains of Ethiopia. Six experimental plots (three for onion and three for maize) were selected along a topographic transect to account for soil and groundwater variability. Irrigation amount (400 to 550 mm during the growing period) was measured using V-notches installed at each plot boundary and daily groundwater levels were measured manually from piezometers. There was no surface runoff observed in the growing period and rainfall was measured using a manual rain gauge. All daily weather data required for the evapotranspiration calculation using Pen Man Monteith equation were collected from a nearby metrological station. The soil profiles were described for each field to include the vertical soil heterogeneity in the soil water balance simulations. The soil texture, organic matter, bulk density, field capacity, wilting point and saturated moisture content were measured for all the soil horizons. Soil moisture monitoring at 30 and 60 cm depths was performed. The soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon was estimated using KNN pedotransfer functions for tropical soils and were effectively fitted using the RETC program (R2= 0.98±0.011) for initial prediction. A local sensitivity analysis was performed to select and optimize the most important hydraulic parameters for soil water flow in the unsaturated zone. The most sensitive parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), saturated moisture content (θs) and pore size distribution (n). Inverse modelling using Hydrus-1D further optimized

  7. Potential groundwater recharge for the State of Minnesota using the Soil-Water-Balance model, 1996-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erik A.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater recharge is one of the most difficult components of a water budget to ascertain, yet is an important boundary condition necessary for the quantification of water resources. In Minnesota, improved estimates of recharge are necessary because approximately 75 percent of drinking water and 90 percent of agricultural irrigation water in Minnesota are supplied from groundwater. The water that is withdrawn must be supplied by some combination of (1) increased recharge, (2) decreased discharge to streams, lakes, and other surface-water bodies, and (3) removal of water that was stored in the system. Recent pressure on groundwater resources has highlighted the need to provide more accurate recharge estimates for various tools that can assess the sustainability of long-term water use. As part of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, used the Soil-Water-Balance model to calculate gridded estimates of potential groundwater recharge across Minnesota for 1996‒2010 at a 1-kilometer (0.621-mile) resolution. The potential groundwater recharge estimates calculated for Minnesota from the Soil-Water Balance model included gridded values (1-kilometer resolution) of annual mean estimates (that is, the means for individual years from 1996 through 2010) and mean annual estimates (that is, the mean for the 15-year period 1996−2010).

  8. Skylab water balance error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the precision of the net water balance were obtained for the entire Skylab preflight and inflight phases as well as for the first two weeks of flight. Quantitative estimates of both total sampling errors and instrumentation errors were obtained. It was shown that measurement error is minimal in comparison to biological variability and little can be gained from improvement in analytical accuracy. In addition, a propagation of error analysis demonstrated that total water balance error could be accounted for almost entirely by the errors associated with body mass changes. Errors due to interaction between terms in the water balance equation (covariances) represented less than 10% of the total error. Overall, the analysis provides evidence that daily measurements of body water changes obtained from the indirect balance technique are reasonable, precise, and relaible. The method is not biased toward net retention or loss.

  9. A new snow-vegetation interaction extension for the Water Balance Simulation Model (WaSiM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Kristian; Meißl, Gertraud; Marke, Thomas; Pohl, Stefan; Garvelmann, Jakob; Schulla, Jörg; Strasser, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    The water balance in forested mountainous catchments is strongly influenced by the interaction of snow and vegetation. Especially coniferous forest canopies have a large storage capacity for snow, exceeding the one for rain by one order of magnitude. The snow intercepted by the trees is exposed to increased turbulence. Hence, the sublimation of intercepted snow can amount to a significant fraction of total precipitation and therefore represents an important component of the water balance in forested environments. The current version of the Water Balance Simulation Model (WaSiM 9.09.01) has been extended to consider snow hydrological processes in forest canopies with: (i) modified micro-meteorological conditions in the forest canopy, (ii) snow interception, melt unload, and sublimation of intercepted snow, and (iii) energy balance snowmelt computation on the ground, considering the modified micro-meteorological conditions. The study presents a detailed description of the new snow-vegetation extension in WaSiM. Internal state variables of the model have been compared to inside-forest measurements (meteorological variables and snow cover dynamics) from a low-cost sensor network established in the 9.2 km2 large alpine catchment of the Brixenbach, Tyrol/Austria. Results show the improvements achieved with the extended model version for forested areas in temperate mountain environments subject to seasonal snow cover.

  10. Modeling of seasonal water balance for crop production in Bangladesh with implications for future projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed R. Karim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Expecting the projected regional or global climate change, weather could have a significant effect on soil moisture and thereby affecting the plant growth. Water deficiency is considered as one of the major climatic restraints for crop production in Bangladesh, especially in the dry season. To better understand the crop responses to moisture variation, a quantitative analysis is done for major water balance components named, potential evapotranspiration (PET, actual evapotranspiration (AET, soil moisture storage (ST, water deficiency (WD and water surplus (WS with the use of Thornthwaite monthly water balance program. Analyses were carried out for three different seasons, together with interannual variability for 12 major rice growing districts of Bangladesh representing the north, central, southern and coastal zones. Hindcasted monthly average surface air temperature and precipitation data were collected from Bangladesh meteorological department during 1986 to 2006. Results suggested, trend of PET was same in every station and generally higher values were observed in the month of July and August. Khulna, the coastal station had the highest annual average PET of 1369 mm. The lowest annual AET of 1108 mm was estimated for Teknaf, while Dinajpur stood in second lowest position. ST was found almost at field capacity from July to September and, the southern station Chittagong experienced the highest average monthly ST. Maximum WD was found in Bogra and second highest shortage was in Dinajpur. The assessment of average WD of 178 mm yr-1 in northern Bangladesh reflected the worst situation among all regions, besides focusing the winter as the most crucial season regarding the water scarcity. Least amount of WS was noticed for the southern station Khulna. Significant positive relationship (p<0.05 between soil moisture and current rice yields proved the importance of surplus water conservation for the drought prone zone of Bangladesh. To boost up the

  11. Characterization of yield reduction in Ethiopia using a GIS-based crop water balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.

    2003-01-01

    In many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, subsistence agriculture is characterized by significant fluctuations in yield and production due to variations in moisture availability to staple crops. Widespread drought can lead to crop failures, with associated deterioration in food security. Ground data collection networks are sparse, so methods using geospatial rainfall estimates derived from satellite and gauge observations, where available, have been developed to calculate seasonal crop water balances. Using conventional crop production data for 4 years in Ethiopia (1996-1999), it was found that water-limited and water-unlimited growing regions can be distinguished. Furthermore, maize growing conditions are also indicative of conditions for sorghum. However, another major staple, teff, was found to behave sufficiently differently from maize to warrant studies of its own.

  12. Asia's water balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immerzeel, W.W.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    The availability of water for human consumption and agriculture can no longer be taken for granted. Various facets of water stress at different spatial scales, such as groundwater depletion1,2, climate change and population increase3, and glacier and snow melt4,5, have been recognized as

  13. Modeling the water balance of sloped vineyards under various climate change scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Grapes for wine production are a highly climate sensitive crop and vineyard water budget is a decisive factor in quality formation. In order to conduct risk assessments for climate change effects in viticulture, models are needed which can be applied to complete growing regions. We first modified an existing simplified geometric vineyard model of radiation interception and resulting water use to incorporate numerical Monte Carlo simulations and the physical aspects of radiation interactions between canopy and vineyard slope and azimuth. We then used four regional climate models to assess for possible effects on the water budget of selected vineyard sites up to 2100. The model was developed to describe the partitioning of short-wave radiation between grapevine canopy and soil surface, respectively green cover, necessary to calculate vineyard evapotranspiration. Soil water storage was allocated to two sub reservoirs. The model was adopted for steep slope vineyards based on coordinate transformation and validated against measurements of grapevine sap flow and soil water content determined down to 1.6 m depth at three different sites over two years. The results showed good agreement of modelled and observed soil water dynamics of vineyards with large variations in site specific soil water holding capacity and viticultural management. Simulated sap flow was in overall good agreement with measured sap flow but site-specific responses of sap flow to potential evapotranspiration were observed. The analyses of climate change impacts on vineyard water budget demonstrated the importance of site-specific assessment due to natural variations in soil water holding capacity. The model was capable of describing seasonal and site-specific dynamics in soil water content and could be used in an amended version to estimate changes in the water budget of entire grape growing areas due to evolving climatic changes.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of a spatially-explicit annual water-balance model: case study of the Cape Fear catchment, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, P.; Guswa, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for assessment of water provisioning ecosystem services. While simple models with low data and expertise requirements are attractive, their use as decision-aid tools should be supported by uncertainty characterization. We assessed the performance of the InVEST annual water yield model, a popular tool for ecosystem service assessment based on the Budyko framework. Our study involved the comparison of ten subcatchments in the Cape Fear watershed, NC, ranging in size and land use configuration. We analyzed the model sensitivity to the eco-hydrological parameters and the effect of extrapolating a lumped theory to a fully distributed model. Comparison of the model predictions with observations and with a lumped water balance model confirmed that the model is able to represent differences in land uses. Our results also emphasize the effect of climate input errors, especially annual precipitation, and errors in the eco-hydrological parameter Z, which are both comparable to the model structure uncertainties. In practice, our case study supports the use of the model for predicting land use change effect on water provisioning, although its use for identifying areas of high water yield will be influenced by precipitation errors. While the results are inherently local, analysis of the model structure suggests that many insights from this study will hold globally. Further work toward characterization of uncertainties in such simple models will help identify the regions and decision contexts where the model predictions may be used with confidence.

  15. A dynamic human water and electrolyte balance model for verification and optimization of life support systems in space flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, P.; Czupalla, M.; Walter, U.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a dynamic MATLAB SIMULINK® model for the water and electrolyte balance inside the human body. This model is part of an environmentally sensitive dynamic human model for the optimization and verification of environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) in space flight applications. An ECLSS provides all vital supplies for supporting human life on board a spacecraft. As human space flight today focuses on medium- to long-term missions, the strategy in ECLSS is shifting to closed loop systems. For these systems the dynamic stability and function over long duration are essential. However, the only evaluation and rating methods for ECLSS up to now are either expensive trial and error breadboarding strategies or static and semi-dynamic simulations. In order to overcome this mismatch the Exploration Group at Technische Universität München (TUM) is developing a dynamic environmental simulation, the "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB). The central element of this simulation is the dynamic and environmentally sensitive human model. The water subsystem simulation of the human model discussed in this paper is of vital importance for the efficiency of possible ECLSS optimizations, as an over- or under-scaled water subsystem would have an adverse effect on the overall mass budget. On the other hand water has a pivotal role in the human organism. Water accounts for about 60% of the total body mass and is educt and product of numerous metabolic reactions. It is a transport medium for solutes and, due to its high evaporation enthalpy, provides the most potent medium for heat load dissipation. In a system engineering approach the human water balance was worked out by simulating the human body's subsystems and their interactions. The body fluids were assumed to reside in three compartments: blood plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid. In addition, the active and passive transport of water and solutes between those

  16. Land surface temperature representativeness in a heterogeneous area through a distributed energy-water balance model and remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corbari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature is the link between soil-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes and soil water content through the energy water balance. This paper analyses the representativeness of land surface temperature (LST for a distributed hydrological water balance model (FEST-EWB using LST from AHS (airborne hyperspectral scanner, with a spatial resolution between 2–4 m, LST from MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 1000 m, and thermal infrared radiometric ground measurements that are compared with the representative equilibrium temperature that closes the energy balance equation in the distributed hydrological model.

    Diurnal and nocturnal images are analyzed due to the non stable behaviour of the thermodynamic temperature and to the non linear effects induced by spatial heterogeneity.

    Spatial autocorrelation and scale of fluctuation of land surface temperature from FEST-EWB and AHS are analysed at different aggregation areas to better understand the scale of representativeness of land surface temperature in a hydrological process.

    The study site is the agricultural area of Barrax (Spain that is a heterogeneous area with a patchwork of irrigated and non irrigated vegetated fields and bare soil. The used data set was collected during a field campaign from 10 to 15 July 2005 in the framework of the SEN2FLEX project.

  17. Influences of Leaf Area Index estimations on water balance modeling in a Mediterranean semi-arid basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gigante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the role played by vegetation parameters, necessary to the hydrological distributed modeling, is investigated focusing on the correct use of remote sensing products for the evaluation of hydrological losses in the soil water balance. The research was carried out over a medium-sized river basin in Southern Italy, where the vegetation status is characterised through a data-set of multi-temporal NDVI images. The model adopted uses one layer of vegetation whose status is defined by the Leaf Area Index (LAI, which is often obtained from NDVI images. The inherent problem is that the vegetation heterogeneity – including soil disturbances – has a large influence on the spectral bands and so the relation between LAI and NDVI is not unambiguous.

    We present a rationale for the basin scale calibration of a non-linear NDVI-LAI regression, based on the comparison between NDVI values and literature LAI estimations of the vegetation cover in recognized landscape elements of the study catchment. Adopting a process-based model (DREAM with a distributed parameterisation, the influence of different NDVI-LAI regression models on main features of water balance predictions is investigated. The results show a significant sensitivity of the hydrological losses and soil water regime to the alternative LAI estimations. These crucially affects the model performances especially in low-flows simulation and in the identification of the intermittent regime.

  18. Application of Tank Model for Predicting Water Balance and Flow Discharge Components of Cisadane Upper Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Mulyana Arifjaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of hydrological tank model was well described into four compartments (tanks. The first tank (tank A comprised of one vertical (qA0 and two lateral (qA1 and qA2 water flow components and tank B comprised of one vertical (qB0 and one lateral (qB1 water flow components. Tank C comprised of one vertical (qC0 and one lateral (qC1 water flow components, whereas tank D comprised of one lateral water flow component (qD1.  These vertical water flows would also contribute to the depletion of water flow in the related tanks but would replenish tanks in the deeper layers. It was assumed that at all lateral water flow components would finally accumulate in one stream, summing-up of the lateral water flow, much or less, should be equal to the water discharge (Qo at specified time concerns. Tank A received precipitation (R and evapo-transpiration (ET which was its gradientof (R-ET over time would become the driving force for the changes of water stored in the soil profiles and thosewater flows leaving the soil layer.  Thus tank model could describe th vertical and horizontal water flow withinthe watershed. The research site was Cisadane Upper Catchment, located at Pasir Buncir Village of CaringinSub-District within the Regency of Bogor in West Java Province.  The elevations ranged 512 –2,235 m above sealevel, with a total drainage area of 1,811.5 ha and total length of main stream of 14,340.7 m.  The land cover wasdominated by  forest  with a total of 1,044.6 ha (57.67%,  upland agriculture with a total of 477.96 ha (26.38%,mixed garden with a total of 92.85 ha(5.13% and semitechnical irigated rice field with a total of 196.09 ha (10,8%.  The soil was classified as hydraquent (96.6% and distropept (3.4%.  Based on the calibration of tank model application in the study area, the resulting coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.72 with model efficiency (NSEof= 0.75, thus tank model could well illustrate the water flow distribution of

  19. Global water balances reconstructed by multi-model offline simulations of land surface models under GSWP3 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, T.; KIM, H.; Ferguson, C. R.; Dirmeyer, P.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    . Forcings for this period are produced from a select number of GCM-representative concentration pathways (RCPs) pairings. GSWP3 is specifically directed towards addressing the following key science questions: 1. How have interactions between eco-hydrological processes changed in the long term within a changing climate? 2. What is /will be the state of the water, energy, and carbon balances over land in the 20th and 21st centuries and what are the implications of the anticipated changes for human society in terms of freshwater resources, food productivity, and biodiversity? 3. How do the state-of-the-art land surface modeling systems perform and how can they be improved? In this presentation, we present preliminary results relevant to science question two, including: revised best-estimate global hydrological cycles for the retrospective period, inter-comparisons of modeled terrestrial water storage in large river basins and satellite remote-sensing estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), and the impacts of climate and anthropogenic changes during the 20th century on the long-term trend of water availability and scarcity.

  20. Water Balance in the Amazon Basin from a Land Surface Model Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getirana, Augusto C. V.; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hong-Yi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; hide

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in land surfacemodeling and remote sensing, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. This study aims to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-ofthe- art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables (terrestrial water storage TWS, evapotranspiration ET, surface runoff R, and base flow B) are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 18 spatial resolution were used to run 14 LSMs. Precipitation datasets that have been rescaled to matchmonthly Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) andGlobal Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) datasets and the daily Hydrologie du Bassin de l'Amazone (HYBAM) dataset were used to perform three experiments. The Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme was forced with R and B and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration datasets andGravity Recovery and ClimateExperiment (GRACE)TWSestimates in two subcatchments of main tributaries (Madeira and Negro Rivers).At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39 to 3.26 mm day(exp -1) and a low spatial correlation between ET and precipitation indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget components vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation dataset, but simulated TWS generally agrees with GRACE estimates at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using HYBAM, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network and the rescaling at a finer temporal scale.

  1. Water storage changes and balances in Africa observed by GRACE and hydrologic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Continental water storage plays a major role in Earth's climate system. However, temporal and spatial variations of continental water are poorly known, particularly in Africa. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite mission provides an opportunity to estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS variations at both continental and river-basin scales. In this paper, seasonal and secular variations of TWS within Africa for the period from January 2003 to July 2013 are assessed using monthly GRACE coefficients from three processing centers (Centre for Space Research, the German Research Centre for Geosciences, and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Monthly grids from Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS-1 and from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM-3B43 models are also used in order to understand the reasons of increasing or decreasing water storage. Results from GRACE processing centers show similar TWS estimates at seasonal timescales with some differences concerning inter-annual trend variations. The largest annual signals of GRACE TWS are observed in Zambezi and Okavango River basins and in Volta River Basin. An increasing trend of 11.60 mm/a is found in Zambezi River Basin and of 9 mm/a in Volta River Basin. A phase shift is found between rainfall and GRACE TWS (GRACE TWS is preceded by rainfall by 2–3 months in parts of south central Africa. Comparing GLDAS rainfall with TRMM model, it is found that GLDAS has a dry bias from TRMM model.

  2. Comparison of model performance and simulated water balance using NASIM and SWAT for the Wupper River Basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorza, Paula; Nottebohm, Martin; Scheibel, Marc; aus der Beek, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Under the framework of the Horizon 2020 project BINGO (Bringing INnovation to onGOing water management), climate change impacts on the water cycle in the Wupper catchment area are being studied. With this purpose, a set of hydrological models in NASIM and SWAT have been set up, calibrated, and validated for past conditions using available data. NASIM is a physically-based, lumped, hydrological model based on the water balance equation. For the upper part of the Dhünn catchment area - Wupper River's main tributary - a SWAT model was also implemented. Observed and simulated discharge by NASIM and SWAT for the drainage area upstream of Neumühle hydrometric station (close to Große Dhünn reservoir's inlet) are compared. Comparison of simulated water balance for several hydrological years between the two models is also carried out. While NASIM offers high level of detail for modelling of complex urban areas and the possibility of entering precipitation time series at fine temporal resolution (e.g. minutely data), SWAT enables to study long-term impacts offering a huge variety of input and output variables including different soil properties, vegetation and land management practices. Beside runoff, also sediment and nutrient transport can be simulated. For most calculations, SWAT operates on a daily time step. The objective of this and future work is to determine catchment responses on different meteorological events and to study parameter sensitivity of stationary inputs such as soil parameters, vegetation or land use. Model performance is assessed with different statistical metrics (relative volume error, coefficient of determination, and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency).

  3. Water-balance subregions (WBSs), soil types, and virtual crops for the five land-use time-frames used in the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the model grid, water-balance subregions (WBSs), soil types, and virtual crops for the five land-use time-frames in the transient...

  4. Latent Heat Flux Estimate Through an Energy Water Balance Model and Land Surface Temperature from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Chiara; Sobrino, Jose A.; Mancini, Marco; Hidalgo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and is responsible for the partitioning of precipitation between runoff and infiltration. Moreover, surface soil moisture controls the redistribution of the incoming solar radiation on land surface into sensible and latent heat fluxes. Recent developments have been made to improve soil moisture dynamics predictions with hydrologic land surface models (LSMs) that compute water and energy balances between the land surface and the low atmosphere. However, most of the time soil moisture is confined to an internal numerical model variable mainly due to its intrinsic space and time variability and to the well known difficulties in assessing its value from remote sensing as from in situ measurements. In order to exploit the synergy between hydrological distributed models and thermal remote sensed data, FEST-EWB, a land surface model that solves the energy balance equation, was developed. In this hydrological model, the energy budget is solved looking for the representative thermodynamic equilibrium temperature (RET) defined as the land surface temperature that closes the energy balance equation. So using this approach, soil moisture is linked to the latent heat flux and then to LST. In this work the relationship between land surface temperature and soil moisture is analysed using LST from AHS (airborne hyperspectral scanner), with a spatial resolution of 2-4 m, LST from MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 1000 m, and thermal infrared radiometric ground measurements that are compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature from the energy water balance model. Moreover soil moisture measurements were carried out during the airborne overpasses and then compared with SM from the hydrological model. An improvement of this well known inverse relationship between soil moisture and land surface temperature is obtained when the thermodynamic approach is used. The analysis of the scale effects of the different

  5. Using a Water Balance Model to Bound Potential Irrigation Development in the Upper Blue Nile Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain Figueroa, A.; McLaughlin, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), on the Blue Nile is an example of water resource management underpinning food, water and energy security. Downstream countries have long expressed concern about water projects in Ethiopia because of possible diversions to agricultural uses that could reduce flow in the Nile. Such diversions are attractive to Ethiopia as a partial solution to its food security problems but they could also conflict with hydropower revenue from GERD. This research estimates an upper bound on diversions above the GERD project by considering the potential for irrigated agriculture expansion and, in particular, the availability of water and land resources for crop production. Although many studies have aimed to simulate downstream flows for various Nile basin management plans, few have taken the perspective of bounding the likely impacts of upstream agricultural development. The approach is to construct an optimization model to establish a bound on Upper Blue Nile (UBN) agricultural development, paying particular attention to soil suitability and seasonal variability in climate. The results show that land and climate constraints impose significant limitations on crop production. Only 25% of the land area is suitable for irrigation due to the soil, slope and temperature constraints. When precipitation is also considered only 11% of current land area could be used in a way that increases water consumption. The results suggest that Ethiopia could consume an additional 3.75 billion cubic meters (bcm) of water per year, through changes in land use and storage capacity. By exploiting this irrigation potential, Ethiopia could potentially decrease the annual flow downstream of the UBN by 8 percent from the current 46 bcm/y to the modeled 42 bcm/y.

  6. A Thermodynamic Approach to Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Modeling: From Metabolic Biochemical Processes to Water-Carbon-Nitrogen Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, H. W.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum has been central part of understanding interrelationships among biogeochemical and hydrological processes. Theory behind of couplings Land Surface Models (LSM) and Dynamical Global Vegetation Models (DGVM) are based on physical and physiological processes connected by input-output interactions mainly. This modeling framework could be improved by the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamic basis that could encompass the majority of biophysical processes in a standard fashion. This study presents an alternative model for plant-water-atmosphere based on energy-mass thermodynamics. The system of dynamic equations derived is based on the total entropy, the total energy balance for the plant, the biomass dynamics at metabolic level and the water-carbon-nitrogen fluxes and balances. One advantage of this formulation is the capability to describe adaptation and evolution of dynamics of plant as a bio-system coupled to the environment. Second, it opens a window for applications on specific conditions from individual plant scale, to watershed scale, to global scale. Third, it enhances the possibility of analyzing anthropogenic impacts on the system, benefiting from the mathematical formulation and its non-linearity. This non-linear model formulation is analyzed under the concepts of qualitative system dynamics theory, for different state-space phase portraits. The attractors and sources are pointed out with its stability analysis. Possibility of bifurcations are explored and reported. Simulations for the system dynamics under different conditions are presented. These results show strong consistency and applicability that validates the use of the non-equilibrium thermodynamic theory.

  7. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. W. Verstraeten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the quantification of the green – vegetation related – water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU components – transpiration, soil and interception evaporation – between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000–August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L., but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.. A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively. Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  8. Combining earth observations, gis data and eco-hydrological modelling for predicting carbon budgets and water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegh, E.; Butts, M.; Hansen, S.; Soegaard, H.; Hasager, C. B.; Pilegaard, K.; Haastrup, M.; Henriksen, H. J.; Jensen, N. O.; Kristensen, M.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing data, GIS data and an eco-hydrological model (Daisy) are coupled within the project EO-FLUX-BUDGET for the prediction of CO2 budgets and water balance at Zealand which is the major island of Denmark (covering approximately 7.000 km2). In order to catch the surface heterogeneity shaped by the large variety of small fields, a high-resolution (30 m) land surface map is produced from satellite observations and validated using GIS data and national statistics on agricultural land use. GIS information on the housing density of built-up areas was superimposed on the land use map to facilitate the implementation of engineering methods for assessment of surface runoff in these regions. A geological soil map is combined with soil texture data registered in 5439 locations to construct a 3-layer GIS based soil map. The ground water depth is represented by the 10 year average water head elevation which is simulated by a distributed hydrological model (MIKE SHE). The Daisy model is run using grid based meteorological data and the results are evaluated by comparing with eddy covariance atmospheric fluxes recorded in agricultural, forest and urban regions. Temporal maps of vegetation properties are produced using multi-scale remote sensing data (Landsat TM, Terra-MODIS and SPOT-VEGETATION) and used to adjust the simulated leaf area indices. The initial result shows that the model efficiency is improved by the implementation of satellite data.

  9. Water balance dynamics in the Nile Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Asante, Kwabena; Artan, Guleid A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial dynamics of key water balance components of the Nile River will provide important information for the management of its water resources. This study used satellite-derived rainfall and other key weather variables derived from the Global Data Assimilation System to estimate and map the distribution of rainfall, actual evapotranspiration (ETa), and runoff. Daily water balance components were modelled in a grid-cell environment at 0·1 degree (∼10 km) spatial resolution for 7 years from 2001 through 2007. Annual maps of the key water balance components and derived variables such as runoff and ETa as a percent of rainfall were produced. Generally, the spatial patterns of rainfall and ETa indicate high values in the upstream watersheds (Uganda, southern Sudan, and southwestern Ethiopia) and low values in the downstream watersheds. However, runoff as a percent of rainfall is much higher in the Ethiopian highlands around the Blue Nile subwatershed. The analysis also showed the possible impact of land degradation in the Ethiopian highlands in reducing ETa magnitudes despite the availability of sufficient rainfall. Although the model estimates require field validation for the different subwatersheds, the runoff volume estimate for the Blue Nile subwatershed is within 7·0% of a figure reported from an earlier study. Further research is required for a thorough validation of the results and their integration with ecohydrologic models for better management of water and land resources in the various Nile Basin ecosystems.

  10. Quantifying Salinization of the Upper-Middle Rio Grande Using a Basin-Scale Water and Chloride Mass Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, S. K.; Phillips, F. M.; Hogan, J. F.; Hendrickx, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    The Rio Grande is clearly undergoing salinization, manifested by a 50-fold increase in total dissolved solids content between its headwaters in Colorado and the U.S.-Mexico border. To elucidate the causes of this salinization, we conducted an eight-day synoptic sampling campaign in August 2001. This sampling included the river, its major tributaries, and major irrigation drain inflows. Along 1200 km between the river headwaters in Colorado and Fort Quitman, Texas, we collected 110 water samples with an average interval of ~10 km between sampling locales. In the laboratory, samples were analyzed for major constituents including chloride, as well as for bromide and the 36Cl/Cl ratio. Isotopic fingerprinting using the 36Cl/Cl ratio indicates that meteoric waters and deep sedimentary brines respectively account for most of the water and most of the salt inflow to the Rio Grande. The meteoric end member has a 36Cl/Cl ratio of 1100 and a Cl/Br ratio of 30; the brine end member has a 36Cl/Cl ratio of 35 and a Cl/Br ratio of 1150. Using these end member chemistries with USGS stream flow gauging data, we constructed a water- and salt- instantaneous mass balance model of the Rio Grande for the eight-day sampling interval. This model indicates that most water losses from the Rio Grande are due to evaporation from Elephant Butte reservoir, open water evaporation from irrigation ditches, and evapotranspiration of riparian and ditch-bank vegetation. The model also emphasizes the significance of salt input due to deep brine discharge to the river, particularly at the downstream ends of local sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift. The Rio Grande receives a smaller amount of salt from saline drains near El Paso, which may be acquiring salt from deep brine discharge as they cross over faults or other structural fluid conduits.

  11. Quantitative analysis of water use of forests in comparison to agricultural fields in Flanders using time series techniques and the water balance model WAVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    It is assumed that evapotranspiration from forests is larger than that from any other vegetation type. In the literature, examples in conflict are found. The objective of this study is to compare the water use terms of forest stands with those of agricultural crops in Flanders by implementing calibrated and validated model parameters for the different vegetations types in the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994, 1996) for a simulation period with a time horizon of 30 years (1971-2000). The data analysis of the time series of the different water use terms is carried out at two levels: (1) the analysis of each individual time series using autocorrelation detection, trend analysis (Mann-Kendall) and autoregressive models (AR, Durbin-Watson) and; (2) grouping of the time series according to the distinctive factor, being water use of forest stands and agricultural crops. Mixed General Linear Models and Profile Analysis are implemented. The actual vegetation transpiration, the actual soil and interception evaporation of the different tree and crop species are compared as well as the general agricultural crop and forest stand. From this study it can be concluded that different statistical methods suggest that forest in Flanders does consume more water than agricultural crops. The water use terms also differ for the two land-use types considered. Generally only a few trends and autocorrelations are detected, especially in the time series from agricultural crops.

  12. Utility of remote sensing-based surface energy balance models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass has not been explored yet. In this paper, the theoretical framework of crop water stress index (CWSI) was utilized to estimate CWSI in rain-fed switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) usin...

  13. Water balance complexities in ephemeral catchments with different land uses: Insights from monitoring and distributed hydrologic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, J.F.; Camporese, M.; Webb, J.A.; Grover, S.P.; Dresel, P.E.; Daly, E.

    2016-01-01

    Although ephemeral catchments are widespread in arid and semiarid climates, the relationship of their water balance with climate, geology, topography, and land cover is poorly known. Here we use 4 years (2011–2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water

  14. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells requires an appropriate hydration in order to ensure high efficiency and long durability. As water is essential for promoting proton conductivity in the membrane, it is important to control membrane water hydration to avoid flooding. In this study we...

  15. Application of a spatially distributed water balance model for assessing surface water and groundwater resources in the Geba basin, Tigray, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyohannes, Tesfamichael; De Smedt, Florimond; Walraevens, Kristine; Gebresilassie, Solomon; Hussien, Abdelwasie; Hagos, Miruts; Amare, Kasa; Deckers, Jozef; Gebrehiwot, Kindeya

    2013-08-01

    The Geba basin is one of the most water-stressed areas of Ethiopia, with only a short rainy period from mid-June to mid-September. Because rainfall in this region has been consistently erratic in the last decades, both in time and space, rain-fed agriculture has become problematic. Hence, in order to supplement rain-fed agriculture by irrigation, a detailed understanding of local and regional surface water and groundwater resources is important. The main objective of this study is to assess the available water resources in the Geba basin using a spatially distributed water balance model (WetSpass). Relevant input data for the model is prepared in the form of digital maps using remote sensing images, GIS tools, FAO and NASA databases, field reconnaissance and processing of meteorological and hydrological observations. The model produces digital maps of long-term average, seasonal and annual surface runoff, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. Results of the model show that 76% of the precipitation in the basin is lost through evapotranspiration, 18% becomes surface runoff and only 6% recharges the groundwater system. Model predictions are verified against river flow observations and are shown to be reliable. Additional maps are derived of accumulated surface runoff, safe yield for groundwater abstraction and water deficit for crop growth. Comparison of existing reservoirs with the accumulated runoff map shows that many reservoirs have failed because their design capacity is much higher than the actual inflow. Comparison of the safe yield map with the crop water deficit map shows that in most areas groundwater can be safely abstracted to supplement the water deficit for crop growth during the wet summer season. However, in the dry winter season the crop water deficit is too high to be supplemented by groundwater abstraction in a sustainable way.

  16. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, Helena; McDonald, Adrian; Bodeker, Greg

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds, and how these interactions change with carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere, are examined with a newly developed energy balance model. A particular focus is the non-linear interactions of these climate system attributes on polar amplification. Polar amplification is defined here as the ratio of the annual rate of surface warming over the polar regions (latitudes poleward of 60o) to the surface warming over equatorial regions (latitudes equatorward of 30o), and is termed the polar amplification factor. Changes in surface albedo plays a major role in polar amplification as might be expected, due to its amplifying effects of CO2 -induced warming of the polar regions, and relatively small warming effects in the equatorial regions. When considered in isolation from the other climate system components, i.e. when water vapour and cloud cover are prescribed, changes in surface albedo result in a polar amplification factor of 4.83 for a doubling of CO2, compared to 5.54 for the full feedback simulation, i.e. the simulation where all three components are allowed to simultaneously change with temperature. In our simple model framework, changes in surface albedo are responsible for 43% of the polar warming from the full feedback run, and 49% of the equatorial warming. The polar amplification for the simulation with isolated climate feedback from cloud cover variations is smaller than the simulation with isolated surface albedo feedback, mainly due to a weaker warming in the polar regions. The polar amplification factor for the isolated cloud cover feedback simulation is 3.73, contributing 30% of the warming in the polar regions to the full feedback simulation and 45% in the equatorial regions. The amplifying effect from changing surface albedo on polar warming and polar amplification is enhanced when surface albedo interacts with cloud cover or water vapour. The polar amplification factor is

  17. Seasonal Water Balance of an Alpine Catchment as Evaluated by Different Methods for Spatially Distributed Snowmelt Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zappa, M.; Pos, F.; Strasser, U.; Warmerdam, P.M.M.; Gurtz, J.

    2003-01-01

    The application of three temperature-index based models and of one energy balance based snowmelt model was investigated. The snow models were integrated in the spatially distributed hydrological model PREVAH. In this study the hydrological simulations of the alpine catchment of the Dischmabach in

  18. Shortcut model for water-balanced operation in fuel processor fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Kramer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a fuel processor, a hydrocarbon or oxygenate fuel is catalytically converted into a mixture rich in hydrogen which can be fed to a fuel cell to generate electricity. In these fuel processor fuel cell systems (FPFCs), water is recovered from the exhaust gases and recycled back into the system. We

  19. Assessment of the water balance of the Barekese reservoir in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SCS-CN model produced an R2 value of 0.84 and an efficiency of 82.68%. Monthly observed reservoir levels were used for the calibration and validation of the water balance model. The water balance model produced an R2 value of 0.84 and an efficiency of 81.9%. The monthly water budget revealed that total ...

  20. Modeling the cadmium balance in Australian agricultural systems in view of potential impacts on food and water quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, W. de, E-mail: wim.devries@wur.nl [Alterra-Wageningen University and Research Centre, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); McLaughlin, M.J. [CSIRO Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, CSIRO Land and Water, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia); University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia)

    2013-09-01

    The historical build up and future cadmium (Cd) concentrations in top soils and in crops of four Australian agricultural systems are predicted with a mass balance model, focusing on the period 1900–2100. The systems include a rotation of dryland cereals, a rotation of sugarcane and peanuts/soybean, intensive dairy production and intensive horticulture. The input of Cd to soil is calculated from fertilizer application and atmospheric deposition and also examines options including biosolid and animal manure application in the sugarcane rotation and dryland cereal production systems. Cadmium output from the soil is calculated from leaching to deeper horizons and removal with the harvested crop or with livestock products. Parameter values for all Cd fluxes were based on a number of measurements on Australian soil–plant systems. In the period 1900–2000, soil Cd concentrations were predicted to increase on average between 0.21 mg kg{sup −1} in dryland cereals, 0.42 mg kg{sup −1} in intensive agriculture and 0.68 mg kg{sup −1} in dairy production, which are within the range of measured increases in soils in these systems. Predicted soil concentrations exceed critical soil Cd concentrations, based on food quality criteria for Cd in crops during the simulation period in clay-rich soils under dairy production and intensive horticulture. Predicted dissolved Cd concentrations in soil pore water exceed a ground water quality criterion of 2 μg l{sup −1} in light textured soils, except for the sugarcane rotation due to large water leaching fluxes. Results suggest that the present fertilizer Cd inputs in Australia are in excess of the long-term critical loads in heavy-textured soils for dryland cereals and that all other systems are at low risk. Calculated critical Cd/P ratios in P fertilizers vary from < 50 to > 1000 mg Cd kg P{sup −1} for the different soil, crop and environmental conditions applied. - Highlights: • Cadmium concentrations in soils and plants

  1. How to constrain multi-objective calibrations of the SWAT model using water balance components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Automated procedures are often used to provide adequate fits between hydrologic model estimates and observed data. While the models may provide good fits based upon numeric criteria, they may still not accurately represent the basic hydrologic characteristics of the represented watershed. Here we ...

  2. Predicting Soil Infiltration and Horizon Thickness for a Large-Scale Water Balance Model in an Arid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaomi Saito

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of soil characteristics over large areas is desirable for environmental modeling. In arid environments, soil characteristics often show strong ecological connectivity with natural vegetation, specifically biomass and/or canopy cover, suggesting that the soil characteristics may be predicted from vegetation data. The objective of this study was to predict soil infiltration characteristics and horizon (soil layer thickness using vegetation data for a large-scale water balance model in an arid region. Double-ring infiltrometer tests (at 23 sites, horizon thickness measurements (58 sites and vegetation surveys (35 sites were conducted in a 30 km × 50 km area in Western Australia during 1999 to 2003. The relationships between soil parameters and vegetation data were evaluated quantitatively by simple linear regression. The parameters for initial-term infiltration had strong and positive correlations with biomass and canopy coverage (R2 = 0.64 − 0.81. The horizon thickness also had strong positive correlations with vegetation properties (R2 = 0.53 − 0.67. These results suggest that the soil infiltration parameters and horizon thickness can be spatially predicted by properties of vegetation using their linear regression based equations and vegetation maps. The background and reasons of the strong ecological connectivity between soil and vegetation in this region were also considered.

  3. Quantification of leachate discharged to groundwater using the water balance method and the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alslaibi, Tamer M; Abustan, Ismail; Mogheir, Yunes K; Afifi, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Landfills are a source of groundwater pollution in Gaza Strip. This study focused on Deir Al Balah landfill, which is a unique sanitary landfill site in Gaza Strip (i.e., it has a lining system and a leachate recirculation system). The objective of this article is to assess the generated leachate quantity and percolation to the groundwater aquifer at a specific site, using the approaches of (i) the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance model (HELP) and (ii) the water balance method (WBM). The results show that when using the HELP model, the average volume of leachate discharged from Deir Al Balah landfill during the period 1997 to 2007 was around, 6800 m3/year. Meanwhile, the average volume of leachate percolated through the clay layer was 550 m3/year, which represents around 8% of the generated leachate. Meanwhile, the WBM indicated that the average volume of leachate discharged from Deir Al Balah landfill during the same period was around 7660 m3/year--about half of which comes from the moisture content of the waste, while the remainder comes from the infiltration of precipitation and re-circulated leachate. Therefore, the estimated quantity of leachate to groundwater by these two methods was very close. However, compared with the measured leachate quantity, these results were overestimated and indicated a dangerous threat to the groundwater aquifer, as there was no separation between municipal, hazardous and industrial wastes, in the area.

  4. Management of the water balance and quality in mining areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, Antti; Krogerus, Kirsti; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija; Turunen, Kaisa; Backnäs, Soile; Vento, Tiia; Veijalainen, Noora; Hentinen, Kimmo; Korkealaakso, Juhani

    2015-04-01

    Although mining companies have long been conscious of water related risks they still face environmental management problems. These problems mainly emerge because mine sites' water balances have not been adequately assessed in the stage of the planning of mines. More consistent approach is required to help mining companies identify risks and opportunities related to the management of water resources in all stages of mining. This approach requires that the water cycle of a mine site is interconnected with the general hydrologic water cycle. In addition to knowledge on hydrological conditions, the control of the water balance in the mining processes require knowledge of mining processes, the ability to adjust process parameters to variable hydrological conditions, adaptation of suitable water management tools and systems, systematic monitoring of amounts and quality of water, adequate capacity in water management infrastructure to handle the variable water flows, best practices to assess the dispersion, mixing and dilution of mine water and pollutant loading to receiving water bodies, and dewatering and separation of water from tailing and precipitates. WaterSmart project aims to improve the awareness of actual quantities of water, and water balances in mine areas to improve the forecasting and the management of the water volumes. The study is executed through hydrogeological and hydrological surveys and online monitoring procedures. One of the aims is to exploit on-line water quantity and quality monitoring for the better management of the water balances. The target is to develop a practical and end-user-specific on-line input and output procedures. The second objective is to develop mathematical models to calculate combined water balances including the surface, ground and process waters. WSFS, the Hydrological Modeling and Forecasting System of SYKE is being modified for mining areas. New modelling tools are developed on spreadsheet and system dynamics platforms to

  5. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility Vadose Zone Model: Confirmation of Water Mass Balance for Subsidence Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-30

    In preparation for the next revision of the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF) Performance Assessment (PA), a mass balance model was developed in Microsoft Excel to confirm correct implementation of intact- and subsided-area infiltration profiles for the proposed closure cap in the PORFLOW vadose-zone model. The infiltration profiles are based on the results of Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model simulations for both intact and subsided cases.

  6. Human Water and Electrolyte Balance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montain, S. J; Cheuvront, S. N; Carter, R; Sawka, M. N

    2006-01-01

    .... Sweat losses, if not replaced, reduce body water volume and electrolyte content. Excessive body water or electrolyte losses can disrupt physiological homeostasis and threaten both health and performance...

  7. Water and sodium balance in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drummer, C; Norsk, P; Heer, M

    2001-01-01

    , cumulative water balance and total body water content are stable during flight if hydration, nutritional energy supply, and protection of muscle mass are at an acceptable level. Recent water balance data disclose that the phenomenon of an absolute water loss during space flight, which has often been reported......We have previously shown that fluid balances and body fluid regulation in microgravity (microG) differ from those on Earth (Drummer et al, Eur J Physiol 441:R66-R72, 2000). Arriving in microG leads to a redistribution of body fluid-composed of a shift of fluid to the upper part of the body...... and an exaggerated extravasation very early in-flight. The mechanisms for the increased vascular permeability are not known. Evaporation, oral hydration, and urinary fluid excretion, the major components of water balance, are generally diminished during space flight compared with conditions on Earth. Nevertheless...

  8. Calibration and validation of SWAT model for estimating water balance and nitrogen losses in a small agricultural watershed in central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarzyńska Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT ver. 2005 was applied to study water balance and nitrogen load pathways in a small agricultural watershed in the lowlands of central Poland. The natural flow regime of the Zgłowiączka River was strongly modified by human activity (deforestation and installation of a subsurface drainage system to facilitate stable crop production. SWAT was calibrated for daily and monthly discharge and monthly nitrate nitrogen load. Model efficiency was tested using manual techniques (subjective and evaluation statistics (objective. Values of Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and percentage of bias for daily/monthly discharge simulations and monthly load indicated good or very good fit of simulated discharge and nitrate nitrogen load to the observed data set. Model precision and accuracy of fit was proved in validation. The calibrated and validated SWAT was used to assess water balance and nitrogen fluxes in the watershed. According to the results, the share of tile drainage in water yield is equal to 78%. The model analysis indicated the most significant pathway of NO3-N to surface waters in the study area, namely the tile drainage combined with lateral flow. Its share in total NO3-N load amounted to 89%. Identification of nitrogen fluxes in the watershed is crucial for decision makers in order to manage water resources and to implement the most effective measures to limit diffuse pollution from arable land to surface waters.

  9. A Monthly-Step Water Balance Model to Evaluate the Hydrological Effects of Climate Change on a Regional Scale for Irrigation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, A.; Kalicz, P.; Kisfaludi, B.; Gribovszki, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Current and ongoing changes in the climate are typified by a rise in global temperatures. Climate change can have a dramatic impact on the water cycle. The aim of this paper was to develop a model based on Thornthwaite-type monthly water balance estimations. The main goals were to calibrate the model parameters using a remote sensing-based evapotranspiration dataset. The calibrated model was used for projection on the basis of four climate model datasets (remo, dmihirham5, smhirca.bcm, knmiracmo2). The four main projection periods were: 1980-2010, 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100. The advantage of this model is its robust structure. It can be applied if temperature and precipitation time series are available. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil (SOILMAX), which can be calibrated using the actual evapotranspiration data available. If the physical properties of the soil are known, the maximal rooting depth is also projectable. The model can be primarily used at the catchment level or for areas without additional amounts of water from below. For testing the model, a mixed parcel of land that is used as a cornfield near Mosonmagyaróvár and a small, forest-covered catchment near Sopron were successfully used as the datasets. Furthermore, we determined the water stress with the calculation of the relative extractable water (REW), soil water deficit (SWD), and the water stress index (IS).

  10. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge on Various Sites in a Tropical Semiarid Basin using a Water Balance Model in Dry Surface Soil.

    OpenAIRE

    Onodera, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    [ABSTRACT] In this study, a simple water balance model linking with Green-Ampt model was improved on basis of measured results in a semiarid upland, Tanzania, and it was applied to local areas under different soil or rainfall conditions in a same basin. In spite of only three parameters with regard to the part under the ground in this model, the calculated value simulated well the measured value. In this model, the critical rainfall which groundwater recharge occurs was determined by the soil...

  11. Balancing the Energy-Water Nexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell, Jan

    2010-09-15

    Optimizing the complex tradeoffs in the Energy-Water Nexus requires quantification of energy use, carbon emitted and water consumed. Water is consumed in energy production and is often a constraint to operations. More global attention and investment has been made on reducing carbon emissions than on water management. Review of public reporting by the largest 107 global power producers and 50 companies in the oil/gas industry shows broad accounting on carbon emissions but only partial reporting on water consumption metrics. If the Energy-Water Nexus is to be balanced, then water must also be measured to be optimally managed with carbon emissions.

  12. A correction of water balance in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tishchenko Vladimir Petrovich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is presented an information about the state of water balance for the sportsmen of high qualification under act of the physical loadings. Directions of prophylaxis dehydration are considered. Basic aspects and methods are shown for conducting of the drinkable mode. The necessity of correction of water balance is grounded. It is set that at the aerobic loadings dehydration is reduced by a capacity on 20%. The most optimum variant of filling in of supplies of water is filling in with intensity of the proper intensity of its losses.

  13. The changing Water Balance in Saxony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael; Schwarze, Robert

    2017-04-01

    A first approach to understand mechanisms of the water balance under a changing climate is the analysis of observations in the past. Due to a breaking point analysis of temperatures between 1961 and 2014 it is possible to determine two time slots of reasonable durations, the first from 1961 to 1987 and the second from 1988 to 2014. The time slots feature an average temperature change of appoximately +0.8 K. Although the temperature is only loosely coupled with precipitation - the most important driver of the water balance - it allows for a first analysis of water balance sensitivity. Over the whole time frame the hydrograph separation method DIFGA is carried out for 98 catchments covering a third of Saxony. DIFGA quantifies the water balance according to the storage equation P = ETa + R + dS on a daily basis with different fast and slow runoff components from storages using optimized storage coefficients. The resulting water balance data is subject to a sensitivity analysis of absolute and related components over the two time slots. The most obvious changes can be found during the first vegetation period from April to June. The decreasing precipitation and the higher evaporative demand result in less runoff and ground water recharge. This leeds to a worse water supply for agriculture especially in the drier parts of Saxony. Less obvious although existent is the change of the water balance on a half year or an annual basis. The shift of vegetational activity to earlier weeks can be seen in an increasing evapotranspiration during winter. Surface runoff decreases significantly in summer as does the overall disposition to runoff. Due to the high inertia of ground water recharge, this slow component decreases over the whole year. For the database a clustering method is implemented. Three main groups of water balance reaction in catchments are identified: (1) moderate mean changes, (2) remarkable changes in slow runoff components and (3) significant changes in fast

  14. The effect of plant water stress approach on the modelled energy-, water and carbon balance for Mediterranean vegetation; implications for (agro)meteorological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Anne; Egea, Gregorio; Garrigues, Sebastien; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Balan Sarojini, Beena

    2017-04-01

    Current land surface schemes in many crop, weather and climate models make use of the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance (A-gs) models of plant function to determine the transpiration flux and gross primary productivity. Vegetation exchange is controlled by many environmental factors, and soil moisture control on root water uptake and stomatal function is a primary pathway for feedbacks in sub-tropical to temperate ecosystems. Representations of the above process of soil moisture control on plant function (often referred to as a 'beta' factor) vary among models. This matters because the simulated energy, water and carbon balances are very sensitive to the representation of water stress in these models. Building on Egea et al. (2011) and Verhoef and Egea (2014), we tested a range of 'beta' approaches in a leaf-level A-gs model (compatible with models such as JULES, CHTESSEL, ISBA, CLM), as well as some beta-approaches borrowed from the agronomic, and plant physiological communities (a combined soil-plant hydraulic approach, see Verhoef and Egea, 2014). Root zone soil moisture was allowed to limit plant function via individual routes (via CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance, or mesophyll conductance) as well as combinations of that. The simulations were conducted for a typical Mediterranean field site (Avignon, France; Garrigues et al., 2015) which provides 14 years of near-continuous measurements of soil moisture and atmospheric driving data. Daytime (8-16 hrs local time) data between April-September were used. This allowed a broad range of atmospheric and soil moisture/vegetation states to be explored. A number of crops and tree types were investigated in this way. We evaluated the effect of choice of beta-function for Mediterranean climates in relation to stomatal conductance, transpiration, photosynthesis, and leaf surface temperature. We also studied the implications for a range of widely used agro-/micro-meteorological indicators such as Bowen ratio

  15. Components of the total water balance of an urban catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, V Grace; McMahon, Thomas A; Mein, Russell G

    2003-12-01

    A daily model was used to quantify the components of the total urban water balance of the Curtin catchment, Canberra, Australia. For this catchment, the mean annual rainfall was found to be three times greater than imported potable water, and the sum of the output from the separate stormwater and wastewater systems exceeded the input of imported potable water by some 50%. Seasonal and annual variations in climate exert a very strong influence over the relative magnitude of the water balance components; this needs to be accounted for when assessing the potential for utilizing stormwater and wastewater within an urban catchment.

  16. Evaluation of Modeling Schemes to Estimate Evapotranspiration and Root Zone Soil Water Content over Vineyard using a Scintillometer and Remotely Sensed Surface Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geli, H. M. E.; Gonzalez-Piqueras, J.; Isidro, C., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    Actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa) and root zone soil water content (SMC) are key operational variable to monitor water consumption and water stress condition for improve vineyard grapes productivity and quality. This analysis, evaluates the estimation of ETa and SMC based on two modeling approaches. The first approach is a hybrid model that couples a thermal-based two source energy balance (TSEB) model (Norman et al. 1995) and water balance model to estimate the two variable (Geli 2012). The second approach is based on Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS)-based estimates of sensible heat flux. The LAS-based estimates of sensible heat fluxes were used to calculate latent heat flux as the residual of surface energy balance equation on hourly basis which was converted to daily ETa. The calculated ETa from the scintillometer was then couple with the water balance approach to provide updated ETa_LAS and SMC_LAS. Both estimates of ETa and SMC based on LAS (i.e. ETa_LAS and SMC_LAS) and TSEB (ETa_TSEB and SMC_TSEB) were compared with ground-based observation from eddy covariance and soil water content measurements at multiple depths. The study site is an irrigated vineyard located in Central Spain Primary with heterogeneous surface conditions in term of irrigation practices and the ground based observation over the vineyard were collected during the summer of 2007. Preliminary results of the inter-comparison of the two approaches suggests relatively good between both modeling approaches and ground-based observations with RMSE lower than 1.2 mm/day for ETa and lower than 20% for SMC. References Norman, J. M., Kustas, W. P., & Humes, K. S. (1995). A two-source approach for estimating soil and vegetation energy fluxes in observations of directional radiometric surface temperature. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 77, 263293. Geli, Hatim M. E. (2012). Modeling spatial surface energy fluxes of agricultural and riparian vegetation using remote sensing, Ph. D. dissertation

  17. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  18. Renal aquaporins and water balance disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortenoeven, Marleen; Fenton, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of proteins that can act as water channels. Regulation of AQPs is critical to osmoregulation and the maintenance of body water homeostasis. Eight AQPs are expressed in the kidney of which five have been shown to play a role in body water balance; AQP1, AQP......2, AQP3, AQP4 and AQP7. AQP2 in particular is regulated by vasopressin. SCOPE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes our current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of various water balance disorders and their treatment strategies. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS: Dysfunctions of AQPs are involved in disorders...... associated with disturbed water homeostasis. Hyponatremia with increased AQP levels can be caused by diseases with low effective circulating blood volume, such as congestive heart failure, or osmoregulation disorders such as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Treatment consists...

  19. What can we learn from the hydrological modeling of small-scale catchments for the discharge and water balance modeling of mesoscale catchments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Thomas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Bogena, Heye

    2015-04-01

    The application of 3D hydrological models remains a challenge both in research and application studies because the parameterization not only depends on the amount and quality of data available for calibration and validation but also on the spatial and temporal model resolution. In recent years, the model parameterization has improved with the availability of high resolution data (e.g. eddy-covariance, wireless soil sensor networks). Unfortunately, these high resolution data are typically only available for small scale research test sites. This study aims to upscale the parameterization from a highly equipped, small-scale catchment to a mesoscale catchment in order to reduce the parameterization uncertainty at that scale. The two nested catchments chosen for the study are the 0.38 km² large spruce covered Wüstebach catchment and the 42 km² large Erkensruhr catchment characterized by a mixture of spruce and beech forest and grassland vegetation. The 3D hydrogeological model HydroGeoSphere (HGS) has already been setup for the Wüstebach catchment in a previous study with a focus on the simulation performance of soil water dynamics and patterns. Thus, the parameterization process did not only optimize the water balance components but the catchment's wireless soil sensor network data were utilized to calibrate porosities in order to improve the simulation of soil moisture dynamics. In this study we compared different HGS model realizations for the Erkensruhr catchment with different input data. For the first model realization, the catchment is treated heterogeneous in terms of soil properties and topography but homogeneous with respect to land use, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. For this case, the spruce forest parameterization and the climate input data were taken directly from the small-scale Wüstebach model realization. Next, the calibrated soil porosity for the Wüstebach catchment is applied to the Erkensruhr. Further model realizations

  20. Regional-scale hydrological modelling using multiple-parameter landscape zones and a quasi-distributed water balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional-scale catchments are characterised typically by natural variability in climatic and land-surface features. This paper addresses the important question regarding the appropriate level of spatial disaggregation necessary to guarantee a hydrologically sound consideration of this variability. Using a simple hydrologic model along with physical catchment data, the problem is reconsidered as a model parameter identification problem. With this manner of thinking the subjective nature as to what to include in the disaggregation scheme is removed and the problem reconsidered in terms of what can be supported by the available data. With such an approach the relative merit of different catchment disaggregation schemes is viewed in terms of their ability to provide constrained parameterisations that can be explained in terms of the physical processes deemed active within a catchment. The outlined methodology was tested for a regional-scale catchment, located in eastern Australia, and involved using the quasi-distributed VIC catchment model to recover the characteristic responses resulting from the disaggregation of the catchment into combinations of climate, soil and vegetation characteristics. A land-surface classification based on a combination of soil depth and land cover type was found to provide the most accurate streamflow predictions during a 10-year validation period. Investigation of the uncertainty associated with the predictions due to weakly identified parameters however, revealed that a simpler classification based solely on land cover actually provided a more robust parameterisation of streamflow response. The result alludes to the hydrological importance of distinguishing between forested and non-forested land cover types at the regional-scale, and suggests that given additional information soil-depth / storage considerations may also have proved significant. Improvements to the outlined method are discussed in terms of increasing

  1. Simulating soil moisture change in a semiarid rangeland watershed with a process-based water-balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard Evan Canfield; Vicente L. Lopes

    2000-01-01

    A process-based, simulation model for evaporation, soil water and streamflow (BROOK903) was used to estimate soil moisture change on a semiarid rangeland watershed in southeastern Arizona. A sensitivity analysis was performed to select parameters affecting ET and soil moisture for calibration. Automatic parameter calibration was performed using a procedure based on a...

  2. Virtual water balance estimation in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambouli, Talel; Benalaya, Abdallah; Ghezal, Lamia; Ali, Chebil; Hammami, Rifka; Souissi, Asma

    2015-04-01

    The water in Tunisia is limited and unevenly distributed in the different regions, especially in arid zones. In fact, the annual rainfall average varies from less than 100 mm in the extreme South to over 1500 mm in the extreme North of the country. Currently, the conventional potential of water resources of the country is estimated about 4.84 billion m³ / year of which 2.7 billion cubic meters / year of surface water and 2.14 billion cubic meters / year of groundwater, characterizing a structural shortage for water safety in Tunisia (under 500m3/inhabitant/year). With over than 80% of water volumes have been mobilized for agriculture. The virtual water concept, defined by Allan (1997), as the amount of water needed to generate a product of both natural and artificial origin, this concept establish a similarity between product marketing and water trade. Given the influence of water in food production, virtual water studies focus generally on food products. At a global scale, the influence of these product's markets with water management was not seen. Influence has appreciated only by analyzing water-scarce countries, but at the detail level, should be increased, as most studies consider a country as a single geographical point, leading to considerable inaccuracies. The main objective of this work is the virtual water balance estimation of strategic crops in Tunisia (both irrigated and dry crops) to determine their influence on the water resources management and to establish patterns for improving it. The virtual water balance was performed basing on farmer's surveys, crop and meteorological data, irrigation management and regional statistics. Results show that the majority of farmers realize a waste of the irrigation water especially at the vegetable crops and fruit trees. Thus, a good control of the cultural package may result in lower quantities of water used by crops while ensuring good production with a suitable economic profitability. Then, the virtual water

  3. Development of a 5-Component Balance for Water Tunnel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.

    1999-01-01

    The principal objective of this research/development effort was to develop a multi-component strain gage balance to measure both static and dynamic forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. A balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The balance mounts internally in the model and is used in a manner typical of wind tunnel balances. The key differences between a water tunnel balance and a wind tunnel balance are the requirement for very high sensitivity since the loads are very low (typical normal force is 90 grams or 0.2 lbs), the need for water proofing the gage elements, and the small size required to fit into typical water tunnel models. The five-component balance was calibrated and demonstrated linearity in the responses of the primary components to applied loads, very low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and F/A-18 models. The data were compared to forces and moments from wind tunnel tests of the same or similar configurations. The comparison showed very good agreement, providing confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multi-component internal balance. The success of the static experiments encouraged the use of the balance for dynamic experiments. Among the advantages of conducting dynamic tests in a water tunnel are less demanding motion and data acquisition rates than in a wind tunnel test (because of the low-speed flow) and the capability of performing flow visualization and force/moment (F/M) measurements simultaneously with relative simplicity. This capability of simultaneous flow visualization and for F/M measurements proved extremely useful to explain the results obtained during these dynamic tests. In general, the development of this balance should encourage the use of water tunnels for a

  4. Model signatures and aridity indices enhance the accuracy of water balance estimations in a data-scarce Eastern Mediterranean catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gunkel

    2015-09-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: We found that the mean annual actual evapotranspiration was about 70% of precipitation, recharge was about 30% and natural runoff (excluding baseflow 1%. Aggregated model results also supported aridity indicators that show the presence of Infiltration Excess (Hortonian Overland Flow, as well as the importance of indirect groundwater recharge and evaporation from soil during dry months. In total, maximum annual water availability was of the same order of magnitude as actual demand estimates (23 MCM. However, high spatial and inter-annual variability, and the presence of karst features suggest that water resources in the region are highly vulnerable.

  5. Over-parameterised, uncertain 'mathematical marionettes' - how can we best use catchment water quality models? An example of an 80-year catchment-scale nutrient balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A J; Jackson, B M; Butterfield, D

    2008-08-01

    The Integrated Catchment Model of Nitrogen (INCA-N) was applied to the River Lambourn, a Chalk river-system in southern England. The model's abilities to simulate the long-term trend and seasonal patterns in observed stream water nitrate concentrations from 1920 to 2003 were tested. This is the first time a semi-distributed, daily time-step model has been applied to simulate such a long time period and then used to calculate detailed catchment nutrient budgets which span the conversion of pasture to arable during the late 1930s and 1940s. Thus, this work goes beyond source apportionment and looks to demonstrate how such simulations can be used to assess the state of the catchment and develop an understanding of system behaviour. The mass-balance results from 1921, 1922, 1991, 2001 and 2002 are presented and those for 1991 are compared to other modelled and literature values of loads associated with nitrogen soil processes and export. The variations highlighted the problem of comparing modelled fluxes with point measurements but proved useful for identifying the most poorly understood inputs and processes thereby providing an assessment of input data and model structural uncertainty. The modelled terrestrial and instream mass-balances also highlight the importance of the hydrological conditions in pollutant transport. Between 1922 and 2002, increased inputs of nitrogen from fertiliser, livestock and deposition have altered the nitrogen balance with a shift from possible reduction in soil fertility but little environmental impact in 1922, to a situation of nitrogen accumulation in the soil, groundwater and instream biota in 2002. In 1922 and 2002 it was estimated that approximately 2 and 18 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) respectively were exported from the land to the stream. The utility of the approach and further considerations for the best use of models are discussed.

  6. The effect of using different time steps in a soil water balance model to estimate groundwater recharge in the dry zone of Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, MR

    2010-01-01

    Importance of groundwater as a natural, renewable resource is well documented. The rate of replenishment of water table (or rate of groundwater recharge) is a key issue central to sustainable development of this valuable resource. Although many workers have used a soil water balance to estimate groundwater recharge, not many workers have investigated the effect of using different time steps (i.e. a day, 7 days etc.) in the water balance on the estimates of recharge. This study looks at the ef...

  7. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, cloud cover and water vapor on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, A. Helena; McDonald, Adrian J.; Bodeker, Gregory E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the effects of non-linear interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and cloud cover (referred to as climate variables) on amplified warming of the polar regions, using a new energy balance model. Our simulations show that the sum of the contributions to surface temperature changes due to any variable considered in isolation is smaller than the temperature changes from coupled feedback simulations. This non-linearity is strongest when all three climate variables are allowed to interact. Surface albedo appears to be the strongest driver of this non-linear behavior, followed by water vapor and clouds. This is because increases in longwave radiation absorbed by the surface, related to increases in water vapor and clouds, and increases in surface absorbed shortwave radiation caused by a decrease in surface albedo, amplify each other. Furthermore, our results corroborate previous findings that while increases in cloud cover and water vapor, along with the greenhouse effect itself, warm the polar regions, water vapor also significantly warms equatorial regions, which reduces polar amplification. Changes in surface albedo drive large changes in absorption of incoming shortwave radiation, thereby enhancing surface warming. Unlike high latitudes, surface albedo change at low latitudes are more constrained. Interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and clouds drive larger increases in temperatures in the polar regions compared to low latitudes. This is in spite of the fact that, due to a forcing, cloud cover increases at high latitudes and decreases in low latitudes, and that water vapor significantly enhances warming at low latitudes.

  8. International Space Station Water Balance Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Barry; Garr, John D., II; Erne, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS), which includes the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of water balance . In November of 2010, the Sabatier system, which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane, was brought on line. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water, which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification (spec) rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water, and drinking needs are well documented and used as the best guess planning rates when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent upon a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS from Mission Control in Houston. This paper reviews the various inputs to water planning, rate changes, and dynamic events, including but not limited to: crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water storage availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), Sabatier, and OGA capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints, and finally the operational challenges and means by which flight controllers

  9. Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS Operations Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS systems which includes the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of "water balance." Even more recently, in 2010 the Sabatier system came online which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water and drinking needs are well documented and used as a general plan when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent on a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS. This paper will review the various inputs to rate changes and inputs to planning events, including but not limited to; crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water containment availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints and finally the operational means by which flight controllers manage this new challenge of "water balance."

  10. WHATCH'EM: A Weather-Driven Energy Balance Model for Determining Water Height and Temperature in Container Habitats for Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Daniel F; Monaghan, Andrew J; Eisen, Lars; Barlage, Michael J; Hopson, Thomas M; Tarakidzwa, Isaac; Ortiz-Rosario, Karielys; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Hayden, Mary H; Bieringer, Paul E; Welsh Rodríguez, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    The mosquito virus vector Aedes (Ae.) aegypti exploits a wide range of containers as sites for egg laying and development of the immature life stages, yet the approaches for modeling meteorologically sensitive container water dynamics have been limited. This study introduces the Water Height and Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM), a state-of-the-science, physically based energy balance model of water height and temperature in containers that may serve as development sites for mosquitoes. The authors employ WHATCH'EM to model container water dynamics in three cities along a climatic gradient in México ranging from sea level, where Ae. aegypti is highly abundant, to ~2100 m, where Ae. aegypti is rarely found. When compared with measurements from a 1-month field experiment in two of these cities during summer 2013, WHATCH'EM realistically simulates the daily mean and range of water temperature for a variety of containers. To examine container dynamics for an entire season, WHATCH'EM is also driven with field-derived meteorological data from May to September 2011 and evaluated for three commonly encountered container types. WHATCH'EM simulates the highly nonlinear manner in which air temperature, humidity, rainfall, clouds, and container characteristics (shape, size, and color) determine water temperature and height. Sunlight exposure, modulated by clouds and shading from nearby objects, plays a first-order role. In general, simulated water temperatures are higher for containers that are larger, darker, and receive more sunlight. WHATCH'EM simulations will be helpful in understanding the limiting meteorological and container-related factors for proliferation of Ae. aegypti and may be useful for informing weather-driven early warning systems for viruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti.

  11. The role of canopy hydrological diversity and complexity on water balance and carbon sequestration during dry conditions: a modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Stewart, A.; Band, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    The importance and influence of forest to catchment hydrology have been well recognized. In the South Eastern U.S., Chapel Hill, NC, evapotranspiration by forest dominates almost 80% of the annual precipitation in long term average. Stomatal conductivity varies by tree species and its response to dry condition differently between evergreen and deciduous, and within their phonology groups. In this study, we simulated the catchment hydrology and forest ecosystem at a local catchment, Cane Creek, in the Chapel Hill triangle area using a spatially distributed, process-based hydro-ecological model, RHESSys. We incorporated characteristics of individual tree species to represent high hydrological diversity (e.g., maple, oak, pine), which has been modeled as either evergreen or deciduous (low hydrological diversity) in many studies. With tree species specifically modeled, we were able to investigate the role of tree species diversity and complexity on catchment hydrology. Local forest plant diversity, size, and density were provided by the U.S. Forest Services FIA, and tree species physiological parameters were obtained through researches at Duke Forest. High hydrological diversity canopy has higher water use and carbon sequestration than low hydrological diversity canopy. This result supports the optimality theory that emergent vegetation pattern in landscape maximizes ecosystem productivity and water use efficiency. Previous study emphasized this emergent pattern in terms of vegetation density along the hillslope gradient, and we further emphasized the emergent pattern in terms of hydrological diversity in this study.

  12. Field-scale water balance closure in seasonally frozen conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological water balance closure is a simple concept, yet in practice it is uncommon to measure every significant term independently in the field. Here we demonstrate the degree to which the field-scale water balance can be closed using only routine field observations in a seasonally frozen prairie pasture field site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Arrays of snow and soil moisture measurements were combined with a precipitation gauge and flux tower evapotranspiration estimates. We consider three hydrologically distinct periods: the snow accumulation period over the winter, the snowmelt period in spring, and the summer growing season. In each period, we attempt to quantify the residual between net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation and the change in field-scale storage (snow and soil moisture, while accounting for measurement uncertainties. When the residual is negligible, a simple 1-D water balance with no net drainage is adequate. When the residual is non-negligible, we must find additional processes to explain the result. We identify the hydrological fluxes which confound the 1-D water balance assumptions during different periods of the year, notably blowing snow and frozen soil moisture redistribution during the snow accumulation period, and snowmelt runoff and soil drainage during the melt period. Challenges associated with quantifying these processes, as well as uncertainties in the measurable quantities, caution against the common use of water balance residuals to estimate fluxes and constrain models in such a complex environment.

  13. Field-scale water balance closure in seasonally frozen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xicai; Helgason, Warren; Ireson, Andrew; Wheater, Howard

    2017-11-01

    Hydrological water balance closure is a simple concept, yet in practice it is uncommon to measure every significant term independently in the field. Here we demonstrate the degree to which the field-scale water balance can be closed using only routine field observations in a seasonally frozen prairie pasture field site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Arrays of snow and soil moisture measurements were combined with a precipitation gauge and flux tower evapotranspiration estimates. We consider three hydrologically distinct periods: the snow accumulation period over the winter, the snowmelt period in spring, and the summer growing season. In each period, we attempt to quantify the residual between net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation) and the change in field-scale storage (snow and soil moisture), while accounting for measurement uncertainties. When the residual is negligible, a simple 1-D water balance with no net drainage is adequate. When the residual is non-negligible, we must find additional processes to explain the result. We identify the hydrological fluxes which confound the 1-D water balance assumptions during different periods of the year, notably blowing snow and frozen soil moisture redistribution during the snow accumulation period, and snowmelt runoff and soil drainage during the melt period. Challenges associated with quantifying these processes, as well as uncertainties in the measurable quantities, caution against the common use of water balance residuals to estimate fluxes and constrain models in such a complex environment.

  14. A simple daily soil-water balance model for estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge in temperate humid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dripps, W.R.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal distribution of natural groundwater recharge is usually a prerequisite for effective groundwater modeling and management. As flow models become increasingly utilized for management decisions, there is an increased need for simple, practical methods to delineate recharge zones and quantify recharge rates. Existing models for estimating recharge distributions are data intensive, require extensive parameterization, and take a significant investment of time in order to establish. The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) has developed a simple daily soil-water balance (SWB) model that uses readily available soil, land cover, topographic, and climatic data in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of groundwater recharge at the watershed scale for temperate humid areas. To demonstrate the methodology and the applicability and performance of the model, two case studies are presented: one for the forested Trout Lake watershed of north central Wisconsin, USA and the other for the urban-agricultural Pheasant Branch Creek watershed of south central Wisconsin, USA. Overall, the SWB model performs well and presents modelers and planners with a practical tool for providing recharge estimates for modeling and water resource planning purposes in humid areas. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  15. A Mass-balance nitrate model for predicting the effects of land use on ground-water quality in municipal wellhead-protection areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpter, M.H.; Donohue, J.J.; Rapacz, M.V.; Beye, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    A mass-balance accounting model can be used to guide the management of septic systems and fertilizers to control the degradation of groundwater quality in zones of an aquifer that contributes water to public supply wells. The nitrate nitrogen concentration of the mixture in the well can be predicted for steady-state conditions by calculating the concentration that results from the total weight of nitrogen and total volume of water entering the zone of contribution to the well. These calculations will allow water-quality managers to predict the nitrate concentrations that would be produced by different types and levels of development, and to plan development accordingly. Computations for different development schemes provide a technical basis for planners and managers to compare water quality effects and to select alternatives that limit nitrate concentration in wells. Appendix A contains tables of nitrate loads and water volumes from common sources for use with the accounting model. Appendix B describes the preparation of a spreadsheet for the nitrate loading calculations with a software package generally available for desktop computers. (USGS)

  16. Effect of nitric oxide pathway regulation on water/sodium balance and renal function in a rodent model of acute liver and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracyn, Marek; Ząbkowski, Tomasz; Zdanowski, Robert; Brytan, Marek; Patera, Janusz; Nowak, Zbigniew; Kade, Grzegorz; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2014-09-27

    The pathomechanism of acute hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), a particular form of acute renal failure that occurs in the course of acute liver injury, is still poorly understood. The aim of our study was to estimate the influence of the activation and inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway on the water/sodium balance and development of acute renal failure in the course of HRS. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute galactosamine (Ga1N) model of HRS. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-NAME and L-arginine were administered intraperitoneally before and after liver damage. HRS developed in all tested groups. L-NAME increased osmotic clearance and urine volume more effectively before liver injury. Furthermore, administration of L-NAME increased creatinine clearance both before and after Ga1N injection. A double dose of L-NAME did not yield further improvement before Ga1N injection, but improved creatinine clearance after Ga1N intoxication. Injection of L-arginine increased sodium excretion and urine volume, but only after liver injury. Moreover, L-arginine injected after Ga1N caused significant improvement of the creatinine clearance in a dose-dependent manner. Our study shows that inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway improves parameters of water and sodium balance and prevents development of acute renal failure in the course of acute liver injury and liver failure. Activation of the nitric oxide system also has a favorable influence on water/sodium balance and renal failure, but only after liver injury.

  17. Assessing climate change impacts on water balance in the Mount ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A statistical downscaling known for producing station-scale climate information from GCM output was preferred to evaluate the impacts of climate change within the Mount Makiling forest watershed, Philippines. The lumped hydrologic BROOK90 model was utilized for the water balance assessment of climate change ...

  18. The significance of the interception in a Thornthwaite-type monthly step water balance model in context of the climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, András; Kalicz, Péter; Kisfaludi, Balázs

    2017-04-01

    The hydrological impacts of the climate change can be dramatic. Our main purpose is the methodical improvement of a previously established Thornthwaite-type monthly step water balance model, which takes the interception item into account, and compare the results of the evapotranspiration and the soil moisture projections for the 21st century of the original and the upgraded models. Both of the models will be calibrated and validated (using remote-sensed actual evapotranspiration data, called CREMAP) and requires only temperature and precipitation time series as inputs. The projections based on 4 bias-corrected regional climate models databases (FORESEE), and the 3 investigation periods are: 2015-2045, 2045-2075, and 2070-2100. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil, which can be also calibrated using the actual evapotranspiration data. The maximal rooting depth is determinable if the physical properties of the soil are available. The interception can be ranges from 5-40% of gross precipitation, which rate are differing in the various plant communities. Generally, the forests canopy intercepts considerable amounts of rainfall and evaporates back into the atmosphere during and after precipitation event. Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most significant factor, which determine the canopies storage capacity. Here, MODIS sensor based LAI time series are applied to estimate the storage capacity. A forest covered experimental catchment is utilized for testing the models near to Sopron, Hungary. The projections will expected to demonstrate increasing actual evapotranspiration values, but decreasing trends for the 10 percentile minimum soil moisture values at the end of the 21st century in both model runs. The seasonal periodicity of evapotranspiration may demonstrates the maximums in June or July, while in case of the soil moisture it may shows minimum values in autumn. With the comparison of the two model runs, we expect lower soil water storage

  19. Improve SSME power balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    Effort was dedicated to development and testing of a formal strategy for reconciling uncertain test data with physically limited computational prediction. Specific weaknesses in the logical structure of the current Power Balance Model (PBM) version are described with emphasis given to the main routing subroutines BAL and DATRED. Selected results from a variational analysis of PBM predictions are compared to Technology Test Bed (TTB) variational study results to assess PBM predictive capability. The motivation for systematic integration of uncertain test data with computational predictions based on limited physical models is provided. The theoretical foundation for the reconciliation strategy developed in this effort is presented, and results of a reconciliation analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel side turbopump subsystem are examined.

  20. Edelman's equation is valid in acute hyponatremia in a porcine model: plasma sodium concentration is determined by external balances of water and cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard-Steensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders; Bluhme, Henrik; Tønnesen, Else; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Ring, Troels

    2010-01-01

    Acute hyponatremia is a serious condition, which poses major challenges. Of particular importance is what determines plasma sodium concentration ([Na(+)]). Edelman introduced an explicit model to describe plasma [Na(+)] in a population as [Na(+)] = alpha.(exchangeable Na(+) + exchangeable K(+))/(total body water) - beta. Evidence for the clinical utility of the model in the individual and in acute hyponatremia is sparse. We, therefore, investigated how the measured plasma [Na(+)] could be predicted in a porcine model of hyponatremia. Plasma [Na(+)] was estimated from in vivo-determined balances of water, Na(+), and K(+), according to Edelman's equation. Acute hyponatremia was induced with desmopressin acetate and infusion of a 2.5% glucose solution in anesthetized pigs. During 480 min, plasma [Na(+)] and osmolality were reduced from 136 (SD 2) to 120 mmol/l (SD 3) and from 284 (SD 4) to 252 mosmol/kgH(2)O (SD 5), respectively. The following interpretations were made. First, Edelman's model, which, besides dilution, takes into account Na(+) and K(+), fits plasma [Na(+)] significantly better than dilution alone. Second, a common value of alpha = 1.33 (SD 0.08) and beta = -13.04 mmol/l (SD 7.68) for all pigs explains well the plasma [Na(+)] in the individual animal. Third, measured exchangeable Na(+) and calculated exchangeable Na(+) + K(+) per weight in the pigs are close to Edelman's findings in humans, whereby the methods are cross-validated. In conclusion, plasma [Na(+)] can be explained in the individual animal by external balances, according to Edelman's construct in acute hyponatremia.

  1. Modelo de simulación del balance hídrico en suelos con freática poco profunda Water balance simulation model in shallow watertable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Degioanni

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Los suelos con capa freática poco profunda poseen mayor probabilidad de ser afectados por anegamiento. La predicción de la oscilación temporal del nivel freático constituye una importante herramienta para valorar el riesgo de ocurrencia de tal proceso. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar los fundamentos teóricos, la estructura operativa y la capacidad predictiva del modelo de simulación del balance hídrico Freat.1. El modelo se fundamenta en el cálculo de la transferencia de agua entre la atmósfera, el perfil del suelo, la vegetación y la capa freática. Los procesos de transferencia simulados son: escurrimiento superficial saliente, ascenso del nivel freático por efecto de la lluvia neta y del escurrimiento subterráneo entrante y descenso del nivel freático por efectos del escurrimiento subterráneo saliente, evaporación, ascenso capilar desde la capa freática y transpiración de la vegetación. Se evalúan los resultados de su aplicación en un Haplustol udorténtico y en un Natralbol típico ambos con freática oscilando a menos de tres metros de profundidad. El error de predicción estimado como la raíz del error cuadrático medio entre registros freáticos observados y simulados es menor de 15 cm para ambos suelos. Se concluye que el modelo resulta apropiado para predecir oscilaciones temporales de capa freática y evaluar el riesgo de inundación por anegamiento en suelos con capa freática cercana a la superficie.Soils with shallow water table have greater probability of being affected by waterlogging. The prediction of the water table depth temporal oscillation is an important tool to assess the risk of occurrence of such processes. The goal of this paper is to present the theoretical foundations, operative structure and predictive capacity of the water balance simulation model Freat.1. This model is based on the calculus of water transference between atmosphere, soil profile, vegetation and water table. The

  2. Characterizing floods in the poorly gauged wetlands of the Tana River Delta, Kenya, using a water balance model and satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leauthaud

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands, such as those of the Tana River Delta in Kenya, are vital but threatened ecosystems. The flooding characteristics of wetlands largely determine their physical, chemical and biological properties, so their quantification is crucial for wetland management. This quantification can be achieved through hydrological modelling. In addition, the analysis of satellite imagery provides essential hydrological data to monitor floods in poorly gauged zones. The objective of this study was to quantify the main water fluxes and flooding characteristics (extent, duration and number of floods in the poorly gauged Tana River Delta in East Africa during 2002–2011. To do so, we constructed a lumped hydrological model (the Tana Inundation Model, TIM that was calibrated and validated with MODIS data. Further analysis of the MYD09A1 500 m composite product provided a map of the empirical probability of flooded state. In non-extreme years and for the current topology of the delta, the flood extent exceeded 300 km2. Floods over 200 km2 occurred on average once a year, with a mean duration of 18 days. River discharge from the upper basin counted for over 95% of the total water inflow. The results are discussed in the light of possible improvements of the models and wetland management issues. This study provides the first known quantification of spatial and temporal flooding characteristics in the Tana River Delta. As such, it is essential for the water and natural resource management of the Tana River basin. The water balance approach was pertinent to the study of this system, for which information on its internal properties and processes is limited. The methodology, a combination of hydrological modelling and flood mapping using MODIS products, should be applicable to other areas, including those for which data are scarce and cloud cover may be high, and where a medium spatial resolution is required.

  3. Modelling water and salt balances in a deep, groundwater-throughflow lake-Lake Purrumbete, southeastern Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yihdego, Yohannes; Webb, John; Leahy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    .... A modified difference water budget method for lakes, that estimates net groundwater flux through the difference between the level of the lake and the water table, along with the specific yield...

  4. The Water Balance Portal in Saxony - An interactive web application concerning the impact of climate change on the water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauffe, Corina; Schwarze, Robert; Röhm, Patric; Müller, Ruben; Dröge, Werner; Gurova, Anastasia; Winkler, Peter; Baldy, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Changes in weather and climate lead to increasing discussions about reasons and possible future impacts on the hydrological cycle. The question of a changed distribution of water also concerns the federal state of Saxony in the eastern part of Germany. Especially with a look at the different and increased requirements for water authorities, water economy and the public. To define and prepare these future requirements estimations of the future development of the natural water resources are necessary. Therefore data, information, and forecast concerning the development of the several components of the water balance are needed. And to make the obtained information easily available for experts and the public, tools like the internet have to be used. Under these frame conditions the water balance portal Saxony (www.wasserhaushaltsportal.sachsen.de) was developed within the project KliWES. The overall approach of the project was devided into the so-called „3 pillars".The first pillar focused on the evaluation of the status quo water balance from 1951-2005 by using a complex area-wide analysis of measured data. Also it contained the generating of a database and the development of a physically based parameter model. Furthermore an extensive model evaluation has been conducted with a number of objective assessment criteria, to select an appropriate model for the project. The second pillar included the calibration of the water balance model and the impact study of climate and land use change (1961-2100) on the water balance of Saxonian catchments. In this context 13 climate scenarios and three land use scenarios were simulated. The web presence of these two pillars represents a classical information service, which provides finalized results at the spatial resolution of sub-catchments using GIS-based webpages. The third pillar focused on the development of an interactive expert system. It allows the user (public, officials and consulting engineers) to simulate the water

  5. Estimations of water balance after validating and administering the water balance questionnaire in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Protopappas, Athanasios; Nyktari, Anastasia; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Antsaklis, Aristides; Zampelas, Antonis; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Dehydration during pregnancy may be harmful for the mother and fetus; thus our objective was to understand whether pregnant women balance water intake and loss. The Water Balance Questionnaire (WBQ) was modified to reflect pregnancy (WBQ-P). Validation was performed using 3-day diaries (n = 60) and hydration indices in urine (osmolality, specific gravity, pH and color, n = 40). The WBQ-P was found valid according to Kedhal τ-b coefficient agreement. The WBQ-P was administered to 95, 100 and 97 women per trimester, in Greece. Median (IQR) water balance, intake and loss were, respectively, 203 (-577, 971), 2917 (2187, 3544) and 2658 (2078, 3391) ml/day; these did not differ among the trimesters or between pregnant and non-pregnant women. However, more pregnant women were falling in the higher quartiles of water balance distribution. No differences in sources of water intake were identified except that women in the third trimester had lower water intake from beverages.

  6. Multidimensional Balanced Efficiency Decision Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Petrillo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a multicriteria methodological approach, based on Balanced Scorecard (BSC and Analytic Network Process (ANP, is proposed to evaluate competitiveness performance in luxury sector. A set of specific key performance indicators (KPIs have been proposed. The contribution of our paper is to present the integration of two methodologies, BSC – a multiple perspective framework for performance assessment – and ANP – a decision-making tool to prioritize multiple performance perspectives and indicators and to generate a unified metric that incorporates diversified issues for conducting supply chain improvements. The BSC/ANP model is used to prioritize all performances within a luxury industry. A real case study is presented.

  7. NUTRIENT BALANCE IN WATER HARVESTING SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz, F

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Dryland farming on Fuerteventura and Lanzarote (Canary Islands, Spain, which has an annual rainfall of less than 150 mm/year, has been based traditionally on water harvesting techniques (known locally as “gavias”. Periods of high productivity alternate with those of very low yield. The systems are sustainable in that they reduce erosive processes, contribute to soil and soil-water conservation and are largely responsible for maintaining the soil’s farming potential. In this paper we present the chemical fertility status and nutrient balance of soils in five “gavia” systems. The results are compared with those obtained in adjacent soils where this water harvesting technique is not used. The main crops are wheat, barley, maize, lentils and chick-peas. Since neither organic nor inorganic fertilisers are used, nutrients are derived mainly from sediments carried by runoff water. Nutrients are lost mainly through crop harvesting and harvest residues. The soils where water harvesting is used have lower salt and sodium in the exchange complex, are higher in carbon, nitrogen, copper and zinc and have similar phosphorous and potassium content. It is concluded that the systems improve the soil’s natural fertility and also that natural renovation of nutrients occurs thanks to the surface deposits of sediments, which mix with the arable layer. The system helps ensure adequate fertility levels, habitual in arid regions, thus allowing dryland farming to be carried out.

  8. Input Digital Datasets for the Soil-Water Balance Groundwater Recharge Model of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Colorado River and its tributaries supply water to more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico, irrigating more than 4.5...

  9. Water balance simulations of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell using a two-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, M.; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    the predominant transport mechanism is diffusion. Consequently, operating conditions with a high net water transport from anode to cathode should be avoided as it is important to keep the cathode catalyst layer well humidified in order to prevent high protonic losses. Addition of the micro-porous layer did...

  10. Quantifying catchment water balances and their uncertainties by expert elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Eva; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Warmink, Jord J.; Stisen, Simon; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    The increasing demand on water resources necessitates a more responsible and sustainable water management requiring a thorough understanding of hydrological processes both on small scale and on catchment scale. On catchment scale, the characterization of hydrological processes is often carried out by calculating a water balance based on the principle of mass conservation in hydrological fluxes. Assuming a perfect water balance closure and estimating one of these fluxes as a residual of the water balance is a common practice although this estimate will contain uncertainties related to uncertainties in the other components. Water balance closure on the catchment scale is also an issue in Denmark, thus, it was one of the research objectives of the HOBE hydrological observatory, that has been collecting data in the Skjern river catchment since 2008. Water balance components in the 1050 km2 Ahlergaarde catchment and the nested 120 km2 Holtum catchment, located in the glacial outwash plan of the Skjern catchment, were estimated using a multitude of methods. As the collected data enables the complex assessment of uncertainty of both the individual water balance components and catchment-scale water balances, the expert elicitation approach was chosen to integrate the results of the hydrological observatory. This approach relies on the subjective opinion of experts whose available knowledge and experience about the subject allows to integrate complex information from multiple sources. In this study 35 experts were involved in a multi-step elicitation process with the aim of (1) eliciting average annual values of water balance components for two nested catchments and quantifying the contribution of different sources of uncertainties to the total uncertainty in these average annual estimates; (2) calculating water balances for two catchments by reaching consensus among experts interacting in form of group discussions. To address the complex problem of water balance closure

  11. Modelling surface hydrology with DR2-SAGA 1.0: development of a user-friendly interface for hillslope water balance assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Montero, Teresa; López-Vicente, Manuel; Navas, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Soil moisture variability and the depth of water stored in the arable layer of the soil are important topics in agricultural research and rangeland management. Additionally, runoff triggers soil detachment and sediment delivery, and thus is one of the most important factors in the soil erosion dynamic. Overland flow generation and accumulation are non-linear and scale-dependent processes and the development of prediction models helps researchers evaluate different scenarios at different temporal and spatial scales. In this study, we present the DR2-SAGA 1.0 module to the scientific community. The DR2 (Distributed Rainfall-Runoff) water balance model computes the depth of water stored within the soil profile (Waa) distinguishing five scenarios of the upslope contributing area, infiltration processes and climatic parameters, and assesses the soil moisture status (SMS) throughout the year for an average monthly rainfall event. The SAGA program is a free Geographical Information System (GIS) with support for vector and, specially, raster data. Its foundation is its Application Programming Interface (API), which provides data object models and basic definitions for the programming of scientific modules. Module libraries contain the scientific methods and are developed using C++ code. The new module was run in a medium size mountain Mediterranean catchment (246 ha; Spanish Central Pre-Pyrenees) at high spatial resolution (5 x 5 meters of cell size). The Estaña Lakes Catchment is affected by karstic processes which explain the presence of 15 endorheic sub-catchments and three fresh-water lakes. Additionally, this area is ungauged and offers the opportunity to test the performance of the new module in a non-conventional landscape. DR2-SAGA 1.0 demands 16 inputs and generates monthly and annual maps of initial and effective runoff depth, Waa and SMS. One user-friendly tab was created with SAGA 2.0.8 for each input and output file. The new module also includes a water

  12. How to constrain multi-objective calibrations using water balance components for an improved realism of model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate discharge simulation is one of the most common objectives of hydrological modeling studies. However, a good simulation of discharge is not necessarily the result of a realistic simulation of hydrological processes within the catchment. To enhance the realism of model results, we propose an ...

  13. Spatio-temporal variability of snow water equivalent in the extra-tropical Andes cordillera from a distributed energy balance modeling and remotely sensed snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, E.; Molotch, N. P.; McPhee, J.

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal snow cover is the primary water resource precursor for human use and environmental sustain along the extratropical Andes Cordillera. Despite its importance, relatively little research has been devoted to understanding the properties, distribution and variability of this natural resource. This research provides high-resolution distributed estimates of end-of-winter and spring snow water equivalent over a 152 000 km2 domain that includes the mountainous reaches of central Chile and Argentina. Remotely sensed fractional snow covered area and other relevant forcings are combined with extrapolated data from meteorological stations and a simplified physically-based energy balance model in order to obtain melt-season peak SWE. Estimates show an overall coefficient of determination R2 of 0.61 compared to observations at 12 automatic snow water equivalent sensors distributed across the model domain, with R2 values between 0.32 and 0.88. Regional estimates of peak SWE accumulation show differential patterns strongly modulated by elevation, latitude and position relative to the continental divide. Average peak SWE increases by nearly 500 mm for every 1000 m in elevation gain for the central and southern sub-regions of the model domain, but this effect is much less pronounced in the northern reaches. The 3000-4000 m a.s.l. elevation band is the most significant accumulation area for most of the northern and central reaches of the domain, although the 4000-5000 m a.s.l. band, despite a smaller contributing area, almost doubles the accumulation amounts estimated for the lower adjacent subdomain. Snow accumulation reaches an earlier peak in the western Andes, and the eastern side of the continental divide shows lower snow accumulation at all elevations except for the southern region represented by the Neuquén River Basin. The results presented here have the potential of informing applications such as seasonal forecast model assessment and improvement, regional climate

  14. Quantifying Streamflow Variations in Ungauged Lake Basins by Integrating Remote Sensing and Water Balance Modelling: A Case Study of the Erdos Larus relictus National Nature Reserve, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological predictions in ungauged lakes are one of the most important issues in hydrological sciences. The habitat of the Relict Gull (Larus relictus in the Erdos Larus relictus National Nature Reserve (ELRNNR has been seriously endangered by lake shrinkage, yet the hydrological processes in the catchment are poorly understood due to the lack of in-situ observations. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the variation in lake streamflow and its drivers. In this study, we employed the remote sensing technique and empirical equation to quantify the time series of lake water budgets, and integrated a water balance model and climate elasticity method to further examine ELRNNR basin streamflow variations from1974 to 2013. The results show that lake variations went through three phases with significant differences: The rapidly expanding sub-period (1974–1979, the relatively stable sub-period (1980–1999, and the dramatically shrinking sub-period (2000–2013. Both climate variation (expressed by precipitation and evapotranspiration and human activities were quantified as drivers of streamflow variation, and the driving forces in the three phases had different contributions. As human activities gradually intensified, the contributions of human disturbances on streamflow variation obviously increased, accounting for 22.3% during 1980–1999 and up to 59.2% during 2000–2013. Intensified human interferences and climate warming have jointly led to the lake shrinkage since 1999. This study provides a useful reference to quantify lake streamflow and its drivers in ungauged basins.

  15. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, Carole; Qiu, Huanguang; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise L; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-04-14

    China's economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies. We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China's future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions on this system, notably on national agricultural water consumption and food self-sufficiency. We simulate interprovincial and international food trade with a general equilibrium welfare model and a linear programming optimization, and we obtain province-level estimates of commodities' virtual water content with a hydrologic model. We find that reducing irrigated land in regions highly dependent on scarce river flow and nonrenewable groundwater resources, such as Inner Mongolia and the greater Beijing area, can improve the efficiency of agriculture and trade regarding water resources. It can also avoid significant consumption of irrigation water across China (up to 14.8 km(3)/y, reduction by 14%), while incurring relatively small decreases in national food self-sufficiency (e.g., by 3% for wheat). Other researchers found that a national, rather than local, water policy would have similar effects on food production but would only reduce irrigation water consumption by 5%.

  16. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, Carole; Qiu, Huanguang; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    China’s economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies. We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China’s future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions on this system, notably on national agricultural water consumption and food self-sufficiency. We simulate interprovincial and international food trade with a general equilibrium welfare model and a linear programming optimization, and we obtain province-level estimates of commodities’ virtual water content with a hydrologic model. We find that reducing irrigated land in regions highly dependent on scarce river flow and nonrenewable groundwater resources, such as Inner Mongolia and the greater Beijing area, can improve the efficiency of agriculture and trade regarding water resources. It can also avoid significant consumption of irrigation water across China (up to 14.8 km3/y, reduction by 14%), while incurring relatively small decreases in national food self-sufficiency (e.g., by 3% for wheat). Other researchers found that a national, rather than local, water policy would have similar effects on food production but would only reduce irrigation water consumption by 5%. PMID:25825748

  17. An updated water balance for the Grootfontein aquifer near Mahikeng

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... Analysis of water levels and a water balance using recent ... term balance. Continued over-abstraction at Grootfontein implies increasing risk to Mahikeng's water supply, and illuminates the larger challenge of ensuring groundwater ...... CGS (Council for Geoscience) (1981) 1:250 000 Geological Map Sheet.

  18. Bathymetric survey and estimation of the water balance of Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantification of the water balance components and bathymetric survey is very crucial for sustainable management of lake waters. This paper focuses on the bathymetry and the water balance of the crater Lake Ardibo, recently utilized for irrigation. The bathymetric map of the lake is established at a contour interval of 10 ...

  19. Integrating soil water and tracer balances, numerical modelling and GIS tools to estimate regional groundwater recharge: Application to the Alcadozo Aquifer System (SE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornero, Jorge; Manzano, Marisol; Ortega, Lucía; Custodio, Emilio

    2016-10-15

    Groundwater recharge is one of the key variables for aquifer management and also one of the most difficult to be evaluated with acceptable accuracy. This is especially relevant in semiarid areas, where the processes involved in recharge are widely variable. Uncertainty should be estimated to know how reliable recharge estimations are. Groundwater recharge has been calculated in the Alcadozo Aquifer System, under steady state conditions, at regional (aquifer) and sub-regional (spring catchment) scales applying different methods. The regional distribution of long-term average recharge values has been estimated with the chloride mass balance method using data from four rain stations and 40 groundwater samples covering almost the whole aquifer surface. A remarkable spatial variability has been found. Average annual recharge rates ranges from 20 to 243mmyear(-1) across the aquifer, with an estimated coefficient of variation between 0.16 and 0.38. The average recharge/precipitation ratio decreases from 34% in the NW to 6% in the SE, following the topographic slope. At spring-catchment scale, recharge has been estimated by modelling the soil water balance with the code Visual Balan 2.0. The results, calibrated with discharge data of the two main springs Liétor and Ayna, are 35.5 and 50mmyear(-1) respectively, with estimated coefficients of variation of 0.49 and 0.36. A sensitivity analysis showed that soil parameters influence the most the uncertainty of recharge estimations. Recharge values estimated with both methods and at two temporal and spatial scales are consistent, considering the regional variability obtained with the chloride method and the respective confidence intervals. Evaluating the uncertainties of each method eased to compare their relative results and to check their agreement, which provided confidence to the values obtained. Thus, the use of independent methods together with their uncertainties is strongly recommended to constrain the magnitude and to

  20. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carole Dalin; Huanguang Qiu; Naota Hanasaki; Denise L. Mauzerall; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe

    2015-01-01

    .... The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies...

  1. Investigation of the energy-based theory of runoff in arctic regions with a hydrological model that couples the heat and water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, W. L.; Endrizzi, S.; Marsh, P.

    2010-12-01

    Runoff production is strongly dependent on the ground-thawing process in most arctic and subarctic permafrost regions covered by taiga and tundra, where the ground contains a relatively thin (i.e. 0.05-1.0 m) organic layer, overlying mineral sediment. The organic layer is characterized by high hydraulic conductivity, in contrast to the lower hydraulic conductivity of the underlying mineral sediment. As a consequence, hillslope drainage occurs predominantly below the ground surface, and, in particular, between the relatively impermeable frost table and the ground surface. In addition, in the first 0.2-0.3 m below the surface, the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the organic soil decreases by approximately 2 orders of magnitude with increasing depth. Early in the thaw period, when the frost table is still relatively close to the ground surface, lateral flow therefore occurs in the portion of the active layer with highest hydraulic conductivity. Later in the thaw season, as a result of the deepening of the frost table, the lateral flow rate is substantially lower since horizontal drainage occurs through the portion of soil with low hydraulic conductivity. This process has been conceptualized as the energy-based theory of runoff, and can only be investigated with a model that couples the heat and water flow equations in the soil. The GEOtop distributed hydrological model is a grid-based model with a complete surface energy balance scheme that accounts for variations in both the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, as well as for variations in radiant fluxes. The model also has a coupled subsurface heat and water flux scheme that is able to route water and energy both vertically between a large number of soil layers, and horizontally between grids. The model has been applied and tested with satisfying results in 3 different basins in the Canadian Arctic: Trail Valley Creek (NWT) located just North of treeline in the Mackenzie delta, Big Lake (NWT) in

  2. Atmospheric Water Balance and Variability in the MERRA-2 Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Takacs, Lawrence; Molod, Andrea; Mocko, David

    2017-01-01

    Closing and balancing Earths global water cycle remains a challenge for the climate community. Observations are limited in duration, global coverage, and frequency, and not all water cycle terms are adequately observed. Reanalyses aim to fill the gaps through the assimilation of as many atmospheric water vapor observations as possible. Former generations of reanalyses have demonstrated a number of systematic problems that have limited their use in climate studies, especially regarding low-frequency trends. This study characterizes the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications version 2 (MERRA-2) water cycle relative to contemporary reanalyses and observations. MERRA-2 includes measures intended to minimize the spurious global variations related to in homogeneity in the observational record. The global balance and cycling of water from ocean to land is presented, with special attention given to the water vapor analysis increment and the effects of the changing observing system. While some systematic regional biases can be identified,MERRA-2 produces temporally consistent time series of total column water and transport of water from ocean to land. However, the interannual variability of ocean evaporation is affected by the changing surface-wind-observing system, and precipitation variability is closely related to the evaporation. The surface energy budget is also strongly influenced by the interannual variability of the ocean evaporation. Furthermore, evaluating the relationship of temperature and water vapor indicates that the variations of water vapor with temperature are weaker in satellite data reanalyses, not just MERRA-2, than determined by observations, atmospheric models, or reanalyses without water vapor assimilation.

  3. Comparison of PALSAR-2 Interferometric Estimates of Snow Water Equivalent, Airborne Snow Observatory Snow Depths, and Results from a Distributed Energy Balance Snow Model (iSnobal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, E. J.; Marshall, H. P.; Painter, T. H.; Marks, D. G.; Hedrick, A. R.; Havens, S.; Forster, R. R.; Siqueira, P.

    2016-12-01

    The interferometric approach to estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) leverages the fact that at relatively low frequencies ( 1 GHz, L-Band), differences in snow microstructure and layering do not significantly affect the radar backscatter of dry snow. At these frequencies, the main contribution of the radar backscatter is the snow/ground interface, and the difference in the timing of the radar propagation through the snowpack is controlled by snow depth, density and liquid water content. While engineering limitations prevent direct measurement of absolute radar travel-time, interferometric phase shift between acquisitions can be used to monitor changes in radar travel-time, caused by changes in snow properties. PALSAR-2 is a L-Band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) aboard the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) ALOS-2 satellite. Launched in 2014, PALSAR-2 interferometric pairs geographically and temporally overlap data collected by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) which provides spatial distribution of snow depths across basins (e.g. Tuolumne, CA and Grand Mesa, CO) identified as contributing significantly to NASA's multi-year airborne SnowEx campaign. As part of ASO's operational requirements, a spatially distributed energy balance snow model (iSnobal) is run over these domains estimating density (and other snow properties) and providing SWE products for water resource managers as well as other cryospheric science applications. This effort identifies PALSAR-2 satellite pairs closely coincident with ASO collections, processes interferometric products of coherence and phase change, and compares these results with the spatially distributed snow depths from ASO and modeled snow densities from iSnobal. Moreover, for satellite acquisitions not temporally matching the ASO collections, the modeled snow properties (depths and densities) from iSnobal are used for comparison with interferometric estimates of SWE. The integration of ground measurements

  4. AMSR-E/Aqua root zone soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km descending and 2-Layer Palmer Water Balance Model V001 (LPRM_AMSRE_D_RZSM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AMSR-E/Aqua root zone soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km descending and 2-Layer Palmer Water Balance Model V001 is a Level 3 (gridded) root zone soil...

  5. Estimating crop yields by integrating the FAO Crop Specific Water Balance model with real-time satellite data and ground-based ancillary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Curt Andrew

    The broad objective of this research was to develop a spatial model which provides both timely and quantitative regional maize yield estimates for real-time Early Warning Systems (EWS) by integrating satellite data with ground-based ancillary data. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Crop Specific Water Balance (CSWB) model was modified by using the real-time spatial data that include: dekad (ten-day) estimated rainfall (RFE) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) composites derived from the METEOSAT and NOAA-AVHRR satellites, respectively; ground-based dekad potential evapo-transpiration (PET) data and seasonal estimated area-planted data provided by the Government of Kenya (GoK). A Geographical Information System (GIS) software was utilized to: drive the crop yield model; manage the spatial and temporal variability of the satellite images; interpolate between ground-based potential evapo-transpiration and rainfall measurements; and import ancillary data such as soil maps, administrative boundaries, etc. In addition, agro-ecological zones, length of growing season, and crop production functions, as defined by the FAO, were utilized to estimate quantitative maize yields. The GIS-based CSWB model was developed for three different resolutions: agro-ecological zone (AEZ) polygons; 7.6-kilometer pixels; and 1.1-kilometer pixels. The model was validated by comparing model production estimates from archived satellite and agro-meteorological data to historical district maize production reports from two Kenya government agencies, the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) and the Department of Resource Surveys and Remote Sensing (DRSRS). For the AEZ analysis, comparison of model district maize production results and district maize production estimates from the MoA (1989-1997) and the DRSRS (1989-1993) revealed correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.93, respectively. The comparison for the 7.6-kilometer analysis showed correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0

  6. Hydrological balance and water transport processes of partially sealed soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Anne; Wessolek, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    With increased urbanisation, soil sealing and its drastic effects on hydrological processes have received a lot of attention. Based on safety concerns, there has been a clear focus on urban drainage and prevention of urban floods caused by storm water events. For this reason, any kind of sealing is often seen as impermeable runoff generator that prevents infiltration and evaporation. While many hydrological models, especially storm water models, have been developed, there are only a handful of empirical studies actually measuring the hydrological balance of (partially) sealed surfaces. These challenge the general assumption of negligible infiltration and evaporation and show that these processes take place even for severe sealing such as asphalt. Depending on the material, infiltration from partially sealed surfaces can be equal to that of vegetated ones. Therefore, more detailed knowledge is needed to improve our understanding and models. In Berlin, two partially sealed weighable lysimeters were equipped with multiple temperature and soil moisture sensors in order to study their hydrological balance, as well as water and heat transport processes within the soil profile. This combination of methods affirms previous observations and offers new insights into altered hydrological processes of partially sealed surfaces at a small temporal scale. It could be verified that not all precipitation is transformed into runoff. Even for a relatively high sealing degree of concrete slabs with narrow seams, evaporation and infiltration may exceed runoff. Due to the lack of plant roots, the hydrological balance is mostly governed by precipitation events and evaporation generally occurs directly after rainfall. However, both surfaces allow for upward water transport from the upper underlying soil layers, sometimes resulting in relatively low evaporation rates on days without precipitation. The individual response of the surfaces differs considerably, which illustrates how

  7. BOREAS TE-19 Ecosystem Carbon Balance Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Spruce and Moss Model (SPAM) was designed to simulate the daily carbon balance of a black spruce/moss boreal forest ecosystem. It is driven by daily weather...

  8. BOREAS TE-19 Ecosystem Carbon Balance Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Spruce and Moss Model (SPAM) was designed to simulate the daily carbon balance of a black spruce/moss boreal forest ecosystem. It is driven by daily...

  9. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  10. Mean-annual and mean-seasonal water-budget estimates from a Soil-Water-Balance model of the Appalachian Plateaus, 1980 through 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program study of Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, mean-annual and mean-seasonal water-budget estimates for...

  11. Water Balance Study of a Groundwater-dependent Oak Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÓRICZ, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were (1 to estimate the water balance components of an oak standby calibrating a Hydrus 1-D model, (2 to determine the groundwater consumption by the water tablefluctuation method and (3 to compare the results of the modelling with a remote-sensing based estimation.Model simulation described the observed soil moisture and groundwater level relatively well, theroot mean square errors varied between 12.0 and 14.9% for the soil moisture measurements and 5.0%for the groundwater level. Groundwater consumption was estimated also by the water table fluctuationmethod, which provided slightly different groundwater consumption rates than estimated by theHydrus model simulation. The simulated evapotranspiration was compared with results of a remotesensingbased estimation using the surface temperature database of MODIS.According to the Hydrus model, the estimated evapotranspiration resulted from transpiration(73%, interception loss (23% and soil surface evaporation (4% in the two-year study period. Theproportion of groundwater consumption was 58% of the total transpiration. During the dry growingseason of 2007 the groundwater consumption was significant with 66% of the total transpiration.Water supply from groundwater was found to be less important in the wet growing season of 2008with 50%. The remote-sensing based estimation of evapotranspiration was about 4% lower than themodel based results of nearby comparable sites.

  12. Salt balance, fresh water residence time and budget for non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water and salt budgets suggest that in order to balance the inflow and outflow of water at Makoba bay, there is net flux of water from the bay to the open ocean during wet season. Residual salt fluxes between the bay and the open ocean indicate advective salt export. Exchange of water between the bay with the open ocean ...

  13. The water balance questionnaire: design, reliability and validity of a questionnaire to evaluate water balance in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Zampelas, Antonis; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2012-03-01

    There is a need to develop a questionnaire as a research tool for the evaluation of water balance in the general population. The water balance questionnaire (WBQ) was designed to evaluate water intake from fluid and solid foods and drinking water, and water loss from urine, faeces and sweat at sedentary conditions and physical activity. For validation purposes, the WBQ was administrated in 40 apparently healthy participants aged 22-57 years (37.5% males). Hydration indices in urine (24 h volume, osmolality, specific gravity, pH, colour) were measured through established procedures. Furthermore, the questionnaire was administered twice to 175 subjects to evaluate its reliability. Kendall's τ-b and the Bland and Altman method were used to assess the questionnaire's validity and reliability. The proposed WBQ to assess water balance in healthy individuals was found to be valid and reliable, and it could thus be a useful tool in future projects that aim to evaluate water balance.

  14. Stochastic soil water balance under seasonal climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Porporato, Amilcare; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-02-08

    The analysis of soil water partitioning in seasonally dry climates necessarily requires careful consideration of the periodic climatic forcing at the intra-annual timescale in addition to daily scale variabilities. Here, we introduce three new extensions to a stochastic soil moisture model which yields seasonal evolution of soil moisture and relevant hydrological fluxes. These approximations allow seasonal climatic forcings (e.g. rainfall and potential evapotranspiration) to be fully resolved, extending the analysis of soil water partitioning to account explicitly for the seasonal amplitude and the phase difference between the climatic forcings. The results provide accurate descriptions of probabilistic soil moisture dynamics under seasonal climates without requiring extensive numerical simulations. We also find that the transfer of soil moisture between the wet to the dry season is responsible for hysteresis in the hydrological response, showing asymmetrical trajectories in the mean soil moisture and in the transient Budyko's curves during the 'dry-down' versus the 'rewetting' phases of the year. Furthermore, in some dry climates where rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are in-phase, annual evapotranspiration can be shown to increase because of inter-seasonal soil moisture transfer, highlighting the importance of soil water storage in the seasonal context.

  15. Water balance analysis of the Morava River floodplain in the Kostice-Lanžhot transect using the WBCM-7 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovář, Pavel; Heřmanovská, Darina; Hadaš, Pavel; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Pešková, Jitka

    2016-02-01

    The study area of the Morava River floodplain is situated between the rivers Morava and Kyjovka in the reach from Hodonín to Lanžhot. This experimental area was chosen because during the last 30 years, there has been a serious problem with the frequent occurrence of hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts. Dry seasons have a very negative impact on the floodplain forest and have been caused mainly by regulation of the Morava River channel in the 1970s. Since flooding in the catastrophic year 1977, a part of this area has served as a polder for flood impact mitigation of the urbanised area of the town of Lanžhot. Management and farming practices have been heavily affected by the enormous economic and ecological damage due to long-term flooding of agricultural land. The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which the precipitation in the growing season of the dry years 2003 and 2011 was deficient, in comparison with the normal year 2009, through a study of the actual evapotranspiration caused by the significant drought in the Morava floodplain. A similar but converse situation in the wet year 2010 was also analysed, with the aim to show the differences in the components of the water balance equation in the growing seasons of all the extreme years tested here. The daily data from the Kostice climatological station were processed using the WBCM-7 model, where the input parameters were calibrated by the fluctuation of the groundwater table in the control borehole.

  16. SWB-A modified Thornthwaite-Mather Soil-Water-Balance code for estimating groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbroek, S.M.; Kelson, V.A.; Dripps, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    A Soil-Water-Balance (SWB) computer code has been developed to calculate spatial and temporal variations in groundwater recharge. The SWB model calculates recharge by use of commonly available geographic information system (GIS) data layers in combination with tabular climatological data. The code is based on a modified Thornthwaite-Mather soil-water-balance approach, with components of the soil-water balance calculated at a daily timestep. Recharge calculations are made on a rectangular grid of computational elements that may be easily imported into a regional groundwater-flow model. Recharge estimates calculated by the code may be output as daily, monthly, or annual values.

  17. Assessment of Cropland Water and Nitrogen Balance from Climate Change in Korea Peninsular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C. H.; Song, C.; Kim, T.; Lee, W. K.; Jeon, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    If crop growth is based on cropland productivity, the changes are due to changes in water and nitrogen balance from climate. In this study, order to estimation the change in cropland water and nitrogen balance in Korea peninsular using meteorological data observed last 30 years(1984-2013y). And we used soil, topography and management data about cropland. So as to estimating water and nitrogen variables, we used to the GIS based EPIC model that is major crop model in agro-ecosystem modelling field. Among the much of water and nitrogen variables, we selected to evapotranspiration, runoff, precipitation, nitrification, N lost, N contents and denitrification for this analysis. This selected variables associate with cropland water and nitrogen balance.First result, we can found the water balance changes in Korea peninsular, especially South Korea better condition than North Korea. In North Korea, evapotranspiration and precipitation result were lower than South Korea, but runoff result was bigger than South Korea. And we got a result about nitrogen balance changes in Korea peninsular from climate. In spatially, South and North Korea showed to similar condition on nitrogen balance in whole period. But in temporally, showed negative trends as time goes on, it caused by climate change. Overall condition of water and nitrogen balance on last 30 years in Korea peninsular, South Korea showed better condition than North Korea. Water and nitrogen balance change means have to be changed on agriculture management action, such as irrigation and fertilizer. In future period, climate change will cause a large effect to cropland water and nitrogen balance in mid-latitude area, so we have to prepare the change of this field for wise adaptation by climate change.

  18. Water Balance and Groundwater Quality of Koraro Area, Tigray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses Koraro Tabia (or Station), one of the millennium villages where shortage and bad quality water is a challenge. Water balance and the hydro chemical characteristics of groundwater have been investigated in order to assess the water potential and quality in the area. Hydrometeorological information has ...

  19. ESCIMO.spread – a spreadsheet-based point snow surface energy balance model to calculate hourly snow water equivalent and melt rates for historical and changing climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the spreadsheet-based point energy balance model ESCIMO.spread which simulates the energy and mass balance as well as melt rates at the snow surface. The model makes use of hourly recordings of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, and incoming global and longwave radiation. The effect of potential climate change on the seasonal evolution of the snow cover can be estimated by modifying the time series of observed temperature and precipitation by means of adjustable parameters. Model output is graphically visualized in hourly and daily diagrams. The results compare well with weekly measured snow water equivalent (SWE. The model is easily portable and adjustable, and runs particularly fast: an hourly calculation of a one winter season is instantaneous on a standard computer. ESCIMO.spread can be obtained from the authors on request.

  20. Fuzzy-probabilistic calculations of water-balance uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete, or subjective information, which may limit the application of conventional stochastic methods in predicting hydrogeologic conditions and associated uncertainty. Instead, redictions and uncertainty analysis can be made using uncertain input parameters expressed as probability boxes, intervals, and fuzzy numbers. The objective of this paper is to present the theory for, and a case study as an application of, the fuzzyprobabilistic approach, ombining probability and possibility theory for simulating soil water balance and assessing associated uncertainty in the components of a simple waterbalance equation. The application of this approach is demonstrated using calculations with the RAMAS Risk Calc code, to ssess the propagation of uncertainty in calculating potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and infiltration-in a case study at the Hanford site, Washington, USA. Propagation of uncertainty into the results of water-balance calculations was evaluated by hanging he types of models of uncertainty incorporated into various input parameters. The results of these fuzzy-probabilistic calculations are compared to the conventional Monte Carlo simulation approach and estimates from field observations at the Hanford site.

  1. Evaluation of seasonality on total water intake, water loss and water balance in the general population in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, O; Bountziouka, V; Panagiotakos, D Β; Zampelas, A; Kapsokefalou, M

    2013-07-01

    Water balance is achieved when water intake from solid and fluid foods and drinking water meets water losses, mainly in sweat, urine and faeces. Seasonality, particularly in Mediterranean countries that have a hot summer, may affect water loss and consequently water balance. Water balance has not been estimated before on a population level and the effect of seasonality has not been evaluated. The present study aimed to compare water balance, intake and loss in summer and winter in a sample of the general population in Greece. The Water Balance Questionnaire (WBQ) was used to evaluate water balance, estimating water intake and loss in summer (n = 480) and in winter (n = 412) on a stratified sample of the general population in Athens, Greece. In winter, mean (SD) water balance was -63 (1478) mL/day(-1) , mean (SD)water intake was 2892 (987) mL/day(-1) and mean (quartile range) water loss was 2637 (1810-3922) mL/day(-1) . In summer, mean (SD) water balance was -58 (2150) mL/day(-1) , mean (SD) water intake was 3875 (1373) mL/day(-1) and mean (quartile range) water loss was 3635 (2365-5258) mL/day(-1) . Water balance did not differ between summer and winter (P = 0.96); however, the data distribution was different; in summer, approximately 8% more participants were falling in the low and high water balance categories. Differences in water intake from different sources were identified (P Water balance in summer and winter was not different. However, water intake and loss were approximately 40% higher in summer than in winter. More people were falling in the low and high water balance categories in summer when comparing the distribution on water balance in winter. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. Modeling water and heat balance components of large territory for vegetation season using information from polar-orbital and geostationary meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To date, physical-mathematical modeling processes of land surface-atmosphere interaction is considered to be the most appropriate tool for obtaining reliable estimates of water and heat balance components of large territories. The model of these processes (Land Surface Model, LSM) developed for vegetation period is destined for simulating soil water content W, evapotranspiration Ev, vertical latent LE and heat fluxes from land surface as well as vertically distributed soil temperature and moisture, soil surface Tg and foliage Tf temperatures, and land surface skin temperature (LST) Ts. The model is suitable for utilizing remote sensing data on land surface and meteorological conditions. In the study these data have been obtained from measurements by scanning radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and Aqua, SEVIRI/geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, -10 (MSG-2, -3). The heterogeneity of the land surface and meteorological conditions has been taken into account in the model by using soil and vegetation characteristics as parameters and meteorological characteristics as input variables. Values of these characteristics have been determined from ground observations and remote sensing information. So, AVHRR data have been used to build the estimates of effective land surface temperature (LST) Ts.eff and emissivity E, vegetation-air temperature (temperature at the vegetation level) Ta, normalized vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, the leaf area index LAI, and precipitation. From MODIS data the values of LST Tls, Å, NDVI, LAI have been derived. From SEVIRI data there have been retrieved Tls, E, Ta, NDVI, LAI and precipitation. All named retrievals covered the vast territory of the part of the agricultural Central Black Earth Region located in the steppe-forest zone of European Russia. This territory with coordinates 49°30'-54°N, 31°-43°E and a total area of 227,300 km2 has been chosen for investigation. It has been carried out for years 2009

  3. Water shortage affects the water and nitrogen balance in Central European beech forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, A; Keitel, C; Nahm, M; Rennenberg, H

    2004-05-01

    Whilst forest policy promotes cultivation and regeneration of beech dominated forest ecosystems, beech itself is a highly drought sensitive tree species likely to suffer from the climatic conditions prognosticated for the current century. Taking advantage of model ecosystems with cool-moist and warm-dry local climate, the latter assumed to be representative for future climatic conditions, the effects of climate and silvicultural treatment (different thinning regimes) on water status, nitrogen balance and growth parameters of adult beech trees and beech regeneration in the understorey were assessed. In addition, validation experiments with beech seedlings were carried out under controlled conditions, mainly in order to assess the effect of drought on the competitive abilities of beech. As measures of water availability xylem flow, shoot water potential, stomatal conductance as well as delta (13)C and delta (18)O in different tissues (leaves, phloem, wood) were analysed. For the assessment of nitrogen balance we determined the uptake of inorganic nitrogen by the roots as well as total N content and soluble N compounds in different tissues of adult and young trees. Retrospective and current analysis of delta (13)C, growth and meteorological parameters revealed that beech growing under warm-dry climatic conditions were impaired in growth and water balance during periods with low rain-fall. Thinning affected water, N balance and growth mostly of young beech, but in a different way under different local climatic conditions. Under cool, moist conditions, representative for the current climatic and edaphic conditions in beech forests of Central Europe, thinning improves nutrient and water status consistent to published literature and long-term experience of forest practitioners. However, beech regeneration was impaired as a result of thinning at higher temperatures and under reduced water availability, as expected in future climate.

  4. A Stochastic Water Balance Framework for Lowland Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sally; MacVean, Lissa; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2017-11-01

    The water balance dynamics in lowland watersheds are influenced not only by local hydroclimatic controls on energy and water availability, but also by imports of water from the upstream watershed. These imports result in a stochastic extent of inundation in lowland watersheds that is determined by the local flood regime, watershed topography, and the rate of loss processes such as drainage and evaporation. Thus, lowland watershed water balances depend on two stochastic processes—rainfall and local inundation dynamics. Lowlands are high productivity environments that are disproportionately associated with urbanization, high productivity agriculture, biodiversity, and flood risk. Consequently, they are being rapidly altered by human development—generally with clear economic and social motivation—but also with significant trade-offs in ecosystem services provision, directly related to changes in the components and variability of the lowland water balance. We present a stochastic framework to assess the lowland water balance and its sensitivity to two common human interventions—replacement of native vegetation with alternative land uses, and construction of local flood protection levees. By providing analytical solutions for the mean and PDF of the water balance components, the proposed framework provides a mechanism to connect human interventions to hydrologic outcomes, and, in conjunction with ecosystem service production estimates, to evaluate trade-offs associated with lowland watershed development.

  5. Beyond annual streamflow reconstructions for the Upper Colorado River Basin: A paleo-water-balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; McCabe, Gregory J.; Woodhouse, Connie A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to use annual tree-ring chronologies and a monthly water balance model to generate annual reconstructions of water balance variables (e.g., potential evapotranspiration (PET), actual evapotranspiration (AET), snow water equivalent (SWE), soil moisture storage (SMS), and runoff (R)). The method involves resampling monthly temperature and precipitation from the instrumental record directed by variability indicated by the paleoclimate record. The generated time series of monthly temperature and precipitation are subsequently used as inputs to a monthly water balance model. The methodology is applied to the Upper Colorado River Basin, and results indicate that the methodology reliably simulates water-year runoff, maximum snow water equivalent, and seasonal soil moisture storage for the instrumental period. As a final application, the methodology is used to produce time series of PET, AET, SWE, SMS, and R for the 1404-1905 period for the Upper Colorado River Basin.

  6. Target Water Consumption Calculation for Human Water Management based on Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, X.; Zhai, Z.; Ye, Y.; Zhai, J.

    2016-12-01

    Degradation of the regional ecological environment has become increasingly serious due to the rapid increase of water usage. Critical to water consumption management is a good approach to control the growth of water usage. Through the identification and analysis of water consumption for various sectors in the hydrosocial cycle, the method for calculating the regional target water consumption also is derived based on water balance theory. Analysis shows that during 1980 - 2004 in Tianjin City, there were 22 years in which the actual water consumption of Tianjin exceeded its target water consumption, with an average excess of 66 million m3 annually. Moreover, calculations show that the maximum human target water consumption water supply is 1.91 billion m3/a. If water consumption is controlled according to the target, the sustainable development of water resource, economic and social growth, and ecological environment in this region can be expected to be achieved.

  7. A power balance model for handcycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Wim G.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; De Koning, Jos J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To demonstrate the applicability of the power balance model to elite handcycling and to obtain values for gross efficiency (GE). Methods. Four members of the Dutch Paralympic team performed trials on a 250-m indoor track. Velocity (v) and power output (PO) were measured in conjunction with

  8. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ET) of agricultural land and forestland surfaces play an important role in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface. Any change in evapotranspiration, either through change in vegetation or climate change, directly effects the available water resources. For quantifying these effects physical models need to be constructed. Most hydrological models have to deal with a lack of good spatial resolution, despite their good temporal information. Remote sensing techniques on the contrary determine the spatial pattern of landscape features and hence are very useful on large scales. The main objective of this research is the combination of the spatial pattern of remote sensing (using visible and thermal infrared spectrum) with the temporal pattern of the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994 and 1996). To realise this, the following objectives are formulated: (i) relate soil and vegetation surface temperatures to actual evapotranspiration of forest and crops simulated with the water balance model WAVE using remote sensing derived parameters. Three methods will be used and mutually compared. Both airborne and satellite imagery will be implemented; (1) compare the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration, as a result of the three methods, with the energy balance model SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and finally; (2) subject the up-scaled WAVE and SEBAL models to an uncertainty analysis using the GLUE-approach (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimate) (Beven en Binley, 1992). To study the behaviour of the model beyond the field-scale (micro-scale), a meso-scale study was conducted at the test-site of DURAS (50°50'38"N, 5°08'50"W, Sint-Truiden). Airborne imagery from the DAIS/ROSIS sensor are available. For the determination of the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration the next two methods are considered: (1) relations between surface temperature, surface albedo and vegetation indices are linked with field

  9. Short period forecasting of catchment-scale precipitation. Part II: a water-balance storm model for short-term rainfall and flood forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple two-dimensional rainfall model, based on advection and conservation of mass in a vertical cloud column, is investigated for use in short-term rainfall and flood forecasting at the catchment scale under UK conditions. The model is capable of assimilating weather radar, satellite infra-red and surface weather observations, together with forecasts from a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, to obtain frequently updated forecasts of rainfall fields. Such data assimilation helps compensate for the simplified model dynamics and, taken together, provides a practical real-time forecasting scheme for catchment scale applications. Various ways are explored for using information from a numerical weather prediction model (16.8 km grid within the higher resolution model (5 km grid. A number of model variants is considered, ranging from simple persistence and advection methods used as a baseline, to different forms of the dynamic rainfall model. Model performance is assessed using data from the Wardon Hill radar in Dorset for two convective events, on 10 June 1993 and 16 July 1995, when thunderstorms occurred over southern Britain. The results show that (i a simple advection-type forecast may be improved upon by using multiscan radar data in place of data from the lowest scan, and (ii advected, steady-state predictions from the dynamic model, using 'inferred updraughts', provides the best performance overall. Updraught velocity is inferred at the forecast origin from the last two radar fields, using the mass-balance equation and associated data and is held constant over the forecast period. This inference model proves superior to the buoyancy parameterisation of updraught employed in the original formulation. A selection of the different rainfall forecasts is used as input to a catchment flow forecasting model, the IH PDM (Probability Distributed Moisture model, to assess their effect on flow forecast accuracy for the 135 km2 Brue catchment

  10. A continuous high resolution water isotope dataset to constrain Alpine water balance estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelon, Anthony; Ceperley, Natalie; Beria, Harsh; Larsen, Josh; Schaefli, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Water delivered from Alpine environments is a crucial resource for many countries around the world. Precipitation accumulated during cold seasons as snowpack or glaciers is often an important source of water during warm (dry) season but also a dominant contributor to the annual water balance. In Switzerland, water from high Alpine, glacier-fed catchments provides a large portion of both the hydroelectric power and water supply. However, large uncertainties regarding changes in glacier volume and snow accumulation can have significant impacts on hydrologic, biologic, physical and economic understanding, modeling, and predictions. Accurately quantifying these water resources is therefore an on-going challenge. Given the well-known difficulty observing solid precipitation (snowfall), it can be assumed that most of the uncertainty in water balance estimates for snow-dominated environments is due to: 1) Poor measurement of winter precipitation and 2) A poor estimation of timing and amount of snow melt. It is noteworthy that the timing of melt plays a crucial role even for annual water balance estimates since it might significantly influence melt runoff flow paths and thereby groundwater recharge. We use continuous monitoring of water stable isotopes over the entire annual cycle in an Alpine catchment to shed light on how such observations can constrain water balance estimates. The selected catchment is the experimental Vallon de Nant catchment in the Vaud Alps of Switzerland, where detailed hydrologic observations have recently started in addition to the existing vegetation and soil investigations. The Vallon de Nant (14 km2, and an altitude ranging from 1200 to 3051 m) is a narrow valley that accumulates large amounts of snow during winter. In spring and summer, the river discharge is mainly supplied by snowmelt, with additional inputs from a small glacier and rainfall. Continuous monitoring of water stable isotopes (δO18 and δD) is combined with measurements of

  11. Hormonal Contraception, Body Water Balance and Thermoregulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadel, Ethan

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis estrogen enhances water and sodium retention, we compared the fluid regulatory responses to 150 mm of exercise-induced dehydration, followed by 180 ruin of ad libitum drinking...

  12. Water balance analysis for efficient water allocation in agriculture. A case study: Balta Brailei, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitu, Zenaida; Villani, Giulia; Tomei, Fausto; Minciuna, Marian; Aldea, Adrian; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Trifu, Cristina; Neagu, Dumitru

    2017-04-01

    Balta Brailei is one of the largest agriculture area in the Danube floodplain, located in SE of Romania. An impressive irrigation system, that covered about 53.500 ha and transferred water from the Danube River, was carried out in the period 1960-1980. Even if the water resources for agriculture in this area cover in most of the cases the volumes required by irrigation water users, the irrigation infrastructure issues as the position of the pumping stations against the river levels hinder the use of the water during low flows periods. An efficient optimization of water allocation in agriculture could avoid periods with water deficit in the irrigation systems. Hydrological processes are essentials in describing the mass and energy exchanges in the atmosphere-plant-soil system. Furthermore, the hydrological regime in this area is very dynamic with many feedback mechanisms between the various parts of the surface and subsurface water regimes. Agricultural crops depend on capillary rise from the shallow groundwater table and irrigation. For an effective optimization of irrigation water in Balta Brailei, we propose to analyse the water balance taking into consideration the water movement into the root zone and the influence of the Danube river, irrigation channel system and the shallow aquifer by combining the soil water balance model CRITERIA and GMS hydrogeological model. CRITERIA model is used for simulating water movement into the soil, while GMS model is used for simulating the shallow groundwater level variation. The understanding of the complex feedbacks between atmosphere, crops and the various parts of the surface and subsurface water regimes in the Balta Brailei will bring more insights for predicting crop water need and water resources for irrigation and it will represent the basis for implementing Moses Platform in this specific area. Moses Platform is a GIS based system devoted to water procurement and management agencies to facilitate planning of

  13. Water Balance and Proximate Composition in Cowpea ( vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studying the water balance and proximate composition in plants subjected to these stresses compared the influence of drought and flooding on cowpea seedlings. In drought plants the leaf water potential, its components and the proximate composition were markedly reduced by the end of the experimental period.

  14. Water balance evaluation, leakage rate and total water loss of Koka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water balance evaluation of Koka Reservoir was attempted by different authors, and different leakage rates were estimated. However, the water balance equation that the previous authors used does not take into account ground water inflow into the reservoir. Koka Reservoir is known to receive groundwater inflow from the ...

  15. An isotope mass balance model for the correlation of freshwater bivalve shell (Unio pictorum carbonate δ18O to climatic conditions and water δ18O in Lake Balaton (Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella SCHÖLL-BARNA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotope composition of bivalve shells (δ18Oshell can potentially record environmental variability of shallow lakes and therefore it has been extensively used as a proxy in the reconstruction of past climate and environmental conditions. As δ18Oshell reflects - besides the water temperature - the oxygen isotope composition of lake water (δ18OL, it is required to interpret the quality and impact of parameters influencing the δ18OL. Using the isotope mass balance model, I tested the hypothesis that Balaton lake water δ18O variability can be described as a result of the combined effects of three main climatic parameters such as river runoff, precipitation and evaporation. I calculated δ18OL time series for the period 1999-2008 for the whole water body at Siófok (eastern part of Lake Balaton, Hungary based on measured precipitation, inflow and evaporation amount and measured inflow, precipitation δ18O and calculated vapour δ18O data. The comparison of the modelled δ18OL time series to measured surface δ18OL data revealed that δ18O of Balaton water is sensitive for variation of climatic parameters. This variability is most striking at the surface, while according to the results of the model, the whole water body itself is less sensitive. Monthly differences suggest that generally during summer the whole water body is mixed up, while moderate isotope stratification (0.3-0.7‰ difference between surface and whole water body can be assumed in early spring and autumn. Predictions of shell δ18O values were made using the measured surface water δ18O data and the modelled δ18O values for the whole water body. High-resolution sampling was conducted on two Unio pictorum shells covering the period of 2001-2008, and both predictions were compared to measured shell δ18O records. The results showed that the prediction for the whole water body gives a better fit to the measured shell δ18O, suggesting that the whole water body better

  16. Automatic balancing of 3D models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Schmidt, Ryan; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technologies allow for more diverse shapes than are possible with molds and the cost of making just one single object is negligible compared to traditional production methods. However, not all shapes are suitable for 3D print. One of the remaining costs is therefore human time spent......, in these cases, we will apply a rotation of the object which only deforms the shape a little near the base. No user input is required but it is possible to specify manufacturing constraints related to specific 3D print technologies. Several models have successfully been balanced and printed using both polyjet...... is solved by creating cavities of air and distributing dense materials inside the model. Consequently, the surface is not deformed. However, printing materials with significantly different densities is often not possible and adding cavities of air is often not enough to make the model balance. Consequently...

  17. Acid-base balance in lake water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosset, C.

    1980-02-01

    As expected, the acid-base content of lake water is composed of strong base or acid, weak acids (mainly fulvic acid) and carbonic acid. All of these may be determined by using a simple titration method. The concentration of undissociated carbonic acid sometimes appears not to be in equilibrium with the CO/sub 2/-concentration in air. Observed supersaturation seems to be connected to the concentration of fulvic acid.

  18. Water balance in afforestation chronosequences of common oak and Norway spruce on former arable soils in Denmark as evaluated using the DAISY model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, O.; Hansen, S.; Abrahamsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    Land use change alters water and element cycles, but the changes in these cycles after conversion for example from cropland to forest are not fully described in hydrological and nutrient transport models, which usually describe either cropland or forest stands. In the European Union future affore...

  19. A Simple Water Balance Approach to Monitor Lake Water Level Changes: Validation using TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason Altimetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.; Alemu, H.; Asante, K. O.

    2008-12-01

    A simple water balance approach is adapted to monitor water resources in semi-arid region of east Africa by integrating coarse and dynamic datasets such as rainfall with fine and static elevation datasets. The model takes in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall data, modeled runoff and reference evapotranspiration (ET) data to monitor changes in lake water heights. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model (SRTM DEM) was used to delineate lake Turkana watershed. A simple water balance modeling approach was applied on Turkana basin to estimate lake water level heights for ten years (1997- 2008) and the results were compared with TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason satellite altimeter data. It was observed that simple water balance approach could capture the trend and seasonal variations of lake water fluctuations as measured by the satellite. The El Nino year of 1998 and the following consecutive dry years until 2002 are captured well on both. A mean deviation up to 30 cm of lake water height was found when compared to the satellite measurements. The satellite measurements made since 2004 showed that the lake water height gradually reduced, whereas simulations made using the water balance model showed an increasing trend. This could be reasoned by the fact that, on the Omo river, which contributes to over 80% of the lake inflows, a dam was commissioned in 2004. Knowledge of such processes occurring upstream or downstream is often required while analyzing satellite altimetry data to avoid misinterpretation. Although the absolute accuracy is low, the advantage of the simple water balance method lies in its ability to: (i) capture the trend and seasonal variations of water level fluctuations of small to large lakes around the world; (ii) when coupled with ground measurements or satellite altimetry data for lake water heights, the simple water balance method can identify the presence and absence of upstream and downstream processes; (iii) since water

  20. Large Scale Evapotranspiration Estimates: An Important Component in Regional Water Balances to Assess Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatuza-Payan, J.; Yepez, E. A.; Watts, C.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Valdez-Torres, L. C.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2013-05-01

    Water security, can be defined as the reliable supply in quantity and quality of water to help sustain future populations and maintaining ecosystem health and productivity. Water security is rapidly declining in many parts of the world due to population growth, drought, climate change, salinity, pollution, land use change, over-allocation and over-utilization, among other issues. Governmental offices (such as the Comision Nacional del Agua in Mexico, CONAGUA) require and conduct studies to estimate reliable water balances at regional or continental scales in order to provide reasonable assessments of the amount of water that can be provided (from surface or ground water sources) to supply all the human needs while maintaining natural vegetation, on an operational basis and, more important, under disturbances, such as droughts. Large scale estimates of evapotranspiration (ET), a critical component of the water cycle, are needed for a better comprehension of the hydrological cycle at large scales, which, in most water balances is left as the residual. For operational purposes, such water balance estimates can not rely on ET measurements since they do not exist, should be simple and require the least ground information possible, information that is often scarce or does not exist at all. Given this limitation, the use of remotely sensed data to estimate ET could supplement the lack of ground information, particularly in remote regions In this study, a simple method, based on the Makkink equation is used to estimate ET for large areas at high spatial resolutions (1 km). The Makkink model used here is forced using three remotely sensed datasets. First, the model uses solar radiation estimates obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES); Second, the model uses an Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) obtained from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized to get an estimate for vegetation amount and land use which was

  1. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  2. Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Model Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2011-01-01

    A new relative error model reduction technique for linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. Both continuous and discrete time systems can be reduced within this framework. The proposed model reduction method is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced truncation and a recently...... developed inner-outer factorization technique. Compared to the other analogous counterparts, the proposed method shows to provide more accurate results in terms of time weighted norms, when applied to different practical examples. The results are further illustrated by a numerical example....

  3. Water Balance and Forest Productivity in Mediterranean Mountain Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Scarascia-Mugnozza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of water resources is one of the major drivers affecting forest and agricultural productivity. The sensitivity of Mediterranean forest species to water shortage is becoming even more relevant in relation to climate changes, that for Southern Europe could lead to an increase in temperature of 2 to 3 °C, paralleled by a decrease of 5 to 15% of summer rainfall. It is then important to study the relationship between water balance and productivity of important forest tree species such as beech and mountain pines that represent the upper limit of forest vegetation in almost all the Apennines range. In the present paper, the measurements of water balance, evapotranspiration, carbon exchange and productivity in beech and pine forests of central-southern Italy (Abruzzo and Calabria regions are reported. The results are obtained in the course of several years of experimentation with innovative techniques and integrated at the canopy level.

  4. Water balance disorders after neurosurgery: The triphasic response revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWater balance disorders after neurosurgery are well recognized, but detailed reports of the triphasic response are scarce. We describe a 55-year-old woman, who developed the triphasic response with severe hyper- and hyponatraemia after resection of a suprasellar meningioma. The case

  5. Water balance in the complex mountainous terrain of Bhutan and linkages to land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorji, Ugyen; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig

    2016-01-01

    data, our models performed clearly better than the global CRU gridded data for Bhutan, indicating that local higher-resolution data and models are preferred in mountainous regions. A positive water balance is found in across east-west belts in southern and northern Bhutan, where mainly broadleaf forest...

  6. Surface energy balance of fresh and saline waters : AquaSEBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelrady, A.R.; Timmermans, J.; Vekerdy, Z.; Salama, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) model

  7. Basin-scale water-balance dataset (BSWB): an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents an update of a basin-scale diagnostic dataset of monthly variations in terrestrial water storage for large river basins worldwide (BSWB v2016; Hirschi et al., in review). Terrestrial water storage comprises all forms of water storage on land surfaces, and its seasonal and inter-annual variations are mostly determined by soil moisture, groundwater, snow cover, and surface water. The presented dataset is derived using a combined atmospheric and terrestrial water-balance approach with conventional streamflow measurements and re-analysis data of atmospheric moisture flux convergence and water vapor content. It extends a previous existing version of the dataset (Mueller et al., 2011) temporally and spatially. Comparison of BSWB v2016 to independent estimates of terrestrial water storage from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) show good agreement. Hirschi, M., and Seneviratne, S. I.: Basin-scale water-balance dataset (BSWB): an update. Earth Syst. Sci. Data Discuss., doi:10.5194/essd-2016-33, in review, 2016. Mueller, B., Hirschi, M., and Seneviratne, S. I.: New diagnostic estimates of variations in terrestrial water storage based on ERA-Interim data. Hydrol. Process., 25, 996-1008, doi:10.1002/hyp.7652, 2011.

  8. Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1995-10-01

    We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

  9. Water balance in the complex mountainous terrain of Bhutan and linkages to land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugyen Dorji

    2016-09-01

    Study Focus: Located in the Himalayas with elevation ranging 100–7550 m and with an area equivalent to Switzerland, Bhutan has great biodiversity despite its small area. A monsoon-dominated climate causes generally wet summer and dry winter. Bhutan is highly dependent of climatic conditions for its developmental activities. Using multiple regression analysis we have established models to predict the evapotranspiration (ETo and water balance and test the linkage to vegetation and land cover using meteorological data from 70 weather stations across Bhutan. Temperature-based ETo equations were evaluated in reference to the Penman-Monteith (PM method and a calibrated Hargreaves (H equation was used for computing the ETo. New Hydrological Insights for the Region. The calibrated Hargreaves equation gave good estimates of average daily ETo comparable to the PM ETo. The spatial variation in PM ETo is linked to variation in sunshine hours in summer and temperature in other seasons. Seasonal and annual ETo was mainly affected by elevation and latitude, which is linked to temperature and sunshine duration. Precipitation and water balance correlated positively with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI while ETo correlated negatively. Our models for predicting ETo and water balances performed clearly better than the global CRU gridded data for Bhutan. A positive water balance is found in broadleaf forest areas and small or negative water balance for coniferous forests.

  10. Latent/sensible heat and water stress retrieval performances of the SPARSE dual-source energy balance model over irrigated and rainfed agricultural crops using eddy covariance, sap flow and extra-large aperture scintillometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, G.; Bahir, M.; Delogu, E.; Mougenot, B.; Bousbih, S.; Raimbault, B.; Fanise, P.; Saadi, S.; Chebbi, W.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Rivalland, V.; Lagouarde, J. P.; Olioso, A.

    2016-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important component of the water cycle, especially in semi-arid lands. Its quantification is crucial for a sustainable management of scarce water resources. Evapotranspiration at large scales is often estimated through integrated water balance models forced by distributed meteorological forcing. This forcing includes irrigation inputs from surface and groundwater uptakes. Those amounts are largely unknown at most scales, including the regional scale, i.e. the working scale of institutional stakeholders. An alternative way to quantify evapotranspiration is to exploit the available surface temperature data from remote sensing as a signature of the surface energy balance. This work evaluates the SPARSE model (http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/19/4653/2015/) forced by in-situ or MODIS surface temperatures. SPARSE is built on the same rationale as the widely used TSEB model. Its new features involve state-of-the art resistance formulations as well as the possibility to run the model in two modes: a retrieval mode to simulate evaporation and transpiration from TIR data, and a prescribed mode which simulates potential evaporation and transpiration rates. This enables to simulate not only actual fluxes but also surface and plant water stress. It ensures also an increased robustness through bounding the actual fluxes by the corresponding potential rates. A wide range of flux datasets acquired over rainfed and irrigated crops in temperate, Mediterranean and semi-arid regions are used to check the robustness of both stress levels and evapotranspiration retrievals. Two flux datasets are relevant for assessing the performance of the MODIS scale retrievals. One is an extensive rainfed oliveyard with very low (7%) vegetation cover. For this site, evapotranspiration from eddy covariance (EC) as well as transpiration from sapflow measurements are available to check the accuracy of evaporation and transpiration components computed by SPARSE. A second

  11. Energy Balance Models and Planetary Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We know that planetary dynamics can have a significant affect on the climate of planets. Planetary dynamics dominate the glacial-interglacial periods on Earth, leaving a significant imprint on the geological record. They have also been demonstrated to have a driving influence on the climates of other planets in our solar system. We should therefore expect th.ere to be similar relationships on extrasolar planets. Here we describe a simple energy balance model that can predict the growth and thickness of glaciers, and their feedbacks on climate. We will also describe model changes that we have made to include planetary dynamics effects. This is the model we will use at the start of our collaboration to handle the influence of dynamics on climate.

  12. Dynamic energy-balance model predicting gestational weight gain123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diana M; Navarro-Barrientos, Jesus E; Rivera, Daniel E; Heymsfield, Steven B; Bredlau, Carl; Redman, Leanne M; Martin, Corby K; Lederman, Sally A; M Collins, Linda; Butte, Nancy F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gestational weight gains (GWGs) that exceed the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommended ranges increase risk of long-term postpartum weight retention; conversely, GWGs within the recommended ranges are more likely to result in positive maternal and fetal outcomes. Despite this evidence, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that the majority of pregnant women gain outside the target GWG ranges. A mathematical model that predicts GWG and energy intake could provide a clinical tool for setting precise goals during early pregnancy and continuous objective feedback throughout pregnancy. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a differential equation model for energy balance during pregnancy that predicts GWG that results from changes in energy intakes. Design: A set of prepregnancy BMI–dependent mathematical models that predict GWG were developed by using data from a longitudinal study that measured gestational-changes in fat-free mass, fat mass, total body water, and total energy expenditure in 63 subjects. Results: Mathematical models developed for women with low, normal, and high prepregnancy BMI were shown to fit the original data. In 2 independent studies used for validation, model predictions of fat-free mass, fat mass, and total body water matched actual measurements within 1 kg. Conclusions: Our energy-balance model provides plausible predictions of GWG that results from changes in energy intakes. Because the model was implemented as a Web-based applet, it can be widely used by pregnant women and their health care providers. PMID:22170365

  13. Management approach of Keibul Lamjao National Park in Loktak Lake, Manipur using water balance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Khwairakpam; Khosa, Rakesh; Gosain, Ashvani; Nema, Arvind

    2017-04-01

    Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP) is situated in Loktak Lake which is a Ramsar designated and Montreaux record listed wetland. KLNP, the only floating national park in the world, is the only natural home of Manipur's brow-antlered deer popularly known as Sangai. Naturally, this natural park has ecological phenomenon of sinking during dry season and staying afloat during rainy season. The primary objective of this study is to formulate management approach for the conservation of KLNP by developing water balance models and correlating to the ecological processes of KLNP. Lake water balance models for two scenarios, Pre and Post Ithai barrage construction have been developed considering various parameters such as direct precipitation, runoff from the sub-basins, evaporation from the open water surface, evapotranspiration from Phumdis and domestic consumption. Hydropower generation, irrigation purposes and releases through the Ithai Barrage are also considered in Post Ithai barrage scenario. Run-off from each sub-basins have been simulated from hydrological-hydraulic models developed using Coupled MIKE SHE, MIKE 11 and SWAT. SWAT is used to model hilly terrain region of each hydrological-hydraulic models and runoff obtain from SWAT have been integrated as input data in MIKE SHE-MIKE11 models. Models have been calibrated and validated using observed runoff for hydrological-hydraulic models and observed lake water level for water balance models. The performance of each hydrological-hydrodynamic and water balance models have been assessed using Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (E) and Coefficient of determination (R2) and the overall efficiency is found to be greater than 0.80. The obtained results have been investigated for causal correlation with the deteriorating ecological condition of the national park to formulate management approach. Results demonstrate the requirement to consider ecology of KLNP while developing wetland water-level management plans.

  14. [Diet and water-salt balance in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, A S; Kutina, A V; Natochin, Iu V

    2012-03-01

    We compared parameters of water-salt balance in Wistar female rats fed normal chows during more than 2 weeks. Potassium content was 1.4-fold higher in diet I than in diet II, and sodium end water content was 3.3- and 7.5-fold higher in diet II than in diet I. Blood osmolality and concentration of Na+, K+, Mg2+ were equal in rats fed different chow. In water-loaded rats (5 ml of water/100 bw per os) fed different chow, urine flow rate did not differ, but solute-free water excretion was higher by 40.2% in the rats fed diet II vs. diet I. The sort of diet did not affect the renal sodium excretion during oral administration of 5 ml 0.9% NaCl per 100 g bw to rats. After vasopressin injection solute-free water reabsorption was 1.5-fold higher in rats fed diet II. Natriuretic and hydruretic effect of exenatide, glucagon-like peptide 1 mimetic, was weaker in rats fed diet I. The data obtained indicate that organism can effectively maintain blood parameters. The modulation of hormone regulatory effects on water and sodium balance was found to depend on the state of organism under diet consumed continuously.

  15. Constructing a framework for risk analyses of climate change effects on the water budget of differently sloped vineyards with a numeric simulation using the Monte Carlo method coupled to a water balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eHofmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grapes for wine production are a highly climate sensitive crop and vineyard water budget is a decisive factor in quality formation. In order to conduct risk assessments for climate change effects in viticulture models are needed which can be applied to complete growing regions. We first modified an existing simplified geometric vineyard model of radiation interception and resulting water use to incorporate numerical Monte Carlo simulations and the physical aspects of radiation interactions between canopy and vineyard slope and azimuth. We then used four regional climate models to assess for possible effects on the water budget of selected vineyard sites up 2100. The model was developed to describe the partitioning of short-wave radiation between grapevine canopy and soil surface, respectively green cover, necessary to calculate vineyard evapotranspiration. Soil water storage was allocated to two sub reservoirs. The model was adopted for steep slope vineyards based on coordinate transformation and validated against measurements of grapevine sap flow and soil water content determined down to 1.6 m depth at three different sites over two years. The results showed good agreement of modelled and observed soil water dynamics of vineyards with large variations in site specific soil water holding capacity and viticultural management. Simulated sap flow was in overall good agreement with measured sap flow but site-specific responses of sap flow to potential evapotranspiration were observed. The analyses of climate change impacts on vineyard water budget demonstrated the importance of site-specific assessment due to natural variations in soil water holding capacity. The improved model was capable of describing seasonal and site-specific dynamics in soil water content and could be used in an amended version to estimate changes in the water budget of entire grape growing areas due to evolving climatic changes.

  16. Simulação do balanço de água no solo cultivado com trigo com modificação de dois modelos Simulating water balance in soil under wheat by two modified models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Maus Alberto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O trigo é a principal cultura de inverno do estado do Rio Grande do Sul e o cálculo do balanço de água no solo é parte importante de modelos de crescimento, desenvolvimento e rendimento de culturas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi obter melhor estimativa do balanço de água no solo cultivado com trigo, modificando dois modelos de balanço de água nesse solo. Mediu-se o conteúdo de água no solo pelo método gravimétrico durante a estação de cultivo de dois cultivares de trigo em três datas de semeadura, em Santa Maria - RS, e a água disponível para a cultura foi representada pela fração de água no solo disponível para as plantas (FADS. O desempenho das versões originais e modificadas dos modelos de balanço de água no solo de Campbell & Diaz e de Amir & Sinclair foi avaliado pela raiz do quadrado médio do erro (RQME. O modelo de Campbell & Diaz modificado é mais realístico e com maior possibilidade de desempenho satisfatório em regiões de clima distinto daquele em que foi desenvolvido, mas o modelo de Amir & Sinclair modificado estimou melhor a água disponível no solo para a cultura do trigo na região do estudo. A profundidade máxima do sistema radicular de 0,30 m é mais apropriada para a simulação da fração de água disponível no solo, para a unidade de mapeamento de solo São Pedro.Wheat is the main winter crop in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and the calculation of soil water balance is an important element in simulation models for crop growth, development and yield. The objective of this study was to improve the water balance estimation in soil under wheat by two modified models. The soil water content was measured by the gravimetric method during the growing season of two wheat cultivars sown on three dates in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil. Soil water for crop was represented as the fraction of plant-available soil water (FASW. The performance of the original and the modified version of two water balance models

  17. Balanced scorecard model for Paulinian educational institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sr. Evangeline Lorenzo Anastacio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The researcher aimed to come up with a mission-centered strategic management system for Paulinian schools using the Balanced Scorecard (BSC approach. To achieve this project, a consensus was derived from 39 schools in the Philippines run by the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres (SPC using the Delphi technique. The resulting BSC model included five perspectives, namely, spirituality, internal processes, learner and external community, learning organization, and fiscal resources perspectives. Strategic objectives with the corresponding key performance indicators (KPIs were identified. Unique to the resulting BSC model is the inclusion of spirituality perspective which ensures the conscious infusion of long-lasting values in all aspects of the school.

  18. A stochastic approach for the description of the water balance dynamics in a river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manfreda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces an analytical approach for the description of the soil water balance dynamics over a schematic river basin. The model is based on a stochastic differential equation where the rainfall forcing is interpreted as an additive noise in the soil water balance. This equation can be solved assuming known the spatial distribution of the soil moisture over the basin transforming the two-dimensional problem in space in a one dimensional one. This assumption is particularly true in the case of humid and semihumid environments, where spatial redistribution becomes dominant producing a well defined soil moisture pattern. The model allowed to derive the probability density function of the saturated portion of a basin and of its relative saturation. This theory is based on the assumption that the soil water storage capacity varies across the basin following a parabolic distribution and the basin has homogeneous soil texture and vegetation cover. The methodology outlined the role played by the soil water storage capacity distribution of the basin on soil water balance. In particular, the resulting probability density functions of the relative basin saturation were found to be strongly controlled by the maximum water storage capacity of the basin, while the probability density functions of the relative saturated portion of the basin are strongly influenced by the spatial heterogeneity of the soil water storage capacity. Moreover, the saturated areas reach their maximum variability when the mean rainfall rate is almost equal to the soil water loss coefficient given by the sum of the maximum rate of evapotranspiration and leakage loss in the soil water balance. The model was tested using the results of a continuous numerical simulation performed with a semi-distributed model in order to validate the proposed theoretical distributions.

  19. A stochastic approach for the description of the water balance dynamics in a river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Fiorentino, M.

    2008-09-01

    The present paper introduces an analytical approach for the description of the soil water balance dynamics over a schematic river basin. The model is based on a stochastic differential equation where the rainfall forcing is interpreted as an additive noise in the soil water balance. This equation can be solved assuming known the spatial distribution of the soil moisture over the basin transforming the two-dimensional problem in space in a one dimensional one. This assumption is particularly true in the case of humid and semihumid environments, where spatial redistribution becomes dominant producing a well defined soil moisture pattern. The model allowed to derive the probability density function of the saturated portion of a basin and of its relative saturation. This theory is based on the assumption that the soil water storage capacity varies across the basin following a parabolic distribution and the basin has homogeneous soil texture and vegetation cover. The methodology outlined the role played by the soil water storage capacity distribution of the basin on soil water balance. In particular, the resulting probability density functions of the relative basin saturation were found to be strongly controlled by the maximum water storage capacity of the basin, while the probability density functions of the relative saturated portion of the basin are strongly influenced by the spatial heterogeneity of the soil water storage capacity. Moreover, the saturated areas reach their maximum variability when the mean rainfall rate is almost equal to the soil water loss coefficient given by the sum of the maximum rate of evapotranspiration and leakage loss in the soil water balance. The model was tested using the results of a continuous numerical simulation performed with a semi-distributed model in order to validate the proposed theoretical distributions.

  20. The water balance of a seasonal stream in the semi-arid Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundwater recharge was calculated to average at 29 mm·a-1. The water balance model (J2000) performed well during the simulation period with all measures of performance exhibiting acceptable values. Simulation results indicate that streamflow is driven by interflow from the soil horizon (94.68% of streamflow), ...

  1. The water balance of a seasonal stream in the semi-arid Western Cape (South Africa)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bugan, Richard DH

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available modelling were used to perform hydrograph separation as well as to quantify components of the water balance. Annual streamflow in the catchment during the period of observation was variable, ranging between 0.026 mm·a-1 and 75.401 mm·a-1. Streamflow volumes...

  2. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Semi-arid vegetation response to antecedent climate and water balance windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, David P.; Munson, Seth M.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Witwicki, Dana L.; Bunting, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Questions Can we improve understanding of vegetation response to water availability on monthly time scales in semi-arid environments using remote sensing methods? What climatic or water balance variables and antecedent windows of time associated with these variables best relate to the condition of vegetation? Can we develop credible near-term forecasts from climate data that can be used to prepare for future climate change effects on vegetation? Location Semi-arid grasslands in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, USA. Methods We built vegetation response models by relating the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from MODIS imagery in Mar–Nov 2000–2013 to antecedent climate and water balance variables preceding the monthly NDVI observations. We compared how climate and water balance variables explained vegetation greenness and then used a multi-model ensemble of climate and water balance models to forecast monthly NDVI for three holdout years. Results Water balance variables explained vegetation greenness to a greater degree than climate variables for most growing season months. Seasonally important variables included measures of antecedent water input and storage in spring, switching to indicators of drought, input or use in summer, followed by antecedent moisture availability in autumn. In spite of similar climates, there was evidence the grazed grassland showed a response to drying conditions 1 mo sooner than the ungrazed grassland. Lead times were generally short early in the growing season and antecedent window durations increased from 3 mo early in the growing season to 1 yr or more as the growing season progressed. Forecast accuracy for three holdout years using a multi-model ensemble of climate and water balance variables outperformed forecasts made with a naïve NDVI climatology. Conclusions We determined the influence of climate and water balance on vegetation at a fine temporal scale, which presents an opportunity to forecast vegetation

  4. Water balance of goats in Jeneponto - South Sulawesi under sunlight exposure and water restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoni Prawira Rahardja

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Water balance of 5 does of Kacang goat of Jeneponto was studied under the condition of sunlight exposure and water restriction. The study was conducted in dry season with 4 consecutive treatments of 10 d with 4-5 d of adjustment period between two consecutive treatments: (1 indoor and unrestricted water; (2 indoor and restricted water; (3 10 h outdoor–and unrestricted water; (4 10 h outdoor – restricted water. The maximum air temperature of outdoor was 39.3OC, and it was 30OC in the indoor environment. In all treatments, the animals were placed in the individual crates. The plasma volume of the goats was higher under sunlight exposure, but it decreased by water restriction, while hematocrite value indicated a reverse responses. Sunlight exposure did not significantly decrease the intake and digestion of organic matter, but water restriction affected significantly and this effect was higher under sunlight exposre. The proportions of water loss through every avenue were maintained relatively constant either under water restriction or sunlight exposure in which the respration rate increased significantly. The findings suggest that sunlight exposure with unrestricted water resulted in a positive water balance without a significant change in organic matter intake and utilization. Water restriction resulted in a negative water balance, reducing organic matter intake and utilization. As the adaptive mechanisms, the goat appeared to be able to withstand in the harsh environment of Jeneponto by expanding plasma volume, increasing body temperature and respiration rate.

  5. Water balance of different forests types in Kiskunság Sandridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Bence; Kalicz, Péter

    2017-04-01

    Kiskunság Sandridge in central Hungary shows the signs of significant drying caused by anthropogenic (e.g. river regulation and water consumption) and climatic reasons. These factors generated dramatically decreasing of groundwater levels which was an important water supply for forest ecosystems. These worsening in site conditions bring up several questions in forest management and natural protection as well because significant part of forests are in protected areas in Kiskunság. This study aims to give a picture of the characteristic features of Sandridge forests concerning their water balance. Hydrology of forest sites were evaluated throughout measurement of hydrological elements and water balance modelling with the Coup 1D water-balance model. Three forest stands and five control stations in the grasslands were settled and monitored to compare the water consumption of different forests with native grasslands. This case study helps the work of forest managers with the quantification of water consumption of forests in Kiskunság. This research has been partly supported by the Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project, and the second author's work was also supported by the János Bolyai Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  6. Drinking and water balance during exercise and heat acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Keil, L. C.; Morse, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The interactions between fluid intake and balance, and plasma ion, osmotic, and endocrine responses during dehydration produced by exercise in cool and warm environments during acclimation are explored. Two groups of five male subjects performed 8 days of ergometer exercise in hot and thermoneutral conditions, respectively. The exercise trials lasted 2 hr each. Monitoring was carried out on the PV, osmotic, sodium, and endocrine concentrations, voluntary fluid intake, fluid balances, and fluid deficits. A negative correlation was observed between the plasma sodium and osmolality during acclimation. The presence of hypervolemia during acclimation is suggested as a cause of drinking, while the vasopressin concentration was not found to be a significant factor stimulating drinking. Finally, the predominant mechanism in fluid intake during exercise and heat exposure is concluded to be the renin-angiotensin II system in the presence of reductions in total body water and extracellular plasma volumes.

  7. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carole Dalin; Huanguang Qiu; Naota Hanasaki; Denise L. Mauzerall; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe

    2015-01-01

    .... We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China's future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions...

  8. Drought impacts on ecosystem functions of the U.S. National Forests and Grasslands: Part I evaluation of a water and carbon balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanlei Sun; Ge Sun; Peter Caldwell; Steven G. McNulty; Erika Cohen; Jingfeng Xiao; Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and quantitatively evaluating the regional impacts of climate change and variability (e.g., droughts) on forest ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield, evapotranspiration, and productivity) and services (e.g., fresh water supply and carbon sequestration) is of great importance for developing climate change adaptation strategies for National Forests and...

  9. WATER SUPPLY MEASUREMENTS IN MULTI-FAMILY BULDINGS AND DISCREPANCIES IN A WATER BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Cichoń

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale implementation of individual water meters in water charging systems has created problems with a water shortage that have to be settled between real estate managers and water and sewage utilities. The article presents the observations and experiences from operation of a water metering system at the Krakow agglomeration. The studies have confirmed that many small leaks in installations, taps, faucets, flush toilets as well as system failures and the incidences of water stealing are still the factors responsible for significant differences in the water balance in the apartment buildings.

  10. Climatological evaluation of some fluxes of the surface energy and soil water balances over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Choisnel

    Full Text Available This paper presents some statistical evaluations of the surface energy and soil water balance fluxes, for a prairie-type canopy, using the Earth model with a double-reservoir system for the management of the soil water reserve and the regulation of actual evapotranspiration. The mean values of these fluxes are estimated from energy and water balance simulations done on a 30-year climatic reference period (1951–1980. From values of these fluxes calculated for each meteorological synoptic station, mappings of net radiation, actual evapotranspiration, drainage and conduction fluxes have been made over French territory. Lastly, a few conclusions pertaining to the spatial variability of fluxes and to the partition of rainfall between run-off and drainage on the one hand and replenishment of the soil water reserve on the other hand are drawn from these preliminary results.

  11. A metabolism perspective on alternative urban water servicing options using water mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Tauheed A; Renouf, Marguerite A; Kenway, Steven J

    2016-12-01

    Urban areas will need to pursue new water servicing options to ensure local supply security. Decisions about how best to employ them are not straightforward due to multiple considerations and the potential for problem shifting among them. We hypothesise that urban water metabolism evaluation based a water mass balance can help address this, and explore the utility of this perspective and the new insights it provides about water servicing options. Using a water mass balance evaluation framework, which considers direct urban water flows (both 'natural' hydrological and 'anthropogenic' flows), as well as water-related energy, we evaluated how the use of alternative water sources (stormwater/rainwater harvesting, wastewater/greywater recycling) at different scales influences the 'local water metabolism' of a case study urban development. New indicators were devised to represent the water-related 'resource efficiency' and 'hydrological performance' of the urban area. The new insights gained were the extent to which alternative water supplies influence the water efficiency and hydrological performance of the urban area, and the potential energy trade-offs. The novel contribution is the development of new indicators of urban water resource performance that bring together considerations of both the 'anthropogenic' and 'natural' water cycles, and the interactions between them. These are used for the first time to test alternative water servicing scenarios, and to provide a new perspective to complement broader sustainability assessments of urban water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-12-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  13. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  14. Water balance and soil losses in an irrigated catchment under conservation tillage in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Patricio; Mateos, Luciano; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena

    2013-04-01

    Conservation tillage based on permanent beds with crop-residue retention and controlled traffic has been recently introduced in irrigated annual crops in Southern Spain as one way to improve water infiltration, reduce soil losses, and save energy. The water balance and soil losses in water runoff have been monitored during 4 years in a 28-ha catchment within a production farm where this kind of soil conservation practice was established in 2004 for a maize-cotton-wheat rotation. The catchment average slope is 6 %. Soils are Typic Calcixerept and Typic Haploxerert. The water balance components that were measured include: applied irrigation water, rainfall, and runoff. Runoff was measured at the outlet of the catchment by means of a hydrological station that consisted of long-throated flume, ultrasonic water level sensor, automatic water sampler, data logger and transmission system, weather station, and ancillary equipment. We present here results from three hydrological seasons (October to September): 2009-10, 2010-11, and 2011-12. The first season the catchment was grown with wheat, thus the irrigation depth was small (25 mm); rainfall above average, 1103 mm; and the runoff coefficient was 26 %. In the season 2010-11, the catchment was grown with cotton, the irrigation depth was 503 mm, rainfall was 999 mm, and the seasonal runoff coefficient was 7 %. The last season, the crop was maize, rainfall was below average (368 mm), irrigation 590 mm, and the runoff coefficient as the previous year, 7 %. Soil losses were very small: 0.05, 1.26, and 1.33 t per ha and year, the first, second, and third monitored seasons, respectively. A simple water balance model allowed simulating evapotranspiration, deep percolation and runoff. The Curve Number for the catchment was calibrated using the balance model.

  15. Vascular functioning and the water balance of ripening kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearwater, Michael J; Luo, Zhiwei; Ong, Sam Eng Chye; Blattmann, Peter; Thorp, T Grant

    2012-03-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that water supply to fleshy fruits during the final stages of development occurs through the phloem, with the xylem providing little water, or acting as a pathway for water loss back to the plant. This inference was tested by examining the water balance and vascular functioning of ripening kiwifruit berries (Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis 'Hort16A') exhibiting a pre-harvest 'shrivel' disorder in California, and normal development in New Zealand. Dye labelling and mass balance experiments indicated that the xylem and phloem were both functional and contributed approximately equally to the fruit water supply during this stage of development. The modelled fruit water balance was dominated by transpiration, with net water loss under high vapour pressure deficit (D(a)) conditions in California, but a net gain under cooler New Zealand conditions. Direct measurement of pedicel sap flow under controlled conditions confirmed inward flows in both the phloem and xylem under conditions of both low and high D(a). Phloem flows were required for growth, with gradual recovery after a step increase in D(a). Xylem flows alone were unable to support growth, but did supply transpiration and were responsive to D(a)-induced pressure fluctuations. The results suggest that the shrivel disorder was a consequence of a high fruit transpiration rate, and that the perception of complete loss or reversal of inward xylem flows in ripening fruits should be re-examined.

  16. NREL Offshore Balance-of-System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maness, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maples, Benjamin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has investigated the potential for 20% of nationwide electricity demand to be generated from wind by 2030 and, more recently, 35% by 2050. Achieving this level of wind power generation may require the development and deployment of offshore wind technologies. DOE (2008) has indicated that reaching these 2030 and 2050 scenarios could result in approximately 10% and 20%, respectively, of wind energy generation to come from offshore resources. By the end of 2013, 6.5 gigawatts of offshore wind were installed globally. The first U.S. project, the Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island, has recently begun operations. One of the major reasons that offshore wind development in the United States is lagging behind global trends is the high capital expenditures required. An understanding of the costs and associated drivers of building a commercial-scale offshore wind plant in the United States will inform future research and help U.S. investors feel more confident in offshore wind development. In an effort to explain these costs, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Offshore Balance-of-System model.

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of water balance components due to a bottomland hedgerow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z.; Ghazavi, G.; Merot, P.

    2009-04-01

    Wooded linear structures in general, and hedgerows in particular, were formerly very abundant in the European landscape, but have undergone a considerable decline in their density in the past decades, before being stabilized. Currently, we observe locally an increase due to the multiple advantages offered by these structures and the effect of agricultural policies. The aim of the present study was to quantify spatially and temporally the impact of an oak hedgerow (Quercus robur) on the various terms of the water balance. This study was carried out at the plot scale by focusing on aspects related to water transfer in the soil and aquifer. From the results obtained on a local scale, we proposed a functional scheme that allowed us to represent the role of hedge trees in water cycle. In this study, groundwater level and soil-water potential were monitored continually at various distances from the hedgerow along two 28 m length transects, at a spacing of 10 m, enabling us to obtain fine-scale information on the functioning of the soil-groundwater system. We evaluate tree transpiration from sap flow density measurements. Functional scheme were proposed illustrating the role of hedgerow, which can then be used for integrating the impact of the hedge trees into hydrological models. For the period when oak trees had their leaves (leafed period), the determining processes that need to be represented are the rainfall interception, tree transpiration and capillary rise. Other terms of the water balance, such as drainage, are directly affected by the presence of the hedgerow. Drainage is strongly reduced under the hedgerow, and decreases significantly at a certain distance from the hedgerow, when capillary rise increased under the hedgerow and decreased far away. Our results show that the impact of a bottomland hedgerow on water balance components can be highly variable according to the climatic conditions. Hedge tree transpiration increased for a wet year when soil-water

  18. Measurement of surface redistribution of rainfall and modelling its effect on water balance calculations for a millet field on sandy soil in Niger.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaze, S.R.; Simmonds, L.P.; Brouwer, J.; Bouma, J.

    1997-01-01

    During rain there can be substantial redistribution of water at the surface of sandy soils in the Sudano-Sahelian zone, because of localised runoff and runon. This results in variable infiltration over a field. Measurements of spatial variability in infiltration and crop growth were made in a millet

  19. Seawater drinking restores water balance in dehydrated harp seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Ole-Jakob; Nordøy, Erling S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the question of whether dehydrated harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) are able to obtain a net gain of water from the intake of seawater. Following 24 h of fasting, three subadult female harp seals were dehydrated by intravenous administration of the osmotic diuretic, mannitol. After another 24 h of fasting, the seals were given 1,000 ml seawater via a stomach tube. Urine and blood were collected for measurement of osmolality and osmolytes, while total body water (TBW) was determined by injections of tritiated water. In all seals, the maximum urinary concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) were higher than in seawater, reaching 540 and 620 mM, respectively, compared to 444 and 535 mM in seawater. In another experiment, the seals were given ad lib access to seawater for 48 h after mannitol-induced hyper-osmotic dehydration. In animals without access to seawater, the mean blood osmolality increased from 331 to 363 mOsm kg(-1) during dehydration. In contrast, the blood osmolality, hematocrit and TBW returned to normal when the seals were permitted ad lib access to seawater after dehydration. In conclusion, this study shows that harp seals have the capacity to gain net water from mariposa (voluntarily drinking seawater) and are able to restore water balance after profound dehydration by drinking seawater.

  20. Improved water balance component estimates through joint assimilation of GRACE water storage and SMOS soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyuan; Tregoning, Paul; Renzullo, Luigi J.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Allgeyer, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of global water balance estimates is limited by the lack of observations at large scale and the uncertainties of model simulations. Global retrievals of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change and soil moisture (SM) from satellites provide an opportunity to improve model estimates through data assimilation. However, combining these two data sets is challenging due to the disparity in temporal and spatial resolution at both vertical and horizontal scale. For the first time, TWS observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and near-surface SM observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) were jointly assimilated into a water balance model using the Ensemble Kalman Smoother from January 2010 to December 2013 for the Australian continent. The performance of joint assimilation was assessed against open-loop model simulations and the assimilation of either GRACE TWS anomalies or SMOS SM alone. The SMOS-only assimilation improved SM estimates but reduced the accuracy of groundwater and TWS estimates. The GRACE-only assimilation improved groundwater estimates but did not always produce accurate estimates of SM. The joint assimilation typically led to more accurate water storage profile estimates with improved surface SM, root-zone SM, and groundwater estimates against in situ observations. The assimilation successfully downscaled GRACE-derived integrated water storage horizontally and vertically into individual water stores at the same spatial scale as the model and SMOS, and partitioned monthly averaged TWS into daily estimates. These results demonstrate that satellite TWS and SM measurements can be jointly assimilated to produce improved water balance component estimates.

  1. Water Balance and Level Change of Lake Babati, Tanzania: Sensitivity to Hydroclimatic Forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René P. Mbanguka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We develop and present a novel integrated water balance model that accounts for lake water—groundwater interactions, and apply it to the semi-closed freshwater Lake Babati system, Northern Tanzania, East Africa. The model was calibrated and used to evaluate the lake level sensitivity to changes in key hydro-climatic variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity and cloudiness. The lake response to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5 output on possible future climate outcomes was evaluated, an essential basis in understanding future water security and flooding risk in the region. Results show high lake level sensitivity to cloudiness. Increased focus on cloud fraction measurement and interpretation could likely improve projections of lake levels and surface water availability. Modelled divergent results on the future (21st century development of Lake Babati can be explained by the precipitation output variability of CMIP5 models being comparable to the precipitation change needed to drive the water balance model from lake dry-out to overflow; this condition is likely shared with many other East African lake systems. The developed methodology could be useful in investigations on change-driving processes in complex climate—drainage basin—lake systems, which are needed to support sustainable water resource planning in data scarce tropical Africa.

  2. 2015 Disastrous Floods in Louisiana, USA, and Assam, India: Groundwater Impact on the Water Balance Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Trifonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally torrential rains are considered as the main factor of flood emergence. With the examples of two disastrous floods in 2015 in absolutely different parts of the world, the authors roughly estimate the water balance and suggest an alternative hypothesis. The simplest model, taking into account precipitation, evaporation and soil permeability, clearly points out the significant discrepancy between potentially accumulated and observed water masses. This observation pushes the idea that precipitation is necessary but not sufficient for disastrous flood emergence, so the only other available water source—groundwater—cannot be ignored.

  3. Determining water use of sorghum from two-source energy balance and radiometric temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of surface actual evapotranspiration (ET can assist in predicting crop water requirements. An alternative to the traditional crop-coefficient methods are the energy balance models. The objective of this research was to show how surface temperature observations can be used, together with a two-source energy balance model, to determine crop water use throughout the different phenological stages of a crop grown. Radiometric temperatures were collected in a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor field as part of an experimental campaign carried out in Barrax, Spain, during the 2010 summer growing season. Performance of the Simplified Two-Source Energy Balance (STSEB model was evaluated by comparison of estimated ET with values measured on a weighing lysimeter. Errors of ±0.14 mm h−1 and ±1.0 mm d−1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively. Total accumulated crop water use during the campaign was underestimated by 5%. It is then shown that thermal radiometry can provide precise crop water necessities and is a promising tool for irrigation management.

  4. The Elements of Water Balance in the Changing Climate in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Szwed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong global warming has been observed in the last three decades. Central Europe, including Poland, is not an exception. Moreover, climate projections for Poland foresee further warming as well as changes in the spatial and seasonal distribution and quantity of precipitation. However, climate models do not agree on the sign of change of precipitation. In Poland precipitation is projected to decrease in summer (this finding is not robust, being model-dependent and to increase in winter. Therefore, there is still considerable uncertainty regarding likely climate change impacts on water resources in Poland. However, there is no doubt that changes in the thermal characteristics as well as in precipitation will influence changes in the water balance of the country. In this study, the components of climatic water balance, that is, precipitation, evaporation, and runoff, are calculated for the average conditions in the control period of 1961–1990 and in the future (2071–2100 in Poland. The changes of the water balance components for the present and for the future are compared and analysed. Due to insufficient consistency between climate models a possible range of changes should be presented; hence the multimodel projections from ENSEMBLES Project of the European Union are used in this study.

  5. THE SIGNAL APPROACH TO MODELLING THE BALANCE OF PAYMENT CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Chernyak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers and presents synthesis of theoretical models of balance of payment crisis and investigates the most effective ways to model the crisis in Ukraine. For mathematical formalization of balance of payment crisis, comparative analysis of the effectiveness of different calculation methods of Exchange Market Pressure Index was performed. A set of indicators that signal the growing likelihood of balance of payments crisis was defined using signal approach. With the help of minimization function thresholds indicators were selected, the crossing of which signalize increase in the probability of balance of payment crisis.

  6. LPRM/AMSR-E/Aqua Daily L3 Descending and 2-Layer Palmer Water Balance Model Root Zone Soil Moisture V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) root-zone soil moisture product is derived via the assimilation of Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM)/Advanced Microwave Scanning...

  7. Soil Water Balance and Irrigation Strategies in an Agricultural District of Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Ventrella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An efficient management of water resources is considered very important for Mediterranean regions of Italy in order to improve the economical and environmental sustainability of the agricultural activity. The purpose of this study is to analyze the components of soil water balance in an important district included in the regions of Basilicata and Puglia and situated in the Jonical coastal area of Southern Italy and mainly cropped with horticultural crops. The study was performed by using the spatially distributed and physically based model SIMODIS in order to individuate the best irrigation management maximizing the water use efficiency and minimizing water losses by deep percolation and soil evaporation. SIMODIS was applied taking in to account the soil spatial variability and localization of cadastral units for two crops, durum wheat and water melon. For water melon recognition in 2007 a remote sensed image, from SPOT5 satellite, at the spatial resolution of 10 m, has been used. In 2008, a multi-temporal data set was available, from SPOT5 satellite to produce a land cover map for the classes water melon and durum wheat. Water melon cultivation was simulated adopting different water supply managements: rainfed and four irrigation strategies based on (i soil water availability and (ii plant water status adopting a threshold daily stress value. For each management, several water management indicators were calculated and mapped in GIS environment. For seasonal irrigation depth, actual evapotranspiration and irrigation efficiency were also determined. The analysis allowed to individuate the areas particularly sensitive to water losses by deep percolation because of their hydraulic functions characterized by low water retention and large values of saturated hydraulic conductivity. For these areas, the irrigation based on plant water status caused very high water losses by drainage. On the contrary, the irrigation scheduled on soil base allowed to

  8. Water balance components and climate change in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, V.

    2009-09-01

    The openness of the continental part of Croatia towards the north and the separation of the Pannonian flatland from coastline by relative high mountain barrier of the Dinaric Alps produce a continental, mountain and Mediterranean climate in Croatia. Climate change has become an important issue for agriculture in recent years since agricultural production is highly sensitive to weather and water scarcity and consequently to climate change. The special problem with drought and difficulties in water supply and water management exist in the eastern and southern Croatia in the summer. The soil with karst porous base and unsuitable annual distribution of precipitation amount make the mid-Adriatic coast and islands the driest region in Croatia. Therefore, the main goal is to research the secular variations of water balance components using the Palmer method in the most vulnerable dry region in Croatia vs. wet region. The results have been established the intensity of regional impact of climate change on regime of precipitation, evapotranspiration and soil moisture. The increase in potential evapotranspiration and decrease in runoff and soil water content were observed in both regions which mostly became significant in the 1980s. However, contrary linear trends (negative in the dry region and positive in the wet region) were noticed in actual evapoptranspiration, moisture loss from the soil and recharge. The reason of that is a significant and faster decrease in annual precipitation and deficit of rainfall in dry region than in wet region in warmer season. Thus, combined influence of precipitation and air temperature affects the decrease in soil water content and runoff that it could have negative consequences on vegetation and agricultural production, particularly in the driest and most vulnerable region in Croatia - in the mid-Adriatic area.

  9. The Acid-Base Balance Between Organic Acids and Circumneutral Ground Waters in Large Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D. I.; Glaser, P. H.; So, J.

    2006-05-01

    Organic acids supply most of the acidity in the surface waters of bogs in peatlands. Yet, the fundamental geochemical properties of peatland organic acids are still poorly known. To assess the geochemical properties of typical organic acid assemblages in peatlands, we used a triprotic analog model for peat pore waters and surface waters in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands, optimizing on charge balance and calibrated to estimates of mole site density in DOC and triprotic acid dissociation constants. Before the calibration process, all bog waters and 76% of fen waters had more than +20% charge imbalance. After calibration, most electrochemically balanced within 20%. In the best calibration, the mole site denisty of bog DOC was estimated as ~0.05 mmol/mmol C., approximately 6 times smaller than that for fen DOC or the DOC in the fen deeper fen peats that underlie bogs. The three modeled de-protonation constants were; pKa1 = ~3.0, pKa2 = ~4.5 and pKa3 = ~7.0 for the bog DOC, and; pKa1 = ~5.2, pKa2 =~ 6.5 and pKa3 = ~7.0 for the fen DOC. Bog DOC, behaves as a strong acid despite its small mole site density. The DOC in bog runoff can therefore theoretically acidify the surface waters in adjacent fens wherever these waters do not receive sufficient buffering alkalinity from active groundwater seepage.

  10. Testing direct and interactive effects of tree size, stand competition, water balance, heat, and freezing on probability of mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hember, R. A.; Kurz, W. A.; Coops, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Water stress affects rates of tree mortality in diverse ways. In a previous study, we included standardized water-balance variables as predictors in conventional models of individual-tree mortality drawing on over 8 million observations for 64 North American tree species. We found that probability of tree mortality (Pm) was related to soil-water content (Ws) and/or reference evapotranspiration (ETref) in over 90 percent of the species samples and that sensitivity to water-balance variables was typically mediated by tree height (h) and aridity class (AC) of the site. Here we expand on the model-building exercise to test the additional hypotheses that: (1) sensitivity of Pm of short trees to water-balance variables increases with stand-level biomass of larger trees (BLS) due to competition among trees for access to soil water; (2) sensitivity of Pm to water-balance variables increases with temperature (T) due either to higher respiration or error in the expression of ETref and (3) sensitivity of Pm to water-balance variables increases with the number of days with frost (DWF) due to decreasing hydraulic conductance associated either with occurrence or avoidance of freezing-induced embolism. We describe whether the hypotheses are supported and how the modifications influence predictions of net ecosystem biomass production (NEBP) of North American forests over 1951-2014.

  11. The water balance components of undisturbed tropical woodlands in the Brazilian cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P. T. S.; Wendland, E.; Nearing, M. A.; Scott, R. L.; Rosolem, R.; da Rocha, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    Deforestation of the Brazilian cerrado region has caused major changes in hydrological processes. These changes in water balance components are still poorly understood but are important for making land management decisions in this region. To better understand pre-deforestation conditions, we determined the main components of the water balance for an undisturbed tropical woodland classified as "cerrado sensu stricto denso". We developed an empirical model to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ET) by using flux tower measurements and vegetation conditions inferred from the enhanced vegetation index and reference evapotranspiration. Canopy interception, throughfall, stemflow, surface runoff, and water table level were assessed from ground measurements. We used data from two cerrado sites, Pé de Gigante (PDG) and Instituto Arruda Botelho (IAB). Flux tower data from the PDG site collected from 2001 to 2003 were used to develop the empirical model to estimate ET. The other hydrological processes were measured at the field scale between 2011 and 2014 at the IAB site. The empirical model showed significant agreement (R2 = 0.73) with observed ET at the daily timescale. The average values of estimated ET at the IAB site ranged from 1.91 to 2.60 mm day-1 for the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Canopy interception ranged from 4 to 20 % and stemflow values were approximately 1 % of the gross precipitation. The average runoff coefficient was less than 1 %, while cerrado deforestation has the potential to increase that amount up to 20-fold. As relatively little excess water runs off (either by surface water or groundwater), the water storage may be estimated by the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. Our results provide benchmark values of water balance dynamics in the undisturbed cerrado that will be useful to evaluate past and future land-cover and land-use changes for this region.

  12. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. Static experiments (which are discussed in Volume 1 of this report) were conducted, and the results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data on similar configurations. Dynamic experiments, which are the main topic of this Volume, were also performed using the balance. Delta wing models and two F/A-18 models were utilized in a variety of dynamic tests. This investigation showed that, as expected, the values of the inertial tares are very small due to the low rotating rates required in a low-speed water tunnel and can, therefore, be ignored. Oscillations in pitch, yaw and roll showed hysteresis loops that compared favorably to data from dynamic wind tunnel experiments. Pitch-up and hold maneuvers revealed the long persistence, or time-lags, of some of the force components in response to the motion. Rotary-balance experiments were also successfully performed. The good results obtained in these dynamic experiments bring a whole new dimension to water tunnel testing and emphasize the importance of having the capability to perform simultaneous flow visualization and force/moment measurements during dynamic situations.

  13. Balancing food security and water demand for freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Amandine; Palazzo, Amanda; Havlik, Petr; Obersteiner, Michael; Biemans, Hester; Wada, Yoshihide; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2017-04-01

    Water is not an infinite resource and demand from irrigation, household and industry is constantly increasing. This study focused on including global water availability including environmental flow requirements with water withdrawal from irrigation and other sectors at a monthly time-step in the GLOBIOM model. This model allows re-adjustment of land-use allocation, crop management, consumption and international trade. The GLOBIOM model induces an endogenous change in water price depending on water supply and demand. In this study, the focus was on how the inclusion of water resources affects land-use and, in particular, how global change will influence repartition of irrigated and rainfed lands at global scale. We used the climate change scenario including a radiative forcing of 8.5 W/m2 (RCP8.5), the socio-economic scenario (SSP2: middle-of-road), and the environmental flow method based on monthly flow allocation (the Variable Monthly Flow method) with high and low restrictions. Irrigation withdrawals were adjusted to a monthly time-step to account for biophysical water limitations at finer time resolution. Our results show that irrigated land might decrease up to 40% on average depending on the choice of EFR restrictions. Several areas were identified as future hot-spots of water stress such as the Mediterranean and Middle-East regions. Other countries were identified to be in safe position in terms of water stress such as North-European countries. Re-allocation of rainfed and irrigated land might be useful information for land-use planners and water managers at an international level to decide on appropriate legislations on climate change mitigation/adaptation when exposure and sensitivity to climate change is high and/or on adaptation measures to face increasing water demand. For example, some countries are likely to adopt measures to increase their water use efficiencies (irrigation system, soil and water conservation practices) to face water shortages, while

  14. Analysis of Sting Balance Calibration Data Using Optimized Regression Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Bader, Jon B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibration data of a wind tunnel sting balance was processed using a candidate math model search algorithm that recommends an optimized regression model for the data analysis. During the calibration the normal force and the moment at the balance moment center were selected as independent calibration variables. The sting balance itself had two moment gages. Therefore, after analyzing the connection between calibration loads and gage outputs, it was decided to choose the difference and the sum of the gage outputs as the two responses that best describe the behavior of the balance. The math model search algorithm was applied to these two responses. An optimized regression model was obtained for each response. Classical strain gage balance load transformations and the equations of the deflection of a cantilever beam under load are used to show that the search algorithm s two optimized regression models are supported by a theoretical analysis of the relationship between the applied calibration loads and the measured gage outputs. The analysis of the sting balance calibration data set is a rare example of a situation when terms of a regression model of a balance can directly be derived from first principles of physics. In addition, it is interesting to note that the search algorithm recommended the correct regression model term combinations using only a set of statistical quality metrics that were applied to the experimental data during the algorithm s term selection process.

  15. Use of a stochastic approach for description of water balance and runoff production dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, A.; Manfreda, S.; Iacobellis, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    2009-04-01

    The present study exploits an analytical model (Manfreda, NHESS [2008]) for the description of the probability density function of soil water balance and runoff generation over a set of river basins belonging to Southern Italy. The model is based on a stochastic differential equation where the rainfall forcing is interpreted as an additive noise in the soil water balance; the watershed heterogeneity is described exploiting the conceptual lumped watershed Xinanjiang model (widely used in China) that uses a parabolic curve for the distribution of the soil water storage capacity (Zhao et al. [1980]). The model, characterized by parameters that depend on soil, vegetation and basin morphology, allowed to derive the probability density function of the relative saturation and the surface runoff of a basin accounting for the spatial heterogeneity in soil water storage. Its application on some river basins belonging to regions of Southern Italy, gives interesting insights for the investigation of the role played by the dynamical interaction between climate, soil, and vegetation in soil moisture and runoff production dynamics. Manfreda, S., Runoff Generation Dynamics within a Humid River Basin, Natural Hazard and Earth System Sciences, 8, 1349-1357, 2008. Zhao, R. -J., Zhang, Y. L., and Fang, L. R.: The Xinanjiang model, Hydrological Forecasting Proceedings Oxford Symposium, IAHS Pub. 129, 351-356, 1980.

  16. Five models of players' rule behavior for game balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seungkeun; Kim, Mijin

    2012-09-01

    We present a five-part model of players' rule behaviors in a multiplayer online game (utilization, emergence, usefulness, usefulness-balance, and balance-usefulness). The model was identified through a pilot study involving nine expert players. The model fitness was then verified in a main experiment involving eighteen regular players. Our results showed that the utilization (4 players) and emergence (4 players) models were most frequently used, followed by the balance-usefulness (3 players), usefulness (3 players), and usefulness-balance (2 players) models. The coding scheme for this research was built from video observations and a literature review. We suggest this model is applicable for the implementation of a human-like virtual character's artificial intelligence algorithm in the game editors and the server loader for quality assurance.

  17. Remote sensing-based soil water balance to estimate Mediterranean holm oak savanna (dehesa) evapotranspiration under water stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Isidro; Villodre, Julio; Carrara, Arnaud; Calera, Alfonso

    2013-06-01

    This paper aims to present the use of a remote sensing-based soil water balance to estimate holm oak woodland evapotranspiration (ET). The model is based on the assimilation of MODIS reflectance-based vegetation indices in the dual crop coefficient methodology. A daily water balance was performed on the root zone soil to estimate plant water stress. The methodology was evaluated with respect to the actual ET measured by eddy covariance in Mediterranean holm oak savanna (dehesa) for five consecutive years (2004-2008). The model adequately reproduced the absolute values and tendencies measured at daily and weekly periods. Root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.50 mm/day for daily values and 2.70 mm/week for weekly accumulated values. The analysis demonstrated the presence of a long period of water stress during the summer and at the beginning of fall. Measured ET dropped during these periods, and the model replicated this tendency accurately, reaching a stress coefficient value close to 0.2. To be operative, the proposed method required low ground data (reference evapotranspiration and precipitation) and the results indicated a simple, robust method that can be used to map ET and water stress in the dehesa ecosystem.

  18. A Dynamic Model for Load Balancing in Cloud Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Bhagwandas Bhatia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysis various challenges faced in optimizing computing resource utilization via load balancing and presents a platform-independent model for load balancing which targets high availability of resources, low SLA (Service Level agreement violations and saves power. To achieve this, incoming requests are monitored for sudden burst, a prediction model is employed to maintain high availability and a power-aware algorithm is applied for choosing a suitable physical node for a virtual host. The proposed dynamic load balancing model provides a way to conflicting goals of saving power and maintaining high resource availability.For anyone building a private, public or hybrid IaaS cloud infrastructure, load balancing of virtual hosts on a limited number of physical nodes, becomes a crucial aspect. This paper analysis various challenges faced in optimizing computing resource utilization via load balancing and presents a platform independent model for load balancing which targets high availability of resources, low SLA (Service Level agreement violations and saves power. To achieve this, incoming requests are monitored for sudden burst, prediction model is employed to maintain high availability and power aware algorithm is applied for choosing a suitable physical node for virtual host. The proposed dynamic load balancing model provides a way to conflicting goals of saving power and maintaining high resource availability.

  19. Maintaining Atmospheric Mass and Water Balance Within Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max; Todling, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the modifications implemented into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version-5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (ADAS) to maintain global conservation of dry atmospheric mass as well as to preserve the model balance of globally integrated precipitation and surface evaporation during reanalysis. Section 1 begins with a review of these global quantities from four current reanalysis efforts. Section 2 introduces the modifications necessary to preserve these constraints within the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis procedure, and the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) algorithm. Section 3 presents experiments quantifying the impact of the new procedure. Section 4 shows preliminary results from its use within the GMAO MERRA-2 Reanalysis project. Section 5 concludes with a summary.

  20. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  1. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations. Discharges of water from areas disturbed by surface mining activities shall be made in compliance...

  2. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations. Discharges of water from areas disturbed by underground mining activities shall be made in...

  3. An energy balance perspective on regional CO2-induced temperature changes in CMIP5 models

    OpenAIRE

    Räisänen, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    An energy balance decomposition of temperature changes is conducted for idealized transient CO2-only simulations in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. The multimodel global mean warming is dominated by enhanced clear-sky greenhouse effect due to increased CO2 and water vapour, but other components of the energy balance substantially modify the geographical and seasonal patterns of the change. Changes in the net surface energy flux are important over the oceans, bein...

  4. Mechanism for negative water balance during weightlessness An hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism for the apparent decrease in body fluid volume in astronauts during spaceflight remains obscure. The widespread postulate that the hypohydration is the result of the Henry-Gauer reflex, a diuresis caused by inhibition of vasopressin secretion resulting from increased left and perhaps right atrial (central) venous pressure, has not been established with direct measurements on astronauts. An hypothesis is proposed to account for fluid-electrolyte shifts during weightlessness. A moderate but transient increase in central venous pressure occurs when orbit is entered that is insufficient to activate the Henry-Gauer reflex but sufficient to stimulate the release of atrial natriuretic peptides. Increased sodium excretion would facilitate some increased urinary water loss. The resulting relatively dilute plasma and interstitial fluids would cause fluid to shift into the cellular space, resulting in edema in the head and trunk and inhibition of thirst and drinking. Thus, the negative water balance in astronauts would be caused by a gradual natriuresis and diuresis coupled with reduced fluid intake.

  5. Teaching a Model-based Climatology Using Energy Balance Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, David

    1981-01-01

    After outlining the difficulties of teaching climatology within an undergraduate geography curriculum, the author describes and evaluates the use of a computer assisted simulation to model surface energy balance and the effects of land use changes on local climate. (AM)

  6. Assessing Variation in Water Balance Components in Mountainous Inland River Basin Experiencing Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenliang Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the changes of water balance components is significant for water resource assessment and management. This paper employed the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model to estimate the water balance in a mountainous watershed in northwest China at different spatial scales over the past half century. The results showed that both Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE and determination coefficient (R2 were over 0.90 for the calibration and validation periods. The water balance components presented rising trends at the watershed scale, and the total runoff increased by 30.5% during 1964 to 2013 period. Rising surface runoff and rising groundwater flow contributed 42.7% and 57.3% of the total rising runoff, respectively. The runoff coefficient was sensitive to increasing precipitation and was not significant to the increase of temperature. The alpine meadow was the main landscape which occupied 51.1% of the watershed and contributed 55.5% of the total runoff. Grass land, forest land, bare land, and glacier covered 14.2%, 18.8%, 15.4%, and 0.5% of the watershed and contributed 8.5%, 16.9%, 15.9%, and 3.2% of the total runoff, respectively. The elevation zone from 3500 to 4500 m occupied 66.5% of the watershed area, and contributed the majority of the total runoff (70.7%. The runoff coefficients in the elevation zone from 1637 to 2800 m, 2800 to 3500 m, 3500 to 4000 m, 4000 to 4500 m, and 4500 to 5062 m were 0.20, 0.27, 0.32, 0.43, and 0.78, respectively, which tend to be larger along with the elevation increase. The quantities and change trends of the water balance components at the watershed scale were calculated by the results of the sub-watersheds. Furthermore, we characterized the spatial distribution of quantities and changes in trends of water balance components at the sub-watershed scale analysis. This study provides some references for water resource management and planning in inland river basins.

  7. Balancing Bio-energy Cropping Benefits and Water Quality Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eiswerth, M.E.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between bio-energy feedstock production and water quality has received little attention from economists. Here, an optimal control model is used to determine the optimal amount of land to convert to the production of energy feedstocks, specifically ethanol corn, taking into account

  8. Evaporative isotope enrichment as a constraint on reach water balance along a dryland river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, John J; Sadek, Mostafa A; Stone, D J M; Hughes, Catherine E; Hankin, S; Cendon, Dioni I; Hollins, Suzanne E

    2008-03-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 enrichment in river water during its transit across dryland region is found to occur systematically along evaporation lines with slopes of close to 4 in (2)H-(18)O space, largely consistent with trends predicted by the Craig-Gordon model for an open-water dominated evaporating system. This, in combination with reach balance assessments and derived runoff ratios, strongly suggests that the enrichment signal and its variability in the Barwon-Darling river, Southeastern Australia is acquired during the process of evaporation from the river channel itself, as enhanced by the presence of abundant weirs, dams and other storages, rather than reflecting inherited enrichment signals from soil water evaporation in the watershed. Using a steady-state isotope mass balance analysis based on monthly (18)O and (2)H, we use the isotopic evolution of river water to re-construct a perspective of net exchange between the river and its contributing area along eight reaches of the river during a drought period from July 2002 to December 2003, including the duration of a minor flow event. The resulting scenario, which uses a combination of climatological averages and available real-time meteorological data, should be viewed as a preliminary test of the application rather than as a definitive inventory of reach water balance. As expected for a flood-driven dryland system, considerable temporal variability in exchange is predicted. While requiring additional real-time isotopic data for operational use, the method demonstrates potential as a non-invasive tool for detecting and quantifying water diversions, one that can be easily incorporated within existing water quality monitoring activities.

  9. Mass balance modeling of arsenic processes in cropland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Yosef, B; Chang, A C; Page, A L

    2005-04-01

    This study delineated the mathematical forms for the reactions involved in the mass balance of As in cropland soils. Even mathematically simplified, many model parameters are required to define the reactive processes involved. Example simulations were conducted based on the range of parameter values and initial conditions derived from published literature. The outcomes showed that the As inputs due to fertilizers and irrigation water caused total As content of the root zone to gradually increase over time. The plant uptake and leaching were equally important as pathways for removal of the added As. In turn, the dissolution kinetics of the mineral phase and the distribution coefficient of the adsorbed phase affected the availability of the As for plant uptake and leaching. Parameters based on laboratory-derived data on the dissolution of As mineral phase, mineralization and oxidation of As(III), and the As plant uptake however appeared to overestimate the As transformations in soils. While the development of mathematical model was a straightforward process, its application to realistic situations was hindered by difficulties of defining model parameter values with confidence. Current knowledge on the processes and reactions of As transformation in the soil-plant system is inadequate to calibrate or validate the model. Studies are needed to understand the kinetics of soil As mineral dissolution and precipitation and the dynamics of root growth and As uptake by plant in soils.

  10. Effects of Drought and Passive Nighttime Warming on Soil Water Balance of Shrubland Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, P.; Beier, C.; De Angelis, P.; Kroel-Dulay, G.; Penuelas, J.; Sowerby, A.; Tietema, A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the climate driven changes in ecosystem functioning requires realistic studies at ecosystem level, involving experimental manipulation of temperature, water and CO2. A new non-intrusive experimental method has been developed and employed within 2 European projects (VULCAN and INCREASE). Climate manipulations, which involve a field scale drought and nighttime warming technique, were carried out at 6 shrubland sites located in Denmark (DK), Hungary (HU), Italy (IT), Spain (ES), United Kingdom (UK) and The Netherlands (NL) during the period 2001-2012. In this study we used data from the climate manipulation experiments in combination with a simplified soil water balance model (SWBM) in order to figure out the effects of drought and warming treatments, compared to control treatment, on the water balance of shrubland ecosystems. The SWBM operates with a daily iteration time step, and is driven by time series of corrected rainfall and actual evapotranspiration (ETa). Daily ETa values are obtained from the calculation of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) in combination with empirically determined vegetation coefficients (Kc), which are calculated splitting the computation into 2 components, transpiration and evaporation (dual coefficient methodology). The determination of Kc values and the calibration of SWBM were made by trial and error comparing model output to soil water content measurements in order to achieve the best model performance. Analysis of data shows important differences between treatments and sites, with the largest increase in ETo rate occurring in the warming treatment (+4%) and at the northern sites (DK, UK, and NL). The effect of the drought treatment on ETa rates was much larger, with a decrease ranging from -10% (IT) to -35% (DK and UK). Warmer conditions determine a general reduction of the ETa/ETo ratio (from -2%, northern sites, to -8% in Spain). The effect of the drought treatment on ETa/ETo is much more relevant

  11. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  12. Terrestrial Water Balances in the Face of Variable Climate over 49 years in Southern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S. K.; Hussain, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    The difference between precipitation and stream discharge over annual periods provides an indication of the total water loss to evaporation and evapotranspiration. The response of evaporative water loss to climate variability and change affects groundwater recharge, stream flow, and lake levels, and is a topic of ongoing debate in the upper Midwest US region and elsewhere. This study examined the watershed water balance for Augusta Creek, which drains a 95-km2 glacial landscape in southwestern Michigan covered by cropland, grassland, forest, and wetlands. The climate is humid and temperate; between 1964-2012 the water-year precipitation averaged 947 mm and ranged from 695-1386 mm. Comparison of precipitation on the upland watershed to baseflow discharge (USGS data; baseflow estimation by WHAT model) across the 49-year record shows that total evaporative water loss averaged 562 +/- 104 mm and ranged from 385-897 mm, with no apparent trend over the record. The evaporative water loss accounts for a mean (s.d.) of 59 +/- 6% of precipitation (range, 48-70%). Evaporative water loss was positively related to total precipitation (r2 = 0.73), but the percentage of precipitation lost to evaporation was only weakly (r2 = 0.12) related to total precipitation. This water balance approach to infer evaporative water loss compares well with direct measurements in the same watershed since 2009 using eddy covariance (grasslands and crops) and soil moisture monitoring by time-domain reflectometry (grasslands, crops, and forest). Thus the evaporative water loss, which is predominantly by evapotranspiration, is linearly related to total precipitation, leaving a relatively consistent proportion for groundwater recharge and streamflow.

  13. Balancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harteveld, Casper

    At many occasions we are asked to achieve a “balance” in our lives: when it comes, for example, to work and food. Balancing is crucial in game design as well as many have pointed out. In games with a meaningful purpose, however, balancing is remarkably different. It involves the balancing of three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play. From the experience of designing Levee Patroller, I observed that different types of tensions can come into existence that require balancing. It is possible to conceive of within-worlds dilemmas, between-worlds dilemmas, and trilemmas. The first, the within-world dilemmas, only take place within one of the worlds. We can think, for example, of a user interface problem which just relates to the world of Play. The second, the between-worlds dilemmas, have to do with a tension in which two worlds are predominantly involved. Choosing between a cartoon or a realistic style concerns, for instance, a tension between Reality and Play. Finally, the trilemmas are those in which all three worlds play an important role. For each of the types of tensions, I will give in this level a concrete example from the development of Levee Patroller. Although these examples come from just one game, I think the examples can be exemplary for other game development projects as they may represent stereotypical tensions. Therefore, to achieve harmony in any of these forthcoming games, it is worthwhile to study the struggles we had to deal with.

  14. Balancing cost-risk in management optimization of water resource systems under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaivoronski, Alexei A.; Sechi, Giovanni M.; Zuddas, Paola

    When a scarce water resource is distributed between different users by a Water Resource Management Authority (WRMA), the replenishment of this resource as well as the meeting of users’ demand is subject to considerable uncertainty. Cost optimization and risk management models can assist the WRMA in its decision about striking the balance between the level of target delivery to the users and the level of risk that this delivery will not be met. Addressing the problem as a multi-period dynamic network optimization, the proposed approach is also based on further developments in stochastic programming for scenario optimization. This approach tries to obtain a “robust” decision policy that minimizes the risk of wrong decisions when managing scarce water resources. In the paper we also illustrate two application examples for water resources management problems.

  15. Surface Energy Balance of Fresh and Saline Waters: AquaSEBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelrady

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System model for large water bodies and add the effect of water salinity to the evaporation rate. Firstly, SEBS is modified for fresh-water whereby new parameterizations of the water heat flux and sensible heat flux are suggested. This is achieved by adapting the roughness heights for momentum and heat transfer. Secondly, a salinity correction factor is integrated into the adapted model. Eddy covariance measurements over Lake IJsselmeer (The Netherlands are carried out and used to estimate the roughness heights for momentum (~0.0002 m and heat transfer (~0.0001 m. Application of these values over the Victoria and Tana lakes (freshwater in Africa showed that the calculated latent heat fluxes agree well with the measurements. The root mean-square of relative-errors (rRMSE is about 4.1% for Lake Victoria and 4.7%, for Lake Tana. Verification with ECMWF data showed that the salinity reduced the evaporation at varying levels by up to 27% in the Great Salt Lake and by 1% for open ocean. Our results show the importance of salinity to the evaporation rate and the suitability of the adapted-SEBS model (AquaSEBS for fresh and saline waters.

  16. Local Balancing System from the Business Model Canvas Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Bożena Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overall view of the business model (BM for the e-balance system for: balancing energy production and consumption in energy efficient, smart neighbourhoods (the e-balance project, FP7-SMARTCITIES-2013 along with its functionalities, based upon the Osterwalder’s canvas methodology. Additionally, this is the second, after two years of work, more incisive evaluation of the BM from the user’s and demo site’s perspective (Bronsbergen, the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is to present results and assess the above mentioned BM in the face its commercialisation and applicability to Europe.

  17. Effects of Water and Land-based Sensorimotor Training Programs on Static Balance among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolhamid Daneshjoo; Ashril Yusof

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of sensorimotor training on static balance in two different environments; in water and on land. Thirty non-clinical university male students (aged 22±0.85 years) were divided randomly into three groups; water, land and control groups. The experimental groups performed their respective sensorimotor training programs for 6 weeks (3 times per week). The Stork Stand Balance Test was used to examine the static balance at pre- and post-time points. Significant main ef...

  18. Proposing water balance method for water availability estimation in Indonesian regional spatial planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniati, A. T.; Sutjiningsih, D.; Soeryantono, H.; Kusratmoko, E.

    2018-01-01

    The water availability (WA) of a region is one of important consideration in both the formulation of spatial plans and the evaluation of the effectiveness of actual land use in providing sustainable water resources. Information on land-water needs vis-a-vis their availability in a region determines the state of the surplus or deficit to inform effective land use utilization. How to calculate water availability have been described in the Guideline in Determining the Carrying Capacity of the Environment in Regional Spatial Planning. However, the method of determining the supply and demand of water on these guidelines is debatable since the determination of WA in this guideline used a rational method. The rational method is developed the basis for storm drain design practice and it is essentially a peak discharge method peak discharge calculation method. This paper review the literature in methods of water availability estimation which is described descriptively, and present arguments to claim that water balance method is a more fundamental and appropriate tool in water availability estimation. A better water availability estimation method would serve to improve the practice in preparing formulations of Regional Spatial Plan (RSP) as well as evaluating land use capacity in providing sustainable water resources.

  19. Impacts of Cropland Changes on Water Balance, Sediment and Nutrient Transport in Eden River, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yumei; Quinn, Paul; Liang, Qiuhua; Adams, Russell

    2017-04-01

    Water is the key to food and human life. Farming is the main part of economic and society in Eden, with approximately 2000 farms which covers 95% of under crops. However, with the growth of farming practice and global climate changes, Eden has presented great challenges and bringing uncertainty in the water quality caused by the agricultural diffuse pollution. This expected to reduce negative impacts of the water diffuse pollution from agriculture in Eden. Therefore, there is a high need to ensure effective water resource management to enhance water quality, to address the flow pathways and sediment transport in different farming practice and cropland changes. Hence we need to understand nutrient and the hydrological flow pathways from soil to Hillslope to channel. The aim of this research is to evaluate the impacts of different cropland changes on water balance, sediment and nutrient transport. By using the hydrological models Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Catchment Runoff Attenuation Flux Tool (CRAFT), it can show the sediment and nutrient export from the load for each flow pathways (overland flow, soil water flow and ground water flow). We will show results from a small research catchment (10km2) area to the whole of Eden (800km2) at a daily time step.

  20. Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance

    OpenAIRE

    Zavaleta, Erika S.; Thomas, Brian D.; Chiariello, Nona R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Shaw, M. Rebecca; Christopher B. Field

    2003-01-01

    Models predict that global warming may increase aridity in water-limited ecosystems by accelerating evapotranspiration. We show that interactions between warming and the dominant biota in a grassland ecosystem produced the reverse effect. In a 2-year field experiment, simulated warming increased spring soil moisture by 5–10% under both ambient and elevated CO2. Warming also accelerated the decline of canopy greenness (normalized difference vegetation index) each spring...

  1. General procedure to initialize the cyclic soil water balance by the Thornthwaite and Mather method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dourado-Neto, D.; Lier, van Q.D.; Metselaar, K.; Reichardt, K.; Nielsen, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The original Thornthwaite and Mather method, proposed in 1955 to calculate a climatic monthly cyclic soil water balance, is frequently used as an iterative procedure due to its low input requirements and coherent estimates of water balance components. Using long term data sets to establish a

  2. On the sources of vegetation activity variation, and their relation with water balance in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Mora; L.R. Iverson

    1998-01-01

    Natural landscape surface processes are largely controlled by the relationship between climate and vegetation. Water balance integrates the effects of climate on patterns of vegetation distribution and productivity, and for that season, functional relationships can be established using water balance variables as predictors of vegetation response. In this study, we...

  3. Student Misconceptions in Writing Balanced Equations for Dissolving Ionic Compounds in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify student misconceptions and difficulties in writing symbolic-level balanced equations for dissolving ionic compounds in water. A sample of 105 college students were asked to provide balanced equations for dissolving four ionic compounds in water. Another 37 college students participated in semi-structured…

  4. Application of SWAT99.2 to sensitivity analysis of water balance components in unique plots in a hilly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-feng Dai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many sensitivity analyses using the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT in a complex watershed have been conducted, little attention has been paid to the application potential of the model in unique plots. In addition, sensitivity analysis of percolation and evapotranspiration with SWAT has seldom been undertaken. In this study, SWAT99.2 was calibrated to simulate water balance components for unique plots in Southern China from 2000 to 2001, which included surface runoff, percolation, and evapotranspiration. Twenty-one parameters classified into four categories, including meteorological conditions, topographical characteristics, soil properties, and vegetation attributes, were used for sensitivity analysis through one-at-a-time (OAT sampling to identify the factor that contributed most to the variance in water balance components. The results were shown to be different for different plots, with parameter sensitivity indices and ranks varying for different water balance components. Water balance components in the broad-leaved forest and natural grass plots were most sensitive to meteorological conditions, less sensitive to vegetation attributes and soil properties, and least sensitive to topographical characteristics. Compared to those in the natural grass plot, water balance components in the broad-leaved forest plot demonstrated higher sensitivity to the maximum stomatal conductance (GSI and maximum leaf area index (BLAI.

  5. Water institutions and governance models for the funding, financing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Model 3: SPV housing dedicated water infrastructure cash-flows, Model 4: stand-alone water institution with strong balance sheet, Model 5: public-private partnership (PPP) with equity, Model 6: private concession, and Model 7: private development. Various institutional options for consideration for the future management ...

  6. Modeling acquaintance networks based on balance theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Vida

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An acquaintance network is a social structure made up of a set of actors and the ties between them. These ties change dynamically as a consequence of incessant interactions between the actors. In this paper we introduce a social network model called the Interaction-Based (IB model that involves well-known sociological principles. The connections between the actors and the strength of the connections are influenced by the continuous positive and negative interactions between the actors and, vice versa, the future interactions are more likely to happen between the actors that are connected with stronger ties. The model is also inspired by the social behavior of animal species, particularly that of ants in their colony. A model evaluation showed that the IB model turned out to be sparse. The model has a small diameter and an average path length that grows in proportion to the logarithm of the number of vertices. The clustering coefficient is relatively high, and its value stabilizes in larger networks. The degree distributions are slightly right-skewed. In the mature phase of the IB model, i.e., when the number of edges does not change significantly, most of the network properties do not change significantly either. The IB model was found to be the best of all the compared models in simulating the e-mail URV (University Rovira i Virgili of Tarragona network because the properties of the IB model more closely matched those of the e-mail URV network than the other models

  7. Mass balance-based plant-wide wastewater treatment plant models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... Mass balance-based plant-wide wastewater treatment plant models – Part 3: Biodegradability of activated sludge organics under anaerobic conditions. GA Ekama*, SW Sötemann and MC Wentzel. Water Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape, ...

  8. Water balance and salt losses in competitive football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Watson, Phillip; Evans, Gethin H; Broad, Nicholas; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2007-12-01

    Fluid balance and sweat electrolyte losses were measured in the players and substitutes engaged in an English Premier League Reserve competitive football match played at an ambient temperature of 6-8 degrees C (relative humidity 50-60%). Intake of water and/or sports drink and urine output were recorded, and sweat composition was estimated from absorbent swabs applied to 4 skin sites for the duration of the game. Body mass was recorded before and after the game. Data were obtained for 22 players (age 21 y, height 180 cm, mass 78 kg) and 9 substitutes (17 y, 181 cm, 72 kg). All were male. Two of the players were dismissed during the game, and none of the substitutes played any part in the game. Mean +/- SD sweat loss of players amounted to 1.68 +/- 0.40 L, and mean fluid intake was 0.84 +/- 0.47 L (n = 20), with no difference between teams. Corresponding values for substitutes, none of whom played in the match, were 0.40 +/- 0.24 L and 0.78 +/- 0.46 L (n = 9). Prematch urine osmolality was 678 +/- 344 mOsm/kg: 11 of the 31 players provided samples with an osmolality of more than 900 mOsm/kg. Sweat sodium concentration was 62 +/- 13 mmol/L, and total sweat sodium loss during the game was 2.4 +/- 0.8 g. These descriptive data show a large individual variability in hydration status, sweat losses, and drinking behaviors in a competitive football match played in a cool environment, highlighting the need for individualized assessment of hydration status to optimize fluid-replacement strategies.

  9. WATER DRAINAGE MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Case

    2000-05-30

    The drainage of water from the emplacement drift is essential for the performance of the EBS. The unsaturated flow properties of the surrounding rock matrix and fractures determine how well the water will be naturally drained. To enhance natural drainage, it may be necessary to introduce engineered drainage features (e.g. drilled holes in the drifts), that will ensure communication of the flow into the fracture system. The purpose of the Water Drainage Model is to quantify and evaluate the capability of the drift to remove water naturally, using the selected conceptual repository design as a basis (CRWMS M&O, 1999d). The analysis will provide input to the Water Distribution and Removal Model of the EBS. The model is intended to be used to provide postclosure analysis of temperatures and drainage from the EBS. It has been determined that drainage from the EBS is a factor important to the postclosure safety case.

  10. Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaleta, Erika S; Thomas, Brian D; Chiariello, Nona R; Asner, Gregory P; Shaw, M Rebecca; Field, Christopher B

    2003-08-19

    Models predict that global warming may increase aridity in water-limited ecosystems by accelerating evapotranspiration. We show that interactions between warming and the dominant biota in a grassland ecosystem produced the reverse effect. In a 2-year field experiment, simulated warming increased spring soil moisture by 5-10% under both ambient and elevated CO2. Warming also accelerated the decline of canopy greenness (normalized difference vegetation index) each spring by 11-17% by inducing earlier plant senescence. Lower transpirational water losses resulting from this earlier senescence provide a mechanism for the unexpected rise in soil moisture. Our findings illustrate the potential for organism-environment interactions to modify the direction as well as the magnitude of global change effects on ecosystem functioning.

  11. Features of Balance Model Development of Exclave Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Rustamovich Gareev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the authors build a balance model for an exclave region. The aim of the work is to explore the unique properties of exclaves to evaluate the possibility of development of a more complex model for the economy of a region. Exclaves are strange phenomena in both theoretical and practical regional economy. There is lack of comparative models, so it is typically quite challenging to study exclaves. At the same time, exclaves produce better statistics, which gives more careful consideration of cross-regional economic flows. The authors discuss methodologies of model-based regional development forecasting. They analyze balance approach on a more general level of regional governance and individually, on the example of specific territories. Thus, they identify and explain the need to develop balance approach models fitted to the special needs of certain territories. By combining regional modeling for an exclave with traditional balance and simulation-based methods and event-based approach, they come up with a more detailed model for the economy of a region. Having taken one Russian exclave as an example, the authors have developed a simulation event-based long-term sustainability model. In the article, they provide the general characteristics of the model, describe its components, and simulation algorithm. The approach introduced in this article combines the traditional balance models and the peculiarities of an exclave region to develop a holistic regional economy model (with the Kaliningrad region serving as an example. It is important to underline that the resulting model helps to evaluate the degree of influence of preferential economic regimes (such as Free Customs Zone, for example on the economy of a region.

  12. Melanocortin Control of Energy Balance: Evidence from Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonghe, Bart C.; Hayes, Matthew R.; Bence, Kendra K.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of energy balance is extremely complex, and involves multiple systems of hormones, neurotransmitters, receptors, and intracellular signals. As data have accumulated over the last two decades, the CNS melanocortin system is now identified as a prominent integrative network of energy balance controls in the mammalian brain. Here, we will review findings from rat and mouse models, which have provided an important framework in which to study melanocortin function. Perhaps most importantly, this review attempts for the first time to summarize recent advances in our understanding of the intracellular signaling pathways thought to mediate the action of melanocortin neurons and peptides in control of long term energy balance. Special attention will be paid to the roles of MC4R/MC3R, as well as downstream neurotransmitters within forebrain and hindbrain structures that illustrate the distributed control of melanocortin signaling in energy balance. In addition, distinctions and controversy between rodent species will be discussed. PMID:21553232

  13. Water balance and ad libitum water intake in football players during a training session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that hydration plays a crucial performance in sports performance. But a great number of studies assessing hydration during football practice have shown that many players have a dehydration state prior to this sport and that most players are not able to replace water loss by sweating with ad libitum water intake. Objectives: To analyze ad libitum water consumption, water balance, thirst sensation and rate of perceived exertion on a sample of young football players during a training session. Material and Methods: A total of 57 players from three teams in the youth category voluntary participated in this study. Weight was collected at the beginning and at the end of training; thirst sensation, rate of perceived exertion and quantification of ingested water were assessed. We used descriptive statistics, correlational and ratio analysis. Results: Mean global intake of players studied was 844.74±351.95mL and an average loss of body water 1274.56±385.82mL. Average rate of dehydration of the initial weight was 0.63%. Average score of 2.81±1.32 on the scale of thirst sensation was obtained. Discussion and conclusions: Rate of loss of body water similar to previous studies is obtained. The players were not able to replace water loss by drinking liquid ad libitum, so the intake of an amount previously scheduled could become helpful.

  14. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination...

  15. Hydrogeophysics and Water Balance of Cerro Prieto Dam, NE Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutsis, V.; de León Gómez, H.; Masuch Oesterreich, D.; Izaguirre, F.

    2007-05-01

    The geographical location of the State of Nuevo Leon, due to its physiographic features, has temperate and arid climate; undeveloped drainage, low precipitations, and high evapotranspiration rates, as well as rapid demographic growth. The hydrological data of the Pablillo basin, registered in the hydrometric station Cerro Prieto, showed an annual precipitation from 415 up to 1130 mm/a , the mean evaporation of 705 mm/a (up to 2460 mm/a in 1996). The maximum water storage of the Cerro Prieto reservoir is 395 millions m3 which corresponds to a water level of 295 meters. However, this level was reached only three times after the dam's construction. By the end of June 2006 the water level was at 276.2 m which corresponds to a water volume of about 127,806,300 m3 which is less than a third of maximum storage. Analysis of hydrological data showed sufficient misbalance between water recharge (by rain, river flow) and loss due to evaporation, filtration, extraction, discharge, etc. 160 gravity reading points, 400 onshore magnetic field readings as well as about 250 offshore magnetic points were carried out. The standard corrections as instrumental drift, latitude, elevation, IGRF, etc. were applied to obtained data. Data procession includes Fourier transformation, wavelength filters, upward continuation, vertical and horizontal derivates, etc. As a result a 2D geological-geophysical models and 3D maps were elaborated. The general trend of the magnetic field reduced to a pole is NW - SE on which background anomalies of northeast trend are obviously traced. The general trend of the gravity field received as a result of our works is the same. However, local magnetic and residual gravity anomalies have mosaic character and, being morphologically extended in a NE direction, grouped in chains of northwest trend. Potential data interpretation allows assuming a series of the superficial fractures focused in a NE direction, perpendicular (NW-SE) to the general deep fault. The

  16. Water balance and soil moisture dynamics of field plots with barley and grass ley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Holger; Jansson, Per-Erik

    1991-12-01

    A physically based soilwater and heat model was used to estimate the water balance of an arable field in central Sweden for each of three different crop covers (barley with and without N fertilization and grass ley). Annual water balances were calculated for each year from 1981 to 1985. On-site measurements of soil physical properties, meteorological variables and plant development were used as input to the model. Simulated soil forst, snow cover, soilwater contents, soilwater tensions and relative differences in simulated drainage between treatments were in agreement with the corresponding measured values. In the simulation, surface runoff (70 mm year -1 in all treatments) mainly occurred during snowmelt periods and accounted for much of the variation in the total runoff estimate. Annual mean precipitation amounted to 610 mm year -1, whereas average evapotranspiration was calculated to be 320, 360 and 435 mm year -1 in barley without N fertilization, barley with N fertilization and grass ley, respectively. Soil evaporation accounted for 60, 43 and 23% whereas evaporation of intercepted water accounted for 5, 12 and 19% of the total evapotranspiration, respectively. Drainage estimates amounted to 205, 170 and 110 mm year -1.

  17. System Dynamics Modelling for a Balanced Scorecard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - To construct a dynamic model/framework inspired by a case study based on an international company. As described by the theory, one of the main difficulties of BSC is to foresee the time lag dimension of different types of indicators and their combined dynamic effects. Design/methodology...

  18. Assessment of check-dam groundwater recharge with water-balance calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Bruggeman, Adriana; Camera, Corrado; Eliades, Marinos

    2017-04-01

    Studies on the enhancement of groundwater recharge by check-dams in arid and semi-arid environments mainly focus on deriving water infiltration rates from the check-dam ponding areas. This is usually achieved by applying simple water balance models, more advanced models (e.g., two dimensional groundwater models) and field tests (e.g., infiltrometer test or soil pit tests). Recharge behind the check-dam can be affected by the built-up of sediment as a result of erosion in the upstream watershed area. This natural process can increase the uncertainty in the estimates of the recharged water volume, especially for water balance calculations. Few water balance field studies of individual check-dams have been presented in the literature and none of them presented associated uncertainties of their estimates. The objectives of this study are i) to assess the effect of a check-dam on groundwater recharge from an ephemeral river; and ii) to assess annual sedimentation at the check-dam during a 4-year period. The study was conducted on a check-dam in the semi-arid island of Cyprus. Field campaigns were carried out to measure water flow, water depth and check-dam topography in order to establish check-dam water height, volume, evaporation, outflow and recharge relations. Topographic surveys were repeated at the end of consecutive hydrological years to estimate the sediment built up in the reservoir area of the check dam. Also, sediment samples were collected from the check-dam reservoir area for bulk-density analyses. To quantify the groundwater recharge, a water balance model was applied at two locations: at the check-dam and corresponding reservoir area, and at a 4-km stretch of the river bed without check-dam. Results showed that a check-dam with a storage capacity of 25,000 m3 was able to recharge to the aquifer, in four years, a total of 12 million m3 out of the 42 million m3 of measured (or modelled) streamflow. Recharge from the analyzed 4-km long river section without

  19. Estimating Evapotranspiration of an Apple Orchard Using a Remote Sensing-Based Soil Water Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Odi-Lara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to estimate the actual evapotranspiration (ETc of a drip-irrigated apple orchard located in the semi-arid region of Talca Valley (Chile using a remote sensing-based soil water balance model. The methodology to estimate ETc is a modified version of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO dual crop coefficient approach, in which the basal crop coefficient (Kcb was derived from the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI calculated from satellite images and incorporated into a daily soil water balance in the root zone. A linear relationship between the Kcb and SAVI was developed for the apple orchard Kcb = 1.82·SAVI − 0.07 (R2 = 0.95. The methodology was applied during two growing seasons (2010–2011 and 2012–2013, and ETc was evaluated using latent heat fluxes (LE from an eddy covariance system. The results indicate that the remote sensing-based soil water balance estimated ETc reasonably well over two growing seasons. The root mean square error (RMSE between the measured and simulated ETc values during 2010–2011 and 2012–2013 were, respectively, 0.78 and 0.74 mm·day−1, which mean a relative error of 25%. The index of agreement (d values were, respectively, 0.73 and 0.90. In addition, the weekly ETc showed better agreement. The proposed methodology could be considered as a useful tool for scheduling irrigation and driving the estimation of water requirements over large areas for apple orchards.

  20. Water Balance to Recharge Calculation: Implications for Watershed Management Using Systems Dynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Dhungel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater depletion in the face of growth is a well-known problem, particularly in those areas that have grown to become dependent on a declining resource. This research comprises a broad synthesis of existing water resources data, to understand the long-term implications of continued growth in water demand on groundwater dominant water resources, and to develop a tool for sustainable water management. The Palouse region of Washington and Idaho, USA. (approximately 60,000 people in a rural setting is entirely dependent on groundwater from two basalt aquifers for potable water. Using the systems dynamics approach and a water balance that considered the entire hydrologic cycle, a hydrologic model of these aquifers was developed, tested and applied to simulate their behavior over a 150 year time period assuming the current infrastructure does not change. With 1% population growth and current water extraction rates, the results indicated the upper aquifer use may be sustainable, while the lower aquifer use is likely unsustainable in the long term. This study also shows that uncertainties in key aspects of the system create limitations to groundwater management.

  1. Comparison of four different energy balance models for estimating evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in the Midwestern United States. Our models validation using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska, showed that all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well with an R2 of more than 0.81. Both the METRIC and SSEBop models showed a low root mean square error (0.80), whereas the SEBAL and SEBS models resulted in relatively higher bias for estimating daily ET. The empirical equation of daily average net radiation used in the SEBAL and SEBS models for upscaling instantaneous ET to daily ET resulted in underestimation of daily ET, particularly when the daily average net radiation was more than 100 W·m−2. Estimated daily ET for both cropland and grassland had some degree of linearity with METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS, but linearity was stronger for evaporative fraction. Thus, these ET models have strengths and limitations for applications in water resource management.

  2. Comparison of Four Different Energy Balance Models for Estimating Evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET in the Midwestern United States. Our models validation using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska, showed that all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well with an R2 of more than 0.81. Both the METRIC and SSEBop models showed a low root mean square error (<0.93 mm·day−1 and a high Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (>0.80, whereas the SEBAL and SEBS models resulted in relatively higher bias for estimating daily ET. The empirical equation of daily average net radiation used in the SEBAL and SEBS models for upscaling instantaneous ET to daily ET resulted in underestimation of daily ET, particularly when the daily average net radiation was more than 100 W·m−2. Estimated daily ET for both cropland and grassland had some degree of linearity with METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS, but linearity was stronger for evaporative fraction. Thus, these ET models have strengths and limitations for applications in water resource management.

  3. Evaluating the potential of improving residential water balance at building scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M; Keesman, Karel J; Mels, Adriaan R; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-12-15

    Earlier results indicated that, for an average household, self-sufficiency in water supply can be achieved by following the Urban harvest Approach (UHA), in a combination of demand minimization, cascading and multi-sourcing. To achieve these results, it was assumed that all available local resources can be harvested. In reality, however, temporal, spatial and location-bound factors pose limitations to this harvest and, thus, to self-sufficiency. This article investigates potential spatial and temporal limitations to harvest local water resources at building level for the Netherlands, with a focus on indoor demand. Two building types were studied, a free standing house (one four-people household) and a mid-rise apartment flat (28 two-person households). To be able to model yearly water balances, daily patterns considering household occupancy and presence of water using appliances were defined per building type. Three strategies were defined. The strategies include demand minimization, light grey water (LGW) recycling, and rainwater harvesting (multi-sourcing). Recycling and multi-sourcing cater for toilet flushing and laundry machine. Results showed that water saving devices may reduce 30% of the conventional demand. Recycling of LGW can supply 100% of second quality water (DQ2) which represents 36% of the conventional demand or up to 20% of the minimized demand. Rainwater harvesting may supply approximately 80% of the minimized demand in case of the apartment flat and 60% in case of the free standing house. To harvest these potentials, different system specifications, related to the household type, are required. Two constraints to recycle and multi-source were identified, namely i) limitations in the grey water production and available rainfall; and ii) the potential to harvest water as determined by the temporal pattern in water availability, water use, and storage and treatment capacities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Norway's historical and projected water balance in TWh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Holmqvist, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Hydroelectric power production is closely linked to the water cycle, and variations in power production numbers reflect variations in weather. The expected climate changes will influence electricity supply through changes in annual and seasonal inflow of water to hydropower reservoirs. In Norway, more than 95 percent of the electricity production is from hydroelectric plants, and industry linked to hydropower has been an important part of the society for more than a century. Reliable information on historical and future available water resources is hence of crucial importance both for short and long-term planning and adaptation purposes in the hydropower sector. Traditionally, the Multi-area Power-market Simulator (EMPS) is used for modelling hydropower production in Norway. However, due to the models' high level of details and computational demand, this model is only used for historical analyses and a limited number of climate projections. A method has been developed that transfers water fluxes (mm day-1) and states (mm) into energy units (GWh mm-1), based on hydrological modelling of a limited number of catchments representing reservoir inflow to more than 700 hydropower plants in Norway. The advantages of using the conversion factor method, compared to EMPS, are its simplicity and low computational requirements. The main disadvantages are that it does not take into account flood losses and the time lag between inflow and power production. The method is used operationally for weekly and seasonal energy forecasts, and has proven successful at the range of results obtained for reproducing historical hydropower production numbers. In hydropower energy units, mean annual precipitation for the period 1981-2010 is estimated at 154 TWh year-1. On average, 24 TWh year-1 is lost through evapotranspiration, meaning runoff equals 130 TWh year-1. There are large interannual variations, and runoff available for power production ranges from 91 to 165 TWh year-1. The snow pack

  5. Role of vegetation cover on soil water balance in two Mediterranean areas: semiarid and dry at southeastern of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Àngela; Ruiz, Samantha; Chirino, Esteban; Bellot, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Water is a limited resource in the semiarid areas, which affects both, the population services, the economic growth, like the natural ecosystems stability. In this context, an accurate knowledge of soil water balance and role of the vegetation cover contribute to improve the management of resources water and forest. These studies are increasingly important, if we consider the latest Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In this paper the main objectives were focused on:(1)To determine the soil water balance on two different climatic conditions, semiarid and dry climate and(2) Assess the effect of vegetation (structure and cover) on soil water balance under the studied climatic conditions. For this purpose we used HYDROBAL ecohydrological model, which calculates at a daily resolution the water flows through of the vegetation canopy, estimates daily soil moisture and predicts deep drainage from the unsaturated soil layer into the aquifer. In order to achieve these objectives, we have selected two sites in the south-eastern of Spain, on soils calcareous and different climatic conditions. Ventós site in a semiarid Mediterranean area and Confrides site in a dry Mediterranean area, with 303 and 611 mm of annual precipitation respectively. Both sites, the predominant vegetation are afforestations with Pinus halepensis on dry grasslands with some patches of thorn shrublands and dwarf scrubs; but it show difference on trees density, cover and height of pines.Soil water balance was determined in each site using HYDROBAL ecohydrological model on one hydrological year (October 2012 and September 2013).Model inputs include climatic variables (daily rainfall and temperature), as well as soil and vegetation characteristics (soil field capacity, soil wilting point, initial soil water content and vegetation cover index). Model outputs are interception, net rainfall, runoff, soil water reserves, actual evapotranspiration, direct percolation, and deep

  6. A Review of Population Balance Modelling for Isothermal Bubbly Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman C.P. Cheung

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a review of the state-of-the-art population balance modelling techniques that have been adopted to describe the phenomenological nature of isothermal bubbly flows. The main focus of the review can be broadly classified into three categories: (i Numerical approaches or solution algorithms of the PBE; (ii Applications of the PBE in practical gas-liquid multiphase problems and (iii Possible aspects of the future development in population balance modelling. For the first category, details of solution algorithms based on both method of moment (MOM and discrete class method (CM that have been proposed in the literature are provided. Advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are also discussed from the theoretical and practical viewpoints. For the second category, applications of existing population balance models in practical multiphase problems that have been proposed in the literature are summarized. Selected existing mathematical closures for modelling the “birth” and “death” rate of bubbles in gas-liquid bubbly flows are introduced. Particular attention is devoted to assess the capability of some selected models in predicting bubbly flow conditions through detail validation studies against experimental data. These studies demonstrate that good agreement can be achieved by the present model by comparing the predicted results against measured data with regards to the radial distribution of void fraction and sauter mean bubble diameter. Finally, weaknesses and limitations of the existing models are revealed are suggestions for further development are discussed. Emerging topics for future population balance studies are provided as to complete the aspect of population balance modelling.

  7. A volume-balance model for flow on porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2015-11-01

    Volume-balance models are used by petroleum engineers for simulating multiphase and multicomponent flow phenomena in porous media and the extraction process in oil reservoirs. In these models, mass conservation equations and Darcy's law are supplemented by a balance condition for the pore and fluid volumes. This provides a pressure equation suitable for simulating a compressible flow within a compressible solid matrix. Here we present an alternative interpretation of the volume-balance condition that includes the advective transport within a consolidated porous media. We obtain a modified equation for the time evolution of the pressure field. Numerical tests for phase separation under gravity are presented for multiphase three dimensional flow in heterogeneous porous media. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER grant number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  8. Estimating ground-water inflow to lakes in central Florida using the isotope mass-balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    quantification. The lakes fit into three categories based on their range of ground-water inflow: low (less than 25 percent of total inflows), medium (25-50 percent of inflows), and high (greater than 50 percent of inflows). The majority of lakes in the coastal lowlands had low ground-water inflow, whereas the majority of lakes in the central highlands had medium to high ground-water inflow. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict ground-water inflow to lakes. These models help identify basin characteristics that are important in controlling ground-water inflow to Florida lakes. Significant explanatory variables include: ratio of basin area to lake surface area, depth to the Upper Floridan aquifer, maximum lake depth, and fraction of wetlands in the basin. Models were improved when lake water-quality data (nitrate, sodium, and iron concentrations) were included, illustrating the link between ground-water geochemistry and lake chemistry. Regression models that considered lakes within specific geographic areas were generally poorer than models for the entire study area. Regression results illustrate how more simplified models based on basin and lake characteristics can be used to estimate ground-water inflow. Although the uncertainty in the amount of ground-water inflow to individual lakes is high, the isotope mass-balance approach was useful in comparing the range of ground-water inflow for numerous Florida lakes. Results were also helpful in understanding differences in the geographic distribution of ground-water inflow between the coastal lowlands and central highlands. In order to use the isotope mass-balance approach to estimate inflow for multiple lakes, it is essential that all the lakes are sampled during the same time period and that detailed isotopic, hydrologic, and climatic data are collected over this same period of time. Isotopic data for Florida lakes can change over time, both seasonally and interannually, primarily because of differ

  9. Stream Water Quality Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — QUAL2K (or Q2K) is a river and stream water quality model that is intended to represent a modernized version of the QUAL2E (or Q2E) model (Brown and Barnwell 1987).

  10. Continuous-time model of structural balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Seth A; Kleinberg, Jon; Kleinberg, Robert D; Strogatz, Steven H

    2011-02-01

    It is not uncommon for certain social networks to divide into two opposing camps in response to stress. This happens, for example, in networks of political parties during winner-takes-all elections, in networks of companies competing to establish technical standards, and in networks of nations faced with mounting threats of war. A simple model for these two-sided separations is the dynamical system dX/dt = X(2), where X is a matrix of the friendliness or unfriendliness between pairs of nodes in the network. Previous simulations suggested that only two types of behavior were possible for this system: Either all relationships become friendly or two hostile factions emerge. Here we prove that for generic initial conditions, these are indeed the only possible outcomes. Our analysis yields a closed-form expression for faction membership as a function of the initial conditions and implies that the initial amount of friendliness in large social networks (started from random initial conditions) determines whether they will end up in intractable conflict or global harmony.

  11. EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER BALANCE AS A BASIC PRECONDITION OF PROGRESSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF LAND AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K KUDRNA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of water balance components – precipitation, transpiration, evaporation, underground waters and surface runoff – is a determining factor of stabile development of land area. But this proportion can be considerably disturbed and is permanently changing. Certain many-year averages are usually accepted as a stable state. That is why, in the presented work, we have tried to defi ne water balance on symmetry and invariance principles, to express it as a limit state, which would characterize it as a natural principle and enable comparison with the present balance.

  12. Designing of Hydraulically Balanced Water Distribution Network Based on GIS and EPANET

    OpenAIRE

    RASOOLI Ahmadullah; Kang, Dongshik

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of this paper are, designing and balancing of Water Distribution Network (WDN) based on loops hydraulically balanced method as well as using Geographical Information System (GIS) methodology with the contribution of EPANET. GIS methodology is used to ensure WDN’s integrity and skeletonized a proper and functional WDN by using Network Analyst utilizing the geometric network and topology network by hierarchical geo-databases. The problem is to make WDN hydraulically balanced...

  13. Modeling of the ecological balance of construction and demolition facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tskhovrebov Eduard Stanislavovich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic impact of construction is diverse in nature and occurs at all stages of construction activities: beginning with the extraction of building materials and ending with the commissioning of completed construction projects, demolition of buildings, installations, and facilities with no life cycles. Stage-by-stage restoration of the natural environment in the territories disturbed by construction along with the rational use of Russia’s natural resources — land, water, forests and subsoil — is a priority in respect of both ecological safety and sustainable development of Russian society and the state. In the current multifaceted problem selected as the focus of the study that deals with the resource-saving and waste management in a building complex, the economic, civil, environmental, industrial, social relations defining the subject of the present study are closely interrelated. The research subject of this paper is represented by the processes of negative impact of construction on the components of the natural environment; the management of construction wastes and demolition of buildings, installations, facilities. This also includes issues of accounting and assessment of the potential economic damage to the environment and human health as a result of construction and demolition in justifying the costs of investment projects in this area. The purpose of the study is to create and justify the methodology for the formation of the organizational and structural as well as the economic model of the ecological balance of construction and demolition facilities. The background materials for this scientific research are guidelines, standards, methodologies, methodological recommendations, project and regulatory documentation in the field of construction, environmental protection and waste management, published data and materials of national and foreign scientific research on this subject. The methods of scientific research are based on the

  14. Nitrogen retention and water balance in animals fed medium protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    libitum with restricted water consumption was studied. During the 8-day digestibility trial, 3 groups of five animals each were subjected to 30%, 50% and 100% water supply, with concomitant jugular blood samples taken daily to monitor their hydration status. Water loss via the urine reflects the animals water intake, thus ...

  15. Astrochemical models of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yuri

    We will review the chemical reaction network models of water and its D/H ratio coupled with the dynamics of star formation. Infrared observations show that water ice is abundant even in molecular clouds with relatively low visual extinction (~ 3 mag), which indicates that water ice is formed in early stage of molecular clouds. We thus start from a possible formation site of molecular clouds, i.e. the converging flow of diffuse gas. Then we proceed to dense cloud cores and its gravitational collapse, during which a significant deuterium enrichment occurs. The gas and ice accrete onto the circumstellar disks, which evolve to protoplanetary disks in T Tauri phase. If the disks are turbulent, water could be photodissociated in the disk surface and re-formed in deeper layers. The cycle continues until the dust grains with ice mantle are decoupled from the turbulence and settle to the midplane. The water D/H ratio could thus vary within the disk.

  16. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Steven R.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1997-01-01

    The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of a causeway constructed during 1957-59 that divides the lake into the south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway originally included two culverts, each 15 feet wide, and the permeable rock-fill material.During 1980-86, the salt balance changed as a result of record high inflow that averaged 4,627,000 acre-feet annually and modifications made to the conveyance properties of the causeway that included opening a 300-foot-wide breach. In this study, a model developed in 1973 by Waddell and Bolke to simulate the water and salt balance of the lake was revised to accommodate the high water-surface altitude and modifications made to the causeway. This study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of State Lands and Forestry, updates the model with monitoring data collected during 1980-86. This report describes the calibration of the model and presents the results of simulations for three hypothetical 10-year periods.During January 1, 1980, to July 31, 1984, a net load of 0.5 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the south to the north part of the lake primarily as a result of record inflows. From August 1, 1984, when the breach was opened, to December 31,1986, a net load of 0.3 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the north to the south part of the lake primarily as a result of the breach.For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in the water-surface altitude decreasing from about 4,200 to 4,192 feet, there was a net movement of about 1.0 billion tons of dissolved salt from the south to the north part, and about 1.7 billion tons of salt precipitated in the north part. For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in a rise in water-surface altitude from about 4,200 to 4

  17. 1st order mass balance model - Excel and GAMS

    OpenAIRE

    ALS-NSCORT,

    2004-01-01

    Provider Notes:This zipfile contains the Excel files and GAMS code for a solvable version of the NSCORT mass balance.unzip this in an ECN working directory 1. in model_june04.xls, read the intro sheet and update the working directory cell. 2. run the macro create

  18. Net Balanced Floorplanning Based on Elastic Energy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    with balanced net delays to increase the safety margins of the design. In this paper, we investigate the properties of floorplanning based on the elastic energy model. The B*-tree, which is based on an ordered binary tree, is used for circuit representation and the elastic energy is used as the cost function...

  19. Evaluation of a mass-balance approach to determine consumptive water use in northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patrick C.; Duncker, James J.; Over, Thomas M.; Marian Domanski,; ,; Engel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A principal component of evaluating and managing water use is consumptive use. This is the portion of water withdrawn for a particular use, such as residential, which is evaporated, transpired, incorporated into products or crops, consumed by humans or livestock, or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment. The amount of consumptive use may be estimated by a water (mass)-balance approach; however, because of the difficulty of obtaining necessary data, its application typically is restricted to the facility scale. The general governing mass-balance equation is: Consumptive use = Water supplied - Return flows.

  20. Water-Electrolytic and Acid-Base Balance in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Gerasimov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with some aspects of correction of water-electrolytic and acid-base balance and this problem-associated infusion therapy. It characterizes various electrolytic solutions and considers the efficacy and safety of their use in terms of homeostatic maintenance. Key words: homeostasis, dyshidria, acid-base balance, acidosis, infusion therapy, crystalloid solutions.

  1. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  2. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  3. Load Balancing of Large Distribution Network Model Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINOVIC, L.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement and evaluation study of calculations based on load flow analysis in power distribution network is presented. The focus is on the choice of load index as it is the basic input for efficient dynamic load balancing. The basic description of problem along with the proposed architecture is given. Different server resources are inspected and analyzed while running calculations, and based on this investigation, recommendations regarding the choice of load index are made. Short description of used static and dynamic load balancing algorithms is given and the proposition of load index choice is supported by tests run on large real-world power distribution network models.

  4. The balance model for heat transport from hydrolytic reaction mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janacova Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of the paper is the industrial application of enzyme hydrolysis of tanning solids waste with a view to minimizing the price of enzyme hydrolysate product, which has widely used. On the base of the energy balance of the enzymatic hydrolysis we estimated the critical minimal charge of a tanning drum. We performed of the critical minimal on the basis of a balance model for heat transport from reaction mixture into the environment through reactor wall. Employing a tanning drum for hydrolytic reaction allows to process tanning wastes in the place of their origin. It means thus considerably to enhancing economics of the whole process.

  5. Channel water balance and exchange with subsurface flow along a mountain headwater stream in Montana, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Payn; M.N. Gooseff; B.L. McGlynn; K.E. Bencala; S.M. Wondzell

    2009-01-01

    Channel water balances of contiguous reaches along streams represent a poorly understood scale of stream-subsurface interaction. We measured reach water balances along a headwater stream in Montana, United States, during summer base flow recessions. Reach water balances were estimated from series of tracer tests in 13 consecutive reaches delineated evenly along a 2.6-...

  6. Hydrological behaviour and water balance analysis for Xitiaoxi catchment of Taihu Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Lijuan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid social and economic development of the Taihu region, Taihu Lake now faces an increasingly severe eutrophication problem. Pollution from surrounding catchments contributes greatly to the eutrophication of water bodies in the region. Investigation of surface flow and associated mass transport for the Xitiaoxi catchment is of a significant degree of importance as the Xitiaoxi catchment is one of the major catchments within the Taihu region. A SWAT-based distributed hydrological model was established for the Xitiaoxi catchment. The model was calibrated and verified using hydrometeorological data from 1988 to 2001. The results indicate that the modeled daily and annual stream flow match the observed data both in the calibration period and the verification period, with a linear regression coefficient R2 and a coefficient e for modeled daily stream flow greater than 0.8 at Hengtangcun and Fanjiacun gauge stations. The results show that the runoff process in the Xitiaoxi catchment is affected both by rainfall and human activities (e.g., reservoirs and polder areas. Moreover, the human activities weaken flood peaks more noticeably during rainstorms. The water balance analysis reveals the percentages of precipitation made up by surface flow, evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge and the change of soil storage, all of which are considered useful to the further understanding of the hydrological processes in the Xitiaoxi catchment. This study provides a good base for further studies in mass transport modeling and comparison of modeling results from similar hydrological models.

  7. A Thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance Model for Estimating Evapotranspiration over Complex Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, William; Anderson, Martha; Nieto, Hector; Andreu, Ana; Yang, Yun; Cammalleri, Carmelo; Alfieri, Joseph; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Torres-Rua, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) provides valuable information for quantifying root-zone water availability, evapotranspiration (ET) and crop condition as well as providing useful information for constraining prognostic land surface models. This presentation describes a robust but relatively simple LST-based land surface model called the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model. The TSEB algorithms solve for the soil/substrate and canopy temperatures that achieves a balance in the radiation and turbulent heat flux exchange for the soil/substrate and vegetation elements coupled to the lower atmosphere. As a result, the TSEB modeling framework is applicable to a wide range of environmental and canopy cover conditions, which has been a limitation in many other LST-based energy balance approaches. This is particularly relevant in applying surface energy balance models using LST over heterogeneous landscapes with complex vegetation distribution and architecture/structure. An overview of applications of the TSEB modeling framework to a variety of landscapes will be presented. In addition, a modeling system will be described called the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) that couples the TSEB scheme with an atmospheric boundary layer model in time-differencing mode to routinely map continental-scale daily ET at 5 to 10-km resolution using geostationary satellites. A related algorithm (DisALEXI) spatially disaggregates ALEXI output down to finer spatial resolutions using polar orbiting satellites such as Landsat, which provides pixel resolutions at the scale of human management activities affecting land use⪉nd cover.

  8. Balance of payments constrained growth models: history and overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P. Thirlwall

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirlwall’s 1979 balance of payments constrained growth model predicts that a country’s long run growth of GDP can be approximated by the ratio of the growth of real exports to the income elasticity of demand for imports assuming negligible effects from real exchange rate movements. The paper surveys developments of the model since then, allowing for capital flows, interest payments on debt, terms of trade movements, and disaggregation of the model by commodities and trading partners. Various tests of the model are discussed, and an extensive list of papers that have examined the model is presented.

  9. Balance in Training for Latin American Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefoot, Neil F.

    1977-01-01

    Using a Peru case study, this article examines the problem of training imbalance for water and wastewater operators. Guidelines towards achieving adequate training for all water and wastewater personnel are suggested. (Author/MA)

  10. Myths and methodologies: Making sense of exercise mass and water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? There is a need to revisit the basic principles of exercise mass and water balance, the use of common equations and the practice of interpreting outcomes. What advances does it highlight? We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying exercise mass and water balance calculations in conditions where food is not consumed and waste is not excreted: ∆body mass - 0.20 g/kcal-1  = ∆body water. The relative efficacy of exercise drinking behaviours can be judged using the following equation: percentage dehydration = [(∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal-1 )/starting body mass] × 100. Changes in body mass occur because of flux in liquids, solids and gases. This knowledge is crucial for understanding metabolism, health and human water needs. In exercise science, corrections to observed changes in body mass to estimate water balance are inconsistently applied and often misinterpreted, particularly after prolonged exercise. Although acute body mass losses in response to exercise can represent a close surrogate for body water losses, the discordance between mass and water balance equivalence becomes increasingly inaccurate as more and more energy is expended. The purpose of this paper is briefly to clarify the roles that respiratory water loss, gas exchange and metabolic water production play in the correction of body mass changes for fluid balance determinations during prolonged exercise. Computations do not include waters of association with glycogen because any movement of water among body water compartments contributes nothing to water or mass flux from the body. Estimates of sweat loss from changes in body mass should adjust for non-sweat losses when possible. We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying the study of exercise mass and water balance: ∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal-1  = ∆body water. This equation directly controls for the influence of energy expenditure on body mass balance

  11. TerraClimate, a high-resolution global dataset of monthly climate and climatic water balance from 1958–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatzoglou, John T.; Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Parks, Sean A.; Hegewisch, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    We present TerraClimate, a dataset of high-spatial resolution (1/24°, ~4-km) monthly climate and climatic water balance for global terrestrial surfaces from 1958–2015. TerraClimate uses climatically aided interpolation, combining high-spatial resolution climatological normals from the WorldClim dataset, with coarser resolution time varying (i.e., monthly) data from other sources to produce a monthly dataset of precipitation, maximum and minimum temperature, wind speed, vapor pressure, and solar radiation. TerraClimate additionally produces monthly surface water balance datasets using a water balance model that incorporates reference evapotranspiration, precipitation, temperature, and interpolated plant extractable soil water capacity. These data provide important inputs for ecological and hydrological studies at global scales that require high spatial resolution and time varying climate and climatic water balance data. We validated spatiotemporal aspects of TerraClimate using annual temperature, precipitation, and calculated reference evapotranspiration from station data, as well as annual runoff from streamflow gauges. TerraClimate datasets showed noted improvement in overall mean absolute error and increased spatial realism relative to coarser resolution gridded datasets. PMID:29313841

  12. TerraClimate, a high-resolution global dataset of monthly climate and climatic water balance from 1958-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatzoglou, John T; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Parks, Sean A; Hegewisch, Katherine C

    2018-01-09

    We present TerraClimate, a dataset of high-spatial resolution (1/24°, ~4-km) monthly climate and climatic water balance for global terrestrial surfaces from 1958-2015. TerraClimate uses climatically aided interpolation, combining high-spatial resolution climatological normals from the WorldClim dataset, with coarser resolution time varying (i.e., monthly) data from other sources to produce a monthly dataset of precipitation, maximum and minimum temperature, wind speed, vapor pressure, and solar radiation. TerraClimate additionally produces monthly surface water balance datasets using a water balance model that incorporates reference evapotranspiration, precipitation, temperature, and interpolated plant extractable soil water capacity. These data provide important inputs for ecological and hydrological studies at global scales that require high spatial resolution and time varying climate and climatic water balance data. We validated spatiotemporal aspects of TerraClimate using annual temperature, precipitation, and calculated reference evapotranspiration from station data, as well as annual runoff from streamflow gauges. TerraClimate datasets showed noted improvement in overall mean absolute error and increased spatial realism relative to coarser resolution gridded datasets.

  13. Battery model for electrical power system energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    A model to simulate nickel-cadmium battery performance and response in a spacecraft electrical power system energy balance calculation was developed. The voltage of the battery is given as a function of temperature, operating depth-of-charge (DOD), and battery state-of-charge. Also accounted for is charge inefficiency. A battery is modeled by analysis of the results of a multiparameter battery cycling test at various temperatures and DOD's.

  14. Assessment of the regional water balance of the limestone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Therefore, all the water dependent activities depend on groundwater resources. Kyrenia Range subaquifers are the only natural domestic water supplying sources, fulfilling the required worldwide drinking water quality standards. In the present study, various hydrogeological factors that could influence the aquifer recharge ...

  15. Assessment of the regional water balance of the limestone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The northern part of Cyprus is usually characterized by its small watersheds and the lack of ephemeral surface water resources. Therefore, all the water dependent activities depend on groundwater resources. Kyrenia Range subaquifers are the only natural domestic water supplying sources, fulfilling the required worldwide ...

  16. Impacts of climate projections on water balance and implications on olive crop in Minas Gerais

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Diego F. dos; Martins,Fabrina B.; Torres,Roger R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Minas Gerais is vulnerable to climate change, with negative impacts on water balance and changes in the cultivation of several crops. Currently, the olive crop has been an alternative source for farmers, especially those in the South of the state. However, there is no information on areas with climatic conditions suitable for olive cultivation, as well as the possible impacts of climate change. The aim of this study was to verify the impact of climate projections on water balance and...

  17. Water-balance response of Rhinella arenarum (Hensel, 1867) tadpoles to graduated increase in environmental osmolarity

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari,L.; de la Torre,FR.; Salibián,A.

    2010-01-01

    The water balance and the upper limit of osmotic tolerance of premetamorphic Rhinella arenarum larvae (Gosner's stage 26) was evaluated after semistatic incubation in electrolyte (NaCl) and non-electrolyte (mannitol) media following a protocol of progressively increased osmotic pressure. Wet and dry weights were measured to calculate the water content as a derived variable indicative of the hydric balance. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and integrated multivariate analysi...

  18. Effects of Land Cover / Land Use, Soil Texture, and Vegetation on the Water Balance of Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamaaji, R. A.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Chad Basin (LCB) has experienced drastic changes of land cover and poor water management practices during the last 50 years. The successive droughts in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the shortage of surface water and groundwater resources. This problem of drought has a devastating implication on the natural resources of the Basin with great consequence on food security, poverty reduction and quality of life of the inhabitants in the LCB. Therefore, understanding the effects of land use / land cover must be a first step to find how they disturb cycle especially the groundwater in the LCB. The abundance of groundwater is affected by the climate change through the interaction with surface water, such as lakes and rivers, and disuse recharge through an infiltration process. Quantifying the impact of climate change on the groundwater resource requires reliable forecasting of changes in the major climatic variables and other spatial variations including the land use/land cover, soil texture, topographic slope, and vegetation. In this study, we employed a spatially distributed water balance model WetSpass to simulate a long-term average change of groundwater recharge in the LCB of Africa. WetSpass is a water balance-based model to estimate seasonal and spatial distribution of surface runoff, interception, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. The model is especially suitable for studying the effect of land use/land cover change on the water regime in the LCB. The present study describes the concept of the model and its application to the development of recharge map of the LCB. The study shows that major role in the water balance of LCB. The mean yearly actual evapotranspiration (ET) from the basin range from 60mm - 400 mm, which is 90 % (69mm - 430) of the annual precipitation from 2003 - 2010. It is striking that about 50 - 60 % of the total runoff is produced on build-up (impervious surfaces), while much smaller contributions are obtained from vegetated

  19. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  20. Measuring air-water interfacial area for soils using the mass balance surfactant-tracer method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Juliana B; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L

    2015-09-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Actual Evapotranspiration in the Al-Khazir Gomal Basin (Northern Iraq Using the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL and Water Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Jassas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing dependence on groundwater requires a detailed determination of the different outputs and inputs of a basin for better water management. Determination of spatial and temporal actual evapotranspiration (ETa, in this regard, is of vital importance as there is significant water loss from drainage basins. This research paper uses the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL, as well as the water balance, to estimate the spatial and temporal ETa in the Al-Khazir Gomal Basin, Northern Iraq. To compensate for the shortage in rainfall, and to irrigate summer crops, farmers in this basin have been depending, to a large extent, on groundwater extracted from the underlying unconfined aquifer, which is considered the major source for both domestic and agricultural uses in this basin. Rainfed farming of wheat and barley is one of the most important activities in the basin in the winter season, while in the summer season, agricultural activity is limited to small rice fields and narrow strips of vegetable cultivation along the Al-Khazir River. The Landsat Thematic Mapper images (TM5 acquired on 21 November 2006, 9 March 2007, 5 May 2007, 21 July 2007, and 23 September 2007 were used, along with a digital elevation model (DEM and ground-based meteorological data, measured within the area of interest. Estimation of seasonal ETa from periods between satellite overpasses was computed using the evaporative fraction (Ʌ. The water balance approach was utilized, using meteorological data and river hydrograph analysis, to estimate the ETa as the only missing input in the predefined water balance equation. The results of the two applied methods were comparable. SEBAL results were compared with the land use land cover (LULC map. The river showed the highest ETa, as evaporation from the free-water surface. Rice fields, irrigated in the summer season, have a high ETa in the images, as these fields are immersed in water during June, July and August

  2. Performance of five surface energy balance models for estimating daily evapotranspiration in high biomass sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Bhattarai, Nishan; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Kakani, Vijaya G.

    2017-06-01

    Robust evapotranspiration (ET) models are required to predict water usage in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems under different geographical and agrometeorological conditions. As a result, several remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models have been developed to estimate ET over large regions. However, comparison of the performance of several SEB models at the same site is limited. In addition, none of the SEB models have been evaluated for their ability to predict ET in rain-fed high biomass sorghum grown for biofuel production. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five widely used single-source SEB models, namely Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping ET with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS), Simplified Surface Energy Balance Index (S-SEBI), and operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop), for estimating ET over a high biomass sorghum field during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. The predicted ET values were compared against eddy covariance (EC) measured ET (ETEC) for 19 cloud-free Landsat image. In general, S-SEBI, SEBAL, and SEBS performed reasonably well for the study period, while METRIC and SSEBop performed poorly. All SEB models substantially overestimated ET under extremely dry conditions as they underestimated sensible heat (H) and overestimated latent heat (LE) fluxes under dry conditions during the partitioning of available energy. METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS overestimated LE regardless of wet or dry periods. Consequently, predicted seasonal cumulative ET by METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS were higher than seasonal cumulative ETEC in both seasons. In contrast, S-SEBI and SSEBop substantially underestimated ET under too wet conditions, and predicted seasonal cumulative ET by S-SEBI and SSEBop were lower than seasonal cumulative ETEC in the relatively wetter 2013 growing season. Our results indicate the necessity of inclusion of soil moisture or plant water stress

  3. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-06

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  4. On the Capabilities of Using AIRSAR Data in Surface Energy/Water Balance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose F.; Saatchi, Susan S.

    1996-01-01

    The capabilities of using remote sensing data, and in particular multifrequency/multipolarization SAR data, like AIRSAR, for the retrieval of surface parameters, depend considerably on the specificity of each application. The potentials, and limitations, of SAR data in ecological investigations are well known. Because the chemistry is a major component in such studies and because of the almost lacking chemical information at the wavelengths of SAR data, the capabilities of using SAR-derived information in such studies are considerably limited. However, in the case of surface energy/water balance studies, the determination of the amount of water content, both in the soil and in the plants, is a major component in all modeling approaches. As the information about water content is present in the SAR signal, then the role of SAR data in studies where water content is to be determined becomes clearly predominant. Another situation where the role of SAR data becomes dominant over other remote sensing systems is the case of dense canopies. Because of the penetration capabilities of microwave data, which is especially superior as compared to optical data, information about the canopy as a whole and even the underlying soil is contained in the SAR data, while only the top canopy provides the information content in the case of optical data. In the case of relatively dense canopies, as has been demonstrated in this study, such different penetration capabilities provide very different results in terms of the derived total canopy water content, for instance. However, although all such capabilities are well known, unfortunately there are also well known limitations. Apart from calibration-related aspects (that we will not consider in this study), and apart from other intrinsic problems (like image noise, topographic corrections, etc.) which also significantly affect the derived results, we will concentrate on the problem of extracting information from the data. Even at this

  5. A model to assess water tariffs as part of water demand management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WC/WDM) forms part of integrated water resource management and can be used as an economically viable alternative to the upgrade of infrastructure to balance supply and demand. In order to enable effective decision-making, a model was developed in this study to ...

  6. Water Balances in the Eastern Mediterranean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The roots of destabilization, migration, and local conflict around the world can often be traced to a lack of fresh water. As a result, the importance of fresh water to economic development, quality of life, ecosystem sustainability, and political stability is gaining renewed global recognition. In the Middle East and the countries of ...

  7. Water and salt balances of two shallow groundwater cropping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt tends to accumulate in poorly drained soils under irrigation if inadequate water and salt management practices are applied. Furthermore, over- irrigation may deteriorate the quality of water resources, because of salt pollution resulting from excessive drainage and leaching (United States Salinity Laboratory Staff, 1954; ...

  8. A worldwide evaluation of basin-scale evapotranspiration estimates against the water balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Li, Yanzhong; Sun, Fubao; Fu, Guobin; Li, Xiuping; Sang, Yan-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a critical role in linking the water and energy cycles but is difficult to estimate at regional and basin scales. In this study, we present a worldwide evaluation of nine ET products (three diagnostic products, three land surface model (LSM) simulations and three reanalysis-based products) against reference ET (ETwb) calculated using the water balance method corrected for the water storage change at an annual time scale over the period 1983-2006 for 35 global river basins. The results indicated that there was no significant intra-category discrepancy in the annual ET estimates for the 35 basins calculated using the different products in 35 basins, but some products performed better than others, such as the Global Land surface Evaporation estimated using the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM_E) in the diagnostic products, ET obtained from the Global Land Data Assimilation System version 1 (GLDAS 1) with the Community Land Model scheme (GCLM_E) in LSM simulations, and ET from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis dataset (MERRA_E) in the reanalysis-based products. Almost all ET products (except MERRA_E) reasonably estimated the annual means (especially in the dry basins) but systematically underestimated the inter-annual variability (except for MERRA_E, GCLM_E and ET simulation from the GLDAS 1 with the MOSAIC scheme - GMOS_E) and could not adequately estimate the trends (e.g. GCLM_E and MERRA_E) of ETwb (especially in the energy-limited wet basins). The uncertainties in nine ET products may be primarily attributed to the discrepancies in the forcing datasets and model structural limitations. The enhancements of global forcing data (meteorological data, solar radiation, soil moisture stress and water storage changes) and model physics (reasonable consideration of the water and energy balance and vegetation processes such as canopy interception loss

  9. Ecohydrology of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States and implications of water balance following a biocontrol agent introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-12-01

    With increased demand on water sources for human use and likely diminished supplies due to climate change, it is important to understand the variation in evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation water use by transpiration (T) in arid and semi-arid zone riparian areas in the western U.S. Understanding riparian plant water use is critical for accuracy of climate models, predictions used in water resources management, and assessment of land use change impacts on the water balance of ecosystems. Moore and Heilman (2011) suggested the following three principles for predicting when vegetation changes will impact the local or regional water budget: (i) variation will result if energy balance partitioning has been altered, (ii) if deeper or shallower active rooting depth has changed the amount of soil moisture accessible to plants, or (iii) if temporary changes in water use add up over longer time scales. They note that large changes in vegetation types do not necessarily result in changes in water discharge. We will use these principles to consider the case of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) on western U.S. rivers. Once considered a high-water-use plant that out-competed native trees, research over the past two decades has shown that saltcedar water use is low to moderate, and less than native trees. Consequently, the prospects of salvaging water for human use by replacing saltcedar with native trees, once thought to be bright, now appear questionable. Furthermore, saltcedar has come to occupy ecohydrological niches on altered river systems that are no longer available to native plants. However, with the widespread introduction and spread of saltcedar leaf beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) on western rivers, introduced in part to reduce riparian water use through reduction of saltcedar abundance, saltcedar ecology has now entered a new phase. The talk will present a synthesis of the recent literature on saltcedar water use and provide an overview of saltcedar ecohydrology in terms of

  10. The mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet: sensitivity to climate change as revealed by energy-balance modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet to climate change is studied with an energy-balance model of the ice/snow surface, applied at 200 m elevation intervals for four characteristic regions of the ice sheet. Solar radiation, longwave radiation, turbulent heat fluxes

  11. A stochastic approach for the description of soil water balance at basin scale: application to semiarid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, Salvatore; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito; Fiorentino, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    The present study extends the analytical work proposed by Manfreda (2008) and Manfreda and Fiorentino (2008) for the description of the soil water balance in a humid river basin. The model is based on a stochastic differential equation, where the rainfall forcing is interpreted as an additive noise in the soil water balance. Spatial heterogeneity of a basin is incorporated by a parabolic function describing the distribution of soil water storage capacity. This distribution is a key factor for a correct interpretation of the soil water balance that have been modified proposing a generalized expression adequate for both humid and arid basins. In the previous version of the model, the soil water storage distribution was set with a minimum in zero. This imply that the relative saturated portion of the river basin areas have an infinitesimal probability to be zero and consequently runoff rate is equal to rainfall rate. This approach has been generalized adopting a distribution of soil depths bounded between two non zero-values allowing to reproduce the condition of zero runoff under some rainfall events. The model, characterized by parameters that depend on soil, vegetation and basin morphology, allowed to derive analytically the probability density function of the relative saturation, portion of the saturated area and the surface runoff of a basin. Its application over a set of river basins belonging to a semiarid region of Southern Italy provides a formal description of the role played by climate, soil, and vegetation interactions in relative basin saturation and runoff production. References Manfreda, S., Runoff Generation Dynamics within a Humid River Basin, Nat. Hazard Earth Sci., 8, 1349-1357, 2008. Manfreda S., M. Fiorentino, A Stochastic Approach for the Description of the Water Balance Dynamics in a River Basin, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 1189-1200, 2008.

  12. Recharge contribution to the Guarani Aquifer System estimated from the water balance method in a representative watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, Edson; Gomes, Luis H; Troeger, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of recharge to regional groundwater flow systems is essential information required to establish sustainable water resources management. The objective of this work was to determine the groundwater outflow in the Ribeirão da Onça Basin using a water balance model of the saturated soil zone. The basin is located in the outcrop region of the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS). The water balance method involved the determination of direct recharge values, groundwater storage variation and base flow. The direct recharge was determined by the water table fluctuation method (WTF). The base flow was calculated by the hydrograph separation method, which was generated by a rain-flow model supported by biweekly streamflow measurements in the control section. Undisturbed soil samples were collected at depths corresponding to the variation zone of the groundwater level to determine the specific yield of the soil (drainable porosity). Water balances were performed in the saturated zone for the hydrological years from February 2004 to January 2007. The direct recharge ranged from 14.0% to 38.0%, and groundwater outflow from 0.4% to 2.4% of the respective rainfall during the same period.

  13. Hydrological functioning and water balance in a heavily modified hydrographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnel, Vincent; Brion, Natacha; Elskens, Marc; Claeys, Philippe; Verbanck, Michel A.

    2017-04-01

    Rivers and canals are often the location for the historical settlement of cities and the backbone for their expansion, as they permit the transport of goods and people, the access to water for industrial activities and energy production, and the evacuation of the domestic and industrial wastewaters. In turn, human activities can result in modifications of the natural river systems to allow for instance ship transport or protection against flooding. The complex interconnected hydrographic network composed of the Zenne and the parallel Charleroi-Brussels-Scheldt Canal, which supports the development of the economy and urbanization of Brussels Metropolitan Area (Belgium), is a good example of such an altered system. The natural water course has been profoundly modified by the deviation of rivers to feed the canal, the control of the water flow in the canal by locks and pumps and the overflow exchange of water between the river and the canal for flood protection purposes. Also, the functioning of this system is strongly impacted by urban hydrology in Brussels, which results in amounts of wastewater discharged in the Zenne River that are nearly equivalent to the natural riverine flow. Water and water quality management in such complex and altered systems correspond to difficult tasks. They require, as a first step, a deep understanding of their hydrological functioning. Building an accurate water budget is also a necessary step in the investigation of the pollution sources, sinks, dynamics and mass-balance. In order to assess the water quality and provide insights for water management in the Zenne-Canal hydrographic network (cf. other contributions in this session), we established a detailed box-model representation of the water budget for the whole system, with a particular interest on the importance and the effects of the exchanges of water between the river and the canal. A particularity of this study is that, in contrast to the widespread use of hydrological

  14. Climatic and physiographic controls of spatial variability in surface water balance over the contiguous United States using the Budyko relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatzoglou, John T.; Ficklin, Darren L.

    2017-09-01

    The geographic variability in the partitioning of precipitation into surface runoff (Q) and evapotranspiration (ET) is fundamental to understanding regional water availability. The Budyko equation suggests this partitioning is strictly a function of aridity, yet observed deviations from this relationship for individual watersheds impede using the framework to model surface water balance in ungauged catchments and under future climate and land use scenarios. A set of climatic, physiographic, and vegetation metrics were used to model the spatial variability in the partitioning of precipitation for 211 watersheds across the contiguous United States (CONUS) within Budyko's framework through the free parameter ω. A generalized additive model found that four widely available variables, precipitation seasonality, the ratio of soil water holding capacity to precipitation, topographic slope, and the fraction of precipitation falling as snow, explained 81.2% of the variability in ω. The ω model applied to the Budyko equation explained 97% of the spatial variability in long-term Q for an independent set of watersheds. The ω model was also applied to estimate the long-term water balance across the CONUS for both contemporary and mid-21st century conditions. The modeled partitioning of observed precipitation to Q and ET compared favorably across the CONUS with estimates from more sophisticated land-surface modeling efforts. For mid-21st century conditions, the model simulated an increase in the fraction of precipitation used by ET across the CONUS with declines in Q for much of the eastern CONUS and mountainous watersheds across the western United States.

  15. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  16. Dynamical models explaining social balance and evolution of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traag, Vincent Antonio; Van Dooren, Paul; De Leenheer, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Social networks with positive and negative links often split into two antagonistic factions. Examples of such a split abound: revolutionaries versus an old regime, Republicans versus Democrats, Axis versus Allies during the second world war, or the Western versus the Eastern bloc during the Cold War. Although this structure, known as social balance, is well understood, it is not clear how such factions emerge. An earlier model could explain the formation of such factions if reputations were assumed to be symmetric. We show this is not the case for non-symmetric reputations, and propose an alternative model which (almost) always leads to social balance, thereby explaining the tendency of social networks to split into two factions. In addition, the alternative model may lead to cooperation when faced with defectors, contrary to the earlier model. The difference between the two models may be understood in terms of the underlying gossiping mechanism: whereas the earlier model assumed that an individual adjusts his opinion about somebody by gossiping about that person with everybody in the network, we assume instead that the individual gossips with that person about everybody. It turns out that the alternative model is able to lead to cooperative behaviour, unlike the previous model.

  17. Dynamical models explaining social balance and evolution of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Antonio Traag

    Full Text Available Social networks with positive and negative links often split into two antagonistic factions. Examples of such a split abound: revolutionaries versus an old regime, Republicans versus Democrats, Axis versus Allies during the second world war, or the Western versus the Eastern bloc during the Cold War. Although this structure, known as social balance, is well understood, it is not clear how such factions emerge. An earlier model could explain the formation of such factions if reputations were assumed to be symmetric. We show this is not the case for non-symmetric reputations, and propose an alternative model which (almost always leads to social balance, thereby explaining the tendency of social networks to split into two factions. In addition, the alternative model may lead to cooperation when faced with defectors, contrary to the earlier model. The difference between the two models may be understood in terms of the underlying gossiping mechanism: whereas the earlier model assumed that an individual adjusts his opinion about somebody by gossiping about that person with everybody in the network, we assume instead that the individual gossips with that person about everybody. It turns out that the alternative model is able to lead to cooperative behaviour, unlike the previous model.

  18. A Root Zone Water Balance Algorithm for Educational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Joel E.; Ferguson, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple technique for monitoring root zone water status on demonstration project fields and incorporating the demonstration site results into workshop-type educational settings. Surveys indicate the presentation was well received by demonstration project cooperators and educators. (LZ)

  19. Water balance of the Drini i Bardh River Basin, Kosova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdullahi, Sabri; Fejza, Isalm

    2010-05-01

    Republic of Kosova lines on the highlands (500-600 m above sea level) surrounded by the mountains reaching the altitude of more than 2000m. Lower mountains divide the highland plain into four watershed areas, from where waters flow to there different seas, namely to the Adriatic Sea, the Aegean Sea and the Black Sea. In the present day world, the problems of too much, too little or too polluted water are increasing at a rapid rate. These problems have become particularly severe for the developing countries, adversely affecting their agriculture, drinking water supply and sanitation. Water recourse management is no more just a challenger it is a declared crises. Water resources in Kosova are relatively small, total amount of water in our country is small around 1600 m3/inhabitant /year Drini i Bardhë river basin is in the western part of Kosova, it is the biggest river basin with surface of 4.289 km2. Drini i Bardhë discharges its water to Albania and finally to the Adriatic Sea. The area consist of several small stream from the mountains, water flows into tributaries and Drini i Bardhë River. In this river basin are based 12 hydrometric stations, 27 manual and 5 automatic rainfall measurements Drini i Bardhe River main basin contain a big number of sub basins from which the most important are: Lumëbardhi i Pejës (503.5km2), Lumëbardhi i Deçanit (278.3km2), Erenikut (515.5km2), Burimi (446.7km2), Klinës (439.0km2), Mirushes (334.5km2), Toplluges (498.2km2), Bistrica e Prizrenit (266.0 km2) and Plava (309 km2) fig 2. For evapotranspiration measurement we have applied four methods: the method of BLANEY - CRIDDLE, radiation, SCHENDELE and Turk. Protecting from pollution is a very important issue having in consideration that this river discharges its water and outside the territory. Hydrometeorology Institute of Kosova is in charge for monitoring of water quality. Key works: rainfall, flow, evaporation, river, evaporation coefficient (Ke) and feeding coefficient

  20. Estimation of the climate change impact on a catchment water balance using an ensemble of GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshmidevi, T. V.; Nagesh Kumar, D.; Mehrotra, R.; Sharma, A.

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluates the impact of climate change on the water balance of a catchment in India. Rainfall and hydro-meteorological variables for current (20C3M scenario, 1981-2000) and two future time periods: mid of the 21st century (2046-2065) and end of the century (2081-2100) are simulated using Modified Markov Model-Kernel Density Estimation (MMM-KDE) and k-nearest neighbor downscaling models. Climate projections from an ensemble of 5 GCMs (MPI-ECHAM5, BCCR-BCM2.0, CSIRO-mk3.5, IPSL-CM4, and MRI-CGCM2) are used in this study. Hydrologic simulations for the current as well as future climate scenarios are carried out using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) integrated with ArcGIS (ArcSWAT v.2009). The results show marginal reduction in runoff ratio, annual streamflow and groundwater recharge towards the end of the century. Increased temperature and evapotranspiration project an increase in the irrigation demand towards the end of the century. Rainfall projections for the future shows marginal increase in the annual average rainfall. Short and moderate wet spells are projected to decrease, whereas short and moderate dry spells are projected to increase in the future. Projected reduction in streamflow and groundwater recharge along with the increase in irrigation demand is likely to aggravate the water stress in the region under the future scenario.

  1. Balancing of hot water distribution networks; Equilibrage des reseaux de distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridmann, P. [Societe Comap SA (France)

    1998-10-01

    The hydraulic balancing of hot water distribution networks is of prime importance for the optimum exploitation of air-conditioning installations. In the case of a non-correct balancing, heat exchangers, hot or cold batteries, water heaters or convection heaters are supplied by an insufficient or excessive water flow rate which disturbs the thermal equilibrium of the system and its correct regulation. The result is a degradation of the thermal comfort and a loss of energy. The aim of this technical paper is to precise the conditions of a good hydraulic (and thermal) balancing and the main rules to apply in order to avoid difficulties and counter-performances in space heating installations. The examples are restricted to closed and ramified hot or cold water networks and to a qualitative description of the phenomena: 1 - generalities (terminology, pressure drops, Z coefficients, network-pump coupling, thermosiphon effect, flow rate adjustment, flow and/or differential pressure regulation); 2 - application to the balancing of new installations (networks calculation principles, determination and adjustment of balancing equipments, follow up of hydraulic characteristics and prevention of disturbances); 3 - application to the balancing of existing installations; 4 - perspectives of evolution. (J.S.) 21 refs.

  2. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  3. Water balance in Cucumis plants measured by nuclear magnetic resonance. 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, J.E.A.; As, van H.; Schaafsma, T.J.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to investigate the effects of changes in root temperature, of changes in the area of root in contact with culture solution and of day/night rhythm on the water balance of a cucumber and a gherkin plant. Results are discussed in terms of water potential, flow

  4. Estimating Water Balance Components of Lakes and Reservoirs Using Various Open Access Satellite Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    There are millions of lakes and ten thousands of reservoirs in the world. The number of reservoirs is still increasing through the construction of large dams to meet the growing demand for water resources, hydroelectricity and economic development. Accurate information on the water balance

  5. Surface fluxes and water balance of spatially varying vegetation within a small mountainous headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the role of ecosystems in modulating energy, water and carbon fluxes is critical to quantifying the variability in energy, carbon, and water balances across landscapes. This study compares and contrasts the seasonal surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat and carbon fluxes measur...

  6. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  7. Assessment of climate change impacts on water balance components of Heeia watershed in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkeba Tolessa Leta

    2016-12-01

    New hydrological insights for the study region: Compared to continental watersheds, the Heeia watershed showed high rainfall initial abstraction due to high initial infiltration capacity of the soils. The simulated and observed streamflows generally showed a good agreement and satisfactory model performance demonstrating the applicability of SWAT for small island watersheds with large topographic, precipitation, and land-use gradients. The study also demonstrates methods to resolve data scarcity issues. Predicted climate change scenarios showed that the decrease in rainfall during wet season and marginal increase in dry season are the main factors for the overall decrease in water balance components. Specifically, the groundwater flow component may consistently decrease by as much as 15% due to predicted rainfall and temperature changes by 2100, which may have serious implications on groundwater availability in the watershed.

  8. Two strategies by epiphytic orchids for maintaining water balance: thick cuticles in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Sun, Mei; Yang, Qiu-Yun; Ma, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are an important component of tropical and subtropical flora, and serve vital ecological functions in forest hydrology and nutrient fluxes. However, they often encounter water deficits because there is no direct contact between their roots and the soil. The strategies employed by epiphytes for maintaining water balance in relatively water-limited habitats are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the anatomical traits, water loss rates, and physiology of leaves and pseudobulbs of four Dendrobium species with different pseudobulb morphologies to understand the roles of leaf and pseudobulb in maintaining water balance of epiphytic orchids. Our results showed that two species (D. chrysotoxum and D. officinale), with lower rates of water loss, have thicker leaves and upper cuticles, but lower epidermal thickness and leaf dry mass per area. In contrast, the other two species (D. chrysanthum and D. crystallinum) with thinner cuticles and higher rates of water loss, have less tissue density and greater saturated water contents in their pseudobulbs. Therefore, our results indicate that these latter two species may resist drought by storing water in the pseudobulbs to compensate for their thin cuticles and rapid water loss through the leaves. Under the same laboratory conditions, excised pseudobulbs with attached leaves had lower rates of water loss when compared with samples comprising only excised leaves. This implies that epiphytic orchids utilize two different strategies for sustaining water balance: thick cuticles to conserve water in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs. Our results also show that Dendrobium species with thin cuticles tend to have pseudobulbs with high water storage capacity that compensates for their faster rates of water loss. These outcomes contribute to our understanding of the adaptive water-use strategies in Dendrobium species, which is beneficial for the conservation and cultivation of epiphytic orchids

  9. Comparison of Four Different Energy Balance Models for Estimating Evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in the Midweste...

  10. Soil Water Balance and Vegetation Dynamics in two Contrasting Water-limited Mediterranean Ecosystems on Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.; Corona, R.

    2011-12-01

    the dynamics of land surface fluxes, soil moisture, CO2 and vegetation cover for two contrasting water-limited ecosystems; 2) assess the impact of the soil depth and type on the CO2 and water balance dynamics. For reaching the objectives an ecohydrologic model is also successfully used and applied to the case studies. It couples a vegetation dynamic model, which computes the change in biomass over time for the PFTs, and a 3-component (bare soil, grass and woody vegetation) land surface model.

  11. Estimating Runoff and Soil Moisture Deficit in Guinea Savannah Region of Nigeria using Water Balance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Adesiji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of runoff and soil moisture deficit in Guinea Savannah region using semi arid model based on soil water balance technique (SAMBA was carried out. The input to the SAMBA model are daily rainfall, daily evapotranspiration, type and date of planting of crop, and soil parameters. The estimated runoff was validated with field measurement taken in a 67.23 ha catchment in the study area. The annual rainfall for the year under study (2009 is 1356.2 mm, the estimated annual evapotranspiration. runoff and recharge are 638mm, 132.93mm, and 447.8mm respectively. Recharge was experienced 23 days after a significant depth of rainfall was recorded. For the crop growth in the catchment, the soil was cropped with a pepper and the growth monitored from the planting to the harvesting. The crop enjoyed so much moisture throughout the growing period as Total Available Water in the soil is greater than Soil Moisture Deficit (TAW>SMD. The model results show that the larger percentage of the total annual rainfall was lost to evaporation and recharge during the growing season. The low runoff and high recharge are attributed to soil characteristics of the area and moderate terrain of the study area.

  12. Resolving hydrologic water balances through a novel error analysis approach, with application to the Tahoe basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, James C.; Fogg, Graham E.; Puente, Carlos E.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a new approach for improving estimates of water balance components, applicable to a multi-period water balance series for a lake, watershed, or other area of any size. It consists of making use of statistical relationships between a component series estimate and the residual errors of the water mass balance series. Through this approach, two novel specific techniques are developed. The first, 'precipitation-decorrelation', entails implementing a criterion of decorrelation of residual errors from precipitation estimates. The second, 'residual-redistribution', consists of redistributing each residual error over initial water balance component estimates, in accord with an error minimization criterion for each component series. Efficacy is tested using series of annual water balances for the Tahoe Basin. Upon implementation of precipitation-decorrelation, a tightly bounded statistical estimate of mean annual Lake Tahoe evaporation is obtained, which closely matches independent measurement-based estimates. Residual-redistribution yields revised estimates of annual series of Tahoe areal precipitation and watershed runoff, which are each shown to have substantially reduced random error variance. Highly precise revised estimates of inter-annual variations in Tahoe precipitation have enabled resolution of the watershed multi-year 'memory' of precipitation, and more reliable separation of inter-annual changes in watershed storage from inter-annual variations in atmospheric loss.

  13. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tasseff, Byron Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  14. The Role of Vegetation Dynamics on the Soil Water Balance in Water-Limited Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Rondena, R.; Albertson, J. D.; Mancini, M.

    2003-12-01

    The structure and function of the vegetation regulates the exchange of mass, energy and momentum across the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Vegetation dynamics are usually neglected, other than seasonal phenology, in land surface models (LSMs). However, changes in vegetation densities, influencing the partitioning of incoming solar energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes, can result in long-term changes in both local and global climates (e.g., precipitation and temperature), which in turn will feedback to affect the vegetation growth. In semi-arid regions, this may result in persistent drought and desertification, with substantial impacts on the human populations of these regions through reduction in agricultural productivity and reduction in quantity and quality of water supply. With an objective of finding a simple vegetation model able to accurately simulate the leaf area index (LAI) dynamics, vegetation models of different level of complexity (e.g., including or not the modeling of the root biomass or the modeling of the dead biomass) are developed and compared. The vegetation dynamics models are coupled to a LSM, with the vegetation models providing the green biomass and the LAI evolution through time, and the LSM using this information in the computation of the land surface fluxes and updating the soil water content in the root-zone. We explore the models on a case study of a water limited grass field in California. Results show that a simple vegetation model that simulates the living aboveground green biomass (i.e., with low parameterization and computational efforts) is able to accurately simulate the LAI. Results also highlight the importance of including the plant growth model in the LSM when studying the climate-soil-vegetation interactions and the impact of watershed management practices on the scarce water resources over moderate to long time scales. The inclusion of the vegetation model in the LSM is demonstrated to be essential for assessing the

  15. An updated water balance for the Grootfontein aquifer near Mahikeng

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Grootfontein Aquifer, part of the important North West dolomite aquifers, supplies about 20% of Mahikeng's domestic water needs. Over-abstraction caused the large natural spring draining the aquifer to disappear in 1981, and groundwater levels have since fallen nearly 30 m in the vicinity of the former spring. Analysis ...

  16. Comments on: A flow balance approach to scenarios for water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    I would like to offer a brief comment on the above paper, which appeared in Water SA 25 (4), October 1999. Reuse of treated sewage effluent is essential to the survival of this country and this paper correctly highlights that this important resource is not being optimally used. I am concerned though that the research ...

  17. Balancing competing water needs in Morocco's Saiss basin | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Now Dean of Science and Engineering at Al Akhawayn University, his work serves communities in the surrounding area, focusing on applied research with social, economic or technological impacts. In their current research on water demand in the Saiss basin, the Al Akhawayn team faces the challenge of attempting to ...

  18. Balancing competing water needs in Morocco's Saiss basin | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-04-21

    Apr 21, 2011 ... Each year, Moroccans use nearly 70% of their annual recoverable water supply which is about 20 cubic kilometres. While this may sound sustainable, at the local level it is not viable because community use of groundwater is increasing, while overall supplies are limited.

  19. Water and salt balances of two shallow groundwater cropping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence suggests that, in general, subjective rather than objective irrigation scheduling decisions are adopted by farmers. Irrigators have 'calibrated' themselves with years of experience to irrigate subjectively according to perceived crop water requirements. This study aimed to determine the associated benefits of ...

  20. Balancing competing water needs in Morocco's Saiss basin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CCAA

    The Saiss basin serves many competing water users – local industry, a diverse agricultural sector, and towns and cities in the region, which include the major centres Fez and Meknes. Declining levels of precipitation in the region over the last 40 years have been accompanied by a 1°C increase in the average temperature.

  1. Balancing Waste Water Treatment Plant Load Using Branch and Bound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nooijen, R.R.P.; Kolechkina, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of smoothing dry weather inflow variations for
    a Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) that receives sewage from
    multiple mixed sewer systems is presented, together with a first rough
    solution algorithm. A simplification followed by a naive translation into
    a zero-one linear

  2. Water balance of global aquifers revealed by groundwater footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc F P; van Beek, Ludovicus P H

    2012-08-09

    Groundwater is a life-sustaining resource that supplies water to billions of people, plays a central part in irrigated agriculture and influences the health of many ecosystems. Most assessments of global water resources have focused on surface water, but unsustainable depletion of groundwater has recently been documented on both regional and global scales. It remains unclear how the rate of global groundwater depletion compares to the rate of natural renewal and the supply needed to support ecosystems. Here we define the groundwater footprint (the area required to sustain groundwater use and groundwater-dependent ecosystem services) and show that humans are overexploiting groundwater in many large aquifers that are critical to agriculture, especially in Asia and North America. We estimate that the size of the global groundwater footprint is currently about 3.5 times the actual area of aquifers and that about 1.7 billion people live in areas where groundwater resources and/or groundwater-dependent ecosystems are under threat. That said, 80 per cent of aquifers have a groundwater footprint that is less than their area, meaning that the net global value is driven by a few heavily overexploited aquifers. The groundwater footprint is the first tool suitable for consistently evaluating the use, renewal and ecosystem requirements of groundwater at an aquifer scale. It can be combined with the water footprint and virtual water calculations, and be used to assess the potential for increasing agricultural yields with renewable groundwaterref. The method could be modified to evaluate other resources with renewal rates that are slow and spatially heterogeneous, such as fisheries, forestry or soil.

  3. NEW METHOD TO ESTIMATE POLLUTANTS BALANCE IN MARINE WATER AREA ALLOTTED FOR EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION OF HYDROCARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Monakhova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Estimation of pollutants balance at the license area “Severniy” using the operational hydrodynamic model of the Caspian Sea and the data of industrial environmental monitoring.Methods. A new method was used to estimate pollutants balance at the license area based on the data of the hydrodynamic model and environmental monitoring. The indicated method was developed by Caspian Marine Scientific Research Center jointly with Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia in 2015.Results. The pollutants balance was estimated for oil products, heavy metals (copper, lead, cadmium, mercury, cobalt, iron, manganese, zinc and nickel and the total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It was discovered that from 17 to 20 October 2014 the balance of most pollutants was negative and amounted to less than 1% of the total transport. Pollutants outflow was registered 0-5 and 5-10 m layers, and the inflow was discovered in the layers of 10-15 and 15-20 m.Conclusion. The new approach based on the modified calculation technology of water exchange and pollutants transport has performed well and will make it possible to estimate the balance and flows of pollutants passing through different areas of the Caspian Sea.

  4. NETPATH-WIN: an interactive user version of the mass-balance model, NETPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Plummer, L.N.; Aggarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    NETPATH-WIN is an interactive user version of NETPATH, an inverse geochemical modeling code used to find mass-balance reaction models that are consistent with the observed chemical and isotopic composition of waters from aquatic systems. NETPATH-WIN was constructed to migrate NETPATH applications into the Microsoft WINDOWS® environment. The new version facilitates model utilization by eliminating difficulties in data preparation and results analysis of the DOS version of NETPATH, while preserving all of the capabilities of the original version. Through example applications, the note describes some of the features of NETPATH-WIN as applied to adjustment of radiocarbon data for geochemical reactions in groundwater systems.

  5. A water balance approach to enhance national (GB) Daily Landslide Hazard Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Tom; Reeves, Helen; Freeborough, Katy; Dashwood, Claire; Pennington, Catherine; Jordan, Hannah; Hobbs, Peter; Richardson, Jennifer; Banks, Vanessa; Cole, Steven; Wells, Steven; Moore, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) is a member of the Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP) and delivers a national (GB) daily landslide hazard assessment (DLHA). The DLHA is based largely on 'expert' driven evaluations of the likelihood of landslides in response to antecedent ground conditions, adverse weather and reported landslide events. It concentrates on shallow translational slides and debris flows - events that most frequently have societal consequences by disrupting transport infrastructure and affecting buildings. Considerable experience with the issuing of DLHAs has been gained since 2012. However, it remains very difficult to appropriately assess changing ground conditions throughout GB even when good quality precipitation forecasts are available. Soil moisture sensors are available, but the network is sparse and not yet capable of covering GB to the detail required to underpin the forecasts. Therefore, we developed an approach where temporal and spatial variations in soil moisture can be obtained from a water balance model, representing processes in the near-surface and configured on a relatively coarse grid of 1 km2. Model outputs are not intended to be relevant to the slope scale. The assumption is that the likelihood of landslides being triggered by rainfall is dependent upon the soil moisture conditions of the near-surface, in combination with how much rain is forecast to occur for the following day. These variables form the basis for establishing thresholds to guide the issuing of DLHA and early warnings. The main aim is to obtain an insight into regional patterns of change and threshold exceedance. The BGS water balance model is still in its infancy and it requires substantial work to fine-tune and validate it. To test the performance of the BGS model we focused on an analysis of Scottish landslides (2004-2015) comprising translational slides and debris flows where the BGS model is conditionally evaluated against the Grid-to-Grid (G2G) Model. G2G is

  6. Simulation of the water and isotopic balance of a closed tropical lake at a daily time step (Lake Ihotry, South-West of Madagascar)

    OpenAIRE

    Vallet Coulomb, C.; Gasse, F; Robison, L.; Ferry, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Lake Ihotry is a closed lake where evaporation constitute 99% of water outputs, and where the seasonal isotopic evaporative enrichment is important (from delta O-18=-3 parts per thousand to +6 parts per thousand and from delta H-2=-20 parts per thousand to +30 parts per thousand). For a two-year measurement period, a dynamic model of lake water level leads to an accurate determination of the water balance at a daily time step. An isotopic balance model (6180 and 62 H), including the Craig and...

  7. Simulation of effects of climate change on surface water balances of agricultural lands. Final technical report, 30 September 1992-29 September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, J.L.; McFarland, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this project, the authors used the simulation model ENWATBAL and a stochastic weather generator (WXGEN) to evaluate the impact of climatic change on water balances of cotton and sorghum, major crops in Texas that differ in their response to elevated CO2. Specific objectives were: test the accuracy of the ENWATBAL model for the study of climate change; determine the sensitivities of soil water evaporation and transpiration of cotton and sorghum to single and multifactor changes in climate and CO2; and assess effects of gradual climate change on water balances of cotton and sorghum in west Texas.

  8. Bottom Sediment Chemistry, Nutrient Balance, and Water Birds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water bird characteristics, nutrient loadings, and the levels of bottom sediment silicon oxide (SiO2), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), ferric oxide (Fe2O3), calcium oxide (CaO), copper (Cu), phosphorus (P) and organic carbon (C) was studied in eight high altitude (2040-2640m) small shallow (0.065-0.249 km2; 0.9-3.1 m) ...

  9. Evaluation of Methods to Calculate a Wetlands Water Balance

    OpenAIRE

    W. Lee Daniels; Angela Cummings; Mike Schmidt; Nicole Fomchenko; Gary Speiran; Mike Focazio; G. Michael Fitch

    2000-01-01

    The development of a workable approach to estimating mitigation site water budgets is a high priority for VDOT and the wetlands research and design community in general as they attempt to create successful mitigation sites. Additionally, correct soil physical, chemical and biological properties must be restored that are appropriate to the intended wetlands biota in order for the sites to function similar to a natural sites that they are replacing. The major objectives of this research program...

  10. Nitrate leaching through climatologic water balance in a fertigated coffee plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pivotto Bortolotto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate losses from soil profiles by leaching should preferentially be monitored during high rainfall events and during irrigation when fertilizer nitrogen applications are elevated. Using a climatologic water balance, based on the models of Thornthwaite and Penman Monteith for potential evapotranspiration, drainage soil water fluxes below the root zone were estimated in a fertigated coffee crop. Soil solution extraction at the depth of 1 m allowed the calculation of nitrate leaching. The average nitrate concentration in soil solution for plots that received nitrogen by fertigation at a rate of 400 kg ha-1, was 5.42 mg L-1, surpassing the limit of the Brazilian legislation of 10.0 mg L-1, only during one month. For plots receiving 800 kg ha-1 of nitrogen, the average was 25.01 mg L-1, 2.5 times higher than the above-mentioned limit. This information indicates that nitrogen rates higher than 400 kg ha-1 are potentially polluting the ground water. Yearly nitrate amounts of leaching were 24.2 and 153.0 kg ha-1 for the nitrogen rates of 400 and 800 kg ha-1, respectively. The six times higher loss indicates a cost/benefit problem for coffee fertigations above 400 kg ha-1.

  11. Simulation model of load balancing in distributed computing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botygin, I. A.; Popov, V. N.; Frolov, S. G.

    2017-02-01

    The availability of high-performance computing, high speed data transfer over the network and widespread of software for the design and pre-production in mechanical engineering have led to the fact that at the present time the large industrial enterprises and small engineering companies implement complex computer systems for efficient solutions of production and management tasks. Such computer systems are generally built on the basis of distributed heterogeneous computer systems. The analytical problems solved by such systems are the key models of research, but the system-wide problems of efficient distribution (balancing) of the computational load and accommodation input, intermediate and output databases are no less important. The main tasks of this balancing system are load and condition monitoring of compute nodes, and the selection of a node for transition of the user’s request in accordance with a predetermined algorithm. The load balancing is one of the most used methods of increasing productivity of distributed computing systems through the optimal allocation of tasks between the computer system nodes. Therefore, the development of methods and algorithms for computing optimal scheduling in a distributed system, dynamically changing its infrastructure, is an important task.

  12. Increased fat catabolism sustains water balance during fasting in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Joanna; Sadowska, Edyta T; Cichoń, Mariusz; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Patterns of physiological flexibility in response to fasting are well established, but much less is known about the contribution of water deprivation to the observed effects. We investigated body composition and energy and water budget in three groups of zebra finches: birds with access to food and water, food-deprived birds having access to drinking water and food-and-water-deprived birds. Animals were not stimulated by elevated energy expenditure and they were in thermoneutral conditions; thus, based on previous studies, water balance of fasting birds was expected to be maintained by increased catabolism of proteins. In contrast to this expectation, we found that access to water did not prevent reduction of proteinaceous tissue, but it saved fat reserves of the fasting birds. Thus, water balance of birds fasting without access to water seemed to be maintained by elevated fat catabolism, which generated 6 times more metabolic water compared with that in birds that had access to water. Therefore, we revise currently established views and propose fat to serve as the primary source for metabolic water production. Previously assumed increased protein breakdown for maintenance of water budget would occur if fat stores were depleted or if fat catabolism reached its upper limits due to high energy demands. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Eulerian Multiphase Population Balance Model of Atomizing, Swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana P. Rayapati

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An Eulerian/Eulerian multiphase flow model coupled with a population balance model is used as the basis for numerical simulation of atomization in swirling flows. The objective of this exercise is to develop a methodology capable of predicting the local point-wise drop size distribution in a spray, such as would be measured by the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDA. Model predictions are compared to experimental measurements of particle size distributions in an air-blast atomizer spray to demonstrate good qualitative and quantitative agreement. It is observed that the dependence of velocity on drop size inherent in a multiphase description of the drop cloud appears necessary to capture some features of the experimental data. Using this model, we demonstrate the relative contributions of secondary atomization and transport to the variation observed in the downstream spray drop size distribution.

  14. THE USE OF DRINKING WATER IN THE CONDITIONS OF MAINTAINING ECOLOGICAL BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtandil SILAGADZE

    2016-02-01

    pipelines. Thus, there is proposed a model of bacteriological pure underground artesian water supply from Georgia to Europe in the conditions of maintaining ecological balance. This model takes into account the analysis of water pipeline alternatives, “Georgia-Europe” pipeline construction, as Europe's population is in need of high-quality drinking water, and Georgia is interested in its export.

  15. An energy balance climate model with hydrological cycle. 1. Model description and sensitivity to internal parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Volker

    1991-09-01

    A thermodynamical model designed to illustrate the effect of a hydrological cycle on climate sensitivity is presented. The model contains three climatic variables: two temperatures referring to an idealized atmosphere and ocean, respectively, and atmospheric humidity. The independent variables are time and latitude. Atmosphere and ocean are coupled by radiation and convection at their interface. Some structure of the atmospheric circulation is retained by differentiating between the dynamics of a low latitude zone (0° - ϕH) and that of a high latitude zone (ϕH-90°), where ϕH ≈ 30° is the intersection of meridional temperature gradient and critical gradient for baroclinic instability. The atmospheric transport is split into an advective and a diffusive part, while the oceanic transport is approximated by pure diffusion. The coefficients associated with horizontal and vertical motion are modelled in terms of temperature gradients. The predicted water vapor gives rise to precipitation and clouds and influences (via cloud cover and greenhouse effect) the radiation balance of the system. The model is integrated for annual mean conditions until an asymptotic equilibrium is reached. The free (internal) parameters of the system are determined by optimization methods so that simulated temperature, heat flux and hydrological cycle are in close agreement with observations. The sensitivity of the model is governed by radiation parameters. Of these, the cloud albedo is the most sensitive quantity. By contrast, the model is relatively little affected by parameters associated with horizontal and vertical transport of heat.

  16. On the Direct Calculation of Snow Water Balances Using Snow Cover Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pistocchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the direct determination of the snowmelt coefficient of widely used degree-day models, using only cumulated temperature and precipitation over the days of snow cover. We develop a proof of concept using (1 local measurements of precipitation, temperature and snow water equivalent (SWE at a set of well-monitored sites in the US, and (2 available time series of snow cover from satellite and gridded daily precipitation and daily average temperature for the study region of South Tyrol, in the Italian Alps. We demonstrate how the method can reproduce the snow water balance to an acceptable extent, critically depending on the accuracy of input precipitation and temperature, highlighting the importance of a reliable representation of weather forcing if the estimate has to be robust and representative. Although not always accurate at a point, our approach yields a SWE reasonably consistent with observations, and snowmelt flows compatible with measured streamflow. At the same time, the model allows an interpretation of discrepancies between observations and simulations to detect inconsistencies between snow cover and weather forcing. This method is in principle applicable for large-scale hydrological assessments thanks to the increasing global coverage of snow cover, precipitation and temperature data. As the only other type of observation available to calibrate models is often streamflow, the direct calibration of the snow component of a model using snow cover and weather forcing reduces the number of model processes and parameters to be calibrated with streamflow, and is expected to increase model robustness.

  17. A Water Balance Budget for Bung Boraphet—A Flood Plain Wetland-Reservoir Complex in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. Hawkins

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A water balance model was developed for Bung Boraphet reservoir, a large flood plain lake in Thailand, from daily measurements over three inflow outflow cycles between 2003 and 2006. Measurement error was 10% (as one standard deviation of the total measured volume. The specific yield from the Bung Boraphet catchment was 3.9 m3/ha/yr and surface water inflow from the local catchment was the largest gain term and evaporation was the largest loss term in the water budget. Irrigation was the second largest loss term and dry season demand exceeded the storage supply. Uncontrolled extraction of water for irrigation is regarded as a threat to the reservoir fishery, although the increasing drawdown range may benefit wetland biodiversity. Sustainable management of the Bung Boraphet wetland will depend on careful management based on an informed understanding of the ecohydrological requirements of all wetland uses. Water balance models like this one are recommended as a tool to allocate water equitably and in ways which can be integrated across the Chao Phraya basin.

  18. Flooded area characterization and losses estimation for water balance and hydrological functioning over the Niger inland delta, Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Ibrahim; Dominik, Wisser; Abdou, Ali; Ousmane, Seidou; Adama, Mariko; Abel, Afouda

    2015-04-01

    Water availability is an ongoing challenge for West African countries in general and Niger River basin in particular. Niger Inland Delta undergone an annual flood events from the Niger and Bani Rivers. During such events the flooded area can overs a surface of about 40,000 km2 and extends around 350 km in length and 100 km width in Mali. The processes that occur in NID are not fully incorporated in the conceptual development of many hydrological models under Niger Basin runoff. While these processes in NID can have considerable influence on downstream flow regimes due water losses impacting significantly the water availability. Although several studies in this region developed conceptual models to represent hydrological processes in that system. But the models have been criticized for their limitation and simplicity in conception for representing explicitly all the hydrological processes. This paper presents an attempt to assess the hydrological processes by taking into account more physical knowledge of the NID system. This is in view of incorporating wetland processes into an existing hydrological model to improve model simulations on the basin. The approach is mainly water balance based on large units that account for the system over the NID. Digital elevation model (DEM), satellite data, observed climate and hydrological parameters allowed the assessment of spatiotemporal variations of the flooded area, and then the quantification of evaporative and infiltration fluxes. Characterization of the extent of the flooded area is obtained from monthly-scale inflow data and remote sensing derived flood maps within a non-linear regression Model based. The modelization of the spatiotemporal extension of the flooding of the NID show that the flooded areas vary between 25 000 km2 in wet period and 2 000 km2 in dry period. Time series of input water volumes in the Niger Inland delta and of the water losses through the NID show that the percentage of volume of annual water

  19. Mass balance modeling to elucidate historical and continuing sources of dioxin into an urban estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Hanadi S; Lakshmanan, Divagar; Suarez, Monica P

    2013-09-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (dioxins) are typically found in sediment, water and tissue as in the case of the Houston Ship Channel and Upper Galveston Bay (HSC-UGB) in Texas studied in this research. While hydrodynamic and fate and transport models are important to understand dioxin distribution in the various media, it is difficult to assimilate modeling results into a decision framework without appropriate tools that can aid in the interpretation of the simulated data. This paper presents the development of a mass-balance modeling tool linked to RMA2 and WASP models of the HSC-UGB system for 2002-2005. The mass-balance tool was used to aggregate modeling results spatially and temporally and estimate the relative contribution of sediments to dioxin loading into the Channel in comparison to runoff, deposition, and permitted effluent discharges. The total sediment associated-dioxin load into the system calculated using the mass balance model was 2.34 × 10(7) ng d(-1) (almost 86% of the toxic equivalent load), and the re-deposited load to the sediment from the water column was 1.48 × 10(7)ng-TEQd(-1), such that 8.6 × 10(6)ng-TEQ d(-1) or approximately 69% of the average daily dioxin flux is transported between model segments as sediment. The external loads to the system contribute approximately 3.83 × 10(6)ng-TEQ d(-1), a value that is an order of magnitude smaller when compared to the contribution from sediment. These findings point to the need for sediment remediation strategies that take into account the spatial locations within the system that serve as sediment sources to dioxin in the water column. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Meteorological conditions, physiochemical properties, thermal-oxygen stratification, water overturn and water balance of Lake Gardno on Wolin Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tylkowski Jacek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main research problem of the paper is aimed at determining the proper functioning of Lake Gardno within the period 2012-2014 considered as hydrological years in reference to the physiochemical properties of its waters, water balance, thermal regime and water overturn. Lake Gardno is a representative of non-run-off lake geo-eco-systems; it is situated within the Southern Baltic Sea Coastland at the cliff shore of Wolin Island. The paper analyses how weather conditions affect the specifics of water supplies provided to the lake and seasonal dynamics of its waters, their chemical, thermal and aerobic properties. It also specifies their overturn and balance with a particular emphasis on their supplies together with fog deposits.

  1. Energy balance of forage consumption by phyllophagous insects: optimization model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Tarasova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The model of optimal food consumption by phytophagous insects proposed, in which the metabolic costs are presented in the form of two components – the cost of food utilization and costs for proper metabolism of the individuals. Two measures were introduced – the «price» of food conversion and the «price» of biomass synthesis of individuals to assess the effectiveness of food consumption by caterpillars. The proposed approach to the description of food consumption by insects provides the exact solutions of the equation of energy balance of food consumption and determining the effectiveness of consumption and the risk of death of the individual. Experiments on larvae’s feeding in laboratory conditions were carried out to verify the model. Caterpillars of Aporia crataegi L. (Lepidoptera, Pieridae were the research subjects. Supply­demand balance, calculated value of the environmental price of consumption and efficiency of food consumption for each individual were determined from experimental data. It was found that the fertility of the female does not depend on the weight of food consumed by it, but is linearly dependent on the food consumption efficiency index. The greater the efficiency of food consumption by an individual, the higher its fertility. The data obtained in the course of experiments on the feeding caterpillars Aporia crataegi were compared with the data presented in the works of other authors and counted in the proposed model of consumption. Calculations allowed estimation of the critical value of food conversion price below which the energy balance is negative and the existence of an individual is not possible.

  2. A holistic water balance of Austria - how does the quantitative proportion of urban water requirements relate to other users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, D

    2012-01-01

    Traditional water use statistics only include the blue water withdrawal/consumption of municipalities, industry and irrigated agriculture. When, however, green water use of the agricultural sector is included as well as the virtual water use/water footprint (WF), water use quantity statistics become very different. In common water use statistics, Austria withdraws in total about 2.5 km(3) per year, only 3% of available resources (total discharge 81.4 km(3) = surface and ground water). The total water consumption (0.5 km(3)) is less than 1% of available resources. Urban (municipal) water requirements account for 27% of total withdrawal or 33% of consumption. When agricultural green water use (cropland) is included in statistics, the fraction of municipal water requirements diminishes to 7.6% of total withdrawal and 2.5% of total consumption. If the evapotranspiration of grassland and alpine meadows is also included in agricultural green water use, this fraction decreases to 3.2% and 0.9% respectively. When the WF is assessed as base value for water use in Austria, the municipal water use represents 5.8% of this value. In this globalized world, these traditional water use statistics are no longer recommendable. Only a holistic water balance approach really represents water use statistics.

  3. The Climate change impact on the water balance and use efficiency of two contrasting water limited Mediterranean ecosystems in Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, Nicola; Corona, Roberto; Albertson, John

    2016-04-01

    . Sardinia island is a very interesting and representative region of Mediterranean ecosystems. It is low urbanized, and is not irrigated, except some plan areas close to the main cities where main agricultural activities are concentrated. The two case study sites are within the Flumendosa river basin, with similar height a.s.l., and close (distance of 4 km). But the first site is a typically grass site located on an alluvial plan valley with a soil depth more than 2m, while the second site is a patchy mixture of Mediterranean vegetation types with wild olive trees and C3 herbaceous (grass) species and the soil thickness varies from 15-40 cm. In both sites land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by eddy correlation technique based micrometeorological towers. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water content reflectometers and gravimetric method, and periodically leaf area index (LAI) PFTs are estimated from 2003. An ecohydrologic model is successfully tested to the case studies. It couples a vegetation dynamic model (VDM), which computes the change in biomass over time for the PFTs, and a 3-component (bare soil, grass and woody vegetation) land surface model (LSM). Model is first used for simulating historically land surface fluxes from 1922 at the two sites. Climate change scenarios are then generated using a stochastic weather generator. It simulates hydrometeorological variables from historical time series altered by IPCC meteorological change predictions. The VDM-LSM predicts soil water balance and vegetation dynamics for the generated hydrometeorological scenarios at the two sites. Results demonstrate that contrasting climate change effects (decrease of winter precipitation vs increase of spring-summer air temperature) are significantly impacting land surface interactions (evapotranspiration and runoff dynamics) but with different effects on the two contrasting sites, due to the key role of the soil depth. Water resources predictions

  4. A carbon balance model for the great dismal swamp ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeter, Rachel; Sleeter, Benjamin M; Williams, Brianna; Hogan, Dianna; Hawbaker, Todd; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2017-12-01

    Carbon storage potential has become an important consideration for land management and planning in the United States. The ability to assess ecosystem carbon balance can help land managers understand the benefits and tradeoffs between different management strategies. This paper demonstrates an application of the Land Use and Carbon Scenario Simulator (LUCAS) model developed for local-scale land management at the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. We estimate the net ecosystem carbon balance by considering past ecosystem disturbances resulting from storm damage, fire, and land management actions including hydrologic inundation, vegetation clearing, and replanting. We modeled the annual ecosystem carbon stock and flow rates for the 30-year historic time period of 1985-2015, using age-structured forest growth curves and known data for disturbance events and management activities. The 30-year total net ecosystem production was estimated to be a net sink of 0.97 Tg C. When a hurricane and six historic fire events were considered in the simulation, the Great Dismal Swamp became a net source of 0.89 Tg C. The cumulative above and below-ground carbon loss estimated from the South One and Lateral West fire events totaled 1.70 Tg C, while management activities removed an additional 0.01 Tg C. The carbon loss in below-ground biomass alone totaled 1.38 Tg C, with the balance (0.31 Tg C) coming from above-ground biomass and detritus. Natural disturbances substantially impact net ecosystem carbon balance in the Great Dismal Swamp. Through alternative management actions such as re-wetting, below-ground biomass loss may have been avoided, resulting in the added carbon storage capacity of 1.38 Tg. Based on two model assumptions used to simulate the peat system, (a burn scar totaling 70 cm in depth, and the soil carbon accumulation rate of 0.36 t C/ha -1 /year -1 for Atlantic white cedar), the total soil carbon loss from the South One and Lateral West fires

  5. A carbon balance model for the great dismal swamp ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sleeter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon storage potential has become an important consideration for land management and planning in the United States. The ability to assess ecosystem carbon balance can help land managers understand the benefits and tradeoffs between different management strategies. This paper demonstrates an application of the Land Use and Carbon Scenario Simulator (LUCAS model developed for local-scale land management at the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. We estimate the net ecosystem carbon balance by considering past ecosystem disturbances resulting from storm damage, fire, and land management actions including hydrologic inundation, vegetation clearing, and replanting. Results We modeled the annual ecosystem carbon stock and flow rates for the 30-year historic time period of 1985–2015, using age-structured forest growth curves and known data for disturbance events and management activities. The 30-year total net ecosystem production was estimated to be a net sink of 0.97 Tg C. When a hurricane and six historic fire events were considered in the simulation, the Great Dismal Swamp became a net source of 0.89 Tg C. The cumulative above and below-ground carbon loss estimated from the South One and Lateral West fire events totaled 1.70 Tg C, while management activities removed an additional 0.01 Tg C. The carbon loss in below-ground biomass alone totaled 1.38 Tg C, with the balance (0.31 Tg C coming from above-ground biomass and detritus. Conclusions Natural disturbances substantially impact net ecosystem carbon balance in the Great Dismal Swamp. Through alternative management actions such as re-wetting, below-ground biomass loss may have been avoided, resulting in the added carbon storage capacity of 1.38 Tg. Based on two model assumptions used to simulate the peat system, (a burn scar totaling 70 cm in depth, and the soil carbon accumulation rate of 0.36 t C/ha−1/year−1 for Atlantic white cedar, the total

  6. A carbon balance model for the great dismal swamp ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeter, Rachel; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Williams, Brianna; Hogan, Dianna; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundCarbon storage potential has become an important consideration for land management and planning in the United States. The ability to assess ecosystem carbon balance can help land managers understand the benefits and tradeoffs between different management strategies. This paper demonstrates an application of the Land Use and Carbon Scenario Simulator (LUCAS) model developed for local-scale land management at the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. We estimate the net ecosystem carbon balance by considering past ecosystem disturbances resulting from storm damage, fire, and land management actions including hydrologic inundation, vegetation clearing, and replanting.ResultsWe modeled the annual ecosystem carbon stock and flow rates for the 30-year historic time period of 1985–2015, using age-structured forest growth curves and known data for disturbance events and management activities. The 30-year total net ecosystem production was estimated to be a net sink of 0.97 Tg C. When a hurricane and six historic fire events were considered in the simulation, the Great Dismal Swamp became a net source of 0.89 Tg C. The cumulative above and below-ground carbon loss estimated from the South One and Lateral West fire events totaled 1.70 Tg C, while management activities removed an additional 0.01 Tg C. The carbon loss in below-ground biomass alone totaled 1.38 Tg C, with the balance (0.31 Tg C) coming from above-ground biomass and detritus.ConclusionsNatural disturbances substantially impact net ecosystem carbon balance in the Great Dismal Swamp. Through alternative management actions such as re-wetting, below-ground biomass loss may have been avoided, resulting in the added carbon storage capacity of 1.38 Tg. Based on two model assumptions used to simulate the peat system, (a burn scar totaling 70 cm in depth, and the soil carbon accumulation rate of 0.36 t C/ha−1/year−1 for Atlantic white cedar), the total soil carbon loss from the

  7. Water balance-based actual evapotranspiration reconstruction from ground and satellite observations over the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhanming; Zhang, Ke; Xue, Xianwu; Hong, Zhen; Hong, Yang; Gourley, Jonathan J.

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce an observationally based monthly evapotranspiration (ET) product using the simple water balance equation across the conterminous United States (CONUS). We adopted the best quality ground and satellite-based observations of the water budget components, i.e., precipitation, runoff, and water storage change, while ET is computed as the residual. Precipitation data are provided by the bias-corrected PRISM observation-based precipitation data set, while runoff comes from observed monthly streamflow values at 592 USGS stream gauging stations that have been screened by strict quality controls. We developed a land surface model-based downscaling approach to disaggregate the monthly GRACE equivalent water thickness data to daily, 0.125° values. The derived ET computed as the residual from the water balance equation is evaluated against three sets of existing ET products. The similar spatial patterns and small differences between the reconstructed ET in this study and the other three products show the reliability of the observationally based approach. The new ET product and the disaggregated GRACE data provide a unique, important hydro-meteorological data set that can be used to evaluate the other ET products as a benchmark data set, assess recent hydrological and climatological changes, and terrestrial water and energy cycle dynamics across the CONUS. These products will also be valuable for studies and applications in drought assessment, water resources management, and climate change evaluation.

  8. CHASE-PL—Future Hydrology Data Set: Projections of Water Balance and Streamflow for the Vistula and Odra Basins, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołaj Piniewski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable concern that the water resources of Central and Eastern Europe region can be adversely affected by climate change. Projections of future water balance and streamflow conditions can be obtained by forcing hydrological models with the output from climate models. In this study, we employed the SWAT hydrological model driven with an ensemble of nine bias-corrected EURO-CORDEX climate simulations to generate future hydrological projections for the Vistula and Odra basins in two future horizons (2024–2050 and 2074–2100 under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. The data set consists of three parts: (1 model inputs; (2 raw model outputs; (3 aggregated model outputs. The first one allows the users to reproduce the outputs or to create the new ones. The second one contains the simulated time series of 10 variables simulated by SWAT: precipitation, snow melt, potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, soil water content, percolation, surface runoff, baseflow, water yield and streamflow. The third one consists of the multi-model ensemble statistics of the relative changes in mean seasonal and annual variables developed in a GIS format. The data set should be of interest of climate impact scientists, water managers and water-sector policy makers. In any case, it should be noted that projections included in this data set are associated with high uncertainties explained in this data descriptor paper.

  9. Surface Energy and Mass Balance Model for Greenland Ice Sheet and Future Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojian

    The Greenland Ice Sheet contains nearly 3 million cubic kilometers of glacial ice. If the entire ice sheet completely melted, sea level would raise by nearly 7 meters. There is thus considerable interest in monitoring the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Each year, the ice sheet gains ice from snowfall and loses ice through iceberg calving and surface melting. In this thesis, we develop, validate and apply a physics based numerical model to estimate current and future surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The numerical model consists of a coupled surface energy balance and englacial model that is simple enough that it can be used for long time scale model runs, but unlike previous empirical parameterizations, has a physical basis. The surface energy balance model predicts ice sheet surface temperature and melt production. The englacial model predicts the evolution of temperature and meltwater within the ice sheet. These two models can be combined with estimates of precipitation (snowfall) to estimate the mass balance over the Greenland Ice Sheet. We first compare model performance with in-situ observations to demonstrate that the model works well. We next evaluate how predictions are degraded when we statistically downscale global climate data. We find that a simple, nearest neighbor interpolation scheme with a lapse rate correction is able to adequately reproduce melt patterns on the Greenland Ice Sheet. These results are comparable to those obtained using empirical Positive Degree Day (PDD) methods. Having validated the model, we next drove the ice sheet model using the suite of atmospheric model runs available through the CMIP5 atmospheric model inter-comparison, which in turn built upon the RCP 8.5 (business as usual) scenarios. From this exercise we predict how much surface melt production will increase in the coming century. This results in 4-10 cm sea level equivalent, depending on the CMIP5 models. Finally, we try to bound melt water

  10. The Water, Energy and Food Nexus: Finding the Balance in Infrastructure Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-lee, A. T.; Wickel, B.; Kemp-Benedict, E.; Purkey, D. R.; Hoff, H.; Heaps, C.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that single-sector infrastructure planning is leading to severely stressed human and ecological systems. There are a number of cross-sectoral impacts in these highly inter-linked systems. Examples include: - Promotion of biofuels that leads to conversion from food crops, reducing both food and water security. - Promotion of dams solely built for hydropower rather than multi-purpose uses, that deplete fisheries and affect saltwater intrusion dynamics in downstream deltas - Historical use of water for cooling thermal power plants, with increasing pressure from other water uses, as well as problems of increased water temperatures that affect the ability to cool plants efficiently. This list can easily be expanded, as these inter-linkages are increasing over time. As developing countries see a need to invest in new infrastructure to improve the livelihoods of the poor, developed countries face conditions of deteriorating infrastructure with an opportunity for new investment. It is crucial, especially in the face of uncertainty of climate change and socio-political realities, that infrastructure planning factors in the influence of multiple sectors and the potential impacts from the perspectives of different stakeholders. There is a need for stronger linkages between science and policy as well. The Stockholm Environment Institute is developing and implementing practical and innovative nexus planning approaches in Latin America, Africa and Asia that brings together stakeholders and ways of integrating uncertainty in a cross-sectoral quantitative framework using the tools WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning) and LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning). The steps used include: 1. Identify key actors and stakeholders via social network analysis 2. Work with these actors to scope out priority issues and decision criteria in both the short and long term 3. Develop quantitative models to clarify options and balances between the needs and

  11. Does plant diversity affect the water balance of established grassland systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimer, Sophia; Bischoff, Sebastian; Blaser, Stefan; Boch, Steffen; Busch, Verena; Escher, Peter; Fischer, Markus; Kaupenjohann, Martin; Kerber, Katja; Klaus, Valentin; Michalzik, Beate; Prati, Daniel; Schäfer, Deborah; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schwarz, Martin T.; Siemens, Jan; Thieme, Lisa; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The water cycle drives nutrient cycles and plant productivity. The impact of land use on the water cycle has been extensively studied and there is experimental evidence that biodiversity modifies the water cycle in grasslands. However, the combined influences of land-use and associated biodiversity on the water cycle in established land-use systems are unclear. Therefore, we investigated how evapotranspiration (ETa), downward water flux (DF), and capillary rise (CR) in topsoil and subsoil are related to land-use and plant diversity in established, commercially managed grassland and compared these results to findings from experiments where plant diversity was manipulated. In three Central European regions ("Biodiversity Exploratories"), we studied 29 grassland plots (50 m x 50 m; 9-11 plots per region) from 2010 to 2015. The land-use types cover pasture, mown pasture, and meadow in at least triplicate per region. On each plot, we measured soil water contents, meteorological data (hourly resolution), cumulative precipitation (biweekly), plant species richness, the number of plants in the functional groups of grasses, herbs, and legumes (annually), and root biomass (once). Potential evapotranspiration (ETp) was calculated from meteorological data per plot. Missing data points of ETp and soil water contents were estimated with Bayesian hierarchical models. ETa, DF, and CR were calculated for two soil layers with a soil water balance model. The model is based on changes in soil water storage between subsequent observation dates and ETp, which was partitioned between soil layers according to root distribution. Water fluxes in annual resolution were statistically analyzed for land-use and biodiversity effects using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Land-use type did not affect water fluxes. Species richness did not influence DF and CR. DF from topsoil was higher on plots with more grass species, which is opposite to the results from a manipulative

  12. Internal accumulation on Storglaciären, Sweden, in a multi-layer snow model coupled to a distributed energy- and mass balance model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, C.H.; Hock, Regine

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the internal accumulation on Storglaciären, Sweden, we couple a multilayer snow model to a distributed energy- and mass-balance model. The snow model describes the temperature, density and water-content evolution of the snow/ice pack and includes the processes of percolation and

  13. Balancing water, religion and tourism on Redang Island, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Joshua B [Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 0EZ (United Kingdom); Nawaz, Rizwan; Nawaz, Faiza [HydroRisk Ltd, Leeds University Union, Lifton Place, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fauzi, Rosmadi [Department of Geography, Universiti Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sadek, Eran Sadek Said Md; Latif, Zulkiflee Abd [Department of Surveying Science and Geomatics, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Blackett, Matthew [Department of Geography, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: joshbfisher@gmail.com

    2008-04-15

    Redang Island (Pulau Redang) is an island off of Peninsular Malaysia that is part of a Marine Park archipelago of corals and thousands of fish and invertebrates. The relatively isolated local community is generally centered on fishing, and Islam guides daily life. Recently, the tourism industry has expanded on the island. New hotels and resorts provide jobs, but also expose the locals to western culture and touristic behavior, which may clash with deeply traditional community values. Further, the tourism industry may be putting a strain on the natural resources, especially the quantity and quality of freshwater. The island village may become divided between those who support the tourism industry and those who do not. Here we present an exploratory investigation into the development-environment-culture dynamics of tourism, water and religion on Redang Island while building collaborations between universities of this Muslim state and the West.

  14. Balancing water, religion and tourism on Redang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Nawaz, Rizwan; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Nawaz, Faiza; Sadek, Eran Sadek Said Md; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackett, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Redang Island (Pulau Redang) is an island off of Peninsular Malaysia that is part of a Marine Park archipelago of corals and thousands of fish and invertebrates. The relatively isolated local community is generally centered on fishing, and Islam guides daily life. Recently, the tourism industry has expanded on the island. New hotels and resorts provide jobs, but also expose the locals to western culture and touristic behavior, which may clash with deeply traditional community values. Further, the tourism industry may be putting a strain on the natural resources, especially the quantity and quality of freshwater. The island village may become divided between those who support the tourism industry and those who do not. Here we present an exploratory investigation into the development environment culture dynamics of tourism, water and religion on Redang Island while building collaborations between universities of this Muslim state and the West.

  15. Water Balance and Groundwater Quality of Koraro Area, Tigray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) has been given a paramount importance by both Regional and Federal Governments in Ethiopia. In this direction some stations in. Hawzen Woreda, Tigray Regional state, extremely poor, have been selected as model areas to test the achievement of the ...

  16. The balanced care model for global mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, G; Tansella, M

    2013-04-01

    For too long there have been heated debates between those who believe that mental health care should be largely or solely provided from hospitals and those who adhere to the view that community care should fully replace hospitals. The aim of this study was to propose a conceptual model relevant for mental health service development in low-, medium- and high-resource settings worldwide. Method We conducted a review of the relevant peer-reviewed evidence and a series of surveys including more than 170 individual experts with direct experience of mental health system change worldwide. We integrated data from these multiple sources to develop the balanced care model (BCM), framed in three sequential steps relevant to different resource settings. Low-resource settings need to focus on improving the recognition and treatment of people with mental illnesses in primary care. Medium-resource settings in addition can develop 'general adult mental health services', namely (i) out-patient clinics, (ii) community mental health teams (CMHTs), (iii) acute in-patient services, (iv) community residential care and (v) work/occupation. High-resource settings, in addition to primary care and general adult mental health services, can also provide specialized services in these same five categories. The BCM refers both to a balance between hospital and community care and to a balance between all of the service components (e.g. clinical teams) that are present in any system, whether this is in low-, medium- or high-resource settings. The BCM therefore indicates that a comprehensive mental health system includes both community- and hospital-based components of care.

  17. Integrated water resources modelling for assessing sustainable water governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Ganoulis, Jacques; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Makropoulos, Christos; Gkatzogianni, Eleni; Michas, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    Climatic variations and resulting future uncertainties, increasing anthropogenic pressures, changes in political boundaries, ineffective or dysfunctional governance of natural resources and environmental degradation are some of the most fundamental challenges with which worldwide initiatives fostering the "think globally, act locally" concept are concerned. Different initiatives target the protection of the environment through sustainable development; Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Transboundary Water Resources Management (TWRM) in the case of internationally shared waters are frameworks that have gained wide political acceptance at international level and form part of water resources management planning and implementation on a global scale. Both concepts contribute in promoting economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability. Inspired by these holistic management approaches, the present work describes an effort that uses integrated water resources modelling for the development of an integrated, coherent and flexible water governance tool. This work in which a sequence of computer based models and tools are linked together, aims at the evaluation of the sustainable operation of projects generating renewable energy from water as well as the sustainability of agricultural demands and environmental security in terms of environmental flow under various climatic and operational conditions. More specifically, catchment hydrological modelling is coupled with dams' simulation models and thereafter with models dedicated to water resources management and planning,while the bridging of models is conducted through geographic information systems and custom programming tools. For the case of Mesta/Nestos river basin different priority rules in the dams' operational schedule (e.g. priority given to power production as opposed to irrigation needs and vice versa), as well as different irrigation demands, e.g. current water demands as opposed to

  18. WATER DIVERSION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Case

    1999-12-21

    The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS M&O 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of unsaturated

  19. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration of Mediterranean perennial crops by means of remote-sensing based surface energy balance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rallo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual evapotranspiration from typical Mediterranean crops has been assessed in a Sicilian study area by using surface energy balance (SEB and soil-water balance models. Both modelling approaches use remotely sensed data to estimate evapotranspiration fluxes in a spatially distributed way. The first approach exploits visible (VIS, near-infrared (NIR and thermal (TIR observations to solve the surface energy balance equation whereas the soil-water balance model uses only VIS-NIR data to detect the spatial variability of crop parameters. Considering that the study area is characterized by typical spatially sparse Mediterranean vegetation, i.e. olive, citrus and vineyards, alternating bare soil and canopy, we focused the attention on the main conceptual differences between one-source and two-sources energy balance models. Two different models have been tested: the widely used one-source SEBAL model, where soil and vegetation are considered as the sole source (mostly appropriate in the case of uniform vegetation coverage and the two-sources TSEB model, where soil and vegetation components of the surface energy balance are treated separately. Actual evapotranspiration estimates by means of the two surface energy balance models have been compared vs. the outputs of the agro-hydrological SWAP model, which was applied in a spatially distributed way to simulate one-dimensional water flow in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Remote sensing data in the VIS and NIR spectral ranges have been used to infer spatially distributed vegetation parameters needed to set up the upper boundary condition of SWAP. Actual evapotranspiration values obtained from the application of the soil water balance model SWAP have been considered as the reference to be used for energy balance models accuracy assessment.

    Airborne hyperspectral data acquired during a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council, UK campaign in 2005 have been used. The results of this

  20. DISCRETE VOLUME-ELEMENT METHOD FOR NETWORK WATER- QUALITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An explicit dynamic water-quality modeling algorithm is developed for tracking dissolved substances in water-distribution networks. The algorithm is based on a mass-balance relation within pipes that considers both advective transport and reaction kinetics. Complete mixing of m...

  1. Including the effects of debris cover in a distributed glacier energy balance model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Reid, T.; Carenzo, M.; Brock, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Distributed models of glacier energy balance, which make use of digital elevation models and extensive spatial data on local meteorology, have become very useful tools for predicting glacial ablation and runoff in recent years. They generally function by running a one-dimensional energy balance model at every point on a grid on the glacier surface - for each point in the grid the ablation is calculated based on the balance of heat fluxes at the ice-air boundary. However, one key component has been missing from distributed models to date, namely the effects of debris cover. Many glacier ablation zones are mantled in near-continuous blankets of rock debris, and debris-covered glaciers are important drivers of the water cycle in the European Alps, Andes and Himalayas. Moreover, debris covers have been seen to expand in recent years, so it is essential to assess exactly how the presence of debris may affect a glacier’s surface energy balance and potential responses to climate changes. The effects of a debris cover are complicated by the varying surface roughness, albedo and thermal properties of the debris in question, but generally a debris cover reduces glacier melt rate by insulating the glacier surface from direct solar radiation. Even on glaciers where the debris cover is not continuous, isolated patches of debris caused by rockfalls can affect the glacier evolution by introducing differential ablation across the glacier surface, thus creating ice-cored moraines that may persist after ‘clean’ parts of the glacier have wasted away. This paper presents the results of incorporating a one-dimensional ‘debris energy balance model’ called DEB-Model (Reid and Brock 2010) into a distributed melt model for Haut Glacier d’Arolla, Switzerland. DEB-Model numerically estimates debris surface temperature by considering the balance of heat fluxes at the air-debris interface, then calculates heat conduction through the debris in order to estimate melt rates at the

  2. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiances, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes, which is a vertical (1-D integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. The model links visible to thermal infrared radiance spectra (0.4 to 50 μm as observed above the canopy to the fluxes of water, heat and carbon dioxide, as a function of vegetation structure, and the vertical profiles of temperature. Output of the model is the spectrum of outgoing radiation in the viewing direction and the turbulent heat fluxes, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. A special routine is dedicated to the calculation of photosynthesis rate and chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf level as a function of net radiation and leaf temperature. The fluorescence contributions from individual leaves are integrated over the canopy layer to calculate top-of-canopy fluorescence. The calculation of radiative transfer and the energy balance is fully integrated, allowing for feedback between leaf temperatures, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and radiative fluxes. Leaf temperatures are calculated on the basis of energy balance closure. Model simulations were evaluated against observations reported in the literature and against data collected during field campaigns. These evaluations showed that SCOPE is able to reproduce realistic radiance spectra, directional radiance and energy balance fluxes. The model may be applied for the design of algorithms for the retrieval of evapotranspiration from optical and thermal earth observation data, for validation of existing methods to monitor vegetation functioning, to help interpret canopy fluorescence measurements, and to study the relationships between synoptic observations with diurnally integrated quantities. The model has been implemented in Matlab and has a modular design, thus allowing for great flexibility and scalability.

  3. Soil Moisture and Vegetation Controls on Surface Energy Balance Using the Maximum Entropy Production Model of Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Parolari, A.; Huang, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to formulate and test plant water stress parameterizations for the recently proposed maximum entropy production (MEP) model of evapotranspiration (ET) over vegetated surfaces. . The MEP model of ET is a parsimonious alternative to existing land surface parameterizations of surface energy fluxes from net radiation, temperature, humidity, and a small number of parameters. The MEP model was previously tested for vegetated surfaces under well-watered and dry, dormant conditions, when the surface energy balance is relatively insensitive to plant physiological activity. Under water stressed conditions, however, the plant water stress response strongly affects the surface energy balance. This effect occurs through plant physiological adjustments that reduce ET to maintain leaf turgor pressure as soil moisture is depleted during drought. To improve MEP model of ET predictions under water stress conditions, the model was modified to incorporate this plant-mediated feedback between soil moisture and ET. We compare MEP model predictions to observations under a range of field conditions, including bare soil, grassland, and forest. The results indicate a water stress function that combines the soil water potential in the surface soil layer with the atmospheric humidity successfully reproduces observed ET decreases during drought. In addition to its utility as a modeling tool, the calibrated water stress functions also provide a means to infer ecosystem influence on the land surface state. Challenges associated with sampling model input data (i.e., net radiation, surface temperature, and surface humidity) are also discussed.

  4. WATER LAW AND MODEL OF RESPONSIBLE WATER USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Olegovitch Sivakov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As it is known, the water law regulates dynamic social relationships concerning study, usage and protection of water objects, as well as their transformation. The water law explicitly regulates water economic activities. The regulatory method of the water law has a mixed nature and thus is not distinctive. It predetermines in some cases equality and independence of subjects of relationships (water usage agreement and in other – power and submission (permissive nature of water usage. The aim of the publication is to promote scientific ideas about the fate of the water law in order to make a further polygonal and productive discussion in which the reader is invited to participate. Scientific novelty. In 2016 the monograph of D.O. Sivakov “Water law: dynamics, problems, perspectives: monograph” (second edition, reviewed and updated. Moscow: Stolitsa, 2016. 540 p. was published. In 2017 the author reconsidered some conclusions of his monograph and applied scientific achievements of theory of state and law in water sphere. In accordance with this, it is important to mention research of Petrov D.E. related to issues of differentiation and integration of structural formations of Russian legal system. The scientific novelty of the article includes the synthesis of ideas of the monograph and some achievements of theory of state and law. Methods of research. The author of the article relies on some collective and individual monographic studies in the sphere of theory of state and law, natural resource law, arctic law, financial law. Basic results of research. The author promotes the model of responsible water usage. This model shall be based not on the unstable balance of economic and environmental interests (which shall practically lead to the domination of economic interests, but on the obligatory combination of economic activities with technologies, ensuring maximal preservation of water resources. Responsible water usage shall mean a system of

  5. Dual integral porosity shallow water model for urban flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Vincent; Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.

    2017-05-01

    With CPU times 2 to 3 orders of magnitude smaller than classical shallow water-based models, the shallow water equations with porosity are a promising tool for large-scale modelling of urban floods. In this paper, a new model formulation called the Dual Integral Porosity (DIP) model is presented and examined analytically and computationally with a series of benchmark tests. The DIP model is established from an integral mass and momentum balance whereby both porosity and flow variables are defined separately for control volumes and boundaries, and a closure scheme is introduced to link control volume- and boundary-based flow variables. Previously developed Integral Porosity (IP) models were limited to a single set of flow variables. A new transient momentum dissipation model is also introduced to account for the effects of sub-grid scale wave action on porosity model solutions, effects which are validated by fine-grid solutions of the classical shallow-water equations and shown to be important for achieving similarity in dam-break solutions. One-dimensional numerical test cases show that the proposed DIP model outperforms the IP model, with significantly improved wave propagation speeds, water depths and discharge calculations. A two-dimensional field scale test case shows that the DIP model performs better than the IP model in mapping the floods extent and is slightly better in reproducing the anisotropy of the flow field when momentum dissipation parameters are calibrated.

  6. Including spatial data in nutrient balance modelling on dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne; Oenema, Jouke; Stoorvogel, Jetse; de Boer, Imke

    2017-04-01

    The Annual Nutrient Cycle Assessment (ANCA) calculates the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) balance at a dairy farm, while taking into account the subsequent nutrient cycles of the herd, manure, soil and crop components. Since January 2016, Dutch dairy farmers are required to use ANCA in order to increase understanding of nutrient flows and to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. A nutrient balance calculates the difference between nutrient inputs and outputs. Nutrients enter the farm via purchased feed, fertilizers, deposition and fixation by legumes (nitrogen), and leave the farm via milk, livestock, manure, and roughages. A positive balance indicates to which extent N and/or P are lost to the environment via gaseous emissions (N), leaching, run-off and accumulation in soil. A negative balance indicates that N and/or P are depleted from soil. ANCA was designed to calculate average nutrient flows on farm level (for the herd, manure, soil and crop components). ANCA was not designed to perform calculations of nutrient flows at the field level, as it uses averaged nutrient inputs and outputs across all fields, and it does not include field specific soil characteristics. Land management decisions, however, such as the level of N and P application, are typically taken at the field level given the specific crop and soil characteristics. Therefore the information that ANCA provides is likely not sufficient to support farmers' decisions on land management to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. This is particularly a problem when land management and soils vary between fields. For an accurate estimate of nutrient flows in a given farming system that can be used to optimize land management, the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs (and thus the effect of land management and soil variation) could be essential. Our aim was to determine the effect of the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs on modelled nutrient flows and nutrient use efficiencies

  7. Modelled climate sensitivity of the mass balance of Morteratschgletscher and its dependence on albedo parameterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, E.J.; Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the climate sensitivity of the mass balance of Morteratschgletscher in Switzerland, estimated from a two-dimensional mass balance model. Since the albedo scheme chosen is often the largest error source in mass balance models, we investigated the impact of using

  8. Modeling climate change impacts on water trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Maqsood, Imran; Gong, Yazhen

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of evaluating the impacts of climate change on the long-term performance of water trading programs, through designing an indicator to measure the mean of periodic water volume that can be released by trading through a water-use system. The indicator is computed with a stochastic optimization model which can reflect the random uncertainty of water availability. The developed method was demonstrated in the Swift Current Creek watershed of Prairie Canada under two future scenarios simulated by a Canadian Regional Climate Model, in which total water availabilities under future scenarios were estimated using a monthly water balance model. Frequency analysis was performed to obtain the best probability distributions for both observed and simulated water quantity data. Results from the case study indicate that the performance of a trading system is highly scenario-dependent in future climate, with trading effectiveness highly optimistic or undesirable under different future scenarios. Trading effectiveness also largely depends on trading costs, with high costs resulting in failure of the trading program. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential growth responses to water balance of coexisting deciduous tree species are linked to wood density in a Bolivian tropical dry forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooz A Mendivelso

    Full Text Available A seasonal period of water deficit characterizes tropical dry forests (TDFs. There, sympatric tree species exhibit a diversity of growth rates, functional traits, and responses to drought, suggesting that each species may possess different strategies to grow under different conditions of water availability. The evaluation of the long-term growth responses to changes in the soil water balance should provide an understanding of how and when coexisting tree species respond to water deficit in TDFs. Furthermore, such differential growth responses may be linked to functional traits related to water storage and conductance. We used dendrochronology and climate data to retrospectively assess how the radial growth of seven coexisting deciduous tree species responded to the seasonal soil water balance in a Bolivian TDF. Linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the relationships between basal area increment and seasonal water balance. We related these relationships with wood density and sapwood production to assess if they affect the growth responses to climate. The growth of all species responded positively to water balance during the wet season, but such responses differed among species as a function of their wood density. For instance, species with a strong growth response to water availability averaged a low wood density which may facilitate the storage of water in the stem. By contrast, species with very dense wood were those whose growth was less sensitive to water availability. Coexisting tree species thus show differential growth responses to changes in soil water balance during the wet season. Our findings also provide a link between wood density, a trait related to the ability of trees to store water in the stem, and wood formation in response to water availability.

  10. Application of isotope and water balance approaches for the study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on quantifying the groundwater fluxes and assessment of the hydrogeological regime of the Bishoftu Crater Lakes using conventional water balance and stable environmental isotope (2h and 18o) techniques. The convenient geological setting of these lakes has provided a suitable base for determining ...

  11. Effects of Water-Based Training on Static and Dynamic Balance of Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Paulo Cesar Barauce; Lopes, Maria de Fátima A; Cebolla, Elaine Cristine; Wolf, Renata; Rodacki, André L F

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a water-based exercise program on static and dynamic balance. Thirty-six older women were randomly assigned to a water-based training (3 days/week for 12 weeks) or control group. Water level was kept at the level of the xiphoid process and temperature at ∼28-30°C. Each session included aerobic activities and lower limb strength exercises. The medial-lateral, the anterior-posterior amplitude, and displacement of the center of pressure (CP-D) were measured in a quiet standing position (60 sec eyes opened and closed). The dynamic balance and 8-Foot Up-and-Go tests were also applied. Group comparisons were made using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. No differences were found in the center of pressure variables; however, the WBT group showed better performance in the 8 Foot Up-and-Go Test after training (5.61±0.76 vs. 5.18±0.42; p<0.01). The water-based training was effective in improving dynamic balance, but not static balance.

  12. Using expert elicitation to quantify catchment water balances and their uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebok, E.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Warmink, Jord Jurriaan; Stisen, S.; Jensen, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation with the participation of 35 experts was used to estimate a water balance for the nested Ahlergaarde and Holtum catchments in Western Denmark. Average annual values of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and surface runoff as well as subsurface outflow and recharge and their

  13. Assessing topographic patterns in moisture use and stress using a water balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Dyer

    2009-01-01

    Through its control on soil moisture patterns, topography's role in influencing forest composition is widely recognized. This study addresses shortcomings in traditional moisture indices by employing a water balance approach, incorporating topographic and edaphic variability to assess fine-scale moisture demand and moisture availability. Using GIS and readily...

  14. Water vapor mass balance method for determining air infiltration rates in houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; Gordon M. Heisler

    1980-01-01

    A water vapor mass balance technique that includes the use of common humidity-control equipment can be used to determine average air infiltration rates in buildings. Only measurements of the humidity inside and outside the home, the mass of vapor exchanged by a humidifier/dehumidifier, and the volume of interior air space are needed. This method gives results that...

  15. BALANCE OF ENERGY AND COMPONENTS OF VOLTAGE DURING THE ELECTROTECHNICAL MODIFICATION OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiopka O.G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dealing with results of theoretical and experimental investigations related to the balance of energy and voltage distribution in units for electrochemical units for water treatment. The electrical energy conversion mechanism in electrochemical units equipped with ionic selective membrane is analyzed. The obtained results could be used for design of electrochemical units for the water conditioning for diverse technological processes in agriculture and biotechnology.

  16. Dynamic mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Charlotte R; Poulain, Alexandre J; Ridal, Jeffrey J; Blais, Jules M

    2014-12-01

    A dynamic mass balance model was developed for the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario that predicts and hindcasts mercury concentrations and fluxes in three forms, elemental Hg (Hg(0)), divalent mercury (Hg(2+)), and methyl mercury (MeHg), in a six compartment environment (air, water, porewater, sediment, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates). Our objective was to construct a dynamic mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario based on the framework and results of a steady-state mass balance model developed previously for this site. The second objective was to estimate industrial mercury emissions based on mercury residues deposited in sediments prior to 1970, the year when regulations were implemented to reduce mercury pollution in the environment. We compiled mercury concentrations, fluxes, and transformation rates from previous studies completed in this section of the river (area of approximately 100km(2)) to develop the model. Estimated mercury concentrations in all media were similar to measured data (R(2)=0.99), with only minor exceptions, providing a satisfactory overall description of the mercury loadings and transformation rates of the different mercury species. The estimated historical emissions prior to 1970 from local industries along the Cornwall waterfront were approximately 400kgyear(-1). A storm sewer discharge of 5000m(3)/day resulted in a significant increase in mercury concentrations, particularly in sediment (617ngg(-1) to 624ngg(-1); p=0.004). Model results suggest that discharges of mercury from sources such as local industries and storm sewers have an impact on mercury in media such as sediment and water. This model should provide a basis for predicting and hindcasting mercury concentrations in other river environments as well, because it considers three distinct forms of mercury, and contains environmental media common to all rivers, including some (e.g. periphyton) not typically included in

  17. Moisture Absorption Model of Composites Considering Water Temperature Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water temperature on composite moisture absorption parameters was investigated in temperature-controlled water bath. Experiments of carbon fiber/bismaleimide resin composites immersed in water of 60℃, 70℃and 80℃ were developed respectively. According to the moisture content-time curves obtained from the experimental results, the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content of the composites immersed in different water temperature could be calculated. What's more, the effect of water temperature on the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content were discussed too. According to the Arrhenius equation and the law of Fick, a moisture absorption model was proposed to simulate the hygroscopic behaviour of the composite laminates immersed in different water temperature which can predict the absorption rate of water of the composites immersed in distilled water of 95℃ at any time precisely and can calculate how long it will take to reach the specific absorption rate.

  18. Impacts of deforestation on water balance components of a watershed on the Brazilian East Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donizete dos Reis Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian East coast was intensely affected by deforestation, which drastically cut back the original biome. The possible impacts of this process on water resources are still unknown. The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the impacts of deforestation on the main water balance components of the Galo creek watershed, in the State of Espírito Santo, on the East coast of Brazil. Considering the real conditions of the watershed, the SWAT model was calibrated with data from 1997 to 2000 and validated for the period between 2001 and 2003. The calibration and validation processes were evaluated by the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient and by the statistical parameters (determination coefficient, slope coefficient and F test of the regression model adjusted for estimated and measured flow data. After calibration and validation of the model, new simulations were carried out for three different land use scenarios: a scenario in compliance with the law (C1, assuming the preservation of PPAs (permanent preservation areas; an optimistic scenario (C2, which considers the watershed to be almost entirely covered by native vegetation; and a pessimistic scenario (C3, in which the watershed would be almost entirely covered by pasture. The scenarios C1, C2 and C3 represent a soil cover of native forest of 76, 97 and 0 %, respectively. The results were compared with the simulation, considering the real scenario (C0 with 54 % forest cover. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients were 0.65 and 0.70 for calibration and validation, respectively, indicating satisfactory results in the flow simulation. A mean reduction of 10 % of the native forest cover would cause a mean annual increase of approximately 11.5 mm in total runoff at the watershed outlet. Reforestation would ensure minimum flows in the dry period and regulate the maximum flow of the main watercourse of the watershed.

  19. Modelling Ballast Water Transport

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    Ballast water discharges in the coastal environs have caused a great concern over the recent periods as they account for transporting marine organisms from one part of the world to the other. The movement of discharged ballast water as well...

  20. Urban water metabolism indicators derived from a water mass balance - Bridging the gap between visions and performance assessment of urban water resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, M A; Serrao-Neumann, S; Kenway, S J; Morgan, E A; Low Choy, D

    2017-10-01

    Improving resource management in urban areas has been enshrined in visions for achieving sustainable urban areas, but to date it has been difficult to quantify performance indicators to help identify more sustainable outcomes, especially for water resources. In this work, we advance quantitative indicators for what we refer to as the 'metabolic' features of urban water management: those related to resource efficiency (for water and also water-related energy and nutrients), supply internalisation, urban hydrological performance, sustainable extraction, and recognition of the diverse functions of water. We derived indicators in consultation with stakeholders to bridge this gap between visions and performance indicators. This was done by first reviewing and categorising water-related resource management objectives for city-regions, and then deriving indicators that can gauge performance against them. The ability for these indicators to be quantified using data from an urban water mass balance was also examined. Indicators of water efficiency, supply internalisation, and hydrological performance (relative to a reference case) can be generated using existing urban water mass balance methods. In the future, indicators for water-related energy and nutrient efficiencies could be generated by overlaying the urban water balance with energy and nutrient data. Indicators of sustainable extraction and recognising diverse functions of water will require methods for defining sustainable extraction rates and a water functionality index. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved population balance model for straining-dominant deep bed filtration using network calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; You, Zhenjiang; Shapiro, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal-suspension flow in porous media is modelled simultaneously by the large scale population balance equations and by the microscale network model. The phenomenological parameter of the correlation length in the population balance model is determined from the network modelling. It is found...... out that the correlation length in the population balance model depends on the particle size. This dependency calculated by two-dimensional network has the same tendency as that obtained from the laboratory tests in engineered porous media....

  2. Population Balance Models: A useful complementary modelling framework for future WWTP modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nopens, Ingmar; Torfs, Elena; Ducoste, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Population Balance Models (PBMs) represent a powerful modelling framework for the description of the dynamics of properties that are characterised by statistical distributions. This has been demonstrated in many chemical engineering applications. Modelling efforts of several current and future unit...... processes in WWTPs could potentially benefit from this framework, especially when distributed dynamics have a significant impact on the overall unit process performance. In these cases, current models that rely on average properties cannot sufficiently captured the true behaviour. Examples are bubble size......, floc size, crystal size or granule size,... PBMs can be used to provide new insights that can be embedded in our current models to improve their predictive capability. This paper provides an overview of current applications and the future potential of PBMs in the field of WWT modelling, introducing new...

  3. Annual safe groundwater yield in a semiarid basin using combination of water balance equation and water table fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Abolfazl; Mohammadi, Zargham

    2017-10-01

    The safe groundwater yield plays a major role in the appropriate management of groundwater systems, particularly in (semi-)arid areas like Iran. This study incorporates both the water balance equation and the water table fluctuation to estimate the annual safe yield of the unconfined aquifer in the eastern part of the Kaftar Lake, an Iranian semiarid region. Firstly, the water balance year 2002-03, owing same water table elevation at the beginning and year-end, was chosen from the monthly representative groundwater hydrograph of the aquifer to be taken into account as a basic water year for determining the safe yield. Then the ratio of the total groundwater pumping to the annual groundwater recharge in the selected water balance year together with the quantity of total recharge occurred in the wet period (October to May) of the year of interest were applied to evaluate the annual safe yield at the initiation of the dry period (June to September) of the year of interest. Knowing the annual safe groundwater withdrawal rate at the initiation of each dry period could be helpful to decision makers in managing groundwater resources conservation. Analysis results indicate that to develop a safe management strategy in the aquifer; the ratio of the annual groundwater withdrawal to the annually recharged volume should not exceed 0.69. In the water year 2003-04 where the ratio is equal to 0.52, the water table raised up (about 0.48 m) while the groundwater level significantly declined (about 1.54 m) over the water year 2007-08 where the ratio of the annual groundwater withdrawal to the annually recharged volume (i.e., 2.76) is larger than 0.69.

  4. A performance measurement using balanced scorecard and structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosha Makvandi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, balanced scorecard (BSC has been widely used as a promising method for performance measurement. BSC studies organizations in terms of four perspectives including customer, internal processes, learning and growth and financial figures. This paper presents a hybrid of BSC and structural equation modeling (SEM to measure the performance of an Iranian university in province of Alborz, Iran. The proposed study of this paper uses this conceptual method, designs a questionnaire and distributes it among some university students and professors. Using SEM technique, the survey analyzes the data and the results indicate that the university did poorly in terms of all four perspectives. The survey extracts necessary target improvement by presenting necessary attributes for performance improvement.

  5. Modeling and analysis of linear hyperbolic systems of balance laws

    CERN Document Server

    Bartecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This monograph focuses on the mathematical modeling of distributed param