WorldWideScience

Sample records for water act section

  1. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Clean Water Act Section 404 and Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and EPA have longstanding programs to promote water quality and broader environmental goals identified in both the Agriculture Act of 2014 and the Clean Water Act.

  3. California's 2002 Clean Water Act Section 303(d) - Impaired Waterbodies

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset contains California's 2002 Clean Water Act Section 303(d) list which is submitted by the California State Water Resources Control Board. The layer has...

  4. Comparing Clean Water Act Section 316(b Policy Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kadvany

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a comparative framework for policy proposals involving fish protection and Section 316(b of the Clean Water Act (CWA. Section 316(b addresses the impingement and entrainment of fish by cooling-water intake structures used principally by steam electric power plants. The framework is motivated by examining the role of adverse environmental impacts (AEIs in the context of Section 316(b decision making. AEI is mentioned in Section 316(b, but not defined. While various AEI options have been proposed over the years, none has been formalized through environmental regulations nor universally accepted. Using a multiple values approach from decision analysis, AEIs are characterized as measurement criteria for ecological impacts. Criteria for evaluating AEI options are identified, including modeling and assessment issues, the characterization of ecological value, regulatory implementation, and the treatment of uncertainty. Motivated by the difficulties in defining AEI once and for all, a framework is introduced to compare options for 316(b decision making. Three simplified policy options are considered, each with a different implicit or explicit AEI approach: (1 a technology-driven rule based on a strict reading of the 316(b regulatory text, and for which any impingement and entrainment count as AEI, (2 a complementary, open-ended risk-assessment process for estimating population effects with AEI characterized on a site-specific basis, and (3 an intermediate position based on proxy measures such as specially constructed definitions of littoral zone, sensitive habitat, or water body type. The first two proposals correspond roughly to responses provided, respectively, by the Riverkeeper environmental organization and the Utility Water Act Group to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA’s proposed 316(b new facilities rule of August 2000; the third example is a simplified form of the EPA’s proposed August 2000 new facilities

  5. 76 FR 20664 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... decree, or settlement agreement required EPA to take action on a list in 2000 (65 FR 17170). Consistent... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... pursuant to Clean Water Act Section 303(d), and request for public comment. Section 303(d) requires...

  6. 76 FR 74057 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... decree, or settlement agreement required EPA to take action on a list in 2000 (65 FR 17170). Consistent... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... pursuant to Clean Water Act Section 303(d), and request for public comment. Section 303(d) requires...

  7. California's 2002 Clean Water Act Section 303(d) - Impaired Streams and Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset contains California's 2002 Clean Water Act Section 303(d) list which is submitted by the California State Water Resources Control Board. The layer has...

  8. 76 FR 62061 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... added by EPA because the applicable numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved....epa.gov/region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm#303dlists , or by writing or calling Ms. Diane Smith...

  9. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  10. 75 FR 69063 - Extension of the Period for Preparation of the Clean Water Act Section 404(c) Final Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Extension of the Period for Preparation of the Clean Water Act Section 404(c) Final Determination... signed a Recommended Determination, under Section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act, recommending withdrawal of the specification embodied in DA Permit No. 199800436-3 (Section 10: Coal River) of...

  11. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  12. A Bibliography of Selected Literature on Indirect Impacts Associated with Clean Water Act Section 404 Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    understory removal in riparian corridors. Water Resources Research 45 (5). http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2008WR007152 Mason, J., C. Moorman, G. Hess , and K...Hydrological Processes 22 (7):987-999. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hyp.6986 Hess , A. J., and P. A. Johnson. 2001. A systematic analysis of the constraints to...of the American Water Resources Association 38 (1):69-78. Ervin, G. N., B. D. Herman , J. T. Bried, and D. C. Holly. 2006. Evaluating non-native

  13. Use of Equivalent Loss Models Under Section 316(b of the Clean Water Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Dey

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent loss models encompass a variety of life table-based approaches that can be used to convert age- and life stage-specific estimates of entrainment and impingement loss to a common, easily understood currency. This common currency can be expressed in terms of numbers of individuals, yield to the fishery, or biomass to the ecosystem. These models have at least two key uses in the Section 316(b assessment process: screening for adverse environmental impact (AEI and determination of environmental benefits associated with intake alternatives. This paper reviews the various forms of equivalent loss models, their data input requirements, and their assumptions and limitations. In addition, it describes how these models can be used as a second-level screening tool as part of the assessment of the potential for AEI. Given their relative simplicity and ease of use, equivalent loss models should prove to be an important tool in the arsenal of impact assessment methods for Section 316(b.

  14. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into U.S. waters and regulating quality standards for surface...

  15. Opportunities for Energy Development in Water Conduits: A Report Prepared in Response to Section 7 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Michael J. [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Bishop, Norman A. [Knight Piesold, Chicago, IL (United States); Reiser, Sonya L. [Knight Piesold, Chicago, IL (United States); Johnson, Kurt [Telluride Energy LLC, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Bailey, Andrea C. [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Frank, Anthony [BCS, Incorporated, Laurel, MD (United States); Smith, Brennan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2014-09-01

    In Section 7 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act (HREA) of 2013 (P.L. 113-23), Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare an analysis of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States and to present case studies that describe the potential energy generation from these types of hydropower projects. Those analyses have been included in a new DOE report to Congress, and this ORNL/TM provides additional technical details supporting that report. Conduit hydropower offers important new ways to enhance renewable energy portfolios in the United States, as well as to increase the energy efficiency of water delivery systems. Conduit hydropower projects are constructed on existing water-conveyance structures, such as irrigation canals or pressurized pipelines that deliver water to municipalities, industry, or agricultural water users. Although water conveyance infrastructures are usually designed for non-power purposes, new renewable energy can often be harvested from them without affecting their original purpose and without the need to construct new dams or diversions. Conduit hydropower differs from more conventional hydropower development in that it is generally not located on natural rivers or waterways and therefore does not involve the types of environmental impacts that are associated with hydropower. The addition of hydropower to existing water conduits can provide valuable new revenue sources from clean, renewable energy. The new energy can be used within the existing water distribution systems to offset other energy demands, or it can be sold into regional transmission systems.

  16. 75 FR 2860 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... water quality impairments. The results of this watershed model may be used to develop one or more total... quality assurance and quality control documentation. All data submissions should be provided in an... water quality related data and information that may be relevant to the development of the Illinois...

  17. Energy technology scenarios for use in water resources assessments under Section 13a of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    This document presents two estimates of future growth of emerging energy technology in the years 1985, 1990, and 2000 to be used as a basis for conducting Water Resources Council assessments as required by the Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act of 1974. The two scenarios are called the high world oil price (HWOP) and low world oil price (LWOP) cases. A national-level summary of the ASA tabulations is shown in Appendix A; the scenarios are presented at the ASA level of detail in Appendix B. The two scenarios were generally derived from assumptions of the Second National Energy Plant (NEP II), including estimates of high and low world oil price cases, growth rate of GNP, and related economic parameters. The overall national energy growth inherent in these assumptions was expressed as a detailed projection of various energy fuel cycles through use of the Fossil-2 model and regionalized through use of the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS). These scenarios are for the use of regional analysts in examining the availability of water for and the potential impacts of future growth of emerging energy technology in selected river basins of the Nation, as required by Section 13(a).

  18. 77 FR 15368 - Clean Water Act; Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act; Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... segments and associated pollutants in Oregon to be listed pursuant to section 303(d)(2) of the Clean Water... INFORMATION: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) (hereinafter referred to as ``Section...

  19. 77 FR 54909 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... certain water quality limited waters and the associated pollutant to be listed pursuant to the Clean Water... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that each state identify...

  20. 78 FR 20912 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice and initial request for public input. SUMMARY: The Clean Water Act requires that States... Richardson at (215) 814-5675. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires...

  1. ECOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF PROPOSED DISCHARGE OF DREDGED MATERIAL INTO OCEAN WATERS; IMPLEMENTATION MANUAL FOR SECTION 103 OF PUBLIC LAW 92-532 (MARINE PROTECTION, RESEARCH, AND SANCTUARIES ACT OF 1972)

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to Section 103 of Public Law 92-532 (Marine Protection ,Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972), any proposed dumping of dredged material into ocean waters must be evaluated through the use of criteria published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) i n the Federa...

  2. 78 FR 27233 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... decree, or settlement agreement required EPA to take action on a list in 2000 (65 FR 17170). Consistent... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Clean Water Act Section 303(d), and request for public comment. Section 303(d) requires that...

  3. 78 FR 45925 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that each state identify...

  4. 40 CFR 2.302 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Clean Water Act. 2.302 Section 2.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq. (2)(i) Effluent data...

  5. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  6. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  7. Section 294 of the Children's Act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    amounts to discrimination on the basis of disability, which then constitutes unfair discrimination. .... refuse to hand over the child upon birth, the author cannot submit that the inclusion of section. 294, and the ..... Pillay and Zaal97 suggest that a specialist body review applications before court .... Labour" 2013 SAJHR 496-514 ...

  8. 40 CFR 131.36 - Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration—the water quality criteria to protect against acute effects in aquatic life and is the highest... total hardness of 100 mg/L and a water effect ratio of 1.0. f. Freshwater aquatic life criteria for... quality criteria to protect against chronic effects in aquatic life is the highest instream concentration...

  9. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Section 18 Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Section 18 of Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) authorizes EPA to allow an unregistered use of a pesticide for a limited time if EPA...

  10. 75 FR 13537 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Notice of Call for Public Comment on 303(d) Program and Ocean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... and Territories in their development, adoption, and implementation of coral reef biocriteria in their respective water quality standards. EPA supported the development of the Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output (COMBO) model to project the effects of climate change on coral reefs by calculating impacts from...

  11. 18 CFR 16.18 - Annual licenses for projects subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual licenses for projects subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act. 16.18 Section 16.18 Conservation of Power... Projects Subject to Sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.18 Annual licenses for...

  12. 40 CFR 2.304 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Safe Drinking Water Act. 2.304 Section 2.304 Protection of Environment... Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Safe Drinking Water Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et seq....

  13. Assessed Clean Water Act 305(b) Water Sources of Impairment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Identifies the sources of impairment for assessed waters under the Clean Water Act 305(b) program. This view can be used for viewing the details at the assessment...

  14. 76 FR 72973 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act Notice is hereby... ``Fort Gay'') for permanent injunctive relief and civil penalties under the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251-387; the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f-300j-26; the West Virginia Water...

  15. Lakes in Iowa Listed as Impaired in 2010 Under the Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, states are required from "time to time" to submit a list of waters for which effluent limits will not be sufficient to...

  16. Streams in Iowa Listed as Impaired in 2010 Under the Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, states are required from "time to time" to submit a list of waters for which effluent limits will not be sufficient to...

  17. 78 FR 19261 - Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Program; Designation of Bainbridge Island, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... AGENCY Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Program; Designation of Bainbridge Island, Washington.... SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Section 1424(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the... Aquifer System located in Kitsap County, Washington is the sole or principle source of drinking water...

  18. UTILIZING INFORMATION COLLECTED UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Water Act was established to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters". Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency collects information from each state regarding the intended ...

  19. 3 CFR - Designation of Officers of the United States Section, International Boundary and Water Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico To Act as the Commissioner of the United... Designation of Officers of the United States Section, International Boundary and Water Commission, United... of the United States Section, International Boundary and Water Commission, United......

  20. 29 CFR 785.50 - Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.50 Section 785.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Provisions § 785.50 Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. Section 4 of this Act provides that: (a) Except...

  1. 40 CFR 23.7 - Timing of Administrator's action under Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Safe Drinking Water Act. 23.7 Section 23.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Drinking Water Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly provides in a particular...

  2. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  3. 29 CFR 4.160 - Effect of section 6(e) of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effect of section 6(e) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 4... Compensation Standards § 4.160 Effect of section 6(e) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Contractors and... the general minimum wage standard provided in section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as...

  4. 77 FR 61027 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act at mobile home parks operated by defendants in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. The defendants treat sewage and provide drinking water at a number of its mobile... about drinking water problems. The Consent Decree requires payment of a civil penalty of...

  5. Risk Management Programs under Clean Air Act Section 112(r): Guidance for Implementing Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accidental release prevention programs under section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) are related to and build on activities under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

  6. 17 CFR 230.146 - Rules under section 18 of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rules under section 18 of the Act. 230.146 Section 230.146 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION...) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(12)) as in effect on the date of adoption of this section...

  7. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  8. 28 CFR 55.22 - Requirements of section 5 of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements of section 5 of the Act. 55.22 Section 55.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Preclearance § 55.22 Requirements...

  9. 75 FR 28848 - Determination and Certification Under Section 40a of the Arms Export Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination and Certification Under Section 40a of the Arms Export Control Act Pursuant to section 40A of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2781), and Executive Order 11958, as amended, I hereby determine...

  10. 29 CFR 785.26 - Section 3(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Section 3(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 785.26 Section 785.26 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.26 Section 3(o) of the Fair Labor Standards...

  11. 78 FR 13222 - Procedures for the Handling of Retaliation Complaints Under Section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... the Affordable Care Act, which added section 18C of the Fair Labor Standards Act, to provide... goals, the Affordable Care Act's section 1558 amended the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to add section... Fair Labor Standards, the failure to serve copies of the objections on the other parties of record does...

  12. 75 FR 34983 - Order (1) Pursuant to Section 4(c) of the Commodity Exchange Act, Permitting the Kansas City...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Order (1) Pursuant to Section 4(c) of the Commodity Exchange Act, Permitting the Kansas City Board... Section 4d of the Commodity Exchange Act, Permitting Customer Positions in Such Cleared-Only Swaps and.... Authority for granting this request is found in section 4(c) of the Commodity Exchange Act (Act).\\1\\ The...

  13. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... upon the legislative history, stated that the problem of a reactor accident in the United States... Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2... caused outside the United States by a nuclear incident occurring within the United States. (b)...

  14. Section 10: Ground Water - Waste Characteristics & Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRS Training. The waste characteristics factor category in the ground water pathway is made up of two components: the toxicity/mobility of the most hazardous substance associated with the site and the hazardous waste quantity at the site.

  15. Section 9: Ground Water - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRS training. the ground water pathway likelihood of release factor category reflects the likelihood that there has been, or will be, a release of hazardous substances in any of the aquifers underlying the site.

  16. Section 609 of the Clean Air Act: Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet provides a general overview of EPA regulations under Section 609 of the Clean Air Act, which is focused on preventing the release of refrigerants during the servicing of motor vehicle air-conditioning systems and similar appliances.

  17. 75 FR 43797 - Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 1264 of the Victims of Iranian Censorship Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Victims of Iranian Censorship Act (Public Law 111-84, Subtitle D of the National Defense Authorization Act... President by section 1264 of the Victims of Iranian Censorship Act (Public Law 111-84, subtitle D) to...

  18. 75 FR 11560 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act Notice is hereby given that... violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq....

  19. Legal financial institutions in the Water Law Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Borodo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some fees and payments are connected with obligatory participation in the cost of public projects and public investment. In the framework of the Water Law Act there are diverse public payments and fees. In this law there is the drainage fee and the investment fee. There are also contributions and other payments to the water companies. In the regulations of the Water Law Act there are also legal financial solutions for sharing the public costs, the use of budget subsidies, fixing and allocation of public expenditure.

  20. 75 FR 75855 - Presidential Determination With Respect To Section 404(c) of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Respect To Section 404(c) of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008 Memorandum for the Secretary of... of America, pursuant to section 404(c) of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008 (CSPA), title IV...

  1. 12 CFR 347.214 - Branch established under section 5 of the International Banking Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Branch established under section 5 of the International Banking Act. 347.214 Section 347.214 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING Foreign Banks § 347.214 Branch established...

  2. 21 CFR 860.95 - Exemptions from sections 510, 519, and 520(f) of the act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemptions from sections 510, 519, and 520(f) of the act. 860.95 Section 860.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification §...

  3. 16 CFR 1500.213 - Presentation of views under section 7 of the act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presentation of views under section 7 of the... REGULATIONS § 1500.213 Presentation of views under section 7 of the act. (a) Presentation of views under..., such guaranty or undertaking, or a verified copy thereof, shall be made a part of such presentation...

  4. 78 FR 78159 - Delegation of Authority Under Section 506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Section 506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as Amended Presidential Determination No. 2014-05... Defense Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act #0; #0; #0... Authority Under Section 506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as Amended Memorandum for...

  5. Microbiological water methods: quality control measures for Federal Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act regulatory compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Patsy; Hunt, Margo; Fjeld, Karla; Kundrat, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) data are required in order to have confidence in the results from analytical tests and the equipment used to produce those results. Some AOAC water methods include specific QA/QC procedures, frequencies, and acceptance criteria, but these are considered to be the minimum controls needed to perform a microbiological method successfully. Some regulatory programs, such as those at Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 136.7 for chemistry methods, require additional QA/QC measures beyond those listed in the method, which can also apply to microbiological methods. Essential QA/QC measures include sterility checks, reagent specificity and sensitivity checks, assessment of each analyst's capabilities, analysis of blind check samples, and evaluation of the presence of laboratory contamination and instrument calibration and checks. The details of these procedures, their performance frequency, and expected results are set out in this report as they apply to microbiological methods. The specific regulatory requirements of CFR Title 40 Part 136.7 for the Clean Water Act, the laboratory certification requirements of CFR Title 40 Part 141 for the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the International Organization for Standardization 17025 accreditation requirements under The NELAC Institute are also discussed.

  6. 75 FR 34434 - Request To Amend an Existing Order Under Section 4(c) of the Commodity Exchange Act Permitting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Request To Amend an Existing Order Under Section 4(c) of the Commodity Exchange Act Permitting...) of the Commodity Exchange Act (``Act'') \\1\\ to certain over-the-counter (``OTC'') agricultural swaps... Commodity Exchange Act (``Act'') and subject to the conditions below, hereby: (a) Permits eligible swap...

  7. Clean Water Act 303(d) Listed Impaired Waters and their Causes of Impairment from All Years

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Waters identified as impaired as well as their associated causes of impairment from all approved Clean Water Act 303(d) lists submitted by the states. Includes all...

  8. Learn About the Water Pollution Control (Section 106) Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under CWA Section 106, EPA is authorized to provide grants to states, eligible interstate agencies, and eligible tribes to establish and administer programs, including enforcement programs,for the prevention, reduction, and elimination of water pollution.

  9. 77 FR 33945 - Delegation of Reporting Functions Specified in Section 8 of the Belarus Democracy Act of 2004, as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... the Belarus Democracy Act of 2004, as Amended Memorandum for the Secretary of State By the authority... conferred upon the President by section 8 of the Belarus Democracy Act of 2004 (Public Law 109-480; 22 U.S.C. 5811 note), as amended by section 5 of the Belarus Democracy and Human Rights Act of 2011 (Public...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.88 - Exemptions from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for certain electronic devices. 1500.88 Section 1500.88 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT... from lead limits under section 101 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act for...

  11. Section 136 of the Mental Health Act: a new literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschmann, R D; Gillard, S; Turner, K; Chambers, M; O'Brien, A

    2010-01-01

    Section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (amended) provides police officers in the United Kingdom with the authority to remove individuals who appear to be suffering from a mental illness from any public place to a designated 'place of safety' for appropriate assessment. A considerable amount of research has been dedicated to investigate who is detained under this section and how it is implemented. A review of the literature revealed a high prevalence of schizophrenia, personality disorders and mania in individuals detained under Section 136 and an over-representation of black detainees. Several studies also reported poor communication between different agencies and poor levels of knowledge regarding the implementation of the section. There is a lack of qualitative research exploring detainee and professional experience of Section 136 and in particular the patient pathway to mental health care via Section 136 experienced by black detainees. Implications for clinical practice, multi-agency collaboration and future research are discussed.

  12. Admission of Handicapped Students into Pharmacy Schools under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, Richard R.; Iovacchini, Eric V.

    1980-01-01

    The 1977 regulations and the case law interpreting Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are explored as both pertain to postsecondary educational programs with particular application to pharmacy schools. Some court cases involving deaf students are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  13. 76 FR 73989 - Redelegation of Administrative Authority Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Redelegation of Administrative Authority Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act...: Notice of redelegation of authority. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) supersedes all prior redelegations of authority made within the Office...

  14. 76 FR 10527 - Regulatory Flexibility Act: Section 610 Review of National Organic Program Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 Regulatory Flexibility Act: Section 610 Review of National Organic Program Regulations AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Review and request for... regulations implementing the National Organic Program (NOP) were published December 21, 2000 (65 FR...

  15. 26 CFR 303.1 - Statutory provisions; section 36, Trading With the Enemy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... effectuate this section. Statutes of limitations on assessment, collection, refund, or credit of Federal... assessment; and also any interest, penalty, additional amount, or addition thereto not arising from any act, omission, neglect, failure, or delay on the part of the Custodian. (e) Any tax exemption accorded to...

  16. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND PERSONAL LIABILITY IN TERMS OF SECTION 424(1 OF THE COMPANIES ACT OR SECTION 64(1 OF THE CLOSE CORPORATIONS ACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Basson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: TThe author poses the question: "In knowingly becoming a party to the conducting of corporate business, within which boundaries must I operate so as not to become personally liable for all or any of such debts or other liabilities of the corporation as the Court may direct in terms of section 424(1 of the Companies Act 61 of 1973 or section 64(1 of the Close Corporations Act 69 of 1984?"
    The answer to this question may prove to be of paramount importance to members of the scientific and engineering fraternity who become involved in corporate governance, whether in a technology advisory capacity, in a managerial capacity, or otherwise.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die outeur stel die volgende vraag: "Indien ek wetens as 'n party betrokke raak by die bedryfvan 'n maatskappy, binne welke grense moet ek optree om persoonlike aanspreeklikheid te vermy vir al of enige van die skulde of ander verpligtinge van die maatskappy soos die Hof mag gelas ingevolge artikel 424(1 van die Maatskappywet, No. 61 van 1973 of artikel 64(1 van die Wet op Beslote Korporasies, No. 69 van 1984?"
    Die antwoord op hierdie vraag mag van groot belang wees vir lede van die wetenskap- en ingenieursberoepe wat op die een of ander manier betrokke raak by die bedryf van ' n maatskappy, hetsy in 'n tegnologie-adviserende hoedanigheid, in 'n bestuurshoedanigheid ofandersins.

  17. Section 5(4) (nurse's holding power) of the Mental Health Act 1983: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, R

    2015-04-01

    Section 5(4) (nurse's holding power) of the Mental Health Act 1983 permits nurses of the 'prescribed class' to detain an informal inpatient. The patient must already be receiving treatment for mental disorder. The section lasts for up to 6 h. Section 5(4) is over 30 years old; however, there is relatively little literature exploring its use. Existing literature has limited itself to surveys and audits investigating: nurses' opinions of Section 5(4); nurses' knowledge of Section 5(4); and trends associated with the implementation of Section 5(4). The literature review suggests that what is known about the implementation of Section 5(4) is incomplete. For example, there are no accounts of how and why the holding power is implemented from both a nursing and patient perspective. Section 5(4) (nurse's holding power) of the Mental Health Act 1983 in England and Wales accounts for 10% (n = 1714) of all detentions after admission to hospital. It is followed by further detention in 66% of cases and may require nurses to restrain, seclude or closely observe the patient to prevent them harming themselves and/or others. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning the implementation of Section 5(4), a literature search was undertaken in ASSIA, British Nursing Index, Medline, PsycINFO and Lawtel, using a combination of the keywords 'Section 5(4)', 'nurse's holding powers', 'holding powers', 'Mental Health Act 1983', 'MHA', 'compulsory detention', 'formal detention', 'emergency psychiatric interventions', 'containment interventions' and 'involuntary commitment'. Twenty-five articles were included in the review. Existing literature has focused on surveys and audits investigating: nurses' opinions of Section 5(4); nurses' knowledge of Section 5(4); and trends associated with the implementation of Section 5(4). While this literature has provided some insights into the implementation of Section 5(4), it is clear that what is known about its use is incomplete

  18. 76 FR 79023 - Determinations Under Section 1106(a) of the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988Russian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... and Competitiveness Act of 1988--Russian Federation Memorandum for the United States Trade Representative Pursuant to section 1106(a) of the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 (19 U.S.C....

  19. 29 CFR 2700.22 - Notice of contest of imminent danger withdrawal orders under section 107 of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of contest of imminent danger withdrawal orders under section 107 of the Act. 2700.22 Section 2700.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued....22 Notice of contest of imminent danger withdrawal orders under section 107 of the Act. (a) Time...

  20. 29 CFR 785.5 - General requirements of sections 6 and 7 of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Fair Labor Standards Act. Section 6 requires the payment of a minimum wage by an employer to his... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements of sections 6 and 7 of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 785.5 Section 785.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION...

  1. 75 FR 43554 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (“Clean Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (``Clean Water Act... Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 and 1318, at thirteen of its facilities in Massachusetts by discharging pollutants in storm water associated with construction activity without a permit, failing to timely ]...

  2. Water assessment report: Section 13 (c); Great Plains gasification project, Mercer County, ND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Water Resources Council is completing a water assessment of synfuels development in the Upper Missouri River Basin. This is being done under Section 13(a) of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act. The assessment area includes the coal deposits in the Mercer County project site. Levels of North Dakota coal gasification development that are several times the production level of the Great Plains gasification project are being examined. This report assesses: (1) the availability of adequate water supplies to meet the water requirements of the project, supporting activities, and other development induced by the project; and (2) the changes in the water resources that will result from the project. Findings of the 13(a) assessment show that water supplies are physically available within the mainstem of the Missouri River in North Dakota to supply the requirements of the gasification facilities and the supporting activities - mining and reclamation, electricity, and project-induced population increases.

  3. Water quality modeling in the dead end sections of drinking water (Supplement)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dead-end sections of drinking water distribution networks are known to be problematic zones in terms of water quality degradation. Extended residence time due to...

  4. 2 CFR 176.190 - Award term-Wage rate requirements under Section 1606 of the Recovery Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... THAT INCLUDE FUNDS UNDER THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009, PUBLIC LAW 111-5 Wage Rate... rate requirements under Section 1606 of the Recovery Act. When issuing announcements or requesting... to the Recovery Act shall be paid wages at rates not less than those prevailing on projects of...

  5. 75 FR 56833 - Notice of Waivers Granted Under Section 9401 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Education Notice of Waivers Granted Under Section 9401 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965... Secondary Education Act of 1965, as Amended SUMMARY: In this notice, we announce the waivers that the U.S... 9401 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). We also announce...

  6. 78 FR 14939 - American Jobs Creation Act Modifications to Section 6708, Failure To Maintain List of Advisees...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BF39 American Jobs Creation Act Modifications to Section...)(1). These proposed regulations reflect changes to section 6708 made by the American Jobs Creation...,000. The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, Public Law 108-357, 118 Stat. 1418 (AJCA), was enacted...

  7. 75 FR 33205 - Revision of the Procedures for the Administration of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Parts 0 and 51 Revision of the Procedures for the Administration of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act AGENCY: Civil Rights Division, Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The... Administration of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.'' The proposed amendments are designed to...

  8. 75 FR 55393 - Determination Under Section 1010(a) of the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2010 (Pub. L. 111-212)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination Under Section 1010(a) of the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2010 (Pub. L. 111-212) Pursuant to section 1010(a) of the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2010 (Pub. L. 111-212) and the authority vested...

  9. 77 FR 68768 - Electricity Market Transparency Provisions of Section 220 of the Federal Power Act; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RM10-12-000] Electricity Market Transparency Provisions of Section 220 of the Federal Power Act; Notice of Technical Conference...., Washington, DC 20426. \\1\\ Electricity Market Transparency Provisions of Section 220 of the Federal Power Act...

  10. 77 FR 77178 - 2013 Special 301 Review: Identification of Countries Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... regarding actions of Canada affecting U.S. cultural industries. Section 182 requires the Trade Representative to identify any act, policy or practice of Canada that affects cultural industries, is adopted or... Agreement (NAFTA). Section 182 requires the Trade Representative to identify any such acts, policies or...

  11. 17 CFR 240.15d-22 - Reporting regarding asset-backed securities under section 15(d) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Issuers from Section 15(d) of the Act § 240.15d-22 Reporting regarding asset-backed securities under section 15(d) of the Act. (a) With respect to an offering of asset-backed securities registered pursuant... statement. (b) Regarding any class of asset-backed securities in a takedown off of a registration statement...

  12. 78 FR 21414 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... Water Management Plans (Criteria). For the purpose of this announcement, Water Management Plans...

  13. Water Quality Modeling in the Dead End Sections of Drinking Water Distribution Networks -journal article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dead-end sections of drinking water distribution networks are known to be problematic zones in terms of water quality degradation. Extended residence time due to water stagnation leads to rapid reduction of disinfectant residuals allowing the regrowth of microbial pathogens. Wate...

  14. 75 FR 22203 - Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 1265 of the National Defense Authorization Act for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Functions Under Section 1265 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 Memorandum for... the United States, including section 301 of title 3, United States Code, I hereby delegate to you the functions and authority conferred upon the President by section 1265 of the National Defense...

  15. 76 FR 66892 - Notice of Implementation of Determination Under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... International Trade Administration Notice of Implementation of Determination Under Section 129 of the Uruguay... under section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (``URAA'') to implement the findings of the World... issued the memorandum entitled ``Preliminary Results Under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round...

  16. 75 FR 48940 - Notice of Implementation of Determination Under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... International Trade Administration Notice of Implementation of Determination Under Section 129 of the Uruguay... Commerce (the Department) to implement its determination under section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements... Section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act: Antidumping Measures on Polyethylene Retail Carrier...

  17. 78 FR 73206 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act On November 23, 2013 the... requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act and the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (``NPDWRs...-142-F. The action concerns the public water system the defendant, Bryan Pownall (``Defendant'')...

  18. 40 CFR 40.140-3 - Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Water Pollution Control Act. 40... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.140-3 Federal Water Pollution Control Act. (a... such safe water and such elimination or control of water pollution for all native villages in the...

  19. 75 FR 38538 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... 1982, the Bureau of Reclamation developed and published the Criteria for Evaluating Water...

  20. 75 FR 70020 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... Bureau of Reclamation developed and published the Criteria for Evaluating Water Management...

  1. 77 FR 33240 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... Bureau of Reclamation developed and published the Criteria for Evaluating Water Management...

  2. 76 FR 54251 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... Management Plans (Criteria). For the purpose of this announcement, Water Management Plans (Plans)...

  3. 76 FR 12756 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... published the Criteria for Evaluating Water Management Plans (Criteria). For the purpose of...

  4. 3 CFR - Presidential Determination Under Section 402 (c)(2)(A) of the Trade Act of 1974-Republic of Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...)(A) of the Trade Act of 1974-Republic of Belarus Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents...) of the Trade Act of 1974—Republic of Belarus Memorandum for the Secretary of State Pursuant to... with respect to Belarus will substantially promote the objectives of section 402. You are...

  5. 78 FR 40220 - Order Pursuant to Section 17A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Granting Exemption From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... 2007 as a private limited company, ICE Clear Europe is subject to supervision by the Bank of England as... Clearing Agency Registration Requirement Under Section 17A(b) of the Exchange Act for ICE Clear Europe... Exchange Act, 15 U.S.C. 78q- 1(b)(1). ICE Clear Europe Limited (``ICE Clear Europe'') is an...

  6. 78 FR 72131 - Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940... Investment Company Act of 1940 for the month of November. A copy of each application may be obtained via...

  7. 76 FR 62469 - Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Corp., investment adviser for the acquiring fund, and Hartford Investment Financial Services, LLC... COMMISSION Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940... Investment Company Act of 1940 for the month of September 2011. A copy of each application may be obtained...

  8. [Treatment of vertebrates according to Section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormuth, H J

    1992-01-01

    Relating to Section 4 of the Animal Protection Act "Operations on animals", general principles and arguments of the animal protection law are demonstrated; questions about painfulness and necessity of operations on vertebrates are discussed considering the recent states of knowledge and practice. Problems mainly relate to the sensation of pain in juvenile animals during operations without anaesthesia, and to castration and amputation (tails, horns, beaks, combs/wattles, teeth) as well as to destruction or removal of tissues (notching or perforation of ears) in various animal species. Finally, it is recommended to question the indispensability of operations both continuously and more frequently, and to anaesthetize young animals for specified operations despite the legal possibility to dispense from anaesthesia.

  9. 75 FR 12569 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act Pursuant to 28 CFR 50.7, notice is... Safe Drinking Water Act (``SDWA''), 42 U.S.C. 300G-3(b), based upon Evenhouse's alleged violations of the SDWA and regulations thereunder at two separate community water systems serving the...

  10. 78 FR 61867 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... Safe Drinking Water Act On September 26, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent... pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 300g-3,300i of the Safe Drinking Water Act (``SDWA'') for violations at five public... operation of the PMU to ensure proper operation of the drinking water systems on the Reservation....

  11. 77 FR 40382 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act Notice is hereby given that on June 29... the Safe Drinking Water Act (``SDWA''), 42 U.S.C. 300f through 300j-26, including violations of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (``NPDWRs''), at Lincoln Road RV Park, Inc.'s...

  12. 78 FR 28242 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act On May 7, 2013, the... Ramos and Carmen Aurea Fernandez Ramos for violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and the Surface Water Treatment Rule, promulgated under the SDWA. Under the terms of the consent decree,...

  13. 78 FR 44599 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On July 18, 2013, the Department of... civil penalties under the Clean Water Act (``CWA''), 33 U.S.C. 1251-1387, resulting from unauthorized discharges of flowback fluid and produced fluid into waters of the United States from tanks and...

  14. 40 CFR 40.145-2 - Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Water Pollution Control Act. 40... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.145-2 Federal Water Pollution Control Act. (a... or control of acid or other mine water pollution; and (2) That the State shall provide legal...

  15. 75 FR 60452 - Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Water... standards under the Clean Water Act (CWA). Interested persons may submit comments on this intended...

  16. 19 CFR 206.44a - Special rules for conducting investigations under section 421(b) of the Trade Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 421(b) of the Trade Act. 206.44a Section 206.44a Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS RELATING TO GLOBAL AND BILATERAL SAFEGUARD ACTIONS, MARKET DISRUPTION, TRADE DIVERSION, AND REVIEW OF RELIEF ACTIONS Investigations for Relief From Market...

  17. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of Human Organ Under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of Human Organ Under section 301 of the..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.13 Definition of Human Organ Under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act,...

  18. 19 CFR 206.44 - Contents of a petition under section 421(b) or (o) of the Trade Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contents of a petition under section 421(b) or (o) of the Trade Act. 206.44 Section 206.44 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... the industry are unable to generate adequate capital to finance the modernization of their...

  19. 17 CFR 170.3 - Fair and equitable representation of members (section 17(b)(5) of the Act).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fair and equitable representation of members (section 17(b)(5) of the Act). 170.3 Section 170.3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION REGISTERED FUTURES ASSOCIATIONS Standards Governing Commission Review of Applications for Registration as...

  20. 26 CFR 1.269-7 - Relationship of section 269 to sections 382 and 383 after the Tax Reform Act of 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the principal purpose of an acquisition is the evasion or avoidance of Federal income tax. ... 383 after the Tax Reform Act of 1986. 1.269-7 Section 1.269-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible...

  1. 26 CFR 7.48-3 - Election to apply the amendments made by sections 804 (a) and (b) of the Tax Reform Act of 1976...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1976 § 7.48-3 Election to apply the amendments made by sections 804 (a) and (b) of the Tax Reform Act of 1976 to property... sections 804 (a) and (b) of the Tax Reform Act of 1976 to property described in section 50(a) of the Code...

  2. 29 CFR 536.3 - “Area of production” as used in section 13(b)(14) of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Fair Labor Standards Act. 536.3 Section 536.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND... in section 13(b)(14) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. (a) An employee employed by an establishment... within the “area of production,” within the meaning of section 13(b)(14) of the Fair Labor Standards Act...

  3. 29 CFR 102.83 - Petition for referendum under section 9(e)(1) of the Act; who may file; where to file; withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Petition for referendum under section 9(e)(1) of the Act... NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Procedure for Referendum Under Section 9(e) of the Act § 102.83 Petition for referendum under section 9(e)(1) of the Act; who may file; where to...

  4. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS)

    2011-09-01

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section

  5. 77 FR 61008 - Request for Comments Under the Paperwork Reduction Act, Section 3506

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Carr, Acting Director, Office of Clinical Research and Bioethics Policy, Office of Science Policy, NIH... 28, 2012. Sarah Carr, Acting Director, Office of Clinical Research and Bioethics Policy, Office...

  6. Defending the Absurd: The Iconoclast's Guide to Section 47(1 of the Superior Courts Act 10 of 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen McCreath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution was intended as a defence of section 25(1 of the Supreme Court Act 59 of 1959. However, the Supreme Court Act was repealed in August 2013 and replaced by the Superior Courts Act 10 of 2013, and in the process section 25(1 of the former gave way to section 47(1 of the latter. Both sections concern the doctrine of leave to sue judges in South Africa. Both prescribe that any civil litigation against a judge requires the consent of the court out of which such litigation is to be launched. Both apply to civil suits against judges for damage caused by either their judicial or their non-judicial conduct. Although section 25(1 had been one of the more inconspicuous sections of the Supreme Court Act, it was contested on occasion. Both curial and extra-curial challenges to section 25(1 assailed its constitutionality, alleging essentially that its provisions violated the right of access to courts enshrined in section 34 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and that such violation did not meet the limitation criteria contained in section 36. It may be anticipated with considerable confidence, given its legal continuity with section 25(1, that any serious assault upon section 47(1 of the Superior Courts Act also will focus upon its relationship to section 34 of the Constitution. This contribution is a pre-emptive defence of section 47(1 of the Superior Courts Act and, by extrapolation, a belated justification of section 25(1 of the Supreme Court Act. An attempt will be made to demonstrate, contrary to conventional wisdom, that section 47(1 does not limit section 34 and passes constitutional muster at the first level of enquiry, thereby obviating the need for advancing to the second level of enquiry contained in section 36 of the Constitution. The jurisprudential crux of section 47(1 of the Superior Courts Act is embedded in the nature of the judicial office and its core value of judicial impartiality. The procedural

  7. 78 FR 5800 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... administrative order assessing a civil penalty against any person who has violated applicable emergency planning... AGENCY Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity... resolve violations of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know...

  8. 77 FR 14425 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act Notice is hereby given that on... action the United States sought permanent injunctive relief and civil penalties under the Safe Drinking Water Act (``SDWA''), 42 U.S.C. 300f-300j-26, resulting from violations of the National Primary...

  9. 76 FR 19128 - Notice of Lodging of Stipulation of Judgment Pursuant to Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... of Lodging of Stipulation of Judgment Pursuant to Safe Drinking Water Act Notice is hereby given that... United States (on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency), for violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act and the implementing regulations, 42 U.S.C. 300h, et seq., and the implementing...

  10. 78 FR 65385 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Safe Drinking Water Act On Wednesday, October 23... Drinking Water Act (``SDWA''), Newfield Production Company (``Newfield'') will pay a civil penalty of...

  11. 75 FR 82072 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... discharges from its combined sewer overflows (``CSOs'') violate the Clean Water Act because the discharge of... States and the State of Ohio v. Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District, Civil Action No. 10-cv-02895 was... Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., in connection with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer...

  12. 75 FR 67088 - Clean Water Act (CWA) and Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) Common...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... expected to have deleterious effects on aquatic life or human health. Water quality criteria developed... tribes adopt water quality criteria to support designated uses (e.g., aquatic life, public water supply... whether pesticides represent a concern for aquatic life, for example, based on water monitoring results...

  13. 77 FR 44672 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water and Clean Air Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water and Clean Air Acts Notice is hereby given that on... resolve its violations of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. The Allegheny County Health... the Clean Water Act, Plaintiffs allege that Shenango violated the effluent limitations in the...

  14. 76 FR 58840 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act; Refuge Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act; Refuge Water Management Plans AGENCY... Refuge Water Management Plans (Refuge Criteria). Several entities have each developed a Refuge Water...) 978-5281 (TDD 978-5608). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following Refuge Water Management Plans...

  15. Procedures for the Handling of Retaliation Complaints Under Section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-13

    This document provides the final text of regulations governing employee protection (retaliation or whistleblower) claims under section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act, which added section 18C to the Fair Labor Standards Act to provide protections to employees who may have been subject to retaliation for seeking assistance under certain affordability assistance provisions (for example, health insurance premium tax credits) or for reporting potential violations of the Affordable Care Act's consumer protections (for example, the prohibition on rescissions). An interim final rule (IFR) governing these provisions and request for comments was published in the Federal Register on February 27, 2013. Thirteen comments were received; eleven were responsive to the IFR. This rule responds to those comments and establishes the final procedures and time frames for the handling of retaliation complaints under section 18C, including procedures and time frames for employee complaints to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), investigations by OSHA, appeals of OSHA determinations to an administrative law judge (ALJ) for a hearing de novo, hearings by ALJs, review of ALJ decisions by the Administrative Review Board (ARB) (acting on behalf of the Secretary of Labor), and judicial review of the Secretary of Labor's (Secretary's) final decision. It also sets forth the Secretary's interpretations of the Affordable Care Act whistleblower provision on certain matters.

  16. 17 CFR 230.191 - Definition of “issuer” in section 2(a)(4) of the Act in relation to asset-backed securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 2(a)(4) of the Act in relation to asset-backed securities. 230.191 Section 230.191 Commodity and... securities. The following applies with respect to asset-backed securities under the Act. Terms used in this... depositor for the asset-backed securities acting solely in its capacity as depositor to the issuing entity...

  17. 77 FR 28741 - The Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA): Changes to the Section 8 Tenant-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... this rule that will meet HUD's objectives as described in this preamble. Environmental Impact A Finding... May 15, 2012 Part IV Department of Housing and Urban Development 24 CFR Parts 5, 982, and 983 The Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA): Changes to the Section 8 Tenant-Based Voucher...

  18. 19 CFR 206.43 - Contents of a petition under section 406(a) of the Trade Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Trade Act. 206.43 Section 206.43 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS RELATING TO GLOBAL AND BILATERAL SAFEGUARD ACTIONS, MARKET DISRUPTION, TRADE DIVERSION, AND REVIEW OF RELIEF ACTIONS Investigations for Relief From Market Disruption...

  19. 78 FR 38872 - American Jobs Creation Act Modifications to Section 6708, Failure To Maintain List of Advisees...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BF39 American Jobs Creation Act Modifications to Section 6708, Failure To Maintain List of Advisees With Respect to Reportable Transactions;...

  20. 76 FR 14419 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and...(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(3)(B)(i), as amended, as.... Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), in consultation with U.S. Immigration and Customs...

  1. 76 FR 14418 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and...(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(3)(B)(i), as amended, as... determination will be made by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), in consultation with...

  2. 77 FR 41795 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and...(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and ] Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(3)(B)(i), as amended.... Implementation of this determination will be made by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS),...

  3. 75 FR 80066 - Technical Suitability of Products Program Section 521 of the National Housing Act; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... materials and products to be used in structures approved for mortgages insured under the National Housing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Technical Suitability of Products Program Section 521 of the National Housing Act...

  4. 8 CFR 1245.3 - Adjustment of status under section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... whose status may be adjusted under section 13, any alien who is prima facie eligible for adjustment of...)(15)(G)(ii) of the Immigration and Nationality Act who performed diplomatic or semi-diplomatic duties... duties were of a custodial, clerical, or menial nature, and members of their immediate families, are...

  5. Section 7033 of the America COMPETES Act: Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    On March 1, 2009 from 2 pm to 5 pm at the Madison Hotel in Washington, DC, the National Science Foundation hosted a listening session, requesting input on Section 7033 of the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act regarding Hispanic-serving institutions and science,…

  6. 76 FR 81555 - 2012 Special 301 Review: Identification of Countries Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... special attention. Section 182 contains a special rule regarding actions of Canada affecting United States cultural industries. The USTR must identify any act, policy or practice of Canada that affects cultural... American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). USTR must make the above-referenced identifications within 30 days...

  7. 75 FR 82424 - 2011 Special 301 Review: Identification of Countries Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... entities. Section 182 contains a special rule regarding actions of Canada affecting United States cultural industries. The USTR must identify any act, policy or practice of Canada that affects cultural industries, is... Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). USTR must make the above-referenced identifications within 30 days after...

  8. 75 FR 2578 - 2010 Special 301 Review: Identification of Countries Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... entities. Section 182 contains a special rule regarding actions of Canada affecting United States cultural industries. The USTR must identify any act, policy or practice of Canada that affects cultural industries, is... Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). USTR must make the above-referenced identifications within 30 days after...

  9. The South Australian Safe Drinking Water Act: summary of the first year of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froscio, Suzanne M; Bolton, Natalie; Cooke, Renay; Wittholz, Michelle; Cunliffe, David

    2016-06-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 was introduced in South Australia to provide clear direction to drinking water providers on how to achieve water safety. The Act requires drinking water providers to register with SA Health and develop a risk management plan (RMP) for their water supply that includes operational and verification monitoring plans and an incident notification and communication protocol. During the first year of operation, 212 drinking water providers registered under the Act, including one major water utility and a range of small to medium sized providers in regional and remote areas of the State. Information was captured on water source(s) used and water treatment. Rainwater was the most frequently reported drinking water source (66%), followed by bore water (13%), on-supply or carting of mains water (13%), mixed source (rainwater with bore water backup) (6%) and surface water (3%). The majority of providers (91%) treated the water supply, 87% used disinfection. During the first year of operation, 16 water quality incidents were formally reported to SA Health. These included both microbial and chemical incidents. Case studies presented highlight how the RMPs are assisting drinking water providers to identify incidents of potential health concern and implement corrective actions.

  10. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w

  11. Navigating the Clean Water Act: Connectivity and Legal Protection of Aquatic Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, D. M.; Raanan Kiperwas, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Clean Water Act is the principal federal law protecting the integrity of waters in the United States (e.g., rivers, streams, wetlands, lakes). Clean Water Act protection after U.S. Supreme Court decisions in Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County (SWANCC) (2001) and Rapanos (2006) is determined based on case-by-case analyses of connections among waters. Determining a water's status as a "water of the US" protected by the Act typically requires data and analysis of characteristics such as its flow, and biological and chemical relationships with downstream waters. When such data is not available, the Clean Water Act might not protect the quality and integrity of the water in question. This raises a number of legal and technical challenges for implementation, as well as questions regarding underlying aquatic sciences. In addition, many of the terms used by the court are not fully consistent with similar scientific terms, potentially causing confusion among policymakers and scientists alike. This presentation will discuss the Clean Water Act, and how currently its protections for aquatic resources are dependent on connectivity with larger downstream waters, particularly for those that do not flow perennially. The presentation will focus on the role science has played in forming and informing policy making, areas where science and policy may not be fully consistent, areas where research is still needed, and provide a policy "dictionary" for scientists interested in working on this evolving issue.

  12. Invertebrate-Based Water Quality Impairments and Associated Stressors Identified through the US Clean Water Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govenor, Heather; Krometis, Leigh Anne H; Hession, W Cully

    2017-07-01

    Macroinvertebrate community assessment is used in most US states to evaluate stream health under the Clean Water Act. While water quality assessment and impairment determinations are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, there is no national summary of biological assessment findings. The objective of this work was to determine the national extent of invertebrate-based impairments and to identify pollutants primarily responsible for those impairments. Evaluation of state data in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Assessment and Total Maximum Daily Load Tracking and Implementation System database revealed considerable differences in reporting approaches and terminologies including differences in if and how states report specific biological assessment findings. Only 15% of waters impaired for aquatic life could be identified as having impairments determined by biological assessments (e.g., invertebrates, fish, periphyton); approximately one-third of these were associated with macroinvertebrate bioassessment. Nearly 650 invertebrate-impaired waters were identified nationwide, and sediment was the most common pollutant in bedded (63%) and suspended (9%) forms. This finding is not unexpected, given previous work on the negative impacts of sediment on aquatic life, and highlights the need to more specifically identify the mechanisms driving sediment impairments in order to design effective remediation plans. It also reinforces the importance of efforts to derive sediment-specific biological indices and numerical sediment quality guidelines. Standardization of state reporting approaches and terminology would significantly increase the potential application of water quality assessment data, reveal national trends, and encourage sharing of best practices to facilitate the attainment of water quality goals.

  13. 47 CFR 51.807 - Arbitration and mediation of agreements by the Commission pursuant to section 252(e)(5) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration and mediation of agreements by the Commission pursuant to section 252(e)(5) of the Act. 51.807 Section 51.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Implementation of Section 252 of the Act § 51.807 Arbitration and mediation of agreements by the...

  14. 12 CFR 250.408 - Short-term negotiable notes of banks not securities under section 32, Banking Act of 1933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Short-term negotiable notes of banks not securities under section 32, Banking Act of 1933. 250.408 Section 250.408 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE... securities under section 32, Banking Act of 1933. (a) The Board of Governors has been asked whether short...

  15. 76 FR 24187 - Electricity Market Transparency Provisions of Section 220 of the Federal Power Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Commission's jurisdiction under FPA section 205 and have more than a de minimis market presence to file... zone from the contract section; and eliminate the Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) data... require market participants that are excluded from the Commission's jurisdiction under section 205 of...

  16. 77 FR 64544 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... and published the Criteria for Evaluating Water Management Plans (Criteria). For the purpose of...

  17. 75 FR 69698 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Improvement Act, Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The ``Criteria for Developing Refuge Water Management Plans..., or standard, for efficient use of water by Federal Wildlife Refuges, State Wildlife Management...

  18. 78 FR 63491 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The following Water Management Plans are... developed and published the Criteria for Evaluating Water Management Plans (Criteria). For the purpose...

  19. 76 FR 40723 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Clean Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Clean Water Act... submitting comments. E-mail: OW-Docket@EPA.gov Mail: Water Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, Mailcode... , or in person viewing at the Water Docket in the EPA Docket Center (EPA/DC), EPA West, Room 3334, 1301...

  20. 76 FR 3159 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... to cause violations of applicable water quality standards for E. coli in the receiving streams; (2... of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on January 6... and Evansville Water and Sewer Utility Board, Civil Action No. 3:09-CV-128, was lodged with the...

  1. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  2. Water quality modeling in the dead end sections of drinking water distribution networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokifa, Ahmed A; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Lo, Cynthia S; Biswas, Pratim

    2016-02-01

    Dead-end sections of drinking water distribution networks are known to be problematic zones in terms of water quality degradation. Extended residence time due to water stagnation leads to rapid reduction of disinfectant residuals allowing the regrowth of microbial pathogens. Water quality models developed so far apply spatial aggregation and temporal averaging techniques for hydraulic parameters by assigning hourly averaged water demands to the main nodes of the network. Although this practice has generally resulted in minimal loss of accuracy for the predicted disinfectant concentrations in main water transmission lines, this is not the case for the peripheries of the distribution network. This study proposes a new approach for simulating disinfectant residuals in dead end pipes while accounting for both spatial and temporal variability in hydraulic and transport parameters. A stochastic demand generator was developed to represent residential water pulses based on a non-homogenous Poisson process. Dispersive solute transport was considered using highly dynamic dispersion rates. A genetic algorithm was used to calibrate the axial hydraulic profile of the dead-end pipe based on the different demand shares of the withdrawal nodes. A parametric sensitivity analysis was done to assess the model performance under variation of different simulation parameters. A group of Monte-Carlo ensembles was carried out to investigate the influence of spatial and temporal variations in flow demands on the simulation accuracy. A set of three correction factors were analytically derived to adjust residence time, dispersion rate and wall demand to overcome simulation error caused by spatial aggregation approximation. The current model results show better agreement with field-measured concentrations of conservative fluoride tracer and free chlorine disinfectant than the simulations of recent advection dispersion reaction models published in the literature. Accuracy of the simulated

  3. 17 CFR 240.3b-19 - Definition of “issuer” in section 3(a)(8) of the Act in relation to asset-backed securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 3(a)(8) of the Act in relation to asset-backed securities. 240.3b-19 Section 240.3b-19 Commodity... § 240.3b-19 Definition of “issuer” in section 3(a)(8) of the Act in relation to asset-backed securities. The following applies with respect to asset-backed securities under the Act. Terms used in this...

  4. Reference News Release: United States Announces Settlement of Clean Water Act Violations at Aqueduct Racetrack

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complaint alleges that NYRA, which operates the Aqueduct Racetrack where horse racing, training, and boarding of horses occur, and where up to 450 horses are housed on site during the horse racing season, violated the Clean Water Act

  5. 77 FR 44562 - Public Meeting: Potential Regulatory Implications of the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Lead in Drinking Water Act of 2011 AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice... discuss and solicit input from States, manufacturers, drinking water systems, other interested groups and consumers on the implementation of the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act of 2011 (``the Act'')....

  6. 75 FR 7627 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Notice is hereby... requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act), 40 CFR part 403 and 33 U.S.C....

  7. A Study on the preparation of environmental act system in Korea II - concentrated on the preparation of environmental policy fundamental act, protection of water supply source, and greenbelt area act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sang Hwan [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    This study is to propose to reform environmental policy fundamental act and land related act into future-oriented direction. First of all, the environmental policy fundamental act presented the direction of reforming water supply, national parks, and greenbelt related acts in environmental preservation perspective. 54 refs., 17 tabs.

  8. 76 FR 4569 - Implementing the Whistleblower Provisions of Section 23 of the Commodity Exchange Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... the Commodity Exchange Act Correction In proposed rule document 2010-29022, beginning on page 75728 in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... Part II, the agency name ``Commodity Futures Trading Corporation'' should read ``Commodity Futures...

  9. 75 FR 44893 - Pipeline Posting Requirements Under Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ..., buyers and sellers of wholesale natural gas, and the public.'' \\6\\ \\3\\ Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public... wholesale and interstate commerce to the Commission, State commissions, buyers and sellers of wholesale... must provide no-notice transportation information based on its best estimate before 11:30 a.m. central...

  10. 17 CFR 240.3a12-12 - Exemption from certain provisions of section 16 of the Act for asset-backed securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... provisions of section 16 of the Act for asset-backed securities. 240.3a12-12 Section 240.3a12-12 Commodity... Exemptions § 240.3a12-12 Exemption from certain provisions of section 16 of the Act for asset-backed securities. Asset-backed securities, as defined in § 229.1101 of this chapter, are exempt from section 16 of...

  11. 7 CFR 46.45 - Procedure in administering section 2(5) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....45 Section 46.45 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES REGULATIONS (OTHER THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER THE PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL... perishable agricultural commodity received, shipped, sold, or offered to be sold in interstate or...

  12. 42 CFR 137.220 - Do section 314 of Public Law 101-512 [25 U.S.C. 450f note] and section 102(d) of the Act [25 U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Do section 314 of Public Law 101-512 and section...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Federal Tort Claims Act (ftca) § 137.220 Do section 314 of Public Law 101... construction project agreements? 137.220 Section 137.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  13. [The logical basis in the sense of section 17 number 1 of the Animal Welfare Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabenbauer, K

    1992-01-01

    Since 1972 in Germany it is not allowed to kill vertebrates without a "reasonable reason". This is laid down in article 17 (1) of the Animal Protection Act. This theme--killing of animals--is one of the taboos in our society. The legislative background of killing vertebrates in regard to the "reasonable reason" is reported. Examples are given to illustrate the range of "reasonable reasons" for which animals are killed today.

  14. Combined use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system-acting agents: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcas, Andreea; Leucuta, Daniel; Bucsa, Camelia; Mogosan, Cristina; Dumitrascu, Dan

    2016-12-01

    Background Due to recent EU warnings and restrictions on the combined use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS)-acting agents, and the seriousness of the associated harm, we analyzed the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as dual therapy or associated with spironolactone. Setting An administrative claims database of a regional hospital in Romania. Methods We retrospectively included all adult patients hospitalized during 18 months in 2013-2014, discharged with a prescription of a RAAS-acting agent. Main outcome measures Counts of ACEIs and ARBs co-prescription, of ACEIs or ARBs combined with spironolactone, co-morbidities, co-medication, creatinine, and electrolytes assessment and values. Results Out of 1697 patients with a prescription of a RAAS-acting agent, 24 (1.4 %) were co-prescribed ACEIs and ARBs, and 416 (24.5 %) ACEIs or ARBs with spironolactone. Patients prescribed dual ACEI/ARB therapy and the ones with ACEI or ARB-spironolactone combination had significantly higher prevalence of increased creatinine level before discharge, compared to the ACEI and ARB monotherapy groups (48 and 31 % compared to 17 and 27 %). Subjects with diabetes, heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, or urea ≥40 mg/dL had higher odds of having ACEI or ARB-spironolactone combination compared to monotherapy, while hypertension and renal disease subjects had lower odds. Similar findings were comparing dual ACEI/ARB therapy to monotherapy except heart failure (not statistically significant). Conclusion Overall, the prevalence of use of dual therapy was low. The combined use of RAAS-acting agents was higher in patients with known risk factors for further renal function deterioration, compared to the ones without.

  15. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962)). Under the Act, any State agency or agency...

  16. 18 CFR 16.6 - Notification procedures under section 15 of the Federal Power Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal and state resource agencies, state water quality and coastal zone management consistency... project is located, or (B) That has a population of 5,000 or more people and is located within 15 miles of...

  17. 6 CFR 37.71 - Driver's licenses and identification cards issued under section 202(d)(11) of the REAL ID Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY REAL ID DRIVER'S LICENSES AND IDENTIFICATION CARDS Driver's Licenses and Identification Cards Issued Under Section 202(d)(11) of the REAL ID Act § 37.71 Driver's licenses and identification cards issued under section 202(d)(11) of the REAL ID Act. (a) Except...

  18. 17 CFR 240.12a-10T - Temporary exemption of eligible credit default swaps from Section 12(a) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary exemption of... (as defined in Section 1a(12) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(12)) as in effect on the date... Section 1(a)(12)(C) of the Commodity Exchange Act. (b) This temporary rule will expire on November 30...

  19. CORAL REEF BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA: USING THE CLEAN WATER ACT TO PROTECT A NATIONAL TREASURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reefs are declining at unprecedented rates worldwide due to multiple interactive stressors including climate change and land-based sources of pollution. The Clean Water Act (CWA) can be a powerful legal instrument for protecting water resources, including the biological inh...

  20. Characterizing light attenuation within Northwest Florida Estuaries: Implications for RESTORE Act water quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Quality (WQ) condition is based on ecosystem stressor indicators (e.g. water clarity) which are biogeochemically important and critical when considering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill restoration efforts under the 2012 RESTORE Act. Nearly all of the proposed RESTORE proj...

  1. CORAL REEF BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA: USING THE CLEAN WATER ACT TO PROTECT A NATIONAL TREASURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reefs are declining at unprecedented rates worldwide due to multiple interactive stressors including climate change and land-based sources of pollution. The Clean Water Act (CWA) can be a powerful legal instrument for protecting water resources, including the biological inh...

  2. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS)

    2011-09-01

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section

  3. FORCEFUL ARRESTS: AN OVERVIEW OF SECTION 49 OF THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE ACT 51 OF 1977 AND ITS RECENT AMENDMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinda Botha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The debate concerning the use of violence by the police force is an endless one. Section 49 of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 serves as a framework for the use of violence by police officers during arrests in South Africa. While some hold the opinion that the powers of the police in this respect should be restricted, others see the 2003 redefined section 49 as a legislative guarantee of a suspect’s right to flee. Against this background this article has as its focus a critical discussion of the historical development of section 49 as well as the recent amendments of the same. The current legal position in South Africa is also compared with that in the United States of America as well as in the United Kingdom. Finally, certain conclusions and recommendations are made in order to enhance more favourable regulation of the employment of force in effecting arrests.

  4. 29 CFR 778.402 - The statutory exception provided by section 7(f) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Exceptions From the Regular Rate Principles Guaranteed Compensation Which Includes... subsection (a) or (b) of section 6 (whichever may be applicable) and compensation at not less than one...

  5. 29 CFR 4.163 - Section 4(c) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contract of a wage determination based on the predecessor contractor's collective bargaining agreement...) Collective bargaining agreement must be applicable to work performed on the predecessor contract. Section 4(c... the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Compensation Standards § 4.163...

  6. 77 FR 52683 - Implementation of Determinations Under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act: Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ...: Certain New Pneumatic Off-the-Road Tires; Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe; Laminated Woven Sacks... woven sacks (``Sacks'') from the PRC, and light-walled rectangular pipe and tube (``LWRPT'') from the... in these section 129 proceedings on July 31, 2012.\\1\\ The Department is now implementing these...

  7. 8 CFR 287.7 - Detainer provisions under section 287(d)(3) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with this section, the criminal justice agency requesting such action or informing the Department of a... detainer for an alien not otherwise detained by a criminal justice agency, such agency shall maintain... detainer issued as a result of a determination made under this chapter I shall incur any fiscal...

  8. 75 FR 5177 - Pipeline Posting Requirements under Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... ``pursuant to authority under section 32 of the NGA.'' \\30\\ Yates and Agave particularly commend the... interstate commerce.'' \\31\\ \\30\\ Yates and Agave Request for Rehearing and Clarification at 1; Williston...). \\31\\ Yates and Agave Request for Rehearing and Clarification at 3-4. 16. Several...

  9. 43 CFR 404.58 - Do rural water projects authorized before the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006 have to comply with the requirements in this rule... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.58 Do rural water projects authorized before the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006 have to comply...

  10. Viewpoint – Why Has the South African National Water Act Been so Difficult to Implement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Schreiner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The South African National Water Act (Act 36 of 1998 was hailed by the international water community as one of the most progressive pieces of water legislation in the world, and a major step forward in the translation of the concept of integrated water resources management (IWRM into legislation. It has been widely quoted and referred to, and a number of countries ranging from China to Zambia have used it as an example in the revision of their own water legislation. And yet, 15 years down the line, implementation of the act has been only partially successful. In a number of critical aspects, implementation has, in fact, been weak. This paper sets out some personal reflections on the challenges facing the implementation of this remarkable piece of legislation and on the failure to achieve the initial high ambitions within the South African water sector. Through this process, it may be that there are lessons for other countries and for South Africa itself as it continues to face the challenge of implementation of the National Water Act (NWA.

  11. Rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: a regulatory history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danziger, R.N.; Caples, P.W.; Huning, J.R.

    1980-09-15

    An analysis is made of the rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The act provides that utilities must purchase power from qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates, and it exempts private generators from virtually all state and Federal utility regulations. Most of the analysis presented is taken from the perspective of photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal electric point-focusing distributed receivers (pfdr). It is felt, however, that the analysis is applicable both to cogeneration and other emerging technologies. Chapters presented are: The FERC Response to Oral Comments on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Additional Changes Made or Not Made That Were Addressed in Other Than Oral Testimony; View on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Response to Comments on the Proposed 201 and 210 Rules; and Summary Analysis of the Environmental Assessment of the Rules. Pertinent reference material is provided in the Appendices, including the text of the rules. (MCW)

  12. 8 CFR 233.5 - Aliens entering Guam pursuant to section 14 of Public Law 99-396, “Omnibus Territories Act.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aliens entering Guam pursuant to section 14 of Public Law 99-396, âOmnibus Territories Act.â 233.5 Section 233.5 Aliens and Nationality... entering Guam pursuant to section 14 of Public Law 99-396, “Omnibus Territories Act.” A transportation...

  13. 29 CFR 550.1 - “Talent fees” as used in section 7(e)(3)(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 550.1 “Talent fees” as used in section 7(e)(3)(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as amended. The... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âTalent feesâ as used in section 7(e)(3)(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as amended. 550.1 Section 550.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued...

  14. Ionization and capture in water: a multi-differential cross sections study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Christophe; Galassi, Mariel E.; Weck, Philippe F.; Fojón, Omar; Hanssen, Jocelyn; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2012-11-01

    Two quantum mechanical models (CB1 and CDW-EIS) are here presented to provide accurate multiple differential and total cross sections for describing the two most important ionizing processes, namely, ionization and capture induced by heavy charged particles in water. A detailed study of the influence of the target description on the cross section calculations is also provided.

  15. 8 CFR 240.21 - Suspension of deportation and adjustment of status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...)(i) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA), as amended by... Section 240.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS... 244(a)(3) of the Act (as in effect prior to April 1, 1997). The Immigration Court and the Board...

  16. Quantifying green water flows for improved Integrated Land and Water Resource Management under the National Water Act of South Africa: A review on hydrological research in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmain, C.; Everson, C. S.; Gush, M. B.; Clulow, A. D.

    2009-09-01

    The contribution of hydrological research in South Africa in quantifying green water flows for improved Integrated Land and Water Resources Management is reviewed. Green water refers to water losses from land surfaces through transpiration (seen as a productive use) and evaporation from bare soil (seen as a non-productive use). In contrast, blue water flows refer to streamflow (surface water) and groundwater / aquifer recharge. Over the past 20 years, a number of methods have been used to quantify the green water and blue water flows. These include micrometeorological techniques (e.g. Bowen ratio energy balance, eddy covariance, surface renewal, scintillometry, lysimetry), field scale models (e.g. SWB, SWAP), catchment scale hydrological models (e.g. ACRU, SWAT) and more recently remote sensing based models (e.g. SEBAL, SEBS). The National Water Act of South Africa of 1998 requires that water resources are managed, protected and used (developed, conserved and controlled) in an equitable way which is beneficial to the public. The quantification of green water flows in catchments under different land uses has been pivotal in (a) regulating streamflow reduction activities (e.g. forestry) and the management of alien invasive plants, (b) protecting riparian and wetland areas through the provision of an ecological reserve, (c) assessing and improving the water use efficiency of irrigated pastures, fruit tree orchards and vineyards, (d) quantifying the potential impact of future land uses like bio-fuels (e.g. Jatropha) on water resources, (e) quantifying water losses from open water bodies, and (f) investigating "biological” mitigation measures to reduce the impact of polluted water resources as a result of various industries (e.g. mining). This paper therefore captures the evolution of measurement techniques applied across South Africa, the impact these results have had on water use and water use efficiency and the extent to which it supported the National Water Act of

  17. Focal point pricing: A challenge to the successful implementation of Section 10a (introduced by the Competition Amendment Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Holland

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Competition Amendment Act introduced section 10A, which provides the Competition Commission with the powers to investigate complex monopoly conduct in a market and allows the Competition Tribunal, under certain conditions, to prohibit such behaviour. Although more than five years have elapsed since the Competition Amendment Act was promulgated, this provision has yet to come into force. However, when it eventually does so, it will mark a significant change in South African competition law, as it seeks to regulate firms’ consciously parallel conduct. This is coordinated conduct that occurs without communication or agreement, but results in the prevention or substantial lessening of competition. Examples of horizontal tacit coordination practices include price leadership and facilitating practices, such as information exchanges and price signaling. The successful implementation of the amendment poses problems for the competition authorities in assessing the competitive effects of complex monopoly conduct and in providing effective remedies. Oligopoly markets result in mutual interdependent decision-making by firms, which can lead to market outcomes similar to explicit collusion. However, a further and little noticed issue is that firms in oligopolistic markets have opportunities to use focal points to determine coordinated strategies. This paper explores the nature and role of focal point pricing, which can lead to prices that are above competitive levels. The South African banking industry is used as an example. We find that focal point pricing is difficult to control, making the successful implementation of section 10A even more problematic. Moreover, the proposed amendment provides scope for the imposition of structural remedies by the Competition Tribunal, a function that the Competition Tribunal is ill-suited to perform.

  18. Impact of Preservation of Subsoil Water Act on Groundwater Depletion: The Case of Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Amarnath; Mishra, Ashok K.; Verma, Geetanjali

    2016-07-01

    Indian states like Punjab and Haryana, epicenters of the Green Revolution, are facing severe groundwater shortages and falling water tables. Recognizing it as a serious concern, the Government of Punjab enacted the Punjab Preservation of Subsoil Water Act in 2009 (or the 2009 act) to slow groundwater depletion. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of this policy on groundwater depletion, using panel data from 1985 to 2011. Results from this study find a robust effect of the 2009 act on reducing groundwater depletion. Our models for pre-monsoon, post-monsoon, and overall periods of analysis find that since implementation of the 2009 act, groundwater tables have improved significantly. Second, our study reveals that higher shares of tube wells per total cropped area and increased population density have led to a significant decline in the groundwater tables. On the other hand, rainfall and the share of area irrigated by surface water have had an augmenting effect on groundwater resources. In the two models, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, this study shows that seasonality plays a key role in determining the groundwater table in Punjab. Specifically, monsoon rainfall has a very prominent impact on groundwater.

  19. Change of water consumption and its potential influential factors in Shanghai: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different water choices affect access to drinking water with different quality. Previous studies suggested social-economic status may affect the choice of domestic drinking water. The aim of this study is to investigate whether recent social economic changes in China affect residents’ drinking water choices. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey to investigate residents’ water consumption behaviour in 2011. Gender, age, education, personal income, housing condition, risk perception and personal preference of a certain type of water were selected as potential influential factors. Univariate and backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed to analyse the relation between these factors and different drinking water choices. Basic information was compared with that of a historical survey in the same place in 2001. Self-reported drinking-water-related diarrhoea was found correlated with different water choices and water hygiene treatment using chi-square test. Results The percentage of tap water consumption remained relatively stable and a preferred choice, with 58.99% in 2001 and 58.25% in 2011. The percentage of bottled/barrelled water consumption was 36.86% in 2001 and decreased to 25.75% in 2011. That of household filtrated water was 4.15% in 2001 and increased to 16.00% in 2011. Logistic regression model showed strong correlation between one’s health belief and drinking water choices (P water-related diarrhoea was found in all types of water and improper water hygiene behaviours still existed among residents. Conclusions Personal health belief, housing condition, age, personal income, education, taste and if worm ever founded in tap water affected domestic drinking water choices in Shanghai. PMID:22708830

  20. THE CHILD JUSTICE ACT: A DETAILED CONSIDERATION OF SECTION 68 AS POINT OF DEPARTURE WITH RESPECT TO THE SENTENCING OF YOUNG OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Terblanche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 establishes a criminal justice system for child accused, separate from the criminal justice system which continues to apply for adult accused in South Africa. The Act aims to keep children out of detention and away from the formal criminal justice system, mainly through diversion. When these interventions would be inadequate or unsuccessful, the Act provides for child offenders to the tried and sentenced in child justice courts. Until now there has been little discussion of the details of the provisions dealing with sentencing.Sentencing in a child justice court is regulated by chapter 10 of the Act and section 68 is the first section in this chapter. This section effectively amounts to the “jurisdictional” provision of the new child sentencing system: it not only mandates child justice courts to impose their sentences in terms of the Act, but also provides the first set of boundaries (or the first part of the framework within which sentencing should take place. Despite its brevity, section 68 is not without interpretative challenges. Of course, it has to be interpreted within the context of the entire Act. Explaining this context is the first function of this article. The various aspects of section 68 are further critically explored and discussed.

  1. Water Quality attainment Information from Clean Water Act Statewide Statistical Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Designated uses assessed by statewide statistical surveys and their state and national attainment categories. Statewide statistical surveys are water quality...

  2. Extracting cross sections and water levels of vegetated ditches from LiDAR point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelens, Jennifer; Dondeyne, Stefaan; Van Orshoven, Jos; Diels, Jan

    2016-12-01

    The hydrologic response of a catchment is sensitive to the morphology of the drainage network. Dimensions of bigger channels are usually well known, however, geometrical data for man-made ditches is often missing as there are many and small. Aerial LiDAR data offers the possibility to extract these small geometrical features. Analysing the three-dimensional point clouds directly will maintain the highest degree of information. A longitudinal and cross-sectional buffer were used to extract the cross-sectional profile points from the LiDAR point cloud. The profile was represented by spline functions fitted through the minimum envelop of the extracted points. The cross-sectional ditch profiles were classified for the presence of water and vegetation based on the normalized difference water index and the spatial characteristics of the points along the profile. The normalized difference water index was created using the RGB and intensity data coupled to the LiDAR points. The mean vertical deviation of 0.14 m found between the extracted and reference cross sections could mainly be attributed to the occurrence of water and partly to vegetation on the banks. In contrast to the cross-sectional area, the extracted width was not influenced by the environment (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.87). Water and vegetation influenced the extracted ditch characteristics, but the proposed method is still robust and therefore facilitates input data acquisition and improves accuracy of spatially explicit hydrological models.

  3. 78 FR 60810 - Change to the Definition of “Human Organ” Under Section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 121 RIN 0906-AB02 Change to the Definition of ``Human Organ'' Under Section... change in the definition of ``human organ'' in section ] 301 of the National Organ and Transplant Act of... human organs for valuable consideration applies to HSCs regardless of whether they were...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.10 - Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS General Provisions § 1271.10 Are my HCT/P's regulated solely.../P is regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part if it...

  5. 8 CFR 1240.21 - Suspension of deportation and adjustment of status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... described in section 309(c)(5)(C)(i) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act... Section 1240.21 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Cancellation...

  6. 17 CFR 270.12d1-3 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(F) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Exemption from sales charge limits. A registered investment company (“acquiring fund”) that relies on... company (“acquired fund”) may offer or sell any security it issues through a principal underwriter or... companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(F) of the Act. 270.12d1-3 Section 270.12d1-3 Commodity and...

  7. Computational analysis of asymmetric water entry of wedge and ship section at constant velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Md. Mashiur; Ullah, Al Habib; Afroz, Laboni; Shabnam, Sharmin; Sarkar, M. A. Rashid

    2016-07-01

    Water impact problems receive much attention due to their short duration and large unsteady component of hydrodynamic loads. The effect of water entry has several important applications in various aspects of the naval field. Significant attention has been given to various water entry phenomena such as ship slamming, planning hulls, high-speed hydrodynamics of seaplanes, surface-piercing propellers and the interaction of high-speed liquid drops with structural elements. Asymmetric water entry may be caused by various natural phenomena such as weather conditions or strong winds. Since the determination of hydrodynamic impact load plays a vital role in designing safe and effcient vessels, an accurate and reliable prediction method is necessary to investigate asymmetric water entry problems. In this paper, water entry of a two-dimensional wedge and ship section at constant velocity in asymmetric condition will be analysed numerically and the effects of asymmetric impact on the velocity and pressure distribution will be discussed. The finite volume method is employed to solve the dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow. During the water entry, the air and water interface is described implicitly by the volume of fluid (VOF) scheme. The numerical code and method was first validated for symmetric condition by one of the present author is applied for asymmetric wedge and ship section. The free surface, velocity and pressure distribution for asymmetric water entry are investigated and visualized with contour plots at different time steps.

  8. Measurement of the muon-neutrino charged-current cross section on water with zero pions

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Tianlu

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) experiment is a 295-km long-baseline neutrino experiment aimed towards the measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters ${\\theta}_{13}$ and ${\\theta}_{23}$. Precise measurement of these parameters requires accurate knowledge of neutrino cross sections. We present a flux-averaged double differential measurement of the charged-current cross section on water with zero pions in the final state using the T2K off-axis near detector, ND280. A selection of $\

  9. 78 FR 72789 - Delegation of Authority Pursuant to Section 404(c) of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... 404(c) of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008, as Amended Memorandum for the Secretary of State... the authority conferred upon the President by the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008 (title IV...

  10. 76 FR 709 - Guidelines for Awarding Clean Water Act Section 319 Base Grants to Indian Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... partnership between two or more tribes that is authorized by the governing bodies of those tribes to apply for... allowable costs borne by non-Federal grants; by cash donations from non-Federal third parties; or by the... specific geographic focus, integrating strong partnerships, integrating strong science and data,...

  11. Packaging policies to reform the water sector: The case of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischhendler, Itay; Zilberman, David

    2005-07-01

    Existing water policies often deviate from measures suggested by economic and environmental analysis. This is particularly true in the case of drought response policies, where effective policies are rarely adopted. This study focuses on how to enhance the political feasibility of options rather than identifying the optimal water policies. It argues that a legislative policy package may be a mechanism both to unite divergent interest groups into a coalition with common policy agendas and also to fragment or realign existing and traditional alliances. This majority building approach may have a greater chance of obtaining the required political support to advance water reforms. The negotiation over the Central Valley Project Improvement Act in California is used as an example. The case study illustrates how the policy packaging strategy split the traditional power alliance between the agricultural sector and the urban sector in California and between the agricultural sector in California and their allies in other U.S. western states. At the same time, policy packaging has created new regional and sectoral advocacy coalitions in support of water reform. As a result, the Bureau of Reclamation changed its policies in the Central Valley in California relating to the establishment of water markets, water pricing, and wildlife restoration fund and allocating water for the environment.

  12. Spatial profiles of positrons injected at low energies into water: influence of cross section models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade J.; Cocks, Daniel G.; Boyle, Gregory J.; Brunger, Michael J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; García, Gustavo; Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ronald D.

    2017-04-01

    We present a collated set of interaction cross sections for positrons in water, and study how the choice of ionisation energy sharing and of anisotropy in elastic cross sections influences low-energy spatial transport. A Monte Carlo code has been developed to model the transport of a beam of positrons injected at 60 eV into water, in which we compare several ionisation energy sharing models, and also vary the anisotropic scattering behaviour for elastic collisions. While the cross sections are primarily applicable to water vapour, we have investigated the inclusion of coherent elastic scattering which is present in liquid water. We present comparative profiles of positron number density, energy deposition, positronium formation, and secondary electron generation. Anisotropic scattering can increase radial diffusion by a factor of two, and a similar effect occurs as a result of coherent elastic scattering, though only at energies below the positronium formation threshold. The results emphasise the need for detailed knowledge of scattering cross sections that are differential in both scattering angles and energy transfer.

  13. A Guide for Teaching Conservation Education in the Schools of Louisiana; Soil and Water Section. (Revision)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, George; McCollum, Howard P.

    This publication is a revised edition of the teachers guide for teaching soil and water conservation in the elementary and junior high schools of Louisiana. The format of the guide includes a statement of concept, followed by discussion of the concept, suggested activities, and possible outcomes. There is a glossary of terms and a section that…

  14. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents calculated cross sections for bare and dressed carbon projectiles of charge states q (0 to 6) with energies 1-104 keV u-1 impacting on molecular water and atomic neon targets. The cross sections of water are of interest for radiobiological studies, but there are very few experimental data for water in any phase, while those for liquid water are non-existent. The more extensive experimental database for the neon target made it possible to test the reliability of the model calculations for the many-electron collision system. The current calculations cover major single and double electronic interactions of low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method was used for the calculation of one-electron transition probabilities for target ionization, electron capture and projectile electron loss. The many-electron problem was taken into account using statistical methods: a modified independent event model was used for pure (direct) and simultaneous target and projectile ionizations, and the independent particle model for pure electron capture and electron capture accompanied by target ionization. Results are presented for double differential cross sections (DDCS) for total electron emission by carbon projectile impact on neon. For the water target, we present the following: single differential cross sections (SDCS) and DDCS for single target ionization; total cross sections (TCS) for electron emission; TCS for the pure single electronic interactions; equilibrium charge state fractions; and stopping cross sections. The results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in many cases, including DDCS and SDCS for the single target ionization, TCS for the total electron emission and TCS for the pure single electron capture. The stopping cross sections of this work are consistent with the other model calculations for projectile energies ≥800 keV u-1, but smaller than the

  15. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents calculated cross sections for bare and dressed carbon projectiles of charge states q (0 to 6) with energies 1-10(4) keV u(-1) impacting on molecular water and atomic neon targets. The cross sections of water are of interest for radiobiological studies, but there are very few experimental data for water in any phase, while those for liquid water are non-existent. The more extensive experimental database for the neon target made it possible to test the reliability of the model calculations for the many-electron collision system. The current calculations cover major single and double electronic interactions of low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method was used for the calculation of one-electron transition probabilities for target ionization, electron capture and projectile electron loss. The many-electron problem was taken into account using statistical methods: a modified independent event model was used for pure (direct) and simultaneous target and projectile ionizations, and the independent particle model for pure electron capture and electron capture accompanied by target ionization. Results are presented for double differential cross sections (DDCS) for total electron emission by carbon projectile impact on neon. For the water target, we present the following: single differential cross sections (SDCS) and DDCS for single target ionization; total cross sections (TCS) for electron emission; TCS for the pure single electronic interactions; equilibrium charge state fractions; and stopping cross sections. The results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in many cases, including DDCS and SDCS for the single target ionization, TCS for the total electron emission and TCS for the pure single electron capture. The stopping cross sections of this work are consistent with the other model calculations for projectile energies ≥800 keV u(-1), but smaller

  16. 17 CFR 259.5s - Form U5S, for annual reports filed under section 5(c) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form U5S, for annual reports filed under section 5(c) of the Act. 259.5s Section 259.5s Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... 1935 Forms for Registration and Annual Supplements § 259.5s Form U5S, for annual reports filed under...

  17. 75 FR 64773 - Study Required by Section 989G(b) of the Dodd-Frank Act Regarding Compliance With Section 404(b...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Exchange Act Rule 12b-2 . \\4\\ See, e.g., Release No. 33-9072 (Oct. 13, 2009) [74 FR 53628]; and Release 33... Commission (COSO), such as the June 2006 guidance for smaller public companies on internal control over... http://www.coso.org/ICFR-GuidanceforSPCs.htm . \\9\\ For further information, see...

  18. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  19. Predicted effects on ground water of construction of Divide Cut section, Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, northeastern Mississippi, using a digital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Mark S.

    1981-01-01

    The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, connecting the Tennessee River in northeastern Mississippi with the Gulf of Mexico, is currently (1980) under construction. The Divide Section, the northernmost 39 miles of the Waterway, will consist, from north to south, of (1) a dredged channel, (2) the Divide Cut, and (3) an artifical lake impounded by the Bay Springs Dam. In all three , water will be at Tennessee River level. A three-dimensional digital model covering 3,273 square miles was constructed to simulate ground-water flow in the Gordo and Eutaw Formations and the Coffee Sand in the vicinity of the Divide Section. The model was calibrated to preconstruction water levels, then used to simulate the effects of stresses imposed by the construction of the Divide Section. The model indicates that the system stabilizes after major changes in conditions within a few months. The Divide Cut acts as a drain, lowering water levels as much as 55 feet. Drawdowns of 5 feet occur as much as 8 miles from the Cut. The 80-foot-high Bay Springs Dam raises ground-water levels by 5 feet as far as 6 miles from its impoundment. Drawdown is not likely to affect public water supplies significantly, but probably will adversely affect a relatively small number of private wells. (USGS)

  20. 76 FR 68084 - Procedures for the Handling of Retaliation Complaints Under Section 806 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Fair Labor Standards Act, which prohibits employers from discharging or otherwise discriminating... of violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 563 U.S. ----, 131 S.Ct. 1325 (2011). OSHA believes... Associate Solicitor, Division of Fair Labor Standards, U.S. Department of Labor, the failure to serve copies...

  1. 76 FR 34066 - In Accordance With Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army In Accordance With Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App 2.), Announcement Is Made of the Following Committee Meeting: Western Hemisphere Institute...

  2. A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Manganese 2016A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)William K BoyesBackground. In the 1990’s, the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) as an octane-enh...

  3. 7 CFR Exhibit E to Subpart I of... - Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Guidance for Recipients of Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants (Section 523 of Housing Act of 1949) E Exhibit E to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. E Exhibit E...

  4. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 103 - Certification for Purposes of Section 314(b) of the USA Patriot Act and 31 CFR 103.110

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification for Purposes of Section 314(b) of the USA Patriot Act and 31 CFR 103.110 B Appendix B to Part 103 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND...

  5. 17 CFR 270.18f-1 - Exemption from certain requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end investment companies which have the right... which have the right to redeem in kind. (a) A registered open-end investment company which has the right... to pay in cash all requests for redemption by any shareholder of record, limited in amount...

  6. Web Accessibility of the Higher Education Institute Websites Based on the World Wide Web Consortium and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Najma H.

    2014-01-01

    The problem observed in this study is the low level of compliance of higher education website accessibility with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The literature supports the non-compliance of websites with the federal policy in general. Studies were performed to analyze the accessibility of fifty-four sample web pages using automated…

  7. A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Manganese 2016A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)William K BoyesBackground. In the 1990’s, the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) as an octane-enh...

  8. Energy deposition model based on electron scattering cross section data from water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A; Oiler, J C [Centra de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gorfinkiel, J D [Department of Physiscs and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Limao-Vieira, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Maira-Vidal, A; Borge, M J G; Tengblad, O [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid, Spam (Spain); Huerga, C; Tellez, M [Hospital Universitario La Paz, paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientifIcas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: g.garcia@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2008-10-01

    A complete set of electrons scattering cross sections by water molecules over a broad energy range, from the me V to the Me V ranges, is presented in this study. These data have been obtained by combining experiments and calculations and cover most relevant processes, both elastic and inelastic, which can take place in the considered energy range. A new Monte Carlo simulation programme has been developed using as input parameter these cross sectional data as well as experimental energy loss spectra. The simulation procedure has been applied to obtain electron tracks and energy deposition plots in water when irradiated by a Ru-106 plaque as those used for brachytherapy of ocular tumours. Finally, the low energy electron tracks provided by the present model have been compared with those obtained with other codes available in the literature.

  9. Determination of Sectional Constancy of Organic Coal-Water Fuel Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To use widespreadly the waste of coals and oils processing in the great and the small-scale power generation, the key parameter, which is sectional constancy of promising organic coal-water fuels (OCWF, was studied. The compo-sitions of OCWF from brown and bituminous coals, filter cakes, used motor, turbine and dielectrical oils, water-oil emul-sion and special wetting agent (plasticizer were investigated. Two modes of preparation were considered. They are with homogenizer and cavitator. It was established that the constancy did not exceed 5–7 days for the compositions of OCWF with brown coals, and 12–15 days for that compositions with bituminous coals and filter cakes. The injection of used oils in a composition of OCWF led to increase in viscosity of fuel compositions and their sectional constancy.

  10. Positron interactions with water-total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J R; Anderson, Emma; White, Ron D; Brunger, M J; Buckman, Stephen J; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco; Sullivan, James P

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  11. Prevalence and factors affecting use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in Jinka town, Southern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Getachew; Enquselassie, Fikre; Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    In Ethiopia, knowledge of contraceptive methods is high though there is low contraceptive prevalence rate. This study was aimed to assess prevalence and associated factors of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in Jinka town, southern Ethiopia. Community based cross sectional survey was conducted to assess the prevalence and factors affecting long acting and permanent methods of contraceptives utilization from March to April 2008. Eight hundred child bearing age women were participated in the quantitative study and 32 purposively selected focus group discussants were participated in the qualitative study. Face to face interview was used for data collection. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13.0 statistical software. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were computed to analyze the data. The prevalence of long acting and permanent contraceptive method was 7.3%. Three fourth (76.1%) of the women have ever heard about implants and implant 28 (50%) were the most widely used method. Almost two third of women had intention to use long acting and permanent methods. Knowledge of contraceptive and age of women have significant association with the use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods. The overall prevalence of long acting and permanent contraceptive method was low. Knowledge of contraceptive and age of women have significant association with use of long acting and permanent contraceptive. Extensive health information should be provided.

  12. 2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES)

    2010-11-01

    For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  13. Fluorescent layers for characterization of sectioning microscopy with coverslipuncorrected and water immersion objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method to generate thin (thickness > 200 nm) and ultrathin (thickness < 200 nm) fluorescent layers to be used for microscope optical characterization. These layers are obtained by ultramicrotomy sectioning of fluorescent acrylic slides. This technique generates sub-resolution sheets with high fluorescence emission and uniform thickness, permitting to determine the z-response of different optical sectioning systems. Compared to the state of the art, the here proposed technique allows shorter and easier manufacturing procedure. Moreover, these fluorescent layers can be employed without protective coverslips, allowing the use of the Sectioned Imaging Property (SIP)-chart characterization method with coverslip-uncorrected objectives, water immersion objectives and micro-endoscopes. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  14. When is Arsenic Poisoning Prevention Unaffordable? Determining the EPA 'Affordability Criteria' for Small Water Systems Under the 1996 Clean Drinking Water Act

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    Why would anyone want lower quality drinking water? The Safe Drinking Water Act allows an "affordability, variance technology, small system variance exemption" to the drinking water standards based on a supply side argument. It assumes small drinking water systems have significant diseconomies of scale in meeting the maximum contaminant levels. We can test this assumption by examining the cost of compliance technologies by system size developed by the Environmental Protection Agency to meet t...

  15. 75 FR 45494 - Implementation of Section 224 of the Act; a National Broadband Plan for Our Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Doc. 2010-17048, the Commission seeks comment on additional considerations regarding boxing and... are unjust and unreasonable under section 224. 18. Section 224 also provides for the adoption of...

  16. The rules implementing sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: A regulatory history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The act provides that utilities must purchase power for qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates. It exempts private generators from virtually all state and federal utility regulation. Pertinent reference material is provided.

  17. 77 FR 11369 - Delegation of Certain Function Under Section 308(a) of the Intelligence Authorization Act for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... 110(f) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, as Amended #0; #0; #0; Presidential....) THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, January 27, 2012 [FR Doc. 2012-4598 Filed 2-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing...

  18. Section 27 of the Insolvency Act 24 of 1936 as a Violation of the Equality Clause of the Constitution of South Africa: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zingaphi Mabe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines section 27 of the Insolvency Act 24 of 1936 within the context of the right to equality in section 9 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (the Constitution. Section 27 of the Insolvency Act protects benefits arising from an antenuptial contract and given by a man to his wife or to a child born of their marriage, from being set aside as dispositions without value during sequestration proceedings. It excludes men, same-sex partners, children born outside of wedlock and children born to same-sex partners from keeping benefits given to them in an antenuptial contract. It affords such a privilege only to a wife or a child born in the marriage. The right to equality in the Constitution seeks to provide equal benefits before the law to persons in the same or similar positions by prohibiting unfair discrimination. This paper points out that the limitations in section 27 make it vulnerable to constitutional review under section 9(3 of the Constitution on the grounds of marital status, sexual orientation and birth. Certain proposals have been made to develop section 27 to be consistent with the Constitution by amending the definition of spouse in section 21(13 of the Insolvency Act. Such proposals will be considered to illustrate the progress made in reforming the section and to establish whether the reform measures proposed will protect all those affected by the discrimination arising from section 27. The paper concludes that if the proposals are implemented in a future Insolvency Act, they will eliminate the discriminatory effect section 27 has on husbands and wives, civil unions, and children adopted by civil union partners. However, as regards the right to birth, the proposals extend the benefit only to children born of a customary marriage or union, children who are adopted by partners in a civil union, or children who are born to parents who live together as partners in a partnership. Children born outside of

  19. 75 FR 43791 - Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 3134 of the National Defense Authorization Act for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Memorandum of July 21, 2010--Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 3134 of the National Defense... Functions and Authorities Memorandum of July 21, 2010--Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 1264 of... ] Memorandum of July 21, 2010 Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 3134 of the National...

  20. 3 CFR - Assignment of Function Under Section 601 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assignment of Function Under Section 601 of the... Memorandum of August 6, 2009 Assignment of Function Under Section 601 of the American Recovery and... 3, United States Code, I hereby assign to you the function of the President under section 601,...

  1. Demand for long acting contraceptive methods and associated factors among family planning service users, Northwest Ethiopia: a health facility based cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalew, Saleamlak Adbaru; Zeleke, Berihun Megabiaw; Teferra, Alemayehu Shimeka

    2015-02-04

    Demand for long acting contraceptive methods is one of the key factors for total fertility rate and reproductive health issues. Increased demand for these methods can decline fertility rate through spacing and limiting family size in turn improving maternal and family health and socioeconomic development of a country. The aim of this study was to assess demand for long acting contraceptives and associated factors among family planning users in Debre-Tabor Town, Northwest Ethiopia. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from July to August 2013. Data was collected on 487 current family planning users through face to face interview using structured questionnaire. Study participants were selected by systematic sampling method. Data were entered in to Epi Info and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Bi-variable and multi-variable regression analyses were done to identify factors associated with demand for long acting contraceptive methods. Odds ratio with 95% CI was used to assess the association between the independent variables and demand for long acting family planning methods. The study showed that, demand for long acting contraceptives was 17%. Only 9.2% of the women were using long acting contraceptive methods (met need). About 7.8% of women were using short acting methods while they actually want to use long acting methods (unmet need). Demand for LACMs was positively associated 3 with being a daily labour (AOR = 3.87, 95% CI = [1.06, 14.20]), being a student (AOR = 2.64, 95% CI = [1.27, 5.47]), no future birth intensions (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI = [1.12, 4.23]), having five or more children (AOR = 1.67, 95% CI = [1.58, 4.83]), deciding together with husbands for using the methods (AOR = 2.73, 95% CI = [1.40, 5.32]) and often having discussion with husband (AOR = 3.89, 95% CI = [1.98, 7.65]). Clients treated poorly by the health care providers during taking the services was negatively associated with demand for LACMs (AOR = 0.42, 95% CI = [0.24, 0

  2. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  3. Putting Regulatory Data to Work at the Service of Public Health: Utilizing Data Collected Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collects information from states on intended use and impairment of each water body. We explore the feasibility of using these data, collected for regulatory purposes, for public health analyses. Combining E...

  4. 77 FR 29757 - Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... alternate procedures for nationwide and Regional use; minimum quality control requirements to improve... with the technology-based and water quality-based requirements of the Clean Water Act (CWA). These... NPDES permits. Municipalities POTWs or other municipality owned facilities that must conduct monitoring...

  5. Hydrogeologic uncertainties and policy implications: The Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. G.; Matlock, W. G.; Jacobs, K. L.

    The 1995 Water Consumer Protection Act of Tucson, Arizona, USA (hereafter known as the Act) was passed following complaints from Tucson Water customers receiving treated Central Arizona Project (CAP) water. Consequences of the Act demonstrate the uncertainties and difficulties that arise when the public is asked to vote on a highly technical issue. The recharge requirements of the Act neglect hydrogeological uncertainties because of confusion between "infiltration" and "recharge." Thus, the Act implies that infiltration in stream channels along the Central Wellfield will promote recharge in the Central Wellfield. In fact, permeability differences between channel alluvium and underlying basin-fill deposits may lead to subjacent outflow. Additionally, even if recharge of Colorado River water occurs in the Central Wellfield, groundwater will become gradually salinized. The Act's restrictions on the use of CAP water affect the four regulatory mechanisms in Arizona's 1980 Groundwater Code as they relate to the Tucson Active Management Area: (a) supply augmentation; (b) requirements for groundwater withdrawals and permitting; (c) Management Plan requirements, particularly mandatory conservation and water-quality issues; and (d) the requirement that all new subdivisions use renewable water supplies in lieu of groundwater. Political fallout includes disruption of normal governmental activities because of the demands in implementing the Act. Résumé La loi de 1995 sur la protection des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson (Arizona, États-Unis) a été promulguée à la suite des réclamations des consommateurs d'eau de Tucson alimentés en eau traitée à partir à la station centrale d'Arizona (CAP). Les conséquences de cette loi montrent les incertitudes et les difficultés qui apparaissent lorsque le public est appeléà voter sur un problème très technique. Les exigences de la loi en matière de recharge négligent les incertitudes hydrogéologiques du fait de la

  6. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Emma J.; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S.; Lavrentieva, Nina N.

    2017-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H216O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H2- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number J up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300-2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for J ‧ J ″ -dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution (Δ ν ˜ = 0.01cm-1) pressure broadened cross sections for a fixed range of temperatures and pressures between 300 and 2000 K and 0.001-10 bar. An interpolation procedure which can be used to determine cross sections at intermediate temperature and pressure is described. Pressure broadening parameters and cross sections are presented in new ExoMol format.

  7. Water transfer and major environmental provisions of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act: A preliminary economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, John B.

    1994-06-01

    Increasing block water pricing, water transfer, and wildlife refuge water supply provisions of the Central Valley Project (CVP) Improvement Act are analyzed in terms of likely farmer response and economic efficiency of these provisions. Based on a simplified partial equilibrium analysis, we estimate small, but significant water conservation savings due to pricing reform, the potential for substantial water transfers to non-CVP customers in severe drought years when the water price exceeds 110 per acre foot (1 acre foot equals 1.234 × 103 m3) and positive net benefits for implementation of the wildlife refuge water supply provisions. The high threshold water price is partly a result of requiring farmers to pay full cost on transferred water plus a surcharge of 25 per acre foot if the water is transferred to a non-CVP user. The act also sets an important precedent for water pricing reform, water transfer provisions, and environmental surcharges on water users that may find their way to other Bureau of Reclamation projects.

  8. Added Resistance Acting on Hull of a Non Ballast Water Ship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ngo Van He; Yoshiho Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, added resistances acting on a hull of non ballast water ship (NBS) in high waves is discussed. The non ballast water ships were developed at the laboratory of the authors at Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. In the present paper, the performances of three kinds of bow shapes developed for the NBS were theoretically and experimentally investigated to find the best one in high waves. In previous papers, an optimum bow shape for the NBS was developed in calm water and in moderated waves. For a 2 m model for experiments and computations, the wave height is 0.02 m. This means that the wave height is 15%of the draft of the ship in full load conditions. In this paper, added resistances in high waves up to 0.07 m for a 2 m model or 53%of the full load draft are investigated. In such high waves linear wave theories which have been used in the design stage of a ship for a long time may not work well anymore, and experiments are the only effective tool to predict the added resistance in high waves. With the computations for waves, the ship is in a fully captured condition because shorter waves,λ/Lpp<0.6, are assumed.

  9. Inelastic-collision cross sections of liquid water for interactions of energetic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Dingfelder, M; Paretzke, H G

    2000-01-01

    Cross-section data for inelastic interactions of energetic protons with liquid water, for use, e.g. as input in track structure analysis, are derived for an energy range from 0.1 keV to 10 GeV. At proton kinetic energies above about 500 keV, the first Born approximation and the dielectric-response function determined earlier are used. At proton energies above several hundred MeV in particular, the Fermi-density effect is also incorporated. At energies below about 500 keV, which corresponds to a residual range of about 8.9x10 sup - sup 6 m, cross-section values are derived semi-empirically by an extensive and critical analysis of experimental and theoretical information concerning not only cross sections for individual processes such as ionisation, excitation, and charge transfer but also stopping power and other relevant quantities. Spectra of secondary electrons resulting from ionising collisions are also presented. The analysis also includes considerations of phase effects on cross sections.

  10. 78 FR 1306 - Transition Period Under Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... dealers as swap dealers. \\4\\ Guidance on the Effective Date of Section 716, 77 FR 27465 (May 10, 2012... deems necessary and appropriate.\\12\\ \\11\\ See Further Definition of Swap Dealer, 77 FR 30595 (May 23... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Transition Period Under Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank...

  11. Rural women are more likely to use long acting contraceptive in Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia: a comparative community-based cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Mussie; Kalayu, Aster; Desta, Alem; Gebremichael, Hailay; Hagos, Tesfalem; Yebyo, Henock

    2015-09-04

    In the latest report of Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) 2011, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) was estimated at 676/100,000 live births, with total fertility rate at 4.8 and contraceptive prevalence rate at 29 %. Knowledge and utilization of long acting contraceptive in the Tigray region are low. This study aims at comparing and identifying factors related to the utilization of long acting contraceptive in urban versus rural settings of Ethiopia. A comparative community-based cross-sectional study, comprised of quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted among 1035 married women in Wukro (urban area) and Kilteawlaelo district (rural area) in March, 2013. Stratified sampling technique was employed to approach the study participants. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the respective effect of independent predictors on utilization of long acting contraceptive. The proportion of long acting contraceptive use among the respondents was 19.9 % in the town of Wukro and 37.8 % in the district of Kilteawlaelo. Implanon was the most common type of contraceptive used in both districts, urban (75 %) and rural (94 %). The odds of using the long acting contraceptive method were three times higher among married women in the rural areas as compared with the urban women [AOR = 3. 30; 95 %, CI:2.17, 5.04]. No or limited support from male partners was an obstacle to using long acting contraceptive method [AOR = 0. 24, 95 of CI: 0.13, 0.44]. Moreover, married women whose partner did not permit them to use long acting contraceptive [AOR = 0. 47, 95 % of CI: 0.24, 0.92] and women who attended primary education [AOR = 0.24, 95 %, CI: 0.13, 0.44] were significantly associated with long acting contraceptive use. Overall, the proportion of long acting contraceptive use has found to be low. Rural women were more likely to use long acting contraceptives as compared to urban women

  12. 75 FR 41337 - Implementation of Section 224 of the Act; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... power source. The current rule requiring a response to pole access requests within 45 days applies in...-making power. In the majority of cases, electric power companies and other non-incumbent LECs are... allow an incumbent LEC a veto over contractors would provide them with an undue ability to act on that...

  13. 75 FR 64776 - Initiation of Section 302 Investigation and Request for Public Comment: China-Acts, Policies and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... benefits under the GATT 1994, under the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (``SCM Agreement... Agreement (``SCM Agreement''), and under China's Protocol of Accession to the WTO. ] These acts, policies... SCM Agreement, and under China's Protocol of Accession to the WTO. C. Delay of Request...

  14. 75 FR 57766 - Notice of Petition To Amend Authorizations Under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act; Cameron LNG, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Gas Act; Cameron LNG, LLC September 15, 2010. Take notice that on September 3, 2010, Cameron LNG, LLC (Cameron), 101 Ash Street, San Diego, California 92101, filed a petition to amend the authorizations issued... liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal facility located in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, for the additional...

  15. 48 CFR 952.226-70 - Subcontracting goals under section 3021(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Energy Policy Act target groups. Individual goals shall be expressed in terms of a percentage of the... target groups, as used in this provision means: (1) An institution of higher education that meets the... Hawaiians, or any combination thereof; (2) Institutions of higher learning determined by the Secretary of...

  16. 78 FR 15771 - Order Granting a Temporary Exemption Pursuant to Section 36(a)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ...), 77 FR 45722 (August 1, 2012) (``Adopting Release''). \\4\\ April 28, 2013, is a Sunday. Therefore, in... Register on August 1, 2012,\\3\\ thus requiring the national market system plan (the ``NMS plan'') to be... specified in Rule 613(a)(1) of the Exchange Act \\7\\ for submitting the NMS plan to the Commission.\\8\\ \\1\\...

  17. 20 CFR 725.702 - Claims for medical benefits only under section 11 of the Reform Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... IV of the Act, the Department shall accept the Social Security Administration's finding of... made by the Social Security Administration. The Social Security Administration may, however, reopen a... identity of the medical provider, the cost of the service, and the fact that the cost was paid by the miner...

  18. 8 CFR 245.3 - Adjustment of status under section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., any alien who is prima facie eligible for adjustment of status to that of a lawful permanent resident... Act who performed diplomatic or semi-diplomatic duties and to their immediate families, and who... residence would be in the national interest. Aliens whose duties were of a custodial, clerical, or...

  19. 75 FR 34673 - Approval of the Clean Air Act, Section 112(l), Authority for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ...'') request for approval to implement and enforce Air Pollution Control Regulation Number 36, Control of Emissions from Organic Solvent Cleaning (``RI Regulation No. 36'') and Rhode Island Air Pollution Control.... Ira W. Leighton, Acting Regional Administrator, EPA New England. BILLING CODE 6560-50-P...

  20. 17 CFR 3.56 - Suspension or modification of registration pursuant to section 8a(11) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... State law that would reflect on the honesty or the fitness of the person to act as a fiduciary that is... pose a threat to the public interest or may threaten to impair public confidence in any market... public interest or may threaten to impair public confidence in any market regulated by the...

  1. A microfluidic approach to water-rock interactions using thin rock sections: Pb and U sorption onto thin shale and granite sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youn Soo; Jo, Ho Young; Ryu, Ji-Hun; Kim, Geon-Young

    2017-02-15

    The feasibility of using microfluidic tests to investigate water-rock (mineral) interactions in fractures regarding sorption onto thin rock sections (i.e., shale and granite) of lead (Pb) and uranium (U) was evaluated using a synthetic PbCl2 solution and uranium-containing natural groundwater as fluids. Effluent composition and element distribution on the thin rock sections before and after microfluidic testing were analyzed. Most Pb removal (9.8mg/cm(2)) occurred within 3.5h (140 PVF), which was 74% of the total Pb removal (13.2mg/cm(2)) at the end of testing (14.5h, 560 PVF). Element composition on the thin shale sections determined by μ-XRF analysis indicated that Pb removal was related primarily to Fe-containing minerals (e.g., pyrite). Two thin granite sections (biotite rich, Bt-R and biotite poor, Bt-P) exhibited no marked difference in uranium removal capacity, but a slightly higher amount of uranium was removed onto the thin Bt-R section (266μg/cm(2)) than the thin Bt-P section (240μg/cm(2)) within 120h (4800 PVF). However, uranium could not be detected by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis, likely due to the detection limit. These results suggest that microfluidic testing on thin rock sections enables quantitative evaluation of rock (mineral)-water interactions at the micro-fracture or pore scale.

  2. Section 175 report: Secretary of Energy report to the Congress pursuant to Section 175 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This report contributes to, but does not supplant, ongoing studies being conducted by DOE to ensure that potentially significant adverse effects that may result from the repository program are minimized to the maximum extent practicable. As indicated in the Environmental Assessment for the Yucca Mountain site (US DOE, 1986) DOE does not believe significant adverse effects will result from site characterization activities. Nevertheless, DOE is conducting a variety of studies to determine if this conclusion is valid. These studies include, but are not limited to, monitoring of air and water quality and other environmental factors; monitoring the number of immigrating repository program workers and their residential locations; identifying cultural resources in the Yucca Mountain area and traditional culture and religious values of American Indian people associated with those resources; evaluating possible rail access routes to the Yucca Mountain site; and evaluating possible highway routes. These studies have been implemented after consultation with affected parties in Nevada. As part of the determination of suitability, and Environmental Impact Statement will be written and will include an analysis of potential impacts associated with constructing, operating, closing, and decommissioning a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 59 refs., 33 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Fiscal year 1996 progress in implementing Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Tenth annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Public Law 96-510), commonly known as Superfund, in 1980. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) (Public Law 99-499), which amended CERCLA in 1986, added Section 120 regarding the cleanup of contaminated sites at Federal facilities. Under Section 120(e)(5) of CERCLA, each department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal government responsible for compliance with Section 120 must submit an annual report to Congress concerning its progress in implementing the requirements of Section 120. The report must include information on the progress in reaching Interagency Agreements (IAGs), conducting remedial investigation and feasibility studies (RI/FSs), and performing remedial actions. Federal agencies that own or operate facilities on the National Priorities List (NPL) are required to begin an RI/FS for these facilities within 6 months after being placed on the NPL. Remediation of these facilities is addressed in an IAG between the Federal agency, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and in some instances the state within which the facility is located.

  4. Correlation of air temperature above water-air sections with the forecasted low level clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, N. Sh.; Malikov, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    As a case study approach the development of low clouds forecasting methods in correlation with air temperature transformational variations on the sections "water-air" is surveyed. It was evident, that transformational variations of air temperature mainly depend on peculiarities and value of advective variations of temperature. DT is the differences of initial temperature on section water-air in started area, from contrast temperature of water surface along a trajectory of movement of air masses and from the temperature above water surface in a final point of a trajectory. Main values of transformational variations of air temperature at advection of a cold masses is 0.530C•h, and at advection of warm masses is -0.370C•h. There was dimensionless quantity K determined and implemented into practice which was characterized with difference of water temperature in forecasting point and air temperature in an initial point in the ratio of dew-points deficiency at the forecasting area. It follows, that the appropriate increasing or decreasing of K under conditions of cold and warm air masses advection, contributes decreasing of low clouds level. References: Abramovich K.G.: Conditions of development and forecasting of low level clouds. vol. #78, 124 pp., Hydrometcenter USSR 1973. Abramovich K.G.: Variations of low clouds level // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 5, 30-41, Moscow, 1968. Budiko M.I.: Empirical assessment of climatic changes toward the end of XX century // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. #12, 5-13, Moscow, 1999. Buykov M.V.: Computational modeling of daily evolutions of boundary layer of atmosphere at the presence of clouds and fog // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 4, 35-44, Moscow, 1981. Huseynov N.Sh. Transformational variations of air temperature above Caspian Sea / Proceedings of Conference On Climate And Protection of Environment, 118-120, Baku, 1999. Huseynov N.Sh.: Consideration of advective and transformational variations of air temperature in

  5. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Karamitros, M.; Mantero, A.; Moretto, P.; Tran, H. N.; Mascialino, B.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Bernal, M. A.; Francis, Z.; Villagrasa, C.; Baldacchino, G.; Gueye, P.; Capra, R.; Nieminen, P.; Zacharatou, C. [Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, CENBG, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 260, S-171-76 Stockholm (Sweden); Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, Technopo circumflex le 2000, 57078 Metz (France); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, P.O. Box 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS SIS2M, Laboratoire de Radiolyse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Via Niella 12, 17100 Savona (Italy); ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H{sup 0}, H{sup +}) and (He{sup 0}, He{sup +}, He{sup 2+}), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt regime and the submicrometer scale, providing GEANT4 users with the so-called ''GEANT4-DNA'' physics models suitable for microdosimetry simulation applications. The corresponding software has been recently re-engineered in order to provide GEANT4 users with a coherent and unique approach to the simulation of electromagnetic interactions within the GEANT4 toolkit framework (since GEANT4 version 9.3 beta). This work presents a quantitative comparison of these physics models with a collection of experimental data in water collected from the literature. Methods: An evaluation of the closeness between the total and differential cross section models available in the GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry and experimental reference data is performed using a dedicated statistical toolkit that includes the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. The authors used experimental data acquired in water vapor as direct measurements in the liquid phase are not yet available in the literature. Comparisons with several recommendations are also presented. Results: The authors have assessed the compatibility of experimental data with GEANT4 microdosimetry models by means of quantitative methods. The results show that microdosimetric measurements in liquid water are necessary to assess quantitatively the validity of the software implementation for the liquid water phase. Nevertheless, a comparison with existing experimental data in water vapor provides a qualitative appreciation of the plausibility of the simulation models. The existing reference data themselves should undergo a critical interpretation and selection, as some of the series

  6. Office of Inspector General report on audit of work force restructuring under Section 3161 of the National Defense Authorization Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    As authorized by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal year 1993, Department of Energy (Department) policy is to provide educational assistance to terminated contractor employees who were impacted by the Department`s downsizing. A terminated employee is anyone who voluntarily or involuntarily departs due to a reduction in employment under a Departmental restructuring plan. The objectives of the audit were to determine if the Department provided (1) reasonable means for terminated contractor employees to obtain training to qualify for new employment and (2) reasonable compensation to southern Nevada for any impact the Department`s downsizing had on the community.

  7. 76 FR 2130 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... exercise of authority creates no substantive or procedural right or benefit that is legally enforceable by... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and... benefit or protection under the INA and has been determined to be otherwise eligible for the benefit...

  8. 76 FR 2131 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... regarding any subsequent benefit or protection applications, unless such exercise of authority has been... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and...) Is seeking a benefit or protection under the INA and has been determined to be otherwise eligible...

  9. 17 CFR 240.10A-1 - Notice to the Commission Pursuant to Section 10A of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Office of the Chief Accountant within the time period prescribed in that section. The notice may be... Office of the Chief Accountant within the required time period. (2) The notice specified in paragraph (a... the independent accountant (including the independent accountant's name and phone number, and...

  10. 7 CFR 1717.860 - Lien accommodations and subordinations under section 306E of the RE Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... subordination under this section, the investment must be an original capital investment, i.e., not a refinancing or refunding. (See § 1717.851 for the definition of capital investment.) (b) Determination of net... of capital investments, provided that the security, including the assurance of repayment, for...

  11. 75 FR 19297 - Medical Loss Ratios; Request for Comments Regarding Section 2718 of the Public Health Service Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... other provisions, requires health insurance issuers offering individual or group coverage to submit annual reports to the Secretary on the percentages of premiums that the coverage spends on reimbursement... enrollees if this spending does not meet minimum standards for a given plan year. Section 1562 of PPACA...

  12. 29 CFR 1990.152 - Model emergency temporary standard pursuant to section 6(c) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... occupational exposures to ___, or to (specify the uses of classes of uses of ___ , which are covered by the... provided in paragraph (a)(2). (2) Exemption. This section does not apply to (insert those uses or classes... protective devices worn, if any; and (D) Name, social security number, and job classification of the...

  13. Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

  14. Concomitant changes in cross-sectional area and water content in skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Uhrbrand, Anders; Hansen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how one bout (1EX) and three bouts (3EX) of strenuous resistance exercise affected the cross-sectional area (CSA) and water content (WC) of the quadriceps muscle and patella tendon (PT), 4 h and 52 h after the last exercise bout. Ten healthy untrained male subjects performed...... was significantly reduced at 52 h (3EX: 14 ± 2%) compared with baseline and (3EX: 13 ± 1%) compared with 4 h. Present data demonstrate that strenuous resistance exercise results in an acute increase in muscle WC and underlines the importance of ensuring sufficient time between the last exercise bout...

  15. A Numerical Study on the Asymmetric Water Entry of A Wedge Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. S. Seif; S. M. Mousaviraad; S. H. Saddathosseini

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the asymmetric water entry over a submerged part of a ship on the hydrodynamic impact is investigated numerically. A wedge body is considered and the problem is assumed to be two-dimensional. The results of symmetric and asymmetric impacts are compared. The effect is found significant in the numerical simulation. The maximum hydrodynamic pressure at a heel angle of 10 degrees becomes about 95% more than that of the symmetric entry. The result of the present work proves the importance of asymmetrical hydrodynamic impact loading for structural design of a ship. Besides, the numerical procedure is not limited to a wedge type cross section and it is possible to apply it for any real geometry of ships and high-speed craft.

  16. A shallow-water theory for annular sections of Keplerian Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Umurhan, O M

    2008-01-01

    A scaling argument is presented that leads to a shallow water theory of non-axisymmetric disturbances in annular sections of thin Keplerian disks. The aims of this study is to develop a theoretical construction that will aid in physically understanding the relationship of known two-dimensional vortex dynamics to their three-dimensional counterparts in Keplerian disks. Using asymptotic scaling arguments varicose disturbances of a Keplerian disk are considered on radial and vertical scales consistent with the height of the disk while the azimuthal scales are the full $2\\pi$ angular extent of the disk. For simplicity perturbations are assumed to be homentropic according to a polytropic equation of state. The timescales considered are long compared to the local disk rotation time. The scalings lead to dynamics which are radially geostrophic and vertically hydrostatic. It follows that a potential vorticity quantity emerges and is shown to be conserved in a Lagrangian sense. Uniform potential vorticity solutions, b...

  17. Maintaining Student Records and Meeting Confidentiality Requirements under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (504). A Primer for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, John

    2006-01-01

    An important federal statute impacting student records is the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), enacted to ensure student/parent access to education records and to limit disclosures to others for unauthorized purposes. FERPA Regulations set forth the basic federal records retention and destruction requirements. The records of…

  18. Extracting cross sections and water levels of minor streams and ditches from LiDAR point data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelens, Jennifer; Dondeyne, Stefaan; Deckers, Jozef; Van Orshoven, Jos; Diels, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative data on the shape and dimensions of location-specific cross-sections is useful for water and floodplain management. In addition, information about the water level is often needed, for example to be used as a boundary condition in hydrological, hydraulic and groundwater models. To detect a water course, let alone the cross section of small streams, the spatial resolution of DEM's derived from LiDAR or other data sources is insufficient. This is not the case for high resolution LiDAR data clouds. An aerial LiDAR database encompassing on average 16 points per square meter is available for the entire Flanders region. LiDAR elevation point clouds and digital RGB aerial images were collected simultaneously. To extract the right points for determination of the water course's cross-section at a given location, a buffer zone is defined around a predefined cross-section. This is based on the assumption that the cross-section of a channel is invariable over a small distance (0.1-1m). The set of extracted and then projected points was subjected to curve fitting based on shape language modelling (SLM). Based on the modelled cross-sectional profile, characteristics like cross-sectional area, width and water level were extracted. Furthermore, normalized indices combining the RGB and intensity data were used to detect the presence of water and the different characteristics of the points close to the water level and close to the banks. The study area is located in the alluvial valley of the Dijle, 20 km east of Brussels. It is part of the nature reserve 'de Doode Bemde'. The area of the test site is 10.3 ha and contains a ditch network of approximately three km. The field data, collected during August 2015 with a real time kinematic (RTK) GPS, was used for validation. The measurement result contained 153 cross sections with all the bathymetry data under the water level. Validation showed that all of the cross-sections modelled with the LiDAR data had a positive mean

  19. Procedures for Handling Retaliation Complaints Under Section 31307 of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    On March 16, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the U.S. Department of Labor (Department) issued an interim final rule (IFR) that provided procedures for the Department's processing of complaints under the employee protection (retaliation or whistleblower) provisions of Section 31307 of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). The IFR established procedures and time frames for the handling of retaliation complaints under MAP-21, including procedures and time frames for employee complaints to OSHA, investigations by OSHA, appeals of OSHA determinations to an administrative law judge (ALJ) for a hearing de novo, hearings by ALJs, review of ALJ decisions by the Administrative Review Board (ARB) (acting on behalf of the Secretary of Labor) and judicial review of the Secretary's final decision. It also set forth the Department's interpretations of the MAP-21 whistleblower provisions on certain matters. This final rule adopts, without change, the IFR.

  20. Implementation and Utilization of Section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2006 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    108 e. Communications Equipment In FY2007, the LAF purchased Datron secure, frequency hopping radios using Section 1206 funding. These radios...visibility training for pilots. The aircraft targeted for spare parts were the Mi-17 hip transport helicopters, Bell 412 transport helicopters, and the AH...Army believe that there is both an operational and psychological impact from having Cobra helicopters available to support special operations forces

  1. Concentrations and composition of aerosols and particulate matter in surface waters along the transatlantic section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Redzhepova, Z. U.; Dara, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Along the transatlantic section from Ushuaia to Gdańsk (March 26-May 7, 2015; cruise 47 of R/V Akademik Ioffe), data were obtained on the concentrations of aerosols in the near-water layer of the atmosphere and of particulate matter in surface waters, as well as of organic compounds within the considered matter (Corg, chlorophyll a, lipids, and hydrocarbons). The concentrations of aerosols amounted to 1237-111 739 particles/L for the fraction of 0.3-1 μm and to 0.02-34.4 μg/m2/day for the matter collected by means of the network procedure. The distribution of aerosols is affected by circumcontinental zoning and by the fluxes from arid areas of African deserts. The maximum concentration of the treated compounds were found in the river-sea frontal area (the runoff of the Colorado River, Argentina), as well as when nearing the coasts, especially in the English Channel.

  2. Modeling the Gila-San Francisco Basin using system dynamics in support of the 2004 Arizona Water Settlement Act.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Peplinski, William J.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2012-04-01

    Water resource management requires collaborative solutions that cross institutional and political boundaries. This work describes the development and use of a computer-based tool for assessing the impact of additional water allocation from the Gila River and the San Francisco River prescribed in the 2004 Arizona Water Settlements Act. Between 2005 and 2010, Sandia National Laboratories engaged concerned citizens, local water stakeholders, and key federal and state agencies to collaboratively create the Gila-San Francisco Decision Support Tool. Based on principles of system dynamics, the tool is founded on a hydrologic balance of surface water, groundwater, and their associated coupling between water resources and demands. The tool is fitted with a user interface to facilitate sensitivity studies of various water supply and demand scenarios. The model also projects the consumptive use of water in the region as well as the potential CUFA (Consumptive Use and Forbearance Agreement which stipulates when and where Arizona Water Settlements Act diversions can be made) diversion over a 26-year horizon. Scenarios are selected to enhance our understanding of the potential human impacts on the rivers ecological health in New Mexico; in particular, different case studies thematic to water conservation, water rights, and minimum flow are tested using the model. The impact on potential CUFA diversions, agricultural consumptive use, and surface water availability are assessed relative to the changes imposed in the scenarios. While it has been difficult to gage the acceptance level from the stakeholders, the technical information that the model provides are valuable for facilitating dialogues in the context of the new settlement.

  3. Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990, Number 3; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1 through September 30, 1990. This report is the third of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, study plans, and performance assessment. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  5. Public perception of drinking water safety in South Africa 2002–2009: a repeated cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Jim A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low and middle income countries, public perceptions of drinking water safety are relevant to promotion of household water treatment and to household choices over drinking water sources. However, most studies of this topic have been cross-sectional and not considered temporal variation in drinking water safety perceptions. The objective of this study is to explore trends in perceived drinking water safety in South Africa and its association with disease outbreaks, water supply and household characteristics. Methods This repeated cross-sectional study draws on General Household Surveys from 2002–2009, a series of annual nationally representative surveys of South African households, which include a question about perceived drinking water safety. Trends in responses to this question were examined from 2002–2009 in relation to reported cholera cases. The relationship between perceived drinking water safety and organoleptic qualities of drinking water, supply characteristics, and socio-economic and demographic household characteristics was explored in 2002 and 2008 using hierarchical stepwise logistic regression. Results The results suggest that perceived drinking water safety has remained relatively stable over time in South Africa, once the expansion of improved supplies is controlled for. A large cholera outbreak in 2000–02 had no apparent effect on public perception of drinking water safety in 2002. Perceived drinking water safety is primarily related to water taste, odour, and clarity rather than socio-economic or demographic characteristics. Conclusion This suggests that household perceptions of drinking water safety in South Africa follow similar patterns to those observed in studies in developed countries. The stability over time in public perception of drinking water safety is particularly surprising, given the large cholera outbreak that took place at the start of this period.

  6. Drinking Water Management and Governance in Canada: An Innovative Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) Framework for a Safe Drinking Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereskie, Ty; Rodriguez, Manuel J.; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-08-01

    Drinking water management in Canada is complex, with a decentralized, three-tiered governance structure responsible for safe drinking water throughout the country. The current approach has been described as fragmented, leading to governance gaps, duplication of efforts, and an absence of accountability and enforcement. Although there have been no major waterborne disease outbreaks in Canada since 2001, a lack of performance improvement, especially in small drinking water systems, is evident. The World Health Organization water safety plan approach for drinking water management represents an alternative preventative management framework to the current conventional, reactive drinking water management strategies. This approach has seen successful implementation throughout the world and has the potential to address many of the issues with drinking water management in Canada. This paper presents a review and strengths-weaknesses-opportunities-threats analysis of drinking water management and governance in Canada at the federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal levels. Based on this analysis, a modified water safety plan (defined as the plan-do-check-act (PDCA)-WSP framework) is proposed, established from water safety plan recommendations and the principles of PDCA for continuous performance improvement. This proposed framework is designed to strengthen current drinking water management in Canada and is designed to fit within and incorporate the existing governance structure.

  7. Water-hammer pressure waves interaction at cross-section changes in series in viscoelastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meniconi, S.; Brunone, B.; Ferrante, M.

    2012-08-01

    In view of scarcity of both experimental data and numerical models concerning transient behavior of cross-section area changes in pressurized liquid flow, the paper presents laboratory data and numerical simulation of the interaction of a surge wave with a partial blockage by a valve, a single pipe contraction or expansion and a series of pipe contraction/expansion in close proximity.With regard to a single change of cross-section area, laboratory data point out the completely different behavior with respect to one of the partially closed in-line valves with the same area ratio. In fact, for the former the pressure wave interaction is not regulated by the steady-state local head loss. With regard to partial blockages, transient tests have shown that the smaller the length, the more intense the overlapping of pressure waves due to the expansion and contraction in series.Numerically, the need for taking into account both the viscoelasticity and unsteady friction is demonstrated, since the classical water-hammer theory does not simulate the relevant damping of pressure peaks and gives rise to a time shifting between numerical and laboratory data. The transient behavior of a single local head loss has been checked by considering tests carried out in a system with a partially closed in-line valve. As a result, the reliability of the quasi steady-state approach for local head loss simulation has been demonstrated in viscoelastic pipes. The model parameters obtained on the basis of transients carried out in single pipe systems have then been used to simulate transients in the more complex pipe systems. These numerical experiments show the great importance of the length of the small-bore pipe with respect to one of the large-bore pipes. Precisely, until a gradually flow establishes in the small-bore pipe, the smaller such a length, the better the quality of the numerical simulation.

  8. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  9. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  10. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  11. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  12. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  13. Balancing Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... scientific research on hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language—common elements in how we perceive ...

  14. Welfare, Liberty, and Security for All? U.S. Sex Education Policy and the 1996 Title V Section 510 of the Social Security Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Justin E; Hawkins, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    When adolescents delay (meaning they wait until after middle school) engaging in sexual intercourse, they use condoms at higher rates and have fewer sexual partners than those who have sex earlier, thus resulting in a lower risk for unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. The 1996 Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act (often referred to as A-H) is a policy that promotes abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOE) within public schools. Using Stone's (2012) policy analysis framework, this article explores how A-H limits welfare, liberty, and security among adolescents due to the poor empirical outcomes of AOE policy. We recommend incorporating theory-informed comprehensive sex education in addition to theory-informed abstinence education that utilizes Fishbein and Ajzen's (2010) reasoned action model within schools in order to begin to address adolescent welfare, liberty, and security.

  15. Perspectives on the Termination of Debt Review in Terms of Section 86(10 of the National Credit Act 34 of 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C van Heerden

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Credit Act 34 of 2005 (the NCA aims to address and prevent the overindebtedness of consumers and to provide mechanisms for resolving over-indebtedness based on the principle of satisfaction by the consumer of all his obligations. In this regard it provides inter alia for the mechanism of debt review, during which a debt counsellor reviews the debt situation of a consumer in order to determine if the consumer is over-indebted and to attempt to assist the consumer in obtaining debt relief in the form of a consensual debt re-arrangement agreement or court-ordered debt re-structuring. A pending debt review has serious consequences. It bars a consumer from entering into further credit agreements and creates a moratorium on debt enforcement by the credit provider. However, a debt review in terms of section 86 does not end or lapse automatically if a specific event fails to occur or upon the expiry of a specific time period. Before a credit provider can enforce a credit agreement that is the subject of a pending debt review, the debt review must be terminated in accordance with section 86(10 and certain other requirements must be met. If a debt review is incorrectly terminated in accordance with section 86(10, the enforcement proceedings instituted thereafter will be unlawful and premature. In practice the debt review process – and specifically the termination thereof – are problematic as there appears to be uncertainty, as a result of the sparse provisions of section 86(10, regarding exactly when a debt review can be terminated. Uncertainty exists regarding the scope of a debt review and whether it should be afforded a narrow or broad interpretation, which will inevitably affect the cut-off date for termination. This article attempts to address some of these issues.

  16. Recovery Act: Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, William P. [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Buescher, Tom [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The objective of Emerson's Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller is to support the DOE's AARA priority for Clean, Secure Energy by designing a water heater control that levels out residential and small business peak electricity demand through thermal energy storage in the water heater tank.

  17. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  18. Influence of the ab-initio nd cross sections in the critical heavy-water benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Morillon, B; Carbonell, J

    2013-01-01

    The n-d elastic and breakup cross sections are computed by solving the three-body Faddeev equations for realistic and semi-realistic Nucleon-Nucleon potentials. These cross sections are inserted in the Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear processes considered in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP). The results obtained using thes ab initio n-d cross sections are compared with those provided by the most renown international libraries.

  19. Los Derechos de las Personas Incapacitadas Bajo la Ley Federal. Seccion 504 de la Ley de Rehabilitacion de 1973 (Handicapped Persons's Rights under Federal Law. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This Spanish-language pamphlet explains Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which outlaws disability discrimination in programs receiving federal funds and the extensive regulations stemming from Section 504. The rights and responsibilities of handicapped persons are related to the following issues: eligibility for coverage under the…

  20. 78 FR 49512 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), and their implementing regulations. The... included operating facilities, corporate offices, warehouses, and other storage locations. On October 2... Commission (SERC) and/or the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) that these facilities are subject...

  1. 77 FR 35323 - National Environmental Policy Act: Categorical Exclusions for Soil and Water Restoration Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ..., or the rights and obligations of recipients of such programs. Regulatory Flexibility Act This... 12630, ``Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property Rights.'' The... inadequate culvert to improve aquatic organism passage or prevent resource or property damage where the road...

  2. Biochar particle size, shape, and porosity act together to influence soil water properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon; Masiello, Caroline A; Gonnermann, Helge M

    2017-01-01

    Many studies report that, under some circumstances, amending soil with biochar can improve field capacity and plant-available water. However, little is known about the mechanisms that control these improvements, making it challenging to predict when biochar will improve soil water properties. To develop a conceptual model explaining biochar's effects on soil hydrologic processes, we conducted a series of well constrained laboratory experiments using a sand matrix to test the effects of biochar particle size and porosity on soil water retention curves. We showed that biochar particle size affects soil water storage through changing pore space between particles (interpores) and by adding pores that are part of the biochar (intrapores). We used these experimental results to better understand how biochar intrapores and biochar particle shape control the observed changes in water retention when capillary pressure is the main component of soil water potential. We propose that biochar's intrapores increase water content of biochar-sand mixtures when soils are drier. When biochar-sand mixtures are wetter, biochar particles' elongated shape disrupts the packing of grains in the sandy matrix, increasing the volume between grains (interpores) available for water storage. These results imply that biochars with a high intraporosity and irregular shapes will most effectively increase water storage in coarse soils.

  3. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  4. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Arzu Alpan, F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  5. 78 FR 48845 - Hydrofluorosilicic Acid in Drinking Water; TSCA Section 21 Petition; Reasons for Agency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... million (ppm) (10 ppb) to protect consumers served by public water systems from the effects of long-term...). Educating the public about lead in drinking water and actions consumers can take to reduce their exposure to.... 2000. 8. Stein, M.; Starinsky, A.; and Kolodny, Y. Behaviour of uranium during phosphate...

  6. EPA Office of Water (OW): Waters with Nitrogen and Phosphorus (N/P) TMDLs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), states, territories, and authorized tribes, collectively referred to in the Act and here as “states,â€� are...

  7. EPA Office of Water (OW): Waters with Nitrogen and Phosphorus (N/P) TMDLs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), states, territories, and authorized tribes, collectively referred to in the Act and here as “states,â€� are...

  8. Duke Energy Subsidiaries Plead Guilty and Sentenced for Clean Water Act Crimes/The companies will pay a fine and conduct community service and wetlands mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - Three subsidiaries of North Carolina-based Duke Energy Corporation, the largest utility in the United States, pleaded guilty today to nine criminal violations of the Clean Water Act at several of its North Carolina facilities and agreed

  9. Faecal contamination of household drinking water in Rwanda: A national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Miles A; Nagel, Corey L; Rosa, Ghislaine; Iyakaremye, Laurien; Zambrano, Laura Divens; Clasen, Thomas F

    2016-11-15

    Unsafe drinking water is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among young children in low-income settings. We conducted a national survey in Rwanda to determine the level of faecal contamination of household drinking water and risk factors associated therewith. Drinking water samples were collected from a nationally representative sample of 870 households and assessed for thermotolerant coliforms (TTC), a World Health Organization (WHO)-approved indicator of faecal contamination. Potential household and community-level determinants of household drinking water quality derived from household surveys, the 2012 Rwanda Population and Housing Census, and a precipitation dataset were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Widespread faecal contamination was present, and only 24.9% (95% CI 20.9-29.4%, n=217) of household samples met WHO Guidelines of having no detectable TTC contamination, while 42.5% (95% CI 38.0-47.1%, n=361) of samples had >100TTC/100mL and considered high risk. Sub-national differences were observed, with poorer water quality in rural areas and Eastern province. In multivariate analyses, there was evidence for an association between detectable contamination and increased open waste disposal in a sector, lower elevation, and water sources other than piped to household or rainwater/bottled. Risk factors for intermediate/high risk contamination (>10TTC/100mL) included low population density, increased open waste disposal, lower elevation, water sources other than piped to household or rainwater/bottled, and occurrence of an extreme rain event the previous day. Modelling suggests non-household-based risk factors are determinants of water quality in this setting, and these results suggest a substantial proportion of Rwanda's population are exposed to faecal contamination through drinking water.

  10. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 6; Computed Temperature Distribution Through Cross Section of Water-Cooled Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, John N. B.; Sams, Eldon W.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the cross-sectional temperature distribution of a water-cooled turbine blade was made using the relaxation method to solve the differential equation derived from the analysis. The analysis was applied to specific turbine blade and the studies icluded investigations of the accuracy of simple methods to determine the temperature distribution along the mean line of the rear part of the blade, of the possible effect of varying the perimetric distribution of the hot gas-to -metal heat transfer coefficient, and of the effect of changing the thermal conductivity of the blade metal for a constant cross sectional area blade with two quarter inch diameter coolant passages.

  11. Indian Child Welfare: A Status Report. Final Report of the Survey of Indian Child Welfare and Implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act and Section 428 of the Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantz, Margaret C.; And Others

    This is a report on the first national examination of the effects of the Indian Child Welfare Act (Public Law 95-608), enacted in 1978. The study examines the prevalence of Native American children in substitute care and the implementation of the act and portions of the Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 as they affect Indian…

  12. 77 FR 60962 - Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... following industries may be transferred: Airport deicing; aquaculture; centralized waste treatment; coal bed methane; concentrated animal feeding operations; coal mining; construction and development; drinking water... machinery; nonferrous metals manufacturing; oil and gas extraction (including coalbed methane); ore...

  13. 75 FR 55577 - Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ...; concentrated animal feeding operations; coal mining; construction and development; drinking water treatment... metals manufacturing; oil and gas extraction (including coalbed methane); ore mining and dressing; organic chemicals, plastics, and synthetic fibers; pesticide chemicals; petroleum refining; pharmaceutical...

  14. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility... Water Act, as amended. (b) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility shall not cause...

  15. Introduction to special section on impacts of land use change on water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, D.A.; Scanlon, B.R.; Zhang, L.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in land use have potentially large impacts on water resources, yet quantifying these impacts remains among the more challenging problems in hydrology. Water, food, energy, and climate are linked through complex webs of direct and indirect effects and feedbacks. Land use is undergoing major changes due not only to pressures for more efficient food, feed, and fiber production to support growing populations but also due to policy shifts that are creating markets for biofuel and agricultural carbon sequestration. Hydrologic systems embody flows of water, solutes, sediments, and energy that vary even in the absence of human activity. Understanding land use impacts thus necessitates integrated scientific approaches. Field measurements, remote sensing, and modeling studies are shedding new light on the modes and mechanisms by which land use changes impact water resources. Such studies can help deconflate the interconnected influences of human actions and natural variations on the quantity and quality of soil water, surface water, and groundwater, past, present, and future. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. 75 FR 57776 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Notice for the Public Review of the Draft Total Maximum Daily...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... the Bay. EPA used the Chesapeake Bay Program committee structure to engage the watershed jurisdictions... your name and other contact information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you...) 566-1744. Certain material, such as copyrighted materials, will be publicly available only in hard...

  17. 75 FR 39683 - Clean Water Act Section 312(b): Notice Seeking Stakeholder Input on Petition and Other Request To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ...-2010-0126. Please include a total of two copies in addition to the original. 4. Hand Delivery or... disinfection for the treatment of sewage. Type I devices may be installed only on vessels less than or equal to... MSDs are also flow-through treatment devices, which may employ biological treatment and...

  18. 76 FR 70442 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of 28 Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    .... 040505 Ponchatoula Creek and Ponchatoula Fecal Coliform. River. 040603 Selsers Creek--Origin to South... Amite River--Amite River Mercury. Diversion Canal to Lake Maurepas. 040401 Blind River--From Amite River Mercury. Diversion Canal to mouth at Lake Maurepas (Scenic). 040403 Blind River--Source to...

  19. 76 FR 549 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Notice for the Establishment of the Total Maximum Daily Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...) allocations for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that when met will assure the attainment and maintenance of... Nutrient Subcommittee), which is composed of the seven Bay watershed jurisdictions, the Chesapeake Bay... tidal tributaries. The Bay TMDL consists of pollutant allocations, addressing nitrogen, phosphorus...

  20. Microbiological Evaluation of Household Drinking Water Treatment in Rural China Shows Benefits of Electric Kettles: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Cohen

    Full Text Available In rural China ~607 million people drink boiled water, yet little is known about prevailing household water treatment (HWT methods or their effectiveness. Boiling, the most common HWT method globally, is microbiologically effective, but household air pollution (HAP from burning solid fuels causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease, and black carbon emissions exacerbate climate change. Boiled water is also easily re-contaminated. Our study was designed to identify the HWT methods used in rural China and to evaluate their effectiveness.We used a geographically stratified cross-sectional design in rural Guangxi Province to collect survey data from 450 households in the summer of 2013. Household drinking water samples were collected and assayed for Thermotolerant Coliforms (TTC, and physicochemical analyses were conducted for village drinking water sources. In the winter of 2013-2104, we surveyed 120 additional households and used remote sensors to corroborate self-reported boiling data.Our HWT prevalence estimates were: 27.1% boiling with electric kettles, 20.3% boiling with pots, 34.4% purchasing bottled water, and 18.2% drinking untreated water (for these analyses we treated bottled water as a HWT method. Households using electric kettles had the lowest concentrations of TTC (73% lower than households drinking untreated water. Multilevel mixed-effects regression analyses showed that electric kettles were associated with the largest Log10TTC reduction (-0.60, p<0.001, followed by bottled water (-0.45, p<0.001 and pots (-0.44, p<0.01. Compared to households drinking untreated water, electric kettle users also had the lowest risk of having TTC detected in their drinking water (risk ratio, RR = 0.49, 0.34-0.70, p<0.001, followed by bottled water users (RR = 0.70, 0.53-0.93, p<0.05 and households boiling with pots (RR = 0.74, 0.54-1.02, p = 0.06.As far as we are aware, this is the first HWT-focused study in China, and the first to quantify the

  1. Federal energy conservation programs pursuant to section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (Public Law 94-163). Annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-21

    This report provides an overview of the activities and achievements of the executive branch of the Federal Government in implementing the energy conservation requirements and provisions of section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) of 1975 (Public Law 94-163). The report describes Federal actions to develop procurement policies that promote energy conservation and efficiency, develop a Federal 10-Year Buildings Energy Conservation Plan, develop responsible public education and information programs, encourage energy conservation and energy efficiency, and promote vanpooling and carpooling arrangements. About half of the Nation's energy is used in our homes and automobiles. Another 48 percent is used by State and local governments, business and insutry, in providing needed goods and services. The Federal Government is the Nation's largest energy user, accouting for 2.2 percent of the total national energy used in 1977. This energy is used by nearly 6 million people in more than 400 thousand buildings and in the operation of more than 600 thousand vehicles. While energy conservation and energy efficiency measures alone cannot solve our immediate problems, they are an essential part of our transition to an era of scarce and expensive energy supplies.

  2. 78 FR 42942 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... emergency response commission (SERC), and the fire department with jurisdiction over these facilities. In..., SERC, and the fire department with jurisdiction over these facilities. Under EPCRA Section 325, 42 U.S... RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6922, and the regulations found at 40 CFR 273.13--.15 (universal waste requirements...

  3. 75 FR 35087 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, Environment and Natural Resources Division, and either e-mailed..., Environmental Enforcement Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. BILLING CODE 4410-15-P ... ( tonia.fleetwood@usdoj.gov ), fax no. (202) 514-0097, phone confirmation number (202) 514-1547....

  4. 76 FR 68788 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Natural Resources Division, and either emailed to pubcomment-ees.enrd@usdoj.gov or mailed to P.O. Box 7611... Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. BILLING CODE 4410-15-P ... ), fax no. (202) 514-0097, phone confirmation number (202) 514-1547. In requesting a copy from...

  5. Drosophila big brain does not act as a water channel, but mediates cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kimiko; Tsuji, Shoji; Miwa, Hideki; Morisaku, Toshinori; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Orihara, Minako; Kaneko, Kazunari; Okano, Hideyuki; Yasui, Masato

    2009-06-18

    The neurogenic gene Drosophila big brain (bib) has a high sequence homology to aquaporin-4. However, its cellular functions in Drosophila neurogenesis have remained elusive. Here we investigated cell adhesion, and the ion and water permeability of Bib. The adhesive function was examined by a cell aggregation assay using L cells. Bib-transfected L cells formed aggregated clusters, while control-L cells remained as a single cell suspension. Ion permeation was not confirmed in L cells stably expressing Bib. When expressed in COS7 cells, Bib exhibited limited water permeability. This newly found cell adhesive function of Bib may be important for Drosophila neurogenesis.

  6. Appendix to HDC 2118 design criteria 100-X reactor water plant, general description - section II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-03-29

    The factors responsible for the advances of 100-X compared with the older areas are: Simplification of the process, such as elimination of separate process water clearwells, by having the filtered water reservoirs perform that function. Combination of separate buildings into one building, such as combining filter pump house and process pump house. Use of electric standby. Use of higher capacity pumps and filter basins, and so fewer number of units. Centralization of control and operation. More compact arrangement of plant components. Use of waste heat for space heating, recovered from reactor effluent, backed up by steam plant.

  7. 76 FR 49505 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... sewage from its sanitary sewer system-- discharges that often are referred to as Sanitary Sewer Overflows or ``SSOs''--and from MSD's combined storm water and sanitary sewer system--discharges that often are referred to as Combined Sewer Overflows or ``CSOs''--violate MSD's National Pollutant Discharge...

  8. 77 FR 43860 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... its entire sewer collection system to eliminate overflows of untreated raw sewage. Chattanooga will... to ensure proper management, operation and maintenance of its sewer systems; and install additional controls on the Chattanooga Creek combined sewer outfalls to ensure compliance with water quality...

  9. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, A; Karamitros, M

    2010-01-01

    The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H0, H+) and (He0, He+, He2+), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt...

  10. Performance of Combined Water Turbine with Semielliptic Section of the Savonius Rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Kaprawi Sahim; Dyos Santoso; Agus Radentan

    2013-01-01

    The Darrieus turbine is a suitable power generation in free stream flow because it is simple in construction, but it has the disadvantage of its small starting torque. The Savonius turbine has a high starting torque but the efficiency is smaller than that of Darrieus turbine. To improve the starting torque of Darrieus turbine, the Savonius buckets are introduced into the Darrieus turbine and the combined turbine is called Darrieus-Savonius turbine. In this study, three semielliptic sections o...

  11. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Emma J; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S; Lavrentieva, Nina N

    2016-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H$_2{}^{16}$O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H$_2$- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number $J$ up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300 - 2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for $J$\\p $J$\\pp-dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  12. Mutagenicity Assessment of Drinking Water in Combination with Flavored Black Tea Bags: a Cross Sectional Study in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebouyeh, Farzaneh; Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Ziarati, Parisa; Heshmati, Masoomeh; Qomi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Diseases related to water impurities may present as major public health burdens. The present study aimed to assess the mutagenicity of drinking water from different zones of Tehran, and evaluate possible health risks through making tea with tea bags, by Ames mutagenicity test using TA 100, TA 98 and YG1029 strains. For this purpose, 450 water samples were collected over the period of July to December 2014 from 5 different zones of Tehran. Except for one sample, no mutagenic potential was detected during these two seasons and the MI scores were almost normal (≤ 1-1.6) in TA 100, TA 98 and YG1029 strains. Although no mutagenic effects were considered in TA 98 and TA 100 in the test samples of our three evaluated tea bag brands, one sample from a local company showed mutagenic effects in the YG1029 strain (MI=1.7-1.9 and 2) after prolonged (10-15 min.) steeping. Despite the mild mutagenic effect discovered for one of the brand, this cross sectional study showed relative safety of water samples and black tea bags in Tehran. According to the sensitivity of YG1029 to the mutagenic potential of water and black tea, even without metabolic activation by s9 fraction, this metabolizer strain could be considered as sensitive and applicable to food samples for quantitative analysis of mutagens.

  13. How safe is our "place of safety"? Clinical guidance promoting safer medical care of patients detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouko, Josie; Goddard, Aurielle; Nimmo-Smith, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    A new four-bed unit was opened in Bristol, UK, in 2014, for people detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act. Police bring individuals posing a risk to themselves or others to a Place of Safety (PoS) in order to receive a mental health assessment. Individuals may be held for up to 72 hours, but cannot receive treatment against their will, unless assessed as lacking the capacity to refuse treatment. Issues requiring medical input arose in more than a third of patients, yet there was little guidance for trainees around the PoS. We conducted a survey which confirmed that robust clinical guidance was needed for junior doctors around medical assistance in this unique environment. We identified specific concerns around patient safety in relation to alcohol withdrawal, uncertainties around legislation and lack of clarity of who to call out of hours. Trainees felt they were working outside of their expertise. We collaborated with a variety of professionals to produce clinical guidance in line with best evidence, and made this easily accessible. We also gained a consensus that more experienced core trainees (SHOs) in Psychiatry should be the first point of contact. We then conducted a survey in June 2015, and found that doctors covering the PoS now felt there was sufficient guidance on most clinical scenarios, 100% consensus on who to contact and improved confidence in their ability to manage issues arising. In August 2015 we held an informal training session for the new intake of trainees on the rota. A subsequent survey revealed similarly positive results. Through this project, we were able to identify defects in a system, provide needed guidance to enable safer and more equitable care to a vulnerable group, and foster closer collaboration between junior doctors and managers in the design and use of services.

  14. Comparison of ALE and SPH Simulations of Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section into Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of multi-terrain impact has been identified as an important research area for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program on Rotorcraft Crashworthiness. As part of this effort, two vertical drop tests were conducted of a 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section into water. For the first test, the fuselage section was impacted in a baseline configuration without energy absorbers. For the second test, the fuselage section was retrofitted with a composite honeycomb energy absorber. Both tests were conducted at a nominal velocity of 25-ft/s. A detailed finite element model was developed to represent each test article and water impact was simulated using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches in LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Analytical predictions were correlated with experimental data for both test configurations. In addition, studies were performed to evaluate the influence of mesh density on test-analysis correlation.

  15. Determination of neutron cross sections of iron and water between 0. 3 and 11 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Gaafar, M.A.; El-Cherif, A.I. (Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.)

    1981-07-01

    Total neutron cross-sections of iron and water have been determined experimentally using a continuous neutron spectrum emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Measurements have been carried out using neutron spectrometer with single stilbene scintillator. The gamma background was rejected from the measured pulses by a compensation method based on the differences in the shape of neutrons and gamma pulses. The measured pulse amplitude distributions were transformed to neutron energy distributions by means of a differential method. The measured fast neutron spectrum leaking directly from the reactor core and that transmitted through iron and water barriers were used to evaluate the total cross-sections for neutrons of energies between 0.3 and 11 MeV for these materials. Comparison between the values of obtained cross-sections and that given by others shows that a reasonable agreement could be observed between the two for neutrons of energies >1.5 MeV. However, for neutrons of energies <1.5 MeV a large discrepancy was observed. This could be attributed to the failure of the discriminating technique used in these measurements to separate between neutron and gamma pulses.

  16. EPA Office of Water (OW): Impaired Waters with TMDLs by Causes of Impairment and Probable Sources and TMDL Pollutant

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), states, territories, and authorized tribes, collectively referred to in the Act and here as "states," are required...

  17. Performance of Combined Water Turbine with Semielliptic Section of the Savonius Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprawi Sahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Darrieus turbine is a suitable power generation in free stream flow because it is simple in construction, but it has the disadvantage of its small starting torque. The Savonius turbine has a high starting torque but the efficiency is smaller than that of Darrieus turbine. To improve the starting torque of Darrieus turbine, the Savonius buckets are introduced into the Darrieus turbine and the combined turbine is called Darrieus-Savonius turbine. In this study, three semielliptic sections of aspect ratio 0.8 were used for Savonius bucket while the Darrieus blade used three wings of airfoil NACA 0015. The Darrieus-Savonius turbine’s performances were studied experimentally in an irrigation canal of South Sumatera, Indonesia. The results show that the distance of Savonius buckets from the shaft centre influences performance of combined turbine, and the attachment angle of Savonius rotor made important variation of turbine performance.

  18. Methodology and Principles for Applying Section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act = Methodologie et principes d'application de l'article 11 de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Human Rights Commission, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The purpose of this paper is to help employers, employee groups, and others understand the concept of equal pay by explaining the intentions of section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Canadian Human Rights Commission's approach to its application. It can be used as a reference by those responsible for developing pay systems or…

  19. Methodology and Principles for Applying Section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act = Methodologie et principes d'application de l'article 11 de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Human Rights Commission, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The purpose of this paper is to help employers, employee groups, and others understand the concept of equal pay by explaining the intentions of section 11 of the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Canadian Human Rights Commission's approach to its application. It can be used as a reference by those responsible for developing pay systems or…

  20. 33 CFR 203.61 - Emergency water supplies due to contaminated water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Water Act (see 40 CFR 141), is exceeded. (ii) The water supply has been identified as a source of... contaminated water source. 203.61 Section 203.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... PROCEDURES Emergency Water Supplies: Contaminated Water Sources and Drought Assistance § 203.61...

  1. (e,3e) and (e,3-1e) differential cross sections for the double ionization of water molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, A. [Laboratoire de Physique quantique et systemes dynamiques, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Dal Cappello, C., E-mail: cappello@univ-metz.f [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, ICPMB (FR 2843), Institut de Physique, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Kada, I. [Laboratoire de Physique quantique et systemes dynamiques, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Champion, C. [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, ICPMB (FR 2843), Institut de Physique, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Roy, A.C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2009-08-24

    We report new results for differential cross sections for the double ionization of water molecule by 1 keV electron impact. The present calculation is based on the first Born approximation. We describe the water molecule by a single centre wave function of Moccia. For the final state, an approximation of the well-known 3C wave function is used. An extensive study has been made by varying the angles of detection and the energies of each ejected electron. We have investigated the double ionization of each molecular state (1b{sub 1}, 3a{sub 1}, 1b{sub 2} and 2a{sub 1}) and identified the mechanisms of this process.

  2. Reactivity impact of deuterium cross sections for heavy-water benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kozier, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Campbell, J.M.; Little, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The final release of version 6 of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (Endf/B-6) was distributed in October 2001. During post-release testing, it was discovered that calculated eigenvalues for a set of heavy-water solution benchmarks had decreased substantially relative to earlier interim versions of Endf/B-6. Revisions to the angular scattering distribution for deuterium were determined to be the cause of the reactivity change. These changes improve the calculated results for some high-leakage benchmarks but degrade the results for others. The reactivity impact on low-leakage cases was found to be essentially negligible. It is recommended that the differences between the two sets of angular distributions should be reviewed and, if possible, reconciled before the initial version of Endf/B-6 is issued. (authors)

  3. MaxEnt analysis of a water distribution network in Canberra, ACT, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Steven H.; Niven, Robert K.; Abel, Markus; Schlegel, Michael; Noack, Bernd R.

    2015-01-01

    A maximum entropy (MaxEnt) method is developed to infer the state of a pipe flow network, for situations in which there is insufficient information to form a closed equation set. This approach substantially extends existing deterministic methods for the analysis of engineered flow networks (e.g. Newton's method or the Hardy Cross scheme). The network is represented as an undirected graph structure, in which the uncertainty is represented by a continuous relative entropy on the space of internal and external flow rates. The head losses (potential differences) on the network are treated as dependent variables, using specified pipe-flow resistance functions. The entropy is maximised subject to "observable" constraints on the mean values of certain flow rates and/or potential differences, and also "physical" constraints arising from the frictional properties of each pipe and from Kirchhoff's nodal and loop laws. A numerical method is developed in Matlab for solution of the integral equation system, based on multidimensional quadrature. Several nonlinear resistance functions (e.g. power-law and Colebrook) are investigated, necessitating numerical solution of the implicit Lagrangian by a double iteration scheme. The method is applied to a 1123-node, 1140-pipe water distribution network for the suburb of Torrens in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia, using network data supplied by water authority ACTEW Corporation Limited. A number of different assumptions are explored, including various network geometric representations, prior probabilities and constraint settings, yielding useful predictions of network demand and performance. We also propose this methodology be used in conjunction with in-flow monitoring systems, to obtain better inferences of user consumption without large investments in monitoring equipment and maintenance.

  4. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Schools in Low Socio-Economic Regions in Nicaragua: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Tania; Cronk, Ryan; Obando, Wanda; Medina, Octavio Zeledon; Kinoshita, Rinko; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) in schools contributes to better health and educational outcomes among school-aged children. In 2012, UNICEF Nicaragua and partners conducted a cross-sectional survey of WaSH in 526 schools in 12 low socio-economic status municipalities in Nicaragua. The survey gathered information on: school characteristics; teacher and community participation; water and sanitation infrastructure; and hygiene education and habits. Survey results were analyzed for associations between variables. WaSH coverage was significantly higher in urban than rural areas. Presence of drinking water infrastructure (43%) was lower than sanitation infrastructure (64%). Eighty-one percent of schools had no hand washing stations and 74% of schools lacked soap. Sanitation facilities were not in use at 28% of schools with sanitation infrastructure and 26% of schools with water infrastructure had non-functional systems. Only 8% of schools had budgets to purchase toilet-cleaning supplies and 75% obtained supplies from students’ families. This study generates transferable WaSH sector learnings and new insights from monitoring data. Results can be used by donors, service providers, and policy makers to better target resources in Nicaraguan schools. PMID:26035665

  5. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Schools in Low Socio-Economic Regions in Nicaragua: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Jordanova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH in schools contributes to better health and educational outcomes among school-aged children. In 2012, UNICEF Nicaragua and partners conducted a cross-sectional survey of WaSH in 526 schools in 12 low socio-economic status municipalities in Nicaragua. The survey gathered information on: school characteristics; teacher and community participation; water and sanitation infrastructure; and hygiene education and habits. Survey results were analyzed for associations between variables. WaSH coverage was significantly higher in urban than rural areas. Presence of drinking water infrastructure (43% was lower than sanitation infrastructure (64%. Eighty-one percent of schools had no hand washing stations and 74% of schools lacked soap. Sanitation facilities were not in use at 28% of schools with sanitation infrastructure and 26% of schools with water infrastructure had non-functional systems. Only 8% of schools had budgets to purchase toilet-cleaning supplies and 75% obtained supplies from students’ families. This study generates transferable WaSH sector learnings and new insights from monitoring data. Results can be used by donors, service providers, and policy makers to better target resources in Nicaraguan schools.

  6. Water, sanitation, and hygiene in schools in low socio-economic regions in Nicaragua: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Tania; Cronk, Ryan; Obando, Wanda; Medina, Octavio Zeledon; Kinoshita, Rinko; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-05-29

    Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) in schools contributes to better health and educational outcomes among school-aged children. In 2012, UNICEF Nicaragua and partners conducted a cross-sectional survey of WaSH in 526 schools in 12 low socio-economic status municipalities in Nicaragua. The survey gathered information on: school characteristics; teacher and community participation; water and sanitation infrastructure; and hygiene education and habits. Survey results were analyzed for associations between variables. WaSH coverage was significantly higher in urban than rural areas. Presence of drinking water infrastructure (43%) was lower than sanitation infrastructure (64%). Eighty-one percent of schools had no hand washing stations and 74% of schools lacked soap. Sanitation facilities were not in use at 28% of schools with sanitation infrastructure and 26% of schools with water infrastructure had non-functional systems. Only 8% of schools had budgets to purchase toilet-cleaning supplies and 75% obtained supplies from students' families. This study generates transferable WaSH sector learnings and new insights from monitoring data. Results can be used by donors, service providers, and policy makers to better target resources in Nicaraguan schools.

  7. H.R. 2605: Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Appropriations are made for the following purposes: (1) Corps of Engineers for general investigations, construction, flood control, operation and maintenance, regulatory program, general expenses, revolving fund, and administrative provision; (2) Dept. of the Interior for the central Utah project, Bureau of Reclamation, water and related resources, Central Valley project restoration fund, California Bay-Delta restoration, and administrative provisions; (3) Dept. of Energy for energy supply, non-defense environmental management, uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, science, nuclear waste disposal, and departmental administration; (4) Atomic Energy Defense activities for weapon activities, defense environmental restoration and waste management, defense environmental management privatization, and defense nuclear waste disposal; (5) Power marketing administrations for Bonneville Power Administration fund, operation and maintenance of the Southeastern Power Administration, the Southwestern Power Administration, the Western Area Power Administration, Falcon and Amistad operating and maintenance fund, and salaries and expenses for FERC; (6) Independent agencies including Appalachian Regional Commission, Denali Commission, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Inspector General, Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, and the Tennessee Valley Authority fund. Certain appropriations are also rescinded.

  8. Emission projections for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Section 812 second prospective Clean Air Act cost/benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James H; Mullen, Maureen A; Bollman, Andrew D; Thesing, Kirstin B; Salhotra, Manish; Divita, Frank; Neumann, James E; Price, Jason C; DeMocker, James

    2008-05-01

    Section 812 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform periodic, comprehensive analyses of the total costs and total benefits of programs implemented pursuant to the CAAA. The first prospective analysis was completed in 1999. The second prospective analysis was initiated during 2005. The first step in the second prospective analysis was the development of base and projection year emission estimates that will be used to generate benefit estimates of CAAA programs. This paper describes the analysis, methods, and results of the recently completed emission projections. There are several unique features of this analysis. One is the use of consistent economic assumptions from the Department of Energy's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005) projections as the basis for estimating 2010 and 2020 emissions for all sectors. Another is the analysis of the different emissions paths for both with and without CAAA scenarios. Other features of this analysis include being the first EPA analysis that uses the 2002 National Emission Inventory files as the basis for making 48-state emission projections, incorporating control factor files from the Regional Planning Organizations (RPOs) that had completed emission projections at the time the analysis was performed, and modeling the emission benefits of the expected adoption of measures to meet the 8-hr ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), the Clean Air Visibility Rule, and the PM2.5 NAAQS. This analysis shows that the 1990 CAAA have produced significant reductions in criteria pollutant emissions since 1990 and that these emission reductions are expected to continue through 2020. CAAA provisions have reduced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by approximately 7 million t/yr by 2000, and are estimated to produce associated VOC emission reductions of 16.7 million t by 2020. Total oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emission reductions attributable to the

  9. The Water Resources Council's Principles and Standards for Planning Water and Related Land Resources Projects were established in response to the Water Resources Planning Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The overall purpose of water and land resource planning is to promote the quality of life by reflecting society's preferences for attainment of the objectives...

  10. 17 CFR 230.168 - Exemption from sections 2(a)(10) and 5(c) of the Act for certain communications of regularly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section is not available for any communication that, although in technical compliance with this section... (iii) Either: (A) Has its equity securities trading on a designated offshore securities market as...

  11. Seasonality of intermediate waters hydrography west of the Iberian Peninsula from a 8-yr semiannual timeseries of an oceanographic section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Prieto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Seasonality of hydrographical properties at depth in the western Iberian margin (Eastern North Atlantic is analysed from a 2003–2010 timeseries of a semi-annual oceanographic section extending ~ 200 nm off Cape Finisterre (43° N. All waters masses down to the whole extent of the permanent thermocline (2000 dbar show a consistent seasonal signature in their termohaline properties and there is a notable asymmetry between the slope region and the outer ocean (in the surroundings of the Galicia Bank. There is overall cooling and freshening of East North Atlantic Central Waters in summertime, which is larger and deeper-reaching on the slope. In summertime, Mediterranean Water gets tightly attached against the slope and is uplifted, reinforcing its thermohaline signature and diminishing its presence at the outer ocean. In wintertime the situation reverses, MW seems to detach from the slope and spreads out to the open ocean, even developing a secondary branch around the Galicia Bank. Thermohaline seasonality at depth shows values up to 0.4 °C and 0.08 in salinity at the lower MW, of the order of 20 % of the overall interannual variability observed during the whole period. Decomposition of thermohaline changes at isobaric levels to changes along isoneutral surfaces and changes due to vertical displacements helps to analyse the physical processes behind the observed seasonality in terms of (1 the large-scale seasonality of the subtropical gyre in response to the seasonal migration of the subtropical high pressure system and subsequent anomalies in Ekman transport and wind stress curl, (2 the continental slope dynamics, characterized by summer upwelling, winter development of the Iberian Poleward Current and Mediterranean Water spreading and (3 the possible influence of seasonal changes of water mass properties at their formation sources.

  12. 18 CFR 284.3 - Jurisdiction under the Natural Gas Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Natural Gas Act. 284.3 Section 284.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OTHER REGULATIONS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978 AND RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978...

  13. 29 CFR 4.2 - Payment of minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payment of minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the... and Procedures § 4.2 Payment of minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards... employees shall pay any employees engaged in such work less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a...

  14. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

    2010-09-30

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

  15. Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water, Dietary Intakes of B Vitamins and Folate, and Risk of High Blood Pressure in Bangladesh: A Population-based, Cross-sectional Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yu; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Howe, Geoffrey R; Graziano, Joseph H; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Parvez, Faruque; van Geen, Alexander; Ahsan, Habibul

    The authors performed a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate the association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and blood pressure using baseline data of 10,910 participants in the Health...

  16. Calculation of lineal energies for water and DNA bases using the Rudd model cross sections integrated within the Geant4-DNA processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Z.; El Bitar, Z.; Incerti, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Karamitros, M.; Tran, H. N.

    2017-07-01

    This study presents new parameters for proton ionisation cross sections in guanine, adenine, thymine, and cytosine based upon the semi-empirical Rudd model. The same model was used to find differential electron cross sections considering a speed scaling procedure. To accelerate computation, the total electron cross sections were obtained using the binary-encounter-Bethe approximation instead of the integrated Rudd formula. The cross sections were implemented in the Geant4 simulation toolkit as Geant4-DNA processes, and simulations were carried out measuring protons lineal energies in spherical micrometric volumes filled with water, adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine. Large differences were seen in the lineal energies evaluated for the different materials, with the lineal energy measured in guanine being sometimes twice that of water. This suggests that the cross sections developed here should be considered in biological simulations where cellular substructures are modelled, in contrast to the current approach which approximates these volumes as consisting of liquid water.

  17. 18 CFR 382.203 - Annual charges under the Interstate Commerce Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual charges under the Interstate Commerce Act. 382.203 Section 382.203 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... § 382.203 Annual charges under the Interstate Commerce Act. (a) The adjusted costs of administration...

  18. Raf V Sweatman (162/2014 [2015] ZASCA 22 (20 March 2015 A Simple Illustration of the SCA'S Statutory Misinterpretation of Section 17(4(C of the Road Accident Fund Act 56 of 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Fick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Road Accident Fund v Sweatman (162/2014 [2015] ZASCA 22 (20 March 2015 (hereafter Sweatman the Supreme Court of Appeal was faced with the interpretation of section 17(4(c of the Road Accident Fund Act 56 of 1998 (the "cap provision". The purpose of this note is to assess the court's interpretation of the "cap provision" to determine whether this interpretation is sound. This is achieved by explaining the purpose of the Road Accident Fund and the Amendment Act. Thereafter the general method of calculating loss of income is explored, together with the different interpretations of the "cap provision" and the application thereof. The abovementioned decision of the SCA on the most appropriate interpretation is then critically analysed. It is argued that the court, in Sweatman, misunderstood the implication of its decision and was therefore incapable of interpreting the provision correctly. The effect is that one of the primary purposes of the Amendment Act is circumvented.

  19. Foraminifera and paleoenvironment of the Plio-Pleistocene Kallithea Bay section, Rhodes, Greece: Evidence for cyclic sedimentation and shallow-water sapropels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Thomsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 250 species of benthic foraminifera have been identified from the Plio-Pleistocene strata of the Kallithea Bay section on the eastern coast of Rhodes. The section comprises an overall transgressive succession ranging from fluviatile and brackish-water gravel at the base to fine-grained dee...

  20. 17 CFR 239.500 - Form D, notice of sales of securities under Regulation D and section 4(6) of the Securities Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amount since the previously filed notice of sales on Form D, does not result in an increase of more than... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form D, notice of sales of... ACT OF 1933 Forms Pertaining to Exemptions § 239.500 Form D, notice of sales of securities under...

  1. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 18. Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-05-01

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 18 which reports the design of Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment. The objective of the Waste Water Treatment system is to collect and treat all plant liquid effluent streams. The system is designed to permit recycle and reuse of the treated waste water. Plant Section 2700 is composed of primary, secondary, and tertiary waste water treatment methods plus an evaporation system which eliminates liquid discharge from the plant. The Waste Water Treatment Section is designed to produce 130 pounds per hour of sludge that is buried in a landfill on the plant site. The evaporated water is condensed and provides a portion of the make-up water to Plant Section 2400 - Cooling Water.

  2. Impact of maintenance of floodplains of the Vistula River on high water levels on the section from Włocławek to Toruń

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Gąsiorowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the methodology of hydraulic calculations to estimate the water levels in open channels for steady gradually varied flow. The presented method has been used to analyse the water level on the Vistula River from Włocławek cross-section to Toruń cross-section. The HEC-RAS modelling system has been used for parameterization of the river channel and floodplains, as well as for flow simulation. The results obtained have been the basis for assessing the impact of maintenance of floodplains on water level during maximum discharges.

  3. Association between type 2 diabetes and chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water: A cross sectional study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic exposure to high level of inorganic arsenic in drinking water has been associated with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. Most research has been ecological in nature and has focused on high levels of arsenic exposure with few studies directly measuring arsenic levels in drinking water as an index of arsenic exposure. The effect of low to moderate levels of arsenic exposure on diabetes risk is largely unknown thus our study is adding further knowledge over previous works. Methods This cross sectional study was conducted in 1004 consenting women and men from 1682 eligible participants yielding a participation rate of 60%. These participants are aged >30 years and were living in Bangladesh and had continuously consumed arsenic-contaminated drinking water for at least 6 months. T2D cases were diagnosed using glucometer following the new diagnostic criteria (Fasting Blood Glucose > 126 mg/dl from the WHO guideline (WHO 2006, or a self-reported physician diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Association between T2D and chronic arsenic exposure was estimated by multiple logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, education, Body Mass Index (BMI and family history of T2D. Results A total of 1004 individuals participated in the study. The prevalence of T2D was 9% (95% CI 7-11%. After adjustment for diabetes risk factors, an increased risk of type 2 diabetes was observed for arsenic exposure over 50 μg/L with those in the highest category having almost double the risk of type 2 diabetes (OR=1.9 ; 95% CI 1.1-3.5. For most levels of arsenic exposure, the risk estimates are higher with longer exposure; a dose–response pattern was also observed. Conclusions These findings suggest an association between chronic arsenic exposure through drinking water and T2D. Risks are generally higher with longer duration of arsenic exposure. The risk of T2D is highest among those who were exposed to the highest concentration of arsenic for more than 10 years.

  4. A critical analysis of the meaning of the term ‘income’ in Sections 7(2 to 7(8 of the Income Tax Act No. 58 of 1962

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Van Wyk

    2017-04-01

    Aim: The objective of the study is to understand whether the term ‘income’, as used in Sections 7(2 to 7(8 of the Act, is used in its defined sense or if it should be ascribed a different meaning. Setting: This article examines existing literature in a South African income tax environment. Method: A non-empirical study of existing literature was conducted by performing a historical analysis within a South African context. A doctrinal research approach was followed. Results: Possible interpretations determined include ‘income’ as defined in section 1 of the Act, namely ‘gross income’ (also defined less exempt income, ‘gross income’, profits and gains or ‘taxable income’ (i.e. ‘income’ less allowable expenditure, deductions and losses and ‘gross income’ less related deductible expenses and losses. Conclusion: It was found that the meaning of ‘income’, for purposes of Sections 7(2 to 7(8, remains an uncertainty, and it is recommended that the wording of Section 7 be amended to reflect the intended meaning thereof.

  5. Access to improved water and its relationship with diarrhoea in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shrestha, Salina; Aihara, Yoko; Yoden, Kanako; Yamagata, Zentaro; Nishida, Kei; Kondo, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    To assess the associations between diarrhoea and types of water sources, total quantity of water consumed and the quantity of improved water consumed in rapidly growing, highly populated urban areas...

  6. Characteristics of Late Permian Deep-Water Sedimentary Environments: A Case Study of Shaiwa Section, Ziyun County, Guizhou Province, Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yongqun; Yang Fengqing; Peng Yuanqiao

    2005-01-01

    Sediments of carbonate gravity flows and terrigenous debris turbidites, and normal bathyal deposits were found at the Shaiwa Section, Ziyun County, Guizhou Province, southwestern China. Through grain-size analysis of some typical sediments at this section, the changing patterns of the grain parameters and the grain-size cumulations were recovered. Results show that the study area was deposited under turbidite control during the Late Permian period, which we also recognized at the outcrop section upon sedimentary characteristics of the sediments. In addition, fossils are abundant in the Upper Permian of the Shaiwa Section, including radiolarians, sponge-spicules, bivalves, brachiopods, ammonoids and trace fossils. Radiolarians and siliceous sponge-spicules are typical deep water assemblages. Bivalves are dominated by genera of Hunanopecten and Claraia, both showing deep water living characteristics. Ammonoids are composed of planktonic types, showing characteristics of smooth and flat shells. Brachiopods are dominated by a small and thin shelled assemblage, which are commonly flat in shape and usually of slight ornamentations on shells. In addition, trace fossils found at the Shaiwa Section are also common types of deep water facies. Thus, the fossil evidence of the Shaiwa Section also suggests a deep water environment, possibly from the bathyal slope to the basin margin facies, of the studied area during the Late Permian period.

  7. 78 FR 15376 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act On March 4, 2013, the Department of Justice..., 2011 (Dkt. Item No. 116), resolved a joint multimedia action by the United States and the State of... and Community Right- to-Know Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation,...

  8. 50 CFR 27.33 - Water skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water skiing. 27.33 Section 27.33 Wildlife... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: With Vehicles § 27.33 Water skiing. When water skiing is permitted upon national wildlife refuge waters, the public will be notified...

  9. 28 CFR Appendix to Part 55 - Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Pt. 55, App. Appendix to Part 55—Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f... heritage. Union County Spanish heritage. New Mexico: Bernalillo County American Indian (Keres, Navajo, Tiwa... (Jan. 8, 1976)), and 41 FR 34329 (Aug. 13, 1976). Covered counties in Colorado, New Mexico, and...

  10. 17 CFR 230.132 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(a)(2) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintained by a bank which is a member of an affiliated group, as defined in section 1504(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (26 U.S.C. 1504(a)), and which is maintained exclusively for the collective investment and reinvestment of monies contributed thereto by one or more bank members of such affiliated...

  11. 17 CFR 270.3c-4 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for the collective investment and reinvestment of monies contributed thereto by one or more bank... trust fund which is maintained by a bank which is a member of an affiliated group, as defined in section... regulatory requirements as would apply if the bank maintaining such fund and any other contributing banks...

  12. 17 CFR 240.3a12-6 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(a)(12) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the collective investment and reinvestment of monies contributed thereto by one or more bank members... fund which is maintained by a bank which is a member of an affiliated group, as defined in section 1504... requirements as would apply if the bank maintaining such fund and any other contributing banks were the same...

  13. 17 CFR 250.14 - Exemption of acquisitions of securities of power supply companies from section 9(a)(2) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... company, either directly or through a wholly-owned company organized solely for that purpose, provided... company which is not an “affiliate” of any other company under clause (B) of section 2(a)(11) shall be... securities of the power supply company are owned by one or more electric utility companies to which the...

  14. 17 CFR 259.5a - Form U5A, for notification of registration filed under section 5(a) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting Form U5A, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form U5A, for notification of... OF 1935 Forms for Registration and Annual Supplements § 259.5a Form U5A, for notification...

  15. 29 CFR 516.14 - Country elevator employees exempt from overtime pay requirements under section 13(b)(14) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Country elevator employees exempt from overtime pay....14 Country elevator employees exempt from overtime pay requirements under section 13(b)(14) of the... names and occupations of all persons employed in the country elevator, whether or not covered by the...

  16. Prevalence, characteristics and correlates of enteric pathogenic protozoa in drinking water sources in Molyko and Bomaka, Cameroon: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsoh, Fuh Anold; Wung, Buh Amos; Atashili, Julius; Benjamin, Pokam Thumamo; Marvlyn, Eba; Ivo, Keumami Katte; Nguedia, Assob Jules Clément

    2016-11-08

    Access to potable water remains a major challenge particularly in resource-limited settings. Although the potential contaminants of water are varied, enteric pathogenic protozoa are known to cause waterborne diseases greatly. This study aimed at investigating the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of enteric pathogenic protozoa in drinking water sources in Buea, Cameroon. A cross-sectional study was conducted using 155 water samples collected from various drinking sources (boreholes, springs, taps and wells). Each sample was subjected to physicochemical examinations (pH, turbidity, odour and sliminess) and parasitological analysis (wet mount, modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain) to determine the presence of enteric pathogenic protozoa. A data collection tool was used to note characteristics of collected samples and the data was analysed using EPI-INFO Version 3.5.3. The overall prevalence of enteric pathogenic protozoa in water sources was 62.6 %. Eight species of enteric protozoa were observed with Cryptosporidium parvum being the most predominant (45.8 %). Spring water was the most contaminated source with enteric protozoa (85.7 %) while pipe borne water had all eight species of protozoa identified. A pH of 6 was the only significant factor associated with the prevalence of these pathogens in water sources. The prevalence of enteric protozoa in water sources in Molyko and Bomaka is high, spring water is the most contaminated water source and Cryptosporidium parvum is the most common protozoa contaminating water. A water pH of 6 is associated to the prevalence of protozoa. Community members need to be educated to treat water before drinking to avoid infection by enteric protozoa in water and further studies with larger samples of water need to be conducted to find other correlates of the presence of protozoa in water.

  17. Water Quality, Sanitation, and Hygiene Conditions in Schools and Households in Dolakha and Ramechhap Districts, Nepal: Results from A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Akina; Sharma, Subodh; Gerold, Jana; Erismann, Séverine; Sagar, Sanjay; Koju, Rajendra; Schindler, Christian; Odermatt, Peter; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2017-01-18

    This study assessed drinking water quality, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions among 708 schoolchildren and 562 households in Dolakha and Ramechhap districts of Nepal. Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in March and June 2015. A Delagua water quality testing kit was employed on 634 water samples obtained from 16 purposively selected schools, 40 community water sources, and 562 households to examine water quality. A flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used to test lead and arsenic content of the same samples. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain WASH predictors. A total of 75% of school drinking water source samples and 76.9% point-of-use samples (water bottles) at schools, 39.5% water source samples in the community, and 27.4% point-of-use samples at household levels were contaminated with thermo-tolerant coliforms. The values of water samples for pH (6.8-7.6), free and total residual chlorine (0.1-0.5 mg/L), mean lead concentration (0.01 mg/L), and mean arsenic concentration (0.05 mg/L) were within national drinking water quality standards. The presence of domestic animals roaming inside schoolchildren's homes was significantly associated with drinking water contamination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.64; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-2.50; p = 0.02). Our findings call for an improvement of WASH conditions at the unit of school, households, and communities.

  18. The Streambank Erosion Control Evaluation and Demonstration Act of 1974, Section 32, Public Law 93-251. Appendix C. Geotechnical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    along the banks, secondary currents, freeze-thaw, and bed aggradation as eroded soil from upstream is deposited at the reach of the river under...reinforced headbox , fitted with a motorized aluminum headgate and turning vanes to direct the flow of the water (Figure C29), is mounted on the...does not take into account variations in tractive shear stress due to spiral (or helicoidal) flow, secondary currents, or flow separation in curved

  19. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - TMDL Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  20. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - TMDL Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  1. 76 FR 16818 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Standard Criteria for Ag and Urban Water Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... ``Standard Criteria for Agricultural and Urban Water Management Plans'' (Criteria) are now available for... published the Criteria. The Criteria apply to any Water Management Plans (Plans) submitted to Reclamation as... Management Plans are considered the same as Water Conservation Plans. DATES: Submit written comments by...

  2. ACT Verbal Prep Course

    CERN Document Server

    Standridge, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive Prep for ACT Verbal. Every year, students pay 1,000 and more to test prep companies to prepare for the verbal sections of the ACT. Now you can get the same preparation in a book. The verbal sections are not easy. There is no quick fix that will allow you to "beat" the ACT, but it is very learnable. If you study hard and master the techniques in this book, your score will improve-significantly. The ACT cannot be "beaten." But it can be mastered-through hard work, analytical thought, and by training yourself to think like a test writer. Many of the exercises in this book are design

  3. Economics of place-based monitoring under the safe drinking water act, part I: spatial and temporal patterns of contaminants, and design of screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Edwin; Rajagopal, R

    2008-08-01

    The goals of environmental legislation and associated regulations are to protect public health, natural resources, and ecosystems. In this context, monitoring programs should provide timely and relevant information so that the regulatory community can implement legislation in a cost-effective and efficient manner. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 attempts to ensure that public water systems (PWSs) supply safe water to its consumers. As is the case with many other federal environmental statutes, SDWA monitoring has been implemented in relatively uniform fashion across the USA. In this three part series, spatial and temporal patterns in water quality data are utilized to develop, compare, and evaluate the economic performance of alternative place-based monitoring approaches to current monitoring practice. Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), a common list of over 90 contaminants is analyzed nationwide using EPA-authorized laboratory procedures. National and state-level summaries of SDWA data have shown that not all contaminants occur in all places at all times. This hypothesis is confirmed and extended by showing that only a few (less than seven) contaminants are of concern in any one of 19 Iowa surface water systems studied. These systems collectively serve about 350,000 people and their sizes vary between 1,200 and 120,000. The distributions of contaminants found in these systems are positively skewed, with many non-detect measurements. A screening strategy to identify such contaminants in individual systems is presented. These findings have significant implications not only for the design of alternative monitoring programs, but also in multi-billion-dollar decisions that influence the course of future drinking water infrastructure, repair, and maintenance investments.

  4. 40 CFR 130.8 - Water quality report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality report. 130.8 Section... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.8 Water quality report. (a) Each State shall prepare and submit biennially to the Regional Administrator a water quality report in accordance with section 305(b) of the Act...

  5. Water in the hydration shell of halide ions has significantly reduced Fermi resonance and moderately enhanced Raman cross section in the OH stretch regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-08-22

    Water in the presence of electrolytes plays an important role in biological and industrial processes. The properties of water, such as the intermolecular coupling, Fermi resonance (FR), hydrogen-bonding, and Raman cross section were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra in the OD and OH stretch regions in presence of alkali halides (NaX; X = F, Cl, Br, I). It is observed that the changes in spectral characteristics by the addition of NaX in D2O are similar to those obtained by the addition of H2O in D2O. The spectral width decreases significantly by the addition of NaX in D2O (H2O) than that in the isotopically diluted water. Quantitative estimation, on the basis of integrated Raman intensity, revealed that the relative Raman cross section, σ(H)/σ(b) (σ(H) and σ(b) are the average Raman cross section of water in the first hydration shell of X(-) and in bulk, respectively), in D2O and H2O is higher than those in the respective isotopically diluted water. These results suggest that water in the hydration shell has reduced FR and intermolecular coupling compared to those in bulk. In the isotopically diluted water, the relative Raman cross section increases with increase in size of the halide ions (σ(H)/σ(b) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 for F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), respectively), which is assignable to the enhancement of Raman cross section by charge transfer from halide ions to the hydrating water. Nevertheless, the experimentally determined σ(H)/σ(b) is lower than the calculated values obtained on the basis of the energy of the charge transfer state of water. The weak enhancement of σ(H)/σ(b) signifies that the charge transfer transition in the hydration shell of halide ions causes little change in the OD (OH) bond lengths of hydrating water.

  6. Emergency department as a 'place of safety': reviewing the use of Section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apakama, Dorothy C

    2012-01-01

    Section 136 provides the lawful authority for the removal, by the police, of the person to whom the provision applies, from a place to which the public have access. There has been a longstanding debate as to the most appropriate place of safety for these patients. The aim of this article is to review the literature and determine the ideal place for the detention and assessment of these patients and clarify the responsibilities of the staff of the agencies involved in the detention. It concludes that there is no single most appropriate place of safety for all groups of patients. Rather, there should be a range of options to enable the assessment in the most suitable environment for individual cases according to their needs at the time.

  7. Hydrology of the Beryl-Enterprise area, Escalante Desert, Utah, with emphasis on ground water; With a section on surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Reed W.; Sandberg, George Woodard

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the water resources of the Beryl-Enterprise area, Escalante Desert, Utah (pl. 1), was made during 1976-78 as part of a cooperative program with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights. Wells were the most important source of water for all purposes in the Beryl-Enterprise area during 1978, but it has not always been so. For nearly a century after the first settlers arrived in about 1860, streams supplied most of the irrigation water and springs supplied much of the water for domestic and stock use. A few shallow wells were dug by the early settlers for domestic and stock water, but the widespread use of ground water did not start until the 1920's when shallow wells were first dug to supply irrigation water. Ground-water withdrawals from wells, principally for irrigation, have increased nearly every year since the 1920's. The quantity withdrawn from wells surpassed that diverted from surface sources during the mid-1940's and was about eight times that amount during the 1970's. As a result, water levels have declined measurably throughout the area resulting in administrative water-rights problems.The primary purpose of this report is to describe the water resources with emphasis on ground water. The surface-water resources are evaluated only as they pertain to the understanding of the ground-water resources. A secondary purpose is to discuss the extent and effects of the development of ground water in order to provide the hydrologic information needed for the orderly and optimum development of the resource and for the effective administration and adjudication of water rights in the area. The hydrologic data on which this report is based are given in a companion report by Mower (1981).

  8. Resource conservation and recovery act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    This document describes the progress of 13 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1989. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 32 refs., 30 figs., 103 tabs.

  9. Rust Contamination from Water Leaks in the Cosmic Dust Lab and Lunar and Meteorite Thin Sections Labs at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, J. J.; Berger, E. L.; Fries, M. D.; Bastien, R.; McCubbin, F. M.; Pace, L.; Righter, K.; Sutter, B.; Zeigler, R. A.; Zolensky, M.

    2017-01-01

    On the early morning of September 15th, 2016, on the first floor of Building 31 at NASA-Johnson Space Center, the hose from a water chiller ruptured and began spraying water onto the floor. The water had been circulating though old metal pipes, and the leaked water contained rust-colored particulates. The water flooded much of the western wing of the building's ground floor before the leak was stopped, and it left behind a residue of rust across the floor, most notably in the Apollo and Meteorite Thin Section Labs and Sample Preparation Lab. No samples were damaged in the event, and the affected facilities are in the process of remediation. At the beginning of 2016, a separate leak occurred in the Cosmic Dust Lab, located in the same building. In that lab, a water leak occurred at the bottom of the sink used to clean the lab's tools and containers with ultra-pure water. Over years of use, the ultra-pure water eroded the metal sink piping and leaked water onto the inside of the lab's flow bench. This water also left behind a film of rusty material. The material was cleaned up and the metal piping was replaced with PVC pipe and sealed with Teflon plumber's tape. Samples of the rust detritus were collected from both incidents. These samples were imaged and analyzed to determine their chemical and mineralogical compositions. The purpose of these analyses is to document the nature of the detritus for future reference in the unlikely event that these materials occur as contaminants in the Cosmic Dust samples or Apollo or Meteorite thin sections.

  10. 40 CFR 35.925-2 - Water quality management plans and agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality management plans and... Water Act § 35.925-2 Water quality management plans and agencies. That the project is consistent with any applicable water quality management (WQM) plan approved under section 208 or section 303(e) of...

  11. 40 CFR 125.61 - Existence of and compliance with applicable water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable water quality standards. 125.61 Section 125.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Water Act § 125.61 Existence of and compliance with applicable water quality standards. (a) There must exist a water quality standard or standards applicable to the pollutant(s) for which a section 301(h...

  12. End-Permian conodont fauna from Dongpan section:Correlation between the deep-and shallow-water facies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper systematically investigated the conodonts from the uppermost Permian to the Lower Triassic at the Dongpan Section, Southern Guangxi, South China, and obtained abundant Late Permian conodonts from the syndepositional limestone lenses of beds 3 and 5-2 at this section. One genus and eight species of conodont P1 element including one new species, Neogondolella dongpanensis sp. nov., have been identified. The feature of conodont fauna indicates that conodonts collected from beds 3 and 5 at the Dongpan Section belong to the Neogondolella yini conodont zone, and correspond to bed 24 at the Meishan Section. Based on these conodont data, we suggest that the Neoalbaillella optima radiolarian zone at the Dongpan Section at least extended to the upper part of the N. yini conodont zone.

  13. End-Permian conodont fauna from Dongpan section: Correlation between the deep- and shallow-water facies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO GenMing; LAI XuLong; FENG QingLai; JIANG HaiShui; WIGNALL Paul; ZHANG KeXin; SUN YaDong; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper systematically investigated the conodonts from the uppermost Permian to the Lower Triassic at the Dongpan Section,Southern Guangxi,South China,and obtained abundant Late Permian conodonts from the syndepositional limestone lenses of beds 3 and 5-2 at this section.One genus and eight species of conodont P1 element including one new species,Neogondolella dongpanensis sp.nov.,have been identified.The feature of conodont fauna indicates that conodonts collected from beds 3 and 5 at the Dongpan Section belong to the Neogondolella yini conodont zone,and correspond to bed 24 at the Meishan Section.Based on these conodont data,we suggest that the Neoalbaillella optima radiolarian zone at the Dongpan Section at least extended to the upper part of the N.yini conodont zone.

  14. Geologic Maps and Cross Sections of the Tuba City Open Dump Site and Vicinity, With Implications for the Occurrence and Flow of Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, James K.; Johnson, Ray H.; Horton, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    This report is designed to make available to interested parties geologic and limited hydrologic and geochemical information about the Tuba City Open Dump (TCOD) site. This information has been gathered during studies of the site from January to September 2008. Mapping by the authors and construction of cross sections show that a section of gently northeast-dipping Jurassic sedimentary rocks underlies the TCOD and vicinity. Low mesas in the area are capped by variably cemented gravels and siliceous limestones. Surficial sediments are composed of eolian sand and fluvially reworked eolian sand that overlie bedrock underneath the TCOD. Nearby Pasture Canyon is underlain by fluvial and floodplain sediment consisting of sand and silt. Shallow ground water of the water-table aquifer at the TCOD moves westward through the surficial sediment and the underlying weathered bedrock to Pasture Canyon then southward along the canyon. A fracture zone extends up the wash that passes just to the north of the TCOD and brings deeper ground water of the N-aquifer to the water-table aquifer. Bedrock consists of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone composed of thick sections of eolian crossbedded sandstone with lesser laterally discontinuous layers of silty sandstone, siltstone, and limestone. Below the Navajo Sandstone is a section informally known as the Kayenta Formation-Navajo Sandstone transition zone. It is composed of calcareous sandstone, silty sandstone, siltstone, and limestone beds that intertongue with crossbedded sandstone. The finer grained rocks in both major bedrock units form aquitards that limit downward movement of ground water. The water-table aquifer is perched on these aquitards, which locally occurs beneath the two open dumps that form the TCOD site. A monocline occupies the position of Pasture Canyon west of the TCOD. Fractures likely related to the monocline are exposed in several localities. Deep ground waters consist of dilute calcium-bicarbonate waters low in all

  15. 舞水河怀化城区段水质现状研究%Study on the Water Quality Status of Huaihua Urban Section of Wushui River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁娟; 徐武美; 黄六斌; 伍宏伟; 康亚雄; 谭智文

    2011-01-01

    对舞水河怀化城区段水质分丰水期、平水期、枯水期3个时期进行了实地调查与监测,并利用单项和综合评价法对水质进行了评价,得出舞水河怀化城区段水质符合国家Ⅲ类水质标准,但其支流太平溪水体污染严重,对舞水河水质有一定的影响.因此,进一步加强对舞水河尤其是其支流太平溪的治理,对怀化市建设生态宜居城市意义重大.%This research made a field investigation and monitoring of water quality of Huaihua urban section of Wushui River during abundant, mean and dry water periods. It also made an evaluation of water quality using the individual and comprehensive evaluation methods. The result showed that the water quality of Huaihua urban section of Wushui River met the national class III water quality standards. But its tributary, Taiping River was seriously polluted and it had a certain effect on the water quality of Wushui River. Therefore, further control of Wushui River especially its tributary Taiping River was very important to the construction of ecological livable city of Huaihua.

  16. Petroleum contaminated water and health symptoms: a cross-sectional pilot study in a rural Nigerian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kponee, Kalé Zainab; Chiger, Andrea; Kakulu, Iyenemi Ibimina; Vorhees, Donna; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy

    2015-11-06

    The oil-rich Niger Delta suffers from extensive petroleum contamination. A pilot study was conducted in the region of Ogoniland where one community, Ogale, has drinking water wells highly contaminated with a refined oil product. In a 2011 study, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) sampled Ogale drinking water wells and detected numerous petroleum hydrocarbons, including benzene at concentrations as much as 1800 times higher than the USEPA drinking water standard. UNEP recommended immediate provision of clean drinking water, medical surveillance, and a prospective cohort study. Although the Nigerian government has provided emergency drinking water, other UNEP recommendations have not been implemented. We aimed to (i) follow up on UNEP recommendations by investigating health symptoms associated with exposure to contaminated water; and (ii) assess the adequacy and utilization of the government-supplied emergency drinking water. We recruited 200 participants from Ogale and a reference community, Eteo, and administered questionnaires to investigate water use, perceived water safety, and self-reported health symptoms. Our multivariate regression analyses show statistically significant associations between exposure to Ogale drinking water and self-reported health symptoms consistent with petroleum exposure. Participants in Ogale more frequently reported health symptoms related to neurological effects (OR = 2.8), hematological effects (OR = 3.3), and irritation (OR = 2.7). Our results are the first from a community relying on drinking water with such extremely high concentrations of benzene and other hydrocarbons. The ongoing exposure and these pilot study results highlight the need for more refined investigation as recommended by UNEP.

  17. 18 CFR 2.22 - Pricing policy for transmission services provided under the Federal Power Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transmission services provided under the Federal Power Act. 2.22 Section 2.22 Conservation of Power and Water... for transmission services provided under the Federal Power Act. (a) The Commission has adopted a Policy Statement on its pricing policy for transmission services provided under the Federal Power...

  18. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen, flow, and shade measurements in the three stream sections of the Golden Trout Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen R. Matthews

    2016-01-01

    To determine the current range of water temperatures in the streams inhabited by California golden trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita, I deployed and monitored water temperature recording probes from 2008 through 2013 in three meadows in the Golden Trout Wilderness (GTW). Ninety probes were placed in three meadow streams: Mulkey Creek in Mulkey...

  19. Learn About Section 508

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find out about EPA's commitment to making its websites and other electronic and information technology (EIT) products accessible, learn what Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act covers and why, and how to make your EIT 508 compliant.

  20. What is Section 508?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section of the Rehabilitation Act required federal agencies to develop, procure, maintain, and use information and communications technology (ICT) that is accessible to people with disabilities, whether or not they work for the government.

  1. Penalty model for delay of bidding section construction period in South-to-North Water Diversion Eastern Route Project from perspective of programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-chun FENG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the multi-project and program management theory, this paper analyzes the program generation principle and establishes a program based on progress goals. On the basis of the present situation of calculation of penalty for delay of the bidding section construction period with the critical path method, we studied the effects of contractor-induced delay of the bidding section construction period in detail, including the effects on the construction period of the bidding section itself, the earliest start times of the next bidding section and other subsequent bidding sections, and the construction period of the program, and then constructed a penalty model for delay of the bidding section construction period from the perspective of programs. Using the penalty model, we conducted a practical analysis of penalty for delay of the construction period of the Baoying station program in the South-to-North Water Diversion Project. The model can help determine the amount of penalty for delay of the construction period in bidding sections scientifically and reasonably.

  2. Water Quality, Sanitation, and Hygiene Conditions in Schools and Households in Dolakha and Ramechhap Districts, Nepal: Results from A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akina Shrestha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed drinking water quality, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH conditions among 708 schoolchildren and 562 households in Dolakha and Ramechhap districts of Nepal. Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in March and June 2015. A Delagua water quality testing kit was employed on 634 water samples obtained from 16 purposively selected schools, 40 community water sources, and 562 households to examine water quality. A flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used to test lead and arsenic content of the same samples. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain WASH predictors. A total of 75% of school drinking water source samples and 76.9% point-of-use samples (water bottles at schools, 39.5% water source samples in the community, and 27.4% point-of-use samples at household levels were contaminated with thermo-tolerant coliforms. The values of water samples for pH (6.8–7.6, free and total residual chlorine (0.1–0.5 mg/L, mean lead concentration (0.01 mg/L, and mean arsenic concentration (0.05 mg/L were within national drinking water quality standards. The presence of domestic animals roaming inside schoolchildren’s homes was significantly associated with drinking water contamination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.64; 95% confidence interval: 1.08–2.50; p = 0.02. Our findings call for an improvement of WASH conditions at the unit of school, households, and communities.

  3. Water Quality, Sanitation, and Hygiene Conditions in Schools and Households in Dolakha and Ramechhap Districts, Nepal: Results from A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Akina; Sharma, Subodh; Gerold, Jana; Erismann, Séverine; Sagar, Sanjay; Koju, Rajendra; Schindler, Christian; Odermatt, Peter; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed drinking water quality, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions among 708 schoolchildren and 562 households in Dolakha and Ramechhap districts of Nepal. Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in March and June 2015. A Delagua water quality testing kit was employed on 634 water samples obtained from 16 purposively selected schools, 40 community water sources, and 562 households to examine water quality. A flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used to test lead and arsenic content of the same samples. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain WASH predictors. A total of 75% of school drinking water source samples and 76.9% point-of-use samples (water bottles) at schools, 39.5% water source samples in the community, and 27.4% point-of-use samples at household levels were contaminated with thermo-tolerant coliforms. The values of water samples for pH (6.8–7.6), free and total residual chlorine (0.1–0.5 mg/L), mean lead concentration (0.01 mg/L), and mean arsenic concentration (0.05 mg/L) were within national drinking water quality standards. The presence of domestic animals roaming inside schoolchildren’s homes was significantly associated with drinking water contamination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.64; 95% confidence interval: 1.08–2.50; p = 0.02). Our findings call for an improvement of WASH conditions at the unit of school, households, and communities. PMID:28106779

  4. Hydrochemical study of water collected at a section of the Lower Volta River (Akuse to Sogakope area), Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampson, E. K.; Nartey, V. K.; Golow, A. A.; Akiti, T. T.

    2014-06-01

    The present hydrochemical study at the Lower Volta River (Akuse to Sogakope area), Ghana was conducted by determining the physico-chemical parameters (pH, temperature, total dissolved solute, electrical conductivity, total hardness, phosphate (PO4 3-), nitrate (NO3 -), sulfate (SO4 2-), dissolve oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand, calcium (Ca2+), sodium (Na+), magnesium (Mg2+), total iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) nickel (Ni), and total chromium (Cr) at 38 sampling sites during the wet and the dry seasons. The physical and ionic parameters were mostly found within the WHO (Guidelines for drinking-water quality, 3rd edn, Geneva 2004) standard for drinking water. The trace metals except Cu at some sites recorded values above the WHO (Guidelines for drinking-water quality, 3rd edn, Geneva 2004) standard for drinking water. This shows that the river water is not entirely fit for drinking. Mean values of physico-chemical parameters were mostly found to be high in the dry season as compared to the wet season. Cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed to evaluate the water quality and the interrelationship between variables. CA grouped the physico-chemical parameters into three groups (physical/minor ions, major ions and trace elements). Correlation analysis showed that physico-chemical parameters do not vary much in terms of the sampling sites. Thus, based on obtained information, it is possible to design a future, desirable sampling strategy, which could reduce the number of sampling stations and associated costs for effective river water quality management. Results showed that four principal components (industrial effect, domestic factor, natural source and agricultural effect) accounted for 65.59 % of the total variance among the water quality parameters. PCA also identified sampling sites 69R, 63R, 51M, 87L, 35L, 74L and 84L as polluted with metals. Therefore, water quality monitoring and control of release of industrial

  5. Water Environment Protection in Yangzhou Section of Yangtze River%长江扬州段水环境保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华迎春; 陈勤; 任晓梅; 高荣

    2001-01-01

    It is an urgent task at present to utilize resources of Yangtze River scientifically and reasonably and implement continuous development in the economic region along the river.This paper makes a special research on the status and evolution trend of water environment in Yangzhou section of the Yangtze River and puts forward a measure concerned to bring it under control by total amount control,especially make a breakthrough on pollution analysis and control countermeasure for non-point source based on a vast amount of monitoring data and basic material collected.The evaluation and forecast methods,determination of patternin flow & water quality and design condition,calculation on pollution effect in key section and mixed area of blowoff port etc.used in this paper have higher learning and practical value.It is significant for the protection of water environment and ecological environment,and provides basis for the research on water environment protection of Yangtze River and inspiration for water quality protection.This technology has good value in application and dissemination.

  6. Distribution (State Allotment) of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Appropriation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The ARRA appropriation for the DWSRF program is $2,000,000,000. DWSRF allotments are based on percentages derived from the 2003 Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs...

  7. 75 FR 58023 - Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ..., Oxygen, Alum Flocculation Modification. This method for dissolved oxygen describes a pretreatment step... investigated for use with salt water or solid sample matrices. The reporting limit for nonylphenol is 5 g/L...

  8. Water and Beverage Consumption among Children Aged 4–13 Years in Lebanon: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamis Jomaa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates total water intake (TWI from plain water, beverages and foods among Lebanese children and compares TWI to dietary reference intakes (DRIs. In a national cross-sectional survey, data on demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, and physical activity characteristics were obtained from 4 to 13-year-old children (n = 752. Food and beverage consumption patterns were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. TWI was estimated at 1651 mL/day, with beverages contributing 72% of the TWI compared to 28% from foods. Beverages with the highest contribution to TWI included plain water, fruit juice and soda. A significantly higher proportion of 9–13-year-old children failed to meet the DRIs compared to 4–8 years old (92%–98% vs. 74%. Gender differentials were observed with a significantly higher proportion of boys meeting the DRIs compared to girls. The water to energy ratio ranged between 0.84 and 0.87, which fell short of meeting the desirable recommendations. In addition, children from higher socioeconomic status had higher intakes of water from milk and bottled water, coupled with lower water intakes from sodas. The study findings show an alarming high proportion of Lebanese children failing to meet TWI recommendations, and call for culture-specific interventions to instill healthy fluid consumption patterns early in life.

  9. Association of Urogenital Symptoms with History of Water Contact in Young Women in Areas Endemic for S. haematobium. A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashini Nilushika Galappaththi-Arachchige

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Female genital schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium. Infected females may suffer from symptoms mimicking sexually transmitted infections. We explored if self-reported history of unsafe water contact could be used as a simple predictor of genital schistosomiasis. In a cross-sectional study in rural South Africa, 883 sexually active women aged 16–22 years were included. Questions were asked about urogenital symptoms and water contact history. Urine samples were tested for S. haematobium ova. A score based on self-reported water contact was calculated and the association with symptoms was explored while adjusting for other genital infections using multivariable logistic regression analyses. S. haematobium ova were detected in the urine of 30.5% of subjects. Having ova in the urine was associated with the water contact score (p < 0.001. Symptoms that were associated with water contact included burning sensation in the genitals (p = 0.005, spot bleeding (p = 0.012, abnormal discharge smell (p = 0.018, bloody discharge (p = 0.020, genital ulcer (p = 0.038, red urine (p < 0.001, stress incontinence (p = 0.001 and lower abdominal pain (p = 0.028. In S. haematobium endemic areas, self-reported water contact was strongly associated with urogenital symptoms. In low-resource settings, a simple history including risk of water contact behaviour can serve as an indicator of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  10. Water and Beverage Consumption among Children Aged 4-13 Years in Lebanon: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Lamis; Hwalla, Nahla; Constant, Florence; Naja, Farah; Nasreddine, Lara

    2016-09-08

    This study evaluates total water intake (TWI) from plain water, beverages and foods among Lebanese children and compares TWI to dietary reference intakes (DRIs). In a national cross-sectional survey, data on demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, and physical activity characteristics were obtained from 4 to 13-year-old children (n = 752). Food and beverage consumption patterns were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. TWI was estimated at 1651 mL/day, with beverages contributing 72% of the TWI compared to 28% from foods. Beverages with the highest contribution to TWI included plain water, fruit juice and soda. A significantly higher proportion of 9-13-year-old children failed to meet the DRIs compared to 4-8 years old (92%-98% vs. 74%). Gender differentials were observed with a significantly higher proportion of boys meeting the DRIs compared to girls. The water to energy ratio ranged between 0.84 and 0.87, which fell short of meeting the desirable recommendations. In addition, children from higher socioeconomic status had higher intakes of water from milk and bottled water, coupled with lower water intakes from sodas. The study findings show an alarming high proportion of Lebanese children failing to meet TWI recommendations, and call for culture-specific interventions to instill healthy fluid consumption patterns early in life.

  11. Water and Beverage Consumption among Children Aged 4–13 Years in Lebanon: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Lamis; Hwalla, Nahla; Constant, Florence; Naja, Farah; Nasreddine, Lara

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates total water intake (TWI) from plain water, beverages and foods among Lebanese children and compares TWI to dietary reference intakes (DRIs). In a national cross-sectional survey, data on demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, and physical activity characteristics were obtained from 4 to 13-year-old children (n = 752). Food and beverage consumption patterns were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. TWI was estimated at 1651 mL/day, with beverages contributing 72% of the TWI compared to 28% from foods. Beverages with the highest contribution to TWI included plain water, fruit juice and soda. A significantly higher proportion of 9–13-year-old children failed to meet the DRIs compared to 4–8 years old (92%–98% vs. 74%). Gender differentials were observed with a significantly higher proportion of boys meeting the DRIs compared to girls. The water to energy ratio ranged between 0.84 and 0.87, which fell short of meeting the desirable recommendations. In addition, children from higher socioeconomic status had higher intakes of water from milk and bottled water, coupled with lower water intakes from sodas. The study findings show an alarming high proportion of Lebanese children failing to meet TWI recommendations, and call for culture-specific interventions to instill healthy fluid consumption patterns early in life. PMID:27618092

  12. Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  13. Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Smith, Woutrina; Call, Douglas R

    2016-11-03

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. E. coli was isolated from 71 % of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 % were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 %) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 %; P water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.

  14. Marine Mammal Protection Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA or Act) prohibits, with certain exceptions, the "take" of marine mammals in U.S. waters and by U.S. citizens on the high seas,...

  15. Factors that affect public-supply water use in Florida, with a section on projected water use to the year 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Public-supply water use in Florida increased 242 percent between 1960 and 1987 from 530 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) to 1,811 Mgal/d. This change is primarily a result of increases in population and tourism since 1960. Public-supply utilities provide water to a variety of users. In 1985, 71 percent of the water used for public supply was delivered for residential uses, 15 percent for commercial uses, 9 percent for industrial uses, and the remaining 5 percent for public use or other uses. Residential use of public-supply water in Florida has increased nearly 280 Mgal/d, but has decreased in the proportion of total deliveries from 80 to 71 percent between 1975 and 1985. This trend resulted from increased tourism and related commercial services associated with population and visitors. One of several factors that influences public-supply water use in Florida is the increase in resident population, which increased from 4.95 million in 1960 to more than 12.0 million in 1987. Additionally, Florida's nonresident population increased from 18.8 million visitors in 1977, to 34.1 million visitors in 1987, and the part of Florida?s population that relies on public-supply water increased from 68 percent in 1960, to 86 percent in 1987. The public supply per capita use was multiplied by the projected populations for each county for the years 2000, 2010, and 2020 to forecast public-supply water use. Using medium projections, Florida?s population is expected to increase to nearly 16 million in the year 2000, to 18 million in the year 2010, and to almost 20 million in the year 2020, of which an estimated 13.5 million people will be supplied water from public-supply water systems in the year 2000, 15 million in 2010, and nearly 17 million by the year 2020. Public-supply water use is expected to increase to a projected (medium) 2,310 Mgal/d in the year 2000, 2,610 Mgal/d in the year 2010, and 2,890 Mgal/d in the year 2020. If the population exceeds the medium projections for the

  16. Geology and ground-water resources of the Big Sandy Creek Valley, Lincoln, Cheyenne, and Kiowa Counties, Colorado; with a section on Chemical quality of the ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Donald L.; Horr, Clarence Albert

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the geology and ground-water resources of that part of the Big Sandy Creek valley from about 6 miles east of Limon, Colo., downstream to the Kiowa County and Prowers County line, an area of about 1,400 square miles. The valley is drained by Big Sandy Creek and its principal tributary, Rush Creek. The land surface ranges from flat to rolling; the most irregular topography is in the sandhills south and west of Big Sandy Creek. Farming and livestock raising are the principal occupations. Irrigated lands constitute only a sin311 part of the project area, but during the last 15 years irrigation has expanded. Exposed rocks range in age from Late Cretaceous to Recent. They comprise the Carlile Shale, Niobrara Formations, Pierre Shale (all Late Cretaceous), upland deposits (Pleistocene), valley-fill deposits (Pleistocene and Recent), and dune sand (Pleistocene and Recent). Because the Upper Cretaceous formations are relatively impermeable and inhibit water movement, they allow ground water to accumul3te in the overlying unconsolidated Pleistocene and Recent deposits. The valley-fill deposits constitute the major aquifer and yield as much as 800 gpm (gallons per mixture) to wells along Big Sandy and Rush Creeks. Transmissibilities average about 45,000 gallons per day per foot. Maximum well yields in the tributary valleys are about 200 gpm and average 5 to 10 gpm. The dune sand and upland deposits generally are drained and yield water to wells in only a few places. The ground-water reservoir is recharged only from direct infiltration of precipitation, which annually averages about 12 inches for the entire basin, and from infiltration of floodwater. Floods in the ephemeral Big Sandy Creek are a major source of recharge to ground-water reservoirs. Observations of a flood near Kit Carson indicated that about 3 acre-feet of runoff percolated into the ground-water reservoir through each acre of the wetted stream channel The downstream decrease in channel and

  17. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  18. Smoking water-pipe, chewing nass and prevalence of heart disease: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Golestan Cohort Study, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Poustchi, Hossein; Kamangar, Farin; Golozar, Asieh; Etemadi, Arash; Khademi, Hooman; Freedman, Neal D; Merat, Shahin; Garg, Vaani; Fuster, Valentin; Wakefield, Jon; Dawsey, Sanford M; Pharoah, Paul; Brennan, Paul; Abnet, Christian C; Malekzadeh, Reza; Boffetta, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Water-pipe and smokeless tobacco use have been associated with several adverse health outcomes. However, little information is available on the association between water-pipe use and heart disease (HD). Therefore, we investigated the association of smoking water-pipe and chewing nass (a mixture of tobacco, lime and ash) with prevalent HD. Cross-sectional study. Baseline data (collected in 2004-2008) from a prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. 50 045 residents of Golestan (40-75 years old; 42.4% men). ORs and 95% CIs from multivariate logistic regression models for the association of water-pipe and nass use with HD prevalence. A total of 3051 (6.1%) participants reported a history of HD, and 525 (1.1%) and 3726 (7.5%) reported ever water-pipe or nass use, respectively. Heavy water-pipe smoking was significantly associated with HD prevalence (highest level of cumulative use vs never use, OR=3.75; 95% CI 1.52 to 9.22; p for trend=0.04). This association persisted when using different cut-off points, when restricting HD to those taking nitrate compound medications, and among never cigarette smokers. There was no significant association between nass use and HD prevalence (highest category of use vs never use, OR=0.91; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.20). Our study suggests a significant association between HD and heavy water-pipe smoking. Although the existing evidence suggesting similar biological consequences of water-pipe and cigarette smoking make this association plausible, results of our study were based on a modest number of water-pipe users and need to be replicated in further studies.

  19. Determining behavioral factors for interventions to increase safe water consumption: a cross-sectional field study in rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Alexandra Claudia; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    In developing countries, the lack of safe water options leads to many health risks. In the Ethiopian Rift Valley, most water sources are contaminated with an excess of fluoride. The consumption of fluoride-contaminated water leads to dental and skeletal fluorosis. The article presents an approach to designing community interventions based on evidence from quantitative data. After installing a community filter, a baseline study was conducted in 211 households to survey the acceptance and usage of the filter. To identify important psychological factors that lead to health behavior change, the Risk, Attitude, Norm, Ability, Self-regulation (RANAS) model was taken into account. Descriptive statistics were calculated for behavioral determinants, and their influence on consumption was analyzed with a linear regression. For every behavioral factor, an intervention potential (IP) was calculated. It was found that perceived distance, factual knowledge, commitment, and taste strongly influenced participants' consumption behavior and therefore should be tackled for interventions.

  20. 76 FR 77742 - Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section... defined solely by the elements (solvent, determinative technique) used to measure the analyte. Because... oil and grease values when switching to ASTM D7575-10 are more than 20% lower from values...

  1. Ground-water conditions in the Dutch Flats area, Scotts Bluff and Sioux Counties, Nebraska, with a section on chemical quality of the ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, H.M.; Visher, F.N.; Durum, W.H.

    1951-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) studied contamination induced by irrigation drainage in 26 areas of the Western United States during 1986-95. Comprehensive compilation, synthesis, and evaluation of the data resulting from these studies were initiated by DOI in 1992. Soils and ground water in irrigated areas of the West can contain high concentrations of selenium because of (1) residual selenium from the soil's parent rock beneath irrigated land; (2) selenium derived from rocks in mountains upland from irrigated land by erosion and transport along local drainages, and (3) selenium brought into the area in surface water imported for irrigation. Application of irrigation water to seleniferous soils can dissolve and mobilize selenium and create hydraulic gradients that cause the discharge of seleniferous ground water into irrigation drains. Given a source of selenium, the magnitude of selenium contamination in drainage-affected aquatic ecosystems is strongly related to the aridity of the area and the presence of terminal lakes and ponds. Marine sedimentary rocks and deposits of Late Cretaceous or Tertiary age are generally seleniferous in the Western United States. Depending on their origin and history, some Tertiary continental sedimentary deposits also are seleniferous. Irrigation of areas associated with these rocks and deposits can result in concentrations of selenium in water that exceed criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Geologic and climatic data for the Western United States were evaluated and incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) to produce a map identifying areas susceptible to irrigation-induced selenium contamination. Land is considered susceptible where a geologic source of selenium is in or near the area and where the evaporation rate is more than 2.5 times the precipitation rate. In the Western United States, about 160,000 square miles of land, which includes about 4,100 square miles (2.6 million acres) of

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

  3. The use of a brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay to assess the water quality in Hangzhou section of Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Xu, Xiaolu; Li, Tian; Xu, Yifei; Wu, Xu

    2012-03-01

    As physical and chemical tests alone are not sufficient enough for the assessment of potential effects on aquatic organisms, bioassays are required for the integrated evaluation of water pollution. In this study, invertebrate crustacean Artemia salina (brine shrimp) was applied as an indicator to assess the water quality of Hangzhou Section of Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal. The percentage mortality of brine shrimp was recorded after 24-h exposure to the Canal water. The water samples were collected from five typical sites during October 2008 and April 2009. It exhibited 11% ± 8.3%, 26.7% ± 17%, 31.7% ± 8.5%, 28.0% ± 11.7%, and 4% ± 4.3% percentage mortality for the sample from Tangxi Bridge, Yi Bridge, Gongchen Bridge, Maiyu Bridge, and Gujia Bridge in 2008, respectively. And it exhibited 5.7% ± 4.2%, 10.3% ± 8.2%, 24.3% ± 12.3%, 16.0% ± 12.3%, and 0%, percentage mortality in 2009, respectively. According to the results, a relative improvement in water quality was observed, although the results were not significantly different at the p < 0.05 level. It suggested that 24-h A. salina exposure trials represent an acceptable bioassay for water toxicity when alternative bioassays were unavailable.

  4. Factors impacting knowledge and use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods by postpartum HIV positive and negative women in Cape Town, South Africa: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Credé Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV positive women is a neglected strategy in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Women who want to avoid unintended pregnancies can do this by using a modern contraceptive method. Contraceptive choice, in particular the use of long acting and permanent methods (LAPMs, is poorly understood among HIV-positive women. This study aimed to compare factors that influence women's choice in contraception and women's knowledge and attitudes towards the IUD and female sterilization by HIV-status in a high HIV prevalence setting, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional survey was conducted using an interviewer-administered questionnaire amongst 265 HIV positive and 273 HIV-negative postpartum women in Cape Town. Contraceptive use, reproductive history and the future fertility intentions of postpartum women were compared using chi-squared tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum and Fisher's exact tests where appropriate. Women's knowledge and attitudes towards long acting and permanent methods as well as factors that influence women's choice in contraception were examined. Results The majority of women reported that their most recent pregnancy was unplanned (61.6% HIV positive and 63.2% HIV negative. Current use of contraception was high with no difference by HIV status (89.8% HIV positive and 89% HIV negative. Most women were using short acting methods, primarily the 3-monthly injectable (Depo Provera. Method convenience and health care provider recommendations were found to most commonly influence method choice. A small percentage of women (6.44% were using long acting and permanent methods, all of whom were using sterilization; however, it was found that poor knowledge regarding LAPMs is likely to be contributing to the poor uptake of these methods. Conclusions Improving contraceptive counselling to include LAPM and strengthening services for these methods are warranted in this setting

  5. Heeding a Call to Action for U.S. Coral Reefs: the Untapped Potential of the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recently published call to action by Dodge et al. (2008) identifies nine actions needed to protect coral reefs. The authors identify several management goals that cannot be accomplished with MPAs alone, the traditional approach to coral reef protection. For U.S. waters, the Cle...

  6. 78 FR 78305 - Energy and Water Use Labeling for Consumer Products Under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... products, ceiling fans, certain types of water heaters, and televisions. The Rule requires manufacturers to... engineers, and applying an associated hourly wage rate of $44.14 per hour, labor costs for testing would... filing requirements will be implemented by data entry workers at an hourly wage rate of $15.11 per hour...

  7. 78 FR 43974 - Energy and Water Use Labeling for Consumer Products Under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 305 Energy and Water Use Labeling for Consumer Products Under the Energy Policy and... standards and to aid shoppers who compare products during this period, AHAM proposed two measures. First,...

  8. Examination of the potential impacts of dust and pollution aerosol acting as cloud nucleating aerosol on water resources in the Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vandana

    In this study we examine the cumulative effect of dust acting as cloud nucleating aerosol (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), and ice nuclei (IN)) along with anthropogenic aerosol pollution acting primarily as CCN, over the entire Colorado Rocky Mountains from the months of October to April in the year 2004-2005; the snow year. This ˜6.5 months analysis provides a range of snowfall totals and variability in dust and anthropogenic aerosol pollution. The specific objectives of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). In general, dust enhances precipitation primarily by acting as IN, while aerosol pollution reduces water resources in the CRB via the so-called "spill-over" effect, by enhancing cloud droplet concentrations and reducing riming rates. Dust is more episodic and aerosol pollution is more pervasive throughout the winter season. Combined response to dust and aerosol pollution is a net reduction of water resources in the CRB. The question is by how much are those water resources affected? Our best estimate is that total winter-season precipitation loss for for the CRB the 2004-2005 winter season due to the combined influence of aerosol pollution and dust is 5,380,00 acre-feet of water. Sensitivity studies for different cases have also been run for the specific cases in 2004-2005 winter season to analyze the impact of changing dust and aerosol ratios on precipitation in the Colorado River Basin. The dust is varied from 3 to 10 times in the experiments and the response is found to be non monotonic and depends on various environmental factors. The sensitivity studies show that adding dust in a wet system increases precipitation when IN affects are dominant. For a relatively dry system high concentrations of dust can result in over-seeding the clouds and reductions in precipitation

  9. Nutrient, organic carbon, and chloride concentrations and loads in selected Long Island Sound tributaries—Four decades of change following the passage of the Federal Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.

    2016-03-10

    Trends in long-term water-quality and streamflow data from 14 water-quality monitoring sites in Connecticut were evaluated for water years 1974–2013 and 2001–13, coinciding with implementation of the Clean Water Act of 1972 and the Connecticut Nitrogen Credit Exchange program, as part of an assessment of nutrient and chloride concentrations and loads discharged to Long Island Sound. In this study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, data were evaluated using a recently developed methodology of weighted regressions with time, streamflow, and season. Trends in streamflow were evaluated using a locally weighted scatterplot smoothing method. Annual mean streamflow increased at 12 of the 14 sites averaging 8 percent during the entire study period, primarily in the summer months, and increased by an average of 9 percent in water years 2001–13, primarily during summer and fall months. Downward trends in flow-normalized nutrient concentrations and loads were observed during both periods for most sites for total nitrogen, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total organic carbon. Average flow-normalized loads of total nitrogen decreased by 23.9 percent for the entire period and 10.9 percent for the period of water years 2001‒13. Major factors contributing to decreases in flow-normalized loads and concentrations of these nutrients include improvements in wastewater treatment practices, declining atmospheric wet deposition of nitrogen, and changes in land management and land use.

  10. Geology and ground-water resources of the Douglas basin, Arizona, with a section on chemical quality of the ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Donald Robert; Cushman, R.L.; Hatchett, James Lawrence

    1955-01-01

    The Douglas basin is part of a large northwest-trending intermontane valley, known as the Sulphur Spring Valley, which lies in southeastern Arizona, and extends into northeastern Sonora, Mexico. Maturely dissected mountains rise abruptly from long alluvial slopes and culminate in peaks 3,000 to 4,000 feet above the valley floor, Bedrock in the mountain areas confines drainage on the east and west, and an arc of low hills to the north separates the basin from the Willcox basin of the Sulphur Spring Valley. Drainage of the 1,200 square miles in the Douglas basin is southward into Mexico through Whitewater Draw. The mountains include igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks ranging in age from pre-Cambrian to Tertiary, including Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that total about 10,000 feet in thickness. The older rocks have been metamorphosed, and all the bedrock has been affected by igneous intrusion, largely in Mesozoic time, and by structural movements, largely in Cenozoic time and extending into the Quaternary period. By the early part of Cenozoic time the major structural features were formed, and mountain ranges had been uplifted above the valley trough along northwest-trending fault zones. Since that time the physiographic features have resulted through erosion of the mountain blocks and the deposition, in places, of more than 2,800 feet of unconsolidated rock debris in the valley. Ground-water supplies of the Douglas basin are developed largely in the saturated zone of the valley-fill sediments. The ground water in the valley fill occurs in thin lenses and strata of sand and gravel, which are interbedded with large thicknesses of silt and day. Scattered gypsum beds and extensive caliche deposits appear at the surface and occur within the valley fill at various depths. Although the valley-fill sediments are as much as 2,800 feet thick, the uppermost 300 feet or so are the most permeable. Ground water originates as precipitation in the mountain areas

  11. A national cross-sectional study on effects of fluoride-safe water supply on the prevalence of fluorosis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yanhui; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Han, Hepeng; Shi, Yuxia; Yu, Guangqian; Sun, Dianjun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of provided fluoride-safe drinking-water for the prevention and control of endemic fluorosis in China. Design A national cross-sectional study in China. Setting In 1985, randomly selected villages in 27 provinces (or cities and municipalities) in 5 geographic areas all over China. Participants Involved 81 786 children aged from 8 to 12 and 594 698 adults aged over 16. Main outcome measure The prevalence of dental fluorosis and clinical skeletal fluorosis, the fluoride concentrations in the drinking-water in study villages and in the urine of subjects. Results The study showed that in the villages where the drinking-water fluoride concentrations were higher than the government standard of 1.2 mg/l, but no fluoride-safe drinking-water supply scheme was provided (FNB areas), the prevalence rate and index of dental fluorosis in children, and prevalence rate of clinical skeletal fluorosis in adults were all significantly higher than those in the historical endemic fluorosis villages after the fluoride-safe drinking-water were provided (FSB areas). Additionally, the prevalence rate of dental fluorosis as well as clinical skeletal fluorosis, and the concentration of fluoride in urine were found increased with the increase of fluoride concentration in drinking-water, with significant positive correlations in the FNB areas. While, the prevalence rate of dental fluorosis and clinical skeletal fluorosis in different age groups and their degrees of prevalence were significantly lower in the FSB areas than those in the FNB areas. Conclusions The provision of fluoride-safe drinking-water supply schemes had significant effects on the prevention and control of dental fluorosis and skeletal fluorosis. The study also indicated that the dental and skeletal fluorosis is still prevailing in the high-fluoride drinking-water areas in China. PMID:23015601

  12. Economics of place-based monitoring under the safe drinking water act, part II: design and development of place-based monitoring strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Edwin; Rajagopal, R

    2008-08-01

    The goals of environmental legislation and associated regulations are to protect public health, natural resources, and ecosystems. In this context, monitoring programs should provide timely and relevant information so that the regulatory community can implement legislation in a cost-effective and efficient manner. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 attempts to ensure that public water systems (PWSs) supply safe water to its consumers. As is the case with many other federal environmental statutes, SDWA monitoring has been implemented in relatively uniform fashion across the United States. In this three part series, spatial and temporal patterns in water quality data are utilized to develop, compare, and evaluate the economic performance of alternative place-based monitoring approaches to current monitoring practice. Part II: Several factors affect the performance of monitoring strategies, including: measurable objectives, required precision in estimates, acceptable confidence levels of such estimates, available budget for sampling. In this paper, we develop place-based monitoring strategies based on extensive analysis of available historical water quality data (1960-1994) of 19 Iowa community water systems. These systems supply potable water to over 350,000 people. In the context of drinking water, the objective is to protect public health by utilizing monitoring resources to characterize contaminants that are detectable, and are close to exceeding health standards. A place-based monitoring strategy was developed in which contaminants were selected based on their historical occurrence, rather than their appearance on the SDWA contaminant list. In a subset of the water systems, the temporal frequency of monitoring for one ubiquitous contaminant, nitrate, was tailored to patterns in its historical occurrence and concentration. Three sampling allocation models (linear, quadratic, and cubic) based on historic patterns in peak occurrence were developed and

  13. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA can act as a penetration enhancer for topically applied substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterry, Wolfram

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA irradiation has been shown to enhance penetration of clinically used topically applied substances in humans through investigation of functional effects of penetrated substances like vasoconstriction by cortisone. Aim of the study: Investigation of the influence of wIRA irradiation on the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances by use of optical methods, especially to localize penetrating substances, in a prospective randomised controlled study in humans. Methods: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic dye fluorescein and the lipophilic dye curcumin in separate standard water-in-oil emulsions were determined on the inner forearm of test persons by tape stripping in combination with spectroscopic measurements. Additionally, the penetration was investigated in vivo by laser scanning microscopy. Transepidermal water loss, hydration of the epidermis, and surface temperature were determined. Three different procedures (modes A, B, C were used in a randomised order on three separate days of investigation in each of 12 test persons. In mode A, the two dyes were applied on different skin areas without water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA irradiation. In mode B, the skin surface was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min before application of the two dyes (Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, orange filter OG590, water-filtered spectrum: 590–1400 nm with dominant amount of wIRA. In mode C, the two dyes were applied and immediately afterwards the skin was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min. In all modes, tape stripping started 30 min after application of the formulations. Main variable of interest was the ratio of the amount of the dye in the deeper (second 10% of the stratum corneum to the amount of the dye in the upper 10% of the stratum corneum. Results: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic fluorescein showed in case of pretreatment or treatment with wIRA (modes B and C an

  14. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  15. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) can act as a penetration enhancer for topically applied substances

    OpenAIRE

    Sterry, Wolfram; Ackermann, Hanns; Hoffmann, Gerd; Schanzer, Sabine; Meyer, Lars; Grone, Diego; Otberg, Nina; Lademann, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) irradiation has been shown to enhance penetration of clinically used topically applied substances in humans through investigation of functional effects of penetrated substances like vasoconstriction by cortisone. Aim of the study: Investigation of the influence of wIRA irradiation on the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances by use of optical methods, especially to localize penetrating substances, in a prospective randomised contr...

  16. Experimental investigation of drag force, Magnus force and drag torque acting on rough sphere moving in calm water

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Chára, Z. (Zdeněk); Vlasák, P. (Pavel)

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments with a rotating golf ball moving quasi-steadily in calm water. The motion of the ball was recorded on a digital video camera. The dimensionless drag force, Magnus force, and drag torque coefficients were determined from the comparison of the calculated translational and angular velocities and trajectory with experimental ones for the rough particle. The proper value of the correction coefficients were established from condition of the best fittin...

  17. LaCoO3 acting as an efficient and robust catalyst for photocatalytic water oxidation with persulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Yano, Kentaro; Hong, Dachao; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-04-28

    Cobalt-containing metal oxides [perovskites (LaCoO(3), NdCoO(3), YCoO(3), La(0.7)Sr(0.3)CoO(3)), spinel (Co(3)O(4)) and wolframite (CoWO(4))] have been examined as catalysts for photocatalytic water oxidation with Na(2)S(2)O(8) and [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) as an electron acceptor and a photosensitizer, respectively. Catalysts with the perovskite structure exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the catalysts with the spinel and wolframite structures. LaCoO(3), which stabilizes Co(III) species in the perovskite structure, exhibited the highest catalytic activity in the photocatalytic water oxidation compared with CoWO(4), Co(3)O(4) and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)CoO(3) which contain Co(II) or Co(IV) species in the matrices. The high catalytic reactivity of LaCoO(3) possessing perovskite structure was maintained in NdCoO(3) and YCoO(3) which exclusively contain Co(III) species. Thus, the catalytic activity of Co ions can be controlled by the additional metal ions, which leads to development of highly reactive and robust catalysts for the photocatalytic water oxidation.

  18. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  19. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  20. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Rural Health-Care Facilities: A Cross-Sectional Study in Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Amy; Bowling, J Michael; Bartram, Jamie; Kayser, Georgia

    2017-07-31

    Safe and sufficient water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) prevent the spread of disease in health-care facilities (HCFs). Little research has been conducted on WaSH in HCF in sub-Saharan Africa. We carried out a cross-sectional study of WaSH in 1,318 randomly selected rural HCF (hospitals, health centers, health posts, and clinics) in regions throughout Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, and Zambia. Methods included questionnaires with head doctors and nurses to document WaSH access, continuity, quality, quantity and reliability, and analysis of drinking water samples for Escherichia coli. We found that fewer than 50% of rural HCFs had access to improved water sources on premises, improved sanitation, and consistent access to water and soap for handwashing (Ethiopia [7%), Kenya [30%], Mozambique [29%], Rwanda [50%], Uganda [30%], and Zambia [21%]). Adequate hand hygiene reduces disease transmission and health-care-acquired infections, but fewer than 25% of HCF in each country reported that a combination of water, soap, and hand-drying materials were always available. Our research points to a lack of basic WaSH services in rural HCFs in regions of sub-Saharan Africa, which poses a threat to the health of patients and health-care workers in these settings.

  1. Intermediate and High-Frequency Acoustic Backscattering Cross Sections for Water-Ice Interfaces: I. Two-Component Profile Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    ensures the vanishing of 8coh’ unless the Snell angle (aox = aoy = 0) is chosen.] Note that this coherent-scatter cross section depends on the area...Bistatic at the Snell Angle (R T): L 0 6ioR)x = (1oT)x when oT = ’/2 = ( oR - i/2); ) when =(R +R )sin Snell (A.2-14a) R)y = oT)y whe oT + oR) s oT

  2. 75 FR 33570 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... with the permit or vessel participating in a reduction program and that (if not scrapped) the vessel will be effectively prevented from fishing in Federal or state waters, or fishing on the high seas or in the waters of a foreign nation. The Magnuson-Stevens Reauthorization Act revised section...

  3. Economics of place-based monitoring under the safe drinking water act, part III: performance evaluation of place-based monitoring strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Edwin; Rajagopal, R

    2008-08-01

    The goals of environmental legislation and associated regulations are to protect public health, natural resources, and ecosystems. In this context, monitoring programs should provide timely and relevant information so that the regulatory community can implement legislation in a cost-effective and efficient manner. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 attempts to ensure that public water systems (PWSs) supply safe water to its consumers. As is the case with many other federal environmental statutes, SDWA monitoring has been implemented in relatively uniform fashion across the USA. In this three part series, we present over 30 years of evidence to demonstrate unique patterns in water quality contaminants over space and time, develop alternative place-based monitoring approaches that exploit such patterns, and evaluate the economic performance of such approaches to current monitoring practice. Part III: Place-based (PBA) and current SDWA monitoring approaches were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from 19 water systems and evaluated based on the following criteria: percent of total detections, percent detections above threshold values (e.g. 20, 50, 90% of MCL), and cost. The PBA outperformed the current SDWA monitoring requirements in terms of total detections, missed only a small proportion of detections below the MCL, and captured all detections above 50% of the MCL. Essentially the same information obtained from current compliance monitoring requirements can be gained at approximately one-eighth the cost by implementing the PBA. Temporal sampling strategies were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from four water systems and evaluated by the following criteria: parameter estimation, percent deviation from "true" 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles, and number of samples versus accuracy of the estimate. Non event-based (NEB) strategies were superior in estimating percentiles 1-50, but underestimated the higher percentiles. Event-based strategies were

  4. What Constitutes a Benefit by Virtue of Section 186(2 of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995?Apollo Tyres South Africa (Pty Ltd v CCMA 2013 5 BLLR 434 (LAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmarie Fourie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainty surrounding the concept benefit as provided for in section 186(2 of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 was created not by the courts but rather by the legislature. The concept is not defined and clearly has a wide ambit. In previous decisions the courts upheld a restrictive interpretation of benefits to maintain the divide between disputes of interest and disputes of rights and to ensure that issues that should be the subject of negotiation could not become issues that can be decided by an arbitrator. Previously the courts insisted that a benefit was something arising out of a contract or law. In the Apollo case the court had to determine what constitutes a benefit and if a benefit is limited to an entitlement which arises ex contractu or ex lege. The court found that the early retirement scheme was a benefit, although the employee at that stage did not have a contractual entitlement to the benefit and that the benefit was subject to the employer's discretion. What becomes clear from this case is that the unfair labour practice jurisdiction cannot be used to assert an entitlement to new benefits, new forms of remuneration or new policies. The Labour Appeal Court criticizes the distinction between salaries and remuneration drawn by our courts and describes it as artificial and unsustainable. Under the unfair labour practice regime the conduct of the employer may be scrutinized by the CCMA in at least two instances, namely when an employer fails to comply with a contractual obligation, an entitlement or right that an employee may have in terms of a statute, and secondly when an employer exercises a discretion under the contractual terms of a scheme conferring a benefit, including situations where the employer enjoys a discretion in terms of benefits provided in terms of a policy or practice – rights created judicially. This decision places the emphasis on the employer's actions and the unfairness of such acts or omissions.

  5. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 33.1 Section 33.1 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and...

  6. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  7. ACTS 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Co-curator of ACTS 2014 together with Rasmus Holmboe, Judith Schwarzbart and Sanne Kofoed. ACTS is the Museum of Contemporary Art’s international bi-annual festival. ACTS was established in 2011 and, while the primary focus is on sound and performance art, it also looks toward socially oriented art...... various possibilities and public spaces as a stage. ACTS takes place in and around the museum and diverse locations in Roskilde city. ACTS is partly curated by the museum staff and partly by guest curators. ACTS 2014 is supported by Nordea-fonden and is a part of the project The Museum goes downtown....

  8. Bacterial communities in the collection and chlorinated distribution sections of a drinking water system in Budapest, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homonnay, Zalán G; Török, György; Makk, Judit; Brumbauer, Anikó; Major, Eva; Márialigeti, Károly; Tóth, Erika

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial communities of a bank-filtered drinking water system were investigated by aerobic cultivation and clone library analysis. Moreover, bacterial communities were compared using sequence-aided terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting at ten characteristic points located at both the collecting and the distributing part of the water supply system. Chemical characteristics of the samples were similar, except for the presence of chlorine residuals in the distribution system and increased total iron concentration in two of the samples. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration increased within the collection system, it was reduced by chlorination and it increased again in the distribution system. Neither fecal indicators nor pathogens were detected by standard cultivation techniques. Chlorination reduced bacterial diversity and heterotrophic plate counts. Community structures were found to be significantly different before and after chlorination: the diverse communities in wells and the collection system were dominated by chemolithotrophic (e.g., Gallionella and Nitrospira) and oligocarbophilic-heterotrophic bacteria (e.g., Sphingomonas, Sphingopyxis, and Bradyrhizobium). After chlorination in the distribution system, the most characteristic bacterium was related to the facultative methylotrophic Methylocella spp. Communities changed within the distribution system too, Mycobacterium spp. or Sphingopyxis spp. became predominant in certain samples.

  9. Addressing the Issue of Microplastics in the Wake of the Microbead-Free Waters Act-A New Standard Can Facilitate Improved Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Jason P; Criddle, Craig S; Morse, Molly; Hale, Robert C; Bott, Charles B; Rochman, Chelsea M

    2017-06-20

    The United States Microbead-Free Waters Act was signed into law in December 2015. It is a bipartisan agreement that will eliminate one preventable source of microplastic pollution in the United States. Still, the bill is criticized for being too limited in scope, and also for discouraging the development of biodegradable alternatives that ultimately are needed to solve the bigger issue of plastics in the environment. Due to a lack of an acknowledged, appropriate standard for environmentally safe microplastics, the bill banned all plastic microbeads in selected cosmetic products. Here, we review the history of the legislation and how it relates to the issue of microplastic pollution in general, and we suggest a framework for a standard (which we call "Ecocyclable") that includes relative requirements related to toxicity, bioaccumulation, and degradation/assimilation into the natural carbon cycle. We suggest that such a standard will facilitate future regulation and legislation to reduce pollution while also encouraging innovation of sustainable technologies.

  10. Neutron cross section measurements of water, heavy water, urine and blood for nutrition application; Medidas de secoes de choque para neutrons da agua leve, da agua pesada, urina e sangue para aplicacao em nutricao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voi, Dante Luiz; Oliveira Ferreira, Francisco J. de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Helio F. da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Pediatria e Puericultura Marzagao Gesteira

    1997-12-01

    The present work describes the application of a method developed at the reactor physics laboratory of IEN-CNEN-RJ for the determination of body water in subjects. The method is based on neutron cross section determinations of molecular compounds. It was used the crystal neutron spectrometer installed in J-9 channel irradiation of the Argonauta reactor. Hydrogenous and deuterated samples were measured to demonstrate the viability of the method. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurements of Total and Partial Charge-changing Cross Sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in Water and Polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshito, T.; /CREST, Japan Sci. Tech. Corp. /KEK, Tsukuba; Kodama, K.; /Aichi U. of Education; Sihver, L.; /Chalmers U. Tech.; Yusa, K.; /Gunma U., Maebashi; Ozaki, M.; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Aoki, S.; /Kobe U.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshida, J.; /Nagoya U. /Naruto U. of Education /NIRS, Chiba /SLAC /Toho U.

    2011-11-10

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  12. Measurements of total and partial charge-changing cross sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in water and polycarbonate

    CERN Document Server

    Toshito, T; Aoki, S; Asai, M; Ban, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, C; Kameoka, S; Kanazawa, M; Kanematsu, N; Kodama, K; Koi, T; Komatsu, M; Komori, M; Kubota, H; Murakami, K; Naganawa, N; Nakamura, T; Nakano, T; Natsume, M; Niwa, K; Ogawa, S; Ozaki, M; Sasaki, T; Sato, S; Shibasaki, M; Shibuya, H; Sihver, L; Takahashi, S; Yoshida, H; Yoshida, J; Yusa, K

    2007-01-01

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  13. Two-phase mixture simulation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid heat transfer in a non-uniform heat addition test section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbassi, Yasser; Shirani, Amir Saeed [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering

    2016-11-15

    Results of a numerical investigation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Water nanofluid heat transfer are presented. The two-phase mixture model is used to study the effects of Reynolds number and nanoparticle concentrations on nanofluid heat transfer in flow around an annulus test section. Non-uniform heat flux is assumed as heat boundary condition on annuli inner wall. Annuli wall and bulk temperature profiles, Local and averaged heat transfer coefficient profiles, local and averaged Nusselt number profiles are presented as functions of nanoparticle volume concentrations and Reynolds numbers. Both laminar and turbulent flow regimes are simulated.

  14. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Single Pion Production Cross Section on Water with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2017-01-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross section measurements of muon neutrino charged current single positive pion production on a water target at energies ${\\sim}0.8$~GeV. The differential measurements are presented as a function of muon and pion kinematics, in the restricted phase-space defined by $p_{\\pi^+}>200$MeV/c, $p_{\\mu^-}>200$MeV/c, $\\cos \\theta_{\\pi^+}>0.3$ and $\\cos \\theta_{\\mu^-}>0.3$. The total flux integrated $\

  15. Daphne Genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. Water-Soluble Extracts Act on Enterovirus 71 by Inhibiting Viral Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wen Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dried flowers of Daphne genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. (Thymelaeaceae are a Chinese herbal medicine used as an abortifacient with purgative, diuretic and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the activity of this medicine against enteroviral infections has not been investigated. The water-extract of dried buds of D. genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. (DGFW was examined against various strains of enterovirus 71 (EV71 by neutralization assay, and its initial mode of action was characterized by time-of-addition assay followed by attachment and penetration assays. Pretreatment of DGFW with virus abolished viral replication, indicating that DGFW inhibits EV71 by targeting the virus. GFW exerts its anti-EV71 effects by inhibiting viral entry without producing cytotoxic side effects and thus provides a potential agent for antiviral chemotherapeutics.

  16. Gripe Water Administration in Infants 1-6 months of Age-A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Keerthi; Gunasekaran, Dhandapany; Venkatesh, Chandrasekaran; Soundararajan, Palanisamy

    2015-11-01

    Gripe water (GW) administration to young infants is common practice in this part of country. In order to ascertain why mothers administer gripe water to their infants and to find out what benefits or health risks it poses, we proposed to study the practice of mothers giving GW to their babies. Three hundred and thirty five eligible mothers of infants aged 1-6 months (who after qualifying inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study) who attended the well baby clinic during the study period, were interviewed using a semi structured questionnaire which contained both open and close ended questions after obtaining informed written consent. The study population was then divided into two groups based on administration of GW or not and the results were compared and analysed among the two groups using odds ratio with 95% C.I. For calculation of statistics, the statistical package SPSS 13 was used. 64.18% of the mothers were administering GW for their infants. Most mothers believed that GW helps in digestion and prevents stomach ache. Infantile colic, vomiting and constipation were common in GW administered infants, when compared to those who did not receive GW and the difference was significant with p-values of 0.0001, 0.0373, 0.0007respectively. GW administration is a common problem in infants and remains a significant challenge that thwarts exclusive breast feeding. More over GW administration does not seem to prevent infantile colic and on the other hand, may be associated with vomiting and constipation. Misconceptions prevailing among mothers have to be removed by effective counseling so that the mothers are aware of safe and healthy feeding practices to be adopted for feeding their babies.

  17. Partnerships for technology introduction -- Putting the technologies of tomorrow into the marketplace of today. Report to Congress on Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report to Congress was prepared on behalf of the Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to Sections 127 and 128 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), Pub. L. 102-486. In preparing the report to the Congress, DOE has assessed the national and regional energy savings potential of products already on the market and those that will be available to consumers by the late 1990s. The Department has also examined the present cost-effectiveness of these emerging appliances as mature technologies. To help in its assessment, DOE organized eight workshops at which representatives from manufacturing and building industries, utilities, retailers and wholesalers, public interest groups and Federal and state government agencies could express their views. The information derived from these workshops was key to the formulation of the report`s general and specific recommendations. DOE has concluded that the Federal Government can effectively stimulate the market for emerging technologies by forming partnerships with the appliance industry and other interested parties promoting the use of highly efficient appliances. Based on the interaction with industry at the eight workshops and through direct contact, DOE has concluded that Federal action and technical assistance is not only desired by industry, but crucial to the expansion of these markets. Section 128 of EPAct requires an assessment of the energy savings and environmental benefits of replacing older, less efficient appliances with more efficient products than currently required by Federal law. Since early replacement of appliances is but one possible market-stimulating action, DOE has elected to include its discussion as part of the overall report to the Congress.

  18. PEEL V HAMON J&C ENGINEERING (PTY LTD: Ignoring The Result-Requirement of Section 163(1(A of the Companies Act And Extending the Oppression Remedy Beyond its statutorily intended reach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HGJ Beukes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This case note provides a concise and understandable version of the confusing facts in Peel v Hamon J&C Engineering (Pty Ltd, and deals with the remedy provided for in section 163 of the Companies Act (the oppression remedy. The importance of drawing a distinction between the application of this section and the orders that the Court can make to provide relief in terms of subsection (2 is explained, after which each requirement contained in subsection (1(a is analysed. With reference to the locus standi-requirement, it is indicated that the judgment is not to be regarded as authority for the contention that a shareholder or a director who wants to exercise the oppression remedy need not have been a shareholder or a director of the company at the time of the conduct. With reference to the conduct-requirement, it is indicated that it would have been more appropriate for the applicants to have made use of a remedy in terms of the law of contract. Most importantly, the result-requirement is indicated to have been ignored, as a lack of certainty that there will be a result is argued not to constitute a result. Ignoring the result-requirement is explained to have resulted in ignoring the detriment-requirement, in turn. Accordingly, it is concluded that the oppression remedy was utilised without the specified statutory criteria having been satisfied and that the applicants' interests were protected by a remedy which should not have found application under the circumstances, as this was beyond the remedy's statutorily intended reach.

  19. Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) A A A What's in this ... babies in the United States are delivered via cesarean section (C-section). Even if you're envisioning a ...

  20. Measuring electron-impact cross sections of water: elastic scattering and electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Midori; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Kato, Hidetoshi; Ferreira da Silva, Fillipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron scattering from water in the incident energy range of 2-100 eV. Furthermore, we present a complete study on the electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states at electron impact energies of 15, 20, and 30 eV and in the scattering angle range of 10° - 130°. Integral cross sections (ICSs) are determined from the DCSs. Measuring elastic DCSs in various experimental conditions confirmed the reproducibility of the data. The present results agree with the data previously obtained from a conventional collimating tube gas source. Ambiguities associated with the unfolding procedure of the electron energy loss (EEL) spectra for the electronic excitations have been reduced by comparison against the EEL spectrum at high electron impact energy and for small scattering angle. The reliability of the extracted DCSs is improved significantly for optically forbidden contributions from the overlap of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 electronic states. The BEf-scaling model is also confirmed to produce the integral cross section for the optical allowed transition of the Ã1B1 state in the intermediate electron energy region above 15 eV.

  1. Occurrence, distribution and risk assessment of suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals in surface water and suspended particulate matter of Yangtze River (Nanjing section).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Ji, Gui-Xiang; Wu, Sheng-Min; Guo, Rui-Xin; Cheng, Jie; Yan, Zheng-Yu; Chen, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of eight selected endocrine-disrupting chemicals were investigated in samples of surface water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in Nanjing section of Yangtze River over a year (the flow period, the wet period and the dry period). All target compounds were detected at least once in surface water with 4-tert-butylphenol (4-TBP), nonyphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) as the dominant compounds, with concentrations in the range of 225-1121ng/L, 1.4-858ng/L and 1.7-563ng/L, respectively. Except for December, all selected compounds for the other sampling times were not found in all sampling points. NP (mean concentration 69.8µg/g) and BPA (mean concentration 51.8µg/g) were also the dominant estrogens in SPM. In addition, the highest total compounds concentrations were found in December in both phases, which could be due to the low flow conditions and temperature during this season. Meanwhile, a significant positive correlation was found between the total compounds concentrations in the water phase and those in SPM phase. Risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients (RQ) showed that low and moderate risk for the aquatic environment from presence of the target compounds at all sampling points with exception of 4-TBP and NP which might pose a high risk to aquatic organisms.

  2. Variability of the Antarctic Surface Water and the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water from 1992 WOCE and 2007-2008 Argo data along the section P19 in Southeastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, E.; Seung, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The variability of the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and Antarctic Surface Water (AASW) is examined based upon the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) data in 1992 and Argo data in 2007 and 2008 along the section P19. D.G. Martinson (2012) examined the Antarctic Circumpolar Current's role in the Antarctic Ice System and showed that 3-color WOCE temperature sections, including section P19, showed that tilt of the isopycnals associated with ACC prevent warm tropical waters from reaching Antarctic continental margin. The paper also described that warm UCDW layer slips along the tilted isopycnals to reach the continental slope in section P19 along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). It is also revealed that the UCDW, associated with the ACC in section P19, occupies the domain from 58°S to 68°S with meridional ACC width of about 1,000km. In order to estimate the fluctuation of the warm UCDW layer the Argo data both in 2007 and 2008 were collected and the location of the warm UCDW from Argo data in 2007 and 2008 was compared with that of WOCE from Martinson (2012) in 1992. The argo data in 2007 and 2008 are used to examine the tilted isopycnal pattern of the warm UCDW represented by warm waters above 1.8°C. One thing to note is that the southern limit of the UCDW in the WOCE data in 1992, appears to move northward in Argo data of 2007 and 2008. Also AASW less than 2.0°C from the WAP in Argo data replaces the rather warm thin layer between 62°S nearly to 69°S shown in the WOCE data in 1992. The low salinity layer bounded by 34.0 psu extends far north compared with that of WOCE data, indicating that the ice melting water from the WAP flows northward. Since all year round data in case of Argo data are used and the error by the seasonal fluctuation may be introduced in the location of the upper 500m depth. The global wind stress curl data by SCOW (Scatterometer Climatology of Ocean Wind) are available over 1997 to 2007, which reveals that the wind stress

  3. An Analysis of Citizen Participation Programs Relating to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (P.L. 92-500): Case Studies of the Washington County Project; State of Wisconsin; and Dane County, Wisconsin Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Elizabeth E.

    The thesis, which presents an analysis of three Wisconsin citizen participation programs relating to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law 92-500), has identified the adult education role in teaching and applying skills, promoting growth in governmental understanding, assisting in public planning and…

  4. 34 CFR 300.4 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.4 Act. Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 300.4 Section 300.4 Education Regulations of...

  5. 40 CFR 791.105 - Prohibited acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prohibited acts. 791.105 Section 791.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Prohibited Acts § 791.105 Prohibited acts. Failure to provide information...

  6. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  7. Effect of Antioxidant Mixtures on Growth and Ochratoxin A Production of Aspergillus Section Nigri Species under Different Water Activity Conditions on Peanut Meal Extract Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Barberis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mixtures of antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA and propyl paraben (PP on lag phase, growth rate and ochratoxin A (OTA production by four Aspergillus section Nigri strains was evaluated on peanut meal extract agar (PMEA under different water activities (aw. The antioxidant mixtures used were: BHA + PP (mM, M1 (0.5 + 0.5, M2 (1.0 + 0.5, M3 (2.5 + 0.5, M4 (0.5 + 1.0, M5 (1.0 + 1.0, M6 (2.5 + 1.0, M7 (5.0 + 2.5 and M8 (10 + 2.5. The mixture M8 completely suppressed mycelial growth for all strains. A significant stimulation in OTA production was observed with mixtures M1 to M5 mainly at the highest aw; whereas M6, M7 and M8 completely inhibited OTA production in all strains assayed; except M6 in A. carbonarius strain (RCP G. These results could enable a future intervention strategy to minimize OTA contamination.

  8. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For information about lead in water in Flint, MI, please visit http://www.phe. ...

  9. Inspecting Underground Storage Tanks - 2005 Energy Policy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    these grant guidelines implement the inspection provisions in Sections 9005(c)(1) and 9005(c)(2) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, enacted by the Underground Storage Tank Compliance Act, part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  10. Public Record About Underground Storage Tanks - 2005 Energy Policy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    These grant guidelines implement the public record provision in Section 9002(d) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, enacted by the Underground Storage Tank Compliance Act, part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  11. Financial Responsibility and Installer Certification - 2005 Energy Policy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant guidelines to implement the financial responsibility and installer certification provision in Section 9003(i) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, enacted by the Underground Storage Tank Compliance Act, part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  12. 12 CFR 741.214 - Report of crime or catastrophic act and Bank Secrecy Act compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report of crime or catastrophic act and Bank Secrecy Act compliance. 741.214 Section 741.214 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... Unions § 741.214 Report of crime or catastrophic act and Bank Secrecy Act compliance. Any credit...

  13. On conservation and development of architecture and environment in the construction of large-scale national infrastructure——Exemptified by the Jiangsu Section of the Eastern Route South-to-North Water Diversion Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Jin; LUO dianLi; WANG XingPing; TANG Jun; YU Gang

    2009-01-01

    The water-diverting route project's characteristics,natural landscapes,and histories and humanism of the Jiangsu Section of the Eastern Route South-to-North Water Diversion Project were systemically analyzed through proposing and studying the canal culture routes,the water resources heritage corridors,the landscape and recreation corridors,and the town economic corridors.The station areas along the water-diverting route were scientifically zoned and graded through quantitative and qualitative synthetic methods.Both planning compendiums and construction controlling methods were proposed based on the project grades of points,lines,and areas.Conservation and development of architecture and environment in the large-scale national infrastructure construction were explored systemically.Theories and methods of developing harmonious water-supplying functions,ecological functions,landscape effects,and cultural effects of large-scale water resources were examined.

  14. On conservation and development of architecture and environment in the construction of large-scale national infrastructure——Exemplified by the Jiangsu Section of the Eastern Route South-to-North Water Diversion Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The water-diverting route project’s characteristics,natural landscapes,and histories and humanism of the Jiangsu Section of the Eastern Route South-to-North Water Diversion Project were systemically analyzed through proposing and studying the canal culture routes,the water resources heritage corridors,the landscape and recreation corridors,and the town economic corridors.The station areas along the water-diverting route were scientifically zoned and graded through quantitative and qualitative synthetic methods.Both planning compendiums and construction controlling methods were proposed based on the project grades of points,lines,and areas.Conservation and development of architecture and environment in the large-scale national infrastructure construction were explored systemically.Theories and methods of developing harmonious water-supplying functions,ecological functions,landscape effects,and cultural effects of large-scale water resources were examined.

  15. 78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... QUALITY Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources... Principles and Requirements. SUMMARY: Section 2031 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2007 (Pub. L... Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation Studies'' (Principles and Guidelines),...

  16. 77 FR 25163 - Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, the Stoughton Water Power Company filed an application for a preliminary permit under section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act proposing to study the feasibility of the proposed Stoughton Dam Water...

  17. 77 FR 14775 - Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, the Stoughton Water Power Company filed an application for a preliminary permit under section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act proposing to study the feasibility of the proposed Stoughton Dam Water...

  18. 31 CFR 0.216 - Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy Act. 0.216 Section 0.216... RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.216 Privacy Act. Employees involved in the design, development, operation, or maintenance of any system of records or in maintaining records subject to the Privacy Act of...

  19. 12 CFR 619.9000 - The Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Act. 619.9000 Section 619.9000 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9000 The Act. The Farm Credit Act of 1971; Pub. L. 92-181 and amendments....

  20. 29 CFR 1614.203 - Rehabilitation Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rehabilitation Act. 1614.203 Section 1614.203 Labor... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Provisions Applicable to Particular Complaints § 1614.203 Rehabilitation Act. (a... Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 791), has been violated in a complaint alleging...

  1. 12 CFR 268.203 - Rehabilitation Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rehabilitation Act. 268.203 Section 268.203... Rehabilitation Act. (a) Model employer. The Board shall be a model employer of individuals with disabilities. The... Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 791), has been violated in a complaint alleging...

  2. 7 CFR 1205.10 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1205.10 Section 1205.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND... for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.10 Act. The term Act means the Cotton Research...

  3. 78 FR 63528 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94-409, that the Securities and Exchange Commission will hold an Open Meeting on... sale of securities through crowdfunding pursuant to Section 4(a)(6) of the Securities Act of 1933,...

  4. 7 CFR 29.13 - The act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The act. 29.13 Section 29.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.13 The act. The Tobacco Inspection Act, approved August 23, 1935. (7...

  5. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is without a doubt on of the greatest threats to the human species and has all the potential to destabilise world peace. Falling water tables are a new phenomenon. Up until the development of steam and electric motors, deep groudwater...

  6. 43 CFR 2.47 - Records subject to Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records subject to Privacy Act. 2.47 Section 2.47 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Privacy Act § 2.47 Records subject to Privacy Act. The Privacy Act applies to all...

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  8. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  9. Domestic water sourcing and the risk of diarrhoea: a cross-sectional survey of a peri-urban community in Jos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilgwan, C S; Yilgwan, G; Abok, I I

    2010-01-01

    Water and sanitation has been identified as an important component of Primary Health Care (PHC) necessitating the World Health Organization to declare 1981-1990 as the international water years. Nigeria is the largest single country in sub Saharan Africa worst hit with about three quarters of its population unable to access safe water. The study aims to examine the association between domestic water sourcing practice and the risk of developing diarrhea. A total of 200 households were studied over an eight week period from 4th June to 31st July 2005 using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using Epi Info version 3.5.1. Most of the household (80%) were seen to source domestic water from the municipal pipe-borne water supply while only 5% source water from their own dug-in well only. 27% of the households reported diarrhea in their household in the last six month. The diarrhea was found to have bivariate association with the number of children in the household, the educational level of the household head, and income of household head. No association was found between diarrhea and age of household head. The study showed that there is association between domestic water sourcing practice and the risk of developing diarrhea. It is therefore recommended that high premium be placed on improving access to water and improved household hygiene as a way of helping to curb diarrhea.

  10. Investigation on Seasonal Water Area Change in Lake Sakata Based on POLSAR Image Analysis(Sensing,Section>2006 International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation)

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Ryoichi; Yajima, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yamada, Hiroyoshi

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines seasonal change of the true water area of Lake Sakata by using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POLSAR) image analysis. The true water area includes not only the body of water but also the water area under emerged-plants and/or floating-leave plants in the lake. Statistical POLSAR image analysis is carried out for both X- and L-band data, based on the three-component scattering power decomposition method, where the decomposed components are surface scattering, double...

  11. Flow patterns and their transition characteristicsof the air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe with asudden-changed cross-section area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Flow patterns in upstream and downstream straight tubes of sudden-changedareas in ahorizontal straight pipe were experimentally examined. Both sudden-expansioncross-section (SECS)and sudden-contraction cross-section (SCCS) were investigated. The flow pattern mapsupstream anddownstream were delineated and compared with those in straight tubes with uniformcross-sections.The effects of the SECS and SCCS on flow patterns were discussed and analyzed.Furthermore, flowpattern transition mechanisms resulting in occurrences of different flow patternswere simplydiscussed and some transition criteria for the flow pattern transitions were deduced byusing the non-dimensionlized analysis method.

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

  13. 水下超大断面隧道衬砌施工新技术%New Technology for Construction of Secondary Lining for Under-water Tunnel Sections with Super-large Cross-sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄灵强

    2013-01-01

    The bifurcation sections of Yingpanlu Xiangjian River Crossing Tunnel have super-large cross-sections.The bifurcation sections, located in complex geological conditions, are excavated by double side drift method.The conventional lining construction method can not meet the requirements to ensure the safety of the tunnel construction and the primary support.Therefore, a new lining construction technology, that is, installing the secondary lining by means of special lining formwork jumbos and full scaffold system while keeping the temporary support in place, is adopted.In the paper, the new lining construction technology is presented and the key points of the technology are expounded.The practice demonstrates that the new lining construction technology adopted is effective.%营盘路湘江隧道主线与匝道分合流段均以暗挖形式设计,地质相当复杂,江底分岔大跨段(A、B型)超大断面采用双侧壁导坑法施工.为了保证施工和初期支护的结构安全,在量测数据反映初期支护安全预警的情况下,传统的衬砌施工方法已经不能满足正常施工状态的需求.本文介绍了一种在保留临时支撑的情况下采用特制异型台车和满堂支架组合联合施工拱墙的新型衬砌施工技术,并对关键技术控制进行了详细阐述.实践证明,不拆支撑采用台车和满堂支架组合施工分岔段二次衬砌的方法是切实有效的,同时也为其他类似工程施工提供参考.

  14. Traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections used to develop the hydrogeologic framework model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections that were used in the construction of a digital three-dimensional (3D)...

  15. Traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections used to develop the hydrogeologic framework model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the traces of geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections that were used in the construction of a digital three-dimensional (3D)...

  16. Geology and ground-water resources of the lower Little Bighorn River Valley, Big Horn County, Montana, with special reference to the drainage of waterlogged lands, with a section on chemical quality of the water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, E.A.; Klug, M.F.; Morris, D.A.; Swenson, F.A.; Krieger, R.A.

    1960-01-01

    The lower Little Bighorn River valley, Montana, is in the unglaciated part of the Missouri Plateau section of the Great Plains physiographic province. The river and its principal tributaries rise in the Bighorn Mountains, and the confluence of this northward-flowing stream with the Bighorn River is near the east edge of Hardin, Mont. The normal annual precipitation ranges from about 12 inches in the northern part of the area to 15 inches in the southern part. The economy of the area is founded principally on farming, much of the low-lying land adjacent to the river being irrigated. The irrigated land is within the Crow Indian Reservation, although a part is privately owned. The bedrock formations exposed in the area are of Cretaceous age and include the Parkman sandstone, Claggett shale, Eagle sandstone, Telegraph Creek shale, and Cody shale. The Cloverly formation, Tensleep sandstone, and Madison limestone, which underlie but are not exposed in the area, and the Parkman sandstone in the southern half of the area appear to be the principal bedrock aquifers. All except the Parkman lie at depths ranging from a few feet to several thousand feet, and all appear to be capable of yielding water in commercial quantities. Some of the other formations arc capable of yielding enough water for domestic and stock needs. The river alluvium of Recent age and the Pleistocene terrace deposits are the principal unconsolidated formations in the area with respect to water supply and drainage. Wells yielding as much as 100 gallons per minute may be developed in favorable areas. Pumping tests reveal that the transmissibility of the coarser unconsolidated materials probably ranges from about 15,000 to 30,000 gallons per day per foot. Two tests of the Parkman sandstone showed transmissibilities of 6,000 and 20,000 gallons per day per foot. Although a test of the Cloverly formation showed a transmissibility of only 3,000 gallons per day per foot, the high artesian pressure--80 pounds per

  17. Study on water exchange between river lake and groundwater in Yinchuan section of Aiyi river%宁夏艾依河银川段河湖水与地下水水量转换研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯勇

    2014-01-01

    In order to master the recharge situation between the two sides of the Aiyi river and groundwa-ter in Yinchuan section,the paper selected the representative section of the river and built two monitoring sections of water level of river and groundwater on both sides of the river,and monitored the relationship between river water level and groundwater level in different time.The results show that in certain sections of the river, the water level of river is higher than that of groundwater level in long term, the amount of water recharge of river to underground reach 806000 m3/km,which enhanced the underground level on the two sides of river and resulted in the more serious salinization river soil;in another section of the riv-er, the water level of river is lower than that of groundwater, the river undertakes the discharge of ground-water which achieves 25580 m3/km every year.The result can provide technical support for the water regulation and soil salinization prevention and treatment on both sides of the Aiyi river.%为了掌握艾依河在银川市段排泄两岸地下水或对两岸地下水的补给情况,选择具有代表性的河段,建设河道水位、两岸地下水位监测断面2处,试验监测不同时段河道水位与两岸地下水位的关系。试验监测结果分析表明:部分河段河道水位长期高于两岸地下水位,河道年补给两岸地下水量达到80.6万m3/km,抬高了河道两岸地下水位,造成河道两岸土壤盐渍化较重;部分河段河道水位低于两岸地下水位,河道承担地下水的排泄,年排泄地下水量2.558万m3/km。研究成果可为艾依河水量调度、两岸土壤盐渍化的防治提供技术支撑。

  18. Water resources investigations: A section in Thirty-third biennial report of the State Engineer to the governor of Utah: 1960-1962

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1962-01-01

    The Geological Survey is authorized by Congress to cooperate with the States and other local governmental units in water-resources investigations on a 50-50 financial basis. Principal cooperation for Utah is through the office of the Utah State Engineer. Other State offices, such as the State Road Commission, Water and Power Board, Fish and Game Department, and Oil and Gas Conservation Commission have assisted financially. Counties, cities, education institutions, and water users’ organizations also have cooperated for many years. The need for water information applies to all levels of government. It is, therefore, advantageous for the Federal Government, State governments, and other political subdivisions to share in the expense to the extent possible consistent with their common interests and responsibilities. The formal cooperative program in Utah began in 1909, and has been continuous since that date.

  19. Field report 2011 on the German Renewables Act (EEG-Erfahrungsbericht) as required by Section 65 EEG; Erfahrungsbericht 2011 zum Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG-Erfahrungsbericht) gemaess paragraph 65 EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    According to Section 65 EEG, the German government is obliged to provide regular field reports to the German parliament. This field report outlines the changes that the Federal governmentintends to make in the EEG and in other legal regulations. It is based on a number of scientific projects initiated by the Environmental Ministry. In these projects, the various aspects are analyzed from differentpoints of view, and recommendations for actions are derived. In order to provide a reliable data base for more extensive future investigations and to ensure planning reliability for investors, the Federal government intends to maintain the four-year interval specified in the EEG.

  20. Methods for chemical analysis of water and wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This manual provides test procedures approved for the monitoring of water supplies, waste discharges, and ambient waters, under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, and Ambient Monitoring Requirements of Section 106 and 208 of Public Law 92-500. The test methods have been selected to meet the needs of federal legislation and to provide guidance to laboratories engaged in the protection of human health and the aquatic environment.