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Sample records for wastes actinide speciation

  1. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

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    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy’s (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (i) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (ii) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (iii) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  2. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

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    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  3. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION.

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    FRANCIS, A.J.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  4. Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume

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    Halada, Gary P

    2008-04-10

    In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

  5. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

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    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  6. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

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    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  7. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP [PowerPoint

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    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

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    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  9. Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates

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    Nash, Kenneth L.; Jensen, Mark P.; Rao, Linfeng

    2003-06-01

    Treatment of underground tanks at Hanford with concentrated alkali to improve removal of waste-limiting components of sludges has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. Hence, more aggressive treatments of sludges, including contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to enhance Cr removal. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can no longer be reliably assumed to remain in the sludge phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Extrapolation of acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides little reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are also examining the potential impact of acidic leaching with concurrent secondary separations to enhance Al removal. Our objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative leaching protocols.

  10. Sorption Speciation of Lanthanides/Actinides on Minerals by TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT Studies: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Tan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanides/actinides sorption speciation on minerals and oxides by means of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS and density functional theory (DFT is reviewed in the field of nuclear disposal safety research. The theoretical aspects of the methods are concisely presented. Examples of recent research results of lanthanide/actinide speciation and local atomic structures using TRLFS, EXAFS and DFT are discussed. The interaction of lanthanides/actinides with oxides and minerals as well as their uptake are also of common interest in radionuclide chemistry. Especially the sorption and inclusion of radionuclides into several minerals lead to an improvement in knowledge of minor components in solids. In the solid-liquid interface, the speciation and local atomic structures of Eu(III, Cm(III, U(VI, and Np(IV/VI in several natural and synthetic minerals and oxides are also reviewed and discussed. The review is important to understand the physicochemical behavior of lanthanides/actinides at a molecular level in the natural environment.

  11. Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study

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    Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Greegor, R.B. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Lytle, F.W. [EXAFS Co., Pioche, NV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data.

  12. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

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    Novak, C.F. [ed.

    1995-08-01

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

  13. Correlation of retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with stability constants and their speciation

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    Datta, A.; Sivaraman, N.; Viswanathan, K.S.; Ghosh, Suddhasattwa; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2013-03-01

    The present study describes a correlation that is developed from retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with the stability constant. In these studies, an ion-pairing reagent, camphor-10-sulphonic acid (CSA) was used as the modifier and organic acids such as {alpha}-hydroxy isobutyric acid ({alpha}-HIBA), mandelic acid, lactic acid and tartaric acid were used as complexing reagent for elution. From these studies, a correlation has been established between capacity factor of a metal ion, concentration of ion-pairing reagent and complexing agent with the stability constant of metal complex. Based on these studies, it has been shown that the stability constant of lanthanide and actinide complexes can be estimated using a single lanthanide calibrant. Validation of the method was carried out with the complexing agents such as {alpha}-HIBA and lactic acid. It was also demonstrated that data from a single chromatogram can be used for estimation of stability constant at various ionic strengths. These studies also demonstrated that the method can be applied for estimation of stability constant of actinides with a ligand whose value is not reported yet, e.g., ligands of importance in the lanthanide-actinide separations, chelation therapy etc. The chromatographic separation method is fast and the estimation of stability constant can be done in a very short time, which is a significant advantage especially in dealing with radioactive elements. The stability constant data was used to derive speciation data of plutonium in different oxidation states as well as that of americium with {alpha}-HIBA. The elution behavior of actinides such as Pu and Am from reversed phase chromatographic technique could be explained based on these studies. (orig.)

  14. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

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    Raymond, K.N.; White, D.J.; Xu, Jide; Mohs, T.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this project is to take a biomimetic approach toward developing new separation technologies for the removal of radioactive elements from contaminated DOE sites. To achieve this objective, the authors are investigating the fundamental chemistry of naturally occurring, highly specific metal ion sequestering agents and developing them into liquid/liquid and solid supported actinide extraction agents. Nature produces sideophores (e.g., Enterobactin and Desferrioxamine B) to selectivity sequester Lewis acidic metal ions, in particular Fe(III), from its surroundings. These chelating agents typically use multiple catechols or hydroxamic acids to form polydentate ligands that chelate the metal ion forming very stable complexes. The authors are investigating and developing analogous molecules into selective chelators targeting actinide(IV) ions, which display similar properties to Fe(III). By taking advantage of differences in charge, preferred coordination number, and pH stability range, the transition from nature to actinide sequestering agents has been applied to the development of new and highly selective actinide extraction technologies. Additionally, the authors have shown that these chelating ligands are versatile ligands for chelating U(VI). In particular, they have been studying their coordination chemistry and fundamental interactions with the uranyl ion [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, the dominant form of uranium found in aqueous media. With an understanding of this chemistry, and results obtained from in vivo uranium sequestration studies, it should be possible to apply these actinide(IV) extraction technologies to the development of new extraction agents for the removal of uranium from waste streams.

  15. Aqueous waste management for minor actinides and lanthanides separation process

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    Pochon, P.; Boyer, S.; Sans, D

    2004-07-01

    The French strategy of high level radioactive aqueous waste management is an incorporation in glassy fission products containers. Therefore, nitric acid soluble organic reagents needed for minor actinides and lanthanides selective separation from fission product solutions have to be sufficiently removed to reach carbon concentrations compatible with calcinator working. Thus, the ability of reagents to be oxidized under concentration conditions with or without denitration becomes a criteria of selection and have been studied. Further, if not working, other operations like hot hydrogen peroxide oxidation, catalyzed or not, are investigated. Reagents involved in this work are mainly complexing products (N-(2-Hydroxyethyl) Ethylene-diamine-tri-acetic Acid), pH keeping reagents (carboxylic acids like citric, glycolic, tartaric and lactic acid) and alkaline species (Tetramethylammonium hydroxide). Behaviour of acetic acid, which is often the main degradation product, has also been observed. In all cases, reaction products are characterized. (authors)

  16. Radiochemical separation of actinides for their determination in environmental samples and waste products

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    Gleisberg, B. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The determination of low level activities of actinides in environmental samples and waste products makes high demands on radiochemical separation methods. Artificial and natural actinides were analyzed in samples form the surrounding areas of NPP and of uranium mines, incorporation samples, solutions containing radioactive fuel, solutions and solids resutling from the process, and in wastes. The activities are measured by {alpha}-spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry. (DG)

  17. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

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    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste is generated by many different technical and scientific applications. For the past decades, different waste disposal strategies have been considered. Several questions on the waste disposal strategy remain unanswered, particularly regarding the long-term radiotoxicity of minor actinides (Am, Cm, Np), plutonium and uranium. These radionuclides mainly arise from high level nuclear waste (HLW), specific waste streams or dismantled nuclear weapons. Although many countries have opted for the direct disposal of spent fuel, from a scientific and technical point of view it is imperative to pursue alternative waste management strategies. Apart from the vitrification, especially for trivalent actinides and Pu, crystalline ceramic waste forms are considered. In contrast to glasses, crystalline waste forms, which are chemically and physically highly stable, allow the retention of radionuclides on well-defined lattice positions within the crystal structure. Besides polyphase ceramics such as SYNROC, single phase ceramics are considered as tailor made host phases to embed a specific radionuclide or a specific group. Among oxidic single phase ceramics pyrochlores are known to have a high potential for this application. This work examines ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores as potential nuclear waste forms, which are known to show a high aqueous stability and a high tolerance towards radiation damage. This work contributes to (1) understand the phase stability field of pyrochlore and consequences of non-stoichiometry which leads to pyrochlores with mixed cationic sites. Mixed cationic occupancies are likely to occur in actinide-bearing pyrochlores. (2) The structural uptake of radionuclides themselves was studied. (3) The chemical stability and the effect of phase transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite were probed. This phase transition is important, as it is the result of radiation damage in ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores. ZrO{sub 2} - Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pellets

  18. Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program

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    Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

  19. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed.

  20. STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS FROM HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE SOLUTIONS USING MONOSODIUM TITANATE 1. SIMULANT TESTING

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    HOBBS, D. T.; BARNES, M. J.; PULMANO, R. L.; MARSHALL, K. M.; EDWARDS, T. B.; BRONIKOWSKI, M. G.; FINK, S. D.

    2005-04-14

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for {sup 137}Cs removal, and ion exchange/sorption of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides with an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from simulated waste solutions. These tests evaluated the influence of ionic strength, temperature, solution composition and the oxidation state of plutonium.

  1. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS WASTE TANKS TO IMPROVE ACTINIDE SOLUBILITY

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    Rudisill, T.; Thompson, M.

    2011-09-20

    Processes for the removal of residual sludge from SRS waste tanks have historically used solutions containing up to 0.9 M oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining material following sludge removal. The selection of this process was based on a comparison of a number of studies performed to evaluate the dissolution of residual sludge. In contrast, the dissolution of the actinide mass, which represents a very small fraction of the waste, has not been extensively studied. The Pu, Np, and Am in the sludge is reported to be present as hydrated and crystalline oxides. To identify aqueous solutions which have the potential to increase the solubility of the actinides, the alkaline and mildly acidic test solutions shown below were selected as candidates for use in a series of solubility experiments. The efficiency of the solutions in solubilizing the actinides was evaluated using a simulated sludge prepared by neutralizing a HNO{sub 3} solution containing Pu, Np, and Am. The hydroxide concentration was adjusted to a 1.2 M excess and the solids were allowed to age for several weeks prior to starting the experiments. The sludge was washed with 0.01 M NaOH to prepare the solids for use. Following the addition of an equal portion of the solids to each test solution, the concentrations of Pu, Np, and Am were measured as a function of time over a 792 h (33 day) period to provide a direct comparison of the efficiency of each solution in solubilizing the actinide elements. Although the composition of the sludge was limited to the hydrated actinide oxides (and did not contain other components of demonstrated importance), the results of the study provides guidance for the selection of solutions which should be evaluated in subsequent tests with a more realistic surrogate sludge and actual tank waste.

  2. Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes

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    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

  3. Conjugates of magnetic nanoparticle-actinide specific chelator for radioactive waste separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Zhang, Huijin; Martin, Leigh; Todd, Terry; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed.

  4. Conjugates of Magnetic Nanoparticle -- Actinide Specific Chelator for Radioactive Waste Separation

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    Maninder Kaur; Huijin Zhang; Leigh Martin; Terry Todd; You Qiang

    2013-11-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed.

  5. Fundamental thermodynamics of actinide-bearing mineral waste forms. 1998 annual progress report

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    Williamson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly, understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpy of formation of actinide substituted zircon, zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stability of these materials. This report summarizes work after eight months of a three year project.'

  6. Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2001-03-01

    The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

  7. Gadolinium speciation with Tetradentate, N-donor extractants for minor actinide/lanthanide separation: an XRD, mass spectrometry and EPR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, D.M. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sharrad, C.A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sproules, S. [Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The hydrophobic organic molecules CyMe{sub 4}-BTPhen (1) and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP (2) have been developed and tuned over many years to be able to separate the trivalent actinides from the trivalent lanthanides (Ln) selectively in bi-phasic solvent extraction processes for the separation of the long-lived radio-toxic minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The ability of these N-donor ligands to perform this separation is poorly understood, as is their speciation with the metal ions when extracted into the organic phase. Our previous work has shown Ln{sup 3+} speciation to be largely 1:2 Ln:L in nature with another small molecule, either water or nitrate, occupying a cavity between the tetradentate bound N-donor ligands. The identity of the small molecule changes across the lanthanide series, and here we continue investigations into this speciation. Complexes of these N-donor ligands with Gd{sup 3+} have been synthesised and characterised by X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy. We show that the N-donor ligands have no effect on the electronic configuration of Gd{sup 3+} and that the lanthanide contraction with the steric rigidity of the N-donor ligand appears to determine the size of the cavity between the coordinated ligands. This in turn appears to control the identity of the small molecule on the ninth site in the 1:2 Gd:L species. (authors)

  8. Actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) carbonate speciation studies by PAS and NMR spectroscopies; Yucca Mountain Project: Milestone report 3031-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pulsed-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to study speciation of actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) ions (Np, Pu, Am) in aqueous carbonate solutions vs pH, carbonate content, actinide content, temperature. PAS focused on Pu(IV) speciation. Stability fields on a pH (8.4 to 12.0) versus total carbonate content (0.003 to 1.0 M) plot for dilute Pu(IV) carbonate species ([Pu]{sub tot} = 1 mM) were mapped. Four plutonium species, with absorption peaks at 486, 492, 500, and 512 nm were found. Loss of a single carbonate ligand does not account for the difference in speciation for the 486 and 492 nm absorption peaks, nor can any of the observed species be identified as colloidal Pu(IV). NMR data have been obtained for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This report focuses on results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on the PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. In each of the six different PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} samples, two NMR signals are present, one for the free carbonate ligand and one for the carbonate ligand coordinated to a paramagnetic plutonium metal center. The single{sup 13}C resonance line for coordinated carbonate is consistent with expectations of a monomeric PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} species in solution. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was used for determining ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Eyring analysis at standard conditions provided activation parameters of {Delta}H = 38 KJ/M and {Delta}S = {minus}60 J/K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl(VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction.

  9. Bidentate organophosphorus extractants: purification, properties and applications to removal of actinides from acidic waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.; McIsaac, L.D.

    1977-05-01

    At both Hanford and Idaho, DHDECMP (dihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamylmethylene phosphonate) continuous counter-current solvent extraction processes are being developed for removal of americium, plutonium, and, in some cases, other actinides from acidic wastes generated at these locations. Bench and, eventually, pilot and plant-scale testing and application of these processes have been substantially enhanced by the discovery of suitable chemical and physical methods of removing deleterious impurities from technical-grade DHDECMP. Flowsheet details, as well as various properties of purified DHDECMP extractants, are enumerated.

  10. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  11. Leaching of actinides and technetium from simulated high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.J.; Harvey, C.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1979-08-01

    Leach tests were conducted using a modified version of the IAEA procedure to study the behavior of glass waste-solution interactions. Release rates were determined for Tc, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Si in the following solutions: WIPP B salt brine, NaCl (287 g/l), NaCl (1.76 g/1), CaCl/sub 2/ (1.66 g/l), NaHCO/sub 3/ (2.52 g/l), and deionized water. The leach rates for all elements decreased an order of magnitude from their initial values during the first 20 to 30 days leaching time. The sodium bicarbonate solution produced the highest elemental release rates, while the saturated salt brine and deionized water in general gave the lowest release. Technetium has the highest initial release of all elements studied. The technetium release rates, however, decreased by over four orders of magnitude in 150 days of leaching time. In the prepared glass, technetium was phase separated, concentrating on internal pore surfaces. Neptunium, in all cases except CaCl/sub 2/ solution, shows the highest actinide release rate. In general, curium and uranium have the lowest release rates. The range of actinide release rates is from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -8/ g/cm/sup 2//day. 25 figures, 7 tables.

  12. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, S. J.; Wilson, J. N.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Guillemin, P.; Ivanov, E.; Méplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Siem, S.

    2012-02-01

    The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U) is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX) and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  13. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttin A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  14. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  15. Carbon speciation in ash, residual waste and contaminated soil by thermal and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Robinson, Ryan; Brännvall, Evelina; Nordmark, Désirée; Bjurström, Henrik; Andreas, Lale; Lagerkvist, Anders; Ecke, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Carbon in waste can occur as inorganic (IC), organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) each having distinct chemical properties and possible environmental effects. In this study, carbon speciation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical degradation tests and the standard total organic carbon (TOC) measurement procedures in three types of waste materials (bottom ash, residual waste and contaminated soil). Over 50% of the total carbon (TC) in all studied materials (72% in ash and residual waste, and 59% in soil) was biologically non-reactive or EC as determined by thermogravimetric analyses. The speciation of TOC by chemical degradation also showed a presence of a non-degradable C fraction in all materials (60% of TOC in ash, 30% in residual waste and 13% in soil), though in smaller amounts than those determined by TGA. In principle, chemical degradation method can give an indication of the presence of potentially inert C in various waste materials, while TGA is a more precise technique for C speciation, given that waste-specific method adjustments are made. The standard TOC measurement yields exaggerated estimates of organic carbon and may therefore overestimate the potential environmental impacts (e.g. landfill gas generation) of waste materials in a landfill environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical speciation of strontium, americium, and curium in high level waste: Predictive modeling of phase partitioning during tank processing. Annual progress report, October 1996--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Choppin, G. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US)

    1997-12-31

    'The program at Florida State University was funded to collaborate with Dr. A. Felmy (PNNL) on speciation in high level wastes and with Dr. D. Rai (PNNL) on redox of Pu under high level waste conditions. The funding provided support for 3 research associates (postdoctoral researchers) under Professor G. R. Choppin as P.I. Dr. Kath Morris from U. Manchester (Great Britain), Dr. Dean Peterman and Dr. Amy Irwin (both from U. Cincinnati) joined the laboratory in the latter part of 1996. After an initial training period to become familiar with basic actinide chemistry and radiochemical techniques, they began their research. Dr. Peterman was assigned the task of measuring Th-EDTA complexation prior to measuring Pu(IV)-EDTA complexation. These studies are associated with the speciation program with Dr. Felmy. Drs. Morris and Irwin initiated research on redox of plutonium with agents present in the Hanford Tanks as a result of radiolysis or from use in separations. The preliminary results obtained thus far are described in this report. It is expected that the rate of progress will continue to increase significantly as the researchers gain more experience with plutonium chemistry.'

  17. Research in actinide chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH[sup [minus

  18. The coupling of capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer as a speciation instrument for actinides at trace level; Le couplage electrophorese capillaire-spectrometre de masse a source plasma en tant qu'instrument de speciation des actinides a l'etat de traces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, A

    2004-07-01

    An interface between the separation technique (capillary electrophoresis) and the analytical technique (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometer) was developed. In that sense, bibliographic and parametric studies allowed to define necessary conditions for the good working of both techniques. The results obtained led to the realisation of an interface capillary electrophoresis / ICP-MS (CE / ICP-MS). This one was experimentally validated on classical separations (alkalis / earth-alkalis and lanthanides) and the detection limit of the analytical system was determined equal to 4 x 10{sup -11} mol.L{sup -1} for plutonium. This result exhibits a gain in detection limit of a factor higher than 10{sup 4} compared to the capillary electrophoresis in standard detection (UV). The studies were made in order to check the capacity of the CE / ICP-MS coupling as a speciation instrument for actinides at trace level and to define the associated analytical procedures. The coupling turned out to be a suited instrument for the determination of absolute electrophoretic mobilities at infinite dilution (physico-chemical property which allows to predict the migration time of an ion under an electrical field in a given electrolyte), for the determination of thermodynamic constants and for the separation of different actinide oxidation states in solution. (author)

  19. Mechanical environmental transport of actinides and ¹³⁷Cs from an arid radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew S; Clark, Sue B; Morrison, Samuel S; Watrous, Matthew G; Olson, John E; Snyder, Darin C

    2015-10-01

    Aeolian and pluvial processes represent important mechanisms for the movement of actinides and fission products at the Earth's surface. Soil samples taken in the early 1970's near a Department of Energy radioactive waste disposal site (the Subsurface Disposal Area, SDA, located in southeastern Idaho) provide a case study for studying the mechanisms and characteristics of environmental actinide and (137)Cs transport in an arid environment. Multi-component mixing models suggest actinide contamination within 2.5 km of the SDA can be described by mixing between 2 distinct SDA end members and regional nuclear weapons fallout. The absence of chemical fractionation between (241)Am and (239+240)Pu with depth for samples beyond the northeastern corner and lack of (241)Am in-growth over time (due to (241)Pu decay) suggest mechanical transport and mixing of discrete contaminated particles under arid conditions. Occasional samples northeast of the SDA (the direction of the prevailing winds) contain anomalously high concentrations of Pu with (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios statistically identical to those in the northeastern corner. Taken together, these data suggest flooding resulted in mechanical transport of contaminated particles into the area between the SDA and a flood containment dike in the northeastern corner, following which subsequent contamination spreading in the northeastern direction resulted from wind transport of discrete particles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation and testing of sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Romanovski, V.V.; Veeck, A.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate and test the complexing ability of a variety of promising new complexing agents synthesized by Professor Kenneth Raymond`s group at the University of California, Berkeley (ESP-CP TTP Number SF16C311). Some of these derivatives have already shown the potential for selectivity binding Pu(IV) in a wide range of solutions in the presence of other metals. Professor Raymond`s group uses molecular modeling to design and synthesize ligands based on modification of natural siderophores, or their analogs, for chelation of actinides. The ligands are then modified for use as liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extractants. The authors` group at the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science (ITS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory determines the complex formation constants between the ligands and actinide ions, the capacity and time dependence for uptake on the resins, and the effect of other metal ions and pH.

  1. Speciation and leaching of trace metal contaminants from e-waste contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Li; Luo, Chun-Ling; Tang, Chloe Wing-Yee; Chan, Ting-Shan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-05-05

    Primitive electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities have caused serious environmental problems. However, little is known about the speciation and leaching behaviors of metal contaminants at e-waste contaminated sites. This study investigated trace metal speciation/mobilization from e-waste polluted soil through column leaching experiments involving irrigation with rainwater for almost 2.5 years. Over the experimental period, Cu and Zn levels in the porewater were 0.14±0.08mg/L, and 0.16±0.08mg/L, respectively, increasing to 0.33±0.16mg/L, and 0.69±0.28mg/L with plant growth. The amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb released in surface soil (0-2cm) contributed 43.8%, 22.5%, and 13.8%, respectively, to the original levels. The released Cu and Zn were primarily caused by the mobilization of the carbonate species of metals, including Cu(OH)2, CuCO3, and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, and amorphous Fe/Mn oxides associated fractions characterized by sequential extraction coupling with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During the experiments, trace metals were not detected in the effluent, and the re-sequestration of trace metals was mainly attributed to the adsorption on the abundant Fe/Mn oxides in the sub-layer soil. This study quantitatively elucidated the molecular speciation of Cu and Zn in e-waste contaminated soil during the column leaching process.

  2. Loading Actinides in Multilayered Structures for Nuclear Waste Treatment: The First Case Study of Uranium Capture with Vanadium Carbide MXene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Yuan, Liyong; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yujuan; Deng, Qihuang; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Zhifang; Barsoum, Michel W; Wang, Xiangke; Shi, Weiqun

    2016-06-29

    Efficient nuclear waste treatment and environmental management are important hurdles that need to be overcome if nuclear energy is to become more widely used. Herein, we demonstrate the first case of using two-dimensional (2D) multilayered V2CTx nanosheets prepared by HF etching of V2AlC to remove actinides from aqueous solutions. The V2CTx material is found to be a highly efficient uranium (U(VI)) sorbent, evidenced by a high uptake capacity of 174 mg g(-1), fast sorption kinetics, and desirable selectivity. Fitting of the sorption isotherm indicated that the sorption followed a heterogeneous adsorption model, most probably due to the presence of heterogeneous adsorption sites. Density functional theory calculations, in combination with X-ray absorption fine structure characterizations, suggest that the uranyl ions prefer to coordinate with hydroxyl groups bonded to the V-sites of the nanosheets via forming bidentate inner-sphere complexes.

  3. Chromium speciation in hazardous, cement-based waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. F.; Bajt, S.; Clark, S. B.; Lamble, G. M.; Langton, C. A.; Oji, L.

    1995-02-01

    XANES and EXAFS techniques were used to determine the oxidation states and local structural environment of Cr in cement-based waste forms. Results show that Cr in untreated Portland cement formulations remains as toxic Cr 6+, while slag additives to the cement reduce Cr 6+ to the less toxic, less mobile Cr 3+ species. EXAFS analysis suggests that the Cr 6+ species is surrounded by four nearest oxygen atoms, while the reduced Cr 3+ sp ecies is surrounded by six oxygen atoms. The fitted CrO bond lengths for Cr 6+ and Cr 3+ species are around 1.66 and 1.98 Å, respectively.

  4. Study of extraterrestrial disposal of radioactive wastes. Part 3: Preliminary feasibility screening study of space disposal of the actinide radioactive wastes with 1 percent and 0.1 percent fission product contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, R. E.; Wohl, M. L.; Finnegan, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted of the feasibility of space disposal of the actinide class of radioactive waste material. This waste was assumed to contain 1 and 0.1 percent residual fission products, since it may not be feasible to completely separate the actinides. The actinides are a small fraction of the total waste but they remain radioactive much longer than the other wastes and must be isolated from human encounter for tens of thousands of years. Results indicate that space disposal is promising but more study is required, particularly in the area of safety. The minimum cost of space transportation would increase the consumer electric utility bill by the order of 1 percent for earth escape and 3 percent for solar escape. The waste package in this phase of the study was designed for normal operating conditions only; the design of next phase of the study will include provisions for accident safety. The number of shuttle launches per year required to dispose of all U.S. generated actinide waste with 0.1 percent residual fission products varies between 3 and 15 in 1985 and between 25 and 110 by 2000. The lower values assume earth escape (solar orbit) and the higher values are for escape from the solar system.

  5. Evaluation of Cyanex 923-coated magnetic particles for the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaibu, B.S. [Chemical Sciences Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram-695019 (India); Reddy, M.L.P. [Chemical Sciences Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram-695019 (India)]. E-mail: mlpreddy@yahoo.co.uk; Bhattacharyya, A. [Radiochemistry Division, B.A.R.C, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, B.A.R.C, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2006-06-15

    In the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process, tiny ferromagnetic particles coated with solvent extractant are used to selectively separate radionuclides and hazardous metals from aqueous waste streams. The contaminant-loaded particles are then recovered from the waste solutions using a magnetic field. The contaminants attached to the magnetic particles are subsequently removed using a small volume of stripping agent. In the present study, Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide) coated magnetic particles (cross-linked polyacrylamide and acrylic acid entrapping charcoal and iron oxide, 1:1:1, particle size=1-60 {mu}m) are being evaluated for the possible application in the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams. The uptake behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions was investigated by batch studies. The effects of sorption kinetics, extractant and nitric acid concentrations on the uptake behaviour of metal ions were systematically studied. The influence of fission products (Cs(I), Sr(II)) and interfering ions including Fe(III), Cr(VI), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Al(III) were investigated. The recycling capacity of the extractant-coated magnetic particles was also evaluated.

  6. Evaluation of Cyanex 923-coated magnetic particles for the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibu, B. S.; Reddy, M. L. P.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Manchanda, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    In the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process, tiny ferromagnetic particles coated with solvent extractant are used to selectively separate radionuclides and hazardous metals from aqueous waste streams. The contaminant-loaded particles are then recovered from the waste solutions using a magnetic field. The contaminants attached to the magnetic particles are subsequently removed using a small volume of stripping agent. In the present study, Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide) coated magnetic particles (cross-linked polyacrylamide and acrylic acid entrapping charcoal and iron oxide, 1:1:1, particle size=1-60 μm) are being evaluated for the possible application in the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams. The uptake behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions was investigated by batch studies. The effects of sorption kinetics, extractant and nitric acid concentrations on the uptake behaviour of metal ions were systematically studied. The influence of fission products (Cs(I), Sr(II)) and interfering ions including Fe(III), Cr(VI), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Al(III) were investigated. The recycling capacity of the extractant-coated magnetic particles was also evaluated.

  7. Fractionation and speciation of arsenic in fresh and combusted coal wastes from Yangquan, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin; Hu, Qinhong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the content and speciation of arsenic in coal waste and gas condensates from coal waste fires were investigated, respectively, using the digestion and sequential extraction methods. The fresh and fired-coal waste samples were collected from Yangquan, which is one of the major coal production regions in northern China. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) was used to determine the concentrations of four major arsenic species [As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)] in the extracts, while ICP-MS was used to measure total As content. Arsenic content in the investigated coal wastes and the condensate ranges between 23.3 and 69.3 mg/kg, which are higher than its reported average content in soils. Arsenic in coal waste exists primarily in the residual fraction; this is followed in decreasing order by the organic matter-bound, Fe-Mn oxides-bound, exchangeable, carbonates-bound, and water-soluble fractions. The high content of arsenic in the condensates indicates that combustion or spontaneous combustion is one of the major ways for arsenic release into the environment from coal waste. About 15% of the arsenic in the condensate sample is labile and can release into the environment under leaching processes. The water extractable arsenic (WEA) in the fresh coal waste, fired coal wastes, and the condensate varied between 14.6 and 341 μg/kg, with As(V) as the major species. Furthermore, both MMA and DMA were found in fresh coal wastes, fired coal wastes, and the condensate. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  8. Study of the actinide-lanthanide separation from nuclear waste by a new pyrochemical process; Etude de la separation actinides-lanthanides des dechets nucleaires par un procede pyrochimique nouveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemort, F. [CEA Marcoule, Departement de Retraitement, des Dechets et du Demantelement, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)]|[Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-01-01

    The theoretical extraction and separation of platinoids, actinides and lanthanides is allowed by thermodynamic using two adapted reducing agents: zinc and magnesium. Thereby, a pyrochemical method for the nuclear waste processing has been devised. The high temperature handling of the elements in fluoride forms and their processing by a reactive metallic phase required special precautions. The study of the behavior of matter in exploratory systems allowed the development of an experimental technology for the treatment and contacting of phases. The thermodynamical analysis of the experimental results shows the feasibility of the process. A model was developed to predict the distribution coefficients of zirconium, uranium and lanthanum as a function of the system composition. An estimation method was proposed in order to evaluate the distribution coefficients in diluted solution of all the actinides and lanthanides existing in the fission products between LiF CaF{sub 2} and Zn-Mg at 720 deg C. Coupled with the experimental results, the estimates results may be extrapolated to concentrated solutions allowing predictions of the separation of all actinides and lanthanides. The rapidity of element transfer is induced by a thermal effect caused by the high exothermicity of the reduction by magnesium. The kinetic coefficients have been linked with the reduction enthalpy of each element. Moreover, the kinetics seem limited by chemical reaction and not by mass transfer. (author) 66 refs.

  9. Chemical speciation and mobility of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; LIU Jian-guo; YU Qian-feng; NIE Yong-feng

    2004-01-01

    Chemical speciation is a significant factor that governs the toxicity and mobility of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash. Sequential extraction procedure is applied to fractionate heavy metals(Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, and Cr) into five defined groups: exchangeable, carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide, organic, and residual fractions. The mobility of heavy metals is also investigated with the aid of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. In the fly ash sample, Pb is primarily presented in the carbonate(51%) and exchangeable(20%) fractions; Cd and Zn mainly exist as the exchangeable(83% and 49% respectively); Cu is mostly contained in the last three fractions(totally 87%); and Cr is mainly contained in the residual fraction(62%). Pb, Zn and Cd showed the high mobility in the investigation, thus might be of risk to the natural environment when municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is landfilled or reutilized.

  10. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  11. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  12. ACTINIDE BIOCOLLOID FORMATION IN BRINE BY HALOPHILIC BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GILLOW,J.B.; FRANCIS,A.J.; DODGE,C.J.; HARRIS,R.; BEVERIDGE,T.J.; BRADY,P.B.; PAPENGUTH,H.W.

    1998-11-09

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  13. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  14. Arsenic Speciation in Wastes Resulting From Pressure Oxidation, Roasting and Smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paktunc, D. (CCM)

    2010-11-01

    Arsenic commonly occurs in elevated concentrations in some gold and base-metal deposits. Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base-metal ores results in solid wastes, effluents, and air emissions containing high concentrations of arsenic. Such wastes form an important source of anthropogenic arsenic in the environment. The nature and occurrence of arsenic in solid wastes are complex and highly variable. A combination of microanalytical tools and techniques including XAFS were used to determine the form and speciation of arsenic in wastes resulting from pressure oxidation, roasting and smelting, and impacted soil. As K-edge and Fe K-edge XAFS analyses of the pressure oxidation residues indicate that arsenic in tetrahedral coordination is corner-linked to 5 to 6 FeO{sub 6} octahedra that are edge- and perhaps face-sharing. During roasting of refractory gold ores, oxidation of As to As{sub 2}O{sub 5} species may be incomplete, which is detrimental to not only gold recovery but also the tailings management options. As K-edge XANES spectra indicate that more than one-third of the arsenic released from a copper smelter stack is composed of As{sup 3+} species. Most likely arsenic species in the smelter-impacted soil include arsenolite, goethite with adsorbed As{sup 5+}, monomethylarsonic acidm, and tetramethylarsonium iodide.

  15. Prediction of dissolved actinide concentrations in concentrated electrolyte solutions: a conceptual model and model results for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, C.F.; Moore, R.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bynum, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-25

    The conceptual model for WIPP dissolved concentrations is a description of the complex natural and artificial chemical conditions expected to influence dissolved actinide concentrations in the repository. By a set of physical and chemical assumptions regarding chemical kinetics, sorption substrates, and waste-brine interactions, the system was simplified to be amenable to mathematical description. The analysis indicated that an equilibrium thermodynamic model for describing actinide solubilities in brines would be tractable and scientifically supportable. This paper summarizes the conceptualization and modeling approach and the computational results as used in the WIPP application for certification of compliance with relevant regulations for nuclear waste repositories. The WIPP site contains complex natural brines ranging from sea water to 10x more concentrated than sea water. Data bases for predicting solubility of Am(III) (as well as Pu(III) and Nd(III)), Th(IV), and Np(V) in these brines under potential repository conditions have been developed, focusing on chemical interactions with Na, K, Mg, Cl, SO{sub 4}, and CO{sub 3} ions, and the organic acid anions acetate, citrate, EDTA, and oxalate. The laboratory and modeling effort augmented the Harvie et al. parameterization of the Pitzer activity coefficient model so that it could be applied to the actinides and oxidation states important to the WIPP system.

  16. Chemistry of actinides; Chimie des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorge, P. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DESD), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    This article gives the basic data of the actinides chemistry, describes then qualitatively the main parts of the fuel cycle and concludes with quantitative data. The theoretical recalls give qualitative notions to explain the chemical reactivity of actinides and to understand thus the values of the thermodynamic data which allow quantitative anticipations at equilibrium. The Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) of the NEA-OECD and the CEA in France have recently estimated some of them in using and developing methodologies whose some are presented here. Some current problems of actinides chemistry are described: analysis of the possibilities to (1)improve the reprocessing of long-lived actinides (2)anticipate their behaviour in the environment in order to compare the impact of the different options of the wastes management. The Pourbaix diagrams summarize the chemistry in solution; the author has added information on the solubility, the influence of the ionic strength and of the complexes formation in bicarbonate/carbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) media. The discussion on the choice of the equilibrium constants allows to point out the particular points, the dubiousness and the data which have to be proved. (O.M.)

  17. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  18. Partitioning and speciation of Pu in the sedimentary rocks aquifer from the deep liquid nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry; Vlasova, Irina E.; Romanchuk, Anna Yu.; Presnyakov, Igor A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Zakharova, Elena V.; Volkova, Anna G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2015-06-01

    Plutonium partitioning and speciation was studied under the conditions of a liquid nuclear waste repository site. The dominating effect of corrosion products (Fe and Cr) oxides on plutonium partitioning was established in batch sorption tests at 150 C and by using sequential extraction. Various techniques including Moessbauer spectrometry, XRD and TEM were used to characterize Fe/Cr oxide phases that form both precipitates and surface coatings which sorb plutonium. The sorption and speciation of plutonium was modeled thermodynamically using Pourbaix diagram that takes into account both surface complexation reaction and precipitation of insoluble PuO{sub 2}.

  19. Actinide Sorption in a Brine/Dolomite Rock System: Evaluating the Degree of Conservatism in Kd Ranges used in Performance Assessment Modeling for the WIPP Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Reed, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM is the only operating nuclear waste repository in the US and has been accepting transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The WIPP is located in a salt deposit approximately 650 m below the surface and performance assessment (PA) modeling for a 10,000 year period is required to recertify the operating license with the US EPA every five years. The main pathway of concern for environmental release of radioactivity is a human intrusion caused by drilling into a pressurized brine reservoir below the repository. This could result in the flooding of the repository and subsequent transport in the high transmissivity layer (dolomite-rich Culebra formation) above the waste disposal rooms. We evaluate the degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) ranges used in the PA based on an approach developed with granite rock and actinides (Dittrich and Reimus, 2015; Dittrich et al., 2015). Sorption onto the waste storage material (Fe drums) may also play a role in mobile actinide concentrations. We will present (1) a conceptual overview of how Kds are used in the PA model, (2) technical background of the evolution of the ranges and (3) results from batch and column experiments and model predictions for Kds with WIPP dolomite and clays, brine with various actinides, and ligands (e.g., acetate, citrate, EDTA) that could promote transport. The current Kd ranges used in performance models are based on oxidation state and are 5-400, 0.5-10,000, 0.03-200, and 0.03-20 mL g-1 for elements with oxidation states of III, IV, V, and VI, respectively. Based on redox conditions predicted in the brines, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV). We will also discuss the challenges of upscaling from lab experiments to field scale predictions, the role of colloids, and the effect of engineered barrier materials (e.g., MgO) on transport conditions. Dittrich

  20. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  1. On the use of speciation techniques and ab initio modelling to understand tetravalent actinide behavior in a biological medium: An(IV)DTPA case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupiais, J; Bonin, L; Den Auwer, C; Moisy, P; Siberchicot, B; Topin, S

    2016-03-07

    In the case of an accidental nuclear event, contamination of human bodies by actinide elements may occur. Such elements have the particularity to exhibit both radiological and chemical toxicities that may induce severe damages at several levels, depending on the biokinetics of the element. In order to eliminate the actinide elements before they are stored in target organs (liver, kidneys, or bone, depending on the element), sequestering agents must be quickly injected. However, to date, there is still no ideal sequestering agent, despite the recent interest in this topic due to contamination concerns. DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) is currently generating interest for the development of oral or alternative self-administrable forms. Although biokinetics data are mostly available, molecular scale characterization of actinide-DTPA complexes is still scarce. Nevertheless, strong interest is growing in the characterization of An(IV)DTPA(-) complexes at the molecular level because this opens the way for predicting the stability constants of unknown systems or even for developing new analytical strategies aimed at better and more selective decorporation. For this purpose, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) investigations were undertaken and compared with capillary electrophoresis (CE) used in a very unusual way. Indeed, it is commonly believed that CE is incapable of extracting structural information. In capillary electrophoresis, the electrophoretic mobility of an ion is a function of its charge and size. Despite very similar ratios, partial separations between An(IV)DTPA(-) species (An(IV) = Th, U, Np, Pu) were obtained. A linear relationship between the electrophoretic mobility and the actinide--oxygen distance calculated by AIMD was evidenced. As an example, the interpolated U-O distances in U(IV)DTPA(-) from CE-ICPMS experiments, EXAFS, AIMD, and the relationship between the stability constants and

  2. Chromium speciation and mobility in a high level nuclear waste vadose zone plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brown, Gordon E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.; Traina, Sam J.; Warner, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive core samples containing elevated concentrations of Cr from a high level nuclear waste plume in the Hanford vadose zone were studied to asses the future mobility of Cr. Cr(VI) is an important subsurface contaminant at the Hanford Site. The plume originated in 1969 by leakage of self-boiling supernate from a tank containing REDOX process waste. The supernate contained high concentrations of alkali (NaOH ≈ 5.25 mol/L), salt (NaNO 3/NaNO 2 >10 mol/L), aluminate [Al(OH) 4- = 3.36 mol/L], Cr(VI) (0.413 mol/L), and 137Cs + (6.51 × 10 -5 mol/L). Water and acid extraction of the oxidized subsurface sediments indicated that a significant portion of the total Cr was associated with the solid phase. Mineralogic analyses, Cr valence speciation measurements by X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and small column leaching studies were performed to identify the chemical retardation mechanism and leachability of Cr. While X-ray diffraction detected little mineralogic change to the sediments from waste reaction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that mineral particles within 5 m of the point of tank failure were coated with secondary, sodium aluminosilicate precipitates. The density of these precipitates decreased with distance from the source (e.g., beyond 10 m). The XANES and column studies demonstrated the reduction of 29-75% of the total Cr to insoluble Cr(III), and the apparent precipitation of up to 43% of the Cr(VI) as an unidentified, non-leachable phase. Both Cr(VI) reduction and Cr(VI) precipitation were greater in sediments closer to the leak source where significant mineral alteration was noted by SEM. These and other observations imply that basic mineral hydrolysis driven by large concentrations of OH - in the waste stream liberated Fe(II) from the otherwise oxidizing sediments that served as a reductant for CrO 42-. The coarse-textured Hanford sediments contain silt-sized mineral phases (biotite, clinochlore, magnetite, and

  3. Cesium Speciation in Dust from Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge Incineration by Synchrotron Radiation Micro-X-ray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Terada, Yasuko

    2015-11-17

    The chemical behavior of Cs in waste incineration processes is important to consider when disposing of radionuclide-contaminated waste from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. To determine the speciation of Cs, we attempted the direct speciation of trace amounts of stable Cs in the dust from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and sewage sludge incineration (SSI) by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-XAFS) at the SPring-8 facility. The μ-XRF results revealed that locally produced Cs was present in MSWI and SSI dust within the cluster size range of 2-10 μm. The μ-XAFS analysis confirmed that the speciation of Cs in MSWI dust was similar to that of CsCl, while in SSI dusts it was similar to pollucite. The solubility of Cs was considered to be influenced by the exact Cs species present in incineration residue.

  4. Durability of Actinide Ceramic Waste Forms Under Conditions of Granitoid Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burakov, B. E.; Anderson, E. B.

    2002-02-26

    Three samples of {sup 239}Pu-{sup 241}Am-doped ceramics obtained from previous research were used for alteration experiments simulating corrosion of waste forms in ion-saturated solutions. These were ceramics based on: pyrochlore, (Ca,Hf,Pu,U,Gd){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, containing 10 wt.% Pu and 0.1 wt.% Am; zircon, (Zr,Pu)SiO{sub 4}, containing 5-6 wt.% Pu and 0.05 wt.% Am; cubic zirconia, (Zr,Gd,Pu)O{sub 2}, containing 10 wt.% Pu and 0.1 wt.% Am. All these samples were milled in an agate mortar to obtain powder with particle sizes less than 30 micron. Sample of granite taken from the depth 500-503 m was studied and then used for preparing ion-saturated water solutions. A rock sample was ground, washed and classified. A fraction with particle size 0.10-0.25 mm was selected for alteration experiments. Powdered ceramic samples were separately placed into deionized water together with ground granite (approximately 1gram granite per 12-ml water) in special Teflon{trademark} vessels and set at 90 C in the oven for 3 months. After alteration experiments, the ceramic powders were studied by precise XRD analysis. Aqueous solutions and granite grains were analyzed for Am and Pu contents. The results show that alteration did not cause significant phase transformation in all ceramic samples. For all altered samples, the Am contents in aqueous solutions after experiments were similar (approximately n x 10{sup 2} Bq/ml) as well as Am amounts absorbed on granite grains (approximately n x 10{sup 5} Bq/g). Results on Pu contents were varied: for the solutions--from 60 Bq/ml for pyrochlore ceramic to 2.1 x 10{sup 3} Bq/ml for zircon ceramic; and for the absorption on granite--from 2.6 x 10{sup 4} Bq/g for zirconia ceramic to 1.4-6.8 x 10{sup 5} Bq/g for pyrochlore and zircon ceramics.

  5. Mercury speciation and emission from municipal solid waste incinerators in the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Laiguo; Liu, Ming; Fan, Ruifang; Ma, Shexia; Xu, Zhencheng; Ren, Mingzhong; He, Qiusheng

    2013-03-01

    The potential for Hg release during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is attracting increased attention due to high volume of municipal waste being treated by incineration in China. Emission amounts have been estimated using emission factors developed for other countries. To fine tune our emission estimate total mercury (THg) and mercury speciation were measured using isokinetic sampling in eight plants, of which six used grate furnace combustor (GFC) and two circulation fluidized bed combustors (CFBCs). Results showed that average THg concentration (19.5 ± 13.6 μg/Nm) in flue gas at the facilities that used CFBC was significantly lower than that at those using GFC (51.4 ± 28.3 μg/Nm, p=0.002). Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, Hg), and particulate mercury (Hg) represented 95.5 ± 3.8%, 4.1 ± 3.9% and 0.4 ± 0.3% in GFC, and 63.8 ± 8.6%, 33.6 ± 10.5% and 2.6 ± 1.9% in CFBC, respectively. The measured average THg emission factor for the 8 MSWI plants was 208 ± 130 mg/t in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, with 217 ± 158 mg/t and 188 ± 17.7 mg/t were from GFC and CFBC, respectively. Using the average emission factor the estimated total mercury emissions from MSWI were 4.67 ± 2.91 t in China, and 770 ± 65.5 kg in the PRD region in 2010. Of these, 4240 ± 210 kg, 408 ± 231 kg and 14.8 ± 14.1 kg, and 688 ± 37 kg, 78.9 ± 40.6 kg and 3.2 ± 3.0 kg were GOM, Hg, and Hg, respectively. Mercury emissions will continue to increase as the amounts of MSW being incinerated increases.

  6. Effects of Sorbents on the Partitioning and Speciation of Cu During Municipal Solid Waste Incineration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhou; Jin Sun; Aihong Meng; Qinghai Li; Yanguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Oxides of silicon, aluminium and calcium are normally dominant minerals during municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion. In flue gas, SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO all act as sorbents capturing heavy metals (and semi-volatile organics). To further understand the effect of sorbents during MSW combustion, the effects of SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO on Cu partitioning were experimentally investigated by the combustion of synthetic MSW in a tubular furnace and their effects on Cu speciation were studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using ChemKin software. The experiments show that CaO has the highest Cu sorption efficiency at 900 °C, followed by Al2O3 and SiO2. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that for Cu the addition of SiO2 and Al2O3 reduces the amount of liquid CuCl, which is more volatile. However, the addition of CaO has little influence on chemical sorption of Cu, indicating that the sorption of CaO is resulted from physical sorption.

  7. Humic substances in performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal: Actinide and iodine migration in the far-field. Third technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckau, G.

    2005-04-01

    The present report describes progress within the third and final year of the EC-project 'Humic Substances in Performance Assessment of Nuclear Waste Disposal: Actinide and Iodine Migration in the Far-Field'. The work conducted within the present project builds on a number of previous activities/project supported by the Commission. It finds its continuation within different EC FP 6 instruments and also provides for additional continued cooperation through network structures resulting from the broad cooperation within the project. Without being a formal requirement of the Commission or co-funding bodies, this report documents results in great technical detail and makes the results available to a broad scientific community. The report contains an executive summary written by the coordinator. More detailed results are given as individual contributions in the form of 12 annexes. Not all results are discussed or referred to in the executive summary report and thus readers with a deeper interest also need to consult the annexes. The overall objectives were to generate knowledge about the impact of humic substances on the migration of actinides and iodine in the far-field of a nuclear waste repository. In the beginning, focus was rather on the potential enhancement due to humic colloid mediated radionuclide transport. Thereby, sources, inventory, stability and mobility of dissolved humic substances in their colloidal form formed a key topic. Other key topics were the interaction with actinides and iodine, transport studies under near-natural conditions in the laboratory, rationalization of knowledge in models and application to three migration cases for visualization of the overall outcome. Changes relative to the original objectives were given by moving emphasis of natural chemical analogue studies from the question of kinetic exchange constants for different inventories in natural and laboratory systems to the study of anthropogenic actinide contaminants in the

  8. Copper speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash leachates; Kopparformer i lakvatten fraan energiaskor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Susanna; Gustafsson, Jon Petter [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Schaik, Joris van; Berggren Kleja, Dan [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Hees, Patrick van [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The formation of copper (Cu) complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) may increase the total amount of Cu released but at the same time reduce its toxicity. In this study, DOC in a MSWI bottom ash leachate was characterized and the Cu-binding properties of different DOC fractions in the ash leachate and in a soil solution were studied. This knowledge may be used for improved environmental assessment of MSWI bottom ash in engineering applications. The Cu{sup 2+} activity at different pH values was measured potentiometrically using a Cu-ion selective electrode (Cu-ISE). Experimental copper complexation results were compared to speciation calculations made in Visual MINTEQ with the NICA-Donnan model and the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM). The MSWI bottom ash leachate contained a larger proportion of hydrophilic organic carbon than the investigated soil solution and other natural waters. The hydrophilic fraction of both samples showed Cu{sup 2+} binding properties similar to that of the bulk, cation-exchanged, leachate. For the ash leachate, the pH dependence of the Cu activity was not correctly captured by neither the SHM nor the NICA-Donnan model, but for the soil solution the model predictions of Cu speciation were in good agreement with the obtained results. The complex formation properties of the ash DOC appears to be less pH-dependent than what is assumed for DOC in natural waters. Hence, models calibrated for natural DOC may give inconsistent simulations of Cu-DOC complexation in MSWI bottom ash leachate. A Biotic Ligand Model for Daphnia Magna was used to provide an estimate of the copper concentrations at LC50 for a simulated bottom ash leachate. It was concluded that the Cu concentrations in certain bottom ash leachates are high enough to pose an ecotoxicological risk; however, after dilution and soil sorption, the risks for neighboring water bodies are most likely negligible. Three processes were

  9. Effect of lead speciation on its oral bioaccessibility in surface dust and soil of electronic-wastes recycling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Taniguchi, Masaya; Agusa, Tetsuro; Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Yoshida, Aya; Terazono, Atsushi; Ballesteros, Florencio C; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2018-01-05

    We measured bioaccessible lead (Pb) in simulated gastrointestinal fluids containing Pb-contaminated soil or dust from electronic waste (e-waste) recycling sites to assess the risk of Pb ingestion. The physiologically based extraction test (PBET) was used as in vitro bioaccessibility assay. Pb speciation was determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The total Pb concentrations in dusts (n=8) and soils (n=4) were in the range of 1630-131,000 and 239-7800mg/kg, respectively. Metallic Pb, a common component of e-waste, was ubiquitous in the samples. We also found Pb adsorbed onto goethite and as oxides and carbonate, implying soil mixing and weathering influences. Pb phosphate and organic species were only found in the soil samples, suggesting that formation was soil-specific. We identified other Pb compounds in several samples, including Pb silicate, Pb chromate, and Pb(II) hydrogen phosphate. A correlation analysis indicated that metallic Pb decreased bioaccessibility in the stomach, while a Pb speciation analysis revealed a low bioaccessibility for Pb phosphates and high bioaccessibility for organic Pb species. The health risk based on bioaccessible Pb was estimated to be much lower than that of total Pb due to the lower concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Humic substances in performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal: Actinide and iodine migration in the far-field. Second technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckau, G. (ed.)

    2004-07-01

    The present report describes progress within the second year of the EC-project ''Humic Substances in Performance Assessment of Nuclear Waste Disposal: Actinide and Iodine Migration in the Far-Field''. Without being a formal requirement of the commission or co-funding bodies, this report documents results in great technical detail. It is an open report and thus makes the detailed results available to a broad scientific community. The report contains an executive summary written by the coordinator. More detailed results are given as individual contributions in the form of 23 annexes. Not all results are discussed or referred to in the executive summary report and thus readers with a deeper interest also need to consult the annexes. (orig.)

  11. Speciation, in the nuclear fuel cycle by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, S.; Plancque, G.; Allain, F.; Lamouroux, C.; Steiner, V.; Amekraz, B.; Moulin, C. [CEA/Saclay, Dept, des Procedes d' Enrichissement (DPE), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-07-01

    New analytical techniques allowing to perform speciation in the framework of the nuclear fuel cycle are more and more needed. They have to be selective (since matrix encountered are very complex), sensitive (in order to work at representative concentration and below solubility limit), as well as non intrusive (in order to keep the image of the real solution). Among them, laser-based analytical techniques present these advantages together with the possibility to perform remote measurements via fiber optics. Hence, Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) has been used for actinides/lanthanides interaction and speciation studies in inorganic and organic matrices from the reprocessing to waste storage. Moreover, new ion detection methods such as Electro-Spray - Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) seems promising for speciation studies. Hence, it is the first time that it is possible to directly couple a liquid at atmospheric pressure to a mass detection working at reduced pressure with a soft mode of ionisation that should allow to give informations on chemical species present. Principle, advantages and limitations as well as results obtained with the use of TRLIF and ES-MS on different systems of interest including actinides, lanthanides, fission products in interaction with simple organic molecules to very complex structure will be presented and discussed. (authors)

  12. Leaching for recovery of copper from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash: influence of ash properties and metal speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassesson, Henric; Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Recovery of metals occurring in significant amounts in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, such as copper, could offer several advantages: a decreased amount of potentially mobile metal compounds going to landfill, saving of natural resources and a monetary value. A combination of leaching and solvent extraction may constitute a feasible recovery path for metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. However, it has been shown that the initial dissolution and leaching is a limiting step in such a recovery process. The work described in this article was focused on elucidating physical and chemical differences between two ash samples with the aim of explaining the differences in copper release from these samples in two leaching methods. The results showed that the chemical speciation is an important factor affecting the release of copper. The occurrence of copper as phosphate or silicate will hinder leaching, while sulphate and chloride will facilitate leaching.

  13. Review and needs in actinide chemistry in relation with biological purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Moulin, V.; Bion, L.; Doizi, D.; Moulin, C.; Cote, G.; Madic, C.; Van der Lee, J

    2004-07-01

    In case of accidental release of radionuclides in the environment, actinides could occur and may present an healthy risk for human beings. In order to study their behavior in human organism (metabolism, retention, excretion), it is of prime importance to know solution actinide chemistry, and more particularly thermodynamic constants, which will allow to determine their speciation: speciation governs biological availability and toxicity of elements and is also of great interest for decorporation purposes. In this framework, a CEA working group on speciation has been created in order to share data both on thermodynamic constants and on speciation analytical methods, interesting chemists, environmentalists and biologists. It has been focused, in a first time, on actinides. The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art on actinide speciation within biological media and to focus on the lack of information in order to orientate future research. (authors)

  14. Transmutation of nuclear waste. Status report RAS programme 1994: Recycling and transmutation of actinides and fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Gruppelaar, H.; Franken, W.M.P.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the status and progress of the Dutch RAS programme on `Recycling and Transmutation of Actinides and Fission Products` over the year 1994, which is the first year of the second 4-year programme. This programme is outlined and a short progress report is given over 1994, including a listing of 23 reports and publications over the year 1994. Highlights of 1994 were: The completion of long-lived fission-product transmutation studies, the initiation of small-scale demonstration experiments in the HFR on Tc and I, the issue of reports on the potential of the ALMR (Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor) for transmutation adn the participation and international cooperation on irradiation experiments with actinides in inert matrices. The remaining chapters contain more extended contributions on recent developments and selected topics, under the headings: Benefits and risks of partitioning and transmutation, Perspective of chemical partitioning, Inert matrices, Evolutionary options (MOX), Perspective of heavy water reactors, Perspective of fast burners, Perspective of accelerator-based systems, Thorium cycle, Fission-product transmutation, End scenarios, and Executive summary and recommendations. (orig.).

  15. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  16. Research Program to Determine Redox Reactions and Their Effects on Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium in DOE Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppin, G.R.; Rai, D.

    2000-10-01

    Plutonium in geologic matrices undergoes a variety of complex reactions which complicate its environmental behavior. These complexities in plutonium chemistry whereby a large variety of precipitation, dissolution, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions control plutonium speciation and concentrations, result in the need for a rather large amount of reliable, fundamental data to predict Pu behavior in geologic media. These data are also needed for evaluation of remediation strategies that involve removing most of the contaminants by selective methods, followed by in situ immobilization of residual contaminants. Two areas were studied during this project: (1) thermodynamic data for Th(IV) and Pu(IV) complexes of EDTA and for Pu(V) interactions with chloride; (2) kinetic data for redox reactions of Pu in the presence of common redox agents (e.g., H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, MnO{sub 2}, and NaOCl) encountered under waste disposal conditions. These studies are relevant to understanding Pu behavior in wastes disposed of in diverse geologic conditions (e.g., at the WIPP and YUCCA Mountain repositories and in contaminated sediments at many different DOE sites) and also for developing effective remediation strategies (e.g., processing of high level waste tanks). These studies have yielded data to address redox reactions of plutonium in the presence of environmentally important agents (e.g. organic and inorganic oxidants/reductants).

  17. Radiation damage effects in pyrochlore and zirconolite ceramic matrices for the immobilization of actinide-rich wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, G.R.; Begg, B.D.; Smith, K.L. [Materials Div., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    Actinide-doping experiments using short-lived {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm have demonstrated that pyrochlore and zirconolite become fully amorphous at a dose of 0.2-0.5 x 10{sup 16} {alpha}/mg at ambient temperature and exhibit bulk swelling of 5-7%. Detailed studies of natural samples have included determination of the critical amorphization dose, long-term annealing rate, microstructural changes as a function of dose, and the thermal histories of the host rocks. Together, the laboratory based work and studies of natural samples indicate that the critical amorphization dose will increase by about a factor of 2-4 for samples stored at temperatures of 100-200 deg. C for up to 10 million years. These studies of alpha-decay damage have been complemented by heavy ion irradiation studies over the last ten years. Most of the irradiation work has concerned the critical amorphization dose as a function of temperature in thin films; however, some work has been carried out on bulk samples. The irradiation work indicates that most pyrochlore and zirconolite compositions will have similar critical amorphization doses at low temperatures (e.g., below 300-400 deg. C). Pyrochlore with Zr as the major B-site cation transform to a defect fluorite structure with increasing ion irradiation dose, but do not become amorphous. (authors)

  18. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...... leachates showed different Cd speciation patterns as expected. Some leachates were dominated by free divalent Cd (1-70%), some by inorganic complexes (1-87%), and some by organic complexes (7-98%)....

  19. Modeling minor actinide multiple recycling in a lead-cooled fast reactor to demonstrate a fuel cycle without long-lived nuclear waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisz Przemysław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle seems to be the most promising options for the efficient usage of the nuclear energy resources. However, it can be implemented only in fast breeder reactors of the IVth generation, which are characterized by the fast neutron spectrum. The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR was defined and studied on the level of technical design in order to demonstrate its performance and reliability within the European collaboration on ELSY (European Lead-cooled System and LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced Demonstration Reactor projects. It has been demonstrated that LFR meets the requirements of the closed nuclear fuel cycle, where plutonium and minor actinides (MA are recycled for reuse, thereby producing no MA waste. In this study, the most promising option was realized when entire Pu + MA material is fully recycled to produce a new batch of fuel without partitioning. This is the concept of a fuel cycle which asymptotically tends to the adiabatic equilibrium, where the concentrations of plutonium and MA at the beginning of the cycle are restored in the subsequent cycle in the combined process of fuel transmutation and cooling, removal of fission products (FPs, and admixture of depleted uranium. In this way, generation of nuclear waste containing radioactive plutonium and MA can be eliminated. The paper shows methodology applied to the LFR equilibrium fuel cycle assessment, which was developed for the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup (MCB code, equipped with enhanced modules for material processing and fuel handling. The numerical analysis of the reactor core concerns multiple recycling and recovery of long-lived nuclides and their influence on safety parameters. The paper also presents a general concept of the novel IVth generation breeder reactor with equilibrium fuel and its future role in the management of MA.

  20. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  1. Strontium speciation during reaction of kaolinite with simulated tank-waste leachate: bulk and microfocused EXAFS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunkyung; O'Day, Peggy A; Rivera, Nelson A; Mueller, Karl T; Vairavamurthy, Murthy A; Seraphin, Supapan; Chorover, Jon

    2006-04-15

    Radioactive strontium (90Sr) is an important constituent of the complex wastes from past nuclear weapons production and has been stored in underground tanks at U.S. DOE sites (e.g., Hanford, WA). Using bulk and microfocused EXAFS spectroscopy, we examined temporal changes in solid-phase Sr speciation in kaolinite samples reacted for 1-369 d with high-pH, high ionic strength synthetic tank-waste leachate containing Sr(2+) and Cs(+) at 10(-3) mol kg(-1). Analyses of bulk EXAFS spectra showed that Sr initially forms a precipitate by 7 d with a local structure similar to SrCO(3-) (s). At 33 d, microfocused EXAFS of individual particles in one sample revealed a mixture of hydrated and dehydrated Sr associated with neoformed sodalite-type phases. At aging times of 93 d and longer, bulk EXAFS spectra and supporting characterizations indicated nonexchangeable Sr with a local structure consistent with incorporation into increasingly crystalline aluminosilicate particles, particularly sodalite. These experimental studies suggest that irreversible trapping of radionuclides occurs if they are present during the formation and aging of feldspathoid alteration products of local Si-bearing sediment minerals. This may serve as an effective contaminant sequestration mechanism at sites such as Hanford.

  2. Speciation of Chromium in Bottom Ash Obtained by the Incineration of the Leather Waste Shavings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k. louhab

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of bottom ash morphology and chromium metals behavior during incineration of a leather waste shavings at different incineration temperature have been studied. The Cr, Ca, Mg, Cl rates in bottom ashes, flay ashes and emitted gases in different incineration temperature of the tannery wastes are also determined. The morphology of the bottom ashes obtained by incineration at different temperature from the leather waste shavings was examined by MEB. The result show that the temperature and the length of incineration influence on the structure of the bottom ash and on the chromium in the bottom ash.

  3. Multi-trace element levels and arsenic speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Agusa, Tetsuro; Biney, Charles Augustus; Agyekum, William Atuobi; Bello, Mohammed; Otsuka, Masanari; Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-05-01

    To understand human contamination by multi-trace elements (TEs) in electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling site at Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana, this study analyzed TEs and As speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers. Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste recycling workers were significantly higher than those of reference sites after consideration of interaction by age, indicating that the recycling workers are exposed to these TEs through the recycling activity. Urinary As concentration was relatively high, although the level in drinking water was quite low. Speciation analysis of As in human urine revealed that arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinic acid were the predominant As species and concentrations of both species were positively correlated with total As concentration as well as between each other. These results suggest that such compounds may be derived from the same source, probably fish and shellfish and greatly influence As exposure levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study on human contamination resulting from the primitive recycling of e-waste in Ghana. This study will contribute to the knowledge about human exposure to trace elements from an e-waste site in a less industrialized region so far scantly covered in the literature.

  4. Fine particulate speciation profile and emission factor of municipal solid waste incinerator established by dilution sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Luo, Shao-Wei; Lee, Kuei-Ting; Wu, Jhin-Yan; Chang, Chun Wei; Chu, Pei Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emitted from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) was collected using dilution sampling method. Chemical compositions of the collected PM2.5 samples, including carbon content, metal elements, and water-soluble ions, were analyzed. Traditional in-stack hot sampling was simultaneously conducted to compare the influences of dilution on PM2.5 emissions and the characteristics of the bonded chemical species. The results, established by a dilution sampling method, show that PM2.5 and total particulate matter (TPM) emission factors were 61.6 ± 4.52 and 66.1 ± 5.27 g ton-waste(-1), respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TPM is 0.93, indicating that more than 90% of PM emission from the MSWI was fine particulate. The major chemical species in PM2.5 included organic carbon (OC), Cl(-), NH4(+), elemental carbon (EC) and Si, which account for 69.7% of PM2.5 mass. OC was from the unburned carbon in the exhaust, which adsorbed onto the particulate during the cooling process. High Cl(-) emission is primarily attributable to wastes containing plastic bags made of polyvinyl chloride, salt in kitchen refuse and waste biomass, and so on. Minor species that account for 0.01-1% of PM2.5 mass included SO4(2-), K(+), Na, K, NO3(-), Al, Ca(2+), Zn, Ca, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Mg. The mean ratio of dilution method/in-stack hot method was 0.454. The contents of water-soluble ions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-)) were significantly enriched in PM2.5 via gas-to-particle conversion in the dilution process. Results indicate that in-stack hot sampling would underestimate levels of these species in PM2.5. PM2.5 samples from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) were collected simultaneously by a dilution sampling technique and a traditional in-stack method. PM2.5 emission factors and chemical speciation profiles were established. Dilution sampling provides more reliable data than in-stack hot sampling. The results can be applied to estimate the PM2

  5. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Decontamination of Cs, Sr, and Actinides from Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-06

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also substantially decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  6. SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-09-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the

  7. Multi-trace element levels and arsenic speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Agusa, Tetsuro [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Biney, Charles Augustus [Volta Basin Authority (VBA), 10 P. O. Box 13621, Ouagadougou 10 (Burkina Faso); Agyekum, William Atuobi; Bello, Mohammed [CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Otsuka, Masanari [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Ehime Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science, 8-234 Sanban-cho, Matsuyama 790-0003 (Japan); Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Shin [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    To understand human contamination by multi-trace elements (TEs) in electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling site at Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana, this study analyzed TEs and As speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers. Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste recycling workers were significantly higher than those of reference sites after consideration of interaction by age, indicating that the recycling workers are exposed to these TEs through the recycling activity. Urinary As concentration was relatively high, although the level in drinking water was quite low. Speciation analysis of As in human urine revealed that arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinic acid were the predominant As species and concentrations of both species were positively correlated with total As concentration as well as between each other. These results suggest that such compounds may be derived from the same source, probably fish and shellfish and greatly influence As exposure levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study on human contamination resulting from the primitive recycling of e-waste in Ghana. This study will contribute to the knowledge about human exposure to trace elements from an e-waste site in a less industrialized region so far scantly covered in the literature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure status of trace elements in e-waste recycling workers was assessed in Ghana. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste workers were significantly higher than those of the reference subjects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to investigate human contamination arising from primitive recycling of e-waste arguably from Africa.

  8. Carbon speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash in relation to facilitated metal leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomeren, van A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    The release of inorganic and organic contaminants from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash is controlled to a large extent by the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and in particular by the reactive humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) subfractions of DOC. The properties of organ

  9. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...

  10. Toxicity and metal speciation characterisation of waste water from an abandoned gold mine in tropical northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Rick van; Hogan, Alicia; Harford, Andrew; Markich, Scott

    2008-09-01

    The decommissioned Mount Todd gold mine, located in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia, consists of a large waste water inventory and an acid rock drainage problem, which has the potential to impact upon freshwater ecosystems of the Edith River catchment. The toxicity of retention pond 1 (RP1) water was determined using six local freshwater species (duckweed, alga, cladoceran, snail, hydra and a fish). RP1 water was very toxic to all species, with the percentage dilution of RP1 water inhibiting 10% of organism response (IC10), or lethal to 5% of individuals (LC5), ranging from 0.007 to 0.088%. The percentage dilution of RP1 water inhibiting 50% of organism response (IC50), or lethal to 50% of individuals (LC50), ranged from 0.051% to 0.58%. Based on chemical analyses and geochemical speciation modelling of the test waters, Cu, Zn and Al were the most likely toxic components at acidic dilutions (i.e. > or =1%), while Cu and Zn were the most likely toxic components at 0.1% RP1 water, where pH was 6.5. Species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were used to predict dilutions of RP1 water that would protect or unacceptably affect the downstream aquatic ecosystems. A dilution ratio of 1 part RP1 water to 20000 parts Edith River water (0.005% RP1 water) was calculated to be required for the protection of at least 95% of species. This information can be used in conjunction with field chemical and biological data to better predict the ecological risks of RP1 waste water downstream of the Mount Todd mine.

  11. Speciation of lipids and humus-like colloidal compounds in a forest soil reclaimed with municipal solid waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancada, M Cristina; Almendros, Gonzalo; Sanz, Jesús; Román, Román

    2004-02-01

    The progressive transformations of lipid and humus-like fractions in soil after massive input (400 Mg ha(-1)) of urban waste have been studied during an 87-week experiment in field plots of a degraded Calcic Regosol in Central Spain. Structural changes in the macromolecular fractions were small when compared with the qualitative and quantitative changes in lipid composition. The intense depletion of the lipid fraction with time and the decrease of the humic acid to fulvic acid ratio were the most significant quantitative indices of the compost transformation in soil. Changes in soil lipid fractions were especially noted in relation to their speciation status and distribution patterns (carbon preference index and relative chain length). Three subfractions were considered: (I) direct extraction with petroleum ether, (II) liquid-liquid extraction after soil treatment with 2 M H3PO4 and (III) after soil treatment with 0.1 M NaOH. Although lipid concentration tends to decrease with time, lipids in the fraction tightly bonded to soil (III) remained qualitatively and quantitatively constant in the course of the field experiment. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses showed that the more stable the association of lipid to the soil matrix, the fewer the changes observed in the distribution pattern of the fatty acids during the progressive transformation stages.

  12. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  13. Monitoring of gross alpha, gross beta and actinides activities in exhaust air released from the waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, P., E-mail: pthakur@cemrc.org [Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 (United States); Mulholland, G.P. [Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The simultaneous measurements of gross alpha and beta activities is one of the simplest radioanalytical technique used as a method for screening samples of both high and low activities of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental and bioassay samples. Such measurements are of great interest from both a radiological, waste disposal viewpoint, and to establish a trend of radioactivity based on long term monitoring. At the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, unfiltered exhaust air from the underground repository is the most important effluent. As part of its monitoring program, the particulates from WIPP exhaust air are collected everyday at a location typically called the Fixed Air Sampler (FAS) site or Station A, this site is located at the release point for aerosol effluents from the underground to the environment. The measurements of gross alpha and beta activity on air filter samples were performed using an ultra low level counter, PIC-MPC 9604-{alpha}/{beta}, from Protean Instrument Corporation. The high sensitivity of the gross alpha and beta instrument enables detection of low value activity from the air filters. In 2009, the values of gross alpha and beta activity concentrations ranged from Simultaneous measurements of gross alpha and gross beta activities in the particulates from WIPP exhaust air were performed. > Ultra low level counter, PIC-MPC 9604-{alpha}/{beta} counter was used for the measurements. > Values of gross alpha activity concentrations ranged from Values of gross beta activity concentrations ranged from

  14. Predictions of Actinide Solubilities under Near-Field Conditions Expected in the WIPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, L. H.; Xiong, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The repository, which opened in March 1999, is located at a subsurface depth of 655 m (2150 ft) in the Salado Fm., a Permian bedded-salt formation. The repository will eventually contain the equivalent of 844,000 208 L (55 gal) drums of TRU waste. After filling the rooms and access drifts and installing panel closures, creep closure of the salt will crush the steel waste containers in most cases and encapsulate the waste. The WIPP actinide source term model used for long-term performance assessment (PA) of the repository comprises dissolved and suspended submodels (solubilities and colloids). This presentation will describe the solubilities. From the standpoint of long-term PA, the order of importance of the radioelements in the TRU waste to be emplaced in the WIPP is Pu ~ Am >> U > Th >> Np ~ Cm and fission products. The DOE has included all of these actinides, but not fission products, in the WIPP Actinide Source Term Program (ASTP). Anoxic corrosion of Fe- and Al-base metals and microbial consumption of cellulosic, plastic, and rubber materials will produce gas and create strongly reducing conditions in the WIPP after closure. The use of MgO as an engineered barrier to consume microbially produced CO2 will result in low fCO2 and basic pH. Under these conditions, Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am will speciate essentially entirely as Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III), and Am(III); or Th(IV), U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), and Am(III). The DOE has developed thermodynamic speciation-and-solubility models for +III, +IV, and +V actinides in brines. Experimental data for Nd, Am, and Cm species were used to parameterize the +III Pitzer activity-coefficient model; data for Th species were used for the +IV model; and data for Np(V) species were used for the +V model. These models include the effects of the organic ligands acetate, citrate

  15. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  16. Arsenic Speciation in Old Mine Waste Site in Korea - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Woo, N.; Choi, I.; Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2004-05-01

    The ulsan mine, which is known as an important producer of iron, tungsten and arsenic ores in southeastern Korea, is located in Gyeongsangnam Province. This mine is of calcareous skarn deposit represented by ore pipe consisting mainly of magnetite with minor scheelite, sulphides, sulphosalts, arsenides and sulpharsenides (Choi et.al. 1993). A total of 13 groundwater samples and a surface-water sample at an adjacent creek, Dalcheon, were collected in January 2004. Most samples showed neutral pH ranges and normal ORP and temperature conditions. But one sample showed basic and extremely reducing condition, and another one was with relatively high temperature. Results of chemical analysis indicate that total arsenic concentrations of all samples are exceeding the WHO guideline for drinking water quality (10 ug/L), and 64% of those are over the Korean Drinking Water Guideline (KDWG) of 50 ug/L. Especially, arsenic concentrations in two samples exceed 1000 ug/L. Concentrations of some elements like Al, Fe, Mn, SO4 are over the KDWG in several samples, too. Consequence of arsenic speciation using IC-ICP-MS, arsenic exists as three species; arsenite, arsenate, and monomethylarsonate (MMA). Arsenite detected in three groundwater samples. Two of these were from wells in the tailing dam, and the other was the one with basic pH and extremely reducing condition. Arsenic in a surface-water sample mainly exists as MMA form that has lower toxicity than inorganic species. This indicates that microbial activity is the important factor to explain risks in the studied environment. Except for these samples, arsenic exists as arsenate form. Samples were prepared in two ways; 1) acidified water samples with phosphoric acid to the pH less than 2 and filtered through 0.45 um filter papers, and 2) filtered water samples first and then acidified. Comparison of the analysis from the two sample sets indicates that significant mass of arsenic appears to be with clay and the pH condition of the

  17. Demonstration of trivalent actinide partitioning from simulated high-level liquid waste using modifier-free unsymmetrical diglycolamide in n-dodecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, P.K.; Kumaresan, R.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Subramanian, G.G.S.; Rajeswari, S.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.; Chaurasia, Shivkumar; Bhanage, B.M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2015-07-01

    Partitioning of trivalent americium from fast-reactor (FR) simulated high-level liquid waste (SHLLW) has been demonstrated, for the first time, using a modifier-free organic phase containing an unsymmetrical diglycolamide, N,N,-didodecyl-N',N'-dioctyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (D{sup 3}DODGA), in n-dodecane (n-DD). The extraction behavior of various metal ions present in the FR-SHLLW that contained about 3.2 g/L of trivalent metal ions (Am(III) and Ln(III)) was studied using a solution of 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA/n-DD, by batch equilibration mode. The extraction of Am(III) was accompanied by the co-extraction of all lanthanides and unwanted metal ions such as Zr(IV), Y(III), and Pd(II) from FR-SHLLW. The co-extraction of unwanted metal ions was minimized by adding a suitable aqueous soluble complexing agents to FR-SHLLW, prior to extraction. As a result, trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CyDTA) was identified as an appropriate reagent for preventing the extraction of zirconium and palladium, that posed problems during recovery of trivalent metal ions from the loaded organic phase. The stripping of behavior of Am(III) and Ln(III) from the loaded organic phase was studied using dilute nitric acid in batch equilibration mode. Based on those results, a counter-current mixer-settler run was performed in a 20-stage mixer-settler. About 99.9% of Am(III), Ln(III) and Y(III) from FR-SHLLW in 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA/n-DD was achieved in 20 contacts and the recovery of Am(III) and other trivalents from the loaded organic phase was achieved in 5 contacts using 0.01 M nitric acid. The study demonstrated the possibility of using the modifier-free reagent, D{sup 3}DODGA, for the separation of trivalent actinides from FR-SHLLW.

  18. Study and development of a method allowing the identification of actinides inside nuclear waste packages, by active neutron or photon interrogation and delayed gamma-ray spectrometry; Etude et developpement d'une technique de dosage des actinides dans les colis de dechets radioactifs par interrogation photonique ou neutronique active et spectrometrie des gamma retardes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrel, F

    2007-10-15

    An accurate estimation of the alpha-activity of a nuclear waste package is necessary to select the best mode of storage. The main purpose of this work is to develop a non-destructive active method, based on the fission process and allowing the identification of actinides ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu). These three elements are the main alpha emitters contained inside a package. Our technique is based on the detection of delayed gammas emitted by fission products. These latter are created by irradiation with the help of a neutron or photon beam. Performances of this method have been investigated after an Active Photon or Neutron Interrogation (INA or IPA). Three main objectives were fixed in the framework of this thesis. First, we measured many yields of photofission products to compensate the lack of data in the literature. Then, we studied experimental performances of this method to identify a given actinide ({sup 239}Pu in fission, {sup 235}U in photofission) present in an irradiated mixture. Finally, we assessed the application of this technique on different mock-up packages for both types of interrogation (118 l mock-up package containing EVA in fission, 220 l mock-up package with a wall of concrete in photofission). (author)

  19. Speciation of zinc in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash after heat treatment: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struis, Rudolf P W J; Ludwig, Christian; Lutz, Harald; Scheidegger, André M

    2004-07-01

    Fly ash is commonly deposited in special landfills as it contains toxic concentrations of heavy metals, such as Zn, Pb, Cd, and Cu. This study was inspired by our efforts to detoxify fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration by thermal treatment to produce secondary raw materials suited for reprocessing. The potential of the thermal treatment was studied by monitoring the evaporation rate of zinc from a certified fly ash (BCR176) during heating between 300 and 950 degrees C under different carrier gas compositions. Samples were quenched at different temperatures for subsequent investigation with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XAS spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), target transformation (TT), and linear combination fitting (LCF) to analyze the major Zn compounds in the fly ash as a function of the temperature. The original fly ash comprised about 60% zinc oxides mainly in the form of hydrozincite (Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2) and 40% inerts like willemite (Zn2SiO4) and gahnite (ZnAl2O4) in a weight ratio of about 3:1. At intermediate temperatures (550-750 degrees C) the speciation underlines the competition between indigenous S and Cl with solid zinc oxides to form either volatile ZnCl2 or solid ZnS. ZnS then transformed into volatile species at about 200 degrees C higher temperatures. The inhibiting influence of S was found absent when oxygen was introduced to the inert carrier gas stream or chloride-donating alkali salt was added to the fly ash.

  20. Chemical speciation of neptunium in spent fuel. Annual report for period 15 August 1999 to 15 August 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Czerwinski; Don Reed

    2000-09-01

    (B204) This project will examine the chemical speciation of neptunium in spent nuclear fuel. The R&D fields covered by the project include waste host materials and actinide chemistry. Examination of neptunium is chosen since it was identified as a radionuclide of concern by the NERI workshop. Additionally, information on the chemical form of neptunium in spent fuel is lacking. The identification of the neptunium species in spent fuel would allow a greater scientific based understanding of its long-term fate and behavior in waste forms. Research to establish the application and development of X-ray synchrotrons radiation (XSR) techniques to determine the structure of aqueous, adsorbed, and solid actinide species of importance to nuclear considerations is being conducted at Argonne. These studies extend current efforts within the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate actinide speciation with more conventional spectroscopic and solids characterization (e.g. SEM, TEM, and XRD) methods. Our project will utilize all these techniques for determining neptunium speciation in spent fuel. We intend to determine the chemical species and oxidation state of neptunium in spent fuel and alteration phases. Different types of spent fuel will be examined. Once characterized, the chemical behavior of the identified neptunium species will be evaluated if it is not present in the literature. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the neptunium species under typical repository near-field conditions (elevated temperature, high pH, varying Eh). This will permit a timely inclusion of project results into near-field geochemical models. Additionally, project results and methodologies have applications to neptunium in the environment, or treatment of neptunium containing waste. Another important aspect of this project is the close cooperation between a university and a national laboratory. The PI has a transuranic laboratory at MIT where

  1. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  2. Combustible and incombustible speciation of Cl and S in various components of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sakai, Mamoru; Fukuyama, Johji

    2004-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) in municipal solid waste (MSW) are important reactive elements during combustion. They generate the acidic pollutants HCl and SOx, and, furthermore, produce and suppress organic chlorinated compounds. Nevertheless, few practical reports about Cl and S content in MSW have been published. In combustion and recycling processes, both combustible Cl and S, and incombustible Cl and S species are equally important. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study about combustible and incombustible Cl and S in MSW components, including kitchen garbage, paper, textiles, wood and leaves, plastics and small chips. By integrating this collected data with data about MSW composition, not only the overall content of Cl and S in MSW, but also the origins of both combustible and incombustible Cl and S were estimated. The average Cl content in bulk MSW was 3.7 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 2.7 and 1.0 g/kg were combustible and incombustible, respectively. The Cl contribution from plastics was 76% and 27% with respect to combustible and incombustible states. The average S content in bulk MSW was 0.81 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 0.46 g/kg was combustible and 0.35 g/kg was incombustible. Combustible S was mainly due to synthetic textiles, while incombustible S was primarily from paper.

  3. Research in actinide chemistry. Progress report, 1990--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements.

  4. Review of the complexation of tetravalent actinides by ISA and gluconate under alkaline to hyperalkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, X.; Montoya, V.; Colàs, E.; Grivé, M.; Duro, L.

    2008-12-01

    Isosaccharinic (ISA) and gluconic acids (GLU) are polyhydroxy carboxylic compounds showing a high affinity to metal complexation. Both organic ligands are expected in the cementitious environments usually considered for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The hyperalkaline conditions imposed by cementitious materials contribute to the formation of ISA through cellulose degradation, whereas GLU is commonly used as a concrete additive. Despite the high stability attributed to ISA/GLU complexes of tetravalent actinides, the number and reliability of available experimental studies is still limited. This work aims at providing a general and comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding Th, U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) complexes with ISA and GLU. In the presence of ISA/GLU concentrations in the range 10 - 5 -10 - 2 M and absence of calcium, An(IV)(OH) x(L) y complexes (An(IV) = Th, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV); L = ISA, GLU) are expected to dominate the aqueous speciation of tetravalent actinides in the alkaline pH range. There is a moderate agreement among their stability, although the stoichiometry of certain An(IV)-GLU complexes is still ill-defined. Under hyperalkaline conditions and presence of calcium, the species CaTh(OH) 4(L) 2(aq) has been described for both ISA and GLU, and similar complexes may be expected to form with other tetravalent actinides. In the present work, the available thermodynamic data for An(IV)-ISA/GLU complexes have been reviewed and re-calculated to ensure the internal consistency of the stability constants assessed. Further modelling exercises, estimations based on Linear Free-Energy Relationships (LFER) among tetravalent actinides, as well as direct analogies between ISA and GLU complexes have also been performed. This approach has led to the definition of a speciation scheme for the complexes of Th, U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with ISA and GLU forming in alkaline to hyperalkaline pH conditions, both in the

  5. Influence of bacteria on lanthanide and actinide transfer from specific soil components (humus, soil minerals and vitrified municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash) to corn plants: Sr-Nd isotope evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouad, Georges [Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Centre de Geochimie de la Surface/CNRS UMR 7517, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Stille, Peter [Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Centre de Geochimie de la Surface/CNRS UMR 7517, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)]. E-mail: pstille@illite.u-strasbg.fr; Crovisier, Jean-Louis [Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Centre de Geochimie de la Surface/CNRS UMR 7517, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Geoffroy, Valerie A. [UMR 7156 Universite Louis-Pasteur/CNRS, Genetique Moleculaire, Genomique Microbiologie, Departement Micro-organisme, Genomes, Environnement, 28 rue Goethe, 67083 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Meyer, Jean-Marie [UMR 7156 Universite Louis-Pasteur/CNRS, Genetique Moleculaire, Genomique Microbiologie, Departement Micro-organisme, Genomes, Environnement, 28 rue Goethe, 67083 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Lahd-Geagea, Majdi [Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Centre de Geochimie de la Surface/CNRS UMR 7517, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2006-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to test the stability of vitrified municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator bottom ash under the presence of bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and plants (corn). The substratum used for the plant growth was a humus-rich soil mixed with vitrified waste. For the first time, information on the stability of waste glasses in the presence of bacteria and plants is given. Results show that inoculated plant samples contained always about two times higher lanthanide and actinide element concentrations. Bacteria support the element transfer since plants growing in inoculated environment developed a smaller root system but have higher trace element concentrations. Compared with the substratum, plants are light rare earth element (LREE) enriched. The vitrified bottom ash has to some extent been corroded by bacteria and plant activities as indicated by the presence of Nd (REE) and Sr from the vitrified waste in the plants. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd isotope ratios of plants and soil components allow the identification of the corroded soil components and confirm that bacteria accelerate the assimilation of elements from the vitrified bottom ash. These findings are of importance for landfill disposal scenarios, and similar experiments should be performed in order to better constrain the processes of microbially mediated alteration of the MSW glasses in the biosphere.

  6. Influence of bacteria on lanthanide and actinide transfer from specific soil components (humus, soil minerals and vitrified municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash) to corn plants: Sr-Nd isotope evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouad, Georges; Stille, Peter; Crovisier, Jean-Louis; Geoffroy, Valérie A; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Lahd-Geagea, Majdi

    2006-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to test the stability of vitrified municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator bottom ash under the presence of bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and plants (corn). The substratum used for the plant growth was a humus-rich soil mixed with vitrified waste. For the first time, information on the stability of waste glasses in the presence of bacteria and plants is given. Results show that inoculated plant samples contained always about two times higher lanthanide and actinide element concentrations. Bacteria support the element transfer since plants growing in inoculated environment developed a smaller root system but have higher trace element concentrations. Compared with the substratum, plants are light rare earth element (LREE) enriched. The vitrified bottom ash has to some extent been corroded by bacteria and plant activities as indicated by the presence of Nd (REE) and Sr from the vitrified waste in the plants. (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratios of plants and soil components allow the identification of the corroded soil components and confirm that bacteria accelerate the assimilation of elements from the vitrified bottom ash. These findings are of importance for landfill disposal scenarios, and similar experiments should be performed in order to better constrain the processes of microbially mediated alteration of the MSW glasses in the biosphere.

  7. PREFACE: Actinides 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tobin, James G.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering consists of 98 papers that were presented at Actinides 2009, the 8th International Conference on Actinide Science held on 12-17 July 2009 in San Francisco, California, USA. This conference was jointly organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Actinides conference series started in Baden-Baden, Germany (1975) and this first conference was followed by meetings at Asilomar, CA, USA (1981), Aix-en-Provence, France (1985), Tashkent, USSR (1989), Santa Fe, NM, USA (1993), Baden-Baden, Germany (1997), Hayama, Japan (2001), and Manchester, UK (2005). The Actinides conference series provides a regular venue for the most recent research results on the chemistry, physics, and technology of the actinides and heaviest elements. Actinides 2009 provided a forum spanning a diverse range of scientific topics, including fundamental materials science, chemistry, physics, environmental science, and nuclear fuels. Of particular importance was a focus on the key roles that basic actinide chemistry and physics research play in advancing the worldwide renaissance of nuclear energy. Editors Linfeng Rao Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (lrao@lbl.gov) James G Tobin Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (tobin1@llnl.gov) David K Shuh Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (dkshuh@lbl.gov)

  8. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  9. Distribution of actinides in SFR1; Aktinidfoerdelning i SFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, Tor [ALARA Engineering, Skultuna (Sweden)

    2000-02-01

    The amount of actinides in the Swedish repository for intermediate level radioactive wastes has been estimated. The sources for the actinides are mainly the purification filters of the reactors and the used fuel pools. Defect fuel elements are the originating source of the actinides. It is estimated that the 12 Swedish reactors, in total, have had 2.2 kg of fuel dissolved in their systems since start-up. About 880 g of this amount has been brought to the intermediate-level repository.

  10. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  11. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy as a speciation tool for natural organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, J.; Plaschke, M.; Denecke, M.A. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    A molecular-scale understanding of the basic processes affecting stability and transport behavior of actinide cations, complexes or hydroxide ('eigencolloid') species is prerequisite to performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in geological formations. Depending on their functional group chemistry and macromolecular structure, naturally occurring organic molecules (NOM) possess a high tendency towards actinide complexation reactions. However, the compositional and structural heterogeneity of NOM and mixed aggregates with inorganic phases makes speciation by spectromicroscopy techniques highly desirable. The applicability of Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) as a speciation tool for the characterization of NOM is demonstrated for a multifunctional natural organic acid (chlorogenic acid), Eu(III)-loaded humic acid (HA) aggregates and Eu(III)-oxo/hydroxide/HA hetero-aggregates. It is shown that in situ probing of HA functional group chemistry down to a spatial resolution < 100 nm (i.e., less than femto-liter sampled volumes) is feasible, at the same time revealing morphological details on NOM aggregates and NOM/mineral associations. (orig.)

  12. The influence of metal speciation in combustion waste on the efficiency of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cr bioleaching in a mixed culture of sulfur-oxidizing and biosurfactant-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowska, Ewa; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Dorota

    2015-12-15

    Metal leachability from ash and combustion slag is related to the physico-chemical properties, including their speciation in the waste. Metals speciation is an important factor that influences the efficiency of metal bioleaching from combustion wastes in a mixed culture of acidophilic and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. It was observed that individual metals tended to occur in different fractions, which reflects their susceptibility to bioleaching. Cr and Ni were readily removed from wastes when present with a high fraction bound to carbonates. Cd and Pb where not effectively bioleached when present in high amounts in a fraction bound to organic matter. The best bioleaching results were obtained for power plant slag, which had a high metal content in the exchangeable, bound to carbonates and bound to Fe and Mg oxides fractions- the metal recovery percentage for Zn, Cu and Ni from this waste exceeded 90%.

  13. Sources and speciation of heavy metals in municipal solid waste (MSW) and its effect on the separation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biollaz, S.; Ludwig, Ch.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A literature search was carried out to determine sources and speciation of heavy metals in MSW. A combination of thermal and mechanical separation techniques is necessary to achieve the required high degrees of metal separation. Metallic goods should be separated mechanically, chemically bound heavy metals by a thermal process. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  14. The ALMR actinide burning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, J.E. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) actinide burning system is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to bring its unique capabilities to fruition for deployment in the early 21st century. The system consists of four major parts: the reactor plant, the metal fuel and its recycle, the processing of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel to extract the actinides, and the development of a residual waste package. This paper addresses the status and outlook for each of these four major elements. The ALMR is being developed by an industrial group under the leadership of General Electric (GE) in a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Department of Energy. This effort is nearing completion of the advanced conceptual design phase and will enter the preliminary design phase in 1994. The innovative modular reactor design stresses simplicity, economics, reliability, and availability. The design has evolved from GE's PRISM design initiative and has progressed to the final stages of a prelicensing review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); a safety evaluation report is expected by the end of 1993. All the major issues identified during this review process have been technically resolved. The next design phases will focus on implementation of the basic safety philosophy of passive shutdown to a safe, stable condition, even without scram, and passive decay heat removal. Economic projections to date show that it will be competitive with non- nuclear and advanced LWR nuclear alternatives.

  15. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment. NKS-B speciation project report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolin Hou (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aldahan, A. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Science, Uppsala (Sweden)); Possnert, G. (Uppsala Univ., Tandem Lab., Uppsala (Sweden)); Lujaniene, G. (Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)); Lehto, J. (Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Chemistry, Helsinki (Finland)); Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences (UMB), AAs (Norway))

    2008-07-15

    This report describes the work carried out under the NUK-B project SPECIATION 2007. In 2007, the project partners had two meeting in April and November, organized a NUK seminar on speciation and hot particles. SPECIATION 2007 t mainly focused on two issues on speciation (1) further development of speciation methods for radionuclides, and (2) investigation of speciation of radionuclides in environment. The report summarized the work done in partners labs, which includes: (1) Further development on the speciation of 129I and 127I in water samples; (2) Speciation method for 129I and 127I in air; (3) Dynamic system for fractionation of Pu and Am in soil and sediment; (4) Investigation on Re-absorption of Pu during the fractionation of Pu in soil and sediment; (5) Speciation of 129I in North Sea surface water; (6) Partition of 137Cs and 129I in the Nordic lake sediment, pore-water and lake water; (7) Sequential extraction of Pu in soil, sediment and concrete samples, (8) Pu sorption to Mn and Fe oxides in the geological materials, (10) Investigation of the adsorbed species of lanthanides and actinides on clays surfaces. In addition, two review articles on the speciation of plutonium and iodine in environmental are planned to be submitted to an international journal for publication. (au)

  16. Solidification of simulated actinides by natural zircon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-Wen; LUO Shang-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Natural zircon was used as precursor material to produce a zircon waste form bearing 20wt% simulated actinides (Nd2O3 and UO2) through a solid state reaction by a typical synroc fabrication process. The fabricated zircon waste form has relatively good physical properties (density 5.09g/cm3, open porosity 4.0%, Vickers hardness 715kg/mm2). The XRD, SEM/EDS and TEM/EDS analyses indicate that there are zircon phases containing waste elements formed through the reaction. The chemical durability and radiation stability are determined by the MCC-1method and heavy ion irradiation; the results show that the zircon waste form is highly leach resistance and relatively stable under irradiation (amorphous dose 0.7dpa). From this study, the method of using a natural mineral to solidify radioactive waste has proven to be feasible.

  17. Selection of actinide chemical analogues for WIPP tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, R.; Spall, D.

    1995-07-05

    The Department of Energy must demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a permanent repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. Performance assessments of the WIPP require that estimates of the transportability and outcome of the radionuclides (actinides) be determined from disposal rooms that may become either partially or completely filled with brine. Federal regulations limit the amount of radioactivity that may be unintentionally released to the accessible environment by any mechanism during the post closure phase up to 10,000 years. Thermodynamic models have been developed to predict the concentrations of actinides in the WIPP disposal rooms under various situations and chemical conditions. These models are based on empirical and theoretical projections of the chemistry that might be present in and around the disposal room zone for both near and long-term periods. The actinides that are known to be present in the TRU wastes (and are included in the model) are Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am. Knowledge of the chemistry that might occur in the disposal rooms when the waste comes in contact with brine is important in understanding the range of oxidation states that might be present under different conditions. There is a need to establish the mechanisms and resultant rate of transport, migration, or effective retardation of actinides beyond the disposal rooms to the boundary of the accessible environment. The influence of the bulk salt rock, clay sediments and other geologic matrices on the transport behavior of actinides must be determined to establish the overall performance and capability of the WIPP in isolating waste from the environment. Tests to determine the capabilities of the WIPP geologic formations in retarding actinide species in several projected oxidation states would provide a means to demonstrate the effectiveness of the WIPP in retaining TRU wastes.

  18. Helium and fission gas behaviour in magnesium aluminate spinel and zirconia for actinide transmutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, P.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, many studies are performed on partitioning and transmutation of actinides. In such a scenario, the long-lived radio-isotopes (mostly actinides) are partitioned from the nuclear waste, and subsequently transmuted or fissioned in a

  19. Helium and fission gas behaviour in magnesium aluminate spinel and zirconia for actinide transmutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, P.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, many studies are performed on partitioning and transmutation of actinides. In such a scenario, the long-lived radio-isotopes (mostly actinides) are partitioned from the nuclear waste, and subsequently transmuted or fissioned in a

  20. Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion

  1. Experimental Determination of the Speciation, Partitioning, and Release of Perrhenate as a Chemical Surrogate for Pertechnetate from a Sodalite-Bearing Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Lukens, Wayne W [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fitts, Jeffrey P [Princeton University; Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Jantzen, C M [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)

    2013-01-01

    A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion

  2. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  3. Recovery and chemical purification of actinides at JRC, Karlsruhe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelund, H.; Apostolidis, C.; Glatz, J.-P.

    1989-07-01

    The application of actinide elements in research and in technology is many times subject to rather stringent purity requirements; often a nuclear grade quality is specified. The additional possible demand for a high isotopic purity is a special feature in the handling of these elements. The amount of actinide elements contained in or adhering to materials declared as waste should be low for safety reasons and out of economic considerations. The release of transuranium elements to the environment must be kept negligible. For these and for other reasons a keen interest in the separation of actinides from various materials exists, either for a re-use through recycling, or for their safe confinement in waste packages. This paper gives a short review of the separation methods used for recovery and purification of actinide elements over the past years in the European Institute for Transuranium Elements. The methods described here involve procedures based on precipitation, ion exchange or solvent extraction; often used in a combination. The extraction methods were preferably applied in a Chromatographie column mode. The actinide elements purified and/or separated from each other by the above methods include uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, and californium. For the various elements the work was undertaken with different aims, ranging from reprocessing and fabrication of nuclear fuels on a kilogramme scale, over the procurement of alpha-free waste, to the preparation of neutron sources of milligramme size.

  4. Studies on the properties of hard-spectrum, actinide fissioning reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J.B.; Prichard, A.W.; Schofield, P.E.; Robinson, A.H.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is technically feasible to construct an operable (e.g., safe and stable) reactor to burn waste actinides rapidly. The heart of the concept is a driver core of EBR-II type, with a central radial target zone in which fuel elements, made entirely of waste actinides are exposed. This target fuel undergoes fission, as a result of which actinides are rapidly destroyed. Although the same result could be achieved in more conventionally designed LWR or LMFBR systems, the fast spectrum reactor does a much more efficient job, by virtue of the fact that in both LWR and LMFBR reactors, actinide fission is preceded by several captures before a fissile nuclide is formed. In the fast spectrum reactor that is called ABR (actinide burning reactor), these neutron captures are short-circuited.

  5. Evaluation of actinide biosorption by microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happel, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional methods for removing metals from aqueous solutions include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical treatment and evaporation. The removal of radionuclides from aqueous waste streams has largely relied on ion exchange methods which can be prohibitively costly given increasingly stringent regulatory effluent limits. The use of microbial cells as biosorbants for heavy metals offers a potential alternative to existing methods for decontamination or recovery of heavy metals from a variety of industrial waste streams and contaminated ground waters. The toxicity and the extreme and variable conditions present in many radionuclide containing waste streams may preclude the use of living microorganisms and favor the use of non-living biomass for the removal of actinides from these waste streams. In the work presented here, we have examined the biosorption of uranium by non-living, non-metabolizing microbial biomass thus avoiding the problems associated with living systems. We are investigating biosorption with the long term goal of developing microbial technologies for the remediation of actinides.

  6. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  7. Device for Detecting Actinides, Method for Detecting Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Fred J.; Wilkins-Stevens, Priscilla

    1998-10-29

    A heavy metal detector is provided comprising a first molecule and a second molecule, whereby the first and second molecules interact in a predetermined manner; a first region on the first molecule adapted to interact with an actinide; and a second region on the second molecule adapted to interact with the actinide, whereby the interactions of the actinide with the regions effect the predetermined manner of interaction between the molecules.

  8. Functionalized pyrazines as ligands for minor actinide extraction and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, N.

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the design of ligands for a wide range of applications, from nuclear waste treatment to catalysis. The strategies employed to design actinide-selective extractants, for instance, comprise the fine tuning of the ligand electronic properties as well as

  9. Functionalized pyrazines as ligands for minor actinide extraction and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikishkin, N.

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the design of ligands for a wide range of applications, from nuclear waste treatment to catalysis. The strategies employed to design actinide-selective extractants, for instance, comprise the fine tuning of the ligand electronic properties as well as us

  10. Study on the Extraction of Actinides From Simulated High-level Liquid Waste by Mixture of DHDECMP and TBP in Kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution ratios of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV) and Am(III) are measured by the single stage extraction experiments of simulated high-level liquid waste with 22%DHDECMP-42%TBP/OK. The extraction behavior of U, Np, Pu and Am in simulated high-level liquid waste is determined on miniature countercurrent centrifugal contactor cascade (6 stages for extraction, 2 stages for scrubbing, 6 stages for stripping, AF : AX : AS=1 : 1.5 : 0.5; BF : BX=1 : 1). The experimental results show that removal efficiency of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from simulated high-level liquid waste, all of them ,is equal or more than 99.9%. The stripping efficiency of U(VI),

  11. 废弃线路板中重金属形态分布特征%Speciation Distribution Characters of Heavy Metals in Waste Printed Circuit Boards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国华; 罗兴章; 黄卓辉; 冯景伟; 郑正; 高顺枝; 聂耳; 倪利晓

    2009-01-01

    The environmental availability of heavy metals from the waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) were studied through BCR's three-stage extraction procedures from EU and Tessier's five sequential extraction procedures. The results show that the heavy metal extraction rates with BCR's procedures are higher than that with Tessier' s from waste PCBs. There are significant differences in fraction distributions of heavy metals in PCBs. The speciation of Ni in the PCBs exists mainly in residual forms and has little effect on the environment. The percentage of acidic extractable forms with BCR's method and the total amount of exchangeable and carbonate which bound for Tessier's procedure of Pb and Zn are high, in the South China, the two metals are more easily released by acid rain. Acidic extractable forms of Cu is the main speciation in PCBs with BCR's extraction procedures, while the percentage of Fe-Mn oxides- bound of Cu is the highest with Tessier's procedures, though the result is not agree consistent, due to the high content of Cu in PCBs, the harm of Cu from PCBs could not be neglected.%通过BCR3态连续提取方法和Tessier 5步连续提取方法,对某废弃线路板中重金属的赋存形态进行研究.结果表明,BCR连续提取法对废弃线路板中重金属的提取率比Tessier连续提取方法高.废弃线路板中Cu、Pb、Zn和Ni各形态分布差别很大.BCR和Tessier连续提取方法结果均表明废弃线路板中Ni主要是以残渣态存在,对环境的污染风险小;而Pb和Zn主要以酸可提取态或者碳酸盐态和可交换态存在,在南方酸雨环境中容易溶出;BCR和Tessier连续提取方法对Cu的活性评价不一致,但是由于废弃线路板中Cu总量高,对环境的影响不可忽视.

  12. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des actinides et de leurs simulants dans les verres nucleaires. Limites d'incorporation et comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Ch

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  13. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourg Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities striving to meet these challenges, carried out under the Euratom FP7 collaborative project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes. Emphasis is put on the safety issues of fuel reprocessing and waste storage. Two types of actinide separation processes, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical, are considered, as well as related aspects of material studies, process modeling and the radiolytic stability of solvent extraction systems. Education and training of young researchers in nuclear chemistry is of particular importance for further development of this field.

  14. New molecules for the separation of actinides (III): the picolinamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, P.Y.; Condamines, N.; Berthon, L.; Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Minor actinide partitioning from high level liquid wastes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels by the Purex process, requires the design of new extracting molecules. These new extractants must be able to separate, for example, actinides from lanthanides. This separation is very difficult, due to the similar chemical properties of these metallic species, but it can possibly be reached by using extractants with soft donor atoms (N or S). Some new molecules : the picolinamides are investigated in this way. The general chemical formula and the behaviour of these compounds in acidic media are given. (O.L.). 3 refs.

  15. Mineral transformation controls speciation and pore-fluid transmission of contaminants in waste-weathered Hanford sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrial, Nicolas; Thompson, Aaron; O'Day, Peggy A.; Steefel, Carl I.; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-01

    Portions of the Hanford Site (WA, USA) vadose zone were subjected to weathering by caustic solutions during documented releases of high level radioactive waste (containing Sr, Cs and I) from leaking underground storage tanks. Previous studies have shown that waste-sediment interactions can promote variable incorporation of contaminants into neo-formed mineral products (including feldspathoids and zeolites), but processes regulating the subsequent contaminant release from these phases into infiltrating background pore waters remain poorly known. In this paper, reactive transport experiments were conducted with Hanford sediments previously weathered for one year in simulated hyper-alkaline waste solutions containing high or low 88Sr, 127I, and 133Cs concentrations, with or without CO2(aq). These waste-weathered sediments were leached in flow-through column experiments with simulated background pore water (characteristic of meteoric recharge) to measure contaminant release from solids formed during waste-sediment interaction. Contaminant sorption-desorption kinetics and mineral transformation reactions were both monitored using continuous-flow and wet-dry cycling regimes for ca. 300 pore volumes. Less than 20% of contaminant 133Cs and 88Sr mass and less than 40% 127I mass were released over the course of the experiment. To elucidate molecular processes limiting contaminant release, reacted sediments were studied with micro- (TEM and XRD) and molecular- (Sr K-edge EXAFS) scale methods. Contaminant dynamics in column experiments were principally controlled by rapid dissolution of labile solids and competitive exchange reactions. In initially feldspathoidic systems, time-dependent changes in the local zeolitic bonding environment observed with X-ray diffraction and EXAFS are responsible for limiting contaminant release. Linear combination fits and shell-by-shell analysis of Sr K-edge EXAFS data revealed modification in Sr-Si/Al distances within the zeolite cage. Wet

  16. Geochemical speciation and dynamic of copper in tropical semi-arid soils exposed to metal-bearing mine wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlatti, Fabio [Department of Environmental Technology, National Department of Mineral Production – DNPM, Rua Dr. José Lourenço, 90560115-280 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Graduate Course of Ecology and Natural Resources, Department of Biology, Federal University of Ceará – UFC, Building 906, 60455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Otero, Xosé Luis; Macias, Felipe [Department of Edaphology and Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Santiago de Compostela – USC, Rúa Lope Gómez de Marzoa, s/n. Campus sur, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ferreira, Tiago Osório, E-mail: toferreira@usp.br [Department of Soil Science, University of São Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Av. Pádua Dias, 11, 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Graduate Course of Ecology and Natural Resources, Department of Biology, Federal University of Ceará – UFC, Building 906, 60455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-12-01

    The potentially hazardous effects of rock wastes disposed at open pit in three different areas (Pr: Ore processing; Wr: Waste rock and Bd: Border) of an abandoned copper mine were evaluated in this study, with emphasis on acid drainage generation, metal contamination and copper geochemical dynamics in soils. Samples of waste rock were analyzed by Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Soil samples were analyzed to determine the total metal contents (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), pH (H2O and H2O2), organic and inorganic carbon, % of total N, S and P, particle size, and a sequential extraction procedure was used to identify the different copper fractions. As a result of the prevalence of carbonates over sulphides in the wastes, the soil pH remained close to neutral, with absence of acid mine drainage. The geochemical interaction between these mineral phases seems to be the main mechanism to release Cu{sup 2+} ions. Total Cu in soils from the Pr area reached 11,180 mg.kg{sup −1}, while in Wr and Bd areas the values reached, on average, 4683 and 1086 mg.kg{sup −1}, respectively, indicating a very high level of soil contamination. In the Pr and Wr, the Cu was mainly associated with carbonates and amorphous iron oxides. In the Bd areas, the presence of vegetation has influenced the geochemical behavior of copper by increasing the dissolution of carbonates, affecting the buffer capacity of soils against sulphide oxidation, reducing the pH levels and enhancing the proportion of exchangeable and organic bound Cu. The present findings show that the use of plants or organic amendments in mine sites with high concentration of Cu carbonate-containing wastes should be viewed with caution, as the practice may enhance the mobilization of copper to the environment due to an increase in the rate of carbonates dissolution. - Highlights: • The hazardous effects of mine waste rocks at

  17. Speciation, Dissolution, and Redox Reactions of Chromium Relevant to Pretreatment and Separation of High-Level Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark Sue B.; Dhanpat Rai; Linfeng Rao

    2005-04-20

    Chromium, one of the problematic elements in tank sludges, is considered the most important constituent in defining the total volume of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Current sludge washing processes (e.g. caustic leaching, 3 M NaOH) are not effective in removing Cr. This inefficient removal would result in production of an unacceptably large volume of HLW glass and thus a tremendous increase in the cost of waste disposal. This proposed research seeks to develop fundamental data for chromium (Cr) reactions that are not currently available but are essential for developing effective methodologies for removing Cr form high-level waste (HLW). Our objectives are to study (1) the dissolution of several solid phases (e.g., CrOOH, Cr2O3(c), Cr(OH)3, and Fe and Cr, binary hydroxides, identified to be important from sludge leaching studies) in highly alkaline solutions and in the presence of other electrolytes (e.g., carbonate, phosphate, sulfate, nitrite), and (2) the effect of the nature of Cr solid phases and aqueous species on their redox reactivity with a variety of potential oxidants (e.g., H2o2, persulfate, O2, and ferrate). This information will provide critical support for developing enhanced pretreatment strategies for removing Cr from HLW and will achieve a major cost reduction HLW disposal.

  18. Speciation, Dissolution, and Redox Reactions of Chromium Relevant to Pretreatment and Separation of High-Level Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhapat Rai; Linfeng Rao

    2006-06-01

    Chromium, one of the problematic elements in tank sludges, is considered the most important constituent in defining the total volume of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Current sludge-washing processes (e.g. caustic leaching, 3 M NaOH) are not effective in removing Cr. Such inefficient removal would result in the production of an unacceptably large volume of HLW glass and thus a tremendous increase in the cost of waste disposal. This proposed research seeks to develop fundamental data for chromium (Cr) reactions that are not currently available but are essential for developing effective methodologies for removing Cr form high-level waste (HLW). Our objectives are to study (1) the dissolution of several solid phases (e.g., CrOOH, Cr2O3(c), Cr(OH)3, and Fe and Cr, binary hydroxides, identified to be important from sludge leaching studies) in highly alkaline solutions and in the presence of other electrolytes (e.g., carbonate, phosphate, sulfate, nitrite), and (2) the effect of the nature of Cr solid phases and aqueous species on their redox reactivity with a variety of potential oxidants (H2O2, persulfate, hypochlorite, etc.). This information will provide critical support for developing enhanced pretreatment strategies for removing Cr from HLW and will achieve a major cost reduction in HLW disposal.

  19. Modeling for speciation of radionuclides in waste packages with high-level radioactive wastes; Modellierung zur Speziation von Radionukliden in Abfallgebinden mit hoch radioaktiven Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyand, Torben; Bracke, Guido; Seher, Holger

    2016-10-15

    Based on a literature search on radioactive waste inventories adequate thermodynamic data for model inventories were derived for geochemical model calculations using PHREEQC in order to determine the solid phase composition of high-level radioactive wastes in different containers. The calculations were performed for different model inventories (PWR-MOX, PWR-UO2, BWR-MOX, BMR-UO2) assuming intact containers under reduction conditions. The effect of a defect in the container on the solid phase composition was considered in variation calculations assuming air contact induced oxidation.

  20. Geochemical speciation and dynamic of copper in tropical semi-arid soils exposed to metal-bearing mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlatti, Fabio; Otero, Xosé Luis; Macias, Felipe; Ferreira, Tiago Osório

    2014-12-01

    The potentially hazardous effects of rock wastes disposed at open pit in three different areas (Pr: Ore processing; Wr: Waste rock and Bd: Border) of an abandoned copper mine were evaluated in this study, with emphasis on acid drainage generation, metal contamination and copper geochemical dynamics in soils. Samples of waste rock were analyzed by Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Soil samples were analyzed to determine the total metal contents (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), pH (H2O and H2O2), organic and inorganic carbon, % of total N, S and P, particle size, and a sequential extraction procedure was used to identify the different copper fractions. As a result of the prevalence of carbonates over sulphides in the wastes, the soil pH remained close to neutral, with absence of acid mine drainage. The geochemical interaction between these mineral phases seems to be the main mechanism to release Cu(2)(+) ions. Total Cu in soils from the Pr area reached 11,180mg.kg(-1), while in Wr and Bd areas the values reached, on average, 4683 and 1086mg.kg(-1), respectively, indicating a very high level of soil contamination. In the Pr and Wr, the Cu was mainly associated with carbonates and amorphous iron oxides. In the Bd areas, the presence of vegetation has influenced the geochemical behavior of copper by increasing the dissolution of carbonates, affecting the buffer capacity of soils against sulphide oxidation, reducing the pH levels and enhancing the proportion of exchangeable and organic bound Cu. The present findings show that the use of plants or organic amendments in mine sites with high concentration of Cu carbonate-containing wastes should be viewed with caution, as the practice may enhance the mobilization of copper to the environment due to an increase in the rate of carbonates dissolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Future nuclear fuel cycles: Prospect and challenges for actinide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warin, Dominique

    2010-03-01

    The global energy context pleads in favour of a sustainable development of nuclear energy since the demand for energy will likely increase, whereas resources will tend to get scarcer and the prospect of global warming will drive down the consumption of fossil fuel. In this context, nuclear power has the worldwide potential to curtail the dependence on fossil fuels and thereby to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions while promoting energy independence. How we deal with nuclear radioactive waste is crucial in this context. In France, the public's concern regarding the long-term waste management made the French Governments to prepare and pass the 1991 and 2006 Acts, requesting in particular the study of applicable solutions for still minimizing the quantity and the hazardousness of final waste. This necessitates High Active Long Life element (such as the Minor Actinides MA) recycling, since the results of fuel cycle R&D could significantly change the challenges for the storage of nuclear waste. HALL recycling can reduce the heat load and the half-life of most of the waste to be buried to a couple of hundred years, overcoming the concerns of the public related to the long-life of the waste and thus aiding the "burying approach" in securing a "broadly agreed political consensus" of waste disposal in a geological repository. This paper presents an overview of the recent R and D results obtained at the CEA Atalante facility on innovative actinide partitioning hydrometallurgical processes. For americium and curium partitioning, these results concern improvements and possible simplifications of the Diamex-Sanex process, whose technical feasibility was already demonstrated in 2005. Results on the first tests of the Ganex process (grouped actinide separation for homogeneous recycling) are also discussed. In the coming years, next steps will involve both better in-depth understanding of the basis of these actinide partitioning processes and, for the new promising

  2. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  3. PF-4 actinide disposition strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margevicius, Robert W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-05-28

    The dwindling amount of Security Category I processing and storage space across the DOE Complex has driven the need for more effective storage of nuclear materials at LANL's Plutonium Facility's (PF-4's) vault. An effort was begun in 2009 to create a strategy, a roadmap, to identify all accountable nuclear material and determine their disposition paths, the PF-4 Actinide Disposition Strategy (PADS). Approximately seventy bins of nuclear materials with similar characteristics - in terms of isotope, chemical form, impurities, disposition location, etc. - were established in a database. The ultimate disposition paths include the material to remain at LANL, disposition to other DOE sites, and disposition to waste. If all the actions described in the document were taken, over half of the containers currently in the PF-4 vault would been eliminated. The actual amount of projected vault space will depend on budget and competing mission requirements, however, clearly a significant portion of the current LANL inventory can be either dispositioned or consolidated.

  4. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  5. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  6. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  7. New cubic structure compounds as actinide host phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S V [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, S V; Livshits, T S, E-mail: profstef@mtu-net.ru [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetny lane 35, Moscow 119017 (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    Various compounds with fluorite (cubic zirconia) and fluorite-derived (pyrochlore, zirconolite) structures are considered as promising actinide host phases at immobilization of actinide-bearing nuclear wastes. Recently some new cubic compounds - stannate and stannate-zirconate pyrochlores, murataite and related phases, and actinide-bearing garnet structure compounds were proposed as perspective matrices for complex actinide wastes. Zirconate pyrochlore (ideally Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) has excellent radiation resistance and high chemical durability but requires high temperatures (at least 1500 deg. C) to be produced by hot-pressing from sol-gel derived precursor. Partial Sn{sup 4+} substitution for Zr{sup 4+} reduces production temperature and the compounds REE{sub 2}ZrSnO{sub 7} may be hot-pressed or cold pressed and sintered at {approx}1400 deg. C. Pyrochlore, A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} (two-fold elementary fluorite unit cell), and murataite, A{sub 3}B{sub 6}C{sub 2}O{sub 20-y} (three-fold fluorite unit cell), are end-members of the polysomatic series consisting of the phases whose structures are built from alternating pyrochlore and murataite blocks (nano-sized modules) with seven- (2C/3C/2C), five- (2C/3C), eight- (3C/2C/3C) and three-fold (3C - murataite) fluorite unit cells. Actinide content in this series reduces in the row: 2C (pyrochlore) > 7C > 5C > 8C > 3C (murataite). Due to congruent melting murataite-based ceramics may be produced by melting and the firstly segregated phase at melt crystallization is that with the highest fraction of the pyrochlore modules in its structure. The melts containing up to 10 wt. % AnO{sub 2} (An = Th, U, Np, Pu) or REE/An fraction of HLW form at crystallization zoned grains composed sequentially of the 5C {yields} 8C {yields} 3C phases with the highest actinide concentration in the core and the lowest - in the rim of the grains. Radiation resistance of the 'murataite' is comparable to titanate pyrochlores. One

  8. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (approx.1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Arsenic mobility and speciation in a contaminated urban soil are affected by different methods of green waste compost application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, William, E-mail: w.hartley@ljmu.ac.u [Liverpool John Moores University, Faculty of Science, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M.; Riby, Philip [Liverpool John Moores University, Faculty of Science, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Leese, Elizabeth; Morton, Jackie [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Lepp, Nicholas W., E-mail: nickandeileenlepp@hotmail.co [35 Victoria Road, Formby L37 7DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Application of green waste compost (GWC) to brownfield land is now common practice in soil restoration. However, previous studies have demonstrated both beneficial and detrimental effects on arsenic and metal mobility. In this paper, trace element behaviour was investigated following GWC application, either as surface mulch to, or mixed into soil from a previously described brownfield site in the U.K. Significant differences in arsenic mobility were observed between treatments. Mulching caused most disturbance, significantly increasing soil pore water As, together with Fe, P, Cr, Ni and dissolved organic carbon, the latter was a critical factor enhancing As mobilization. Arsenate was the main inorganic As species in soil pore water, increasing in concentration over time. An initial flush of potentially more toxic arsenite decreased 4 weeks after compost application. Biological processes appeared to play an important role in influencing As mobility. The results point to the necessity for careful management of As-contaminated soils. - A comparison of mulching and mixing of green waste compost to an urban soil results in differences in arsenic and metal leaching.

  10. Special Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countryman, Lyn L.; Maroo, Jill D.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable anecdotal evidence indicates that some of the most difficult concepts that both high school and undergraduate elementary-education students struggle with are those surrounding evolutionary principles, especially speciation. It's no wonder that entry-level biology students are confused, when biologists have multiple definitions of…

  11. Speciation of neptunium during sorption and diffusion in natural clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Bӧrner, P. J. B.; Drebert, J.; Frӧhlich, D. R.; Grolimund, D.; Kaplan, U.

    2016-05-01

    In argillaceous rocks, which are considered as a potential host rock for nuclear waste repositories, sorption and diffusion processes govern the migration behaviour of actinides like neptunium. For the safety analysis of such a repository, a molecular-level understanding of the transport and retardation phenomena of radioactive contaminants in the host rock is mandatory. The speciation of Np during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus Clay was studied at near neutral pH using a combination of spatially resolved synchrotron radiation techniques. During the sorption and diffusion experiments, the interaction of 8 μM Np(V) solutions with the clay lead to the formation of spots at the clay-water interface with increased Np concentrations as determined by μ-XRF. Several of these spots are correlated with areas of increased Fe concentration. Np L3-edge μ-XANES spectra revealed that up to 85% of the initial Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV). Pyrite could be identified by μ-XRD as a redox-active mineral phase responsible for the formation of Np(IV). The analysis of the diffusion profile within the clay matrix after an in-diffusion experiment for two months showed that Np(V) is progressively reduced with diffusion distance, i.e. Np(IV) amounted to ≈12% and ≈26% at 30 μm and 525 μm, respectively.

  12. Thermodynamics of actinide complexation in solution at elevated temperatures: application of variable-temperature titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2007-06-01

    Studies of actinide complexation in solution at elevated temperatures provide insight into the effect of solvation and the energetics of complexation, and help to predict the chemical behavior of actinides in nuclear waste processing and disposal where temperatures are high. This tutorial review summarizes the data on the complexation of actinides at elevated temperatures and describes the methodology for thermodynamic measurements, with the emphasis on variable-temperature titration calorimetry, a highly valuable technique to determine the enthalpy and, under appropriate conditions, the equilibrium constants of complexation as well.

  13. Set up of an innovative methodology to measure on-line the incineration potential of minor actinides under very high neutron sources in the frame of the future prospects of the nuclear waste transmutation; Mise au point d'une methodologie innovante pour la mesure du potentiel d'incineration d'actinides mineurs sous des sources tres intenses de neutrons, dans la perspective de transmutation des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadil, M

    2003-03-01

    This work deals generally with the problem of nuclear waste management and especially with the transmutation of it to reduce considerably its radiotoxicity potential. The principal objective of this thesis is to show the feasibility to measure on-line the incineration potential of minor actinides irradiated under very high neutron flux. To realize this goal, we have developed fission micro-chambers able to operate, for the first time in the world, in saturation regime under a severe neutron flux. These new chambers use {sup 235}U as an active deposit. They were irradiated in the high flux reactor at Laue-Langevin Institute in Grenoble. The measurement of the saturation current delivered by these chambers during their irradiation for 26 days allowed to evaluate the burn-up of {sup 235}U. We have determined the neutron flux intensity of 1,6 10{sup 15} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} in the bottom of the irradiation tube called 'V4'. The relative uncertainty of this value is less than 4 %. This is for the first time that such high neutron flux is measured with a fission chamber. To confirm this result, we have also performed independent measurements using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated Nb and Co samples. Both results are in agreement within error bars. Simple Deposit Fission Chambers (SDFC) as above were the reference of the new generation of fission chambers that we have developed in the framework of this thesis: Double Deposit Fission Chambers (DDFC). The reference active deposit was {sup 235}U. The other deposit was the actinide that we wanted to study (e.g. {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am). At the end of the thesis, we present some suggestions to ameliorate the operation of the DDFC to be exploited in other transmutation applications in the future. (author)

  14. A comparison of new reagents and processes for hydrometallurgical processing of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div

    2001-07-01

    The future viability of nuclear power as an electricity generation technology depends greatly on addressing all aspects of radioactive waste disposal. A closed fuel cycle with recycle and burnup of actinides is one important option for solving long-term waste sequestration issues. The 50 years of accumulated experience in application of solvent extraction to the processing of spent nuclear fuels uniquely qualifies this technology for actinide partitioning. However, employment of new reagents and development of new processes must be reconciled with century 21 expectations for environment protection. The interrelationship between the separations potential and waste disposal aspects of new reagents and processes are discussed in this report. (author)

  15. Biogeochemical Investigations to Evaluate the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillow, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy facility located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 655 m (2150 ft.) below ground surface in a bedded salt, Permian evaporite formation. This mined geologic repository has been receiving transuranic (TRU) waste from defense-related and environmental-management activities since March 1999. TRU waste contains alpha-emitting transuranic nuclides with half-lives greater than twenty years at concentrations greater than 100 nCi/gram. These actinide-contaminated wastes were generated from nuclear-weapons production and related processing activities. They include various organics, adsorbed liquids, sludges, cellulosics, plastics, rubber, and a variety of metals and cemented materials. An extensive set of investigations were performed to establish the basis for TRU waste disposal at WIPP and to support initial certification from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A significant element of the conceptual geochemical model for WIPP is the microbiologically-driven reactions leading to biodegradation of organic constituents in TRU wastes, as well as interactions with actinides present in the waste. This presentation will discuss the biogeochemical investigations that were performed to evaluate microbiological activity at WIPP, including studies of gas generation due to biodegradation of cellulose, plastic, and rubber materials and actinide-microbe interactions leading to changes in actinide chemical speciation. Highlights of this work are discussed here. Cellulose biodegradation in salt-brine systems results in the generation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and aqueous fermentation products (low molecular weight organic acids). Hypersaline brine can limit the range of microbial metabolic pathways, due to the energetic stresses of maintaining osmotic balance compatible with metabolic processes. Methanogenesis yields the lowest free energy per mole of carbon and as such is often not detected in

  16. Moessbauer spectroscopy with actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Asch, L.; Kalvius, G.M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.)

    1983-01-01

    Although formally equivalent to the lanthanide (4f) elements, the light actinides show a much more varied behaviour due to the larger spatial extent and ionizability of the 5f electrons. The application of Moessbauer spectroscopy for the determination of electronic properties of the actinides is outlined. Emphasis is put on high pressure Moessbauer experiments using the 60 keV transition in /sup 237/Np to study questions of delocalization of 5f electrons.

  17. Mechanical behaviour and diffusion of gas during neutron irradiation of actinides in ceramic inert matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeft, E.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Fission of actinides from nuclear waste in inert matrices (materials without uranium) can reduce the period in time that nuclear waste is more radiotoxic than uranium ore that is the rock from which ordinary reactor fuel is made. A pioneering study is performed with the inert matrices: MgO, MgAl2O4,

  18. Mechanical behaviour and diffusion of gas during neutron irradiation of actinides in ceramic inert matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeft, E.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Fission of actinides from nuclear waste in inert matrices (materials without uranium) can reduce the period in time that nuclear waste is more radiotoxic than uranium ore that is the rock from which ordinary reactor fuel is made. A pioneering study is performed with the inert matrices: MgO, MgAl2O4,

  19. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, F.T. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the `dry method`. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  20. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.; Finney, B.C.

    1980-06-01

    This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted.

  1. Measurements of the neutron capture cross sections and incineration potentials of minor-actinides in high thermal neutron fluxes: Impact on the transmutation of nuclear wastes; Mesures des sections efficaces de capture et potentiels d'incineration des actinides mineurs dans les hauts flux de neutrons: Impact sur la transmutation des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringer, O

    2007-10-15

    This thesis comes within the framework of minor-actinide nuclear transmutation studies. First of all, we have evaluated the impact of minor actinide nuclear data uncertainties within the cases of {sup 241}Am and {sup 237}Np incineration in three different reactor spectra: EFR (fast), GT-MHR (epithermal) and HI-HWR (thermal). The nuclear parameters which give the highest uncertainties were thus highlighted. As a result of fact, we have tried to reduce data uncertainties, in the thermal energy region, for one part of them through experimental campaigns in the moderated high intensity neutron fluxes of ILL reactor (Grenoble). These measurements were focused onto the incineration and transmutation of the americium-241, the curium-244 and the californium-249 isotopes. Finally, the values of 12 different cross sections and the {sup 241}Am isomeric branching ratio were precisely measured at thermal energy point. (author)

  2. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA))

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources.

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle-oriented actinides separation in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; He, Xihong; Wang, Jianchen [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2014-04-01

    In the last decades, the separation of actinides was widely and continuously studied in China. A few kinds of salt-free reductants to adjust Pu and Np valences have been investigated. N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine is a good reductant with high reduction rate constants for the co-reduction of Pu(IV) and Np(VI), and monomethylhydrazine is a simple compound for the individual reduction of Np(VI). Advanced PUREX based on Organic Reductants (APOR) was proposed. Trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO) with a single functional group was found to possess strong affinity to tri-, tetra- and hexa-valent actinides. TRPO process has been first explored in China for actinides partitioning from high level waste and the good partitioning performance was demonstrated by the hot test. High extraction selectivity for trivalent actinides over lanthanides by dialkyldithiophosphinic acids was originally found in China. A separation process based on purified Cyanex 301 for the separation of Am from lanthanides was presented and successfully tested in a battery of miniature centrifugal contactors. (orig.)

  4. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  5. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  6. Calculation of cohesive energy of actinide metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱存富; 陈秀芳; 余瑞璜; 耿平; 段占强

    1997-01-01

    According to empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET), an equation for calculating the cohesive energy of actinide metals is given, the cohesive energy of 9 actinide metals with known crystal structure is calculated, which is identical with the experimental values on the whole, and the cohesive energy of 6 actinide metals with unknown crystal structure is forecast.

  7. Actinide coordination sphere in various U, Np and Pu nitrato coordination complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auwer, C. Den; Revel, R.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Presson, M.T. [CEA, DCC/DRRV/SEMP, Lab. de Chimie Theorique et Structurale, Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Conradson, S.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simoni, E.; Du, J.F. Le [Centre Univ. Paris Sud, IPN, Orsay CEDEX (France); Madic, C. [CEA, DCC Saclay, Gif sur Yvete (France)

    1999-10-01

    Waste management of nuclear fuel represents one of the major environmental concerns of the decade. To recycle fissile valuable materials, intimate knowledge of complexation mechanisms involved in the solvent extraction processes is indispensable. Evolution of the actinide coordination sphere of AnO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}TBP-type complexes (an = U, Np, Pu; TBP = tributylphosphate) with the actinide valence state have been probed by XAS at the metal L{sub III} edge. Dramatic changes in the actinide coordination sphere appeared when the An(VI) metal is reduced to An(IV). However, no significant evolution in the actinide environment has been noticed across the series UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. (au)

  8. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  9. Actinides and Life's Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uranium- and thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3rd by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  10. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL`s Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused.

  11. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  12. Safe management of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle: Role of mineralogy; La gestion des actinides dans le cycle du combustible nucleaire: le role de la mineralogie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Department of Geological Sciences, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    During the past 60 years, more than 1800 metric tonnes of Pu, and substantial quantities of the 'minor' actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranium elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., {sup 239}Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np), and of environmental concern because of their long-half lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these heavy elements: (1) to 'burn' or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to 'sequester' the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, especially isometric pyrochlore, A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium, both as inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of alpha-decay event damage. Recent developments in our understanding of the properties of heavy element solids have opened up new possibilities for the design of advanced nuclear fuels and waste forms. (author)

  13. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, D.L. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Carroll, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

  14. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  15. Recovery of minor actinides from irradiated superfact fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apoltolidis, C.; Glatz, J.P.; Molinet, R.; Nicholl, A.; Pagliosa, G.; Romer, K.; Bokelund, H.; Koch, L. [European Commission, JRC, Institute fuer Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    It could be demonstrated that the reprocessing of fast reactor oxide fuels containing up to 45 % MA (Np and Am), irradiated in the PHENIX reactor in the frame of a transmutation study, is possible. The fuels were dissolved under PUREX type conditions in order to determine their behaviour in the head-end step of the reprocessing process. For one of the fuels containing 20 % Am and 20 % Np before irradiation, an almost complete partitioning of actinides from the dissolver solution could be achieved. Chromatographic extraction was used for the separation of the main bulk elements U, Pu and Np, whereas centrifugal extractors were used to separate the minor actinides from the remaining high level liquid wastes (HLLW). For the relevant radio-toxic isotopes a high recovery rate from the irradiation targets was reached. Those elements are thus available for new fuel fabrication. (authors) 12 refs.

  16. Actinide-specific sequestering agents and decontamination applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Raymond, Kenneth N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-04-07

    With the commercial development of nuclear reactors, the actinides have become very important industrial elements. A major concern of the nuclear industry is the biological hazard associated with nuclear fuels and their wastes. The acute chemical toxicity of tetravalent actinides, as exemplified by Th(IV), is similar to Cr(III) or Al(III). However, the acute toxicity of 239Pu(IV) is similar to strychnine, which is much more toxic than any of the non-radioactive metals such as mercury. Although the more radioactive isotopes of the transuranium elements are more acutely toxic by weight than plutonium, the acute toxicities of 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm are nearly identical in radiation dose, ~100 μCi/kg in rodents. Finally and thus, the extreme acute toxicity of 239Pu is attributed to its high specific activity of alpha emission.

  17. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  18. Study of the behavior of actinides continuously recycled in a hard spectrum reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, P.E.

    1980-12-01

    The behavior of actinides continuously recycled through the central region of an EBR-II type reactor was studied. Such a reactor would convert long-lived nuclear wastes to short-lived isotopes, and simultaneously produce useful power. This process is proposed as an alternative to the geological isolation of long-lived actinide wastes. A driver region of 50% U-235 enriched fuel provided a nearly-constant spectrum and flux that was extremely hard compared to standard LMFBRs. This resulted in a high fission-to-capture ratio for most isotopes. The original actinide fuel was the discharge from a LWR, cooled for two years, with 99.9% of the uranium and plutonium removed by chemical processing. Comparison was made between removal of both Pu and U and removal of only U in subsequent cycles. The latter case resulted in substantial quantities of trans-plutonics burned per cycle.

  19. Neutron capture measuremetns on minor actinides at the n_TOF facility at CERN: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Cano Ott, Daniel; Colonna, Nicola; Tagliente, G.; Belloni, Fabio; Calviño Tavares, Francisco; Cortés Rossell, Guillem Pere; Poch Parés, Agustí; Pretel Sánchez, Carme

    2011-01-01

    The successful development of advanced nuclear systems for sustainable energy production and nuclear waste management depends on high quality nuclear data libraries. Recent sensitivity stud- ies and reports [1-3] have identi ed the need for substantially improving the accuracy of neutron cross-section data for minor actinides. The n TOF collaboration has initiated an ambitious exper- imental program for the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of minor actinides. Two e...

  20. LLNL SFA OBER SBR FY17 Program Management and Performance Report: Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-23

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of anthropogenic plutonium (Pu) has accumulated worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al. 1999; Novikov et al. 2006; Santschi et al. 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA) and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program.

  1. Speciation in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giacomo

    2013-11-01

    The field of speciation has seen much renewed interest in the past few years, with theoretical and empirical advances that have moved it from a descriptive field to a predictive and testable one. The goal of this review is to provide a general background on research on speciation as it pertains to fishes. Three major components to the question are first discussed: the spatial, ecological and sexual factors that influence speciation mechanisms. We then move to the latest developments in the field of speciation genomics. Affordable and rapidly available, massively parallel sequencing data allow speciation studies to converge into a single comprehensive line of investigation, where the focus has shifted to the search for speciation genes and genomic islands of speciation. We argue that fish present a very diverse array of scenarios, making them an ideal model to study speciation processes.

  2. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Nancy Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+•UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+•UO22+, NpO2+•Th4+, PuO2+•UO22+, and PuO2+•Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ~0.8 M-1.

  3. One-electron physics of the actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A.; Marianetti, C. A.; Haule, K.; Kotliar, G.

    2007-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the one-electron physics of the actinides. Various linear muffin-tin orbital basis sets are analyzed in order to determine a robust bare Hamiltonian for the actinides. The hybridization between f and spd states is compared with the f-f hopping in order to understand the Anderson-like and Hubbard-like contributions to itineracy in the actinides. We show that both contributions decrease strongly as one moves from the light actinides to the heavy actinides, while the Anderson-like contribution dominates in all cases. A real-space analysis of the band structure shows that nearest-neighbor hopping dominates the physics in these materials. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results to the delocalization transition as a function of atomic number across the actinide series.

  4. Safe management of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle: Role of mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    2011-02-01

    During the past 60 years, more than 1800 metric tonnes of Pu, and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranium elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), and of environmental concern because of their long-half lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these heavy elements: (1) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; (2) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, especially isometric pyrochlore, A 2B 2O 7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium, both as inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. Systematic studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high doses of alpha-decay event damage. Recent developments in our understanding of the properties of heavy element solids have opened up new possibilities for the design of advanced nuclear fuels and waste forms.

  5. Radioactive contaminants in the subsurface: the influence of complexing ligands on trace metal speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, W

    2007-07-01

    are conditioned as cementitious waste form for interim storage and finally will become part of the radioactive waste in geological repositories. The worst-case scenario is the instantaneous and complete dissolution and decomposition of the ion exchangers in the cementitious environment and the release of free cyanide. I assessed the effects of cyanide complexation on the speciation and solubility of radionuclides by 'backdoor' calculations. In the course of the review process for the Nagra/PSI TDB, two important gaps in the database were identified: a) experimental data for the system ThO{sub 2} -H{sub 2}O cannot be interpreted by a unique set of thermodynamic constants; b) potentially important thermodynamic constants for mixed carbonatohydroxo complexes of tetravalent actinides are missing because of insufficient experimental data. Both problems have been solved using the 'backdoor approach'. (iii) In the field of natural organics, mainly humic and fulvic acids, we face an ill-defined problem concerning the molecular structure of the ligands. There, I proposed a pragmatic approach for performance assessment purposes, the 'conservative roof' approach, which does not aim to accurately model all experimental data, but allows estimates of maximum effects on metal complexation by humic substances to be calculated. The major effects influencing radionuclide-humate interactions are explored in detail: the metal concentration effect; the pH effect; competition effects. The first two effects are included in the 'conservative roof' approach in a simplified form suitable for performance assessment. The competition effects were explored by the 'backdoor approach' using the 'conservative roof' model and additional thermodynamic information. A worked out case study for a safety analysis of a Swiss geological repository project elucidated all important effects in quantitative terms. This case study may serve as a roadmap

  6. NMR studies of actinide dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: tokunaga.yo@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kambe, S.; Walstedt, R.E.; Ikushima, K.; Yasuoka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Y.; Matsuda, T.D.; Ikeda, S.; Yamamoto, E.; Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nakajima, K.; Arai, Y. [Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2007-10-11

    {sup 17}O NMR measurements have been performed on a series of the actinide dioxides, UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Although the {sup 17}O NMR spectra in these materials are similar at higher temperatures, the low-temperature spectra present are significantly different. In UO{sub 2} we have observed a wide spectrum, forming a rectangular shape below T{sub N}=30 K. In NpO{sub 2}, on the other hand, the spectra broaden rather gradually and exhibit a two-peak structure below T{sub 0}=26 K. In PuO{sub 2}, neither spectrum broadening nor splitting has been observed. We show that these NMR spectra clearly indicate the different nature of the low-temperature magnetic ground states in these actinide compounds.

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopy of actinide intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalvius, G.M.; Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Litterst, F.J.; Asch, L.; Zaenkert, J.; Potzel, U.; Kratzer, A.; Wunsch, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik); Gal, J.

    1985-04-01

    Due to their wider radical extent the 5f electrons may form bands of different width and hybridization in metallic compounds of the light actinides. This leads to a broad spectrum of magnetic properties ranging from the localized magnetism of the lanthanides to the itinerant electron magnetism often found in transition metal compounds. Also, the influence of the crystalline electric field tends to be more pronounced than in rare earth compounds, but is usually not as dominant as in the 3d series. Magnetic structures and the question of 5f electron delocalization will be reviewed with respect to actinide Moessbauer data and new results will be presented. In particular the influence of applying external pressure will be discussed.

  8. Mossbauer spectroscopy of actinide intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalvius, G.M.; Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Litterst, F.J.; Asch, L.; Zankert, J.; Potzel, U.; Kratzer, A.; Wunsch, M.; Gal, J.

    1984-09-01

    Due to their wider radial extend the 5f electrons may form bands of different width and hybridization in metallic compounds of the light actinides. This leads to a broad spectrum of magnetic properties ranging from the localized magnetism of the lanthanides to the itinerant electron magnetism often found in transition metal compounds. Also, the influence of the crystalline electric field tends to be more pronounced than in rare earth compounds, but is usually not as dominant as in the 3d series. Magnetic structures and the question of 5f electron delocalization are reviewed with respet to actinide Moessbauer data and new results are presented. In particular the influence of applying external pressure is discussed. 60 references, 24 figures.

  9. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  10. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  11. Crystalline matrices for the immobilization of plutonium and actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.B.; Burakov, E.E.; Galkin, Ya.B.; Starchenko, V.A.; Vasiliev, V.G. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    The management of weapon plutonium, disengaged as a result of conversion, is considered together with the problem of the actinide fraction of long-lived high level radioactive wastes. It is proposed to use polymineral ceramics based on crystalline host-phases: zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} and zirconium dioxide ZrO{sub 2}, for various variants of the management of plutonium and actinides (including the purposes of long-term safe storage or final disposal from the human activity sphere). It is shown that plutonium and actinides are able to form with these phases on ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} was done on laboratory level by the hot pressing method, using the plasmochemical calcination technology. To incorporate simulators of plutonium into the structure of ZrSiO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} in the course of synthesis, an original method developed by the authors as a result of studying the high-uranium zircon (Zr,U) SiO{sub 4} form Chernobyl {open_quotes}lavas{close_quotes} was used.

  12. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Z?nker, Harald; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda?Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near?neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical cha...

  13. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Zänker, Harald; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda‐Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near‐neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical cha...

  14. Methods for the determination of low-level actinide concentrations and their behaviour in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilvioe, R

    1998-12-31

    ,240}Pu concentration was in the surface layer of the bottom sediment (0-1 cm), 24 % in filtered water and 3 % in the particulate fraction (diameter > 0.45 mm). The redox equilibrium of Pu in lake and sea waters studied here is dependent on the amount of organic substances and the presence of H{sub 2}S in these waters. In sea water, Pu(III+IV) dominates only when H{sub 2}S is present in reducing conditions whilst in lake waters, 73-82 % of the Pu exists in the lower oxidation states due to the stabilisation of Pu(III+IV) with organic substances. In this work the main property affecting the speciation of U in ground waters is the salinity. U is present as U(IV) only in highly saline ground waters where reducing conditions prevail. In low salinity waters, even in reducing conditions with low oxygen concentrations, 83-98 % of U was in the oxidised form. The method based on extraction chromatography was successfully applied during the certification process of Th, U, Pu and Am concentrations in bone ash samples, prepared by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This rapid and simple method, when compared to the anion exchange procedure, produces dramatically less waste during the separation and purification of each actinide element. Pure spectra, coupled with high and reproducible recoveries, have been achieved for Th, U, Pu, Am and Cm. The mean recoveries for five replicate analyses of bone ash were 89 {+-} 3%, 86 {+-} 5%, 81 {+-} 5% and 87 {+-} 4% for Th, U, Pu and Am, respectively. (orig.) 168 refs.

  15. Methods for the determination of low-level actinide concentrations and their behaviour in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilvioe, R

    1998-12-31

    ,240}Pu concentration was in the surface layer of the bottom sediment (0-1 cm), 24 % in filtered water and 3 % in the particulate fraction (diameter > 0.45 mm). The redox equilibrium of Pu in lake and sea waters studied here is dependent on the amount of organic substances and the presence of H{sub 2}S in these waters. In sea water, Pu(III+IV) dominates only when H{sub 2}S is present in reducing conditions whilst in lake waters, 73-82 % of the Pu exists in the lower oxidation states due to the stabilisation of Pu(III+IV) with organic substances. In this work the main property affecting the speciation of U in ground waters is the salinity. U is present as U(IV) only in highly saline ground waters where reducing conditions prevail. In low salinity waters, even in reducing conditions with low oxygen concentrations, 83-98 % of U was in the oxidised form. The method based on extraction chromatography was successfully applied during the certification process of Th, U, Pu and Am concentrations in bone ash samples, prepared by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This rapid and simple method, when compared to the anion exchange procedure, produces dramatically less waste during the separation and purification of each actinide element. Pure spectra, coupled with high and reproducible recoveries, have been achieved for Th, U, Pu, Am and Cm. The mean recoveries for five replicate analyses of bone ash were 89 {+-} 3%, 86 {+-} 5%, 81 {+-} 5% and 87 {+-} 4% for Th, U, Pu and Am, respectively. (orig.) 168 refs.

  16. Prompt fission neutron spectrum of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Chen, Y. -J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Hambsch, F. J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Jurado, B. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Kornilov, N. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Lestone, J. P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Litaize, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Morillon, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Neudecker, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oberstedt, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Ohsawa, T. [Kinki Univ., Osaka-fu (Japan); Otuka, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Schmidt, K. H. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Serot, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Shu, N. -C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Smith, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Talou, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Tudora, A. C. [Univ. of Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Vorobyev, A. S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutron emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  17. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  18. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  19. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  20. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of minor actinides transmutation to physical and technological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minor actinides transmutation is one of the three main axis defined by the 2006 French law for management of nuclear waste, along with long-term storage and use of a deep geological repository. Transmutation options for critical systems can be divided in two different approaches: (a homogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are mixed with the fuel. This exhibits the drawback of “polluting” the entire fuel cycle with minor actinides and also has an important impact on core reactivity coefficients such as Doppler Effect or sodium void worth for fast reactors when the minor actinides fraction increases above 3 to 5% depending on the core; (b heterogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are inserted into transmutation targets which can be located in the center or in the periphery of the core. This presents the advantage of decoupling the management of the minor actinides from the conventional fuel and not impacting the core reactivity coefficients. In both cases, the design and analyses of potential transmutation systems have been carried out in the frame of Gen IV fast reactor using a “perturbation” approach in which nominal power reactor parameters are modified to accommodate the loading of minor actinides. However, when designing such a transmutation strategy, parameters from all steps of the fuel cycle must be taken into account, such as spent fuel heat load, gamma or neutron sources or fabrication feasibility. Considering a multi-recycling strategy of minor actinides, an analysis of relevant estimators necessary to fully analyze a transmutation strategy has been performed in this work and a sensitivity analysis of these estimators to a broad choice of reactors and fuel cycle parameters has been carried out. No threshold or percolation effects were observed. Saturation of transmutation rate with regards to several parameters has been observed, namely the minor actinides volume fraction and the irradiation time

  2. Sensitive redox speciation of iron, neptunium, and plutonium by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graser, Carl-Heinrich; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Bender, Kerstin Anne; Lagos, Markus; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Marsac, Rémi; Montoya, Vanessa; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-10-01

    The long-term safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories requires a detailed understanding of actinide (geo)chemistry. Advanced analytical tools are required to gain insight into actinide speciation in a given system. The geochemical conditions in the vicinity of a nuclear repository control the redox state of radionuclides, which in turn has a strong impact on their mobility. Besides the long-lived radionuclides plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np), which are key elements in high level nuclear waste, iron (Fe) represents a main component in natural systems controlling redox-related geochemical processes. Measuring the oxidation state distribution for redox sensitive radionuclides and other metal ions is challenging at trace concentrations below the detection limit of most available spectroscopic methods (≥10(-6) M). Consequently, ultrasensitive new analytical techniques are required. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a suitable separation method for metal cations. CE hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-SF-MS) was used to measure the redox speciation of Pu (III, IV, V, VI), Np (IV, V, VI), and Fe (II, III) at concentrations lower than 10(-7) M. CE coupling and separation parameters such as sample gas pressure, make up flow rate, capillary position, auxiliary gas flow, as well as the electrolyte system were optimized to obtain the maximum sensitivity. We obtain detection limits of 10(-12) M for Np and Pu. The various oxidation state species of Pu and Np in different samples were separated by application of an acetate-based electrolyte system. The separation of Fe (II) and Fe (III) was investigated using different organic complexing ligands, EDTA, and o-phenanthroline. For the Fe redox system, a limit of detection of 10(-8) M was calculated. By applying this analytical system to sorption studies, we were able to underline previously published results for the sorption behavior of Np in highly diluted concentrations, and

  3. Modeling actinide chemistry with ASPEN PLUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    When chemical engineers think of chemical processing, they often do not include the US government or the national laboratories as significant participants. Compared to the scale of chemical processing in the chemical process, petrochemical and pharmaceutical industries, the government contribution to chemical processing is not large. However, for the past fifty years, the US government has been, heavily involved in chemical processing of some very specialized materials, in particular, uranium and plutonium for nuclear weapons. Individuals and corporations have paid taxes that, in part have been used to construct and to maintain a series of very expensive laboratories and production facilities throughout the country. Even ignoring the ongoing R & D costs, the price per pound of enriched uranium or of plutonium exceeds that of platinum by a wide margin. Now, with the end of the cold war, the government is decommissioning large numbers of nuclear weapons and cleaning up the legacy of radioactive wastes generated over the last fifty years. It is likely that the costs associated with the build-down and clean-up of the nuclear weapons complex will exceed the investment of the past fifty years of production. Los Alamos National Laboratory occupies a special place in the history of nuclear weapons. The first weapons were designed and assembled at Los Alamos using uranium produced in Oak Ridge, Tennessee or plutonium produced in Richland, Washington. Many of the thermophysical and metallurgical properties of actinide elements have been investigated at Los Alamos. The only plutonium processing facility currently operating in the US is in Los Alamos, and the Laboratory is striving to capture and maintain the uranium processing technology applicable to the post-cold war era. Laboratory researchers are actively involved in developing methods for cleaning up the wastes associated with production of nuclear weapons throughout the US.

  4. Minor actinide fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reaction in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taieb J.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of nuclear waste incineration and design of new generation nuclear reactors, experimental data on fission probabilities and on fission fragment yields of minor actinides are crucial to design prototypes. Transfer-induced fission has proven to be an efficient method to study fission probabilities of actinides which cannot be investigated with standard techniques due to their high radioactivity. We report on the preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL that investigates fission probabilities with multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics between a 238U beam on a 12C target. Actinides from U to Cm were produced with an excitation energy range from 0 to 30 MeV. In addition, inverse kinematics allowed to characterize the fission fragments in mass and charge. A key point of the analysis resides in the identification of the actinides produced in the different transfer channels. The new annular telescope SPIDER was used to tag the target-like recoil nucleus of the transfer reaction and to determine the excitation energy of the actinide. The fission probability for each transfer channel is accessible and the preliminary results for 238U are promising.

  5. Ionic Interactions in Actinide Tetrahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Karaman, A.; Tosi, M. P.

    2001-05-01

    We determine a model of the ionic interactions in AX 4 compounds (where A is an atom in the actinide series from Th to Am and X = F, Cl, Br or I) by an analysis of data on the static and dynamic structure of their molecular monomers. The potential energy function that we adopt is taken from earlier work on rare-earth trihalides [Z. Akdeniz, Z. Q q e k and M. P. Tosi, Z. Naturforsch. 55a, 861 (2000)] and in particular allows for the electronic polarizability of the actinide ion. This polarizability quantitatively determines the antisymmetric-bending vibrational mode, but its magnitude remains compatible with a symmetric tetrahedral shape of the molecule at equilibrium. The fluorides have an especially high degree of ionic character, and the interionic-force parameters for each halide of the U, Np, Pu and Am series show regular trends, suggesting that extrapolations to the other transuranic-element halides may usefully be made. The Th compounds show some deviations from these trends, and the interionic-force model that we determine for ThCl4 differs somewhat from that obtained in a previous study. We therefore return on the evaluation of the relative stability of charged oligomers of ThCl4 and ZrCl4 and find confirmation of our earlier results on this problem.

  6. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced......The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...

  7. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Cassayre, Laurent; Soucek, Pavel; Mendes, Eric; Malmbeck, Rikard; Nourry, Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel; Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl–KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide–aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorina...

  9. Aqueous chemistry of Ce(iv): estimations using actinide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Rémi; Réal, Florent; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Pédrot, Mathieu; Pourret, Olivier; Vallet, Valérie

    2017-10-10

    The prediction of cerium (Ce) aqueous speciation is relevant in many research fields. Indeed, Ce compounds are used for many industrial applications, which may require the control of Ce aqueous chemistry for their synthesis. The aquatic geochemistry of Ce is also of interest. Due to its growing industrial use and its release into the environment, Ce is now considered as an emerging contaminant. Cerium is also used as a proxy of (paleo)redox conditions due to the Ce(iv)/Ce(iii) redox transition. Finally, Ce(iv) is often presented as a relevant analogue of tetravalent actinides (An(iv)). In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were conducted to highlight the similarities between the structures of Ce(iv) and tetravalent actinide (An(iv); An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu) aqua-ions, especially Pu(iv). The current knowledge of An(iv) hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation in water was briefly reviewed but important discrepancies were observed in the available data for Ce(iv). Therefore, new estimations of the hydrolysis constants of Ce(iv) and the solubility of Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxides are proposed, by analogy with Pu(iv). By plotting pH-Eh (Pourbaix) diagrams, we showed that the pH values corresponding to the onset of Ce(iv) species formation (i.e. Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxide or dissolved Ce(iv)) agreed with various experimental results. Although further experimental studies are required to obtain a more accurate thermodynamic database, the present work might yet help to predict more accurately the Ce chemical behavior in aqueous solution.

  10. Actinide partitioning and transmutation program. Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D.W.; Blomeke, J.O. (comps.)

    1978-02-01

    In Purex process modifications, two cold runs with mixer-settlers were made on the extraction and stripping of ruthenium and zirconium without the presence of uranium. Efforts in actinide recovery from solids were directed toward the determination of dissolution parameters in various reagents for /sup 241/Am and /sup 239/Pu oxide mixtures, /sup 233/U oxide, /sup 237/Np oxide, /sup 244/Cm oxide, /sup 232/Th oxide, and PuO/sub 2/. Studies in americium-curium recovery with OPIX (oxalate precipitation and ion exchange), Talspeak, and cation exchange chromatography focused on the feasibility of forming oxalate precipitates in continuous systems, the effects of zirconium on Talspeak, and methods for removing solvent degradation products of the Talspeak system. In studies of americium-curium recovery using bidentate extractants, additional distribution coefficients for actinides and other key elements between reduced synthetic LWR waste solution and 30 percent dihexyl-N, N-diethyl-carbamylmethylene phosphonate in diisopropylbenzene were measured. Studies in the americium-curium recovery using inorganic ion exchange media to determine the pH dependence of lanthanide ion affinity for niobate, titanate, and zirconate ion exchange materials have been completed. A modified flowsheet for the extraction of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium from high-level liquid waste is presented. Evaluation of methods for measuring actinides from incinerator ash is continuing. A preliminary evaluation of methods for treatment of salt waste and waste waters was completed. In thermal reactor transmutation studies, waste actinides from an LWR lattice containing mixed uranium-plutonium assemblies were recycled in separate target assemblies. (LK)

  11. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  12. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  13. High-temperature vacuum distillation separation of plutonium waste salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In this task, high-temperature vacuum distillation separation is being developed for residue sodium chloride-potassium chloride salts resulting from past pyrochemical processing of plutonium. This process has the potential of providing clean separation of the salt and the actinides with minimal amounts of secondary waste generation. The process could produce chloride salt that could be discarded as low-level waste (LLW) or low actinide content transuranic (TRU) waste, and a concentrated actinide oxide powder that would meet long-term storage standards (DOE-DTD-3013-94) until a final disposition option for all surplus plutonium is chosen.

  14. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  15. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  16. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  17. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated.

  18. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  19. Advances in computational actinide chemistry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqi; Wu, Jingyi; Chai, Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Multidisciplinary Initiative Center; Su, Jing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Div. of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering; Li, Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering

    2014-04-01

    The advances in computational actinide chemistry made in China are reviewed. Several areas relevant to chemistry of actinides in gas, liquid, and solid phases have been explored. However, we limit the scope to selected contributions in the chemistry of molecular actinide systems in gas and liquid phases. These studies may be classified into two categories: treatment of relativistic effects, which cover the development of two- and four-component Hamiltonians and the optimization of relativistic pseudopotentials, and the applications of theoretical methods in actinide chemistry. The applications include (1) the electronic structures of actinocene, noble gas complexes, An-C multiple bonding compounds, uranyl and its isoelectronic species, fluorides and oxides, molecular systems with metal-metal bonding in their isolated forms (U{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}) and in fullerene (U{sub 2} rate at C{sub 60}), and the excited states of actinide complexes; (2) chemical reactions, including oxidation, hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, ligand exchange, reactivities of thorium oxo and sulfido metallocenes, CO{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} functionalization promoted by trivalent uranium complex; and (3) migration of actinides in the environment. A future outlook is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Aqueous complexes of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) with the carbonate and sulphate ions. Thermodynamic study by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and electro-spray-ionisation mass spectrometry; Complexes aqueux de lanthanides (3) et actinides (3) avec les ions carbonate et sulfate. Etude thermodynamique par spectrofluorimetrie laser resolue en temps et spectrometrie de masse a ionisation electrospray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercouter, Th

    2005-03-15

    The prediction of the environmental impact of a possible geological disposal of radioactive wastes is supported by the thermodynamic modelling of the radionuclides behaviour in the groundwater. In this framework, the analogy between lanthanides and actinides(III) is confirmed by a critical analysis of the literature and the comparison with experimental results obtained here. The limiting complex, Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}, is identified by solubility measurements in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. Then the formation constants of the complexes Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-3) and Eu(SO{sub 4}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-2) are measured by TRLFS. The formation of aqueous LaSO{sub 4}{sup +} is studied by ESI-MS and is in good agreement with the expected speciation. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup -} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {r_reversible} Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} are deduced from TRLFS measurements of the equilibrium constant between 10 and 70 C. The ionic strength effect is calculated using the SIT formula. (author)

  1. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M.J.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs re

  2. 城市生活垃圾焚烧中氯化物对铜迁移转化特性的影响%Effects of Chlorides on Copper Partitioning and Speciation During Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙进; 李清海; 李国岫; 周会; 秦岭; 张衍国

    2014-01-01

    The effects of chlorides on the Cu partitioning and speciation in the municipal solid waste (MSW)incineration was investigated using thermodynamic equilibrium calculation and a simulated tubular furnace experiment. The thermodynamic calculation and experimental results show that the form and amount of chloride and the temperature impacted significantly on the Cu partitioning and speciation. Both organic PVC and inorganic NaCl could chlorides copper to form volatile CuCl, as a result, it promotes Cu distribution in fly ash. The NaCl had a more significant effect than the PVC does. The combustion temperature and properties of pyrolysis and combustion of chloride affected Cu partitioning and speciation synergistically. As the temperature increased, the chlorization effect of PVC decreased, whereas the chorization effect of NaCl increased. Incineration time had apparent influence on NaCl but almost no influence on PVC. The results of SEM-EDS show that Cu is present as oxide in bottom ash with PVC addition, while with NaCl addition, Cu as oxide and chloride. The element of Cu in the fly ash is in the form of chloride in small particles.%采用热力学平衡计算和管式炉实验的方法对垃圾焚烧中氯化物对铜迁移转化特性的影响进行了研究。热力学平衡计算和实验研究结果表明,氯化物的形态、含量及焚烧温度对铜的迁移转化特性有显著影响。无论是有机PVC还是无机NaCl对铜都有氯化作用,使其生成易蒸发的CuCl,从而促进铜向飞灰中的迁移分布,NaCl的影响大于PVC。焚烧温度、氯化物的热解特性与焚烧方式协同作用影响铜的迁移转化特性,随温度升高 PVC 的氯化作用减弱而 NaCl 的作用增强。焚烧时间对 PVC 没有显著影响,对 NaCl 的影响显著。扫描电镜-能谱分析(SEM-EDS)结果显示,添加PVC时铜在底渣中以氧化物的形态存在,而添加NaCl时铜以氧化物和氯化物的形态共存,飞灰中铜

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of new Polyfunctional Molecules for Group Actinide Extraction; Synthese et evaluation de Nouvelles Molecules Polyfonctionnelles pour la Separation Groupee des Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, C.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this project is to design new extracting molecules for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In order to minimize the long-term residual radiotoxicity of the waste, the GANEX process is an option based on homogeneous recycling of actinides. All actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), present in a highly acidic aqueous solution, would be extracted together and separated from fission products (especially from lanthanides) using liquid-liquid extraction. In this context, twenty new bi-topic ligands constituted of a nitrogen poly-aromatic unit functionalized by amide groups were synthesized. Liquid-liquid extraction tests with these ligands dissolved alone in the organic phase show that N, N, N', N'-tetra-alkyl-6, 6''(2, 2':6', 2''-terpyridine)-diamides are able to selectively extract actinides at different oxidation states (Np(V et VI), U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Cm(III)) from an aqueous solution 3M HNO{sub 3}. Nevertheless, actinides(III) are poorly extracted. According to crystallographic structures of complexes with Nd(III) and U(VI) determined by X-rays diffraction, these ligands are penta-dentate. In solution (methanol), complexes stoichiometries (1:1) of Nd(III), U(VI) and Pu(IV) were determined by electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Stability constants, evaluated by UV-visible spectrophotometry in MeOH/H{sub 2}O solutions, confirm the selectivity of ligands toward actinides(III) with respect to lanthanides(III). Associate to nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory), a better knowledge of their coordination mode was achieved. (author)

  4. Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents For Cesium, Strontium and Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Nyman, M.; Clearfield, A.; Maginn, E.

    2006-06-01

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations.

  5. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  6. Heat capacities of lanthanide and actinide monazite-type ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Beridze, George; Vinograd, Victor L.; Bosbach, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    (Ln, An)xPO4 monazite-type ceramics are considered as potential matrices for the disposal of nuclear waste. In this study we computed the heat capacities and the standard entropies of these compounds using density functional perturbation theory. The calculations of lanthanide monazites agree well with the existing experimental data and provide information on the variation of the standard heat capacities and entropies along the lanthanide series. The results for AnPO4 monazites are similar to those obtained for the isoelectronic lanthanide compounds. This suggests that the missing thermodynamic data on actinide monazites could be similarly computed or assessed based on the properties of their lanthanide analogs. However, the computed heat capacity of PuPO4 appear to be significantly lower than the measured data. We argue that this discrepancy might indicate potential problems with the existing experimental data or with their interpretation. This shows a need for further experimental studies of the heat capacities of actinide-bearing, monazite-type ceramics.

  7. Actinides transmutation - a comparison of results for PWR benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: luizhenu@ieav.cta.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical aspects involved in the Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) generated by reactors PWR are of great interest in the nuclear industry. Besides these the reduction in the storage of radioactive wastes are related with the acceptability of the nuclear electric power. From the several concepts for partitioning and transmutation suggested in literature, one of them involves PWR reactors to burn the fuel containing plutonium and minor actinides reprocessed of UO{sub 2} used in previous stages. In this work are presented the results of the calculations of a benchmark in P and T carried with WIMSD5B program using its new cross sections library generated from the ENDF-B-VII and the comparison with the results published in literature by other calculations. For comparison, was used the benchmark transmutation concept based in a typical PWR cell and the analyzed results were the k{infinity} and the atomic density of the isotopes Np-239, Pu-241, Pu-242 and Am-242m, as function of burnup considering discharge of 50 GWd/tHM. (author)

  8. Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation using an electron accelerator in order to quantify actinides in encapsulated radioactive wastes; Double interrogation simultanee neutrons et photons utilisant un accelerateur d'electrons pour la caracterisation separee des actinides dans les dechets radioactifs enrobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jallu, F

    1999-09-24

    Measuring out alpha emitters, such as ({sup 234,235,236,238}U {sup 238,239,240,242,}2{sup 44P}u, {sup 237}Np {sup 241,243}Am...), in solid radioactive waste, allows us to quantify the alpha activity in a drum and then to classify it. The SIMPHONIE (SIMultaneous PHOton and Neutron Interrogation Experiment) method, developed in this Ph.D. work, combines both the Active Neutron Interrogation and the Induced Photofission Interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify in only one measurement, fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239,241}Pu...) and fertile ({sup 236,238}U, {sup 238,240}Pu...) elements separately. In the first chapter of this Ph.D. report, we present the principle of the Radioactive Waste Management in France. The second chapter deals with the physical properties of neutron fission and of photofission. These two nuclear reactions are the basis of the SIMPHONIE method. Moreover, one of our purposes was to develop the ELEPHANT (ELEctron PHoton And Neutron Transport) code in view to simulate the electron, photon and neutron transport, including the ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n) and ({gamma}, f) photonuclear reactions that are not taken into account in the MCNP4 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code. The simulation codes developed and used in this work are detailed in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter gives the experimental results of SIMPHONIE obtained by using the DGA/ETCA electron linear accelerators located at Arcueil, France. Fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu) and fertile ({sup 238}U) samples were studied. Furthermore, comparisons between experimental results and calculated data of photoneutron production in tungsten, copper, praseodymium and beryllium by using an electron LINear Accelerator (LINAC) are given. This allows us to evaluate the validity degree of the ELEPHANT code, and finally the feasibility of the SIMPHONIE method. (author)

  9. Arsenic mobility and speciation in a contaminated urban soil are affected by different methods of green waste compost application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, William; Dickinson, Nicholas M; Riby, Philip; Leese, Elizabeth; Morton, Jackie; Lepp, Nicholas W

    2010-12-01

    Application of green waste compost (GWC) to brownfield land is now common practice in soil restoration. However, previous studies have demonstrated both beneficial and detrimental effects on arsenic and metal mobility. In this paper, trace element behaviour was investigated following GWC application, either as surface mulch to, or mixed into soil from a previously described brownfield site in the U.K. Significant differences in arsenic mobility were observed between treatments. Mulching caused most disturbance, significantly increasing soil pore water As, together with Fe, P, Cr, Ni and dissolved organic carbon, the latter was a critical factor enhancing As mobilization. Arsenate was the main inorganic As species in soil pore water, increasing in concentration over time. An initial flush of potentially more toxic arsenite decreased 4 weeks after compost application. Biological processes appeared to play an important role in influencing As mobility. The results point to the necessity for careful management of As-contaminated soils.

  10. AMS of actinides in groundwater: development of a new procedure for trace analysis of Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Francesca; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Schaefer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), Hermann-von Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In order to assess the actinides contamination in groundwater, their geochemistry is intensely studied in field and laboratory experiments focusing on speciation and ways of transport through the aquifers. A challenge lies in the analysis of actinides below ppq levels. We present a new analytical protocol suited to the measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry of Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotopes without previous chemical separation from each other. The actinides are quantitatively co-precipitated with Fe-hydroxide from the groundwater specimens. This procedure allows the pre-concentration of the actinides from the bulk elements and their incorporation into a sample matrix suited to the AMS measurements. The chemical yield of the co-precipitation is estimated measuring samples with suitable spikes by HR ICP-MS. At the AMS sytem: (a) the ionization yield of Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the given sample matrix, (b) the maximum number of nuclides per sample allowing detection limits below 0.01 ppq, and (c) the influence of the laboratory background on the results, are determined.

  11. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectrus...

  12. Arsenic speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting results of synchrotron data to determine arsenic speciation in soil samples. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  13. Radionuclide-Chelating Agent Complexes in Low-Level Radioactive Decontamination Waste; Stability, Adsorption and Transport Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Cantrell, Cantrell J.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Orr, Robert D.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2002-02-01

    Speciation calculations were done to determine whether organic complexants facilitate transport of radionuclides leached from waste buried in soils. EDTA readily mobilizes divalent transition metals and moderately impacts trivalent actinides. Picolinate readily mobilizes only Ni2+ and Co2+. These speciation predictions ignore the influence of soil adsorption and biodegradation that break apart the complexes. In adsorption studies, picolinate concentrations have to be >10-4 M to lower the adsorption of Ni and Co. For Sm(III), Th(IV), Np(V), U(VI), and Pu, the picolinate concentration must be >10-3 M before adsorption decreases. EDTA forms strong complexes with divalent transition metals and can stop adsorption of Ni and Co when EDTA solution concentrations are 10-5 M. EDTA complexes with Np(V), U(VI), and Pu are much weaker; EDTA concentrations would have to be >10-3 M to adversely effects non-transition metal/radionuclide adsorption. Most picolinate and ETDA-metal complexes appear to readily dissociate during interactions with soils. The enhanced migration of radionuclide-organic complexes may be limited to a few unique conditions. We recommend that mixtures of metal/radionuclides and EDTA should not be solidified or co-disposed with high pH materials such as cement. For weaker binding organic complexants, such as picolinate, citrate and oxalate, co-disposal of decontamination wastes and concrete should be acceptable.

  14. What Is Speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B Jesse; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, James

    2016-03-01

    Concepts and definitions of species have been debated by generations of biologists and remain controversial. Microbes pose a particular challenge because of their genetic diversity, asexual reproduction, and often promiscuous horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, microbes also present an opportunity to study and understand speciation because of their rapid evolution, both in nature and in the lab, and small, easily sequenced genomes. Here, we review how microbial population genomics has enabled us to catch speciation "in the act" and how the results have challenged and enriched our concepts of species, with implications for all domains of life. We describe how recombination (including HGT and introgression) has shaped the genomes of nascent microbial, animal, and plant species and argue for a prominent role of natural selection in initiating and maintaining speciation. We ask how universal is the process of speciation across the tree of life, and what lessons can be drawn from microbes? Comparative genomics showing the extent of HGT in natural populations certainly jeopardizes the relevance of vertical descent (i.e., the species tree) in speciation. Nevertheless, we conclude that species do indeed exist as clusters of genetic and ecological similarity and that speciation is driven primarily by natural selection, regardless of the balance between horizontal and vertical descent.

  15. Parallel Ecological Speciation in Plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Ostevik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Populations that have independently evolved reproductive isolation from their ancestors while remaining reproductively cohesive have undergone parallel speciation. A specific type of parallel speciation, known as parallel ecological speciation, is one of several forms of evidence for ecology's role in speciation. In this paper we search the literature for candidate examples of parallel ecological speciation in plants. We use four explicit criteria (independence, isolation, compatibility, and selection to judge the strength of evidence for each potential case. We find that evidence for parallel ecological speciation in plants is unexpectedly scarce, especially relative to the many well-characterized systems in animals. This does not imply that ecological speciation is uncommon in plants. It only implies that evidence from parallel ecological speciation is rare. Potential explanations for the lack of convincing examples include a lack of rigorous testing and the possibility that plants are less prone to parallel ecological speciation than animals.

  16. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  17. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  18. Facilities for preparing actinide or fission product-based targets

    CERN Document Server

    Sors, M

    1999-01-01

    Research and development work is currently in progress in France on the feasibility of transmutation of very long-lived radionuclides such as americium, blended with an inert medium such as magnesium oxide and pelletized for irradiation in a fast neutron reactor. The process is primarily designed to produce ceramics for nuclear reactors, but could also be used to produce targets for accelerators. The Actinide Development Laboratory is part of the ATALANTE complex at Marcoule, where the CEA investigates reprocessing, liquid and solid waste treatment and vitrification processes. The laboratory produces radioactive sources; after use, their constituents are recycled, notably through R and D programs requiring such materials. Recovered americium is purified, characterized and transformed for an experiment known as ECRIX, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating americium-based ceramics and to determine the reactor transmutation coefficients.

  19. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides; Chimie des phosphates d'actinides tetravalents. Le phosphate-diphosphate de thorium en tant que matrice d'imobilisation des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N

    2002-07-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  20. Geomycology: metals, actinides and biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Geoffrey Michael; Rhee, Young Joon; Stephenson, Karen; Wei, Zhan

    2012-06-01

    Geomycology can be simply defined as 'the scientific study of the roles of fungi in processes of fundamental importance to geology' and the biogeochemical importance of fungi is significant in several key areas. These include nutrient and element cycling, rock and mineral transformations, bioweathering, mycogenic biomineral formation and interactions of fungi with clay minerals and metals. Such processes can occur in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, but it is in the terrestrial environment where fungi probably have the greatest geochemical influence. Of special significance are the mutualistic relationships with phototrophic organisms, lichens (algae, cyanobacteria) and mycorrhizas (plants). Central to many geomycological processes are transformations of metals and minerals, and fungi possess a variety of properties that can effect changes in metal speciation, toxicity and mobility, as well as mineral formation or mineral dissolution or deterioration. Some fungal transformations have beneficial applications in environmental biotechnology, e.g. in metal and radionuclide leaching, recovery, detoxification and bioremediation, and in the production or deposition of biominerals or metallic elements with catalytic or other properties. Metal and mineral transformations may also result in adverse effects when these processes result in spoilage and destruction of natural and synthetic materials, rock and mineral-based building materials (e.g. concrete), acid mine drainage and associated metal pollution, biocorrosion of metals, alloys and related substances, and adverse effects on radionuclide speciation, mobility and containment. The ubiquity and importance of fungi in biosphere processes underlines the importance of geomycology as an interdisciplinary subject area within microbiology and mycology. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Dissolved phosphorus speciation of flash carbonization, slow pyrolysis, and fast pyrolysis biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of waste biomass is a promising technology to produce sterile and renewable organic phosphorus fertilizers. Systematic studies are necessary to understand how different pyrolysis platforms influence the chemical speciation of dissolved (bioavailable) phosphorus. This study employed solut...

  2. Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolin Hou

    2008-11-15

    This project started in November 2005 and ended in November 2008, the work and research approaches are summarized in this report. This project studied the speciation of radionuclides in environment. A number of speciation analytical methods are developed for determination of species of 129I, 99Tc, isotopes of Pu, and 237Np in seawater, fresh water, soil, sediment, vegetations, and concrete. The developed methods are used for the investigation of the chemical speciation of these radionuclides as well as their environmental behaviours, especially in Danish environment. In addition the speciation of Pu isotopes in waste samples from the decommissioning of Danish nuclear facilities is also investigated. The report summarizes these works completed in this project. Through this research project, a number of research papers have been published in the scientific journals, the research results has also been presented in the Nordic and international conference/meeting and communicated to international colleagues. Some publications are also enclosed to this report. (au)

  3. Reduction of minor actinides for recycling in a light water reactor; Reduccion de actinidos menores por reciclado en un reactor de agua ligera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of actinide transmutation from spent nuclear fuel is the reduction in mass of high-level waste which must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high-level waste; these two achievements will reduce the number of repositories needed, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which the minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm) could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; a reference of actinides production in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR is first established, after a design of fuel rod containing 6% of minor actinides in a matrix of uranium from the enrichment lines is proposed, then 4 fuel rods of standard uranium are replaced by 4 actinides bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of them and finally the minor actinides reduction in the fuel is evaluated. In the development of this work the calculation tool are the codes: Intrepin-3, Casmo-4 and Simulate-3. (Author)

  4. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Asif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor. For this purpose, the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation and depletion code, KORIGEN, has been modified accordingly. An entirely novel fission product yields library for fast reactors has been created which has replaced the old KORIGEN fission products library. For the purposes of this study, the standard 26 groups data set, KFKINR, developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has been extended by the addition of the cross-sections of 13 important actinides and 68 most important fission products. It has been confirmed that these 68 fission products constitute about 95% of the total fission products yield and about 99.5% of the total absorption due to fission products in fast reactors. The amount of fissile material required to guarantee the criticality of the reactor during recycling schemes has also been investigated. Cumulative high active waste per ton of initial heavy metal is also calculated. Results show that the recycling of actinides and fission products in fast reactors through the atomics international reduction oxidation process results in a reduction of the potential hazard of radioactive waste.

  5. Study of the {sup 60}Co speciation in the aqueous radioactive waste of the la Hague nuclear reprocessing plant; environmental behaviour after discharges in the waters of the channel; Etude de la speciation du {sup 60}Co dans les effluents de l'usine de retraitement de combustibles irradies de la Hague; devenir apres rejet dans les eaux de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudaire, J.M

    1999-07-01

    {sup 60}Co is produced as an activation product and is present in the low-level aqueous radioactive waste released from the La Hague plant. At present, the concentration in the sea (non filtered at 0.45 {mu}m) at the Goury site are close to or even below, the detection limit: 0.2 mBq.l{sup -1}. The {sup 60}Co speciation depends on the type of effluent considered: in the effluent A ('active'), the cobalt is in the form of a stable trivalent complex; in the effluent V (to be checked), the cobalt is in majority (50% of the activity release) in the form of particles (>0.45 {mu}m), and then in the form of two soluble species: ionic divalent (Co{sup 2+}) and some stable complexes. The evolution of the reprocessing techniques used does not affect the speciation. So, since the nuclear reprocessing plant started at the La Hague plant in 1966, the chemical species discharged in the sea shows time variation related to the evolution of the type of effluent discharged. Thus, since 1994, the particles of cobalt are the main species discharged in the Channel (the V effluents represent more than 85% of the total {sup 60}Co activity released). The effect of instantaneous dilution into the marine conditions involving a variation of pH, oxido-reduction, ionic strength, a gradient of salinity, does not interfere with the evolution of the chemical species discharged. Nevertheless, during the discharge of the V effluent, the main constituents of the sea water (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) go through a precipitation. This comes with the coprecipitation of the ion Co{sup 2+} and with the particles of cobalt (complexes are not affected), and it can be responsible for an increase in the concentration in the particles. The chemical behaviour of the cobalt in the Channel is different from those of conservative element such as antimony. The ionic cobalt and the particles have a small dispersion in the water (cobalt has a very high particle/dissolved distribution factor, it is a non

  6. Conceptual study of fusion-driven system for nuclear waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B.G., E-mail: bghong@jbnu.ac.kr

    2014-10-15

    A conceptual study of a fusion-driven system for nuclear waste transmutation using a low aspect ratio (LAR) tokamak as a neutron source is performed. A configuration of the LAR tokamak neutron source optimised with respect to both transmutation rate and the tritium breeding ratio for aspect ratio A in the range of 1.5–2.0 is found. The transmutation characteristics of both transuranic actinides and minor actinides are investigated and compared. When the transuranic actinides are loaded in the blanket, the neutron multiplication factor decreases from its initial value, k{sub eff} = 0.95, but with the minor actinides loaded in the blanket, the neutron multiplication factor shows a peak value during burn-up. The peak value can be controlled by adjusting the blanket dimensions. To transmute the nuclear waste effectively, an equilibrium fuel cycle is developed for both transuranic actinide and minor actinide transmutation.

  7. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...... LMTO electronic structure calculations is introduced. In this model the spd and 5f electronic contributions are treated as separable entities. It is shown that the model reproduces quite well the results from the full treatment. The equilibrium volume, cohesive energy and bulk modulus are calculated...

  8. Habitat Choice and Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E. Webster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of habitat choice in reproductive isolation and ecological speciation has often been overlooked, despite acknowledgement of its ability to facilitate local adaptation. It can form part of the speciation process through various evolutionary mechanisms, yet where habitat choice has been included in models of ecological speciation little thought has been given to these underlying mechanisms. Here, we propose and describe three independent criteria underlying ten different evolutionary scenarios in which habitat choice may promote or maintain local adaptation. The scenarios are the result of all possible combinations of the independent criteria, providing a conceptual framework in which to discuss examples which illustrate each scenario. These examples show that the different roles of habitat choice in ecological speciation have rarely been effectively distinguished. Making such distinctions is an important challenge for the future, allowing better experimental design, stronger inferences and more meaningful comparisons among systems. We show some of the practical difficulties involved by reviewing the current evidence for the role of habitat choice in local adaptation and reproductive isolation in the intertidal gastropod Littorina saxatilis, a model system for the study of ecological speciation, assessing whether any of the proposed scenarios can be reliably distinguished, given current research.

  9. Iron (III) Matrix Effects on Mineralization and Immobilization of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia-May S. Gong; Tyler A. Sullens; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - A number of models for the Yucca Mountain Project nuclear waste repository use studies of actinide sorption onto well-defined iron hydroxide materials. In the case of a waste containment leak, however, a complex interaction between dissolved waste forms and failed containment vessel components can lead to immediate precipitation of migratory iron and uranyl in the silicate rich near-field environment. Use of the Fe(III) and UO22+ complexing agent acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) as a colorimetric agent for visible spectrophotometry is well-known. Using the second derivative of these spectra a distinct shift in iron complexation in the presence of silicate is seen that is not seen with uranyl or alone. Silica also decreases the ability of uranyl and ferric solutions to absorb hydroxide, hastening precipitation. These ferric silicate precipitates are highly amorphous and soluble. Precipitates formed in the presence of uranyl below ~1 mol% exhibit lower solubility than precipitates from up to 50 mol % and of uranyl silicates alone.

  10. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  11. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  12. The 'granite encapsulation' route to the safe disposal of Pu and other actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibb, F.G.F. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.gibb@sheffield.ac.uk; Taylor, K.J. [Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Burakov, B.E. [Laboratory of Applied Mineralogy and Radiogeochemistry, V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2008-03-15

    Waste actinides, including plutonium, present a long-term management problem and a serious security issue. Immobilisation in mineral or ceramic waste forms for interim storage is a widely proposed first step. The safest, most secure geological disposal for Pu is in very deep boreholes and we propose that the key step to combination of these immobilisation and disposal concepts is encapsulation of the waste form in cylinders of recrystallized granite. We discuss the underpinning science, focusing on experimental work, and consider implementation. Finally, we present and discuss analyses of zircon, UO{sub 2} and Ce-doped cubic zirconia from high pressure and temperature experiments in granitic melts that demonstrate the viability of this solution and that actinides can be isolated from the environment for millions, maybe hundreds of millions, of years.

  13. Utilization of Minor Actinides as a Fuel Component for Ultra-Long Life Bhr Configurations: Designs, Advantages and Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov

    2009-05-20

    This project assessed the advantages and limitations of using minor actinides as a fuel component to achieve ultra-long life Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) configurations. Researchers considered and compared the capabilities of pebble-bed and prismatic core designs with advanced actinide fuels to achieve ultra-long operation without refueling. Since both core designs permit flexibility in component configuration, fuel utilization, and fuel management, it is possible to improve fissile properties of minor actinides by neutron spectrum shifting through configuration adjustments. The project studied advanced actinide fuels, which could reduce the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository and enable recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The ultra-long core life autonomous approach may reduce the technical need for additional repositories and is capable to improve marketability of the Generation IV VHTR by allowing worldwide deployment, including remote regions and regions with limited industrial resources. Utilization of minor actinides in nuclear reactors facilitates developments of new fuel cycles towards sustainable nuclear energy scenarios.

  14. Speciation and bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, M V; Livshits, M A

    1989-01-01

    The interrelations of physics and biology are discussed. It is shown that Darwin can be considered as one of the founders of the important field of contemporary physics called physics of dissipative structures or synergetics. The theories of gradual and punctual evolution are presented. The contradiction between these theories can be solved on the basis of molecular theory of evolution and on the basis of the phenomenological physical treatment. The general physical properties of living systems, considered as open systems being far from equilibrium, are listed and simple non-linear mathematical models describing gradual and punctual speciation are suggested. The usual pictures which present these two kinds of speciation can possess physico-mathematical sense. Punctuated speciation means bifurcation, a kind of non-equilibrium phase transition.

  15. Actinide ion extraction using room temperature ionic liquids: opportunities and challenges for nuclear fuel cycle applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Studies on the extraction of actinide ions from radioactive feeds have great relevance in nuclear fuel cycle activities, mainly in the back end processes focused on reprocessing and waste management. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction vis-à-vis molecular diluents, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By the suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids, their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered key parameters in metal ion extraction. Aqueous solubility of the RTILs, which can lead to significant loss in the solvent inventory, can be avoided by appending the extractant moieties onto the ionic liquid. While the low vapour pressure and non-flammability of the ionic liquids make them appear as 'green' diluents, their aqueous solubility raises concerns of environmental hazards. The present article gives a summary of studies carried out on actinide ion extraction and presents perspectives of its applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. The article discusses various extractants used for actinide ion extraction and at many places, comparison is made vis-à-vis molecular diluents which includes the nature of the extracted species and the mechanism of extraction. Results of studies on rare earth elements are also included in view of their similarities with the trivalent minor actinides.

  16. The effects of actinide based fuels on incremental cross sections in a Candu reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morreale, A.C.; Ball, M.R.; Novog, D.R.; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: morreaac@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ballmr@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: novog@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel such as the extraction of actinide materials for use in mixed oxide fuels is a key component of reducing the end waste from nuclear power plant operations. Using recycled spent fuels in current reactors is becoming a popular option to help close the fuel cycle. In order to ensure safe and consistent operations in existing facilities, the properties of these fuels must be compatible with current reactor designs. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU reactor. Specifically, the effect of this fuel design on the incremental cross sections related to the use of adjuster rods is investigated. The actinide concentrations studied in this work were based on extraction from thirty year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium to yield a MOX fuel of 4.75% actinide by weight. The incremental cross sections were calculated using the DRAGON neutron transport code. The results for the actinide fuel were compared to those for standard natural uranium fuel and for a slightly enriched (1% U-235) fuel designed to reduce void reactivity. Adjuster reactivity effect calculations and void reactivity simulations were also performed. The impact of the adjuster on reactivity decreased by as much as 56% with TRUMOX fuel while the CVR was reduced by 71% due to the addition of central burnable poison. The incremental cross sections were largely affected by the use of the TRUMOX fuel primarily due to its increased level of fissile material (five times that of NU). The largest effects are in the thermal neutron group where the Σ{sub T} value is increased by 46.7%, the Σ{sub ny)} values increased by 13.0% and 9.9%. The value associated with thermal fission, υΣ{sub f}, increased by 496.6% over regular natural uranium which is expected due to the much higher reactivity of the fuel. (author)

  17. LINKING WATERFOWL WITH CONTAMINANT SPECIATION IN RIPARIAN SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 38, Linking Waterfowl with Contaminant Speciation in Riparian Soils, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U...

  18. How does climate influence speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xia; Wiens, John J

    2013-07-01

    Variation in climatic conditions over space and time is thought to be an important driver of speciation. However, the role of climate has not been explored in the theoretical literature on speciation, and the theory underlying empirical studies of climate and speciation has come largely from informal, verbal models. In this study, we develop a quantitative model to test a relatively new but theoretically untested model of speciation (speciation via niche conservatism) and to examine the climatic conditions under which speciation via niche conservatism and speciation via niche divergence are most plausible. Our results have three broad implications for the study of speciation: (1) ecological similarity over time (niche conservatism) can be an important part of speciation, despite the traditional emphasis on ecological divergence, (2) long-term directional climate change promotes speciation via niche conservatism for species with low climatic-niche lability, whereas climatic oscillations promote speciation via niche divergence for species with high climatic-niche lability, and (3) population extinction can be a key component of speciation.

  19. Advanced techniques in actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2014). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    In 2012, The Institute of Resource Ecology at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf organized the first international workshop of Advanced Techniques in Actinide Spectroscopy (ATAS). A very positive feedback and the wish for a continuation of the workshop were communicated from several participants to the scientific committee during the workshop and beyond. Today, the ATAS workshop has been obviously established as an international forum for the exchange of progress and new experiences on advanced spectroscopic techniques for international actinide and lanthanide research. In comparison to already established workshops and conferences on the field of radioecology, one main focus of ATAS is to generate synergistic effects and to improve the scientific discussion between spectroscopic experimentalists and theoreticians. The exchange of ideas in particular between experimental and theoretical applications in spectroscopy and the presentation of new analytical techniques are of special interest for many research institutions working on the improvement of transport models of toxic elements in the environment and the food chain as well as on reprocessing technologies of nuclear and non-nuclear waste. Spectroscopic studies in combination with theoretical modelling comprise the exploration of molecular mechanisms of complexation processes in aqueous or organic phases and of sorption reactions of the contaminants on mineral surfaces to obtain better process understanding on a molecular level. As a consequence, predictions of contaminant's migration behaviour will become more reliable and precise. This can improve the monitoring and removal of hazardous elements from the environment and hence, will assist strategies for remediation technologies and risk assessment. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of the first inter-laboratory Round-Robin test on actinide spectroscopy (RRT). The main goal of RRT is the comprehensive molecular analysis of the actinide

  20. Transmuting minor actinides with thermal reactor neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A Kazansky

    2015-11-01

    The final conclusion about the practicability of Americium and Curium transmutation must be drawn by taking into account in the considered scenarios the difference in probability of the environmental release, the difference of biological effect and the transmutation efficiency of minor actinides continuously fed to spent fuel storages by the operating nuclear energy industry.

  1. Actinide valences in xenotime and monazite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, E.R. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Zhang, Y., E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); McLeod, T.; Davis, J. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001 Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-02-28

    Tetravalent U, Np and Pu can be substituted by ceramic methods into the rare earth site of xenotime and monazite in air atmospheres using Ca ions as charge compensators, while no evidence of penta- or hexavalent actinide ions was found. Some Pu{sup 3+} and Np{sup 3+} can be incorporated in xenotime samples fired in a reducing atmosphere.

  2. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  3. Scalar Static Polarizabilities of Lanthanides and Actinides

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2014-01-01

    We calculate scalar static polarizabilities for lanthanides and actinides, the atoms with open $4f$ or $5f$ subshell. We show that polarizabilities of the low states are approximately the same for all states of given configuration and present a way of calculating them reducing valence space to just two or three valence electrons occupying $6s$ and $5d$ states for lanthanides or $7s$ and $6d$ states for actinides while $4f$ and $5f$ states are considered to be in the core. Configuration interaction technique is used to calculate polarizabilities of lanthanides and actinides for all states of the $4f^n6s^2$ and $4f^{n-1}6s^25d$ configurations of lanthanides and all states of the $5f^{n}7s^2$ and $5f^{n-1}7s^26d$ configurations of actinides. Polarizability of the electron core (including f-orbitals) has been calculated in the RPA approximation.

  4. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, R.J., E-mail: Jack.Cornett@uottawa.ca [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kazi, Z.H. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Chartrand, M.G. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Charles, R.J.; Kieser, W.E. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF{sub 3}. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF{sub 3} precipitates were diluted about 6–8 fold with PbF{sub 2}. The measured concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  5. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda‐Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near‐neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical characteristics of these colloids and the potential implication for their environmental behavior. The binary oxyhydroxy silicate colloids of AnIV could be potentially more mobile as a waterborne species than the well‐known mono‐component oxyhydroxide colloids. PMID:27957406

  6. Actinide neutron induced cross section measurements using the oscillation technique in the Minerve reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, B.; Leconte, P.; Gruel, A.; Antony, M.; Di-Salvo, J.; Hudelot, J.P.; Pepino, A.; Lecluze, A. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC/LEPh, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    CEA is deeply involved research programs concerning nuclear fuel advanced studies (actinides, plutonium), waste management, the scientific and technical support of French PWR reactors and EPR reactor, and innovative systems. In this framework, specific neutron integral experiments have been carried out in the critical ZPR (zero power reactor) facilities of the CEA at Cadarache such as MINERVE, EOLE and MASURCA. This paper deals with MINERVE Pool Reactor experiments. MINERVE is mainly devoted to neutronics studies of different reactor core types. The aim is to improve the knowledge of the integral absorption cross sections of actinides (OSMOSE program), of new absorbers (OCEAN program) and also for fission Products (CBU program) in thermal, epithermal and fast neutron spectra. (authors)

  7. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, Charu L., E-mail: dubecharu@gmail.com; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses is simulated by employing ion irradiation technique. • FTIR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm modification of glass network. • The depolymerisation of glass network after irradiation is attributed to synergetic effect of nuclear and electronic losses. - Abstract: A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  8. Engineering test plan for US/UK higher actinides irradiations tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, J A

    1981-03-01

    The objective of the Higher Actinides Irradiations Program is to verify the neutronic and irradiation performance of americium and curium oxides in a fast reactor. The data obtained from the irradiation will be used to assess the basic neutronics parameters for actinide elements and determine the irradiation potential of the oxides of {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm. This information has application in breeder reactor physics, fuel cycle analysis and assessment of waste management options. The irradiation test program is a cooperative effort wherein the US is supplying the completed irradiation test pins, while the UK will perform the irradiation in their Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). Postirradiation examination and data analyses will be conducted on a cooperative basis, with some examinations performed in the UK and others in the US. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Lanthanides and actinides extraction by calixarenes containing CMPO groups; Extraction des lanthanides et des actinides au moyen de calixarenes portant des groupements CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Carrera, A

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of the French program SPIN concerning the radioactive waste management, researches are performed to develop processes allowing the separation of long-lived radioisotopes in order to their transmutation or their specific conditioning. These studies deal with the extraction and the separation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in acid solution. Many systems ''calixarene-diluent-aqueous phase'' are examined by extraction liquid-liquid and membrane transport. The extraction efficiency and the selectivity of the synthesized calixarene-CMPO and of the CMPO are compared with these cations, as the nitric acid extraction by these molecules. (A.L.B.)

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-30

    We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

  11. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, M. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, J. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  12. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  13. Criticality investigations for the fixed bed nuclear reactor using thorium fuel mixed with plutonium or minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Beykoz Lojistik Meslek Yueksekokulu, Beykoz, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: sumer@gazi.edu.tr; Sahin, Haci Mehmet; Acir, Adem [Beykoz Lojistik Meslek Yueksekokulu, Istanbul (Turkey); Al-Kusayer, Tawfik Ahmed [King Saud University, College of Engineering, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-08-15

    Prospective fuels for a new reactor type, the so called fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) are investigated with respect to reactor criticality. These are (1) low enriched uranium (LEU); (2) weapon grade plutonium + ThO{sub 2}; (3) reactor grade plutonium + ThO{sub 2}; and (4) minor actinides in the spent fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) + ThO{sub 2}. Reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides are considered as highly radio-active and radio-toxic nuclear waste products so that one can expect that they will have negative fuel costs. The criticality calculations are conducted with SCALE5.1 using S{sub 8}-P{sub 3} approximation in 238 neutron energy groups with 90 groups in thermal energy region. The study has shown that the reactor criticality has lower values with uranium fuel and increases passing to minor actinides, reactor grade plutonium and weapon grade plutonium. Using LEU, an enrichment grade of 9% has resulted with k{sub eff} = 1.2744. Mixed fuel with weapon grade plutonium made of 20% PuO{sub 2} + 80% ThO{sub 2} yields k{sub eff} = 1.2864. Whereas a mixed fuel with reactor grade plutonium made of 35% PuO{sub 2} + 65% ThO{sub 2} brings it to k{sub eff} = 1.267. Even the very hazardous nuclear waste of LWRs, namely minor actinides turn out to be high quality nuclear fuel due to the excellent neutron economy of FBNR. A relatively high reactor criticality of k{sub eff} = 1.2673 is achieved by 50% MAO{sub 2} + 50% ThO{sub 2}. The hazardous actinide nuclear waste products can be transmuted and utilized as fuel in situ. A further output of the study is the possibility of using thorium as breeding material in combination with these new alternative fuels.

  14. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form

  15. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  16. ENHANCING ADVANCED CANDU PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FUEL WITH MINOR ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray S. Chang

    2010-05-01

    The advanced nuclear system will significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. Minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality assessed. The concept of MARA, significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance.

  17. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  18. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  19. Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

  20. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassayre, L.; Souček, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2011-07-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl 3. A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl 3 alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl 2/UAl 3 molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6. The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 °C.

  1. Actinide Isotopes for the Synthesis of Superheavy Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Dean, D. J.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2014-09-01

    Recent research resulting in the synthesis of isotopes of new elements 113-118 has demonstrated the importance of actinide targets in superheavy element research. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has unique facilities for the production and processing of actinide target materials, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). These facilities have provided actinide target materials that have been used for the synthesis of all superheavy (SHE) elements above Copernicium (element 112). In this paper, the use of actinide targets for SHE research and discovery is described, including recent results for element 117 using 249Bk target material from ORNL. ORNL actinide capabilities are reviewed, including production and separation/purification, availabilities of actinide materials, and future opportunities including novel target materials such as 251Cf.

  2. Redox speciation of final repository relevant elements using separation methods in combination with ICP mass spectrometry; Redoxspeziation von endlagerrelevanten Elementen mit Hilfe von Trennmethoden gekoppelt an ein Massenspektrometer mit induktiv gekoppeltem Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graser, Carl-Heinrich

    2015-12-18

    The long-term safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories requires a detailed understanding of the chemistry of actinide elements in the geosphere. The development of advanced analytical tools is required to gain detailed insights into actinide redox speciation in a given system. The mobility of radionuclides is mostly determined by the geochemical conditions which control the redox state of radionuclides. Besides the longlived radionuclides plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np), which are key elements in high level nuclear waste, iron (Fe) represents a main component in natural systems controlling redox related geochemical processes. Analytical techniques for determining oxidation state distribution for redox sensitive radionuclides and other metal ions often have a lack of sensitivity. The detection limits of these methods (i.e. UV/vis, TRLFS, XANES) are in general in the range of ≥ 10{sup -6} mol.L{sup -1}. As a consequence ultrasensitive new analytical techniques are required. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) are powerful separation methods for metal ions. In the course of this thesis different speciation method for iron, neptunium and plutonium were optimized. With the optimized setup redox speciation analysis of these elements in different samples were done. Furthermore CE hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (CE - ICP - SF - MS) was used to measure the redox speciation of Pu (III, IV, V, VI), Np (IV, V, VI) and Fe (II, III) at concentrations lower than 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1}. CE coupling and separation parameters such as sample gas pressure, make up flow rate, capillary position, auxiliary gas flow, as well as the electrolyte system were optimized to obtain the maximum sensitivity. The methodes detection limits are 10{sup -12} mol.L{sup -1} for Np and Pu. The various oxidation state species of Pu and Np in different samples were separated by application of an acetate based electrolyte system

  3. Seventeen-coordinate actinide helium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-12

    The geometries and electronic structures of molecular ions featuring He atoms complexed to actinide cations are explored computationally using density functional and coupled cluster theories. A new record coordination number is established, as AcHe{sub 17}{sup 3+}, ThHe{sub 17}{sup 4+}, and PaHe{sub 17}{sup 4+} are all found to be true geometric minima, with the He atoms clearly located in the first shell around the actinide. Analysis of AcHe{sub n}{sup 3+} (n=1-17) using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) confirms these systems as having closed shell, charge-induced dipole bonding. Excellent correlations (R{sup 2}>0.95) are found between QTAIM metrics (bond critical point electron densities and delocalization indices) and the average Ac-He distances, and also with the incremental He binding energies. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  5. Modelling bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A central problem in understanding bacterial speciation is how clusters of closely related strains emerge and persist in the face of recombination. We use a neutral Fisher–Wright model in which genotypes, defined by the alleles at 140 house-keeping loci, change in each generation by mutation or recombination, and examine conditions in which an initially uniform population gives rise to resolved clusters. Where recombination occurs at equal frequency between all members of the population, we o...

  6. Preparation, properties, and some recent studies of the actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The actinide elements form a unique series of metals. The variation in their physial properties combined with the varying availability of the different elements offers a challenge to the preparative scientist. This article provides a brief review of selected methods used for preparing ..mu..g to kg amounts of the actinide metals and the properties of these metals. In addition, some recent studies on selected actinide metals are discussed. 62 refs.

  7. SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR THE ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Smith, William L.; Weitl, Frederick L.; Durbin, Patricia W.; Jones, E.Sarah; Abu-Dari, Kamal; Sofen, Stephen R.; Cooper, Stephen R.

    1979-09-01

    This paper summarizes the current status of a continuing project directed toward the synthesis and characterization of chelating agents which are specific for actinide ions - especially Pu(IV) - using a biomimetic approach that relies on the observation that Pu(IV) and Fe(III) has marked similarities that include their biological transport and distribution in mammals. Since the naturally-occurring Fe(III) sequestering agents produced by microbes commonly contain hydroxamate and catecholate functional groups, these groups should complex the actinides very strongly and macrocyclic ligands incorporating these moieties are being prepared. We have reported the isolation and structure analysis of an isostructural series of tetrakis(catecholato) complexes with the general stoichiometry Na{sub 4}[M(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 4}] • 21 H{sub 2}O (M = Th, U, Ce, Hf). These complexes are structural archetypes for the cavity that must be formed if an actinide-specific sequestering agent is to conform ideally to the coordination requirements of the central metal ion. The [M(cat){sub 4}]{sup 4-} complexes have the D{sub 2d} symmetry of the trigonal-faced dodecahedron.. The complexes Th [R'C(0)N(O)R]{sub 4} have been prepared where R = isopropyl and R' = t-butyl or neopentyl. The neopentyl derivative is also relatively close to an idealized D{sub 2d} dodecahedron, while the sterically more hindered t-butyl compound is distorted toward a cubic geometry. The synthesis of a series of 2, 3-dihydroxy-benzoyl amide derivatives of linear and cyclic tetraaza- and diazaalkanes is reported. Sulfonation of these compounds improves the metal complexation and in vivo removal of plutonium from test animals. These results substantially exceed the capabilities of compounds presently used for the therapeutic treatment of actinide contamination.

  8. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    In this method, the powdered material is placed in a solution which contains extremely powerful mineralizers , such as cesium fluoride for actinide...environmentally triggered background counts and it subtends a very small solid angle with respect to the detector. Thus, the benefit of the lead sheet outweighs...low electron density. This is mainly a property of their atomic makeup , though the microstructure of the paper is porous as well. In addition, a

  9. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  10. Aggression patterns and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, E; Naftali, G; Guttman, R

    1975-01-01

    The evolutionary significance of interspecific aggression as a factor in speciation was tested among three chromosome forms of the actively speciating fossorial rodent Spalax ehrenbergi in Israel. Laboratory experiments testing intra- and interspecific aggression were conducted on 48 adult animals from 10 populations comprising three chromosome forms with 2n = 52, 58, and 60. Twelve agonistic, motivational-conflict, and territorial behavioral variables were recorded during 72 combats involving homo- and heter-ogametic encounters between opponents. Analysis of the data matrix was carried out by the nonmetric multivariate Smallest Space Analysis (SSA-II). The results indicate that (a) aggression patterns, involving agonistic conflict and territorial variables, are higher in heterogametic encounters than in homogametic ones; and (b) aggression is higher between contiguous chromosome forms (2n = 58-60, and 2n = 52-58) than between noncontiguous ones (2n = 52-60). Both a and b suggest that high interspecific aggression appears to be adaptively selected at final stages of speciation in mole rats as a premating isolating mechanism which reinforces species identification and establishes parapatric distributions between the evolving species. PMID:1059109

  11. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  12. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, P.; Cassayre, L.; Eloirdi, R.; Malmbeck, R.; Meier, R.; Nourry, C.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys, which originate from pyrochemical recovery of actinides from spent metallic nuclear fuel by electrochemical methods in molten LiCl-KCl. In the present work, the most important steps of this route were experimentally tested using U-Pu-Al alloy prepared by electrodeposition of U and Pu on solid aluminium plate electrodes. The investigated processes were vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the alloy by chlorine gas and sublimation of the AlCl3 formed. The processes parameters were set on the base of a previous thermochemical study and an experimental work using pure UAl3 alloy. The present experimental results indicated high efficiency of salt distillation and chlorination steps, while the sublimation step should be further optimised.

  13. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  14. JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05

    The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

  15. Fast methods for determination of antropogenic actinides and U/Th-series isotopes in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberg, J; Bajo, S; Beer, H; Hitz, J; Ruethi, M; Zumsteg, I; Letessier, P

    2004-01-01

    Rapid and simple methods are applied at the PSI radioanalytical laboratory for determining anthropogenic actinides in waste and nuclear reactor waters (U, Pu, Am, Cm) as well as for analysis of naturally occurring alpha-emitters in continental river and ground water. Anion exchange chromatography followed by alpha-spectrometry as well as alpha/beta-LSC is applied for the reactor coolant waters. To avoid alpha-spectrum interference between 238Pu and 241Am at 5.5 MeV, the Pu-fraction is purified using anion exchange resin. Prior to the separation of the Pu-fraction, all actinides (U, Pu, Am, Cm) are adsorbed batch-wise under stirring onto Actinide Resin and subsequent decomposition of the reagent. The residue is then re-dissolved in a sulfate buffer solution for electrolytic deposition. In tabular water samples isotopes of Ra and Po are analyzed additionally via sorption onto manganese coated discs (Ra) and deposition on silver discs (Po). For counting times of 1 day and use of 0.1-1l sample aliquots, detection limits of a few mBql(-1) can be obtained easily.

  16. Study on separation of minor actinides from HLLW with new extractant of TODGA-DHOA/Kerosene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Guo-an; Zhu, Wen-bin; Li, Feng-feng; Lin, Ru-shan; Li, Hui-rong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-26, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-07-01

    The extraction behavior of U, Np, Pu, Am, rare earth elements and Sr from nitric acid solutions by TODGA/dodecan, DHOA/dodecane and TODGA-DHOA/dodecane were investigated, respectively. Based on experimental results, a separation process was proposed for minor actinide isolation from high level liquid waste (HLLW): the TODGA-DHOA/kerosene system. The multi-stage counter-current cascade experiments were carried out for the purpose by 0.1 mol/l TODGA-1.0 mol/l DHOA/kerosene with miniature mixer- settler contactor rigs (8 stages for extraction, 6 stages for scrubbing, 8 stages for first stripping, 8 stages for second stripping). The results show that the recovery efficiencies of the actinides and lanthanides are more than 99.9%, whereas less than 1% Sr was extracted by 0.1 mol/l TODGA - 1.0 mol/l DHOA/kerosene. The stripping efficiencies of U, Np and Pu are more than 95% in the first stripping step by 0.5 mol/l HNO{sub 3} + 0.5 mol/l AHA(aceto-hydroxamic acid), all of the remained actinides and lanthanides can be stripped by 0.01 mol/l HNO{sub 3} in the second stripping step. 99% Sr was extracted by 0.1 mol/l TODGA/kerosene, so Sr can be recovered efficiently directly from the raffinate by 0.1 mol/l TODGA/kerosene. (authors)

  17. Arsenic Speciation in Groundwater: Role of Thioanions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavior of arsenic in groundwater environments is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Understanding arsenic speciation is important because chemical speciation impacts reactivity, bioavailability, toxicity, and transport and fate processes. In aerobic environments arsen...

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan Brennecke; Mark Dietz; Richard Barrans; Alabert Herlinger

    2003-07-03

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effect method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.

  19. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Charu L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-01

    A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  20. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  2. Speciation of the trivalent f-elements Eu(III) and Cm(III) in digestive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid; Stumpf, Thorsten; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi

    2017-10-01

    In case radioactive materials are released into the environment, their incorporation into our digestive system would be a significant concern. Trivalent f-elements, i.e., trivalent actinides and lanthanides, could potentially represent a serious health risk due to their chemo- and radiotoxicity, nevertheless the biochemical behavior of these elements are mostly unknown even to date. This study, therefore, focuses on the chemical speciation of trivalent f-elements in the human gastrointestinal tract. To simulate the digestive system artificial digestive juices (saliva, gastric juice, pancreatic juice and bile fluid) were prepared. The chemical speciation of lanthanides (as Eu(III)) and actinides (as Cm(III)) was determined experimentally by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and the results were compared with thermodynamic modeling. The results indicate a dominant inorganic species with phosphate/carbonate in the mouth, while the aquo ion is predominantly formed with a minor contribution of the enzyme pepsin in the stomach. In the intestinal tract the most significant species are with the protein mucin. We demonstrated the first experimental results on the chemical speciation of trivalent f-elements in the digestive media by TRLFS. The results highlight a significant gap in chemical speciation between experiments and thermodynamic modeling due to the limited availability of thermodynamic stability constants particularly for organic species. Chemical speciation strongly influences the in vivo behavior of metal ions. Therefore, the results of this speciation study will help to enhance the assessment of health risks and to improve decorporation strategies after ingestion of these (radio-)toxic heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, K.; White, D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Whisenhunt, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop new separation technologies to remove radioactive metal ions from contaminated DOE sites. To this end we are studying both the fundamental chemistry and the extractant properties of some chelators that are either found in nature or are closely related to natural materials. The work is a collaboration betwen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-University of California, Berkeley, and the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  4. Leaching characteristics of actinides from simulated reactor waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, H.C.; Coles, D.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Schweiger, J.S.; Rego, J.H.

    1979-08-01

    Even without statistical analysis, some general trends can be seen in the results: leach rate increases with flow rate at high temperature, but is approximately independent of it at room temperature; agreement between the results from the one-pass method and those from the IAEA method are fair in the case of WIPP brine solution, and good in the case of the others; and the /sup 237/Np leach rate increases with temperature, but the /sup 239/Pu leach rate either decreases with temperature or does not change.

  5. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  6. The disposal of nuclear waste in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The important problem of disposal of nuclear waste in space is addressed. A prior study proposed carrying only actinide wastes to space, but the present study assumes that all actinides and all fission products are to be carried to space. It is shown that nuclear waste in the calcine (oxide) form can be packaged in a container designed to provide thermal control, radiation shielding, mechanical containment, and an abort reentry thermal protection system. This package can be transported to orbit via the Space Shuttle. A second Space Shuttle delivers an oxygen-hydrogen orbit transfer vehicle to a rendezvous compatible orbit and the mated OTV and waste package are sent to the preferred destination. Preferred locations are either a lunar crater or a solar orbit. Shuttle traffic densities (which vary in time) are given and the safety of space disposal of wastes discussed.

  7. The drivers of tropical speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian Tilston; McCormack, John E; Cuervo, Andrés M; Hickerson, Michael J; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Burney, Curtis W; Xie, Xiaoou; Harvey, Michael G; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Prejean, Jesse; Fields, Samantha; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-11-20

    Since the recognition that allopatric speciation can be induced by large-scale reconfigurations of the landscape that isolate formerly continuous populations, such as the separation of continents by plate tectonics, the uplift of mountains or the formation of large rivers, landscape change has been viewed as a primary driver of biological diversification. This process is referred to in biogeography as vicariance. In the most species-rich region of the world, the Neotropics, the sundering of populations associated with the Andean uplift is ascribed this principal role in speciation. An alternative model posits that rather than being directly linked to landscape change, allopatric speciation is initiated to a greater extent by dispersal events, with the principal drivers of speciation being organism-specific abilities to persist and disperse in the landscape. Landscape change is not a necessity for speciation in this model. Here we show that spatial and temporal patterns of genetic differentiation in Neotropical birds are highly discordant across lineages and are not reconcilable with a model linking speciation solely to landscape change. Instead, the strongest predictors of speciation are the amount of time a lineage has persisted in the landscape and the ability of birds to move through the landscape matrix. These results, augmented by the observation that most species-level diversity originated after episodes of major Andean uplift in the Neogene period, suggest that dispersal and differentiation on a matrix previously shaped by large-scale landscape events was a major driver of avian speciation in lowland Neotropical rainforests.

  8. Ecology, sexual selection and speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Seehausen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    P>The spectacular diversity in sexually selected traits among animal taxa has inspired the hypothesis that divergent sexual selection can drive speciation. Unfortunately, speciation biologists often consider sexual selection in isolation from natural selection, even though sexually selected traits e

  9. Nuclear energy waste-space transportation and removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method for utilizing the decay heat of actinide wastes to power an electric thrust vehicle is proposed. The vehicle, launched by shuttle to earth orbit and to earth escape by a tug, obtains electrical power from the actinide waste heat by thermionic converters. The heavy gamma ray and neutron shielding which is necessary as a safety feature is removed in orbit and returned to earth for reuse. The problems associated with safety are dealt with in depth. A method for eliminating fission wastes via chemical propulsion is briefly discussed.

  10. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: implications for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  11. Functionalization of mesoporous materials for lanthanide and actinide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Justyna; Giret, Simon; Juère, Estelle; Larivière, Dominic; Kleitz, Freddy

    2016-10-14

    Among the energy sources currently available that could address our insatiable appetite for energy and minimize our CO2 emission, solar, wind, and nuclear energy currently occupy an increasing portion of our energy portfolio. The energy associated with these sources can however only be harnessed after mineral resources containing valuable constituents such as actinides (Ac) and rare earth elements (REEs) are extracted, purified and transformed into components necessary for the conversion of energy into electricity. Unfortunately, the environmental impacts resulting from their manufacture including the generation of undesirable and, sometimes, radioactive wastes and the non-renewable nature of the mineral resources, to name a few, have emerged as challenges that should be addressed by the scientific community. In this perspective, the recent development of functionalized solid materials dedicated to selective elemental separation/pre-concentration could provide answers to several of the above-mentioned challenges. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of mesoporous solid-phase (SP) sorbents designed for REEs and Ac liquid-solid extraction. Particular attention will be devoted to silica and carbon sorbents functionalized with commonly known ligands, such as phosphorus or amide-containing functionalities. The extraction performances of these new systems are discussed in terms of sorption capacity and selectivity. In order to support potential industrial applications of the silica and carbon-based sorbents, their main drawbacks and advantages are highlighted and discussed.

  12. Chemistry of lower valent actinide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This research effort was concerned almost entirely with the first two members of the actinide series, thorium and uranium, although the work was later extended to some aspects of the neptunium-fluorine system in a collaborative program with Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed information about the lighter actinides will be helpful in modeling the properties of the heavier actinide compounds, which will be much more difficult to study experimentally. In this program, thermochemical information was obtained from high temperature equilibrium measurements made by effusion-beam mass spectrometry and by effusion-pressure techniques. Data were derived primarily from second-law analysis so as to avoid potential errors in third-law calculations resulting from uncertainties in spectroscopic and molecular constants. This approach has the additional advantage of yielding reaction entropies that can be checked for consistency with various molecular constant assignments for the species involved. In the U-F, U-Cl, and U-Br systems, all of the gaseous species UX, UX{sub 2}, UX{sub 3}, UX{sub 4}, and UX{sub 5}, where X represents the halogen, were identified and characterized; the corresponding species ThX, ThX{sub 2}, ThX{sub 3}, and ThX{sub 4} were studied in the Th-F, Th-Cl, and Th-Br systems. A number of oxyhalide species in the systems U-0-F, U-0-Cl, Th-0-F, and Th-O-Cl were studied thermochemically. Additionally, the sublimation thermodynamics of NpF{sub 4}(s) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(s) were studied by mass spectrometry.

  13. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  14. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  15. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  16. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohki, Shigeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  17. Electronic structure and magnetism in actinide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durakiewicz, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: tomasz@lanl.gov; Joyce, J.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lander, G.H. [JRC, Institute of Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Olson, C.G. [Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5011 (United States); Butterfield, M.T. [Lawrence Livermoore National Laboratory, Livermoore, CA 94550 (United States); Guziewicz, E. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Batista, C.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arko, A.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morales, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mattenberger, K. [Laboratorium fur Festkorperphysik, ETH, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Vogt, O. [Laboratorium fur Festkorperphysik, ETH, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-01

    A close relationship between electronic structure and magnetic properties is observed in actinide compounds. The exact nature of this relationship is under investigation. We present examples of a direct link between electronic structure and ordered magnetic moment and/or magnetization. Specifically, results obtained for cubic U, Np and Pu compounds and quasi-2D U compounds are be presented. In the case of cubic compounds, a direct relationship between binding energy of valence band features and magnetic moment will be discussed. A Stoner-like mechanism and simple mean-field explanation is proposed for ferromagnetic UTe.

  18. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains t...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  19. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  20. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of potential ligands for nuclear waste processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, M.

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis deals with the synthesis and evaluation of new potential ligands for the complexation of actinide and lanthanide ions either for their extraction from bulk radioactive waste or their stripping from an extracted organic phase for final processing of the waste. In

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of potential ligands for nuclear waste processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, M.

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis deals with the synthesis and evaluation of new potential ligands for the complexation of actinide and lanthanide ions either for their extraction from bulk radioactive waste or their stripping from an extracted organic phase for final processing of the waste. In

  4. Waste management in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Maeda, A.; Sugikawa, S.; Takeshita, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dept. of Safety Research Technical Support, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In the NUCEF, the researches on criticality safety have been performed at two critical experiment facilities, STACY and TRACY in addition to the researches on fuel cycle such as advanced reprocessing and partitioning in alpha-gamma concrete cells and glove boxes. Many kinds of radioactive wastes have been generated through the research activities. Furthermore, the waste treatment itself may produce some secondary wastes. In addition, the separation and purification of plutonium of several tens-kg from MOX powder are scheduled in order to supply plutonium nitrate solution fuel for critical experiments at STACY. A large amount of wastes containing plutonium and americium will be generated from the plutonium fuel treatment. From the viewpoint of safety, the proper waste management is one of important works in NUCEF. Many efforts, therefore, have been made for the development of advanced waste treatment techniques to improve the waste management in NUCEF. Especially the reduction of alpha-contaminated wastes is a major interest. For example, the separation of americium is planned from the liquid waste evolved alter plutonium purification by application of tannin gel as an adsorbent of actinide elements. The waste management and the relating technological development in NUCEF are briefly described in this paper. (authors)

  5. Annual Report 2011 : Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal. (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7617)

    OpenAIRE

    Geckeis, H.; Stumpf, T. [Hrsg.

    2012-01-01

    The R&D at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, INE, (Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) focuses on (i) long term safety research for nuclear waste disposal, (ii) immobilization of high level radioactive waste (HLW), (iii) separation of minor actinides from HLW and (iv) radiation protection.

  6. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

    1980-09-01

    This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE - AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Missimer, D.

    2010-12-21

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. An inorganic sorbent, monosodium titanate (MST), is currently used to remove {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides, while a caustic-side solvent extraction process is used for removing {sup 134,137}Cs. A new peroxotitanate material, modified MST, or mMST, has recently been developed and has shown increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST. This paper describes recent results focused on further characterization of this material.

  8. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth L. Nash; Sue B. Clark; Gregg Lumetta

    2009-09-23

    With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

  9. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Palmer, M.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  10. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials.

  11. Thin extractive membrane for monitoring actinides in aqueous streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Vivek; Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Kalsi, P C; Goswami, A

    2013-09-15

    Alpha spectrometry and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are used for monitoring ultra-trace amount of alpha emitting actinides in different aqueous streams. However, these techniques have limitations i.e. alpha spectrometry requires a preconcentration step and SSNTDs are not chemically selective. Therefore, a thin polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) supported on silanized glass was developed for preconcentraion and determination of ultra-trace concentration of actinides by α-spectrometry and SSNTDs. PIMs were formed by spin coating on hydrophobic glass slide or solvent casting to form thin and self-supported membranes, respectively. Sorption experiments indicated that uptakes of actinides in the PIM were highly dependent on acidity of solution i.e. Am(III) sorbed up to 0.1 molL(-1) HNO₃, U(VI) up to 0.5 molL(-1) HNO₃ and Pu(IV) from HNO₃ concentration as high as 4 molL(-1). A scheme was developed for selective sorption of target actinide in the PIM by adjusting acidity and oxidation state of actinide. The actinides sorbed in PIMs were quantified by alpha spectrometry and SSNTDs. For SSNTDs, neutron induced fission-fragment tracks and α-particle tracks were registered in Garware polyester and CR-39 for quantifications of natural uranium and α-emitting actinides ((241)Am/(239)Pu/(233)U), respectively. Finally, the membranes were tested to quantify Pu in 4 molL(-1) HNO3 solutions and synthetic urine samples.

  12. Neutron Capture Measuremetns on Minor Actinides at the n_TOF Facility at CERN: Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Cano-Ott, D; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Abbondanno, U; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Wiendler, H; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Rosetti, M; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Duran, I; Rauscher, T; Ketlerov, V; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Griesmayer, E; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Mendoza, E; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Voss, F; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Dolfini, R; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Stephan, C; Tain, J L; Belloni, F; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Milazzo, P M; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Meaze, M H; O'Brien, S; Gunsing, F; Reifarth, R; Perrot, L; Lindote, A; Neves, F; Poch, A; Konovalov, V; Kerveno, M; Marques, L; Rubbia, C; Koehler, P; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Fujii, K; De Albornoz, A C; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Dillman, I; Assimakopoulos, P; Ferrant, L; Lozano, M; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Kadi, Y; Vicente, M C; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Moreau, C; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Paradela, C; Audouin, L; Tassan-Got, L; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Isaev, S; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Alvarez, H; Haight, R; Goverdovski, A; Chepel, V; Plag, R; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Frais-Koelbl, H; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I

    2011-01-01

    The successful development of advanced nuclear systems for sustainable energy production and nuclear waste management depends on high quality nuclear data libraries. Recent sensitivity studies and reports {[}1-3] have identified the need for substantially improving the accuracy of neutron cross-section data for minor actinides. The n\\_TOF collaboration has initiated an ambitious experimental program for the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of minor actinides. Two experimental setups have been constructed for this purpose: a Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) {[}4] for measuring neutron capture cross-sections of low-mass and/or radioactive samples and a set of two low neutron sensitivity C(6)D(6) detectors for the less radioactive materials.

  13. Investigation of the complexation and the migration of actinides and non-radioactive substances with humic acids under geogenic conditions. Complexation of humic acids with actinides in the ocidation state IV Th, U, Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Brendler, V.; Krepelova, A.; Mibus, J.; Geipel, G.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.

    2004-03-01

    and the presence of HA. HA exhibits a significant influence on the transport of U(IV) and U(VI) in a laboratory quartz sand system. In order to provide the basis for a more reliable modeling of the actinide transport, the metal ion complexation with HA has to be integrated into existing geochemical speciation codes. Within this project the metal ion charge neutralization model was embedded into the geochemical modeling code EQ3/6. In addition to that, a digital data base was developed which covers HA complexation data basing on the charge neutralization model. (orig.)

  14. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C., E-mail: christelle.tamain@cea.fr [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, B. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Rivenet, M. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Grandjean, S. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, F. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-04-15

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O, Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, M{sub 2+x}[Pu{sup IV}{sub 2−x}Pu{sup III}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 5}]·nH{sub 2}O and M{sub 1−x}[Pu{sup III}{sub 1−x}Pu{sup IV}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O]·nH{sub 2}O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV–visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new single crystal growth methods dedicated to actinide oxalate compounds. - Highlights: • Use of diester as oxalate precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Use of actinide oxide as precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Crystal growth of Pu(III) and Am(III) oxalates. • Crystal growth of mixed Pu(III)/Pu(IV) oxalates.

  15. Self-interaction corrected local spin density calculations of actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z

    2010-01-01

    We use the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation in order to describe localization-delocalization phenomena in the strongly correlated actinide materials. Based on total energy considerations, the methodology enables us to predict the ground-state valency configuration...... of the actinide ions in these compounds from first principles. Here we review a number of applications, ranging from electronic structure calculations of actinide metals, nitrides and carbides to the behaviour under pressure of intermetallics, and O vacancies in PuO2....

  16. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, which...... in the actinide dioxides is discussed, and it is found that the dioxide is the most stable oxide for the actinides from Np onward. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number and degree of localization which is confirmed by comparing to the ground-state configurations of the corresponding...

  17. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  18. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  19. Managing Zirconium Chemistry and Phase Compatibility in Combined Process Separations for Minor Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2017-03-17

    In response to the NEUP Program Supporting Fuel Cycle R&D Separations and Waste Forms call DEFOA- 0000799, this report describes the results of an R&D project focusing on streamlining separation processes for advanced fuel cycles. An example of such a process relevant to the U.S. DOE FCR&D program would be one combining the functions of the TRUEX process for partitioning of lanthanides and minor actinides from PUREX(UREX) raffinates with that of the TALSPEAK process for separating transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. A fully-developed PUREX(UREX)/TRUEX/TALSPEAK suite would generate actinides as product(s) for reuse (or transmutation) and fission products as waste. As standalone, consecutive unit-operations, TRUEX and TALSPEAK employ different extractant solutions (solvating (CMPO, octyl(phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) vs. cation exchanging (HDEHP, di-2(ethyl)hexylphosphoric acid) extractants), and distinct aqueous phases (2-4 M HNO3 vs. concentrated pH 3.5 carboxylic acid buffers containing actinide selective chelating agents). The separate processes may also operate with different phase transfer kinetic constraints. Experience teaches (and it has been demonstrated at the lab scale) that, with proper control, multiple process separation systems can operate successfully. However, it is also recognized that considerable economies of scale could be achieved if multiple operations could be merged into a single process based on a combined extractant solvent. The task of accountability of nuclear materials through the process(es) also becomes more robust with fewer steps, providing that the processes can be accurately modeled. Work is underway in the U.S. and Europe on developing several new options for combined processes (TRUSPEAK, ALSEP, SANEX, GANEX, ExAm are examples). There are unique challenges associated with the operation of such processes, some relating to organic phase chemistry, others arising from the

  20. Development of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Laboratory; Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Laboratory; Benson, Michael Timothy [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory; Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is also a need for a near zero-loss fabrication process and a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. The incorporation of Am and Np into the traditional U-20Pu-10Zr metallic fuel alloy was demonstrated in the US during the Integral Fast Reactor Program of the 1980’s and early 1990’s. However, the conventional counter gravity injection casting method performed under vacuum, previously used to fabricate these metallic fuel alloys, was not optimized for mitigating loss of the volatile Am constituent in the casting charge; as a result, approximately 40% of the Am casting charge failed to be incorporated into the as-cast fuel alloys. Fabrication development efforts of the past few years have pursued an optimized bottom-pour casting method to increase utilization of the melted charge to near 100%, and a differential pressure casting approach, performed under an argon overpressure, has been demonstrated to result in essentially no loss of Am due to volatilization during fabrication. In short, a path toward zero-loss fabrication of metallic fuels including minor actinides has been shown to be feasible. Irradiation testing of advanced metallic fuel alloys in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been underway since 2003. Testing in the ATR is performed inside of cadmium-shrouded positions to remove >99% of the thermal flux incident on the test fuels, resulting in an epi-thermal driven fuel test that is free from gross flux depression and producing an essentially prototypic radial temperature profile inside the fuel rodlets. To date, three irradiation test series (AFC-1,2,3) have been completed. Over 20 different metallic fuel alloys have been tested to burnups as high as 30% with constituent compositions of Pu up to 30%, Am up to 12%, Np up to 10%, and Zr between 10

  1. Factors affecting the placental transfer of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to consider factors that affect the availability and transport of actinides from maternal blood, through the placenta, to the conceptus. These factors, of particular importance in scaling results from animals to man, include the route and temporal pattern of administration, the mass and physicochemical state of material administered, metabolism of the pregnant animal and fetal organs or tissue, and species-specific changes in placental structure relative to stage of gestation at exposure. Preliminary concepts for descriptive and kinetic models are proposed to integrate these results, to identify additional information required for developing more comprehensive models, and to provide a basis for scaling to human pregnancies for purposes of radiation dosimetry.

  2. Gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Geibel, Kerstin; Vogt, Andreas; Hess, Herbert; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David [Koeln Univ. (Germany). IKP; Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products of Xe- and Ba isotopes after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. The recoil like particles were registered by a MCP detector inside the scattering chamber. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited. First results on the collective properties of various Th and U isotopes are discussed.

  3. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  4. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as `dissolved` Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H{sub 2}S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ({sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th) continues to increase. The flux of {sup 232}Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m{sup 2}/y. 208 refs.

  5. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  6. Interaction of Actinide Species with Microorganisms & Microbial Chelators: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, & Implications for Bioremediation of Soil & Ground Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim Boukhalfa

    2006-03-28

    Microorganisms influence the natural cycle of major elements, including C, N, P, S, and transition metals such as Mn and Fe. Bacterial processes can also influence the behavior of actinides in soil and ground water. While radionuclides have no known biological utility, they have the potential to interact with microorganisms and to interfere with processes involving other elements such as Fe and Mn. These interactions can transform radionuclides and affect their fate and transport. Organic acids, extruded by-products of cell metabolism, can solubilize radionuclides and facilitate their transport. The soluble complexes formed can be taken up by the cells and incorporated into biofilm structures. We have examined the interactions of Pu species with bacterial metabolites, studied Pu uptake by microorganisms and examined the toxicity of Pu and other toxic metals to environmentally relevant bacteria. We have also studied the speciation of Pu(IV) in the presence of natural and synthetic chelators.

  7. Multielemental speciation analysis by advanced hyphenated technique - HPLC/ICP-MS: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Speciation analysis has become an invaluable tool in human health risk assessment, environmental monitoring or food quality control. Another step is to develop reliable multielemental speciation methodologies, to reduce costs, waste and time needed for the analysis. Separation and detection of species of several elements in a single analytical run can be accomplished by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-MS). Our review assembles articles concerning multielemental speciation determination of: As, Se, Cr, Sb, I, Br, Pb, Hg, V, Mo, Te, Tl, Cd and W in environmental, biological, food and clinical samples analyzed with HPLC/ICP-MS. It addresses the procedures in terms of following issues: sample collection and pretreatment, selection of optimal conditions for elements species separation by HPLC and determination using ICP-MS as well as metrological approach. The presented work is the first review article concerning multielemental speciation analysis by advanced hyphenated technique HPLC/ICP-MS.

  8. Stability of artificial ferrite garnets with actinides and lanthanoids in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Extraction of the actinide-REE fraction and its subsequent incorporation into sparingly soluble crystalline phases (confinement matrices) is assumed in processing of spent nuclear fuel from high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). The chemical stability in the process of interaction with subsurface water governs the capability of a matrix phase to keep radionuclides from getting into the biosphere. In static experiments at 90 and 150°C, the chemical stability of ferrite garnets was investigated for three compositions with Th4+, Ce4+ and Gd3+ + serving as simulator components of the actinide fraction of HLW. Experiments were carried out in distilled water (pH 6.5), 0.01 M HCl solution (pH 2), and 0.01 M NaOH solution (pH 12). The behavior of ferrigarnet matrices depends on the acidity of the solution. In neutral and alkaline media, Th, Ce, and Gd are virtually not transferred into the liquid phase. Acid leaching promotes intense dissolution of garnet matrices. In this case, the leaching rate of Gd and Th from ceramics into the liquid phase is two orders of magnitude lower than the leaching rate of Ce because the Ce-doped phases contain less stable (relative to garnet) Ce-rich perovskite. Amorphization of the ferrigarnet structure due to 244Cm isotope decay leads to an increase in the leaching rate of Cm by no more than five times. In terms of radiation and chemical stability, ferrite garnets are not inferior to zirconolites and titanate pyrochlores. The experimental results suggest that garnet matrices can reliably immobilize actinides in subsurface repositories.

  9. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  10. Minor Actinides Loading Optimization for Proliferation Resistant Fuel Design - BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Chang; Hongbin Zhang

    2009-09-01

    One approach to address the United States Nuclear Power (NP) 2010 program for the advanced light water reactor (LWR) (Gen-III+) intermediate-term spent fuel disposal need is to reduce spent fuel storage volume while enhancing proliferation resistance. One proposed solution includes increasing burnup of the discharged spent fuel and mixing minor actinide (MA) transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel. Thus, we can reduce the spent fuel volume while increasing the proliferation resistance by increasing the isotopic ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, MAs are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. A typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of adding MAs (237Np and/or 241Am) to enhance proliferation resistance and improve fuel cycle performance for the intermediate-term goal of future nuclear energy systems. However, adding MAs will increase plutonium production in the discharged spent fuel. In this work, the Monte-Carlo coupling with ORIGEN-2.2 (MCWO) method was used to optimize the MA loading in the UO2 fuel such that the discharged spent fuel demonstrates enhanced proliferation resistance, while minimizing plutonium production. The axial averaged MA transmutation characteristics at different burnup were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality and the ratio of 238Pu/Pu discussed.

  11. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  12. New unsymmetrical digycolamide ligands for trivalent actinide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, Jammu; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2014-10-01

    New unsymmetrical diglycolamides (UDGAs), N,N-di-butyl-N',N'-di-dodecyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}), N,N-di-dodecyl-N',N'-di-hexyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (C{sub 12}-C{sub 6}), N,N-di-decyl-N',N'-di-dodecyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (C{sub 12}-C{sub 10}) have been synthesized, and evaluated for the separation of americium(III) and europium(III) from nitric acid medium. The extraction behavior of Am(III), Eu(III), and Sr(II) in a solution of these UDGAs in n-dodecane was studied as a function of concentration of nitric acid in the aqueous phase. The distribution ratio of Am(III) and Eu(III) increased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. The third phase formation behavior of nitric acid and neodymium(III) in 0.1 M UDGA/n-dodecane was studied. The third phase formation was not observed in all these UDGAs in n-dodecane (0.1 M), when the concentration of Nd(III) was ∝ 500 mM in 3-4M nitric acid. The stoichiometry of Am(III)-UDGA was determined from the slope analysis of the extraction data, which indicated the formation of 1:3 complex in all cases. Our studies revealed that the UDGA ligands with dodecyl group attached to one amidic nitrogen atom is inevitable for preventing third phase formation and the alkyl group at the other amidic nitrogen can be varied from butyl to decyl group for obtaining efficient extraction of trivalent actinides from high-level nuclear waste. (orig.)

  13. Using focused hard X-rays for investigations of nuclear waste repository analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-focused synchrotron radiation techniques to investigate determinant processes in actinide element transport in geological media are becoming an increasingly used tool in nuclear waste disposal research. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily they are driven by the need to characterize radionuclide speciation localized in components of heterogeneous natural systems. The advantage of using X-rays is that in situ investigations are possible, due to elimination of a vacuum requirement, no need for invasive sample preparation, and the high penetration capability of X-rays. The ultimate goal of such studies is to advance development of reliable predictive models for radionuclide transport processes at varying spatial and temporal scales, with a reliable estimate of uncertainty. This information is necessary for designing safe nuclear disposal concepts by assessing potential hazards associated with any radioactive contamination release. Examples using µ-XRF, µ-XAFS, and µ-XRD, partly in confocal geometry, to characterize what are referred to as natural analogs, in this case clayey sediments rich in uranium [1-4], will be presented. Natural analogs are considered to mimic repository geochemical and geological conditions on a geological time scale and knowledge gained from their study can be used to span the long time scales in a top down approach for predicting repository radiological safety. [1] M.A. Denecke, W. De Nolf, K. Janssens, B. Brendebach, A. Rothkirch, G. Falkenberg, U. Noseck, Spectrochim. Acta B 63, 484-492 (2008). [2] M.A. Denecke, A. Somogyi, K. Janssens, R. Simon, K. Dardenne, U. Noseck, Microscopy Microanal. 13(3), 165-172 (2007). [3] M.A. Denecke, K. Janssens, K. Proost, J. Rothe, U. Noseck, Environ. Sci. Technol. 39(7), 2049-2058 (2005). [4] P. Michel, M.A. Denecke, T. Schäfer, B. Brendebach, K. Dardenne, J. Rothe, T. Vitova, F. Huber, K. Rickers, M. Elie, G. Buckau, Proceedings to the 5th Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Workshop on

  14. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des elements aux degres d'oxydation (3) et (4) dans les verres de borosilicate. Application aux actinides dans les verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachia, J.N

    2005-12-15

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  15. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method

  16. Ecology, sexual selection and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Martine E; Seehausen, Ole

    2011-06-01

    The spectacular diversity in sexually selected traits among animal taxa has inspired the hypothesis that divergent sexual selection can drive speciation. Unfortunately, speciation biologists often consider sexual selection in isolation from natural selection, even though sexually selected traits evolve in an ecological context: both preferences and traits are often subject to natural selection. Conversely, while behavioural ecologists may address ecological effects on sexual communication, they rarely measure the consequences for population divergence. Herein, we review the empirical literature addressing the mechanisms by which natural selection and sexual selection can interact during speciation. We find that convincing evidence for any of these scenarios is thin. However, the available data strongly support various diversifying effects that emerge from interactions between sexual selection and environmental heterogeneity. We suggest that evaluating the evolutionary consequences of these effects requires a better integration of behavioural, ecological and evolutionary research. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Effect of spectral characterization of gaseous fuel reactors on transmutation and burning of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, C.; Anghaie, S. [Florida Univ., Wilmington, NC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Gaseous Core Reactors (GCR) are fueled with stable uranium compounds in a reflected cavity. The spectral characteristics of neutrons in GCR systems could shift from one end of the spectrum to the other end by changing design parameters such as reflector material and thickness, uranium enrichment, and the average operational temperature and pressure. The rate of actinide generation, transmutation, and burnup is highly influenced by the average neutron energy in reactor core. In particular, the production rate and isotopic mix of plutonium are highly dependent on the neutron spectrum in the reactor. Other actinides of primary interest to this work are neptunium-237 and americium-241 due to their pivotal impact on high-level nuclear waste disposal. In all cavity reactors including GCR's, the reflector material and thickness are the most important design parameters in determining the core spectrum. The increase in the gaseous fuel pressure and enrichment results in relative shift of neutron population toward energies greater than 2 eV. Reflector materials considered in this study are beryllium oxide, lithium hydride, lithium deuteride, zirconium carbide, graphite, lead, and tungsten. Results of the study suggest that the beryllium oxide and tungsten reflected GCR systems set the lower (softest) and upper (hardest) limits of neutron spectra, respectively. The inventory of actinides with half-lives greater than 1000 years can be minimized by increasing neutron flux level in the reactor core. The higher the neutron flux, the lower the inventory of these actinides. The majority of the GCR designs maintained a flux level on the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1} while the PWR flux is one order of magnitude lower. The inventory of the feeder isotopes to Np{sup 237} including U{sup 237}, Pu{sup 241}, and Am{sup 241} decreases with relative shift of neutron spectrum toward higher energies. This is due to increased resonance absorption in these isotopes due to higher

  18. Speciation and recovery of chromium from chromite ore processing residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeram, K J; Ramasami, T

    2001-10-01

    The processing of chromite ore is associated with the generation of large quantities of solid wastes containing chromium, which have been disposed of as landfill for many years. The mobilization and operational speciation of chromium contained in soils contaminated with metal salts are important in terms of the environment. Several methods have been employed for the extraction and recovery of solid wastes. Chromium contained in contaminated soils and solid wastes can be categorized as exchangeable, oxidizable, carbonate-bound, reducible and residual. The results from this study indicate a need for efficient leaching methodologies in chromite ore processing plants to decrease the non-detrital fractions of chromium in the residue. Aggressive methodologies are required to recover chromium from the detrital fractions. The potential benefits of employing sodium peroxide for the complete recovery of chromium from chromite residue have been demonstrated, and the need to ensure the safety of the process has been emphasized.

  19. Chemical Speciation of Long-lived Radionuclide Technetium-99 and its Environmental Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang

    Because of the high fission yield, high mobility and long half-life, technetium-99 is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in environmental trace application as well as nuclear waste management. The study on the determination of technetium and its speciation is therefore a key...

  20. An expanded porphyrin approach toward transactinium chelation and the development of porphyrin-coated optical fibers as potential actinide sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Silva, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Characterization of the contamination at DOE waste sites and facilities is necessary during environmental restoration. Characterization of toxic waste in containers and storage tanks is needed for effective waste management. Therefore, analytical and monitoring systems are needed for real-time analysis and feedback. The development of in-situ methods to measure chemical properties by specialized instrumentation capable of real-time analysis, without sacrificing sensitivity, has been identified as an area of needed development. Absorption spectroscopy is widely used and considered to be one of the most reliable techniques available for the qualitative and quantitative determination of sample composition. With the advancements in fiber optic technology, using light for remote in-situ sensing of groundwater contaminants has become practical. Significant progress has been made in the area of fiber-optic chemical sensors as can be seen by the number of recent review articles. The objective of this work is to develop a remote sensor for real-time measurement of actinides and concentrations in environmental or process waters based on absorption spectroscopy using internal reflection spectroscopy. Porphyrin coated silica wafers were prepared and the sensitivity and selectivity to actinides was determined.

  1. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATEPHASE II INTERIM REPORT FOR EXTERNAL RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Mary Thompson, M

    2006-08-31

    This document provides an interim summary report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST materials. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger laboratory scale, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and characterization of the modified MST. Key findings and conclusions include the following: (1) Samples of the modified MST prepared by Method 2 and Method 3 exhibited the best combination of strontium and actinide removal. (2) We selected Method 3 to scale up and test performance with actual waste solution. (3) We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using the Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. (4) Performance tests indicated successful scale-up to the 25-gram scale with excellent performance and reproducibility among each of the three batches. For example, the plutonium decontamination factors (6-hour contact time) for the modified MST samples averaged 13 times higher than that of the baseline MST sample at half the sorbent concentration (0.2 g L{sup -1} for modified MST versus 0.4 g L{sup -1} for baseline MST). (5) Performance tests with actual waste supernate demonstrated that the modified MST exhibited better strontium and plutonium removal performance than that of the baseline MST. For example, the decontamination factors for the modified MST measured 2.6 times higher for strontium and between 5.2 to 11 times higher for plutonium compared to the baseline MST sample. The modified MST did not exhibit improved neptunium removal performance over that of the baseline MST. (6) Two strikes of the modified MST provided increased removal of strontium and actinides from actual waste compared to a single strike. The improved performance

  2. Numerical analysis on reduction of radioactive actinides by recycling of nuclear fuel; Analisis numerico sobre reduccion de actinidos radiactivos por reciclado de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboa L, H. E.

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, human growth has reached unparalleled levels historically, this implies a need for more energy, and just in 2007 was consumed in the USA 4157 x 10{sup 9} kWh of electricity and there were 6 x 10{sup 9} metric tons of carbon dioxide, which causes a devastating effect on our environment. To this problem, a solution to the demand for non-fossil energy is nuclear energy, which is one of the least polluting and the cheapest among non-fossil energy; however, a problem remains unresolved the waste generation of nuclear fuels. In this work the option of a possible transmutation of actinides in a nuclear reactor of BWR was analyzed, an example of this are the nuclear reactors at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, which have generated spent fuel stored in pools awaiting a decision for final disposal or any other existing alternative. Assuming that the spent fuel was reprocessed to separate useful materials and actinides such as plutonium and uranium remaining, could take these actinides and to recycle them inside the same reactor that produced them, so il will be reduced the radiotoxicity of spent fuel. The main idea of this paper is to evaluate by means of numeric simulation (using the Core Management System (CMS)) the reduction of minor actinides in the case of being recycled in fresh fuel of the type BWR. The actinides were introduced hypothetically in the fuel pellets to 6% by weight, and then use a burned in the range of 0-65 G Wd/Tm, in order to have a better panorama of their behavior and thus know which it is the best choice for maximum reduction of actinides. Several cases were studied, that is to say were used as fuels; the UO{sub 2} and MOX. Six different cases were also studied to see the behavior of actinides in different situations. The CMS platform calculation was used for the analysis of the cases presented. Favorable results were obtained, having decreased from a range of 35% to 65% of minor actinides initially introduced in the fuel rods

  3. Bibliography of PNL publications in management of radioactive wastes, subject-indexed (alphabetically) and listed chronologically (latest issues first)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1976-07-01

    The citations are arranged under: actinides, alpha particles, americium, beta particles, calcination, cements, ceramics, cesium, containers, decontamination, evaporation, fluidized bed, glass, ground release, high-level wastes, incinerators, liquid wastes, marine disposal, melting, nonradioactive waste disposal, Pu, radiation doses, radiation protection, disposal, processing, radionuclide migration, Ru, safety, separation processes, soils, solidification, solid wastes, stack disposal, temperature, thermal conductivity, transmutation, tritium, underground disposal, U, volatility, and waste disposal/management/processing/storage/transportation. (DLC)

  4. Studies on Neutron, Photon (Bremsstrahlung and Proton Induced Fission of Actinides and Pre-Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Naik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the yields of various fission products determined in the reactor neutron, 3.7-18.1 MeV quasi-mono energetic neutron, 8-80 MeV bremsstrahlung and 20-45 MeV proton induced fission of 232Th and 238U using radiochemical and off-line beta or gamma ray counting. The yields of the fission products in the bremsstrahlung induced fission natPb and 209Bi with 50- 70 MeV and 2.5 GeV based on off-line gamma ray spectrometric technique were also presented. From the yields of fission products, the mass chains yields were obtained using charge distribution correction. From the mass yield distribution, the peak-to-valley (P/V ratio was obtained. The role of excitation energy on the peak-to-valley ratio and fine structure such as effect of shell closure proximity and even-odd effect of mass yield distribution were examined. The higher yields of the fission products around A=133-134, 138-140 and 143-144 and their complementary products explained from the nuclear structure effect and role of standard I and II mode of asymmetric fission. In the neutron, photon (bremsstrahlung and proton induced fission, the asymmetric mass distribution for actinides (Th, U and symmetric distribution for pre-actinides (Pb, Bi were explained from different type of potential fission barrier

  5. Photofission of actinide and pre-actinide nuclei in the quasideuteron and delta energy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, B L; Cole, P L; Dodge, W R; Feldman, G; Sanabria, J C; Kolb, N; Pywell, R E; Vogt, J; Nedorezov, V; Sudov, A; Kezerashvili, G Ya

    1999-01-01

    The photofission cross sections for the actinide nuclei sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np have been measured from 68 to 264 MeV and those for the pre-actinide nuclei sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au and sup N sup A sup T Pb from 122 to 222 MeV at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory, using monoenergetic tagged photons and novel parallel-plate avalanche detectors for the fission fragments. The aim of the experiment was to obtain a comprehensive and self-consistent data set and to investigate previous anomalous results in this energy region. The fission probability for transuranic nuclei is expected to be close to unity here. However, important discrepancies have been confirmed for sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, compared with sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, which have serious implications for the inferred total photoabsorption strengths, and hence call into question the 'Universal Curve' for photon absorption at these energies. High-s...

  6. A Summary of Actinide Enrichment Technologies and Capability Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Bradley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robinson, Sharon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation performed in this study indicates that a new program is needed to efficiently provide a national actinide radioisotope enrichment capability to produce milligram-to-gram quantities of unique materials for user communities as summarized in Table 1. This program xiv should leverage past actinide enrichment, the recent advances in stable isotope enrichment, and assessments of the future requirements to cost effectively develop this capability while establishing an experience base for a new generation of researchers in this vital area. Preliminary evaluations indicate that an EMIS device would have the capability to meet the future needs of the user community for enriched actinides. The EMIS technology could be potentially coupled with other enrichment technologies, such as irradiation, as pre-enrichment and/or post-enrichment systems to increase the throughput, reduce losses of material, and/or reduce operational costs of the base EMIS system. Past actinide enrichment experience and advances in the EMIS technology applied in stable isotope separations should be leveraged with this new evaluation information to assist in the establishment of a domestic actinide radioisotope enrichment capability.

  7. Development of the Chalmers Grouped Actinide Extraction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleröd Jenny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several solvents for Grouped ActiNide EXtraction (GANEX processes have been investigated at Chalmers University of Technology in recent years. Four different GANEX solvents; cyclo-GANEX (CyMe4- -BTBP, 30 vol.% tri-butyl phosphate (TBP and cyclohexanone, DEHBA-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 20 vol.% N,N-di-2(ethylhexyl butyramide (DEHBA and cyclohexanone, hexanol-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and hexanol and FS-13-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and phenyl trifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13 have been studied and the results are discussed and compared in this work. The cyclohexanone based solvents show fast and high extraction of the actinides but a somewhat poor diluent stability in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. FS-13-GANEX display high separation factors between the actinides and lanthanides and a good radiolytic and hydrolytic stability. However, the distribution ratios of the actinides are lower, compared to the cyclohexanone based solvents. The hexanol-GANEX is a cheap solvent system using a rather stable diluent but the actinide extraction is, however, comparatively low.

  8. The actinides-a beautiful ending of the Periodic Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Boerje [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: borje.johansson@fysik.uu.se; Li, Sa [Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2007-10-11

    The 5f elements, actinides, show many properties which have direct correspondence to the 4f transition metals, the lanthanides. The remarkable similarity between the solid state properties of compressed Ce and the actinide metals is pointed out in the present paper. The {alpha}-{gamma} transition in Ce is considered as a Mott transition, namely, from delocalized to localized 4f states. An analogous behavior is also found for the actinide series, where the sudden volume increase from Pu to Am can be viewed upon as a Mott transition within the 5f shell as a function of the atomic number Z. On the itinerant side of the Mott transition, the earlier actinides (Pa-Pu) show low symmetry structures at ambient conditions; while across the border, the heavier elements (Am-Cf) present the dhcp structure, an atomic arrangement typical for the trivalent lanthanide elements with localized 4f magnetic moments. The reason for an isostructural Mott transition of the f electron in Ce, as opposed to the much more complicated cases in the actinides, is identified. The strange appearance of the {delta}-phase (fcc) in the phase diagram of Pu is another consequence of the border line behavior of the 5f electrons. The path leading from {delta}-Pu to {alpha}-Pu is identified.

  9. Hydrophilic actinide complexation studied by solvent extraction radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Consultant Group, Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Actinide migration in the ground water is enhanced by the formation of water soluble complexes. It is essential to the risk analysis of a wet repository to know the concentration of central atoms and the ligands in the ground water, and the stability of complexes formed between them. Because the chemical behavior at trace concentrations often differ from that at macro concentrations, it is important to know the chemical behavior of actinides at trace concentrations in ground water. One method used for such investigations is the solvent extraction radiotracer (SXRT) technique. This report describes the SXRT technique in some detail. A particular reason for this analysis is the claim that complex formation constants obtained by SXRT are less reliable than results obtained by other techniques. It is true that several difficulties are encountered in the application of SXRT technique to actinide solution, such as redox instability, hydrophilic complexation by side reactions and sorption, but it is also shown that a careful application of the SXRT technique yields results as reliable as by any other technique. The report contains a literature survey on solvent extraction studies of actinide complexes formed in aqueous solutions, particularly by using the organic reagent thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in benzene or chloroform. Hydrolysis constants obtained by solvent extraction are listed as well as all actinide complexes studied by SX with inorganic and organic ligands. 116 refs, 11 tabs.

  10. Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward J. Maginn

    2009-11-09

    The primary objective of the Notre Dame component of the project was computational in nature. The goal was to provide a design tool for the synthesis of optimized sorbents for the removal of cesium, strontium and actinides from nuclear waste solutions. Molecular modeling enables us to observe and better understand the molecular level interactions that govern the selectivity of specific radionuclides in a particular sorbent. The research focused on the development and validation of a suitable and transferable model for all the cations and ion exchangers of interest, nd then subsequent simulations which determined the siting and mobility of water and cations. Speciic accomplishments include: (1) improving existing intermolecular force fields to accurately model the sorbents of interest; (2) utilizing energy-minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations for structural prediction of CST and niobium-substituted CST materials; (3) determining Na+/water positions in polyoxoniobate materials using molecular dynamics simulations; and (4) developing Hybrid Monte Carlo methods for improved structural prediction.

  11. How common is homoploid hybrid speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Molly; Rosenthal, Gil G; Andolfatto, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Hybridization has long been considered a process that prevents divergence between species. In contrast to this historical view, an increasing number of empirical studies claim to show evidence for hybrid speciation without a ploidy change. However, the importance of hybridization as a route to speciation is poorly understood, and many claims have been made with insufficient evidence that hybridization played a role in the speciation process. We propose criteria to determine the strength of evidence for homoploid hybrid speciation. Based on an evaluation of the literature using this framework, we conclude that although hybridization appears to be common, evidence for an important role of hybridization in homoploid speciation is more circumscribed.

  12. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding Tc inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford’s 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into final waste forms; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other “pools” such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. This report was revised in September 2014 to add detail and correct inaccuracies in Section 5.0 on the fate of technetium (Tc) recycle from the off-gas systems downstream of the low-activity waste (LAW) melters back to the melters, based on several reports that were not found in the original literature search on the topic. The newly provided reports, from experts active in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) glass studies, the Vitreous State Laboratory at The Catholic University of America (VSL) melter and off-gas system demonstrations and overall WTP systems analysis, were not originally found on electronic databases commonly searched. The major revisions to Section 5.0 also required changes to Section 7.0 (Summary and Conclusions) and this executive summary.

  13. Ventilation system of actinides handling facility in Oarai-branch of Tohoku University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshimitsu; Watanabe, Makoto; Hara, Mituo; Shikama, Tatsuo; Kayano, Hideo; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki [Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    We have reported the development of the facility for handling actinides in Tohoku University at the second KAERI-JAERI joint seminar on PIE technology. Actinide isotopes have most hazurdous {alpha}-radioactivity. Therefore, a specially designed facility is necessary to carry out experimental study for actinide physics and chemistry. In this paper, we will describe the ventilation system and monitoring system for actinide handling facility. (author)

  14. Sensory drive in cichlid speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Hofker, Kees D.; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Seehausen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The role of selection in speciation is a central yet poorly understood problem in evolutionary biology. The rapid radiations of extremely colorful cichlid fish in African lakes have fueled the hypothesis that sexual selection can drive species divergence without geographical isolation. Here we prese

  15. Neutral Models with Generalised Speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haegeman, Bart; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Hubbell's neutral theory claims that ecological patterns such as species abundance distributions can be explained by a stochastic model based on simple assumptions. One of these assumptions, the point mutation assumption, states that every individual has the same probability to speciate. Etienne et

  16. Models of speciation: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilets, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Theory building is an integral part of biological research, in general, and of speciation research, in particular. Here, I review the modeling work on speciation done in the last 10 years or so, assessing the progress made and identifying areas where additional effort is required. Specific topics considered include evolutionary dynamics of genetic incompatibilities, spatial and temporal patterns of speciation, links to neutral theory of biodiversity, effects of multidimensionality of phenotype, sympatric and parapatric speciation, adaptive radiation, speciation by sexual conflict, and models tailored for specific biological systems. Particularly challenging questions for future theoretical research identified here are 1) incorporating gene regulatory networks in models describing accumulation of genetic incompatibilities; 2) integrating models of community ecology with those developed in speciation theory; 3) building models providing better insights on the dynamics of parapatric speciation; 4) modeling speciation in multidimensional ecological niches with mating preferences based on multidimensional mating cues and sexual characters; 5) linking microevolutionary processes with macroevolutionary patterns as observed in adaptive radiations and paleontological record; 6) modeling speciation in specific systems studied by empirical biologists; and 7) modeling human origins. The insights from dynamic models of speciation should be useful in developing statistical tools that would enable empiricists to infer the history of past evolutionary divergence and speciation from genomic data.

  17. Transmutation of minor actinides discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebeyli, Mustafa E-mail: mubeyli@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-12-01

    Significant amounts of nuclear wastes consisting of plutonium, minor actinides and long lived fission products are produced during the operation of commercial nuclear power plants. Therefore, the destruction of these wastes is very important with respect to public health, environment and also the future of nuclear energy. In this study, transmutation of minor actinides (MAs) discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor has been investigated under a neutron wall load of 10 MW/m{sup 2} for an operation period of 10 years. Also, the effect of MA percentage on the transmutation has been examined. The fuel zone, containing MAs as spheres cladded with W-5Re, has been located behind the first wall to utilize the high neutron flux for transmutation effectively. Helium at 40 atm has been used as an energy carrier. At the end of the operation period, the total burning and transmutation are greater than the total buildups in all investigated cases, and very high burnups (420-470 GWd/tHM) are reached, depending on the MA content. The total transmutation rate values are 906 and 979 kg/GW{sub th} year at startup and decrease to 140 and 178 kg/GW{sub th} year at the end of the operation for fuel with 10% and 20% MA, respectively. Over an operation period of 10 years, the effective half lives decrease from 2.38, 2.21 and 3.08 years to 1.95, 1.80 and 2.59 years for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Am, respectively. Total atomic densities decrease exponentially during the operation period. The reductions in the total atomic densities with respect to the initial ones are 79%, 81%, 82%, 83%, 85% and 86% for 10%, 12%, 14%, 16%, 18% and 20% MAs, respectively.

  18. Fluoride-conversion synthesis of homogeneous actinide oxide solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2011-01-01

    Here, a novel route to synthesize (U, Th)O2 solid solutions at a relatively low temperature of 1100 C is demonstrated. First, the separate actinide oxides reacted with ammonium bifluoride to form ammonium actinide fluorides at room temperature. Subsequently, this mixture was converted to the actinide oxide solid solution using a two-phased heat treatment, first at 610 C in static air, then at 1100 C in flowing argon. Solid solutions obeying Vegard s Law were synthesized for ThO2 content from 10 to 90 wt%. Microscopy showed that the (U, Th)O2 solid solutions synthesized with this method to have considerably high crystallinity and homogeneity, suggesting the suitability of material thus synthesized for sintering into nuclear fuel pellets at low temperatures.

  19. X-ray and electron microscopy of actinide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Actinide materials demonstrate a wide variety of interesting physical properties in both bulk and nanoscale form. To better understand these materials, a broad array of microscopy techniques have been employed, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high-angle annular dark-field imaging (HAADF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Here these techniques will be reviewed, highlighting advances made in the physics, materials science, chemistry, and biology of actinide materials through microscopy. Construction of a spin-polarized TEM will be discussed, considering its potential for examining the nanoscale magnetic structure of actinides as well as broader materials and devices, such as those for computational magnetic memory. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic, structural, and thermodynamic properties of actinide dioxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Ray, Asok K.

    2010-03-01

    As a continuation of our studies of pure actinide metals using hybrid density functional theory,footnotetextR. Atta-Fynn and A. K. Ray, Europhysics Letters, 85, 27008-p1- p6 (2009); Chemical Physics Letters, 482, 223-227 (2009). we present here a systematic study of the electronic and geometric structure properties of the actinide dioxides, UO2, PuO2 and AmO2, using both density functional and hybrid density functional theories. For the hybrid density functionals, the fractions of exact Hartree-Fock exchange used were 25% and 40%. Each compound has been studied at the nonmagnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations, with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The influence of SOC on the properties of the actinide dioxides will be discussed. Thermodynamic properties such as phonon dispersion curves, heat capacity, entropy, internal energy and free energy have been calculated by a coupling of first-principles calculations and lattice dynamics.

  1. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  2. Impact of Eu(III) on mammalian cells as a function of its speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Susanne; Heller, Anne; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    In the case of the accidental release of long-lived radionuclides, e.g., actinides, into the environment, knowledge of their behavior in bio-systems is necessary to asses and to prevent radiological and chemical induced adverse health effects. This includes knowledge of the bioavailability and chemo-/radio-toxicity of these elements for/onto cells, which are governed to a large extent by their speciation [1,2]. In order to gain a better process understanding, we study the interaction of trivalent actinides/lanthanides with mammalian cells on a cellular level combining biochemical and analytical methods. Results of these studies can contribute to the estimation of low dose effects and the development of new decontamination strategies. The cellular tolerance of FaDu cells (human squamous cell carcinoma cell line) toward Eu(III) as an analog for trivalent actinides as well as its uptake into the cells has been studied as a function of the Eu(III) concentration and nutrient composition. To differentiate between chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects of Eu(III), {sup 152}Eu (β{sup -}, ε) was applied as radioactive tracer besides europium with natural isotope composition. The Eu(III) speciation in the cell culture media has been investigated by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as well as by solubility studies in combination with ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, cation and anion analysis. These results are used to correlate cytotoxicity and uptake of Eu(III) on/into the cells with its chemical speciation in the nutrient. Presently, we are studying the interaction of Eu(III) with NRK-52E cells (rat kidney epithelial-like cells). The results of these studies will be discussed and compared to those obtained with FaDu cells. From the studies with FaDu cells it was concluded that the Eu(III) cytotoxicity onto these cells depends on the Eu(III) concentration and is influenced by its chemical speciation. This was also reported, for instance, for the

  3. In pursuit of homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Lani A; Walensky, Justin R; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article describes the pursuit of isolable homoleptic actinide alkyl complexes, starting with the pioneering work of Gilman during the Manhattan project. The initial reports in this area suggested that homoleptic uranium alkyls were too unstable to be isolated, but Wilkinson demonstrated that tractable uranium alkyls could be generated by purposeful "ate" complex formation, which serves to saturate the uranium coordination sphere and provide the complexes with greater kinetic stability. More recently, we reported the solid-state molecular structures of several homoleptic uranium alkyl complexes, including [Li(THF)4][U(CH2(t)Bu)5], [Li(TMEDA)]2[UMe6], [K(THF)]3[K(THF)2][U(CH2Ph)6]2, and [Li(THF)4][U(CH2SiMe3)6], by employing Wilkinson's strategy. Herein, we describe our attempts to extend this chemistry to thorium. The treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 5 equiv of LiCH2(t)Bu or LiCH2SiMe3 at -25 °C in THF affords [Th(CH2(t)Bu)5] (1) and [Li(DME)2][Th(CH2SiMe3)5 (2), respectively, in moderate yields. Similarly, the treatment of ThCl4(DME)2 with 6 equiv of K(CH2Ph) produces [K(THF)]2[Th(CH2Ph)6] (3), in good yield. Complexes 1-3 have been fully characterized, while the structures of 1 and 3 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the electronic properties of 1 and 3 were explored by density functional theory.

  4. Actinide consumption: Nuclear resource conservation without breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, W.H.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to the nuclear power issue based on a metallic fast reactor fuel and pyrometallurgical processing of spent fuel is showing great potential and is approaching a critical demonstration phase. If successful, this approach will complement and validate the LWR reactor systems and the attendant infrastructure (including repository development) and will alleviate the dominant concerns over the acceptability of nuclear power. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is a metal-fueled, sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor supported by a pyrometallurgical reprocessing system. The concept of a sodium cooled fast reactor is broadly demonstrated by the EBR-II and FFTF in the US; DFR and PFR in the UK; Phenix and SuperPhenix in France; BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600 in the USSR; and JOYO in Japan. The metallic fuel is an evolution from early EBR-II fuels. This fuel, a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy, has been demonstrated to be highly reliable and fault tolerant even at very high burnup (160-180,000 MWd/MT). The fuel, coupled with the pool type reactor configuration, has been shown to have outstanding safety characteristics: even with all active safety systems disabled, such a reactor can survive a loss of coolant flow, a loss of heat sink, or other major accidents. Design studies based on a small modular approach show not only its impressive safety characteristics, but are projected to be economically competitive. The program to explore the feasibility of actinide recovery from spent LWR fuel is in its initial phase, but it is expected that technical feasibility could be demonstrated by about 1995; DOE has not yet committed funds to achieve this objective. 27 refs.

  5. Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution Analytical Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weaver, Jamie L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This document is a companion report to a previous report, PNNL 24519, Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution, A Brief Review of the Literature, August 2015. In this companion report, we report a fast, accurate, newly developed analytical method for measurement of trace alpha-emitting actinide elements in commercial high-activity molybdenum-99 solution. Molybdenum-99 is widely used to produce 99mTc for medical imaging. Because it is used as a radiopharmaceutical, its purity must be proven to be extremely high, particularly for the alpha emitting actinides. The sample of 99Mo solution is measured into a vessel (such as a polyethylene centrifuge tube) and acidified with dilute nitric acid. A gadolinium carrier is added (50 µg). Tracers and spikes are added as necessary. Then the solution is made strongly basic with ammonium hydroxide, which causes the gadolinium carrier to precipitate as hydrous Gd(OH)3. The precipitate of Gd(OH)3 carries all of the actinide elements. The suspension of gadolinium hydroxide is then passed through a membrane filter to make a counting mount suitable for direct alpha spectrometry. The high-activity 99Mo and 99mTc pass through the membrane filter and are separated from the alpha emitters. The gadolinium hydroxide, carrying any trace actinide elements that might be present in the sample, forms a thin, uniform cake on the surface of the membrane filter. The filter cake is first washed with dilute ammonium hydroxide to push the last traces of molybdate through, then with water. The filter is then mounted on a stainless steel counting disk. Finally, the alpha emitting actinide elements are measured by alpha spectrometry.

  6. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-05-02

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding technetium (Tc) inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford’s 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into a final waste form; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other "pools" such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. A thorough understanding of the inventory for mobile contaminants is key to any performance or risk assessment for Hanford Site facilities because potential groundwater and river contamination levels are proportional to the amount of contaminants disposed at the Hanford Site. Because the majority of the total 99Tc produced at Hanford (~32,600 Ci) is currently stored in Hanford’s 177 tanks (~26,500 Ci), there is a critical need for knowledge of the fate of this 99Tc as it is removed from the tanks and processed into a final solid waste form. Current flow sheets for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant process show most of the 99Tc will be immobilized as low-activity waste glass that will remain on the Hanford Site and disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); only a small fraction will be shipped to a geologic repository with the immobilized high-level waste. Past performance assessment studies, which focused on groundwater protection, have shown that 99Tc would be the primary dose contributor to the IDF performance.

  7. Thermally unstable complexants/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In situ immobilization is an approach to isolation of radionuclides from the hydrosphere that is receiving increasing attention. Rather than removing the actinides from contaminated soils, this approach transforms the actinides into intrinsically insoluble mineral phases resistant to leaching by groundwater. The principal advangates of this concept are the low cost and low risk of operator exposure and/or dispersion of the radionuclides to the wider environment. The challenge of this approach is toe accomplish the immobilization without causing collateral damage to the environment (the cure shouldn`t be worse than the disease) and verification of system performance.

  8. Production of heavy actinides in incomplete fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, N. V.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Iljinov, A. S.; Mebel, M. V.

    1994-10-01

    We present preliminary results of calculations by the phenomenological model of the estimated yield of some heavy actinide isotopes. It is assumed that these isotopes are produced as a result of multinucleon transfers followed by neutrons and charged particle emission A.S. Iljinov and E.A. Cherepanov (1980). The yield P(sub Z, N)(E*) of primary excited actinides is found using the model of N.V. Antonenko and R.V. Jolos (1991). Absolute cross-sections for different binary reaction channels are obtained by summing the cross-sections for all subchannels with an appreciable yield according to J. Wilczynski et al. (1980).

  9. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  12. Non-compound nucleus fission in actinide and pre-actinide regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Tripathi; S Sodaye; K Sudarshan

    2015-08-01

    In this article, some of our recent results on fission fragment/product angular distributions are discussed in the context of non-compound nucleus fission. Measurement of fission fragment angular distribution in 28Si+176Yb reaction did not show a large contribution from the non-compound nucleus fission. Data on the evaporation residue cross-sections, in addition to those on mass and angular distributions, are necessary for better understanding of the contribution from non-compound nucleus fission in the pre-actinide region. Measurement of mass-resolved angular distribution of fission products in 20Ne+232Th reaction showed an increase in angular anisotropy with decreasing asymmetry of mass division. This observation can be explained based on the contribution from pre-equilibrium fission. Results of these studies showed that the mass dependence of anisotropy may possibly be used to distinguish pre-equilibrium fission and quasifission.

  13. Estimating the duration of speciation from phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Rampal S; Morlon, Hélène; Lambert, Amaury

    2014-08-01

    Speciation is not instantaneous but takes time. The protracted birth-death diversification model incorporates this fact and predicts the often observed slowdown of lineage accumulation toward the present. The mathematical complexity of the protracted speciation model has barred estimation of its parameters until recently a method to compute the likelihood of phylogenetic branching times under this model was outlined (Lambert et al. ). Here, we implement this method and study using simulated phylogenies of extant species how well we can estimate the model parameters (rate of initiation of speciation, rate of extinction of incipient and good species, and rate of completion of speciation) as well as the duration of speciation, which is a combination of the aforementioned parameters. We illustrate our approach by applying it to a primate phylogeny. The simulations show that phylogenies often do not contain enough information to provide unbiased estimates of the speciation-initiation rate and the extinction rate, but the duration of speciation can be estimated without much bias. The estimate of the duration of speciation for the primate clade is consistent with literature estimates. We conclude that phylogenies combined with the protracted speciation model provide a promising way to estimate the duration of speciation.

  14. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  15. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  16. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  17. Molecular and electronic structure of actinide hexa-cyanoferrates; Structure moleculaire et electronique des hexacyanoferrates d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhoure, I

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the actinide-ligand bond properties. To this end, the hexacyanoferrate entities have been used as pre-organized ligand. We have synthesized, using mild chemistry, the following series of complexes: An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Th, U, Np, Pu); Am{sup III}[Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O; Pu {sup III}[Co{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O and K(H?)An{sup III}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Pu, Am). The metal oxidation states have been obtained thanks to the {nu}{sub CN}, stretching vibration and to the actinide L{sub III} absorption edge studies. As Prussian Blue, the An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Np, Pu) are class II of Robin and Day compounds. X-ray Diffraction has shown besides that these complexes crystallize in the P6{sub 3}/m space group, as the isomorphic LaKFe(CN){sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O complex used as structural model. The EXAFS oscillations at the iron K edge and at the An L{sub III} edge allowed to determine the An-N, An-O, Fe-C and Fe-N distances. The display of the multiple scattering paths for both edges explains the actinide contribution absence at the iron edge, whereas the iron signature is present at the actinide edge. We have shown that the actinide coordination sphere in actinides hexa-cyanoferrates is comparable to the one of lanthanides. However, the actinides typical behavior towards the lanthanides is brought to the fore by the An{sup IV} versus Ln{sup III} ions presence in this family of complexes. Contrarily to the 4f electrons, the 5f electrons influence the electronic properties of the compounds of this family. However, the gap between the An-N and Ln-N distances towards the corresponding metals ionic radii do not show any covalence bond evolution between the actinide and lanthanide series. (author)

  18. Speciation Analysis of Radionuclides in the Environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran;

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water......, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionu-clides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners’ laboratories, Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation...... analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes...

  19. MODELING MONOMETHYLMERCURY AND TRIBUTYLTIN SPECIATION WITH EPA'S GEOCHEMICAL SPECIATION MODEL MINTEQA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the complexity of the various, simultaneous (and competing) equilibrium reactions governing the speciation of ionic species in aquatic systems, EPA has developed and distributed the geochemical speciation model MINTEQA2 (Brown and Allison, 1987, Allison et al., 1991; Hydrog...

  20. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  1. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Silvia; Tabima, Javier F; Mideros, Maria F; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Matute, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    The process of speciation, by definition, involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed that speciation in pathogens is heavily influenced by host-pathogen dynamics and that traits that mediate such interactions (e.g., host mobility, reproductive mode of the pathogen, complexity of the life cycle, and host specificity) must lead to reproductive isolation and ultimately affect speciation rates. In this review, we summarize the main evolutionary processes that lead to speciation of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and provide an outline of how speciation can be studied rigorously, including novel genetic/genomic developments.

  2. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which...

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Actinide Transport in a Fractured Granodiorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate and evaluate new experimental methods for quantifying the potential for actinide transport in deep fractured crystalline rock formations. We selected a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model system because field experiments have already been conducted with uranium and additional field experiments using other actinides are planned at the site. Thus, working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiment results with fieldscale observations. Rock cores drilled from the GTS were shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory, characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy, and used in batch sorption and column breakthrough experiments. Solutions with pH 6.8 and 8.8 were tested. Solutions were switched to radionuclide-free synthetic Grimsel groundwater after near-steady actinide/colloid breakthrough occurred in column experiments. We are currently evaluating actinide adsorption/desorption rates as a function of water chemistry (initial focus on pH), with future testing planned to evaluate the influence of carbonate concentrations, flow rates, and mineralogy in solutions and suspensions with bentonite colloids. (auth)

  4. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  5. Preparation of actinide targets and sources using nonaqueous electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, M.M.; Gursky, J.C.; Wilhelmy, J.B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1991-05-15

    Application of the method of 'molecular plating' to prepare actinide targets suitable for accelerator bombardment is presented. Two example applications involving {sup 229}Th and {sup 254}Es are discussed along with the merits and liabilities of the method. (orig.).

  6. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    -phonon parameter λ is found to attain its maximum value in Ac, and they predict a transition temperature of 9K for this metal. In the light actinides Th through Pu, λ is found to be of order 0.4 and within a factor of 2 of experiments which is also the accuracy found in studies of the transition metals...

  7. Actinides How well do we know their stellar production?

    CERN Document Server

    Goriely, S

    2001-01-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. In total, thirty-two different multi-event canonical calculations using different nuclear ingredients or astrophysics conditions are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. T...

  8. FY06 ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT #95061STRATEGIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF INORGANIC SORBENTSFOR CESIUM, STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-10

    The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations. During the fifth year of the project our studies focused along the following paths: (1) determination of Cs{sup +} ion exchange mechanism in sodium titanium silicates with sitinikite topology and the influence of crystallinity on ion exchange, (2) synthesis and characterization of novel peroxo-titanate materials for strontium and actinide separations, and (3) further refinements in computational models for the CST and polyoxoniobate materials.

  9. Speciation of Black-necked Crane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of species and speciation,the speciation of Black-necked Grane(Grus nigricollis) was discussed using bio-geographic principles and some evidences suggest that Black-necked Grane had a close relationship with Red-crowned Crane(Grus japonensis).The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau uplift may be the most important factor in allopatric speciation for Black-necked Crane.

  10. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF{sub Ln/Am} obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as

  11. Determination of Uncertainties for +III and +IV Actinide Solubilities in the WIPP Geochemistry Model for the 2009 Compliance Recertification Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A. E.; Xiong, Y.; Nowak, E. J.; Brush, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. Every five years, the DOE is required to submit an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) demonstrating the WIPP’s continuing compliance with the applicable EPA regulations governing the repository. Part of this recertification effort involves a performance assessment—a probabilistic evaluation of the repository performance with respect to regulatory limits on the amount of releases from the repository to the accessible environment. One of the models used as part of the performance assessment process is a geochemistry model, which predicts solubilities of the radionuclides in the brines that may enter the repository in the different scenarios considered by the performance assessment. The dissolved actinide source term comprises actinide solubilities, which are input parameters for modeling the transport of radionuclides as a result of brine flow through and from the repository. During a performance assessment, the solubilities are modeled as the product of a “base” solubility determined from calculations based on the chemical conditions expected in the repository, and an uncertainty factor that describes the potential deviations of the model from expected behavior. We will focus here on a discussion of the uncertainties. To compute a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the uncertainties, we compare published, experimentally measured solubility data to predictions made using the established WIPP geochemistry model. The differences between the solubilities observed for a given experiment and the calculated solubilities from the model are used to form the overall CDF, which is then sampled as part of the performance assessment. We will discuss the methodology used to update the CDF’s for the +III actinides, obtained from data for Nd, Am, and Cm, and the +IV actinides, obtained

  12. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  13. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  14. Speciation by selection: A framework for understanding ecology's role in speciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Brian LANGERHANS; Rüdiger RIESCH

    2013-01-01

    Speciation research during the last several decades has confirmed that natural selection frequently drives the generation of new species.But how does this process generally unfold in nature? We argue that answering this question requires a clearer conceptual framework for understanding selection's role in speciation.We present a unified framework of speciation,providing mechanistic descriptions of fundamentally distinct routes to speciation,and how these may interact during lineage splitting.Two major categories are recognized:reproductive isolation resulting from (1) responses to selection,"speciation by selection,"or (2) non-selective processes,"speciation without selection." Speciation by selection can occur via three mechanisms:(1) similar selection,(2) divergent selection,and (3) reinforcement selection.Understanding ecology's role in speciation requires uncovering how these three mechanisms contribute to reproductive isolation,and their relative importance compared to non-selective processes,because all three mechanisms can occur side-by-side during speciation.To accomplish this,we highlight examination of groups of organisms inhabiting replicated environmental gradients.This scenario is common in nature,and a large literature illustrates that both parallel and non-parallel responses to similar environments are widespread,and each can result in speciation.This recognition reveals four general pathways of speciation by similar or divergent selection-parallel and nonparallel responses to similar and divergent selection.Altogether,we present a more precise framework for speciation research,draw attention to some under-recognized features of speciation,emphasize the multidimensionality of speciation,reveal limitations of some previous tests and descriptions of speciation mechanisms,and point to a number of directions for future investigation [Current Zoology 59(1):31-52,2013].

  15. Neutron-induced capture cross sections of short-lived actinides with the surrogate reaction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsing F.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of neutron-capture cross sections of short-lived nuclei is opening the way to understand and clarify the properties of many nuclei of interest for nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and particularly for transmutation of nuclear wastes. The surrogate approach is well-recognized as a potentially very useful method to extract neutron cross sections for low-energy compound-nuclear reactions and to overcome the difficulties related to the target radioactivity. In this work we will assess where we stand on these neutron-capture cross section measurements and how we can achieve the short-lived Minor Actinides nuclei involved in the nuclear fuel cycle. The CENBG collaboration applied the surrogate method to determine the neutron-capture cross section of 233Pa (T1/2 = 27 d. The 233Pa (n,γ cross section is then deduced from the measured gamma decay probability of 234Pa compound nucleus formed via the surrogate 232Th(3He,p reaction channel. The obtained cross section data, covering the neutron energy range 0.1 to 1 MeV, have been compared with the predictions of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. The importance of establishing benchmarks is stressed for the minor actinides region. However, the lack of desired targets led us to propose recently the 174Yb (3He,pγ reaction as a surrogate reaction for the (n,γ predetermined benchmark cross section of 175Lu. An overview of the experimental setup combining gamma ray detectors such as Ge and C6D6 in coincidence with light charged particles ΔE-E Telescopes will be presented and preliminary results will be discussed.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TITANATE-BASED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS UNDER STRONGLY ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Peters, T.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fink, S.

    2010-02-18

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes at SRS include the sorption of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST) and caustic side solvent extraction of {sup 137}Cs. The MST and separated {sup 137}Cs is encapsulated along with the sludge fraction of high-level waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass waste form for eventual entombment at a federal repository. The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu; {sup 237}Np; and uranium isotopes, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. This paper describes recent results evaluating the performance of an improved sodium titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST.

  17. Internal contamination by actinides after wounding: a robust rodent model for assessment of local and distant actinide retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, N M; Wilk, J C; Abram, M C; Renault, D; Chau, Q; Helfer, N; Guichet, C; Van der Meeren, A

    2012-08-01

    Internal contamination by actinides following wounding may occur in nuclear fuel industry workers or subsequent to terrorist activities, causing dissemination of radioactive elements. Contamination by alpha particle emitting actinides can result in pathological effects, either local or distant from the site of entry. The objective of the present study was to develop a robust experimental approach in the rat for short- and long- term actinide contamination following wounding by incision of the skin and muscles of the hind limb. Anesthetized rats were contaminated with Mixed OXide (MOX, uranium, plutonium oxides containing 7.1% plutonium) or plutonium nitrate (Pu nitrate) following wounding by deep incision of the hind leg. Actinide excretion and tissue levels were measured as well as histological changes from 2 h to 3 mo. Humid swabs were used for rapid evaluation of contamination levels and proved to be an initial guide for contamination levels. Although the activity transferred from wound to blood is higher after contamination with a moderately soluble form of plutonium (nitrate), at 7 d most of the MOX (98%) or Pu nitrate (87%) was retained at the wound site. Rapid actinide retention in liver and bone was observed within 24 h, which increased up to 3 mo. After MOX contamination, a more rapid initial urinary excretion of americium was observed compared with plutonium. At 3 mo, around 95% of activity remained at the wound site, and excretion of Pu and Am was extremely low. This experimental approach could be applied to other situations involving contamination following wounding including rupture of the dermal, vascular, and muscle barriers.

  18. Actinides: How well do we know their stellar production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2001-12-01

    The reliable evaluation of the r-process production of the actinides and careful estimates of the uncertainties affecting these predictions are key ingredients especially in nucleo-cosmochronology studies based on the analysis of very metal-poor stars or on the composition of meteorites. This type of information is also required in order to make the best possible use of future high precision data on the actinide composition of galactic cosmic rays, of the local interstellar medium, or of meteoritic grains of presumed circumstellar origin. This paper provides the practitioners in these various fields with the most detailed and careful analysis of the r-process actinide production available to-date. This study is based on a version of the multi-event canonical model of the r-process which discards the largely used waiting point approximation. It considers also different combinations of models for the calculation of nuclear masses, beta -decay and fission rates. Two variants of the model used to predict nuclear reaction rates are adopted. In addition, the influence of the level of Pb and Bi production by the r-process on the estimated actinide production is evaluated by relying on the solar abundances of these two elements. In total, thirty-two different cases are presented, and are considered to give a fair picture of the level of reliability of the predictions of the actinide production, at least in the framework of a simple r-process model. This simplicity is imposed by our inability to identify the proper astrophysical sites for the r-process. As a guide to the practitioners, constraints on the actinide yield predictions and associated uncertainties are suggested on grounds of the measured abundances of r-nuclides, including Th and U, in the star CS 31082-001, and under the critical and questionable assumption of the ``universality'' of the r-process. We also define alternative constraints based on the nucleo-cosmochronological results derived from the present

  19. Trace Metal-Humic Complexes in Natural Waters: Insights From Speciation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Salters, V.; Sonke, J.

    2006-12-01

    The DOM cycle is intimately linked to the cycling and bioavailability of trace metals in aqueous environments. The presence or absence of DOM in the water column can determined whether trace elements will be present in limited quantities as a nutrient, or in surplus quantities as a toxicant. Humic substances (HS), which represent the refractory products of DOM degradation, strongly affect the speciation of trace metals in natural waters. To simulate metal-HS interactions in nature, experiments must be carried out using trace metal concentrations. Sensitive detection systems such as ICP-MS make working with small (nanomolar) concentrations possible. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with ICP-MS (CE-ICP-MS) has recently been identified as a rapid and accurate method to separate metal species and calculate conditional binding constants (log K_c) of metal-humic complexes. CE-ICP-MS was used to measure partitioning of metals between humic substances and a competing ligand (EDTA) and calculate binding constants of rare earth element (REE) and Th, Hf, and Zr-humic complexes at pH 3.5-8 and ionic strength of 0.1. Equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange (EDLE) experiments to validate the CE-ICP-MS method were performed to separate the metal-HS and metal-EDTA species by partitioning due to size exclusion via diffusion through a 1000 Da membrane. CE-ICP-MS experiments were also conducted to compare binding constants of REE with humic substances of various origin, including soil, peat, and aquatic DOM. Results of our experiments show an increase in log K_c with decrease in ionic radius for REE-humic complexes (the lanthanide contraction effect). Conditional binding constants of tetravalent metal-humic complexes were found to be several orders of magnitude higher than REE-humic complexes, indicating that tetravalent metals have a very strong affinity for humic substances. Because thorium is often used as a proxy for the tetravalent actinides, Th-HS binding constants can allow us

  20. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  1. Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

    1999-10-07

    The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

  2. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior across the High-Level Waste Evaporator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jackson, D. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, H. B. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-17

    The Mercury Program team’s effort continues to develop more fundamental information concerning mercury behavior across the liquid waste facilities and unit operations. Previously, the team examined the mercury chemistry across salt processing, including the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU), and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheets. This report documents the data and understanding of mercury across the high level waste 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  3. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.

  4. Theory of the crystal structures of the actinide metals; Theorie des structures cristallines des metaux actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penicaud, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2005-07-01

    We describe, by bands calculation methods, the delocalized-localized transition of 5f electrons in the series of actinide metals, at ambient conditions, which happens between {alpha}-Pu and Am, and which is characterized by the change from the open and complex monoclinic crystal structure to the double hexagonal close-packed structure, and by the density collapse from 19.86 g.cm{sup -3} to 13.67 g.cm{sup -3}. The case of the alloy stabilized Pu in the high temperature {delta} phase (face centered cubic) is treated. Its ambient experimental density (15.92 g.cm{sup -3}) is obtained with a localization of the only 5f5/2 electrons. We find a 5f5/2 density of states peak pinned at the Fermi level, in agreement with photoelectron spectroscopy, and the high value of the electronic specific heat coefficient. The crystalline stability under pressure of U, Np, Pu and Am is examined. We find theoretically, at high pressure in Am, the stability of the recently discovered experimentally Am IV structure which is primitive-orthorhombic with four atoms in the unit cell. We calculate this structure also stable for Pu, for which it is proposed that the sequence is: {alpha}-Pu {yields} Am IV {yields} body-centered cubic. (author)

  5. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  6. RED-IMPACT. Impact of partitioning, transmutation and waste reduction technologies on the final nuclear waste disposal. Synthesis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lensa, Werner von; Nabbi, Rahim; Rossbach, Matthias (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The impact of partitioning and transmutation (P and T) and waste reduction technologies on the nuclear waste management and particularly on the final disposal has been analysed within the EU-funded RED-IMPACT project. Five representative scenarios, ranging from direct disposal of the spent fuel to fully closed cycles (including minor actinide (MA) recycling) with fast neutron reactors or accelerator-driven systems (ADS), were chosen in the project to cover a wide range of representative waste streams, fuel cycle facilities and process performances. High and intermediate level waste streams have been evaluated for all of these scenarios with the aim of analysing the impact on geological disposal in different host formations such as granite, clay and salt. For each scenario and waste stream, specific waste package forms have been proposed and their main characteristics identified. Both equilibrium and transition analyses have been applied to those scenarios. The performed assessments have addressed parameters such as the total radioactive and radiotoxic inventory, discharges during reprocessing, thermal power and radiation emission of the waste packages, corrosion of matrices, transport of radioisotopes through the engineered and geological barriers or the resulting doses from the repository. The major conclusions of include the fact, that deep geological repository to host the remaining high level waste (HLW) and possibly the long-lived intermediate level waste (ILW) is unavoidable whatever procedure is implemented to manage waste streams from different fuel cycle scenarios including P and T of long-lived transuranic actinides.

  7. Cd(II) Speciation in alginate gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, T.A.; Kalis, E.J.J.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polysaccharides, such as those occurring in cell walls and biofilms, play an important role in metal speciation in natural aqueous systems. This work describes the speciation of Cd(II) in alginate gels chosen as a model system for biogels. The gels are formed by bridging calcium ions at junction zon

  8. Adaptive speciation theory : A conceptual review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weissing, Franz J.; Edelaar, Pim; van Doorn, G. Sander

    2011-01-01

    Speciation-the origin of new species-is the source of the diversity of life. A theory of speciation is essential to link poorly understood macro-evolutionary processes, such as the origin of biodiversity and adaptive radiation, to well understood micro-evolutionary processes, such as allele frequenc

  9. Speciation of heavy metals in River Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vega, F.A.; Weng, L.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical speciation of Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb in River Rhine was studied by measuring free ion concentration and distribution in nanoparticles, and by comparing the measurement with speciation modeling. Concentrations of free metal ions were determined in situ using Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT). T

  10. Estimating the duration of speciation from phylogenies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Morlon, Helene; Lambert, Amaury

    2014-01-01

    Speciation is not instantaneous but takes time. The protracted birth-death diversification model incorporates this fact and predicts the often observed slowdown of lineage accumulation toward the present. The mathematical complexity of the protracted speciation model has barred estimation of its par

  11. Adaptive speciation theory : A conceptual review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weissing, Franz J.; Edelaar, Pim; van Doorn, G. Sander

    Speciation-the origin of new species-is the source of the diversity of life. A theory of speciation is essential to link poorly understood macro-evolutionary processes, such as the origin of biodiversity and adaptive radiation, to well understood micro-evolutionary processes, such as allele

  12. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeki, H.; Evans, N.; Czervinski, K.; Bruggeman, Ch.; Poineau, F.; Breynaert, A.; Reiler, P.; Pablo, J. de; Pipon, Y.; Molnar, M.; Nishimura, T.; Kienzler, B.; Van Iseghem, P.; Crovisier, J.L.; Wieland, E.; Mace, N.; Pablo, J. de; Spahiu, K.; Cui, D.; Lida, Y.; Charlet, L.; Liu, X.; Sato, H.; Goutelard, F.; Savoye, S.; Glaus, M.; Poinssot, C.; Seby, F.; Sato, H.; Tournassat, Ch.; Montavon, G.; Rotenberg, B.; Spahiu, K.; Smith, G.; Marivoet, J.; Landais, P.; Bruno, J.; Johnson, H.; Umeki, L.; Geckeis, H.; Giffaut, E.; Grambow, B.; Dierckx, A

    2007-07-01

    This document gathers 33 oral presentations that were made at this workshop dedicated to the mobility of some radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal. The workshop was organized into 6 sessions: 1) performance assessment, 2) speciation/interaction in aqueous media, 3) radioactive wastes, 4) redox processes at interfaces, 5) diffusion processes, and 6) retention processes.

  13. Rapid parapatric speciation on holey adaptive landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilets, S; Vose, M D; Gavrilets, Sergey; Li, Hai; Vose, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    A classical view of speciation is that reproductive isolation arises as a by-product of genetic divergence. Here, individual-based simulations are used to evaluate whether the mechanisms implied by this view may result in rapid speciation if the only source of genetic divergence are mutation and random genetic drift. Distinctive features of the simulations are the consideration of the complete process of speciation (from initiation until completion), and of a large number of loci, which was only one order of magnitude smaller than that of bacteria. It is demonstrated that rapid speciation on the time scale of hundreds of generations is plausible without the need for extreme founder events, complete geographic isolation, the existence of distinct adaptive peaks or selection for local adaptation. The plausibility of speciation is enhanced by population subdivision. Simultaneous emergence of more than two new species from a subdivided population is highly probable. Numerical examples relevant to the theory of ce...

  14. Microbial diversity in opalinus clay and interaction of dominant microbial strains with actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, Henry; Luetke, Laura; Bachvarova, Velina; Steudtner, Robin; Geissler, Andrea; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Bernhardt, Gert

    2013-07-01

    For the first time microbial tDNA could be isolated from 50 g unperturbed Mont Terri Opalinus Clay. Based on the analysis of the tDNA the bacterial diversity of the unperturbed clay is dominated by representatives of Firmicutes, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes. Firmicutes also dominate after treatment of the clay with R2A medium. Bacteria isolated from Mont Terri Opalinus Clay on R2A medium were related to Sporomusa spp., Paenibacillus spp., and Clostridium spp. All further investigations are concentrated on the unique isolates Sporomusa sp. MT-2 and Paenibacillus sp. MT-2. Cells of the type Sporomusa sp. MT-2 and Paenibacillus sp. MT-2 were comprehensively analyzed in terms of growing, morphology, functional groups of the cell envelope, and cell membrane structure. Strong actinide(An)/lanthanide(Ln)-interactions with the Opalinus Clay isolates and the Aespoe-strain Pseudomonas fluorescens (CCUG 32456) could be determined within a broad pH range (2-8). The metals bind as a function of pH on protonated phosphoryl, carboxyl and deprotonated phosphoryl sites of the respective cell membrane. The thermodynamic surface complexation constants of bacterial An/Ln-species were determined and can be used in modeling programs. Depending on the used An different interaction mechanisms were found (U(VI): biosorption, partly biomineralisation; Cm(III): biosorption, indications for embedded Cm(III); Pu: biosorption, bioreduction and indications for embedded Pu). Different strategies of coping with U(VI) were observed comparing P. fluorescens planktonic cells and biofilms under the chosen experimental conditions. An enhanced capability of the biofilm to form meta-autunite in comparison to the planktonic cells was proven. Conclusively, the P. fluorescens biofilm is more efficient in U(VI) detoxification. In conclusion, Mont Terri Opalinus Clay contains bacterial communities, that may influence the speciation and hence the migration behavior of selected An/Ln under

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF ACTINIDES BETWEEN THE AQUEOUS AND ORGANIC PHASES IN THE TALSPEAK PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.; Kyser, E.

    2010-09-02

    One objective of the US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles which improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation, minimize waste generation, improve safety, and complement institutional measures limiting proliferation risks. Activities in progress which support this objective include the development of advanced separation technologies to recover the actinides from used nuclear fuels. With the increased interest in the development of technology to allow closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, the TALSPEAK process is being considered for the separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanide fission products in a next generation reprocessing plant. However, at this time, the level of understanding associated with the chemistry and the control of the process variables is not acceptable for deployment of the process on an industrial scale. To address this issue, DOE-NE is supporting basic scientific studies focused on the TALSPEAK process through its Fuel Cycle Research and Development (R&D) program. One aspect of these studies is an experimental program at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in which temperature-dependent distribution coefficients for the extraction of actinide elements in the TALSPEAK process were measured. The data were subsequently used to calculate conditional enthalpies and entropies of extraction by van't Hoff analysis to better understand the thermodynamic driving forces for the TALSPEAK process. In the SRNL studies, the distribution of Pu(III) in the TALSPEAK process was of particular interest. A small amount of Pu(III) would be present in the feed due to process losses and valence adjustment in prior recovery operations. Actinide elements such as Np and Pu have multiple stable oxidation states in aqueous solutions; therefore the oxidation state for these elements must be controlled in the TALSPEAK process, as the extraction chemistry is

  16. Accuracy Improvement of Neutron Nuclear Data on Minor Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of accuracy of neutron nuclear data for minor actinides (MAs and long-lived fission products (LLFPs is required for developing innovative nuclear system transmuting these nuclei. In order to meet the requirement, the project entitled as “Research and development for Accuracy Improvement of neutron nuclear data on Minor ACtinides (AIMAC” has been started as one of the “Innovative Nuclear Research and Development Program” in Japan at October 2013. The AIMAC project team is composed of researchers in four different fields: differential nuclear data measurement, integral nuclear data measurement, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear data evaluation. By integrating all of the forefront knowledge and techniques in these fields, the team aims at improving the accuracy of the data. The background and research plan of the AIMAC project are presented.

  17. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  18. Superabsorbing gel for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides an aqueous gel composition for removing actinide ions, lanthanide ions, fission product ions, or a combination thereof from a porous surface contaminated therewith. The composition comprises a polymer mixture comprising a gel forming cross-linked polymer and a linear polymer. The linear polymer is present at a concentration that is less than the concentration of the cross-linked polymer. The polymer mixture is at least about 95% hydrated with an aqueous solution comprising about 0.1 to about 3 percent by weight (wt %) of a multi-dentate organic acid chelating agent, and about 0.02 to about 0.6 molar (M) carbonate salt, to form a gel. When applied to a porous surface contaminated with actinide ions, lanthanide ions, and/or other fission product ions, the aqueous gel absorbs contaminating ions from the surface.

  19. Radioanalytical determination of actinides and fission products in Belarus soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, H; Gasparro, J; Barci-Funel, G; Dalmasso, J; Ardisson, G; Sharovarov, G

    1999-04-01

    Alpha emitting actinides such as plutonium, americium or curium were measured by alpha-spectrometry after radiochemical separation. The short range of alpha-particles within matter requires, after a pre-concentration process, a succession of isolation and purification steps based on the valence states modification of the researched elements. For counting, actinides were electrodeposited in view to obtain the mass-less source necessary to avoid self-absorption of the emitted radiations. Activity concentrations of gamma-emitting fission products were calculated after measurement with high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). These different methods were used to analyse soils sampled in the Republic of Belarus, not far from the Chernobyl nuclear plant.

  20. Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

  1. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  2. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes.

  3. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  4. Validation of minor actinides fission neutron cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Verification of neutron fission cross-sections of minor actinides from some recently available evaluated nuclear data libraries was carried out by comparison of the reaction rates calculated by the MCNP6.1 computer code to the experimental values. The experimental samples, containing thin layers of 235U, 237Np, 238,239,240,241Pu, 242mAm, 243Cm, 245Cm, and 247Cm, deposited on metal support and foils of 235U (pseudo-alloy 27Al + 235U, 238U, natIn, 64Zn, 27Al, and multi-component sample alloy 27Al + 55Mn + natCu + natLu + 197Au, were irradiated in the channels of the tank containing fluorine salts 0.52NaF + 0.48ZrF4, labelled as the Micromodel Salt Blanket, inserted in the lattice centre of the MAKET heavy water critical assembly at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow. This paper is a continuation of earlier initiated scientific-research activities carried out for validation of the evaluated fission cross-sections of actinides that were supposed to be used for the quality examination of the fuel design of the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors, and consequently, determination of transmutation rates of actinides, and therefore, determination of operation parameters of these reactor facilities. These scientific-research activities were carried out within a frame of scientific projects supported by the International Science and Technology Center and the International Atomic Energy Agency co-ordinated research activities, from 1999 to 2010. Obtained results confirm that further research is needed in evaluations in order to establish better neutron cross-section data for the minor actinides and selected nuclides which could be used in the accelerator driven systems or fast reactors.

  5. Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E.D. Morgan; R.M. Housley; J.B. Davis; M.L. DeHaan

    2005-08-19

    A very import, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. THe use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements )e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations.

  6. EXAFS studies of actinide ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, D P; Georgopoulos, P; Knapp, G S

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of the EXAFS technique in the study of actinide systems is discussed. Uranium L/sub III/-edge spectra obtained on an in-lab rotating anode EXAFS facility are presented and analyzed for crystalline UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium ions. Methods for the extension of the technique to more dilute systems are discussed.

  7. Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

  8. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually...... increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold...... of competing localized and delocalized f-electron configurations underlies the ground states of NpC, PuC, AmC, NpN, and PuN. The fully localized 5f-electron configuration is realized in CmC (f7), CmN (f7), and AmN (f6). The observed sudden increase in lattice parameter from PuN to AmN is found to be related...

  9. Rapid separation method for actinides in emergency air filter samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L; Culligan, Brian K; Noyes, Gary W

    2010-12-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified (90)Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and (90)Sr in air filter results were reported in less than 4 h with excellent quality. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of Minor Actinides (Np, Am, Cm) in Nuclear Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, A.; Bergelson, B.; Tikhomirov, G.

    2014-06-01

    Calculation research of the utilization process of minor actinides (transmutation with use of power released) is performed for specialized power reactor of the VVER type operating on the level of electric power of 1000 MW. Five subsequent cycles are considered for the reactor with fuel elements containing minor actinides along with enriched uranium. It was shown that one specialized reactor for the one cycle (900 days) can utilize minor actinides from several VVER-1000 reactors without any technological and structural modifications. Power released because of minor actinide fission is about 4% with respect to the total power

  11. Transmutation of minor actinides in high and representative neutron fluxes: the mini-INCA and MEGAPIE projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A.; Chabod, S.; Marie, F.; Ridikas, D.; Toussaint, J.C.; Veyssiere, C. [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blandin, C. [CEA/DEN/DER/SPEX Cadarache - Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France); Mutti, P. [Inst. Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste transmutation studies, the Mini-INCA project has been initiated at CEA/DSM with objectives to determine optimal conditions for transmutation and incineration of minor actinides (MA) in high intensity neutron fluxes. Our experimental tools based on alpha- and gamma-spectroscopy of the samples and the development of micro fission chambers could gather either microscopic information on nuclear reactions (total or partial cross sections for neutron capture and/or fission reactions) or macroscopic information on transmutation and incineration potentials. Neutron capture cross sections of selected actinides ({sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Am, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 237}Np) have already been measured at ILL, showing some discrepancies when compared to evaluated data libraries but in overall good agreement with recent data. The studies and possibilities offer by the MEGAPIE project to assess neutronic performances of a 1 MW spallation target and the incineration of MA in a representative neutron flux of a spallation source are also discussed. (orig.)

  12. Actinides and lanthanides under pressure: the pseudopotential approach; Actinides et terres rares sous pression: approche pseudopotentiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, N

    2002-07-01

    In the Density Functional Theory Framework, the pseudopotential formalism offers a broader scope of study than other theoretical methods such as global relaxation of the parameters of the cell or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This method has been widely used to study light elements or transition metals but never to study f elements. We have generated two non local norm conserving Trouillier-Martins pseudopotentials (one in LDA and one in GGA) for the cerium. To check the validity of the pseudopotentials, we have calculated the equilibrium volume and the incompressibility modulus and compared our results to previous all-electron calculations. If the GGA and non linear core corrections are used, the equation of state is in a good agreement with the experimental equation of state. A static study of the previously proposed high pressure phases give a transitions fcc-a''(I)-bct. Using the pseudopotentials we have generated, an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at constant pressure, in the region between 5 and 12 GPa where the stable phase of cerium is not well defined, lead us to predict that a centred monoclinic structure, as the a''(I) phase previously observed in some experiments, is the most stable phase. We have also generated pseudopotentials for the light actinides (Th, Pa, U and Np). We have study their phase transitions under pressure at zero temperature. We compared our results with all electron results. The structure parameters have always been relaxed in this study. And for the first time in pseudopotential calculation, the spin-orbit coupling has been taken into account. The curves describing the variation of the volume or the incompressibility modulus depending on the elements and the phase transitions are always in agreement with the one found in the all electron calculations. (author)

  13. Environmental harshness, latitude and incipient speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T

    2014-02-01

    Are rates of evolution and speciation fastest where diversity is greatest - the tropics? A commonly accepted theory links the latitudinal diversity gradient to a speciation pump model whereby the tropics produce species at a faster rate than extra-tropical regions. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Botero et al. () test the speciation pump model using subspecies richness patterns for more than 9000 species of birds and mammals as a proxy for incipient speciation opportunity. Rather than using latitudinal centroids, the authors investigate the role of various environmental correlates of latitude as drivers of subspecies richness. Their key finding points to environmental harshness as a positive predictor of subspecies richness. The authors link high subspecies richness in environmental harsh areas to increased opportunities for geographic range fragmentation and/or faster rates of trait evolution as drivers of incipient speciation. Because environmental harshness generally increases with latitude, these results suggest that opportunity for incipient speciation is lowest where species richness is highest. The authors interpret this finding as incompatible with the view of the tropics as a cradle of diversity. Their results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that reproductive isolation and speciation occur fastest at high latitudes.

  14. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  15. Speciation of selenium in groundwater: Seasonal variations and redox transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. Ramesh [Chemical Laboratory, Central Groundwater Board, South Eastern Coastal Region, E1, Rajaji Bhavan, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090 (India); Riyazuddin, P., E-mail: riyazdr@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Selenium(VI) was the predominant species of Se present in groundwater. {yields} Groundwater recharge increased Se mobilization. {yields} Dissolved oxygen and redox potential control the mobilization of soil selenium. {yields} Shallow groundwater is susceptible for more selenium enrichment than deeper ones. - Abstract: Speciation of selenium in groundwater is essential from the viewpoint of toxicity to organisms and biogeochemical cycling. Selenium speciation in groundwater is controlled by aquifer redox conditions, microbial transformations, dissolved oxygen (DO) and other redox couples. A suburban area of Chennai city in India, where improper waste disposal measures have been practiced is selected for this study. Se(IV), Se(VI) and other hydrochemical parameters were monitored in shallow ground water during pre- and post-monsoon seasons for a period of three years. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of groundwater recharge on selenium speciation. The concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-0.43 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.16-4.73 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. During post-monsoon period the concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-1.25 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.58-10.37 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. Se(VI) was the dominant species of selenium during the pre- and post-monsoon periods. During the post-monsoon periods, leaching of selenium from soil was more effective due to the increased oxidizing nature of the groundwater as indicated by the DO and redox potential (Eh) measurements. This finding has important implications on the behavior of selenium in groundwater, and also on the health of people consuming groundwater from seleniferous areas.

  16. Fission fragment angular distributions in pre-actinide nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dubey, R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Laveen, P. V.; Shamlath, A.; Shareef, M.; Gehlot, J.; Saneesh, N.; Prasad, E.; Sugathan, P.; Pal, Santanu

    2016-10-01

    Background: Complete fusion of two nuclei leading to formation of a heavy compound nucleus (CN) is known to be hindered by various fission-like processes, in which the composite system reseparates after capture of the target and the projectile inside the potential barrier. As a consequence of these non-CN fission (NCNF) processes, fusion probability (PCN) starts deviating from unity. Despite substantial progress in understanding, the onset and the experimental signatures of NCNF and the degree of its influence on fusion have not yet been unambiguously identified. Purpose: This work aims to investigate the presence of NCNF, if any, in pre-actinide nuclei by systematic study of fission angular anisotropies and fission cross sections (σfis) in a number of nuclear reactions carried out at and above the Coulomb barrier (VB) . Method: Fission fragment angular distributions were measured for six 28Si-induced reactions involving isotopically enriched targets of 169Tm,176Yb,175Lu,180Hf,181Ta, and 182W leading to probable formation of CN in the pre-actinide region, at a laboratory energy (Elab) range of 129-146 MeV. Measurements were performed with large angular coverage (θlab=41∘ -170∘) in which fission fragments (FFs) were detected by nine hybrid telescope (E -Δ E ) detectors. Extracted fission angular anisotropies and σfis were compared with statistical model (SM) predictions. Results: Barring two reactions involving targets with large non-zero ground state spin (J ) , viz., 175Lu(7/2+) and 181Ta(7/2+) , experimental fission angular anisotropies were found to be higher in comparison with predictions of the statistical saddle point model (SSPM), at Ec .m . near VB. Comparison of present results with those from neighboring systems revealed that experimental anisotropies increasingly deviated from SSPM predictions as one moved from pre-actinide to actinide nuclei. For reactions involving targets with large nonzero J , this deviation was subdued. Comparison between

  17. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  18. Speciation gradients and the distribution of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph; Pennell, Matthew W

    2017-05-31

    Global patterns of biodiversity are influenced by spatial and environmental variations in the rate at which new species form. We relate variations in speciation rates to six key patterns of biodiversity worldwide, including the species-area relationship, latitudinal gradients in species and genetic diversity, and between-habitat differences in species richness. Although they sometimes mirror biodiversity patterns, recent rates of speciation, at the tip of the tree of life, are often highest where species richness is low. Speciation gradients therefore shape, but are also shaped by, biodiversity gradients and are often more useful for predicting future patterns of biodiversity than for interpreting the past.

  19. Electrochemical/Pyrometallurgical Waste Stream Processing and Waste Form Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Frank; Hwan Seo Park; Yung Zun Cho; William Ebert; Brian Riley

    2015-07-01

    This report summarizes treatment and waste form options being evaluated for waste streams resulting from the electrochemical/pyrometallurgical (pyro ) processing of used oxide nuclear fuel. The technologies that are described are South Korean (Republic of Korea – ROK) and United States of America (US) ‘centric’ in the approach to treating pyroprocessing wastes and are based on the decade long collaborations between US and ROK researchers. Some of the general and advanced technologies described in this report will be demonstrated during the Integrated Recycle Test (IRT) to be conducted as a part of the Joint Fuel Cycle Study (JFCS) collaboration between US Department of Energy (DOE) and ROK national laboratories. The JFCS means to specifically address and evaluated the technological, economic, and safe guard issues associated with the treatment of used nuclear fuel by pyroprocessing. The IRT will involve the processing of commercial, used oxide fuel to recover uranium and transuranics. The recovered transuranics will then be fabricated into metallic fuel and irradiated to transmutate, or burn the transuranic elements to shorter lived radionuclides. In addition, the various process streams will be evaluated and tested for fission product removal, electrolytic salt recycle, minimization of actinide loss to waste streams and waste form fabrication and characterization. This report specifically addresses the production and testing of those waste forms to demonstrate their compatibility with treatment options and suitability for disposal.

  20. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aldahan, A. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Science (Sweden)); Possnert, G. (Uppsala Univ., Tandem Lab. (Sweden)); Lujaniene, G. (Univ. of Helsinki, Lab. of Radiochemistry (Finland)); Lehto, J. (Institute of Physics (Lithuania)); Skipperud, L.; Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences, Isotope Lab., AAs (Norway))

    2009-10-15

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionuclides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners' laboratories. Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes: Speciation of 129I and 127I in time-series precipitation samples collected in Denmark 2001-2006 and its application for the investigation of geochemistry and atmospheric chemistry of iodine, Speciation of radionuclides in Ob and Yenisey Rivers, and Speciation of 129I and 127I in Lake Heimdalen water. Speciation of radionuclides in soils and sediments includes: Sequential extraction of radionuclides in sediments and of trace elements in soil samples. Sequential extraction of radionuclides in aerosols and particles has also been performed. Furthermore, sorption experiments have been performed to investigate the association of Pu, Am and Cs with different geological materials. The intercomparison exercises included sequential extraction of Pu, 137Cs, U, Th, and 129I in one soil and one sediment standard reference materials (NIST-4354, IAEA-375) and Pu in sediment collected from the Lake Heimdalen, Norway. (author)

  1. Phosphorous Speciation in WTR-treated Biosolids Using XANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. Q.; Huff, D.; Lin, Z.-Q.

    2009-04-01

    The concept of co-application of biosolids and drinking water treatment residues (DWTRs) represents an environmentally sustainable and economically sound strategy for the management of municipal solid wastes. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of reducing water-soluble P in biosolids-amended agricultural soil by the addition of DWTRs. Results showed that total P in soil leachate was significantly reduced during the initial 42-days of a 200-day greenhouse study when biosolids (50 g kg-1) were applied along with DWTRs (40 g kg-1). Particulate P was the dominant fraction of P in the soil leachate, which decreases with increasing DWTR application rate. The application of DWTRs does not significantly decrease the growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The primary P chemical composition in biosolids include cupper phytate [Cu(IP6)6], barium phytate [Ba6IP6], and cupper phosphate [Cu3(PO4)2]. The addition of DWTRs to biosolids alternated the P speciation, and the P speciation change became significant with increasing the incubation time of the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs. The chemical component of Cu3(PO4)2 became non significant (IP6 increased steadily from 30 to 50%, while the proportion of Cu(IP6)6 decreased significantly from 53 to 5%. The amorphous Fe(OH)3-adsorbed P and Ba6IP6 formed the dominant P chemical components in the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs.

  2. Burning minor actinides in a HTR energy spectrum and effects on the final radiotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.pohl@de.tuv.com [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The production of nuclear energy with existing nuclear reactors is equivalent to the use of low enriched uranium. But the neutron capture of the large corresponding U-238 fuel fraction also generates a build-up of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides as Neptunium, Americium and Curium. These actinides are dominant for the long time assessment of final disposal therefore a minimization of the long living isotopes is aspired. Burning the actinides in a high temperature helium cooled graphite moderated reactor (HTR) is one of these options. Using plutonium isotopes to sustain the criticality of the system is intended to avoid highly enriched uranium because of international regulations and low enriched uranium because of the build up of new actinides from neutron capture in U-238. Also fractions of plutonium isotopes are build up to minor actinides but for this absorption the overall number of actinides keeps constant. Nevertheless for the final assessment the activity and toxicity of all important actinides have to be taken into account. This paper comprises calculations for plutonium/minor actinides/thorium fuel compositions, their correlated final burn-up and the long term activity and toxicity for a generic pebble bed HTR based on the reference design of the 400 MW PBMR. In particular the behaviour of the different minor actinide isotopes in the higher thermal energy spectrum of a HTR will be discussed. Thorium based fuel - as a promising alternative to uranium based fuel - offers several advantages as a minimized build up of new Pu and MA, a higher thermal conductivity and melting point. Combining the thorium fuel with a significant fraction of minor actinides and an isotope fraction consistent with burned LWR fuel the total amount of the minor actinides stays nearly unchanged while the isotope composition significantly changes. This behaviour with respect to the initial heavy metal load and the influence on the long term activity and toxicity will be discussed.

  3. Burning high-level TRU waste in fusion fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yaosong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the concept of actinide burning instead of a once-through fuel cycle for disposing spent nuclear fuel seems to get much more attention. A new method of burning high-level transuranic (TRU) waste combined with Thorium-Uranium (Th-U) fuel in the subcritical reactors driven by external fusion neutron sources is proposed in this paper. The thorium-based TRU fuel burns all of the long-lived actinides via a hard neutron spectrum while outputting power. A one-dimensional model of the reactor concept was built by means of the ONESN_BURN code with new data libraries. The numerical results included actinide radioactivity, biological hazard potential, and much higher burnup rate of high-level transuranic waste. The comparison of the fusion-fission reactor with the thermal reactor shows that the harder neutron spectrum is more efficient than the soft. The Th-U cycle produces less TRU, less radiotoxicity and fewer long-lived actinides. The Th-U cycle provides breeding of 233U with a long operation time (>20 years), hence significantly reducing the reactivity swing while improving safety and burnup.

  4. 城市生活垃圾焚烧中NaCl迁移转化的实验和热力学平衡分析%Experimental and Thermodynamic Investigation on Partitioning and Speciation of NaCl During Municipal Solid Waste Incineration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙进; 李清海; 李国岫; 蒙爱红; 张衍国

    2014-01-01

    为研究垃圾焚烧过程中NaCl的迁移和转化,在管式炉中进行了模拟垃圾焚烧实验,结合扫描电镜-能谱分析(SEM-EDS)和热力学平衡模拟计算,分析了温度、停留时间、烟气中的水分和 S 等对氯化钠迁移转化的影响。研究结果表明,温度升高能促进NaCl蒸发和分解,从而增加氯在飞灰和烟气中的分布。在1000℃时焚烧12 min后NaCl的迁移分布趋于稳定。SEM-EDS结果显示,800℃时NaCl以不规则的形态聚集在底渣基体表面;而1000℃时氯在底渣中扩散均匀,形成了半球状位错结构,飞灰中的氯为亚微米精细结构。热力学平衡计算表明,酸性氧化物Al2O3、SiO2与Na有很强的亲和力,能促进NaCl氧化分解生成HCl。烟气中的水分对Cl的迁移没有显著影响,水解的反应不易发生。烟气中的SO2和SO3能与NaCl反应生成Na2SO4促进其分解,且随温度降低促进效果越明显。%In order to investigate the partitioning and speciation of NaCl during municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration the artificial waste was experimentally burned in a quartz tube furnace. The scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDS) analysis and thermodynamic equilibrium calculation were performed to study morphological transformation of chlorine. The factors include temperature, retention time, moisture in the flue gas and sulfur content on the NaCl partitioning. The results showed that temperature can promote the NaCl evaporation and decomposition, thus can increase chlorine distribution in fly ash and flue gas. After burning 12 min at 1 000℃ NaCl migration distribution tends to be stable in the experiments. The SEM-EDS results show that NaCl irregularly exists at the surface of slag substrate as the temperature is 800℃; and as the temperature is 1 000℃the chloride diffuse in the bottom slag, forming the half ball dislocation structure, while the chlorine forms the submicron fly ash in

  5. Measurements of thermal fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides within the Mini-INCA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringer, O.; Chabod, S.; Dupont, E.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Oriol, L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chartier, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 38 - Grenoble, (France); AlMahamid, I. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste transmutation studies, the Mini-INCA project has been initiated at Cea/DSM to determine optimal conditions for transmutation and incineration of Minor Actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes in the thermal region. Our experimental tool is based on alpha- and gamma-spectroscopy of irradiated samples and microscopic fission-chambers. It can provide both microscopic information on nuclear reactions (total and partial cross sections for neutron capture and/or fission reactions) and macroscopic information on transmutation and incineration potentials. The {sup 232}Th, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 244}Cm transmutation chains have been explored in details, showing some discrepancies in comparison with evaluated data libraries but in overall good agreement with recent experimental data. (authors)

  6. Pb speciation results in amended soils

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset shows the distribution of Pb phases resulting from various amendments to change Pb speciation. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  7. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) measures particle mass loading and chemical composition in real time for non-refractory sub-micron aerosol particles. The ACSM is designed for long-term unattended deployment and routine monitoring applications.

  8. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS TO RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  9. Speciation of Pb in industrially polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at elucidating the importance of original Pb-speciation versus soil-characteristics to mobility and distribution of Pb in industrially polluted soils. Ten industrially polluted Danish surface soils were characterized and Pb speciation was evaluated through SEM-EDX studies......, examination of pH-dependent desorption, distribution in grain-size fractions and sequential extraction. Our results show that the first factors determining the speciation of Pb in soil are: (1) the stability of the original speciation and (2) the contamination level, while soil characteristics...... are of secondary importance. In nine of ten soils Pb was concentrated strongly in the soil fines (soils, particles with a highly concentrated Pb-content were observed during SEM-EDX. In eight of the soils, the particles contained various Pb-species with aluminum/iron, phosphate, sulfate...

  10. Advanced waste forms from spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1995-12-31

    More than one hundred spent nuclear fuel types, having an aggregate mass of more than 5000 metric tons (2700 metric tons of heavy metal), are stored by the United States Department of Energy. This paper proposes a method for converting this wide variety of fuel types into two waste forms for geologic disposal. The method is based on a molten salt electrorefining technique that was developed for conditioning the sodium-bonded, metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for geologic disposal. The electrorefining method produces two stable, optionally actinide-free, high-level waste forms: an alloy formed from stainless steel, zirconium, and noble metal fission products, and a ceramic waste form containing the reactive metal fission products. Electrorefining and its accompanying head-end process are briefly described, and methods for isolating fission products and fabricating waste forms are discussed.

  11. Long-Term Interactions of Full-Scale Cemented Waste Simulates with Salt Brines (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7721)

    OpenAIRE

    Kienzler, Bernhard [Hrsg.; Borkel, Christoph; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Since 1967 radioactive wastes have been disposed of in the Asse II salt mine in Northern Germany. A signifi-cant part of these wastes originated from the pilot reprocessing plant WAK in Karlsruhe and consisted of cemented NaNO3 solutions bearing fission products, actinides, as well as process chemicals. With respect to the long-term behavior of these wastes, the licensing authorities requested leaching experiments with full scale samples in relevant salt solutions which were performed since 1...

  12. Speciation by Symbiosis: the Microbiome and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Species are fundamental units of comparison in biology. The newly discovered importance and ubiquity of host-associated microorganisms are now stimulating work on the roles that microbes can play in animal speciation. We previously synthesized the literature and advanced concepts of speciation by symbiosis with notable attention to hybrid sterility and lethality. Here, we review recent studies and relevant data on microbes as players in host behavior and behavioral isolation, emphasi...

  13. Recombination and the nature of bacterial speciation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Genetic surveys are uncovering the diversity of bacteria, and are causing the species concepts used to categorize these to be questioned. One difficulty in defining bacterial species arises from the high rates of recombination that results in the transfer of DNA between relatively distantly related bacteria. Barriers to this process, which could be used to define species naturally, are not apparent. Here, we have reviewed conceptual models of bacterial speciation and simulate speciation in si...

  14. Systematic Characteristics of Fast Neutron Fission Cross Sections for Actinide Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The neutron fission cross sections of actinide nuclei are important data for the design of nuclear reactor and nuclear engineering, and so on. So far, there has been a certain amount of experimental data for the fission cross sections of actinide nuclei. However,

  15. Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation Program. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D. W.; Blomeke, J. O. [comps.

    1977-10-01

    Experimental work on the 16 tasks comprising the Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation Program was continued. Summaries of work are given on Purex Process modifications, actinide recovery, Am-Cm recovery, radiation effects on ion exchangers, LMFBR transmutation studies, thermal reactor transmutation studies, fuel cycle studies, and partitioning-transmutation evaluation. (JRD)

  16. Invisible structures in the X-ray absorption spectra of actinides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; De Groot, Frank M F

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of actinides are discussed with an emphasis on the fundamental effects that influence their spectral shape, including atomic multiplet theory, charge transfer theory and crystal field theory. Many actinide spectra consist of a single peak and it is shown that the use of

  17. Refining the conditions for sympatric ecological speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Débarre, F

    2012-12-01

    Can speciation occur in a single population when different types of resources are available, in the absence of any geographical isolation, or any spatial or temporal variation in selection? The controversial topics of sympatric speciation and ecological speciation have already stimulated many theoretical studies, most of them agreeing on the fact that mechanisms generating disruptive selection, some level of assortment, and enough heterogeneity in the available resources, are critical for sympatric speciation to occur. Few studies, however, have combined the three factors and investigated their interactions. In this article, I analytically derive conditions for sympatric speciation in a general model where the distribution of resources can be uni- or bimodal, and where a parameter controls the range of resources that an individual can exploit. This approach bridges the gap between models of a unimodal continuum of resources and Levene-type models with discrete resources. I then test these conditions against simulation results from a recently published article (Thibert-Plante & Hendry, 2011, J. Evol. Biol. 24: 2186-2196) and confirm that sympatric ecological speciation is favoured when (i) selection is disruptive (i.e. individuals with an intermediate trait are at a local fitness minimum), (ii) resources are differentiated enough and (iii) mating is assortative. I also discuss the role of mating preference functions and the need (or lack thereof) for bimodality in resource distributions for diversification.

  18. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  19. GCFR Coupled Neutronic and Thermal-Fluid-Dynamics Analyses for a Core Containing Minor Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Castelliti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems about future energy availability, climate changes, and air quality seem to play an important role in energy production. While current reactor generations provide a guaranteed and economical energy production, new nuclear power plant generation would increase the ways and purposes in which nuclear energy can be used. To explore these new technological applications, several governments, industries, and research communities decided to contribute to the next reactor generation, called “Generation IV.” Among the six Gen-IV reactor designs, the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR uses a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity generation and for a CO2-free thermochemical production of hydrogen. Additionally, the use of a fast spectrum allows actinides transmutation, minimizing the production of long-lived radioactive waste in an integrated fuel cycle. This paper presents an analysis of GCFR fuel cycle optimization and of a thermal-hydraulic of a GCFR-prototype under steady-state and transient conditions. The fuel cycle optimization was performed to assess the capability of the GCFR to transmute MAs, while the thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to investigate the reactor and the safety systems behavior during a LOFA. Preliminary results show that limited quantities of MA are not affecting significantly the thermal-fluid-dynamics behavior of a GCFR core.

  20. Plutonium and minor actinides recycling in PWRs with new APA concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golfier, H.; Rohart, M.; Aniel, S.; Bergeron, J.; Deffain, J.P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation des Systemes et Structures, DM2S, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the studies required by the French law of 1991, CEA have launched a wide range of assessments on waste management for different reactors (PWR, FBR). Considerable R and D work has already been performed in order to improve the use of Plutonium (Pu) in PWRs. In this context, the Advanced Plutonium Assembly (APA) aims to improve the use of Plutonium (Pu) in PWRs while minimizing Minor Actinides (MA) production, with only slight modifications of the core design. From a neutronic point of view, the overall studied cases lead to the stabilization of the Pu inventory with approximately 30% of the park refueled with APA assemblies in full APA cores. Multi-recycling could satisfy the stabilization of Pu+ (Am+Cm) inventory by the implementation of approximately 40% APA reactors in a conventional PWRs park. After 7 or 8 recycles, the equilibrium is reached. The Pu inventory in the fuel cycle ranges from 210 tons to 270 tons for Pu multi-recycling, and from 240 tons to 290 tons for Pu+(Am+Cm) multi-recycling. The saving in Natural Uranium and Separative Work Units (SWU) due to the use of APA reactors would be between 30% and 15% in comparison with the UO{sub 2} open cycle. This paper presents a selection of the main preliminary Pu recycling results of the joint study program COGEMA-CEA. (author)

  1. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  2. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahner, C. T.; Shoun, R. R.; McDowell, W. J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl((dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)((diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl)phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl/sub 4/ as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen ((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions.

  3. Advances in fuel materials for the transmutation of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prunier, C.

    1994-12-31

    The physical feasibility of actinides, spent fuels and fission products burning in fission reactors is well understood. In fast reactors, this operation is more favourable. The homogeneous recycling mode has had a preliminary validation in Phenix (the Super fact experiment). For the heterogenous recycling mode, past experience for {sup 238} Pu production in thermal spectrum was obtained with Np O{sub 2}-Mg O targets. An irradiation experiment in Phenix blanket is foreseen with the same type of target. The {sup 237} Np problem seems to be most conveniently treated, even in the short term, by homogeneous recycling with Pu in fast reactors. (author). 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Fission of actinides using a table-top laser

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, H; Sauerbrey, R; Galy, J; Magill, J; Rondinella, V; Schenkel, R; Butz, T

    2003-01-01

    Powerful table-top lasers are now available in the laboratory and can be used to induce nuclear reactions. We report the first demonstration of nuclear fission using a high repetition rate table-top laser with intensities of 10 sup 2 sup 0 W/cm sup 2. Actinide photo-fission has been achieved in both sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th from the high-energy Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by laser acceleration of electrons. The fission products were identified by time-resolved gamma-spectroscopy. (authors)

  5. Detection of Actinides via Nuclear Isomer De-Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francy, Christopher J. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This dissertation discusses a data collection experiment within the Actinide Isomer Identification project (AID). The AID project is the investigation of an active interrogation technique that utilizes nuclear isomer production, with the goal of assisting in the interdiction of illicit nuclear materials. In an attempt to find and characterize isomers belonging to 235U and its fission fragments, a 232Th target was bombarded with a monoenergetic 6Li ion beam, operating at 45 MeV.

  6. On speciation of VOC localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the gas-phase chemical mechanisms successfully used in gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes, such as CBM-Z, RADM2 or SAPRC-07, treat hundreds of VOC as lumped organic species by their chemical characteristics. Most of the model results are compared with total VOC observations, and it is not appropriate to compare lumped VOC simulations to observations even if there are separate VOC observations like Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). While the PAMS Air Quality Model (PAMS-AQM) is developed, separate organic species observed by PAMS without a doubt can be directly compared with model simulations. From the past case study (Chen et al., 2010), it shows a major and very significant finding in that detailed emissions of VOC in the existing emissions database are often in error in Taiwan or other countries due to the fact that the annual VOC emissions are classified into hundreds of species-specific emissions by using the speciation factors following the protocol of the U.S. EPA (AP-42). Based on all PAMS observations from 2006-2007, four base cases with well comparable meteorological simulations were selected for the unified correction for all sources in Taiwan. After the PAMS species emissions are modified, the diurnal patterns and simulation-observation correlation for most of the PAMS species are improved, and the concentration levels are more comparable with those of observations. More expanded case studies also revealed necessary corrections for the PAMS species emissions. Sensitivity analyses for lumped organic species with modified PAMS species emissions are also conducted. After modified PAMS emissions are added into lumped VOC emissions, there is an increase of only 10% of totally VOC emissions. While the sources of the lumped VOC emissions are changed, ozone formation shows no significant change with modified lumped VOC emissions. This helps to support the argument that for ozone simulation, the lumped VOC processes balance out

  7. Speciation of vanadium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połedniok, Justyna; Buhl, Franciszek

    2003-01-02

    A method for speciation of vanadium in soil is presented in this work. The sequential extraction analysis procedure of Tessier et al. for heavy metals was used for the vanadium separation. The method consists of sequential leaching of the soil samples to separate five fractions of metals: (1) exchangeable, (2) bound to carbonates, (3) bound to Fe-Mn oxides, (4) bound to organic matter and (5) residual. The leaching solutions of Tessier were used for the vanadium extraction, only for the residual fraction the HClO(4) was replaced with H(2)SO(4). The optimum conditions for leaching of vanadium from soil (weight of sample, concentration and volume of extractants, time of extraction) were chosen for each fraction. A sensitive, spectrophotometric method based on the ternary complex V(IV) with Chrome Azurol S and benzyldodecyldimethylammonium bromide (epsilon=7.1x10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1)) was applied for the vanadium determination after separation of V(V) by solvent extraction using mesityl oxide and reduction of V(V) using ascorbic acid. This method was applied for vanadium speciation in soil from two different regions of Poland: Upper Silesia (industrial region) and Podlasie (agricultural region). The content of vanadium in the fractions of Upper Silesia soil was respectively (in 10(-3)%): I, 3.39; III, 4.53; IV, 10.70; V, 8.70 and it was the highest in the organic fraction, indicating input by anthropogenic activities. The content of vanadium in Podlasie soil was clearly lower and it was (in 10(-3)%): I, 2.07; III, 0.92; IV, 0.69; V, 1.23. The concentration of vanadium in fraction 2 of both soils was less than detection limit of applied method. The total content of vanadium in the five soil fractions was in good correlation with the total content of this element in both soils found after HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion. Analysis using the ICP-AES method gave comparable results.

  8. Speciation rates decline through time in individual-based models of speciation and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Anping; Fang, Jingyun; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-09-01

    A well-documented pattern in the fossil record is a long-term decline in the origination rate of new taxa after diversity rebounds from a mass extinction. The mechanisms for this pattern remain elusive. In this article, we investigate the macroevolutionary predictions of an individual-based birth-death model (BDI model) where speciation and extinction rates emerge from population dynamics. We start with the simplest neutral model in which every individual has the same per capita rates of birth, death, and speciation. Although the prediction of the simplest neutral model agrees qualitatively with the fossil pattern, the predicted decline in per-species speciation rates is too fast to explain the long-term trend in fossil data. We thus consider models with variation among species in per capita rates of speciation and a suite of alternative assumptions about the heritability of speciation rate. The results show that interspecific variation in per capita speciation rate can induce differences among species in their ability to resist extinction because a low speciation rate confers a small but important demographic advantage. As a consequence, the model predicts an appropriately slow temporal decline in speciation rates, which provides a mechanistic explanation for the fossil pattern.

  9. Ecological speciation in marine v. freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, O

    2009-10-01

    Absolute barriers to dispersal are not common in marine systems, and the prevalence of planktonic larvae in marine taxa provides potential for gene flow across large geographic distances. These observations raise the fundamental question in marine evolutionary biology as to whether geographic and oceanographic barriers alone can account for the high levels of species diversity observed in marine environments such as coral reefs, or whether marine speciation also operates in the presence of gene flow between diverging populations. In this respect, the ecological hypothesis of speciation, in which reproductive isolation results from divergent or disruptive natural selection, is of particular interest because it may operate in the presence of gene flow. Although important insights into the process of ecological speciation in aquatic environments have been provided by the study of freshwater fishes, comparatively little is known about the possibility of ecological speciation in marine teleosts. In this study, the evidence consistent with different aspects of the ecological hypothesis of speciation is evaluated in marine fishes. Molecular approaches have played a critical role in the development of speciation hypotheses in marine fishes, with a role of ecology suggested by the occurrence of sister clades separated by ecological factors, rapid cladogenesis or the persistence of genetically and ecologically differentiated species in the presence of gene flow. Yet, ecological speciation research in marine fishes is still largely at an exploratory stage. Cases where the major ingredients of ecological speciation, namely a source of natural divergent or disruptive selection, a mechanism of reproductive isolation and a link between the two have been explicitly documented are few. Even in these cases, specific predictions of the ecological hypothesis of speciation remain largely untested. Recent developments in the study of freshwater fishes illustrate the potential for

  10. Microbial characterization for the Source-Term Waste Test Program (STTP) at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, P.A.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Villarreal, R.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of microbial activity on the performance of the proposed underground nuclear waste repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico are being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of an ex situ large-scale experiment. Actual actinide-containing waste is being used to predict the effect of potential brine inundation in the repository in the distant future. The study conditions are meant to simulate what might exist should the underground repository be flooded hundreds of years after closure as a result of inadvertent drilling into brine pockets below the repository. The Department of Energy (DOE) selected LANL to conduct the Actinide Source-Term Waste Test Program (STTP) to confirm the predictive capability of computer models being developed at Sandia National Laboratory.

  11. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-09-01

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

  12. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-09-01

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The