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Sample records for waste-package wp system

  1. Waste package performance allocation system study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memory, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Waste Package Performance Allocation system study was performed in order to provide a technical basis for the selection of the waste package period of substantially complete containment and its resultant contribution to the overall total system performance. This study began with a reference case based on the current Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) baseline design and added a number of alternative designs. The waste package designs were selected from the designs being considered in detail during Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD). The waste packages considered were multi-barrier packages with a 0.95 cm Alloy 825 inner barrier and a 10, 20, or 45 cm thick carbon steel outer barrier. The waste package capacities varied from 6 to 12 to 21 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. The vertical borehole and in-drift emplacement modes were also considered, as were thermal loadings of 25, 57, and 114 kW/acre. The repository cost analysis indicated that the 21 PWR in-drift emplacement mode option with the 10 cm and 20 cm outer barrier thicknesses are the least expensive and that the 12 PWR in-drift case has approximately the same cost as the 6 PWR vertical borehole. It was also found that the cost increase from the 10 cm outer barrier waste package to the 20 cm waste package was less per centimeter than the increase from the 20 cm outer barrier waste package to the 45 cm outer barrier waste package. However, the repository cost was nearly linear with the outer barrier thickness for the 21 PWR in-drift case. Finally, corrosion rate estimates are provided and the relationship of repository cost versus waste package lifetime is discussed as is cumulative radionuclide release from the waste package and to the accessible environment for time periods of 10,000 years and 100,000 years

  2. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weddle, D.C.; Novotny, R.; Cron, J.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''

  3. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  4. Engineered waste-package-system design specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity

  5. TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW REPORT - YUCCA MOUNTAIN: WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2005-10-25

    The objective of the Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) project is to assist in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and associated high-level wastes (HLW) at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Materials will be transferred from the casks into a waste package (WP), sealed, and placed into the underground facility. The SNF/HLW transfer and closure operations will be performed in an aboveground facility. The objective of the Control System is to bring together major components of the entire WPCS ensuring that unit operations correctly receive, and respond to, commands and requests for data. Integrated control systems will be provided to ensure that all operations can be performed remotely. Maintenance on equipment may be done using hands-on or remote methods, depending on complexity, exposure, and ease of access. Operating parameters and nondestructive examination results will be collected and stored as permanent electronic records. Minor weld repairs must be performed within the closure cell if the welds do not meet the inspection acceptance requirements. Any WP with extensive weld defects that require lids to be removed will be moved to the remediation facility for repair.

  6. TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW REPORT - YUCCA MOUNTAIN: WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) project is to assist in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and associated high-level wastes (HLW) at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Materials will be transferred from the casks into a waste package (WP), sealed, and placed into the underground facility. The SNF/HLW transfer and closure operations will be performed in an aboveground facility. The objective of the Control System is to bring together major components of the entire WPCS ensuring that unit operations correctly receive, and respond to, commands and requests for data. Integrated control systems will be provided to ensure that all operations can be performed remotely. Maintenance on equipment may be done using hands-on or remote methods, depending on complexity, exposure, and ease of access. Operating parameters and nondestructive examination results will be collected and stored as permanent electronic records. Minor weld repairs must be performed within the closure cell if the welds do not meet the inspection acceptance requirements. Any WP with extensive weld defects that require lids to be removed will be moved to the remediation facility for repair

  7. Full-scale testing of waste package inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Moriya, Y.; Fujisawa, H.; Takebayashi, N.

    1989-01-01

    In land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in Japan, it is legally required that the waste packages to be disposed of be inspected for conformance to applicable technical regulations prior to shipment from each existing power station. JGC has constructed a fully automatic waste package inspection system for the purpose of obtaining the required design data and proving the performance of the system. This system consists of three inspection units (for visual inspection, surface contamination/dose rate measurement and radioactivity/weight measurement), a labelling unit, a centralized control unit and a drum handling unit. The outstanding features of the system are as follows: The equipment and components are modularized and designed to be of the most compact size and the quality control functions are performed by an advanced centralized control system. The authors discuss how, as a result of the full-scale testing, it has been confirmed that this system satisfies all the performance requirements for the inspection of disposal packages

  8. DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE NAVAL SNF WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.L. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to demonstrate the design of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste package (WP) using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methodologies and processes described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS MandO [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000b). The calculations that support the design of the naval SNF WP will be discussed; however, only a sub-set of such analyses will be presented and shall be limited to those identified in the ''Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000c). The objective of this analysis is to describe the naval SNF WP design method and to show that the design of the naval SNF WP complies with the ''Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System Description Document'' (CRWMS MandO 1999a) and Interface Control Document (ICD) criteria for Site Recommendation. Additional criteria for the design of the naval SNF WP have been outlined in Section 6.2 of the ''Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000c). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the naval long WP containing one naval long SNF canister. This WP is representative of the WPs that will contain both naval short SNF and naval long SNF canisters. The following items are included in the scope of this analysis: (1) Providing a general description of the applicable design criteria; (2) Describing the design methodology to be used; (3) Presenting the design of the naval SNF waste package; and (4) Showing compliance with all applicable design criteria. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the technical product development plan (TPDP) ''Design Analysis for the Naval SNF Waste Package (CRWMS MandO 2000a)

  9. Progress in waste package and engineered barrier system performance assessment and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Luik, A.; Stahl, D.; Harrison, D.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's evaluation of site suitability for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository, long-term interactions between the engineered barrier system and the site must be determined. This requires a waste-package/engineered-system design, a description of the environment around the emplacement zone, and models that simulate operative processes describing these engineered/natural systems interactions. Candidate designs are being evaluated, including a more robust, multi-barrier waste package, and a drift emplacement mode. Tools for evaluating designs, and emplacement mode are the currently available waste-package/engineered-system performance assessment codes development for the project. For assessments that support site suitability, environmental impact, or licensing decisions, more capable codes are needed. Code capability requirements are being written, and existing codes are to be evaluated against those requirements. Recommendations are being made to focus waste-packaging/engineered-system code-development

  10. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight

  11. Application of systems engineering to determine performance requirements for repository waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, E.A.; Stimmell, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The waste package for a nuclear waste repository in salt must contribute substantially to the performance objectives defined by the Salt Repository Project (SRP) general requirements document governing disposal of high-level waste. The waste package is one of the engineered barriers providing containment. In establishing the performance requirements for a project focused on design and fabrication of the waste package, the systems engineering methodology has been used to translate the hierarchy requirements for the repository system to specific performance requirements for design and fabrication of the waste package, a subsystem of the repository. This activity is ongoing and requires a methodology that provides traceability and is capable of iteration as baseline requirements are refined or changed. The purpose of this summary is to describe the methodology being used and the way it can be applied to similar activities in the nuclear industry

  12. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-09-23

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing.

  13. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY-99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-01-01

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing

  14. Yucca Mountain Project waste package design for MRS [Monitored Retrievable Storage] system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.; Russell, E.; Johnson, G.L.; Morissette, R.; Stahl, D.; LaMonica, L.; Hertel, G.

    1989-04-01

    This report, prepared by the Yucca Mountain Project, is the report for Task E of the MRS System Study. A number of assumptions were necessary prior to initiation of this system study. These assumptions have been defined in Section 2 for the packaging scenarios, the waste forms, and the waste package concepts and materials. Existing concepts were utilized because of schedule constraints. Section 3 provides a discussion of sensitivity considerations regarding the impact of different assumptions on the overall result of the system study. With the exception of rod consolidation considerations, the system study should not be sensitive to the parameters assumed for the waste package. The current reference waste package materials and concepts are presented in Section 4. Although stainless steel is assumed for this study, a container material has not yet been selected for Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) from the six candidates currently under study. Section 5 discusses the current thinking for possible alternate waste package materials and concepts. These concepts are being considered in the event that the waste package emplacement environment is more severe than is currently anticipated. Task E also provides a concept in Section 6 for an MRS canister to contain consolidated fuel for storage at the MRS and eventual shipment to the repository. 5 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs

  15. Electrical power system WP-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nored, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System (EPS) WP-40 are presented. Topics covered include: key EPS technical requirements; photovoltaic power module systems; solar array assembly; blanket containment box and box positioning subassemblies; solar cell; bypass diode assembly; Kapton with atomic oxygen resistant coating; sequential shunt unit; gimbal assembly; energy storage subsystem; thermal control subsystem; direct current switching unit; integrated equipment assembly; PV cargo element; PMAD system; and PMC and AC architecture.

  16. Remote systems and automation in radioactive waste package handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gneiting, B.C.; Hayward, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    A proof-of-principle test was conducted at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to demonstrate the feasibility of performing cask receiving and unloading operations in a remote and partially automated manner. This development testing showed feasibility of performing critical cask receipt, preparation, and unloading operations from a single control station using remote controls and indirect viewing. Using robotics and remote automation in a cask handling system can result in lower personnel exposure levels and cask turnaround times while maintaining operational flexibility. An automated cask handling system presents a flexible state-of-the-art, cost effective alternative solution to hands-on methods that have been used in the past

  17. Remote systems and automation in radioactive waste package handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gneiting, B.C.; Hayward, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    A proof-of-principle test was conducted at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to demonstrate the feasibility of performing cask receiving and unloading operations in a remote and partially automated manner. This development testing showed feasibility of performing critical cask receipt, preparation, and unloading operations from a single control station using remote controls and indirect viewing. Using robotics and remote automation in a cask handling system can result in lower personnel exposure levels and cask turnaround times while maintaining operational flexibility. An automated cask handling system presents a flexible state-of-the-art, cost effective alternative solution to hands-on methods that have been used in the past. 7 refs., 13 figs

  18. Waste package reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    Proof of future performance of a complex system such as a high-level nuclear waste package over a period of hundreds to thousands of years cannot be had in the ordinary sense of the word. The general method of probabilistic reliability analysis could provide an acceptable framework to identify, organize, and convey the information necessary to satisfy the criterion of reasonable assurance of waste package performance according to the regulatory requirements set forth in 10 CFR 60. General principles which may be used to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative reliability of a waste package design are indicated and illustrated with a sample calculation of a repository concept in basalt. 8 references, 1 table

  19. Engineered barrier system and waste package design concepts for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, D.W.; Ruffner, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

    1991-10-01

    We are using an iterative process to develop preliminary concept descriptions for the Engineered Barrier System and waste-package components for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The process allows multiple design concepts to be developed subject to major constraints, requirements, and assumptions. Involved in the highly interactive and interdependent steps of the process are technical specialists in engineering, metallic and nonmetallic materials, chemistry, geomechanics, hydrology, and geochemistry. We have developed preliminary design concepts that satisfy both technical and nontechnical (e.g., programmatic or policy) requirements

  20. Development of backfill material as an engineered barrier in the waste package system. Interim topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Hodges, F.N.; Bray, L.A.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Lester, D.H.; Nakai, T.L.; Spaeth, M.E.; Stula, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    A backfill barrier, emplaced between the containerized waste and the host rock, can both protect the other engineered barriers and act as a primary barrier to the release of radionuclides from the waste package. Attributes that a backfill should provide in order to carry out its required function have been identified. Primary attributes are those that have a direct effect upon the release and transport of radionuclides from the waste package. Supportive attributes do not directly affect radionuclide release but are necessary to support the primary attributes. The primary attributes, in order of importance, are: minimize (retard or exclude) the migration of ground water between the host rock and the waste canister system; retard the migration of selected chemical species (corrosive species and radionuclides) in the ground water; control the Eh and pH of the ground water within the waste-package environment. The supportive attributes are: self-seal any cracks or discontinuities in the backfill or interfacing host geology; retain performance properties at all repository temperatures; retain peformance properties during and after receiving repository levels of gamma radiation; conduct heat from the canister system to the host geology; retain mechanical properties and provide resistance to applied mechanical forces; retain morphological stability and compatibility with structural barriers and with the host geology for required period of time. Screening and selection of candidate backfill materials has resulted in a preliminary list of materials for testing. Primary emphasis has been placed on sodium and calcium bentonites and zeolites used in conjunction with quartz sand or crushed host rock. Preliminary laboratory studies have concentrated on permeability, sorption, swelling pressure, and compaction properties of candidate backfill materials

  1. The market-incentive recycling system for waste packaging containers in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor Yunchang, Jeffrey; Chien, Y.-L.; Hsu, Esher

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new market-incentive (MI) system to recycle waste-packaging containers in Taiwan. Since most used packaging containers have no or insufficient market value, the government imposes a combined product charge and subsidy policy to provide enough economic incentive for recycling various kinds of packaging containers, such as iron, aluminum, paper, glass and plastic. Empirical results show that the new MI approach has stimulated and established the recycling market for waste-packaging containers. The new recycling system has provided 18,356 employment opportunities and generated NT$ 6.97 billion in real-production value and NT$ 3.18 billion in real GDP during the 1998 survey year. Cost-effectiveness analysis constitutes the theoretical foundation of the new scheme, whereas data used to compute empirical product charge are from two sources: marketing surveys of internal conventional costs of solid-waste collection, disposal and recycling in Taiwan, and benefit transfer of external environmental costs in the United States. The new recycling policy designed by the authors provides a reasonable solution for solid-waste management in a country with limited land resources such as Taiwan

  2. Vertical Drop of 44-BWR Waste Package With Lifting Collars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.K. Scheider

    2005-08-23

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a waste package (WP) dropped flat on its bottom from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 44-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. The Uncanistered Waste Disposal Container System is classified as Quality Level 1 (Ref. 4, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 16). AP-3. 12Q, Design Calculations and Analyses (Ref. 11) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of 44-BWR WP considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for that design.

  3. Symmetric Rock Fall on Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the Naval SNF (spent nuclear fuel) Waste Package (WP) and the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to the rock fall DBE (design basis event) dynamic loads. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities and residual stresses in the WP, and stress intensities and maximum permanent downward displacements of the EP-lifting surface. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP and EP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for those designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  4. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. Marr

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation

  5. Swing-Down of 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.K. Scheider

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) swinging down from a horizontally suspended height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 13). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 18) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of 21-PWR WP design considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design

  6. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-05-03

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated.

  7. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated

  8. Waste package materials selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fish, R.L.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Southern Nevada to determine its suitability as a mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The B ampersand W Fuel Company (BWFC), as a part of the Management and Operating (M ampersand O) team in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), is responsible for designing and developing the waste package for this potential repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is responsible for testing materials and developing models for the materials to be used in the waste package. This paper is aimed at presenting the selection process for materials needed in fabricating the different components of the waste package

  9. Tritium waste package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmassler, Rich; Ciebiera, Lloyd; Tulipano, Francis J.; Vinson, Sylvester; Walters, R. Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

  10. Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammy S. Edgecumble Summers

    2001-08-23

    This Analysis Model Report (AMR) was prepared in accordance with the Work Direction and Planning Document, ''Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). It takes into consideration the Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II), which has been selected as the preferred design for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) program team (CRWMS M&O 1999b). The salient features of the EDA II design for this model are a waste package (WP) consisting of an outer barrier of Alloy 22 and an inner barrier of Type 316L stainless steel. This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22l, the current waste-package-outer-barrier (WPOB) material. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: (1) Long-range order reactions; (2) Intermetallic and carbide precipitation in the base metal; and (3) Intermetallic and carbide precipitation in welded samples.

  11. Sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; McNeish, J.A.; Vallikat, V.

    1996-01-01

    Simulations were conducted to analyze the sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of the advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures. The first conceptual model assumed that dripping water directly contacts the waste form inside the 'failed' waste package, and radionuclides are released from the EBS by advection. The second conceptual model assumed that dripping water is diverted around the 'failed' waste package (because of the presence of corrosion products plugging the perforations) and dripping water is prevented from directly contacting the waste form. In the second model, radionuclides were assumed to transport through the perforations by diffusion, and, once outside the waste package, to be released from the EBS by advection. The second model was to incorporate more realism into the EBS release calculations. For the case with the second EBS release model, most radionuclides had significantly lower peak EBS release rates (from at least one to several orders of magnitude) than with the first EBS release model. The impacts of the alternative EBS release models were greater for the radionuclides with a low solubility (or solubility-limited radionuclides) than for the radionuclides with a high solubility (or waste form dissolution-limited radionuclides). The analyses indicated that the EBS release model representing advection through a 'failed' waste package (the first EBS release model) may be too conservative in predicting the EBS performance. One major implication from this sensitivity study was that a 'failed' waste package container with multiple perforations may still be able to perform effectively as an important barrier to radionuclide release. (author)

  12. Waste package characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented.

  13. Waste package characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented

  14. An anti-Compton suppression Ge-telescope detection system for quality control of nuclear waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Para, A. Foglio; Chabalier, B.; Huot, N.; Graf, U.; Ravazzani, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kekki, T.; Tanner, V.; Tiitta, A.

    2001-01-01

    An anti-Compton suppression system is studied for the quality control of radioactive waste packages by nondestructive assay. The main objective is the reduction of the detection limit of actinides in the packages. The optimization of a final device is based on Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP and FLUKA) validated by experiments using a prototype consisting of a Ge-telescope detector surrounded by a NaI detector. The validation reveals that most of the discrepancies between experimental and simulated data are due to an incomplete description of the experimental conditions. After fine-tuning of the input file the uncertainties on the simulated full-energy peak efficiency are reduced to less than 5%. Also the total detector response for mono-energetic photons and real waste, including the photon interactions within the drum, can be simulated satisfactorily

  15. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. LeStrange

    1999-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO 2 ) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality

  16. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  17. A waste package strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. 7 refs., 1 fig

  18. Generalized waste package containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Apted, M.J.

    1985-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a performance assessment strategy to demonstrate compliance with standards and technical requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in geologic repositories. One aspect of this strategy is the development of a unified performance model of the entire geologic repository system. Details of a generalized waste package containment (WPC) model and its relationship with other components of an overall repository model are presented in this paper. The WPC model provides stochastically determined estimates of the distributions of times-to-failure of the barriers of a waste package by various corrosion mechanisms and degradation processes. The model consists of a series of modules which employ various combinations of stochastic (probabilistic) and mechanistic process models, and which are individually designed to reflect the current state of knowledge. The WPC model is designed not only to take account of various site-specific conditions and processes, but also to deal with a wide range of site, repository, and waste package configurations. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Waste Package Design Methodology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Brownson

    2001-09-28

    The objective of this report is to describe the analytical methods and processes used by the Waste Package Design Section to establish the integrity of the various waste package designs, the emplacement pallet, and the drip shield. The scope of this report shall be the methodology used in criticality, risk-informed, shielding, source term, structural, and thermal analyses. The basic features and appropriateness of the methods are illustrated, and the processes are defined whereby input values and assumptions flow through the application of those methods to obtain designs that ensure defense-in-depth as well as satisfy requirements on system performance. Such requirements include those imposed by federal regulation, from both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and those imposed by the Yucca Mountain Project to meet repository performance goals. The report is to be used, in part, to describe the waste package design methods and techniques to be used for producing input to the License Application Report.

  20. Waste Package Design Methodology Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.A. Brownson

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe the analytical methods and processes used by the Waste Package Design Section to establish the integrity of the various waste package designs, the emplacement pallet, and the drip shield. The scope of this report shall be the methodology used in criticality, risk-informed, shielding, source term, structural, and thermal analyses. The basic features and appropriateness of the methods are illustrated, and the processes are defined whereby input values and assumptions flow through the application of those methods to obtain designs that ensure defense-in-depth as well as satisfy requirements on system performance. Such requirements include those imposed by federal regulation, from both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and those imposed by the Yucca Mountain Project to meet repository performance goals. The report is to be used, in part, to describe the waste package design methods and techniques to be used for producing input to the License Application Report

  1. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-01-01

    requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1

  2. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-07-12

    and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

  3. Waste package performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to assess the life-expectancy and post-failure nuclide release behavior of high-level and waste packages in a geologic repository. The work involved integrating models of individual phenomena (such as heat transfer, corrosion, package deformation, and nuclide transport) and using existing data to make estimates of post-emplacement behavior of waste packages. A package performance assessment code was developed to predict time to package failure in a flooded repository and subsequent transport of nuclides out of the leaking package. The model has been used to evaluate preliminary package designs. The results indicate, that within the limitation of model assumptions and data base, packages lasting a few hundreds of years could be developed. Very long lived packages may be possible but more comprehensive data are needed to confirm this

  4. STRUCTURAL CALCULATION OF AN EMPLACEMENT PALLET STATICALLY LOADED BY A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to static load from the mounted waste package (WP). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This calculation is associated with the waste emplacement systems design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element solutions are performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The results of these calculations are provided in terms of maximum stress intensity magnitudes

  5. Thermal Response of the 21-PWR Waste Package to a Fire Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.P. Faucher; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal response of the 21-PWR WP (pressurized water reactor waste package) to the regulatory fire event. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation (Attachment IV) is that of the potential design of the type of waste package considered in this calculation. The procedure AP-3.12Q.Calculations (Reference 1), and the Development Plan (Reference 24) are used to develop this calculation

  6. Vertical Drop Of 21-PWR Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic; A. Scheider; S.M. Bennett

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) Waste Package (WP) subjected to the 2-m vertical drop on an unyielding surface at three different temperatures. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities in two different WP components. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only

  7. DHLW Glass Waste Package Criticality Analysis (SCPB:N/A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to determine the viability of the Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) Glass waste package concept with respect to criticality regulatory requirements in compliance with the goals of the Waste Package Implementation Plan (Ref. 5.1) for conceptual design. These design calculations are performed in sufficient detail to provide a comprehensive comparison base with other design alternatives. The objective of this evaluation is to show to what extent the concept meets the regulatory requirements or indicate additional measures that are required for the intact waste package

  8. Waste package/engineered barrier system design concepts for the direct disposal of spent fuel in the potential United States' repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.; Harrison, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) waste package development program is to design a waste package and associated engineered barrier system (EBS) that meets the applicable regulatory requirements for safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel and solidified high-level waste (HLW) in a geologic repository. Attainment of this goal relies on a multi-barrier approach, the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site, consideration of technical alternatives, and sufficient resolution of technical and regulatory uncertainties. To accomplish this, an iterative system engineering approach will be used. The NWPA of 1982 limits the content of the first US repository to 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM). The DOE Mission Plan describes the implementation of the provisions of the NWPA for the waste management system. The Draft 1988 approach will involve selecting candidate designs, evaluating them against performance requirements, and then selecting one or two preferred designs for further detailed evaluation and final design. The reference design of the waste package described in the YMP Site Characterization Plan is a thin-walled, vertical borehole-emplaced waste package with an air gap between the package and the rock wall. The reference design appeared to meet the design requirement. However, the degree of uncertainty was large. This uncertainty led to considering several more-robust design concepts during the Advanced Conceptual Design phase of the program that include small, drift-emplaced packages and higher capacity, drift-emplaced packages, both partially and totally self-shielded. Metallic as well as ceramic materials are being considered

  9. Naval Waste Package Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.M. Lewis

    2004-01-01

    A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository

  10. REMOTE MATERIAL HANDLING IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE CELL AND SUPPORT AREA GLOVEBOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.M. Croft; S.M. Allen; M.W. Borland

    2005-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) cells provide for shielding of highly radioactive materials contained in unsealed waste packages. The purpose of the cells is to provide safe environments for package handling and sealing operations. Once sealed, the packages are placed in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Closure of a typical waste package involves a number of remote operations. Those involved typically include the placement of matched lids onto the waste package. The lids are then individually sealed to the waste package by welding. Currently, the waste package includes three lids. One lid is placed before movement of the waste package to the closure cell; the final two are placed inside the closure cell, where they are welded to the waste package. These and other important operations require considerable remote material handling within the cell environment. This paper discusses the remote material handling equipment, designs, functions, operations, and maintenance, relative to waste package closure

  11. Vendor Assessment for the Waste Package Closure System (Yucca Mountain Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton-Davis, C.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been tasked with developing, designing, constructing, and operating a full-scale prototype of the work package closure system. As a precursor to developing the conceptual design, all commercially available equipment was assessed to identify any existing technology gaps. This report presents the results of that assessment for all major equipment

  12. Vendor Assessment for the Waste Package Closure System (Yucca Mtn. Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleen Shelton-Davis

    2003-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been tasked with developing, designing, constructing, and operating a full-scale prototype of the work package closure system. As a precursor to developing the conceptual design, all commercially available equipment was assessed to identify any existing technology gaps. This report presents the results of that assessment for all major equipment.

  13. Vendor Assessment for the Waste Package Closure System (Yucca Mountain Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton-Davis, C.V.

    2003-09-26

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been tasked with developing, designing, constructing, and operating a full-scale prototype of the work package closure system. As a precursor to developing the conceptual design, all commercially available equipment was assessed to identify any existing technology gaps. This report presents the results of that assessment for all major equipment.

  14. Release rates from waste packages in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambre, P.L.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, W.W.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1987-06-01

    In this report we present estimates of radionuclide release rates from waste packages into salt. This conservative and bounding analysis shows that release rates from waste packages in salt are well below the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's performance objectives for the engineered barrier system. 2 refs., 2 figs

  15. Naval Waste Package Design Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Schmitt

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to varying inner cavity dimensions when subjected to a comer drop and tip-over from elevated surface. This calculation will also determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to the upper bound of the naval canister masses. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of through-wall stress intensities in the outer corrosion barrier. This calculation is intended for use in support of the preliminary design activities for the license application design of the Naval waste package. It examines the effects of small changes between the naval canister and the inner vessel, and in these dimensions, the Naval Long waste package and Naval Short waste package are similar. Therefore, only the Naval Long waste package is used in this calculation and is based on the proposed potential designs presented by the drawings and sketches in References 2.1.10 to 2.1.17 and 2.1.20. All conclusions are valid for both the Naval Long and Naval Short waste packages

  16. Mechanical Assessment of the Waste Package Subject to Vibratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2004-10-14

    The purpose of this document is to provide an integrated overview of the calculation reports that define the response of the waste package and its internals to vibratory ground motion. The calculation reports for waste package response to vibratory ground motion are identified in Table 1-1. Three key calculation reports describe the potential for mechanical damage to the waste package, fuel assemblies, and cladding from a seismic event. Three supporting documents have also been published to investigate sensitivity of damage to various assumptions for the calculations. While these individual reports present information on a specific aspect of waste package and cladding response, they do not describe the interrelationship between the various calculations and the relationship of this information to the seismic scenario class for Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report is designed to fill this gap by providing an overview of the waste package structural response calculations.

  17. Mechanical Assessment of the Waste Package Subject to Vibratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Gross

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an integrated overview of the calculation reports that define the response of the waste package and its internals to vibratory ground motion. The calculation reports for waste package response to vibratory ground motion are identified in Table 1-1. Three key calculation reports describe the potential for mechanical damage to the waste package, fuel assemblies, and cladding from a seismic event. Three supporting documents have also been published to investigate sensitivity of damage to various assumptions for the calculations. While these individual reports present information on a specific aspect of waste package and cladding response, they do not describe the interrelationship between the various calculations and the relationship of this information to the seismic scenario class for Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report is designed to fill this gap by providing an overview of the waste package structural response calculations

  18. A Versatile System for the In-Field Non-Destructive Characterization of Radioactive Waste Packages and of Objects in the Defense against Nuclear Threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Gostomski, Ch.-Lierse-von

    2013-06-01

    In-filed non-destructive characterization of radioactive waste packages and of objects in the defense of nuclear threats requires purpose-built but similar equipment. Based on commercially available measuring devices like dose-rate and gamma detectors, X-ray and gamma-transmission sources etc. a versatile and mobile mechanical positioning system for these devices is designed, assembled and operated facilitating basic to even complex measuring procedures. Several in-field measuring campaigns resulted in its further optimization. Today an highly mobile and flexible mechanical manipulator system is available supporting nearly all types of required measuring devices thus rising to nearly all occasions. (authors)

  19. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  20. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  1. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Waste Package Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison-Giesler, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

    1991-02-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) waste package program is to develop, confirm the effectiveness of, and document a design for a waste package and associated engineered barrier system (EBS) for spent nuclear fuel and solidified high-level nuclear waste (HLW) that meets the applicable regulatory requirements for a geologic repository. The Waste Package Plan describes the waste package program and establishes the technical approach against which overall progress can be measured. It provides guidance for execution and describes the essential elements of the program, including the objectives, technical plan, and management approach. The plan covers the time period up to the submission of a repository license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). 1 fig

  2. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE CODISPOSAL OF TRIGA SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the structural response of a TRIGA Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal canister placed in a 5-Defense High Level Waste (DHLW) waste package (WP) and subjected to a tipover design basis event (DBE) dynamic load; the results will be reported in terms of displacements and stress magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design

  3. Sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; McNeish, J.A.; Vallikat, V.

    1996-01-01

    The first model assumed that dripping water directly contacts the waste form inside the ''failed'' waste package and radionuclides are released from the EBS by advection. The second model assumed that dripping water is diverted around the package (because of corrosion products plugging the perforations), thereby being prevented from directly contacting the waste form. In the second model, radionuclides were assumed to diffuse through the perforations, and, once outside the waste package, to be released from the EBS by advection. For the case with the second EBS release model, most radionuclides had lower peak EBS release rates than with the first model. Impacts of the alternative EBS release models were greater for the radionuclides with low solubility. The analysis indicated that the EBS release model representing advection through a ''failed'' waste package (the first model) may be too conservative; thus a ''failed'' waste package container with multiple perforations may still be an important barrier to radionuclide release

  4. Inspection and verification of waste packages for near surface disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Extensive experience has been gained with various disposal options for low and intermediate level waste at or near surface disposal facilities. Near surface disposal is based on proven and well demonstrated technologies. To ensure the safety of near surface disposal facilities when available technologies are applied, it is necessary to control and assure the quality of the repository system's performance, which includes waste packages, engineered features and natural barriers, as well as siting, design, construction, operation, closure and institutional controls. Recognizing the importance of repository performance, the IAEA is producing a set of technical publications on quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) for waste disposal to provide Member States with technical guidance and current information. These publications cover issues on the application of QA/QC programmes to waste disposal, long term record management, and specific QA/QC aspects of waste packaging, repository design and R and D. Waste package QA/QC is especially important because the package is the primary barrier to radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Waste packaging also involves interface issues between the waste generator and the disposal facility operator. Waste should be packaged by generators to meet waste acceptance requirements set for a repository or disposal system. However, it is essential that the disposal facility operator ensure that waste packages conform with disposal facility acceptance requirements. Demonstration of conformance with disposal facility acceptance requirements can be achieved through the systematic inspection and verification of waste packages at both the waste generator's site and at the disposal facility, based on a waste package QA/QC programme established by the waste generator and approved by the disposal operator. However, strategies, approaches and the scope of inspection and verification will be somewhat different from country to country

  5. Reference waste package environment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    One of three candidate repository sites for high-level radioactive waste packages is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in rhyolitic tuff 700 to 1400 ft above the static water table. Calculations indicate that the package environment will experience a maximum temperature of ∼230 0 C at 9 years after emplacement. For the next 300 years the rock within 1 m of the waste packages will remain dehydrated. Preliminary results suggest that the waste package radiation field will have very little effect on the mechanical properties of the rock. Radiolysis products will have a negligible effect on the rock even after rehydration. Unfractured specimens of repository rock show no change in hydrologic characteristics during repeated dehydration-rehydration cycles. Fractured samples with initially high permeabilities show a striking permeability decrease during dehydration-rehydration cycling, which may be due to fracture healing via deposition of silica. Rock-water interaction studies demonstrate low and benign levels of anions and most cations. The development of sorptive secondary phases such as zeolites and clays suggests that anticipated rock-water interaction may produce beneficial changes in the package environment

  6. CASK/MSC/WP PREPARATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Drummond

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the Cask/MSC/WP preparation system and their bases to allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This SDD is a living document that will be revised at strategic points as the design matures over time. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as they exist at this time, with emphasis on those attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD has been developed to be an engineering tool for design control. Accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This type of SDD both leads and trails the design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flow down of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. This SDD trails the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in the SDD is a reflection of the results of the design process to date. This SDD addresses the ''Project Requirements Document'' (PRD) (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275]) requirements. Additional PRD requirements may be cited, as applicable, to drive the design of specific aspects of the system, with justifications provided in the basis. Functional and operational requirements applicable to this system are obtained from the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' (F and OR) (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557]) document. Other requirements to support the design process have been taken from higher-level requirements documents such as the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (PDC) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599]) and the preclosure safety analyses

  7. CASK/MSC/WP PREPARATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Drummond

    2005-04-12

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the Cask/MSC/WP preparation system and their bases to allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This SDD is a living document that will be revised at strategic points as the design matures over time. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as they exist at this time, with emphasis on those attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD has been developed to be an engineering tool for design control. Accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This type of SDD both leads and trails the design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flow down of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. This SDD trails the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in the SDD is a reflection of the results of the design process to date. This SDD addresses the ''Project Requirements Document'' (PRD) (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275]) requirements. Additional PRD requirements may be cited, as applicable, to drive the design of specific aspects of the system, with justifications provided in the basis. Functional and operational requirements applicable to this system are obtained from the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' (F&OR) (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557]) document. Other requirements to support the design process have been taken from higher-level requirements documents such as the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (PDC) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599]) and the preclosure safety analyses.

  8. Performance implications of waste package emplacement orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1991-05-01

    Emplacement borehole orientation directly impacts many aspects of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and interactions with the near field environment. This paper considers the impacts of orientation on the hydrologic portion of the environment and its interactions with the EBS. The hydrologic environment is considered from a conceptual standpoint, the numerical analyses are left for subsequent work. As reported in this paper, several aspects of the hydrological environment are more favorable for long term performance of vertically oriented rather than horizontally oriented Waste Packages. 19 refs., 15 figs

  9. Evolution of repository and waste package designs for Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, Rob P.; Voegele, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the evolution of the engineered barrier design for the proposed Yucca Mountain disposal system. Initially, the underground facility used a fairly standard panel and drift layout excavated mostly by drilling and blasting. By 1993, the layout of the underground facility was changed to accommodate construction by a tunnel boring machine. Placement of the repository in unsaturated zone permitted an extended period without backfilling; placement of the waste package in an open drift permitted use of much larger, and thus hotter packages. Hence in 1994, the underground facility design switched from floor emplacement of waste in small, single walled stainless steel or nickel alloy containers to in-drift emplacement of waste in large, double-walled containers. By 2000, the outer layer was a high nickel alloy for corrosion resistance and the inner layer was stainless steel for structural strength. Use of large packages facilitated receipt and disposal of high volumes of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, in-drift package placement saved excavation costs. Options considered for in-drift emplacement included different heat loads and use of backfill. To avoid dripping on the package during the thermal period and the possibility of localized corrosion, titanium drip shields were added for the disposal drifts by 2000. In addition, a handling canister, sealed at the reactor to eliminate further handling of bare fuel assemblies, was evaluated and eventually adopted in 2006. Finally, staged development of the underground layout was adopted to more readily adjust to changes in waste forms and Congressional funding. - Highlights: • Progression of events associated with repository design to accommodate tunnel boring machine and in-drift waste package emplacement are discussed. • Change in container design from small, single-layered stainless steel vessel to large, two-layered nickel alloy vessel is discussed. • The addition of drip shield to limit the

  10. Geochemistry Model Abstraction and Sensitivity Studies for the 21 PWR CSNF Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernot, P.; LeStrange, S.; Thomas, E.; Zarrabi, K.; Arthur, S.

    2002-01-01

    The CSNF geochemistry model abstraction, as directed by the TWP (BSC 2002b), was developed to provide regression analysis of EQ6 cases to obtain abstracted values of pH (and in some cases HCO 3 - concentration) for use in the Configuration Generator Model. The pH of the system is the controlling factor over U mineralization, CSNF degradation rate, and HCO 3 - concentration in solution. The abstraction encompasses a large variety of combinations for the degradation rates of materials. The ''base case'' used EQ6 simulations looking at differing steel/alloy corrosion rates, drip rates, and percent fuel exposure. Other values such as the pH/HCO 3 - dependent fuel corrosion rate and the corrosion rate of A516 were kept constant. Relationships were developed for pH as a function of these differing rates to be used in the calculation of total C and subsequently, the fuel rate. An additional refinement to the abstraction was the addition of abstracted pH values for cases where there was limited O 2 for waste package corrosion and a flushing fluid other than J-13, which has been used in all EQ6 calculation up to this point. These abstractions also used EQ6 simulations with varying combinations of corrosion rates of materials to abstract the pH (and HCO 3 - in the case of the limiting O 2 cases) as a function of WP materials corrosion rates. The goodness of fit for most of the abstracted values was above an R 2 of 0.9. Those below this value occurred during the time at the very beginning of WP corrosion when large variations in the system pH are observed. However, the significance of F-statistic for all the abstractions showed that the variable relationships are significant. For the abstraction, an analysis of the minerals that may form the ''sludge'' in the waste package was also presented. This analysis indicates that a number a different iron and aluminum minerals may form in the waste package other than those described in the EQ6 output files which are based on the use

  11. Scientific investigation plan for NNWSI WBS element 1.2.2.5.L: NNWSI waste package performance assessment: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, K.G.; O'Connell, W.J.; Lappa, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Waste package performance assessment contains three broad categories of activities. These activities are: (1) development of a hydrothermal flow and transport model to test concepts to be used in establishing boundary conditions for performance calculations, and to interface EBS release calculations with total system performance calculations; (2) development of a waste package systems model to provide integrated deterministic assessments of performance and analyses of waste package designs; and (3) development of an uncertainty methodology for combination with the system model to perform probabilistic reliability and performance analysis waste package designs. The first category contains activities that aid in determining the scope of a separate, simplified set of hydrologic calculations needed to characterize the waste package environment for performance assessment calculations. The last two activity categories are directly concerned with waste package performance calculations. A rationale for each activity under these groups is presented. All of the activities of performance assessment are either code development or analyses of waste package problems

  12. EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Arthur

    2000-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this

  13. EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2000-09-14

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this

  14. Waste package performance in unsaturated rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.-L.

    1989-03-01

    The unsaturated rock and near-atmospheric pressure of the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain present new problems of predicting waste package performance. In this paper we present some illustrations of predictions of waste package performance and discuss important data needs. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Vertical Drop of the Naval SNF Long Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a Naval SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) Long Waste Package (WP) subjected to 2 m-vertical drop on unyielding surface (US). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the waste package design; calculation is performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element calculation is performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The result of this calculation is provided in terms of maximum stress intensities

  16. Interim storage of radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report covers all the principal aspects of production and interim storage of radioactive waste packages. The latest design solutions of waste storage facilities and the operational experiences of developed countries are described and evaluated in order to assist developing Member States in decision making and design and construction of their own storage facilities. This report is applicable to any category of radioactive waste package prepared for interim storage, including conditioned spent fuel, high level waste and sealed radiation sources. This report addresses the following issues: safety principles and requirements for storage of waste packages; treatment and conditioning methods for the main categories of radioactive waste; examples of existing interim storage facilities for LILW, spent fuel and high level waste; operational experience of Member States in waste storage operations including control of storage conditions, surveillance of waste packages and observation of the behaviour of waste packages during storage; retrieval of waste packages from storage facilities; technical and administrative measures that will ensure optimal performance of waste packages subject to various periods of interim storage

  17. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235 U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited to

  18. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2001-02-27

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited

  19. REPOSITORY LAYOUT SUPPORTING DESIGN FEATURE NO.13 - WASTE PACKAGE SELF SHIELDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to develop a repository layout, for Feature No. 13, that will accommodate self-shielding waste packages (WP) with an areal mass loading of 25 metric tons of uranium per acre (MTU/acre). The scope of this analysis includes determination of the number of emplacement drifts, amount of emplacement drift excavation required, and a preliminary layout for illustrative purposes

  20. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  1. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2004-08-16

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  2. WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip shield Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Mon

    2004-01-01

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), an analysis of the degradation of the engineered barrier system (EBS) drip shields and waste packages at the Yucca Mountain repository is developed. The purpose of this activity is to provide the TSPA with inputs and methodologies used to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. This analysis provides information useful to satisfy ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) requirements. Several features, events, and processes (FEPs) are also discussed (Section 6.2, Table 15). The previous revision of this report was prepared as a model report in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Due to changes in the role of this report since the site recommendation, it no longer contains model development. This revision is prepared as a scientific analysis in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'' and uses models previously validated in (1) ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]); (2) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169984]); and (3) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169845]). The integrated waste package degradation (IWPD) analysis presented in this report treats several implementation-related issues, such as defining the number and size of patches per waste package that undergo stress corrosion cracking; recasting the weld flaw analysis in a form as implemented in the Closure Weld Defects (CWD) software; and, general corrosion rate manipulations (e.g., change of scale in Section 6.3.4). The weld flaw portion of this report takes input from an engineering calculation (BSC 2004

  3. Development of waste packages for tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop nuclear waste packages that meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's requirements for a licensed repository in tuff at the Nevada Test Site. Selected accomplishments for FY82 are: (1) Selection, collection of rock, and characterization of suitable outcrops (for lab experiments); (2) Rock-water interactions (Bullfrog Tuff); (3) Corrosion tests of ferrous metals; (4) Thermal modeling of waste package in host rock; (5) Preliminary fabrication tests of alternate backfills (crushed tuff); (6) Reviewed Westinghouse conceptual waste package designs for tuff and began modification for unsaturated zone; and (7) Waste Package Codes (BARIER and WAPPA) now running on our computer. Brief discussions are presented for rock-water interactions, corrosion tests of ferrous metals, and thermal and radionuclide migration modelling

  4. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Watts Premier WP-4V POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The WP-4V employs a reverse osmosis (RO) m...

  5. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernot, P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The models are based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. The models described in this report constitute the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA (BSC 2004 [DIRS:167796]) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166296]). The technical work plan was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, Planning for Science Activities. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the following sections as they occur. The TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model assessments: (1) Mechanical and thermal impacts of basalt magma intrusion on the invert, waste packages and waste forms of the intersected emplacement drifts of Zone 1. (2) Temperature and pressure trends of basaltic magma intrusion intersecting Zone 1 and their potential effects on waste packages and waste forms in Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (3) Deleterious volatile gases, exsolving from the intruded basalt magma and their potential effects on waste packages of Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (4) Post-intrusive physical

  6. TRANSPORT LOCOMOTIVE AND WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER ITS STANDARDS IDENTIFICATION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems and components (SSCs) based on identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Basis for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005). Further, SSCs credited with performing safe functions are classified as ITS. In turn, performance confirmation for these SSCs is sought through the use of consensus code and standards. The purpose of this study is to identify applicable codes and standards for the waste package (WP) transporter and transport locomotive ITS SSCs. Further, this study will form the basis for selection and the extent of applicability of each code and standard. This study is based on the design development completed for License Application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and that final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, throughout this study alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed. Further, the results of this study will be subject to evaluation as part of a follow-on gap analysis study. Based on the results of this study the gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied a ''gap'' is highlighted. Thereafter, the study will identify supplemental requirements to augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, the gap analysis will identify non-standard areas of the design that will be subject to a Development Plan. Non-standard components and

  7. Development of Specifications for Radioactive Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide guidelines for the development of waste package specifications that comply with waste acceptance requirements for storage and disposal of radioactive waste. It will assist waste generators and waste package producers in selecting the most significant parameters and in developing and implementing specifications for each individual type of waste and waste package. This publication also identifies and reviews the activities and technical provisions that are necessary to meet safety requirements; in particular, selection of the significant safety parameters and preparation of specifications for waste forms, waste containers and waste packages using proven approaches, methods and technologies. This report provides guidance using a systematic, stepwise approach, integrating the technical, organizational and administrative factors that need to be considered at each step of planning and implementing waste package design, fabrication, approval, quality assurance and control. The report reflects the considerable experience and knowledge that has been accumulated in the IAEA Member States and is consistent with the current international requirements, principles, standards and guidance for the safe management of radioactive waste

  8. Development of Specifications for Radioactive Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-10-15

    The main objective of this publication is to provide guidelines for the development of waste package specifications that comply with waste acceptance requirements for storage and disposal of radioactive waste. It will assist waste generators and waste package producers in selecting the most significant parameters and in developing and implementing specifications for each individual type of waste and waste package. This publication also identifies and reviews the activities and technical provisions that are necessary to meet safety requirements; in particular, selection of the significant safety parameters and preparation of specifications for waste forms, waste containers and waste packages using proven approaches, methods and technologies. This report provides guidance using a systematic, stepwise approach, integrating the technical, organizational and administrative factors that need to be considered at each step of planning and implementing waste package design, fabrication, approval, quality assurance and control. The report reflects the considerable experience and knowledge that has been accumulated in the IAEA Member States and is consistent with the current international requirements, principles, standards and guidance for the safe management of radioactive waste.

  9. Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, Thomas; Pasupathi, V.

    2002-01-01

    Over the repository lifetime, the waste package containment barriers will perform various functions that will change with time. During the operational period, the barriers will function as vessels for handling, emplacement, and waste retrieval (if necessary). During the years following repository closure, the containment barriers will be relied upon to provide substantially complete containment, through 10,000 years and beyond. Following the substantially complete containment phase, the barriers and the waste package internal structures help minimize release of radionuclides by aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport. These requirements have lead to a defense-in-depth design philosophy. A multi-barrier design will result in a lower breach rate distributed over a longer period of time, thereby ensuring the regulatory requirements are met. The design of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) has evolved. The initial waste package design was a thin walled package, 3/8 inch of stainless steel 304, that had very limited capacity, (3 PWR and 4 BWR assemblies) and performance characteristics, 300 to 1,000 years. This design required over 35,000 waste packages compared to today's design of just over 10,000 waste packages. The waste package designs are now based on a defense-in-depth/multi-barrier philosophy and have a capacity similar to the standard storage and rail transported spent nuclear fuel casks. Concurrent with the development of the design of the waste packages, a comprehensive waste package materials testing program has been undertaken to support the selection of containment barrier materials and to develop predictive models for the long-term behavior of these materials under expected repository conditions. The testing program includes both long-term and short-term tests and the results from these tests combination with the data published in the open literature are being used to develop models for predicting performance of the waste packages

  10. How reliable does the waste package containment have to be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The final rule (10 CFR Part 60) for Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories specifies that the engineered barrier system shall be designed so that, assuming anticipated processes and events, containment of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) will be substantially complete during the period when radiation and thermal conditions in the engineered barrier system are dominated by fission product decay. This requirement leads to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) being asked the following questions: What is meant by ''substantially complete''. How reliable does waste package containment have to be. How many waste packages can fail. Although the NRC has not defined quantitatively the term ''substantially complete'', a numerical concept for acceptable release during the containment period is discussed. The number of containment failures that could be tolerated under the rule would depend upon the acceptable release, the time at which failure occurs and the rate of release from a failed package

  11. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  12. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports

  13. Number of Waste Package Hit by Igneous Intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wallace

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to document calculations of the number of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Igneous activity is a disruptive event that is included in the TSPA-LA analyses. Two igneous activity scenarios are considered: (1) The igneous intrusion groundwater release scenario (also called the igneous intrusion scenario) considers the in situ damage to waste packages or failure of waste packages that occurs if they are engulfed or otherwise affected by magma as a result of an igneous intrusion. (2) The volcanic eruption scenario depicts the direct release of radioactive waste due to an intrusion that intersects the repository followed by a volcanic eruption at the surface. An igneous intrusion is defined as the ascent of a basaltic dike or dike system (i.e., a set or swarm of multiple dikes comprising a single intrusive event) to repository level, where it intersects drifts. Magma that does reach the surface from igneous activity is an eruption (or extrusive activity) (Jackson 1997 [DIRS 109119], pp. 224, 333). The objective of this analysis is to develop a probabilistic measure of the number of waste packages that could be affected by each of the two scenarios

  14. Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenhofen, M.K.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-10-01

    The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system

  15. Integrated performance assessment model for waste package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  16. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test

  17. Second Generation Waste Package Design Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.; Misra, M.; Kar, Piyush

    2007-01-01

    The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 023 ''Second Generation Waste Package Design Study'' under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objectives of this activity are: to review the current YMP baseline environment and establish corrosion test environments representative of the range of dry to intermittently wet conditions expected in the drifts as a function of time; to demonstrate the oxidation and corrosion resistance of A588 weathering steel and reference Alloy 22 samples in the representative dry to intermittently dry conditions; and to evaluate backfill and design features to improve the thermal performance analyses of the proposed second-generation waste packages using existing models developed at the University of Nevada, Reno(UNR). The work plan for this project activity consists of three major tasks: Task 1. Definition of expected worst-case environments (humidity, liquid composition and temperature) at waste package outer surfaces as a function of time, and comparison with environments defined in the YMP baseline; Task 2. Oxidation and corrosion tests of proposed second-generation outer container material; and Task 3. Second Generation waste package thermal analyses. Full funding was not provided for this project activity

  18. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE LIFTING IN VERTICAL ORIENTATION OF 5-DHLW/DOE SNF SINGLE CRM WASTE PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to determine the structural response of the extension of outer shell (which is referred to as skirt throughout this document) designs of both long and short design concepts of 5-Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) single corrosion resistant material (CRM) waste packages (WP), subjected to a gravitational load in the course of lifting in vertical orientation. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.124, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  19. Quality control concept for radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Martens, B.R.; Odoj, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a contract with the BfS for the performance of quality control measures is necessary. It is principally possible to apply two alternative methods: random checks on waste packages or qualification of conditioning processes with subsequent inspections. Priority is given to the control by the process qualification. Both methods have successfully been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany and can be applied. In the course of the qualification of conditioning processes it must be demonstrated by inactive and/or active runs that waste packages are produced which fulfil the waste acceptance requirements. The qualification results in the fixation of a handbook for the operation of the respective conditioning process including the process instrumentation and the operational margins. The qualified process will be inspected to assure the compliance of the actual operation with the conditions fixed in the handbook. (orig./DG)

  20. Methodologies for certification of transuranic waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, R.N.; Kok, K.D.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this study was to postulate methodologies for certification that a waste package is acceptable for disposal in a licensed geologic repository. Within the context of this report, certification means the overall process which verifies that a waste package meets the criteria or specifications established for acceptance for disposal in a repository. The overall methodology for certification will include (1) certifying authorities, (2) tests and procedures, and (3) documentation and quality assurance programs. Each criterion will require a methodology that is specific to that criterion. In some cases, different waste forms will require a different methodology. The purpose of predicting certification methodologies is to provide additional information as to what changes, if any, are needed for the TRU waste in storage

  1. ERG review of waste package corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisert, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The ERG reviewed the waste package corrosion mechanisms. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by the ERG. 1 ref

  2. License Application Design Selection Feature Report: Waste Package Self Shielding Design Feature 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    In the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design, handling of waste packages (WPs) in the emplacement drifts is performed remotely, and human access to the drifts is precluded when WPs are present. This report will investigate the feasibility of using a self-shielded WP design to reduce the radiation levels in the emplacement drifts to a point that, when coupled with ventilation, will create an acceptable environment for human access. This provides the benefit of allowing human entry to emplacement drifts to perform maintenance on ground support and instrumentation, and carry out performance confirmation activities. More direct human control of WP handling and emplacement operations would also be possible. However, these potential benefits must be weighed against the cost of implementation, and potential impacts on pre- and post-closure performance of the repository and WPs. The first section of this report will provide background information on previous investigations of the self-shielded WP design feature, summarize the objective and scope of this document, and provide quality assurance and software information. A shielding performance and cost study that includes several candidate shield materials will then be performed in the subsequent section to allow selection of two self-shielded WP design options for further evaluation. Finally, the remaining sections will evaluate the impacts of the two WP self-shielding options on the repository design, operations, safety, cost, and long-term performance of the WPs with respect to the VA reference design

  3. Gas formation in drum waste packages of Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, M.; Palcsu, L.; Svingor, E.; Szanto, Z.; Futo, I.; Ormai, P.

    2000-01-01

    Gas composition measurements have been carried out by mass spectrometry analysis of samples taken from the headspace of ten drum waste packages generated and temporarily stored at Paks NPP. Four drums contained compacted solid waste, three drums were filled with grouted (solidified) sludge and three drums contained solid waste without compaction. The drums have been equipped with a special gas outlet system to make repeated sampling possible. Based on the first measurements significant differences in the gas composition and the rate of gas generation among the drums were found. (author)

  4. Release of powdered material from waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Gruendler, D.; Peiffer, F.; Seehars, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    Possible incidents in the operational phase of the planned German repository KONRAD for radioactive waste with negligible heat production were investigated to assess the radiological consequences. For these investigations release fractions of the radioactive materials are required. This paper deals with the determination of the release of powdered material from waste packages under mechanical stress. These determinations were based on experiments. The experimental procedure and the process parameters chosen in accordance with the conditions in the planned repository will be described. The significance of the experimental results is discussed with respect to incidents in the planned repository. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Thermal analysis of NNWSI conceptual waste package designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.; Hockman, J.N.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in the design and testing of high-level nuclear waste packages. Many of the aspects of waste package design and testing (e.g., corrosion and leaching) depend in part on the temperature history of the emplaced packages. This report discusses thermal modeling and analysis of various emplaced waste package conceptual designs including the models used, the assumptions and approximations made, and the results obtained. 16 references

  6. Nuclear-waste-package materials degradation modes and accelerated testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report reviews the materials degradation modes that may affect the long-term behavior of waste packages for the containment of nuclear waste. It recommends an approach to accelerated testing that can lead to the qualification of waste package materials in specific repository environments in times that are short relative to the time period over which the waste package is expected to provide containment. This report is not a testing plan but rather discusses the direction for research that might be considered in developing plans for accelerated testing of waste package materials and waste forms

  7. Nuclear waste package fabricated from concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1987-03-01

    After the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1983, the Department of Energy must design, site, build and operate permanent geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy has recently selected three sites, one being the Hanford Site in the state of Washington. At this particular site, the repository will be located in basalt at a depth of approximately 3000 feet deep. The main concern of this site, is contamination of the groundwater by release of radionuclides from the waste package. The waste package basically has three components: the containment barrier (metal or concrete container, in this study concrete will be considered), the waste form, and other materials (such as packing material, emplacement hole liners, etc.). The containment barriers are the primary waste container structural materials and are intended to provide containment of the nuclear waste up to a thousand years after emplacement. After the containment barriers are breached by groundwater, the packing material (expanding sodium bentonite clay) is expected to provide the primary control of release of radionuclide into the immediate repository environment. The loading conditions on the concrete container (from emplacement to approximately 1000 years), will be twofold; (1) internal heat of the high-level waste which could be up to 400 0 C; (2) external hydrostatic pressure up to 1300 psi after the seepage of groundwater has occurred in the emplacement tunnel. A suggested container is a hollow plain concrete cylinder with both ends capped. 7 refs

  8. Waste package for Yucca Mountain repository: Strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloninger, M.; Short, D.; Stahl, D.

    1989-02-01

    This document summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan (1) for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. This strategy involves an iterative process designed to achieve compliance with the requirements for substantially complete containment and EBS release. The strategy will be implemented in such a manner that sufficient evidence will be provided for presentation to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) so that it may make a finding that there is ''reasonable assurance'' that these performance requirements will indeed be met. In implementing the strategy, DOE recognizes four fundamental goals: (1) protect public health and safety; (2) minimize financial and other resource commitments; (3) comply with applicable laws and regulations; and (4) maintain an aggressive schedule. The strategy is intended to be a reasonable balance of these competing goals. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Degradation modes of nickel-base alternate waste package overpack materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitman, S.G.

    1988-07-01

    The suitability of Ti Grade 12 for waste package overpacks has been questioned because of its observed susceptibility to crevice corrosion and hydrogen-assisted crack growth. For this reason, materials have been selected for evaluation as alternatives to Ti Grade 12 for use as waste package overpacks. These alternative materials, which are based on the nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloy system, are Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, and Hastelloy C-22. The degradation modes of the Ni-base alternate materials have been examined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine the suitability of these materials for waste package overpack applications in a salt repository. Degradation modes investigated included general corrosion, crevice corrosion, pitting, stress-corrosion cracking, and hydrogen embrittlement

  10. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.K. Knudson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M and O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  11. WESTINGHOUSE 17X17 MOX PWR ASSEMBLY - WASTE PACKAGE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS (SCPB: N/A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.W. Davis

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to compare the criticality potential of Westinghouse 17 x 17 mixed oxide (MOX) PWR fuel with the Design Basis spent nuclear fuel (SNF) analyzed previously (Ref. 5.1, 5.2). The basis of comparison will be the conceptual design Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) PWR waste package concepts. The objectives of this evaluation are to show that the criticality potential of the MOX fuel is equal to or lower than the DBF or, if necessary, indicate what additional measures are required to make it so

  12. SECOND WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: GENERATION AND EVALUATION OF INTERNAL CRITICIALITY CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Gottlieb, J.R. Massari, J.K. McCoy

    1996-03-27

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development (WPD) department to provide an evaluation of the criticality potential within a waste package having sonic or all of its contents degraded by corrosion and removal of neutron absorbers. This analysis is also intended to provide an estimate of the consequences of any internal criticality, particularly in terms of any increase in radionuclide inventory. These consequence estimates will be used as part of the WPD input to the Total System Performance Assessment. The ultimate objective of this analysis is to augment the information gained from the Initial Waste Package Probabilistic Criticality Analyses (Ref. 5.8 and 5.9, hereafter referred to as IPA) to a degree which will support preliminary waste package design recommendations intended to reduce the risk of waste package criticality and the risk to total repository system performance posed by the consequences of any criticality. The IPA evaluated the criticality potential under the assumption that the waste package basket retained its structural integrity, so that the assemblies retained their initial separation, even when the neutron absorbers had been leached from the basket. This analysis is based on the more realistic condition that removal of the neutron absorbers is a consequence of the corrosion of the steel in which they are contained, which has the additional consequence of reducing the structural support between assemblies. The result is a set of more reactive configurations having a smaller spacing between assemblies, or no inter-assembly spacing at all. Another difference from the IPA is the minimal attention to probabilistic evaluation given in this study. Although the IPA covered a time horizon to 100,000 years, the lack of consideration of basket degradation modes made it primarily applicable to the first 10,000 years. In contrast, this study, by focusing on the degraded modes of the basket, is primarily

  13. Scale-up considerations relevant to experimental studies of nuclear waste-package behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Peters, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    Results from a study that investigated whether testing large-scale nuclear waste-package assemblages was technically warranted are reported. It was recognized that the majority of the investigations for predicting waste-package performance to date have relied primarily on laboratory-scale experimentation. However, methods for the successful extrapolation of the results from such experiments, both geometrically and over time, to actual repository conditions have not been well defined. Because a well-developed scaling technology exists in the chemical-engineering discipline, it was presupposed that much of this technology could be applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance. A review of existing literature documented numerous examples where a consideration of scaling technology was important. It was concluded that much of the existing scale-up technology is applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance for both size and time extrapolations and that conducting scale-up studies may be technically merited. However, the applicability for investigating the complex chemical interactions needs further development. It was recognized that the complexity of the system, and the long time periods involved, renders a completely theoretical approach to performance prediction almost hopeless. However, a theoretical and experimental study was defined for investigating heat and fluid flow. It was concluded that conducting scale-up modeling and experimentation for waste-package performance predictions is possible using existing technology. A sequential series of scaling studies, both theoretical and experimental, will be required to formulate size and time extrapolations of waste-package performance

  14. 10 CFR 60.143 - Monitoring and testing waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....143 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN... repository operations area, the environment of the waste packages selected for the waste package monitoring program shall be representative of the environment in which the wastes are to be emplaced. (c) The waste...

  15. 10 CFR 63.134 - Monitoring and testing waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....134 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A... geologic repository operations area, the environment of the waste packages selected for the waste package monitoring program must be representative of the environment in which the wastes are to be emplaced. (c) The...

  16. Performance analysis of two 3.5 kWp CPV systems under real operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzi, M.; Egidi, L.; Comodi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The performance monitoring apparatus for a 3.5 kWp CPV system is presented. • The effect on the performance due to the fouling on the lens is assessed. • The effect of ambient temperature and air mass are reported. • The accuracy of the tracking system is reported. • Electric efficiency exceeds 30% with clean lenses. - Abstract: The paper presents the preliminary operational performance results of the of two 3.5 kWp Concentration PhotoVoltaic (CPV) devices. Each system consists of eight modules installed on a chassis for a total number of 1152 triple junction PV cells whose active area is 5.5 × 5.5 mm. The optics has a total geometrical concentration ratio of 476×. Two solutions for the primary PMMA Fresnel lens were tested, one with constant Fresnel pitch and one with variable pitch. The secondary optics is the same for both systems and consists of a truncated pyramid made of high reflective material. The two-axis tracking system is an azimuth-elevation device driven by two electrical motors and controlled by a sun sensor. Results allow to evaluate the efficiency of the plant as well as significant operational parameters under real outdoor operating conditions. The overall AC electrical efficiency is up to 31% and the power production peak is 2.54 kW. Electric power output has a linear dependency with the available Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI) while the Air Mass (AM) spectrum has a negligible effect on the performance. The system equipped with a variable pitch Fresnel lens performs slightly better (about 3.5% more power) with respect to the one with a constant pitch. The effect of lens fouling has a much higher impact: with a dirty lens the system generates over 12% less power and efficiency decreases by 3–5%, at equal solar irradiation. The performance ratio of the CPV system peaked at 82% and it has a monthly value over 70% in spring and summer months. The tracking mechanism has showed, in the worst scenario, an inaccuracy of 0.26

  17. Improved permeation barriers for tritiated waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, G.; Van Den Bergh, R.; Forcey, K.S.; Perujo, A.

    1994-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is extensively used as flexible bagging or packaging for soft tritiated waste in the tritium community because of its low permeability to the more radiotoxic form of tritium, i.e., tritiated water (HTO). However, HDPE does not represent a perfect barrier to HTO nor does it effectively hinder the permeation of elemental tritium, i.e, HT. This latter drawback is particularly important considering that the elemental form may readily convert to HTO outside of the waste package. The possible use of a multilayer film as packing material for the conditioning of tritiated waste is assessed, and its capability to hinder the permeation of elemental tritium is measured and compared with that of bare HDPE. The material investigated is readily available from the food industry. 5 refs., 1 tab

  18. Waste package emplacement borehole option study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, W.S.

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluates the cost and thermal effects of various waste package emplacement configurations that differ in emplacement orientation, number of containers per borehole, and standoff distance at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. In this study, eight additional alternatives to the vertical and horizontal orientation options presented in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report are considered. Typical panel layout configurations based on thermal analysis of the waste and cost estimates for design and construction, operations, and closure and decommissioning were made for each emplacement option. For the thermal analysis average waste 10 years out of reactor and the SIM code were used to determine whether the various configurations temperatures would exceed the design criteria for temperature. This study does not make a recommendation for emplacement configuration, but does provide information for comparison of alternatives

  19. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-09-01

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs

  1. EVALUATION OF WASTE PACKAGE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. N. Lindner and E. F. Dembowski

    1998-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for a permanent underground repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other high-level waste (HLW). The emplacement of high-level radioactive waste in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. Due to this heat, the rock temperature will rise, and then decrease when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. In addition to raising the rock temperature, the heat will vaporize water, which will condense in cooler regions. The condensate water may drain back toward the emplacement drifts or it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. Other effects, such as coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. This study examined near field environmental parameters that could have an effect on the waste package, including temperature, humidity, seepage rate, pH of seepage, chemistry (dissolved salts/minerals) of seepage, composition of drift atmosphere, colloids, and biota. This report is a Type I analysis performed in support of the development of System Description Documents (SDDs). A Type I analysis is a quantitative or qualitative analysis that may fulfill any of a variety of purposes associated with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), other than providing direct analytical support for design output documents. A Type I analysis may establish design input, as defined in the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998). This study establishes a technical basis for emplacement drift (i.e. at the waste package surface) environment criteria to be considered in the development of the waste package design. The information will support development of several SDDs and resolve emplacement drift external environment questions in the criteria of those

  2. PROBABILISTIC ANALYSES OF WASTE PACKAGE QUANTITIES IMPACTED BY POTENTIAL IGNEOUS DISRUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.G. Wallace

    2005-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis was conducted to estimate ranges for the numbers of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The first scenario, igneous intrusion, investigated the case where one or more igneous dikes intersect the repository. A swarm of dikes was characterized by distributions of length, width, azimuth, and number of dikes and the spacings between them. Through the use in part of a latin hypercube simulator and a modified video game engine, mathematical relationships were built between those parameters and the number of waste packages hit. Corresponding cumulative distribution function curves (CDFs) for the number of waste packages hit under several different scenarios were calculated. Variations in dike thickness ranges, as well as in repository magma bulkhead positions were examined through sensitivity studies. It was assumed that all waste packages in an emplacement drift would be impacted if that drift were intersected by a dike. Over 10,000 individual simulations were performed. Based on these calculations, out of a total of over 11,000 planned waste packages distributed over an area of approximately 5.5 km 2 , the median number of waste packages impacted was roughly 1/10 of the total. Individual cases ranged from 0 waste packages to the entire inventory being impacted. The igneous intrusion analysis involved an explicit characterization of dike-drift intersections, built upon various distributions that reflect the uncertainties associated with the inputs. The second igneous scenario, volcanic eruption (eruptive conduits), considered the effects of conduits formed in

  3. Effect of alpha and gamma radiation on the near-field chemistry and geochemistry of high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.

    1985-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can potentially alter geochemical and chemical processes in a geologic system. These effects can either enhance or reduce the performance of the waste package in a deep geologic repository. Current indications are that, in a repository located in basalt, ionizing radiation significantly affects geochemical/chemical processes but does not appear to significantly affect factors important to the long-term performance of the repository. The experimental results presented in this paper were obtained as part of an ongoing effort by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to determine the effect of ionizing radiation on chemical and geochemical processes in the environment of the waste package. Gamma radiolysis experiments were done by subjecting samples of synthetic basalt groundwater in the presence of various waste package components (basalt/packing/low-carbon steel) to high levels of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. Post-irradiation analysis was done on the gas, liquid, and solid components of the basalt system. The results obtained are important in evaluating waste package performance during the containment period. The effect of alpha radiation on the basalt groundwater system in the presence of waste package components is important in evaluating waste package performance during the isolation period. The experimental work in this area is in a very preliminary stage. Results from two experiments are reported. 9 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Impacts of cathodic protection on waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Andrews, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    The current design concept for a multi-barrier waste container for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, calls for an outer barrier of 100 mm thick corrosion-allowance material (CAM) (carbon steel) and an inner barrier of 20 mm thick corrosion-resistant material (CRM) (Alloy 825). Fulfillment of the NRC subsystem requirements (10 CFR 60.113) of substantially complete containment and controlled release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system (EBS) will rely mostly upon the robust waste container design, among other EBS components. In the current waste container design, some degree of cathodic protection of CRM will be provided by CAM. This paper discusses a sensitivity case study for the impacts of cathodic protection of the inner barrier by the outer barrier on the performance of waste package

  5. Methods for maintaining a record of waste packages during waste processing and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    During processing, radioactive waste is converted into waste packages, and then sent for storage and ultimately for disposal. A principal condition for acceptance of a waste package is its full compliance with waste acceptance criteria for disposal or storage. These criteria define the radiological, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties of radioactive waste that can, in principle, be changed during waste processing. To declare compliance of a waste package with waste acceptance criteria, a system for generating and maintaining records should be established to record and track all relevant information, from raw waste characteristics, through changes related to waste processing, to final checking and verification of waste package parameters. In parallel, records on processing technology and the operational parameters of technological facilities should adhere to established and approved quality assurance systems. A records system for waste management should be in place, defining the data to be collected and stored at each step of waste processing and using a reliable selection process carried over into the individual steps of the waste processing flow stream. The waste management records system must at the same time ensure selection and maintenance of all the main information, not only providing evidence of compliance of waste package parameters with waste acceptance criteria but also serving as an information source in the case of any future operations involving the stored or disposed waste. Records generated during waste processing are a constituent part of the more complex system of waste management record keeping, covering the entire life cycle of radioactive waste from generation to disposal and even the post-closure period of a disposal facility. The IAEA is systematically working on the preparation of a set of publications to assist its Member States in the development and implementation of such a system. This report covers all the principal

  6. Far-Field Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.P. Nicot

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to estimate the quantity of fissile material that could accumulate in fractures in the rock beneath plutonium-ceramic (Pu-ceramic) and Mixed-Oxide (MOX) waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This calculation is to feed another calculation (Ref. 31) computing the probability of criticality in the systems described in Section 6 and then ultimately to a more general report on the impact of plutonium on the performance of the proposed repository (Ref. 32), both developed concurrently to this work. This calculation is done in accordance with the development plan TDP-DDC-MD-000001 (Ref. 9), item 5. The original document described in item 5 has been split into two documents: this calculation and Ref. 4. The scope of the calculation is limited to only very low flow rates because they lead to the most conservative cases for Pu accumulation and more generally are consistent with the way the effluent from the WP (called source term in this calculation) was calculated (Ref. 4). Ref. 4 (''In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material from WPs Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Forms'') details the evolution through time (breach time is initial time) of the chemical composition of the solution inside the WP as degradation of the fuel and other materials proceed. It is the chemical solution used as a source term in this calculation. Ref. 4 takes that same source term and reacts it with the invert; this calculation reacts it with the rock. In addition to reactions with the rock minerals (that release Si and Ca), the basic mechanisms for actinide precipitation are dilution and mixing with resident water as explained in Section 2.1.4. No other potential mechanism such as flow through a reducing zone is investigated in this calculation. No attempt was made to use the effluent water from the bottom of the invert instead of using directly the effluent water from the WP. This

  7. Far-Field Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.P. Nicot

    2000-09-29

    The objective of this calculation is to estimate the quantity of fissile material that could accumulate in fractures in the rock beneath plutonium-ceramic (Pu-ceramic) and Mixed-Oxide (MOX) waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This calculation is to feed another calculation (Ref. 31) computing the probability of criticality in the systems described in Section 6 and then ultimately to a more general report on the impact of plutonium on the performance of the proposed repository (Ref. 32), both developed concurrently to this work. This calculation is done in accordance with the development plan TDP-DDC-MD-000001 (Ref. 9), item 5. The original document described in item 5 has been split into two documents: this calculation and Ref. 4. The scope of the calculation is limited to only very low flow rates because they lead to the most conservative cases for Pu accumulation and more generally are consistent with the way the effluent from the WP (called source term in this calculation) was calculated (Ref. 4). Ref. 4 (''In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material from WPs Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Forms'') details the evolution through time (breach time is initial time) of the chemical composition of the solution inside the WP as degradation of the fuel and other materials proceed. It is the chemical solution used as a source term in this calculation. Ref. 4 takes that same source term and reacts it with the invert; this calculation reacts it with the rock. In addition to reactions with the rock minerals (that release Si and Ca), the basic mechanisms for actinide precipitation are dilution and mixing with resident water as explained in Section 2.1.4. No other potential mechanism such as flow through a reducing zone is investigated in this calculation. No attempt was made to use the effluent water from the bottom of the invert instead of using directly the effluent water from the

  8. Hydrothermal waste package interactions with methane-containing basalt groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrothermal waste package interaction tests were conducted with a mixture of crushed glass, basalt, and steel in methane-containing synthetic basalt groundwater. In the absence of gamma radiolysis, methane was found to have little influence on the corrosion behavior of the waste package constituents. Under gamma radiolysis, methane was found to significantly lower the solution oxidation potential when compared to identical tests without methane. In addition, colloidal hydrocarbon polymers that have been produced under the irradiation conditions of these experiments were not formed. The presence of the waste package constituents apparently inhibited the formation of the polymers. However, the mechanism which prevented their formation was not determined

  9. Uncertainty analysis of nuclear waste package corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurth, R.E.; Nicolosi, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an evaluation of three uncertainty analysis methods for assessing the possible variability in calculating the corrosion process in a nuclear waste package. The purpose of the study is the determination of how each of three uncertainty analysis methods, Monte Carlo, Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) and a modified discrete probability distribution method, perform in such calculations. The purpose is not to examine the absolute magnitude of the numbers but rather to rank the performance of each of the uncertainty methods in assessing the model variability. In this context it was found that the Monte Carlo method provided the most accurate assessment but at a prohibitively high cost. The modified discrete probability method provided accuracy close to that of the Monte Carlo for a fraction of the cost. The LHS method was found to be too inaccurate for this calculation although it would be appropriate for use in a model which requires substantially more computer time than the one studied in this paper

  10. Technical considerations for evaluating substantially complete containment of high-level waste within the waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaktala, H.K.; Interrante, C.G.

    1990-12-01

    This report deals with technical information that is considered essential for demonstrating the ability of the high-level radioactive waste package to provide ''substantially complete containment'' of its contents (vitrified waste form or spent light-water reactor fuel) for a period of 300 to 1000 years in a geological repository environment. The discussion is centered around technical considerations of the repository environment, materials and fabrication processes for the waste package components, various degradation modes of the materials of construction of the waste packages, and inspection and monitoring of the waste package during the preclosure and retrievability period, which could begin up to 50 years after initiation of waste emplacement. The emphasis in this report is on metallic materials. However, brief references have been made to other materials such as ceramics, graphite, bonded ceramic-metal systems, and other types of composites. The content of this report was presented to an external peer review panel of nine members at a workshop held at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, April 2--4, 1990. The recommendations of the peer review panel have been incorporated in this report. There are two companion reports; the second report in the series provides state-of-the-art techniques for uncertainty evaluations. 97 refs., 1 fig

  11. Technical considerations for evaluating substantially complete containment of high-level waste within the waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaktala, H.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses); Interrante, C.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of High-Level Waste Management)

    1990-12-01

    This report deals with technical information that is considered essential for demonstrating the ability of the high-level radioactive waste package to provide substantially complete containment'' of its contents (vitrified waste form or spent light-water reactor fuel) for a period of 300 to 1000 years in a geological repository environment. The discussion is centered around technical considerations of the repository environment, materials and fabrication processes for the waste package components, various degradation modes of the materials of construction of the waste packages, and inspection and monitoring of the waste package during the preclosure and retrievability period, which could begin up to 50 years after initiation of waste emplacement. The emphasis in this report is on metallic materials. However, brief references have been made to other materials such as ceramics, graphite, bonded ceramic-metal systems, and other types of composites. The content of this report was presented to an external peer review panel of nine members at a workshop held at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, April 2--4, 1990. The recommendations of the peer review panel have been incorporated in this report. There are two companion reports; the second report in the series provides state-of-the-art techniques for uncertainty evaluations. 97 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Containment barrier metals for high-level waste packages in a Tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O`Neal, W.C.

    1983-10-12

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package project is part of the US Department of Energy`s Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. The NNWSI project is working towards the development of multibarriered packages for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in tuff in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The final engineered barrier system design may be composed of a waste form, canister, overpack, borehole liner, packing, and the near field host rock, or some combination thereof. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) role is to design, model, and test the waste package subsystem for the tuff repository. At the present stage of development of the nuclear waste management program at LLNL, the detailed requirements for the waste package design are not yet firmly established. In spite of these uncertainties as to the detailed package requirements, we have begun the conceptual design stage. By conceptual design, we mean design based on our best assessment of present and future regulatory requirements. We anticipate that changes will occur as the detailed requirements for waste package design are finalized. 17 references, 4 figures, 10 tables.

  13. Containment barrier metals for high-level waste packages in a Tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package project is part of the US Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. The NNWSI project is working towards the development of multibarriered packages for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in tuff in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The final engineered barrier system design may be composed of a waste form, canister, overpack, borehole liner, packing, and the near field host rock, or some combination thereof. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) role is to design, model, and test the waste package subsystem for the tuff repository. At the present stage of development of the nuclear waste management program at LLNL, the detailed requirements for the waste package design are not yet firmly established. In spite of these uncertainties as to the detailed package requirements, we have begun the conceptual design stage. By conceptual design, we mean design based on our best assessment of present and future regulatory requirements. We anticipate that changes will occur as the detailed requirements for waste package design are finalized. 17 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  14. Quality assurance requirements and methods for high level waste package acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This document should serve as guidance for assigning the necessary items to control the conditioning process in such a way that waste packages are produced in compliance with the waste acceptance requirements. It is also provided to promote the exchange of information on quality assurance requirements and on the application of quality assurance methods associated with the production of high level waste packages, to ensure that these waste packages comply with the requirements for transportation, interim storage and waste disposal in deep geological formations. The document is intended to assist both the operators of conditioning facilities and repositories as well as national authorities and regulatory bodies, involved in the licensing of the conditioning of high level radioactive wastes or in the development of deep underground disposal systems. The document recommends the quality assurance requirements and methods which are necessary to generate data for these parameters identified in IAEA-TECDOC-560 on qualitative acceptance criteria, and indicates where and when the control methods can be applied, e.g. in the operation or commissioning of a process or in the development of a waste package design. Emphasis is on the control of the process and little reliance is placed on non-destructive or destructive testing. Qualitative criteria, relevant to disposal of high level waste, are repository dependent and are not addressed here. 37 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Review of DOE waste package program. Subtask 1.1. National waste package program, April-September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1983-03-01

    The current effort is part of an ongoing task to evaluate the national high-level waste package effort. It includes evaluations of reference waste form, container, and packing material components with respect to determining how they may contribute to the containment and controlled release of radionuclides after waste packages have been emplaced in salt and basalt repositories. Chemical and mechanical failure/degradation modes for the waste package have been reviewed and the licensing data requirements to demonstrate compliance with NRC performance objectives specified

  16. Concept for waste package environment tests in the Yucca Mountain exploratory shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is studying a tuffaceous rock unit located at Yucca Mountain on the western boundary of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The objective is to evaluate the suitability of the volcanic rocks located above the water table at Yucca Mountain as a potential location for a repository for high level radioactive waste. As part of the NNWSI project, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the design of the waste package and for determining the expected performance of the waste package in the repository environment. To design an optimal waste package system for the unsaturated emplacement environment, the mechanisms by which liquid water can return to contact the metal canister after peaking of the thermal load must be established. Definition of these flux and flow mechanisms is essential for estimating canister corrosion modes and rates. Therefore, three waste package environment tests are being designed for the in situ phase of exploratory shaft testing. These tests emphasize measurement techniques that offer the possibility of characterizing the movement of water into and through the pores and fractures of the densely welded Topopah Spring Member. Other measurement techniques will be used to examine the interactions between moisture migration and the thermomechanical rock mass behavior. Three reduced-scale heater tests will use electrical resistive heaters in a horizontal configuration. All three tests are designed to investigate moisture conditions in the rock during heating and cooling phases of a thermal cycle so that the effects of these moisture conditions on the performance of the waste package system may be established. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Shielding design of radioactive contaminated metal waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Wenhua; Dong Zhiqiang; Yao Zhenyu; Xu Shuhe; Wang Wen

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the cylindrical source model to calculate γ dose field of waste packages with the relative formulae then derived. By comparing the calculated data of waste packages of type Ⅷ steel box with the monitoring data, it is found that the cylinder source model could accurately reflect the distributions of γ dose of the waste package. Based on the results of the cylindrical source model, a reasonable shielding technology applicable to waste package containers was designed to meet relevant requirements prescribed in standards about the transport and disposal of radioactive materials. The cylinder source model calculated dose distributions for single package in this paper is simple and easy to implement but slightly larger than the monitoring data providing a certain safety margin for the shielding design. It is suitable for radiological engineering practices. (authors)

  18. Safety Analysis Report for packaging (onsite) steel waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOEHNKE, W.M.

    2000-07-13

    The steel waste package is used primarily for the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Building to the 200 Area for interim storage. The steel waste package is authorized for shipment of transuranic isotopes. The maximum allowable radioactive material that is authorized is 500,000 Ci. This exceeds the highway route controlled quantity (3,000 A{sub 2}s) and is a type B packaging.

  19. Safety Analysis Report for packaging (onsite) steel waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOEHNKE, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The steel waste package is used primarily for the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Building to the 200 Area for interim storage. The steel waste package is authorized for shipment of transuranic isotopes. The maximum allowable radioactive material that is authorized is 500,000 Ci. This exceeds the highway route controlled quantity (3,000 A 2 s) and is a type B packaging

  20. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Delabrosse

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1

  1. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Schmitt

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1

  2. In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.W. Stockman; S. LeStrange

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to provide estimates of the amount of fissile material flowing out of the waste package (source term) and the accumulation of fissile elements (U and Pu) in a crushed-tuff invert. These calculations provide input for the analysis of repository impacts of the Pu-ceramic waste forms. In particular, the source term results are used as input to the far-field accumulation calculation reported in Ref. 51, and the in-drift accumulation results are used as inputs for the criticality calculations reported in Ref. 2. The results are also summarized and interpreted in Ref. 52. The scope of this calculation is the waste package (WP) Viability Assessment (VA) design, which consists of an outer corrosion-allowance material (CAM) and an inner corrosion-resistant material (CRM). This design is used in this calculation in order to be consistent with earlier Pu-ceramic degradation calculations (Ref. 15). The impact of the new Enhanced Design Alternative-I1 (EDA-11) design on the results will be addressed in a subsequent report. The design of the invert (a leveling foundation, which creates a level surface of the drift floor and supports the WP mounting structure) is consistent with the EDA-I1 design. The invert will be composed of crushed stone and a steel support structure (Ref. 17). The scope of this calculation is also defined by the nominal degradation scenario, which involves the breach of the WP (Section 10.5.1.2, Ref. 48), followed by the influx of water. Water in the WP may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the ceramic waste forms. Thus, the water in the WP may become laden with dissolved actinides (e.g., Pu and U), and may eventually overflow or leak from the WP. Once the water leaves the WP, it may encounter the invert, in which the actinides may reprecipitate. Several factors could induce reprecipitation; these factors include: the high surface area of the crushed stone, and the presence of

  3. In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W> Stockman; S. LeStrange

    2000-09-28

    The objective of this calculation is to provide estimates of the amount of fissile material flowing out of the waste package (source term) and the accumulation of fissile elements (U and Pu) in a crushed-tuff invert. These calculations provide input for the analysis of repository impacts of the Pu-ceramic waste forms. In particular, the source term results are used as input to the far-field accumulation calculation reported in Ref. 51, and the in-drift accumulation results are used as inputs for the criticality calculations reported in Ref. 2. The results are also summarized and interpreted in Ref. 52. The scope of this calculation is the waste package (WP) Viability Assessment (VA) design, which consists of an outer corrosion-allowance material (CAM) and an inner corrosion-resistant material (CRM). This design is used in this calculation in order to be consistent with earlier Pu-ceramic degradation calculations (Ref. 15). The impact of the new Enhanced Design Alternative-I1 (EDA-11) design on the results will be addressed in a subsequent report. The design of the invert (a leveling foundation, which creates a level surface of the drift floor and supports the WP mounting structure) is consistent with the EDA-I1 design. The invert will be composed of crushed stone and a steel support structure (Ref. 17). The scope of this calculation is also defined by the nominal degradation scenario, which involves the breach of the WP (Section 10.5.1.2, Ref. 48), followed by the influx of water. Water in the WP may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the ceramic waste forms. Thus, the water in the WP may become laden with dissolved actinides (e.g., Pu and U), and may eventually overflow or leak from the WP. Once the water leaves the WP, it may encounter the invert, in which the actinides may reprecipitate. Several factors could induce reprecipitation; these factors include: the high surface area of the crushed stone, and the presence of

  4. Initial waste package interaction tests: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Bradley, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes the results of some initial investigations of the effects of rock media on the release of simulated fission products from a sngle waste form, PNL reference glass 76-68. All tests assemblies contained a minicanister prepared by pouring molten, U-doped 76-68 glass into a 2-cm-dia stanless steel tube closed at one end. The tubes were cut to 2.5 to 7.5 cm in length to expose a flat glass surface rimmed by the canister wall. A cylindrical, whole rock pellet, cut from one of the rock materials used, was placed on the glass surface then both the canister and rock pellet were packed in the same type of rock media ground to about 75 μm to complete the package. Rock materials used were a quartz monzonite basalt and bedded salt. These packages were run from 4 to 6 weeks in either 125 ml digestion bombs or 850 ml autoclaves capable of direct solution sampling, at either 250 or 150 0 C. Digestion bomb pressures were the vapor pressure of water, 600 psig at 250 0 C, and the autoclaves were pressurized at 2000 psig with an argon overpressure. In general, the solution chemistry of these initial package tests suggests that the rock media is the dominant controlling factor and that rock-water interaction may be similar to that observed in some geothermal areas. In no case was uranium observed in solution above 15 ppB. The observed leach rates of U glass not in contact with potential sinks (rock surfaces and alteration products) have been observed to be considerably higher. Thus the use of leach rates and U concentrations observed from binary leach experiments (waste-form water only) to ascertain long-term environmental consequences appear to be quite conservative compared to actual U release in the waste package experiments. Further evaluation, however, of fission product transport behavior and the role of alteration phases as fission product sinks is required

  5. Study on retrievability of waste package in geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Noda, Masaru

    2002-02-01

    Retrievability of waste packages in geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been investigated from a technical aspect in various foreign countries, reflecting a social concern while retrievability is not provided as a technical requirement. This study investigates the concept of reversibility and retrievability in foreign countries and a technical feasibility on retrievability of waste packages in the geological disposal concept shown in the H12 report. The conclusion obtained through this study is as follows: 1. Concept of reversibility and retrievability in foreign countries. Many organizations have reconsidered the retrievability as one option in the geological disposal to improve the reversibility of the stepwise decision-making process and provide the flexibility, even based upon the principle of the geological disposal that retrieval of waste from the repository is not intended. 2. Technical feasibility on the retrievability in disposal concept in the H12 report. It is confirmed to be able to remove the buffer and to retrieve the waste packages by currently available technologies even after the stages following emplacement of the buffer. It must be noted that a large effort and expense would be required for some activities such as the reconstruction of access route if the activities started after a stage of backfilling disposal tunnels. 3. Evaluation of feasibility on the retrievability and extraction of the issues. In the near future, it is necessary to study and confirm the practical workability and economical efficiency for the retrieving method of waste packages proposed in this study, the handling and processing method of removed buffer materials, and the retrieving method of waste packages in the case of degrading the integrity of waste packages or not emplacing the waste packages in the assumed attitude, etc. (author)

  6. Performance of a 34 kWp grid-connected PV system in Indonesia - A comparison of tropical and European PV systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, A.J.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed a monitored grid-connected PV system of 34 kWp in Indonesia to investigate the performance of PV systems in tropical climates. The PV system has been installed in Jayapura, the capital of the Province of Papua, Indonesia, by the beginning of 2012. Due to the aged gensets and frequent

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  9. Long-Term Waste Package Degradation Studies at the Yucca Mountain Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, K. G.; Bullard, B. E.; Longsine, D. E.; Mehta, S.; Lee, J. H.; Monib, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Site Recommendation (SR) process for the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underway. Fulfillment of the requirements for substantially complete containment of the radioactive waste emplaced in the potential repository and subsequent slow release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) into the geosphere will rely on a robust waste container design, among other EBS components. Part of the SR process involves sensitivity studies aimed at elucidating which model parameters contribute most to the drip shield and waste package degradation characteristics. The model parameters identified included (a) general corrosion rate model parameters (temperature-dependence and uncertainty treatment), and (b) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model parameters (uncertainty treatment of stress and stress intensity factor profiles in the Alloy 22 waste package outer barrier closure weld regions, the SCC initiation stress threshold, and the fraction of manufacturing flaws oriented favorably for through-wall penetration by SCC). These model parameters were reevaluated and new distributions were generated. Also, early waste package failures due to improper heat treatment were added to the waste package degradation model. The results of these investigations indicate that the waste package failure profiles are governed by the manufacturing flaw orientation model parameters and models used

  10. Integrity of radioactive waste packages at the Yucca mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.; Biaglow, A.; Huber, M.; Jagmin, C.

    2004-01-01

    Several of the important physical and chemical processes that impact the integrity of the radioactive waste packages planned for disposal at the proposed Repository at Yucca Mountain are examined. These processes are described by the aerodynamic, thermodynamic, and chemical interactions associated with the waste packages. The effects of chemical corrosion, mechanical erosion, temperature distributions throughout the repository environs, interactions of air, water, and solid particles, and radiological and biological influences are addressed. Materials will be exposed to at least 3 conditions threatening the integrity of the waste package: 1) accumulated dust and particles on the package surface and suspended in the air, 2) chemical reactions from deposits on the waste package infrastructure materials and tight contact areas, and crevices, and 3) environmental factors affecting chemical reactions such as moisture, pH, Eh, and radiolysis. All 3 of these conditions can combine and produce damaging impacts upon the thin protective layer on the alloy surface of the waste package. There are certain benefits from the low-temperature operating mode with ambient temperature below 85 Celsius degrees, but the materials could be subjected to a maximum temperature of 180 Celsius degrees which might introduce stress corrosion cracking and high temperature effects

  11. NWTS waste package program plan. Volume II. Program logic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This document describes the work planned for developing the technology to design, test and produce packages used for the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in deep geologic repositories. Waste forms considered include spent fuel and high-level waste. The testing and selection effort for barrier materials for radionuclide containment is described. The NWTS waste package program is a design-driven effort; waste package conceptual designs are used as input for preliminary designs, which are upgraded to a final design as materials and testing data become available. Performance assessment models are developed and validated. Milestones and a detailed schedule are given for the waste package development effort. Program logic networks defining work flow, interfaces among the NWTS Projects, and interrelationships of specific activities are presented. Detailed work elements are provided for the Waste Package Program Plan subtasks - design and development, waste form, barrier materials, and performance evaluation - for salt and basalt, host rocks for which the state of waste package knowledge and the corresponding data base are advanced

  12. Peer Review of the Waste Package Material Performance Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. A. Beavers; T. M. Devine, Jr.; G. S. Frankel; R. H. Jones; R. G. Kelly; R. M. Latanision; J. H. Payer

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC, formed the Waste Package Materials Performance Peer Review Panel (the Panel) to review the technical basis for evaluating the long-term performance of waste package materials in a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This is the interim report of the Panel; a final report will be issued in February 2002. In its work to date, the Panel has identified important issues regarding waste package materials performance. In the remainder of its work, the Panel will address approaches and plans to resolve these issues. In its review to date, the Panel has not found a technical basis to conclude that the waste package materials are unsuitable for long-term containment at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Nevertheless, significant technical issues remain unsettled and, primarily because of the extremely long life required for the waste packages, there will always be some uncertainty in the assessment. A significant base of scientific and engineering knowledge for assessing materials performance does exist and, therefore, the likelihood is great that uncertainty about the long-term performance can be substantially reduced through further experiments and analysis

  13. Radionuclides difficult to measure in waste packages. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierfeldt, S; Deckert, A [Brenk Systemplanung, Aachen (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    In this study nuclide specific correlation analyses between key nuclides that can be easily measured and nuclides that are difficult to measure are presented. Data are taken from studies and data compilations from various countries. The results of this study can serve to perform assays of the nuclide specific radionuclide contents in waste packages by gamma measurements of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs and calculation of the contents of other nuclides via the correlation analyses, sometimes referred to as `scaling factor method`. It can thus be avoided to have to take samples from the waste for separate analysis. An attempt is made to also investigate the physical and chemical backgrounds behind the proposed correlations. For example, a formation pathway common to the two nuclides to be correlated can be regarded as an explanation, if a good correlation is found. On the other hand, if the observed correlation is of poor quality, reasons may possibly lie in different behaviour of the two nuclides in the water system of the nuclear plant. This implies not only chemical solubility, transfer constants etc. in the water system, which would not only affect the proportionality between the two nuclides, but a different behavior in different parts of the water system must be assumed (e.g. different filter efficiencies etc). 47 refs, 57 figs, 40 tabs.

  14. Development and evaluation of a tracer-injection hydrothermal technique for studies of waste package interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.E.; Coles, D.G.; Britton, R.C.; Burnell, J.R.

    1986-11-01

    A tracer-injection system has been developed for use in characterizing reactions of waste package materials under hydrothermal conditions. High-pressure liquid chromatographic instrumentation has been coupled with Dickson-type rocking autoclaves to allow injection of selected components into the hydrothermal fluid while maintaining run temperature and pressure. Hydrothermal experiments conducted using this system included the interactions of depleted uranium oxide and Zircaloy-4 metal alloy discs with trace levels of 99 Tc and non-radioactive Cs and I in a simulated groundwater matrix. After waste-package components and simulated waste forms were pre-conditioned in the autoclave systems (usually 4 to 6 weeks), known quantities of tracer-doped fluids were injected into the autoclaves' gold reaction bag at run conditions. Time-sequenced sampling of the hydrothermal fluid providing kinetic data on the reactions of tracers with waste package materials. The injection system facilitates the design of experiments that will better define ''steady-state'' fluid compositions in hydrothermal reactions. The injection system will also allow for the formation of tracer-bearing solid phases in detectable quantities

  15. Mass Transfer Model for a Breached Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.; McClure, J.

    2004-01-01

    The degradation of waste packages, which are used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the repository, can result in configurations that may increase the probability of criticality. A mass transfer model is developed for a breached waste package to account for the entrainment of insoluble particles. In combination with radionuclide decay, soluble advection, and colloidal transport, a complete mass balance of nuclides in the waste package becomes available. The entrainment equations are derived from dimensionless parameters such as drag coefficient and Reynolds number and based on the assumption that insoluble particles are subjected to buoyant force, gravitational force, and drag force only. Particle size distributions are utilized to calculate entrainment concentration along with geochemistry model abstraction to calculate soluble concentration, and colloid model abstraction to calculate colloid concentration and radionuclide sorption. Results are compared with base case geochemistry model, which only considers soluble advection loss

  16. Nuclear waste package design for the Vadose zone in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Gregg, D.W.; Russell, E.W.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the selection and analysis of conceptual waste package designs that will be used by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project for disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada Site. The design requirements that the waste packages are required to meet are listed. Concept drawings for the reference designs and one alternative package design are shown. Four metal alloys; 304L SS, 321 SS, 316L SS and Incoloy 825 have been selected for candidate canister/overpack materials, and 1020 carbon steel has been selected as the reference metal for the borehole liners. A summary of the results of technical and economic analysis supporting the selection of the conceptual waste package designs is included. Post-closure containment and release rates are not discussed in this paper. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  17. Hydrothermal waste package interactions with methane-containing basalt groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.

    1984-11-01

    Hydrothermal waste package interaction tests with methane-containing synthetic basalt groundwater have shown that in the absence of gamma radiolysis, methane has little influence on the glass dissolution rate. Gamma radiolysis tests at fluxes of 5.5 x 10 5 and 4.4 x 10 4 R/hr showed that methane-saturated groundwater was more reducing than identical experiments where Ar was substituted for CH 4 . Dissolved methane, therefore, may be beneficial to the waste package in limiting the solubility of redox sensitive radionuclides such a 99 Tc. Hydrocarbon polymers known to form under the irradiation conditions of these tests were not produced. The presence of the waste package constituents apparently inhibited the formation of the polymers, however, the mechanism which prevented their formation was not determined

  18. Experiences of storage of radioactive waste packages in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Ruokola, E.; Ramsoey, T.

    2001-04-01

    The present report includes results from a study on intermediate storage of radioactive waste packages in the Nordic countries. Principles for intermediate storage in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are presented. Recommendations are given regarding different intermediate storage options and also regarding control and supervision. The disposal of drums at Kjeller in Norway has also been included in the report. This is an example of an intended (and correctly licensed) disposal facility turned into what in practice has become a storage system. (au)

  19. Demands placed on waste package performance testing and modeling by some general results on reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    Waste packages for a US nuclear waste repository are required to provide reasonable assurance of maintaining substantially complete containment of radionuclides for 300 to 1000 years after closure. The waiting time to failure for complex failure processes affecting engineered or manufactured systems is often found to be an exponentially-distributed random variable. Assuming that this simple distribution can be used to describe the behavior of a hypothetical single barrier waste package, calculations presented in this paper show that the mean time to failure (the only parameter needed to completely specify an exponential distribution) would have to be more than 10 7 years in order to provide reasonable assurance of meeting this requirement. With two independent barriers, each would need to have a mean time to failure of only 10 5 years to provide the same reliability. Other examples illustrate how multiple barriers can provide a strategy for not only achieving but demonstrating regulatory compliance

  20. Isotopic analysis of radioactive waste packages (an inexpensive approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, D.A.; Richmond, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer printout of the isotopic analysis for all radioactive waste packages containing resins, or other aqueous filter media is now required at the disposal sites at Barnwell, South Carolina, and Beatty, Nevada. Richland, Washington requires an isotopic analysis for all radioactive waste packages. The NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission), through 10 CFR 61, will require shippers of radioactive waste to classify and label for disposal all radioactive waste forms. These forms include resins, filters, sludges, and dry active waste (trash). The waste classification is to be based upon 10 CFR 61 (Section 1-7). The isotopes upon which waste classification is to be based are tabulated. 7 references, 8 tables

  1. Value Engineering Study for Closing Waste Packages Containing TAD Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleen Shelton-Davis

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management announced their intention to have the commercial utilities package spent nuclear fuel in shielded, transportable, ageable, and disposable containers prior to shipment to the Yucca Mountain repository. This will change the conditions used as a basis for the design of the waste package closure system. The environment is now expected to be a low radiation, low contamination area. A value engineering study was completed to evaluate possible modifications to the existing closure system using the revised requirements. Four alternatives were identified and evaluated against a set of weighted criteria. The alternatives are (1) a radiation-hardened, remote automated system (the current baseline design); (2) a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system (with personnel intervention if necessary); (3) a nonradiation-hardened, semi-automated system with personnel access for routine manual operations; and (4) a nonradiation-hardened, fully manual system with full-time personnel access. Based on the study, the recommended design is Alternative 2, a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system. It is less expensive and less complex than the current baseline system, because nonradiation-hardened equipment can be used and some contamination control equipment is no longer needed. In addition, the inclusion of remote automation ensures throughput requirements are met, provides a more reliable process, and provides greater protection for employees from industrial accidents and radiation exposure than the semi-automated or manual systems. Other items addressed during the value engineering study as requested by OCRWM include a comparison to industry canister closure systems and corresponding lessons learned; consideration of closing a transportable, ageable, and disposable canister; and an estimate of the time required to perform a demonstration of the recommended closure system

  2. Value Engineering Study for Closing Waste Packages Containing TAD Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleen Shelton-Davis

    2005-11-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management announced their intention to have the commercial utilities package spent nuclear fuel in shielded, transportable, ageable, and disposable containers prior to shipment to the Yucca Mountain repository. This will change the conditions used as a basis for the design of the waste package closure system. The environment is now expected to be a low radiation, low contamination area. A value engineering study was completed to evaluate possible modifications to the existing closure system using the revised requirements. Four alternatives were identified and evaluated against a set of weighted criteria. The alternatives are (1) a radiation-hardened, remote automated system (the current baseline design); (2) a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system (with personnel intervention if necessary); (3) a nonradiation-hardened, semi-automated system with personnel access for routine manual operations; and (4) a nonradiation-hardened, fully manual system with full-time personnel access. Based on the study, the recommended design is Alternative 2, a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system. It is less expensive and less complex than the current baseline system, because nonradiation-hardened equipment can be used and some contamination control equipment is no longer needed. In addition, the inclusion of remote automation ensures throughput requirements are met, provides a more reliable process, and provides greater protection for employees from industrial accidents and radiation exposure than the semi-automated or manual systems. Other items addressed during the value engineering study as requested by OCRWM include a comparison to industry canister closure systems and corresponding lessons learned; consideration of closing a transportable, ageable, and disposable canister; and an estimate of the time required to perform a demonstration of the recommended closure system.

  3. Review of DOE waste package program. Subtask 1.1 - National Waste Package Program, October 1983-March 1984. Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1985-03-01

    The present effort is part of an ongoing task to review the national high-level waste package effort. It includes evaluation of reference waste form, container, and packing material components with respect to determining how they may contribute to the containment and controlled release of radionuclides after waste packages have been emplaced in salt, basalt, tuff, and granite repositories. In the current Biannual Report a review of progress in the new crystalline repository (granite) program is described. Other foreign data for this host rock have also been outlined where relevant. The use of crushed salt, and bentonite- and zeolite-containing packing materials is discussed. The effects of temperature and gamma irradiation are shown to be important with respect to defining the localized environmental conditions around a waste package and the long-term integrity of the packing

  4. Review of DOE waste package program. Subtask 1.1. National waste package program, April-September 1983. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, P. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    The current effort is part of an ongoing task to review the national high-level waste package effort. It includes evaluations of reference waste form, container, and packing material components with respect to determining how they may contribute to the containment and controlled release of radionuclides after waste packages have been emplaced in salt, basalt, and tuff repositories. In the current Biannual Report a section on carbon steel container corrosion has been included to complement prior work on TiCode-12 and Type 304 stainless steel. The use of crushed tuff as a packing material is discussed and waste package component interaction test data are included. Licensing data requirements to estimate the degree of compliance with NRC performance objectives are specified. 41 figures, 24 tables.

  5. Review of DOE waste package program. Subtask 1.1. National waste package program, April-September 1983. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1984-08-01

    The current effort is part of an ongoing task to review the national high-level waste package effort. It includes evaluations of reference waste form, container, and packing material components with respect to determining how they may contribute to the containment and controlled release of radionuclides after waste packages have been emplaced in salt, basalt, and tuff repositories. In the current Biannual Report a section on carbon steel container corrosion has been included to complement prior work on TiCode-12 and Type 304 stainless steel. The use of crushed tuff as a packing material is discussed and waste package component interaction test data are included. Licensing data requirements to estimate the degree of compliance with NRC performance objectives are specified. 41 figures, 24 tables

  6. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1986-January 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Harrison, S.; Shull, R.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon and stainless steels, and copper. In the section on tuff, the current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned. Within the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) section, discussions are given on problems concerning groundwater, materials for use in the metallic overpack, and diffusion through the packing. For the proposed salt site, questions are raised on the work on both ASTM A216 Steel and Ti-Code 12. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is covered. NBS reviews of selected DOE technical reports and a summary of current waste-package activities of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is presented. Using a database management system, a computerized database for storage and retrieval of reviews and evaluations of HLW data has been developed and is described. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mon

    2004-10-11

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts.

  8. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Mon

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts

  9. Review of waste package verification tests. Semiannual report, April 1985-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Several studies were completed this period to evaluate experimental and analytical methodologies being used in the DOE waste package program. The first involves a determination of the relevance of the test conditions being used by DOE to characterize waste package component behavior in a salt repository system. Another study focuses on the testing conditions and procedures used to measure radionuclide solubility and colloid formation in repository groundwaters. An attempt was also made to evaluate the adequacy of selected waste package performance codes. However, the latter work was limited by an inability to obtain several codes from DOE. Nevertheless, it was possible to comment briefly on the structures and intents of the codes based on publications in the open literature. The final study involved an experimental program to determine the likelihood of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and Incoloy 825 in simulated tuff repository environments. Tests for six-month exposure periods in water and air-steam conditions are described. 52 figs., 48 tabs

  10. Mathematical models for diffusive mass transfer from waste package container with multiple perforations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Andrews, R.W.; Chambre, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    A robust engineered barrier system (EBS) is employed in the current design concept for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, US. The primary component of the EBS is a multi-barrier waste package container. Simplifying the geometry of the cylindrical waste package container and the underlying invert into the equivalent spherical configuration, mathematical models are developed for steady-state and transient diffusive releases from the failed waste container with multiple perforations (or pit penetrations) at the boundary of the invert. Using the models the steady-state and transient diffusive release behaviors form the failed waste container are studied. The analyses show that the number of perforations, the size of perforation, the container wall thickness, the geometry of the waste container and invert, and the adsorption of radionuclide in the invert are the important parameters that control the diffusive release rate. It is emphasized that the failed (or perforated) waste package container can still perform as a potentially important barrier (or diffusion barrier) to radionuclide release

  11. Waste package for a repository located in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, S.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of the waste package designs for salt repositories. The status of the supporting studies of environment definition, corrosion of containment materials, and leaching of waste forms is also presented. Emphasis is on the results obtained in FY 83 and the planned effort in FY 84. 8 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  12. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.G. Mon; L.A. Rottinghaus

    2004-01-01

    As directed by a written development plan (BSC 2002 [DIRS 161132]), the primary purpose of this scientific analysis is to identify and document the analyses and resolution of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) affecting the waste package and drip shield performance in the repository. Thirty-three FEPs were identified that are associated with the waste package and drip shield performance. This scientific analysis has been prepared to document the screening methodology used in the process of FEP inclusion and exclusion. The scope of this scientific analysis is to identify the treatment of the FEPs affecting postclosure waste package and drip shield performance. It should be noted that seismic effects are not treated within this report. A full discussion of seismic effects is contained in the ''Engineered Barrier System Features, Events, and Processes'' report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167253]). The FEPs that are deemed potentially important to repository postclosure performance are evaluated, either as components of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) or as a separate discussion in a scientific analysis report. The scope for this activity involves two tasks, namely: Task 1: Identify which FEPs are to be considered explicitly in the TSPA (called included FEPs) and in which scientific analyses these FEPs are addressed. Task 2: Identify FEPs not to be included in the TSPA (called excluded FEPs) and provide justification for why these FEPs do not need to be a part of the TSPA model. The analyses documented in this scientific analysis are for the license application (LA) base case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167040]). In this design, a drip shield is placed over the waste package and no backfill is placed over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167040]). Each FEP may include one or more specific issues that are collectively described by a FEP name, a FEP description, and descriptor phrases. The FEP Description may encompass a single feature, process or event, or a few

  13. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon; L.A. Rottinghaus

    2004-03-26

    As directed by a written development plan (BSC 2002 [DIRS 161132]), the primary purpose of this scientific analysis is to identify and document the analyses and resolution of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) affecting the waste package and drip shield performance in the repository. Thirty-three FEPs were identified that are associated with the waste package and drip shield performance. This scientific analysis has been prepared to document the screening methodology used in the process of FEP inclusion and exclusion. The scope of this scientific analysis is to identify the treatment of the FEPs affecting postclosure waste package and drip shield performance. It should be noted that seismic effects are not treated within this report. A full discussion of seismic effects is contained in the ''Engineered Barrier System Features, Events, and Processes'' report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167253]). The FEPs that are deemed potentially important to repository postclosure performance are evaluated, either as components of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) or as a separate discussion in a scientific analysis report. The scope for this activity involves two tasks, namely: Task 1: Identify which FEPs are to be considered explicitly in the TSPA (called included FEPs) and in which scientific analyses these FEPs are addressed. Task 2: Identify FEPs not to be included in the TSPA (called excluded FEPs) and provide justification for why these FEPs do not need to be a part of the TSPA model. The analyses documented in this scientific analysis are for the license application (LA) base case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167040]). In this design, a drip shield is placed over the waste package and no backfill is placed over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167040]). Each FEP may include one or more specific issues that are collectively described by a FEP name, a FEP description, and descriptor phrases. The FEP Description may encompass a single feature, process

  14. Acceptance and tracking of waste packages from nuclear power plants at the Centre de l'Aube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errera, J.; Tison, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    For 30 years, the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) is in charge of the radioactive waste management and acquired a good knowledge relating to the control of low and intermediate level waste produced by nuclear power plants (NPP), the waste characteristics and the waste conditioning. The integrated waste management system for low-level radioactive waste in France implemented by ANDRA covers all stages from waste generation to final disposal at the Centre de I'Aube near surface facility. ANDRA defined a quality assurance program for waste management that specifies the level of quality to be achieved by solidification and packaging processes, defines quality control requirements and defines waste tracking requirements, from waste generation through final disposal. Verification of quality of waste packages is implemented at three levels of the waste management system. The first one consists of inspections of waste packages at the generator's premises and audits of the quality assurance organization of the waste generator. The second level of verification consists of the waste tracking system. It allows identifying and tracking each waste package from the step it is fabricated to its final disposal at the ANDRA site. The third level of verification is obtained by mean of non-destructive and destructive assays of waste packages. These assays allow to verify generator compliance with ANDRA's technical specifications and to investigate the accuracy of physical and radioactive characteristics reported to ANDRA by the generator. (author)

  15. WP 2: "Data collection and processing systems (DCPS) for the conventional markets" and WP 3: "Data collection and processing systems for organic markets"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfert, J.; Kramer, K.J.; Richter, T.; Hempfling, G.; Lux, S.; Recke, G.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the EU concerted action EISfOM (QLK5-2002-02400) (European Information System for Organic Markets) is to build up a framework for reporting valid and reliable data for relevant production and market sectors of the European organic sector in order to meet the needs of policy-makers,

  16. Use of depleted uranium silicate glass to minimize release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate Container Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill the void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (a) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (b) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments

  17. Interim performance specifications for conceptual waste-package designs for geologic isolation in salt repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The interim performance specifications and data requirements presented apply to conceptual waste package designs for all waste forms which will be isolated in salt geologic repositories. The waste package performance specifications and data requirements respond to the waste package performance criteria. Subject areas treated include: containment and controlled release, operational period safety, criticality control, identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available

  18. Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Plan: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.A.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Under the direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created within the DOE by direction of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the mission of the Salt Repository Project (SRP) is to provide for the development of a candidate salt repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent reactor fuel in a manner that fully protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. In consideration of the program needs and requirements discussed above, the SRP has decided to develop and issue this SRP Waste Package Program Plan. This document is intended to outline how the SRP plans to develop the waste package design and to show, with reasonable assurance, that the developed design will satisfy applicable requirements/performance objectives. 44 refs., 16 figs., 16 tabs

  19. Expected environment for waste packages in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Clark, D.E.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Rai, D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses results of recent efforts to define the very near-field (within approximately 2 m) environmental conditions to which waste packages will be exposed in a salt repository. These conditions must be considered in the experimental design for waste package materials testing, which includes corrosion of barrier materials and leaching of waste forms. Site-specific brine compositions have been determined, and standard brine compositions have been selected for testing purposes. Actual brine compositions will vary depending on origin, temperature, irradiation history, and contact with irradiated rock salt. Results of irradiating rock salt, synthetic brines, rock salt/brine mixtures, and reactions of irradiated rock salt with brine solutions are reported. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  20. Operational considerations in drift emplacement of waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the operational considerations as well as the advantages and disadvantages of emplacing waste packages in drifts in a repository. The considerations apply particularly to the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste glass at Yucca Mountain, although most of the considerations and the advantages and disadvantages discussed in this paper do not necessarily represent the official views of the DOE or of the Management and Operations Contractor, since most of these considerations are still under active discussion and the final decisions will not be made for some time - perhaps years. This paper describes the issues, suggests some principles upon which decisions should be based, and states some of the most significant advantages and disadvantages of the emplacement modes, and the associated waste package types and thermal loadings

  1. Testing of the permissible inventories in radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmaier, W.

    1988-01-01

    The inventories of radionuclides in waste packages which are to be stored in repositories are determined in the Waste Acceptance Requirements of the repository and in the Act on Transport of Dangerous Goods. In this report limiting values of relevant radionuclides are given in such a way that it is possible to use them in a standardized manner. The limiting values apply to single radionuclides, for handling mixtures of nuclides it is necessary to use the sum formula. The minimized number of waste packages which must be produced from a given quantity of raw waste and an inventory of radionuclides keeping all parameters can be calculated with the help of the shown calculating sheet. (orig.) [de

  2. Waste package performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, W.J.; Lappa, D.A.; Thatcher, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors completed a first cycle of model development from a specification to a computer program, PANDORA-1, for long-term performance assessment of waste packages. The model for one waste package at a time incorporates processes specific to the unsaturated environment at the proposed Yucca Mountain, NV, site. PANDORA-1 models the most likely processes and several modes of waste alteration and release. The development identified information needs for future models; many processes, local details, and combinations will have to be examined. Integration of ensemble performance and quantification of uncertainties are modeling steps at higher aggregation. Methodologies for these steps include sampling, which is well studied; we have focused on several open questions. The authors can now calculate the amount of variance reduction available from Latin hypercube sampling; it is a limited reduction. A new method, uncertainty analysis test-bed program compares the new with old sampling methods

  3. Effects of sorption hysteresis on radionuclide releases from waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Reed, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    A one-dimensional, numerical transport model was used to calculate radionuclide releases from waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository in basalt. The model incorporates both sorption and desorption isotherm parameters measured previously for sorption of key radionuclides on the packing material component of the waste package. Sorption hysteresis as described by these isotherms lowered releases of some radionuclides by as much as two orders of magnitude. Radionuclides that have low molar inventories (relative to uranium), high solubility, and strongly sorbed, are most affected by sorption hysteresis. In these cases, almost the entire radionuclide inventory is sorbed on the packing material. The model can be used to help optimize the thickness of the packing material layer by comparing release rate versus packing material thickness curves with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits

  4. ERG review of waste package container materials selection and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, D.P.; Perrin, J.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The October 1984 meeting of the ERG reviewed the waste package container materials selection and corrosion. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by the ERG

  5. Status of ERDA TRU waste packaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, J.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the status of Task 3 of the TRU Waste Cyclone Drum Incinerator and Treatment System program. This task covers acceptable TRU packaging for interim storage and terminal isolation. The kind of TRU wastes generated by contractors and its transport are discussed. Both drum and box systems are desirable

  6. Role of statistics in characterizing nuclear waste package behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, W.M.

    1984-11-01

    The characterization of nuclear waste package behavior is primarily based on the outcome of laboratory tests, where components of a proposed waste package are either individually or simultaneously subjected to simulated repository conditions. At each step of a testing method, both controllable and uncontrollable factors contribute to the overall uncertainty in the final outcome of the test. If not dealt with correctly, these sources of uncertainty could obscure or distort important information that might otherwise be gleaned from the test data. This could result in misleading or erroneous conclusions about the behavior characteristic being studied. It could also preclude estimation of the individual contributions of the major sources of uncertainty to the overall uncertainty. Statistically designed experiments and sampling plans, followed by correctly applied statistical analysis and estimation methods will yield the most information possible for the time and resources spent on experimentation, and they can eliminate the above concerns. Conclusions reached on the basis of such information will be sound and defensible. This presentation is intended to emphasize the importance of correctly applied, theoretically sound statistical methodology in characterizing nuclear waste package behavior. 8 references, 1 table

  7. Role of statistics in characterizing nuclear waste package behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    The characterization of nuclear waste package behavior is primarily based on the outcome of laboratory tests, where components of a proposed waste package are either individually or simultaneously subjected to simulated repository conditions. At each step of a testing method, both controllable and uncontrollable factors contribute to the overall uncertainty in the final outcome of the test. If not dealt with correctly, these sources of uncertainty could obscure or distort important information that might otherwise be gleaned form the test data. This could result in misleading or erroneous conclusions about the behavior characteristic being studied. It could also preclude estimation of the individual contributions of the major sources of uncertainty to the overall uncertainty. Statistically designed experiments and sampling plans, followed by correctly applied statistical analysis and estimation methods will yield the most information possible for the time and resources spent on experimentation, and they can eliminate the above concerns. Conclusions reached on the basis of such information will be sound and defensible. This presentation is intended to emphasize the importance of correctly applied, theoretically sound statistical methodology in characterizing nuclear waste package behavior

  8. Generic Degraded Configuration Probability Analysis for the Codisposal Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.F.A. Deng; M. Saglam; L.J. Gratton

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages'' (CRWMS M and O 2000c), this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is developed for the purpose of screening out degraded configurations for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types. It performs the degraded configuration parameter and probability evaluations of the overall methodology specified in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000, Section 3) to qualifying configurations. Degradation analyses are performed to assess realizable parameter ranges and physical regimes for configurations. Probability calculations are then performed for configurations characterized by k eff in excess of the Critical Limit (CL). The scope of this document is to develop a generic set of screening criteria or models to screen out degraded configurations having potential for exceeding a criticality limit. The developed screening criteria include arguments based on physical/chemical processes and probability calculations and apply to DOE SNF types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package. The degradation takes place inside the waste package and is long after repository licensing has expired. The emphasis of this AMR is on degraded configuration screening and the probability analysis is one of the approaches used for screening. The intended use of the model is to apply the developed screening criteria to each DOE SNF type following the completion of the degraded mode criticality analysis internal to the waste package

  9. Performance analysis of a 11.2 kWp roof top grid-connected PV system in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sharma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Barren land and roof tops of buildings are being increasingly used worldwide to install solar panels for generating electricity. One such step has been taken by Siksha ‘O’Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar (Latitude 20.24° N and Longitude 80.85° E by installing a 11.2 kWp grid connected solar power system during February, 2014. This PV system is tilted at an angle of 21° on the top floor of a 25 metre height building. This system was installed This paper presents the results of this grid connected photovoltaic system which was monitored between September 2014 to August 2015. The entire electricity generated by the system was fed into the state grid. The different parameters of the system studied include PV module efficiency, array yield, final yield, inverter efficiency and performance ratio of the system. The total energy generated during this period was found to be 14.960 MWh and the PV module efficiency, inverter efficiency and performance ratio were found to be 13.42%, 89.83% and 0.78 respectively.

  10. From waste packages acceptance criteria to waste packages acceptance process at the Centre de l'Aube disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutzer, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Centre de l'Aube disposal facility has now been operated for 10 years. At the end of 2001, about 124,000 m3 of low and intermediate level short lived waste packages, representing 180,000 packages, have been disposed, for a total capacity of 1,000,000 m3. The flow of waste packages is now between 12 and 15,000 m3 per year, that is one third of the flow that was taken into account for the design of the repository. It confirms the efforts by waste generators to minimise waste production. This flow represents 25 to 30,000 packages, 50% are conditioned into the compaction facility of the repository, so that 17,000 packages are disposed per year. 54 disposal vaults have been closed. In 1996-1999, the safety assessment of the repository have been reviewed, taking into account the experience of operation. This assessment was investigated by the regulatory body and, subsequently, a so-called 'definitive license' to operate was granted to ANDRA on September 2, 1999 with updated licensing requirements. Another review will be performed in 2004. To ensure a better consistency with the safety assessment of the facility, Andra issued new technical requirements for waste packages at the end of 2000. Discussions with waste generators also showed that the waste package acceptance process should be improved to provide a more precise definition of operational criteria to comply with in waste conditioning facilities. Consequently, a new approach has been implemented since 2000. (orig.)

  11. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.-L. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carasco, C., E-mail: cedric.carasco@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perot, B. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mauerhofer, E.; Kettler, J.; Havenith, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a {approx}20 kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Juelich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between measurements and MCNP calculation has been performed for a PGNAA system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system aims at controlling the amount of toxic elements in nuclear waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple samples and a concrete cylinder in which impurities have been added are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations agree within a factor 2 with measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system can be improved with a better neutron flux monitoring and the use of boron-free graphite.

  12. Use of simple transport equations to estimate waste package performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A method of developing waste package performance requirements for specific nuclides is described. The method is based on: Federal regulations concerning permissible concentrations in solution at the point of discharge to the accessible environment; a simple and conservative transport model; baseline and potential worst-case release scenarios. Use of the transport model enables calculation of maximum permissible release rates within a repository in basalt for each of the scenarios. The maximum permissible release rates correspond to performance requirements for the engineered barrier system. The repository was assumed to be constructed in a basalt layer. For the cases considered, including a well drilled into an aquifer 1750 m from the repository center, little significant advantage is obtained from a 1000-yr as opposed to a 100-yr waste package. A 1000-yr waste package is of importance only for nuclides with half-lives much less than 100 yr which travel to the accessible environment in much less than 1000 yr. Such short travel times are extremely unlikely for a mined repository. Among the actinides, the most stringent maximum permissible release rates are for 236 U and 234 U. A simple solubility calculation suggests, however, that these performance requirements can be readily met by the engineered barrier system. Under the reducing conditions likely to occur in a repository located in basalt, uranium would be sufficiently insoluble that no solution could contain more than about 0.01% of the maximum permissible concentration at saturation. The performance requirements derived from the one-dimensional modeling approach are conservative by at least one to two orders of magnitude. More quantitative three-dimensional modeling at specific sites should enable relaxation of the performance criteria derived in this study. 12 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  13. DOE progress in assessing the long term performance of waste package materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berusch, A.; Gause, E.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA)[1], the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) is conducting activities to select and characterize candidate sites suitable for the construction and operation of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. DOE is funding three first repository projects: Basalt Waste Isolation Project, BWIP; Nevada Nuclear Waste Isolation Project, NNWSI; and Salt Repository Project Office, SRPO. It is essential in the licensing process that DOE demonstrate to the NRC that the long-term performance of the materials and design will be in compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 60.113 on substantially complete containment within the waste packages for 300 to 1000 years and a controlled release rate from the engineered barrier system (EBS) for 10,000 years of 1 part in 10 5 per year for radionuclides present in defined quantities 100 years after permanent closure. Obviously, the time spans involved make it impractical to base the assessment of the long term performance of waste package materials on real time, prototypical testing. The assessment of performance will be implemented by the use of models that are supported by real time field and laboratory tests, monitoring, and natural analog studies. Each of the repository projects is developing a plan for demonstrating long-term waste package material performance depending on the particular materials and the package-perturbed, time-dependent environment under which the materials must function. An overview of progress in each of these activities for each of the projects is provided in the following

  14. Nuclear Waste Package Mockups: A Study of In-situ Redox State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helean, K.; Anderson, B.; Brady, P. V.

    2006-05-01

    The Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR), located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility in the U.S. for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuels. Total system performance assessment(TSPA) has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are Np, Tc, and I. These three radionuclides are mobile in most geochemical settings, and therefore sequestering them within the repository horizon is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Corroding steel may offset radionuclide transport processes within the proposed waste packages at YMR by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron has been shown to reduce UO22+ to UO2s, and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials have been shown to adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals. Locally reducing conditions may lead to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO4-, NpO2+, and UO22+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Water occluded during corrosion produces bulky corrosion products, and consequently less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this study is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package corrosion products and their effects on local redox conditions, radionuclide transport, and porosity. In order to measure in-situ redox, six small-scale (1:40) waste package mockups were constructed using A516 and 316 stainless steel, the same materials as the proposed Yucca Mountain waste packages. The mockups are periodically injected with a simulated groundwater and the accumulated effluent and corrosion products are evaluated for their Fe(II)/Fe(III) content and mineralogy. Oxygen fugacities are then calculated and, thus, in-situ redox conditions are determined. Early results indicate that corrosion products are largely amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxides, goethite and magnetite. That information together with the

  15. Generic Degraded Congiguration Probability Analysis for DOE Codisposal Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.F.A. Deng; M. Saglam; L.J. Gratton

    2001-05-23

    In accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c), this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is developed for the purpose of screening out degraded configurations for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types. It performs the degraded configuration parameter and probability evaluations of the overall methodology specified in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000, Section 3) to qualifying configurations. Degradation analyses are performed to assess realizable parameter ranges and physical regimes for configurations. Probability calculations are then performed for configurations characterized by k{sub eff} in excess of the Critical Limit (CL). The scope of this document is to develop a generic set of screening criteria or models to screen out degraded configurations having potential for exceeding a criticality limit. The developed screening criteria include arguments based on physical/chemical processes and probability calculations and apply to DOE SNF types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package. The degradation takes place inside the waste package and is long after repository licensing has expired. The emphasis of this AMR is on degraded configuration screening and the probability analysis is one of the approaches used for screening. The intended use of the model is to apply the developed screening criteria to each DOE SNF type following the completion of the degraded mode criticality analysis internal to the waste package.

  16. Waste package reference conceptual designs for a repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This report provides the reference conceptual waste package designs for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to baseline these designs, thereby establishing the configuration and interface controls necessary, within the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, formerly the National Waste Terminal Storage Program, to proceed in an orderly manner with preliminary design. Included are designs for the current reference defense high-level waste form from the Savannah River Plant, an optimized commercial high-level waste form, and spent fuel which has been disassembled and compacted into a circular bundle containing either 12 pressurized-water reactor or 30 boiling-water reactor assemblies. For compacted spent fuel, it appears economically attractive to standardize the waste package diameter for all fuel types. The reference waste packages consist of the containerized waste form, a low carbon steel overpack, and, after emplacement, a cover of salt. The overpack is a hollow cylinder with a flat head welded to each end. Its design thickness is the sum of the structural thickness required to resist the 15.4-MPa lithostatic pressure plus the corrosion allowance necessary to assure the required structural thickness will exist through the 1000-year containment period. Based on available data and completed analyses, the reference concepts described in this report satisfy all requirements of the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with reasonable assurance. In addition, sufficient design maturity exists to form a basis for preliminary design; these concepts can be brought under configuration control to serve as reference package designs. Development programs are identified that will be required to support these designs during the licensing process. 19 refs., 37 figs., 31 tabs

  17. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.G.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.C.

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period August 1988 through January 1989. Included are reviews of related materials research and plans, activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center, information on the Yucca Mountain Project, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. NIST comments are given on the Yucca Mountain Consultation Draft Site Characterization Plan (CDSCP) and on the Waste Compliance Plan for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) High-Level Waste (HLW) Form. 3 figs

  18. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.G.; Fraker, A.C.; Escalante, E.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of some of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period, August 1989--January 1990. This includes reviews of related materials research and plans, information on the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. Short discussions are given relating to the publications reviewed and complete reviews and evaluations are included. Reports of other work are included in the Appendices

  19. Thermal modeling of nuclear waste package designs for disposal in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockman, J.N.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in the design and testing of high-level nuclear waste packages. Many of the aspects of waste package design and testing (e.g., corrosion and leaching) depend in part on the temperature history of the emplaced packages. This paper discusses thermal modeling and analysis of various emplaced waste package conceptual designs including the models used, the assumptions and approximations made, and the results obtained. 6 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  20. Thermal modeling of nuclear waste package designs for disposal in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockman, J.N.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1984-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in the design and testing of high-level nuclear waste packages. Many of the aspects of waste package design and testing (e.g., corrosion and leaching) depend in part on the temperature history of the emplaced packages. This paper discusses thermal modeling and analysis of various emplaced waste package conceptual designs including the models used, the assumptions and approximations made, and the results obtained. 6 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  1. Environment on the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Wolery

    2005-01-01

    This report provides supporting analysis of the conditions at which an aqueous solution can exist on the drip shield or waste package surfaces, including theoretical underpinning for the evolution of concentrated brines that could form by deliquescence or evaporation, and evaluation of the effects of acid-gas generation on brine composition. This analysis does not directly feed the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA), but supports modeling and abstraction of the in-drift chemical environment (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169863]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). It also provides analyses that may support screening of features, events, and processes, and input for response to regulatory inquiries. This report emphasizes conditions of low relative humidity (RH) that, depending on temperature and chemical conditions, may be dry or may be associated with an aqueous phase containing concentrated electrolytes. Concentrated solutions at low RH may evolve by evaporative concentration of water that seeps into emplacement drifts, or by deliquescence of dust on the waste package or drip shield surfaces. The minimum RH for occurrence of aqueous conditions is calculated for various chemical systems based on current understanding of site geochemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis makes use of known characteristics of Yucca Mountain waters and dust from existing tunnels, laboratory data, and relevant information from the technical literature and handbooks

  2. Environment on the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Wolery

    2005-02-22

    This report provides supporting analysis of the conditions at which an aqueous solution can exist on the drip shield or waste package surfaces, including theoretical underpinning for the evolution of concentrated brines that could form by deliquescence or evaporation, and evaluation of the effects of acid-gas generation on brine composition. This analysis does not directly feed the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA), but supports modeling and abstraction of the in-drift chemical environment (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169863]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). It also provides analyses that may support screening of features, events, and processes, and input for response to regulatory inquiries. This report emphasizes conditions of low relative humidity (RH) that, depending on temperature and chemical conditions, may be dry or may be associated with an aqueous phase containing concentrated electrolytes. Concentrated solutions at low RH may evolve by evaporative concentration of water that seeps into emplacement drifts, or by deliquescence of dust on the waste package or drip shield surfaces. The minimum RH for occurrence of aqueous conditions is calculated for various chemical systems based on current understanding of site geochemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis makes use of known characteristics of Yucca Mountain waters and dust from existing tunnels, laboratory data, and relevant information from the technical literature and handbooks.

  3. Nuclear-waste-package program for high-level isolation in Nevada tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the waste package program is to insure that a package is designed suitable for a repository in tuff that meets performance requirements of the NRC. In brief, the current (draft) regulation requires that the radionuclides be contained in the engineered system for 1000 years, and that, thereafter, no more than one part in 10 5 of the nuclides per year leave the boundary of the system. Studies completed as of this writing are thermal modeling of waste packages in a tuff repository and analysis of sodium bentonite as a potential backfill material. Both studies will be presented. Thermal calculations coupled with analysis of the geochemical literature on bentonite indicate that extensive chemical and physical alteration of bentonite would result at the high power densities proposed (ca. 2 kW/package and an area density of 25 W/m 2 ), in part due to compacted bentonite's relatively low thermal conductivity when dehydrated (approx. 0.6 +- 0.2 W/m 0 C). Because our groundwater contains K + , an upper hydrothermal temperature limit appears to be 120 to 150 0 C. At much lower power densities (less than 1 kW per package and an areal density of 12 W/m 2 ), bentonite may be suitable

  4. Salt Repository Project: Waste Package Program (WPP) modeling activiteis: FY 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Simonson, S.A.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Salt Repository Project (SRP) through its Waste Package Program (WPP). During FY 1984, the WPP continued its program of waste package component development and interactions testing and application of the resulting data base to develop predictive models describing waste package degradation and radionuclide release. Within the WPP, the Modeling Task (Task 04 during FY 1984) was conducted to interpret the tests in such a way that scientifically defensible models can be developed for use in qualification of the waste package

  5. Methodologies for assessing long-term performance of high-level radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, K.; Boesch, L.; Crane, B.; Johnson, R.; Moler, R.; Smith, S.; Zaremba, L.

    1986-01-01

    Several methods the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can use to independently assess Department of Energy (DOE) waste package performance were identified by The Aerospace Corporation. The report includes an overview of the necessary attributes of performance assessment, followed by discussions of DOE methods, probabilistic methods capable of predicting waste package lifetime and radionuclide releases, process modeling of waste package barriers, sufficiency of the necessary input data, and the applicability of probability density functions. It is recommended that the initial NRC performance assessment (for the basalt conceptual waste package design) should apply modular simulation, using available process models and data, to demonstrate this assessment method

  6. Geochemical Interactions in failed Co-Disposal Waste Packages for N Reactor and Ft. St. Vrain Spent Fuel and the Melt and Dilute Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.E.; McNeish, J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this scientific analysis is to calculate the long-term geochemical behavior in a failed co-disposal waste package (WP) containing U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) glass. This analysis was prepared according to a Technical Work Plan (BSC 2002). Specifically the scope of these calculations is to determine: (1) The geochemical characteristics of the fluids inside the WP after breach, including the corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration; (2) The transport of radionuclides of concern to performance assessment out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water; and (3) The range of parameter variation for additional laboratory and numerical evaluations. This analysis is limited to three SNF groups, uranium (U)/thorium (Th) carbide SNF (Group 5), U metal SNF (Group 7), and aluminum(Al)-based fuels (Group 9). Group 5 is represented by Ft. St. Vrain (FSV) U/Th carbide SNF, Group 7 is represented by N-Reactor U metal SNF, and Group 9 is represented by the Melt and Dilute (MandD) waste form developed from Al-based SNF. The DOE (2001a, Appendix A) describes all of these fuels. Table 1 shows the groups of DOE SNF, the representative SNF for each group, and the metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) of SNF in each group

  7. Waste package performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, W.J.; Lappa, D.A.; Thatcher, R.M.

    1989-02-01

    We completed a first cycle of model development from a specification to a computer program, PANDORA-1, for long-term performance assessment of waste packages. The model for one waste package at a time incorporates processes specific to the unsaturated environment at the proposed Yucca Mountain, NV, site. PANDORA-1 models the most likely processes and several modes of waste alteration and release. The development identified information needs for future models; many processes, local details, and combinations will have to be examined. Integration of ensemble performance and quantification of uncertainties are modeling steps at higher aggregation. Methodologies for these steps include sampling, which is well studied; we have focused on several open questions. We can now calculate the amount of variance reduction available from Latin hypercube sampling; it is a limited reduction. A new method, controlled sampling, provides substantial variance reduction for a broad range of model functions. An uncertainty analysis test-bed program compares the new with old sampling methods. 7 refs., 1 tab

  8. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  9. WIPP waste package testing on simulated DHLW: emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several series of simulated (nonradioactive) defense high-level waste (DHLW) package tests have been emplaced in the WIPP, a research and development facility authorized to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-related wastes. The primary purpose of these 3-to-7 year duration tests is to evaluate the in situ materials performance of waste package barriers (canisters, overpacks, backfills, and nonradioactive DHLW glass waste form) for possible future application to a licensed waste repository in salt. This paper describes all test materials, instrumentation, and emplacement and testing techniques, and discusses progress of the various tests. These tests are intended to provide information on materials behavior (i.e., corrosion, metallurgical and geochemical alterations, waste form durability, surface interactions, etc.), as well as comparison between several waste package designs, fabrications details, and actual costs. These experiments involve 18 full-size simulated DHLW packages (approximately 3.0 m x 0.6 m diameter) emplaced in vertical boreholes in the salt drift floor. Six of the test packages contain internal electrical heaters (470 W/canister), and were emplace under approximately reference DHLW repository conditions. Twelve other simulated DHLW packages were emplaced under accelerated-aging or overtest conditions, including the artificial introduction of brine, and a thermal loading approximately three to four times higher than reference. Eight of these 12 test packages contain 1500 W/canister electrical heaters; the other four are filled with DHLW glass. 9 refs., 1 fig

  10. Uncertainty evaluation methods for waste package performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.T.; Nair, P.K.; Journel, A.G.; Abramson, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    This report identifies and investigates methodologies to deal with uncertainties in assessing high-level nuclear waste package performance. Four uncertainty evaluation methods (probability-distribution approach, bounding approach, expert judgment, and sensitivity analysis) are suggested as the elements of a methodology that, without either diminishing or enhancing the input uncertainties, can evaluate performance uncertainty. Such a methodology can also help identify critical inputs as a guide to reducing uncertainty so as to provide reasonable assurance that the risk objectives are met. This report examines the current qualitative waste containment regulation and shows how, in conjunction with the identified uncertainty evaluation methodology, a framework for a quantitative probability-based rule can be developed that takes account of the uncertainties. Current US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation requires that the waste packages provide ''substantially complete containment'' (SCC) during the containment period. The term ''SCC'' is ambiguous and subject to interpretation. This report, together with an accompanying report that describes the technical considerations that must be addressed to satisfy high-level waste containment requirements, provides a basis for a third report to develop recommendations for regulatory uncertainty reduction in the ''containment''requirement of 10 CFR Part 60. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe 2+ , has been shown to reduce UO 2 2+ to UO 2(s) [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO 4 - from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe 2+ minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO 4 - , NpO 2 + , and UO 2 2+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity

  12. Quality assurance of radioactive waste packages by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimers, P.

    1992-01-01

    According to task 3 'Testing and Evaluation of Conditioned Waste and Technical Barriers' quality assurance is a main scope of research concerned with the handling of radioactive waste. It was provided to characterize medium and high active waste by standard test methods which have been developed and experienced in this contract. Quality evaluation of radioactive waste packages is preferentially done by non-destructive testing methods. The main task of this contract was the elaboration of specific non-destructive testing methods for conditioned and sealed waste packages as well as for the matrix materials themselves (e.g. bitumen, concrete, ceramics and glass). CT with X-rays turned out to be one of the best methods for the comprehensive non-destructive characterization of the physical and technical properties of the above described test objects. The method is especially suitable for the non-destructive evaluation of the absolute density value, of the density distribution, of the gamma activity distribution, of the localization of voids, cracks and inclusions, of the visualization of swelling, shrinkage and phase precipitations, as well as the detection of liquid phases in bentonite and cemented waste. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1987--January 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Ondik, H.; Plante, E.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1988-08-01

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Since enactment of the Budget Reconciliation Act for Fiscal Year 1988, the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site (in which tuff is the geologic medium) is the only site that will be characterized for use as high-level nuclear waste repository. During the reporting period of August 1987 to January 1988, five reviews were completed for tuff, and these were grouped into the categories: ferrous alloys, copper, groundwater chemistry, and glass. Two issues are identified for the Yucca Mountain site: the approach used to calculate corrosion rates for ferrous alloys, and crevice corrosion was observed in a copper-nickel alloy. Plutonium can form pseudo-colloids that may facilitate transport. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and activities of the DOE Materials Characterization Center (MCC) for the 6-month reporting period are also included. 27 refs., 3 figs

  14. Review of waste package verification tests. Semiannual report, October 1984-March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.

    1985-07-01

    The potential of WAPPA, a second-generation waste package system code, to meet the needs of the regulatory community is analyzed. The analysis includes an indepth review of WAPPA's individual process models and a review of WAPPA's operation. It is concluded that the code is of limited use to the NRC in the present form. Recommendations for future improvement, usage, and implementation of the code are given. This report also describes the results of a testing program undertaken to determine the chemical environment that will be present near a high-level waste package emplaced in a basalt repository. For this purpose, low carbon 1020 steel (a current BWIP reference container material), synthetic basaltic groundwater and a mixture of bentonite and basalt were exposed, in an autoclave, to expected conditions some period after repository sealing (150 0 C, approx. =10.4 MPa). Parameters measured include changes in gas pressure with time and gas composition, variation in dissolved oxygen (DO), pH and certain ionic concentrations of water in the packing material across an imposed thermal gradient, mineralogic alteration of the basalt/bentonite mixture, and carbon steel corrosion behavior. A second testing program was also initiated to check the likelihood of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and Incoloy 825 which are being considered for use as waste container materials in the tuff repository program. 82 refs., 70 figs., 27 tabs

  15. Application of digital radiography for the non-destructive characterization of radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lierse, C.; Goebel, H.; Kaciniel, E.; Buecherl, T.; Krebs, K.

    1995-01-01

    Digital radiography (DR) using gamma-rays is a powerful tool for the non-destructive determination of various parameters which are relevant within the quality control procedure of radioactive waste packages prior to an interim storage or a final disposal. DR provides information about the waste form and the extent of filling in a typical container. It can identify internal structures and defects, gives their geometric dimensions and helps to detect non-declared inner containers, shielding materials etc. From a digital radiographic image the waste matrix homogeneity may be determined and mean attenuation coefficients as well as density values for selected regions of interest can be calculated. This data provides the basis for an appropriate attenuation correction of gamma emission measurements (gamma scanning) and makes a reliable quantification of gamma emitters in waste containers possible. Information from DR measurements are also used for the selection of interesting height positions of the object which are subsequently inspected in more detail by other non-destructive methods, e. g. by transmission computerized tomography (TCT). The present paper gives important technical specifications of an integrated tomography system (ITS) which is used to perform digital radiography as well as transmission/emission computerized tomography (TCT/ECT) on radioactive waste packages. It describes the DR mode and some of its main applications and shows typical examples of radiographs of real radioactive waste drums

  16. Mechanical study of the Saclay piezo tuner PTS (piezo tuning system) Care-SRF-WP8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosland, P.; Wu, B.

    2005-03-01

    The present tuner is working inside Tesla test facility's cryo-modules without any piezo actuator. Thus the Lorentz force detuning in the pulsed mode of the accelerator is limiting the maximum accelerating field of cavity at about 25 MV/m. Previous studies and tests have demonstrated that the integration of piezo actuators in the tuner can lead to the compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at field higher than 35 MV/m. Our goal is now to develop and optimize a new tuner integrating piezo actuators. The mechanical studies are now finished and fabrication is in progress. This report presents the principle of this new system, its design and reviews the cavity frequency shifts during preparation process and assesses the forces applied by the cavity on the piezo actuators. (A.C.)

  17. Waste Package Project quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    The following tasks are reported: overview and progress of nuclear waste package project and container design; nuclear waste container design considerations; structural investigation of multi purpose nuclear waste package canister; and design requirements of rock tunnel drift for long-term storage of high-level waste (faulted tunnel model study by photoelasticity/finite element analysis)

  18. Thermomechanical scoping calculations for the waste package environment tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    During the site characterization phase of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation Project, tests are planned to provide field information on the hydrological and thermomechanical environment. These results are needed for assessing performance of stored waste packages emplaced at depth in excavations in a rock mass. Scoping calculations were performed to provide information on displacements and stress levels attained around excavations in the rock mass from imposing a thermal load designed to simulate the heat produced by radioactive decay. In this way, approximate levels of stresses and displacements are available for choosing instrumentation type and sensitivity as well as providing indications for optimizing instrument emplacement during the test. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  19. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 3. Data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creamer, S.C.; Lalies, A.A.; Wise, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    This report, in three volumes, covers the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd, and two major sub-contractors: Harwell Laboratory (AEA Technology) and Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd, on the development of a radioactive waste package assay facility, for cemented 500 litre intermediate level waste drums. Volume 3, describes the work carried out by Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd on the data-processing aspects of an integrated waste assay facility. It introduces the need for a mathematical model of the assay process and develops a deterministic model which could be tested using Harwell experimental data. Relevant nuclear reactions are identified. Full implementation of the model was not possible within the scope of the Harwell experimental work, although calculations suggested that the model behaved as predicted by theory. 34 figs., 52 refs., 5 tabs

  20. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.G.; Fraker, A.C.; Escalante, E.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six-month period, February through July 1989. This includes reviews of related materials research and plans, information on the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities, and other information regarding supporting research and special assistance. Outlines for planned interpretative reports on the topics of aqueous corrosion of copper, mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and internal failure modes of Zircaloy cladding are included. For the publications reviewed during this reporting period, short discussions are given to supplement the completed reviews and evaluations. Included in this report is an overall review of a 1984 report on glass leaching mechanisms, as well as reviews for each of the seven chapters of this report

  1. Initial specifications for nuclear waste package external dimensions and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    Initial specifications of external dimensions and materials for waste package conceptual designs are given for Defense High Level Waste (DHLW), Commercial High Level Waste (CHLW) and Spent Fuel (SF). The designs have been developed for use in a high-level waste repository sited in a tuff media in the unsaturated zone. Drawings for reference and alternative package conceptual designs are presented for each waste form for both vertical and horizontal emplacement configurations. Four metal alloys: 304L SS, 321 SS, 316L SS and Incoloy 825 are considered for the canister or overpack; 1020 carbon steel was selected for horizontal borehole liners, and a preliminary packing material selection is either compressed tuff or compressed tuff containing iron bearing smectite clay as a binder

  2. Long term behaviour of low and intermediate level waste packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The development and application of approaches and technologies that provide long term safety is an essential issue in the disposal of radioactive waste. For low and intermediate level radioactive waste, engineered barriers play an important role in the overall safety and performance of near surface repositories. Thus, developing a strong technical basis for understanding the behaviour and performance of engineered barriers is an important consideration in the development and establishment of near surface repositories for radioactive waste. In 1993, a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Performance of Engineered Barrier Materials in Near Surface Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste was initiated by the IAEA with the twin goals of addressing some of the gaps in the database on radionuclide isolation and long term performance of a wide variety of materials and components that constitute the engineered barriers system (IAEA-TECDOC-1255 (2001)). However, during the course of the CRP, it was realized that that the scope of the CRP did not include studies of the behaviour of waste packages over time. Given that a waste package represents an important component of the overall near surface disposal system and the fact that many Member States have active R and D programmes related to waste package testing and evaluation, a new CRP was launched, in 1997, on Long Term Behaviour of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages Under Repository Conditions. The CRP was intended to promote research activities on the subject area in Member States, share information on the topic among the participating countries, and contribute to advancing technologies for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. Thus, this CRP complements the afore mentioned CRP on studies of engineered barriers. With the active participation and valuable contributions from twenty scientists and engineers from Argentina, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, India, Republic of Korea, Norway, Romania

  3. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R; Beaumont, O; Failleau, G; Hay, B; Plumeri, S

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m 3 ) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  4. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R.; Beaumont, O.; Failleau, G.; Hay, B.; Plumeri, S.

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m3) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  5. Prototype heater test of the environment around a simulated waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Latorre, V.R.; Lee, K; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents selected results obtained during the 301 day duration of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT) planned for the Exploratory Shaft Facility in Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures and gas-phase humidity in the heater borehole

  6. Analytical assessment of 5.05 kWp grid tied photovoltaic plant performance on the system level in a composite climate of western India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaria, Bhaveshkumar; Pandya, Mahesh; Aware, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The analytical assessment of 5.05 kWp grid tied photovoltaic plant performance on the system level has been carried out in this study. The solar PV plant has been installed on the roof of the block-A of the Darshan Institute of Engineering and Technology, Rajkot. India. The Darshan Institute of Engineering and Technology has been monitoring and recording all the parameters of 5.05 kWp grid tied solar PV power plant for 3 years. This paper helps in study of the performance and consistency of this system. The final yield, reference yield and performance ratio are observed to vary from 2.96 h/d to 5.43 h/d, 4.22 h/d to 7.29 h/d and 68%–83% respectively. The global in-plane solar radiation at the city of Rajkot is 2212 kWh/m"2/annum. The average annual measured energy yield of the plant is found to be 1636 kWh/kWp. The total estimated system losses due to irradiance angle, temperature, module quality, array and cell mismatch, AC/DC wiring, MPPT, soiling and dirt, and inverter are found to be 26%. As a whole, the location, soiling pattern, design of PV and maintenance of solar PV system are the primary reasons of energy variability and system energy production. - Highlights: • The variation of final yields were 5.43 h/d–2.96 h/d observed during the year. • The annual average final yield was 4.49 h/d. • The average performance ratio of 74% was observed during year.

  7. The use of performance assessments in Yucca Mountain repository waste package design activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is developing performance assessment approaches as part of the evaluations of the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository site. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing design concepts and the scientific performance assessment methodologies and techniques used for the waste package and engineered barrier system components. This paper presents an overview of the approach under development for postclosure performance assessments that will guide the conceptual design activities and assist in the site suitability evaluations. This approach includes establishing and modeling for the long time periods required by regulations: near-field environment characteristics surrounding the emplaced wastes; container materials performance responses; and waste form properties. All technical work is being done under a fully qualified quality assurance program

  8. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, February 1987--July 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.

    1988-05-01

    The waste package is a proposed engineering barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon steels, stainless steels, and copper. The current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned for the candidate repository in tuff. Three issues are addressed, the possibility of the stress-induced failure of Zircaloy, the possible corrosion of copper and copper alloys, and the lack of site-specific characterization data. Discussions are given on problems concerning localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking of AISI 1020 steel at elevated temperatures (150/degree/C). For the proposed salt site, the importance of the duration of corrosion tests and some of the conditions that may preclude prompt initiation of needed long-term testing are two issues that are discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs

  9. Development of characterization methods applied to radioactive wastes and waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, C.; Bienvenu, Ph.; Comte, J.; Excoffier, E.; Dodi, A.; Gal, O.; Gmar, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Poumarede, B.; Tola, F.; Moulin, V.; Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Ma, J.L.; Oriol, L.; Passard, Ch.; Perot, B.; Pettier, J.L.; Raoux, A.C.; Thierry, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document is a compilation of R and D studies carried out in the framework of the axis 3 of the December 1991 law about the conditioning and storage of high-level and long lived radioactive wastes and waste packages, and relative to the methods of characterization of these wastes. This R and D work has permitted to implement and qualify new methods (characterization of long-lived radioelements, high energy imaging..) and also to improve the existing methods by lowering detection limits and reducing uncertainties of measured data. This document is the result of the scientific production of several CEA laboratories that use complementary techniques: destructive methods and radiochemical analyses, photo-fission and active photonic interrogation, high energy imaging systems, neutron interrogation, gamma spectroscopy and active and passive imaging techniques. (J.S.)

  10. Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Wong

    2004-09-28

    This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP

  11. Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Wong

    2004-01-01

    This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, μ, and σ) are present in

  12. Draft Technical Position Subtask 1.1: waste package performance after repository closure. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Schweitzer, D.G.

    1983-08-01

    This document provides guidance to the DOE on the issues and information necessary for the NRC to evaluate waste package performance after repository closure. Minimal performance objectives of the waste package are required by proposed 10 CFR 60. This Draft Technical Position describes the various options available to the DOE for compliance and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various choices. Examples are discussed dealing with demonstrability, predictability and reasonable assurance. The types of performance are considered. The document summarizes presently identified high priority issues needed to evaluate waste package performance after repository closure. 20 references, 7 tables

  13. Parametric study of the effects of thermal environment on a waste package for a tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, J K; Sundberg, W D; Krumhansl, J L [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, (USA)

    1982-12-31

    The thermal environment has been modeled in a simple reference waste package in a tuff repository for a variety of variables. The waste package was composed of the waste form, canister, overpack and backfill. The emplacement hole was 122cm dia. Waste forms used in the calculations were commercial high level waste (CHLW) and spent fuel (SF). Canister loadings varied from 50 to 100 kW/acre. Primary attention was focused on the backfill behavior in the thermal and chemical environment. Results are related to the maximum temperature calculated for the backfill. These calculations raise serious concerns about the effectiveness of the backfill within the context of the total waste package.

  14. Performance analysis of conceptual waste package designs in salt repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, G. Jr.; Raines, G.E.; Kircher, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A performance analysis of commercial high-level waste and spent fuel conceptual package designs in reference repositories in three salt formations was conducted with the WAPPA waste package code. Expected conditions for temperature, stress, brine composition, radiation level, and brine flow rate were used as boundary conditions to compute expected corrosion of a thick-walled overpack of 1025 wrought steel. In all salt formations corrosion by low Mg salt-dissolution brines typical of intrusion scenarios was too slow to cause the package to fail for thousands of years after burial. In high Mg brines judged typical of thermally migrating brines in bedded salt formations, corrosion rates which would otherwise have caused the packages to fail within a few hundred years were limited by brine availability. All of the brine reaching the package was consumed by reaction with the iron in the overpack, thus preventing further corrosion. Uniform brine distribution over the package surface was an important factor in predicting long package lifetimes for the high Mg brines. 14 references, 15 figures

  15. Shielding Calculations on Waste Packages - The Limits and Possibilities of different Calculation Methods by the example of homogeneous and inhomogeneous Waste Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mike; Smalian, Silva

    2017-09-01

    For nuclear waste packages the expected dose rates and nuclide inventory are beforehand calculated. Depending on the package of the nuclear waste deterministic programs like MicroShield® provide a range of results for each type of packaging. Stochastic programs like "Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System" (MCNP®) on the other hand provide reliable results for complex geometries. However this type of program requires a fully trained operator and calculations are time consuming. The problem here is to choose an appropriate program for a specific geometry. Therefore we compared the results of deterministic programs like MicroShield® and stochastic programs like MCNP®. These comparisons enable us to make a statement about the applicability of the various programs for chosen types of containers. As a conclusion we found that for thin-walled geometries deterministic programs like MicroShield® are well suited to calculate the dose rate. For cylindrical containers with inner shielding however, deterministic programs hit their limits. Furthermore we investigate the effect of an inhomogeneous material and activity distribution on the results. The calculations are still ongoing. Results will be presented in the final abstract.

  16. Repository documentation rethought. A comprehensive approach from untreated waste to waste packages for final disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthofer, Anton Philipp; Schubert, Johannes [VPC GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The German Act on Reorganization of Responsibility for Nuclear Disposal (Entsorgungsuebergangsgesetz (EntsorgUebG)) adopted in June 2017 provides the energy utilities with the new option of transferring responsibility for their waste packages to the Federal Government. This is conditional on the waste packages being approved for delivery to the Konrad final repository. A comprehensive approach starts with the dismantling of nuclear facilities and extends from waste disposal and packaging planning to final repository documentation. Waste package quality control measures are planned and implemented as early as in the process qualification stage so that the production of waste packages that are suitable for final deposition can be ensured. Optimization of cask and loading configuration can save container and repository volume. Workflow planning also saves time, expenditure and exposure time for personnel at the facilities. VPC has evaluated this experience and developed it into a comprehensive approach.

  17. HORIZONTAL LIFTING OF 5 DHLW/DOE LONG, 12-PWR LONG AND 24-BWR WASTE PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. de la Brosse

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation was to determine the structural response of a 12-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Long, a 24-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and a 5-Defense High Level Waste/Department of Energy (DHLW/DOE)--Long spent nuclear fuel waste packages lifted in a horizontal position. The scope of this calculation was limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities in the trunnion collar sleeves. In addition, the maximum stress intensities in the inner and outer shells of the waste packages were presented for illustrative purposes. The information provided by the sketches (Attachments I, II and III) is that of the potential design of the types of waste packages considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for these designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with the ''Technical work plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 7). AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref. 13), was used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  18. Second generation waste package design and storage concept for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, Joseph Sam; Kar, Piyush; Misra, Manoranjan

    2006-01-01

    The reference waste package design and operating mode to be used in the Yucca Mountain Repository is reviewed. An alternate (second generation) operating concept and waste package design is proposed to reduce the risk of localized corrosion of waste packages and to reduce repository costs. The second generation waste package design and storage concept is proposed for implementation after the initial licensing and operation of the reference repository design. Implementation of the second generation concept at Yucca Mountain would follow regulatory processes analogous to those used successfully to extend the design life and uprate the power of commercial light water nuclear reactors in the United States. The second generation concept utilizes the benefits of hot dry storage to minimize the potential for localized corrosion of the waste package by liquid electrolytes. The second generation concept permits major reductions in repository costs by increasing the number of fuel assemblies stored in each waste package, by eliminating the need for titanium drip shields and by fabricating the outer container from corrosion resistant low alloy carbon steel

  19. Criticality Potential of Waste Packages Containing DOE SNF Affected by Igneous Intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.S. Kimball; C.E. Sanders

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently preparing an application to submit to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a construction authorization for a monitored geologic repository. The repository will contain spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and defense high-level waste (DHLW) in waste packages placed in underground tunnels, or drifts. The primary objective of this paper is to perform a criticality analysis for waste packages containing DOE SNF affected by a disruptive igneous intrusion event in the emplacement drifts. The waste packages feature one DOE SNF canister placed in the center and surrounded by five High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canisters. The effective neutron multiplication factor (k eff ) is determined for potential configurations of the waste package during and after an intrusive igneous event. Due to the complexity of the potential scenarios following an igneous intrusion, finding conservative and bounding configurations with respect to criticality requires some additional considerations. In particular, the geometry of a slumped and damaged waste package must be examined, drift conditions must be modeled over a range of parameters, and the chemical degradation of DOE SNF and waste package materials must be considered for the expected high temperatures. The secondary intent of this calculation is to present a method for selecting conservative and bounding configurations for a wide range of end conditions

  20. Simulation and performance analysis of 110 kWp grid-connected photovoltaic system for residential building in India: A comparative analysis of various PV technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Kumar Shukla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available System simulation is necessary to investigate the feasibility of Solar PV system at a given location. This study is done to evaluate the feasibility of grid connected rooftop solar photovoltaic system for a residential Hostel building at MANIT, Bhopal, India (Latitude: 23° 16′ N, Longitude: 77° 36′ E. The study focuses on the use of Solargis PV Planner software as a tool to analyze the performance a 110 kWp solar photovoltaic rooftop plant and also compares the performances of different PV technologies based on simulated energy yield and performance ratio. Solargis proves to easy, fast, accurate and reliable software tool for the simulation of solar PV system.

  1. Radioactive waste packages stored at the Aube facility for low-intermediate activity wastes. A selective and controlled storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The waste package is the first barrier designed to protect the man and the environment from the radioactivity contained in wastes. Its design is thus particularly stringent and controlled. This brochure describes the different types of packages for low to intermediate activity wastes like those received and stored at the Aube facility, and also the system implemented by the ANDRA (the French national agency of radioactive wastes) and by waste producers to safely control each step of the design and fabrication of these packages. (J.S.)

  2. WP EMPLACEMENT CONTROL AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective and scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major control and communication equipment necessary for waste package emplacement at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the required equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. This task was evaluated in accordance with QAP-2-0 and found not to be quality affecting. Therefore, this document was prepared in accordance with NAP-MG-012. The following control and communication equipment are addressed in this document: (1) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's); (2) Leaky Feeder Radio Frequency Communication Equipment; (3) Slotted Microwave guide Communication Equipment; (4) Vision Systems; (5) Radio Control Equipment; and (6) Enclosure Cooling Systems

  3. Behaviour Test with the Leaching of a Waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.R

    1999-01-01

    bibliographic data.With the whole coefficients it was made a prediction about the time involved until the total release of the radionuclides. This work is being developed by the Radioactive Waste Management Division of Cnea and it has been included in a contract with the IAEA, which also studies the changes on the mechanical resistance of the waste package,so as the release of gases from organic wastes and the container corrosion

  4. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  5. Synthesis of knowledge on the long-term behaviour of concretes. Applications to cemented waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richet, C.; Galle, C.; Le Bescop, P.; Peycelon, H.; Bejaoui, S.; Tovena, I.; Pointeau, I.; L'Hostis, V.; Levera, P.

    2004-03-01

    As stipulated in the former law of December 91 relating to 'concrete waste package', a progress report (phenomenological reference document) was first provided in 1999. The objective was to make an assessment of the knowledge acquired on the long-term behaviour of cement-based waste packages in the context of deep disposal and/or interim storage. The present document is an updated summary report. It takes into account a new knowledge assessment, considers coupled mechanisms and should contribute to the first performance studies (operational calculations). Handling and radio-nuclides (RN) confinement are the two major functional properties requested from the concrete used for the waste packages. In unsaturated environment (interim storage/disposal prior to closing), the main problem is the generation of cracks in the material. This aspect is a key parameter from the mechanical point of view (retrievability). It can have a major impact on the disposal phase (confinement). In saturated environment (disposal post-closing phase), the main concern is the chemical degradation of the waste package concrete submitted to underground waters leaching. In this context, the major thema are: the durability of the concretes under water (chemical degradation) and in unsaturated medium (corrosion of reinforcement), matter transport, RN retention, chemistry / transport / mechanical couplings. On the other hand, laboratory data on the behaviour of concretes are used to evaluate the RN source term of waste packages in function of time (concrete waste package OPerational Model, i.e. 'Concrete MOP'). The 'MOP' provides the physico-chemical description of the RN release in relationship with the waste package degradation itself. This description is based on simplified phenomenology for which only dimensioning mechanisms are taken into account. The use of Diffu-Ca code (basic module for the MOP) on the CASTEM numerical plate-form, already allows operational predictions. (authors)

  6. An analytical one-dimensional model for predicting waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Wood, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    A method for allocating waste package performance requirements among waste package components with regard to radionuclide isolation has been developed. Modification or change in this approach can be expected as the understanding of radionuclide behavior in the waste package improves. Thus, the performance requirements derived in this document are preliminary and subject to change. However, this kind of analysis is a useful starting point. It has also proved useful for identifying a small group of radionuclides which should be emphasized in a laboratory experimental program designed to characterize the behavior of specific radionuclides in the waste package environment. A simple one-dimensional, two media transport model has been derived and used to calculate radionuclide transport from the waste form-packing material interface of the waste package into the host rock. Cumulative release over 10,000 years, maximum yearly releases and release rates at the packing material-host rock interface were evaluated on a radionuclide-by radionuclide basis. The major parameters controlling radionuclide release were found to be: radionuclide solubility, porosity of the rock, isotopic ratio of the radionuclide and surface area of the waste form-packing material interface. 15 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs

  7. NWTS waste package program plan. Volume I. Program strategy, description, and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This document describes the work planned for developing the technology to design, test and produce packages used for the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in deep geologic repositories. Waste forms considered include spent fuel and high-level waste. The testing and selection effort for barrier materials for radionuclide containment is described. The NWTS waste package program is a design-driven effort; waste package conceptual designs are used as input for preliminary designs, which are upgraded to a final design as materials and testing data become available. Performance assessment models are developed and validated. Milestones and a detailed schedule are given for the waste package development effort. Program logic networks defining work flow, interfaces among the NWTS Projects, and interrelationships of specific activities are presented. Detailed work elements are provided for the Waste Package Program Plan subtasks - design and development, waste form, barrier materials, and performance evaluation - for salt and basalt, host rocks for which the state of waste package knowledge and the corresponding data base are advanced

  8. The role of waste package specifications as a forerunner to ILW repository conditions for acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, S.V.; Palmer, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    In the absence of a finalized repository site, design or associated safety case, Nirex is not in a position to issue conditions for acceptance. Nirex has therefore developed a strategy which facilitates packaging of intermediate level waste by providing guidance through waste package specifications, supported by the formal assessment of specific packaging proposals on a case-by-case basis. The waste package specifications are comprehensive and cover all aspects of the waste package including dimensions and other key features, performance standards, wasteform, quality assurance, and data recording requirements. The waste package specifications will be subject to periodic review as repository design and safety cases are finalized and will progressively become site- and design-specific. The waste package specifications will eventually form the basis for conditions for acceptance. The strategy described in this paper has been successfully followed by Nirex and customers for the past ten years and has permitted wastes to be packaged for a deep repository with confidence in the absence of a finalized site and safety cases for the repository. Because the process has its basis in a generic repository concept, it remains robust, despite the increased uncertainty following the March 1997 Secretary of State's decision, as to the siting and time-scale of a deep waste repository, and continues to be an important component of the UK's waste management strategy. (author)

  9. CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR THE MOST REACTIVE DEGRADED CONFIGURATIONS OF THE FFTF SNF CODISPOSAL WP CONTAINING AN INTACT IDENT-69 CONTAINER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.R. Moscalu

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to perform additional degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the most reactive degraded configurations of the codisposal WP with an almost intact Ident-69 container (breached and flooded but otherwise non-degraded) containing intact FFTF SNF pins. The configurations have been identified in a previous analysis (CRWMS M andO 1999a) and the present evaluations include additional relevant information that was left out of the original calculations. The additional information describes the exact distribution of fissile material in each container (DOE 2002a). The effects of the changes that have been included in the baseline design of the codisposal WP (CRWMS M andO 2000) are also investigated. The calculation determines the effective neutron multiplication factor (k eff ) for selected degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. These calculations will support the demonstration of the technical viability of the design solution adopted for disposing of MOX (FFTF) spent nuclear fuel in the potential repository. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2002b) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310M2 in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-0000101 (BSC 2002)

  10. Development of a working set of waste package performance criteria for deepsea disposal of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Columbo, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr; Sailor, V.L.

    1982-11-01

    The United States ocean dumping regulations developed pursuant to PL92-532, the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, as amended, provide for a general policy of isolation and containment of low-level radioactive waste after disposal into the ocean. In order to determine whether any particular waste packaging system is adequate to meet this general requirement, it is necessary to establish a set of performance criteria against which to evaluate a particular packaging system. These performance criteria must present requirements for the behavior of the waste in combination with its immobilization agent and outer container in a deepsea environment. This report presents a working set of waste package performance criteria, and includes a glossary of terms, characteristics of low-level radioactive waste, radioisotopes of importance in low-level radioactive waste, and a summary of domestic and international regulations which control the ocean disposal of these wastes

  11. Conceptual waste packaging options for deep borehole disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiann -Cherng [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    -profile threaded connections at each end. The internal-flush design would be suitable for loading waste that arrives from the originating site in weld-sealed, cylindrical canisters. Internal, tapered plugs with sealing filet welds would seal the tubing at each end. The taper would be precisely machined onto both the tubing and the plug, producing a metal-metal sealing surface that is compressed as the package is subjected to hydrostatic pressure. The lower plug would be welded in place before loading, while the upper plug would be placed and welded after loading. Conceptual Waste Packaging Options for Deep Borehole Disposal July 30, 2015 iv Threaded connections between packages would allow emplacement singly or in strings screwed together at the disposal site. For emplacement on a drill string the drill pipe would be connected directly into the top package of a string (using an adapter sub to mate with premium semi-flush tubing threads). Alternatively, for wireline emplacement the same package designs could be emplaced singly using a sub with wireline latch, on the upper end. Threaded connections on the bottom of the lowermost package would allow attachment of a crush box, instrumentation, etc.

  12. Preclosure analysis of conceptual waste package designs for a nuclear waste repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Gregg, D.W.; Hockman, J.N.; Russell, E.W.; Stein, W.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the selection and analysis of conceptual waste package developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project for possible disposal of high-level nuclear waste at a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The design requirements that the waste package must conform to are listed, as are several desirable design considerations. Illustrations of the reference and alternative designs are shown. Four austenitic stainless steels (316L SS, 321 SS, 304L SS and Incoloy 825 high nickel alloy) have been selected for candidate canister/overpack materials, and 1020 carbon steel has been selected as the reference metal for the borehole liners. A summary of the results of technical and ecnonmic analyses supporting the selection of the conceptual waste package designs is included. Postclosure containment and release rates are not analyzed in this report

  13. Long-term durability experiments with concrete-based waste packages in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.

    1993-03-01

    Two extensive experiments on long-term durability of waste packages in simulated repository conditions are described. The first one is a 'half-scale experiment' comprising radioactive waste product and half-scale concrete containers in site specific groundwater conditions. The second one is 'full-scale experiment' including simulated inactive waste product and full-scale concrete container stored in slowly flowing fresh water. The scope of the experiments is to demonstrate long-term behaviour of the designed waste packages in contact with moderately concrete aggressive groundwater, and to evaluate the possible interactions between the waste product, concrete container and ground water. As the waste packages are made of high-quality concrete, provisions have been made to continue the experiments for several years

  14. Shielding Calculations on Waste Packages – The Limits and Possibilities of different Calculation Methods by the example of homogeneous and inhomogeneous Waste Packages

    OpenAIRE

    Adams Mike; Smalian Silva

    2017-01-01

    For nuclear waste packages the expected dose rates and nuclide inventory are beforehand calculated. Depending on the package of the nuclear waste deterministic programs like MicroShield® provide a range of results for each type of packaging. Stochastic programs like “Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System” (MCNP®) on the other hand provide reliable results for complex geometries. However this type of program requires a fully trained operator and calculations are time consuming. The prob...

  15. Planned investigations for packing materials for a waste package in a salt repository: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Bunnell, L.R.; Thornton, T.A.

    1987-10-01

    A considerable number of materials have been either proposed or investigated as packing materials for nuclear waste package systems. Almost always the expandable clays, such as the smectites contained in commercial bentonites, have received the most attention when their primary function is to retard groundwater flow. Other materials including zeolites, metals, and dessicants are considered as special-purpose additives. Materials that tend to hydrolyze and lead to porosity reduction, such as silicates, oxides, and sulfates, have also been suggested as packing materials. All these types of materials are also considered as components of tailored mixtures to achieve a broad range of packing material performance. Some of these materials are reviewed, along with proposed candidate materials, with respect to the properties required to function in a salt repository. The investigation of packing materials is composed of five studies which are discussed below. Initial candidates will consist of calcium hydroxide, a sodium silicate, and a cement-gypsum mixture in addition to the reference crushed salt. Consequently these tests will be necessary to determine properties of individual components and to optimize properties of mixtures. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Preliminary assessment of the controlled release of radionuclides from waste packages containing borosilicate waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; McGrail, B.P.; Apted, M.J.; Engle, D.W.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a preliminary assessment of the release-rate for an engineered barriers subsystem (EBS) containing waste packages of defense high-level waste borosilicate glass at geochemical and hydrological conditions similar to the those at Yucca Mountain. The relationship between the proposed Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) test of glass- dissolution rate and compliance with the NRC's release-rate criterion is also evaluated. Calculations are reported for three hierarchical levels: EBS analysis, waste-package analysis, and waste-glass analysis. The following conclusions identify those factors that most acutely affect the magnitude of, or uncertainty in, release-rate performance

  18. Composition and activity variations in bulk gas of drum waste packages of Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, M.; Palcsu, L.; Svingor, E.; Szanto, Zs.; Futo, I.; Ormai, P.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain reliable estimates of the quantities and rates of the gas production a series of measurements was carried out in drum waste packages generated and temporarily stored at the site of Paks Nuclear Power Plant (Paks NPP). Ten drum waste packages were equipped with sampling valves for repeated sampling. Nine times between 04/02/2000 and 19/07/2001 qualitative gas component analyses of bulk gases of drums were executed. Gas samples were delivered to the laboratory of the ATOMKI for tritium and radiocarbon content measurements.(author)

  19. Assessing microbiologically induced corrosion of waste package materials in the Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J. M., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of bacterial activities to corrosion of nuclear waste package materials must be determined to predict the adequacy of containment for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. The program to evaluate potential microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of candidate waste container materials includes characterization of bacteria in the post-construction YM environment, determination of their required growth conditions and growth rates, quantitative assessment of the biochemical contribution to metal corrosion, and evaluation of overall MIC rates on candidate waste package materials.

  20. Nuclear waste management technical support in the developmnt of nuclear waste form criteria for the NRC. Task 5. National waste package program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.

    1982-02-01

    This report assesses the need for a centrally organized waste package effort and whether the present national program meets those needs. It is the conclusion of the BNL staff that while the DOE has in principle organized a national effort to develop high-integrity waste packages for geologic disposal of high level waste, the effort has not yet produced data to demonstrate that a waste package will comply with NRC's criteria. The BNL staff feels, however, that such a package is achievable either by development of high integrity components which by themselves could comply with 1000-year containment or by the development of new waste package designs that could comply with both the containment and the controlled release criteria in the 10CFR 60 performance objectives. In terms of waste forms, high-integrity components such as pyrolytic carbon coated waste and radioactive glass coated with non-radioactive glass offer higher potential than normal borosilicate waste glass. The existing container research program has yet to produce the data base on which to assess the potential of a container material to contain the waste for 1000 years. However, there may be the potential, based on Swedish calculations and work done on titanium in the DOE program, that Ti or its alloys may satisfy this criterion. Existing data on natural backfills will not be acceptable as the sole source for satisfying containment and the long-term release rate criteria. However, a synthetic zeolite system is an example of a backfill with a potential to satisfy both criteria. In this particular case, it is the BNL staff's opinion that existing technology and data for this system indicate that major development programs may not be required to qualify this material for licensing applications. The most likely means available for satisfying 10 CFR 60 with a single package component is through the performance of a discrete backfill

  1. Grid-Connected Semitransparent Building-Integrated Photovoltaic System: The Comprehensive Case Study of the 120 kWp Plant in Kunming, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 120 kWp building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV system was installed on the south facade of the Solar Energy Research Institute building in Yunnan Normal University. The area of the curtain wall was 1560 m2 (26 m × 60 m, which consisted of 720 semitransparent monocrystalline silicon double-glazing PV panels. This paper studied the yearly and monthly variations of power generation in terms of solar data and meteorological parameters. The total amount of power generation of the BIPV system measured from October 2014 to September 2015 was 64.607 MWh, and the simulation results with TRNSYS (Transient Systems Simulation Program provided the 75.515 MWh predicted value of annual electricity production with the meteorological database of Meteonorm, while, based on the average value of the performance ratio (PR of 60% and the life cycle assessment (LCA of the system, the energy payback time (EPBT of 9.38 years and the potential for pollutant emission reductions have been evaluated and the environmental cost is RMB ¥0.01053 per kWh. Finally, an economic analysis was carried out; the net present value (NPV and the economic payback time of the BIPV system were estimated to be RMB ¥359,347 and 15 years, respectively.

  2. Effects of tuff waste package components on release from 76-68 simulated waste glass: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVay, G.L.; Robinson, G.R.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental matrix has been conducted that will allow evaluation of the effects of waste package constituents on the waste form release behavior in a tuff repository environment. Tuff rock and groundwater were used along with 304L, 316, and 1020M ferrous metals to evaluate release from uranium-doped MCC 76-68 simulated waste glass. One of the major findings was that in the absence of 1020M mild steel, tuff rock powder dominates the system. However, when 1020M mild steel is present, it appears to dominate the system. The rock-dominated system results in suppressed glass-water reaction and leaching while the 1020M-dominated system results in enhanced leaching - but the metal effectively scavenges uranium from solution. The 300-series stainless steels play no significant role in affecting glass leaching characteristics. 6 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Design of a nuclear-waste package for emplacement in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Rothman, A.J.; Gregg, D.W.; Hockman, J.N.; Revelli, M.A.; Russell, E.W.; Schornhorst, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Design, modeling, and testing activities are under way at LLNL in the development of high level nuclear waste package designs. We discuss the geological characteristics affecting design, the 10CFR60 design requirements, conceptual designs, metals for containment barriers, economic analysis, thermal modeling, and performance modeling

  4. Estimation of waste package performance requirements for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.J.

    1980-07-01

    A method of developing waste package performance requirements for specific nuclides is described, and based on federal regulations concerning permissible concentrations in solution at the point of discharge to the accessible environment, a simple and conservative transport model, and baseline and potential worst-case release scenarios

  5. Overview of hydrothermal testing of waste-package barrier materials at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The current Waste Package Department (WPD) hydrothermal testing program for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) has followed a systematic approach for the testing of waste-barrier-basalt interactions based on sequential penetration of barriers by intruding groundwaters. Present test activities in the WPD program have focused on determining radionuclide solubility limits (or steady-state conditions) of simulated waste forms and the long-term stability of waste package barriers under site-specific hydrothermal conditions. The resulting data on solution compositions and solid alteration products have been used to evaluate waste form degradation under conditions specific to a nuclear waste repository located in basalt (NWRB). Isothermal, time-invariant compositional data on sampled solutions have been coupled with realistic hydrologic flow data for near-field and far-field modeling for the calculation of meaningful radionuclide release rates. Radionuclides that are not strongly sorbed or precipitated from solution and that, therefore, may require special attention to ensure their isolation within the waste package have been identified. Taken together, these hydrothermal test data have been used to establish design requirements for waste packages located in basalt

  6. 10 CFR 60.135 - Criteria for the waste package and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 60.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES... for HLW shall be designed so that the in situ chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of the waste package and its interactions with the emplacement environment do not compromise the function of the waste...

  7. Waste package materials testing for a salt repository: 1983 status summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, D.P.

    1986-09-01

    The United States plans to safely dispose of nuclear waste in deep, stable geologic formations. As part of these plans, the US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on the designing and testing of waste packages and waste package materials. This fiscal year 1983 status report summarizes recent results of waste package materials testing in a salt environment. The results from these tests will be used by waste package designers and performance assessment experts. Release characteristics data are available on two waste forms (spent fuel and waste-containing glass) that were exposed to leaching tests at various radiation levels, temperatures, pH, glass surface area to solution volume ratios, and brine solutions simulating expected salt repository conditions. Candidate materials tested for corrosion resistance and other properties include iron alloys; TI-CODE 12, the most promising titanium alloy for containment; and nickel alloys. In component interaction testing, synergistic effects have not ruled out any candidate material. 21 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs

  8. Addendum to the Safety Analysis Report for the Steel Waste Packaging. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Steel Waste Package requires additional analyses to support the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste and special-case waste from the 324 building hot cells to PUREX for interim storage. This addendum provides the analyses required to show that this waste can be safely shipped onsite in the configuration shown

  9. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package fill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Depleted uranium dioxide fill inside the waste package creates the potential for significant improvements in package performance based on uranium geochemistry, reduces the potential for criticality in a repository, and consumes DU inventory. As a new concept, significant uncertainties exist: fill properties, impacts on package design, post- closure performance

  10. Characterization of Old Nuclear Waste Packages Coupling Photon Activation Analysis and Complementary Non-Destructive Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrel, Frederick; Coulon, Romain; Laine, Frederic; Normand, Stephane; Sari, Adrien; Charbonnier, Bruno; Salmon, Corine

    2013-06-01

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste packages is an industrial issue in order to select the best mode of storage. The characterization becomes crucial particularly for waste packages produced at the beginning of the French nuclear industry. For the latter, available information is often incomplete and some key parameters are sometimes missing (content of the package, alpha-activity, fissile mass...) In this case, the use of non-destructive methods, both passive and active, is an appropriate solution to characterize nuclear waste packages and to obtain all the information of interest. In this article, we present the results of a complete characterization carried out on the TE 1060 block, which is a nuclear waste package produced during the 1960's in Saclay. This characterization is part of the DEMSAC (Dismantling of Saclay's facilities) project (ICPE part). It has been carried out in the SAPHIR facility, located in Saclay and housing a linear electron accelerator. This work enables to show the great interest of active methods (photon activation analysis and high-energy imaging) as soon as passive techniques encounter severe limitations. (authors)

  11. DISPOSAL CONTAINER HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. F. Loros

    2000-06-30

    The Disposal Container Handling System receives and prepares new disposal containers (DCs) and transfers them to the Assembly Transfer System (ATS) or Canister Transfer System (CTS) for loading. The system receives the loaded DCs from ATS or CTS and welds the lids. When the welds are accepted the DCs are termed waste packages (WPs). The system may stage the WP for later transfer or transfer the WP directly to the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. The system can also transfer DCs/WPs to/from the Waste Package Remediation System. The Disposal Container Handling System begins with new DC preparation, which includes installing collars, tilting the DC upright, and outfitting the container for the specific fuel it is to receive. DCs and their lids are staged in the receipt area for transfer to the needed location. When called for, a DC is put on a cart and sent through an airlock into a hot cell. From this point on, all processes are done remotely. The DC transfer operation moves the DC to the ATS or CTS for loading and then receives the DC for welding. The DC welding operation receives loaded DCs directly from the waste handling lines or from interim lag storage for welding of the lids. The welding operation includes mounting the DC on a turntable, removing lid seals, and installing and welding the inner and outer lids. After the weld process and non-destructive examination are successfully completed, the WP is either staged or transferred to a tilting station. At the tilting station, the WP is tilted horizontally onto a cart and the collars removed. The cart is taken through an air lock where the WP is lifted, surveyed, decontaminated if required, and then moved into the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. DCs that do not meet the welding non-destructive examination criteria are transferred to the Waste Package Remediation System for weld preparation or removal of the lids. The Disposal Container Handling System is contained within the Waste Handling Building System

  12. Analysis of near-field thermal and psychometric waste package environment using ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, G.

    1995-03-01

    The ultimate objective of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Program is to safely emplace and isolate the nations' spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive wastes in a geologic repository. Radioactive waste emplaced in a geologic repository will generate heat, increasing the temperature in the repository. The magnitude of this temperature increase depends upon (1) the heat source, i.e. the thermal loading of the repository, and (2) the geologic and engineered heat transport characteristics of the repository. Thermal management techniques currently under investigation include ventilation of the emplacement drifts during the preclosure period which could last as long as 100 years. Understanding the amount of heat and moisture removed from the emplacement drifts and near-field rock by ventilation, are important in determining performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS), as well as the corrosive environment of the waste packages, and the interaction of the EBS with the near-field host rock. Since radionuclide releases and repository system performance are significantly affected by the corrosion rate related to the psychometric environment, it is necessary to predict the amount of heat and moisture that are removed from the repository horizon using a realistic model for a wide range of thermal loading. This can be realized by coupling the hydrothermal model of the rock mass to a ventilation/climate model which includes the heat and moisture transport on the rock-air interface and the dilution of water vapor in the drift. This paper deals with the development of the coupled model concept, and determination of the boundary conditions for the calculations

  13. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Christopher P., E-mail: cj0810@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Brenner, Ceri M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stitt, Camilla A. [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mirfayzi, Seyed R. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lucy A. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Allott, Ric [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Butler, Nicholas M.H. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Higginson, Adam [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Notley, Margaret [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jowsey, John [Ground Floor North B582, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10{sup 7}–10{sup 9} neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm{sup 2} scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  14. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher P.; Brenner, Ceri M.; Stitt, Camilla A.; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R.; Mirfayzi, Seyed R.; Wilson, Lucy A.; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M.H.; Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10"7–10"9 neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm"2 scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  15. Analysis of measured and simulated performance data of a 3.2 kWp grid-connected PV system in Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okello, D.; Dyk, E.E. van; Vorster, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparisons between actual measured and simulated performance of a grid-connected PV system. • Simulation using measured climate data sets gave good monthly energy yield comparisons to the measured. • The measured performance ratio of 84.3% shows vast solar energy potential in Eastern Cape region of South Africa. • Better annual specific yield is observed in this study compared to other studies internationally. - Abstract: This paper analyzes and compares the actual measured and simulated performance of a 3.2 kWp grid-connected photovoltaic system. The system is located at the Outdoor Research Facility (34.01°S, 25.67°E) at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), South Africa. The system consists of 14 poly crystalline silicon modules connected in two strings of 7 series-connected modules, each facing north at a fixed tilt of 34°. The data presented in this study were measured in the year 2013, where the system supplied a total of 5757 kW h to the local electric utility grid. The performance of the system was simulated using PVsyst software using measured and Meteonorm derived climate data sets (solar radiation, ambient temperature and wind speed). The comparison between measured and simulated energy yield are discussed. Although, both simulation results were similar, better comparison between measured and predicted monthly energy yield is observed with simulation performed using measured weather data at the site. The measured performance ratio in the present study is 84% which is slightly higher than values of 74%, 81.5%, 67.4%, 70% and 64.5% reported is Khatkar-Kalan (India), Dublin (Ireland), Crete (Greece), Karnataka (India) and Malaga (Spain), respectively

  16. Establishing a store baseline during interim storage of waste packages and a review of potential technologies for base-lining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTeer, Jennifer; Morris, Jenny; Wickham, Stephen [Galson Sciences Ltd. Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom); Bolton, Gary [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); McKinney, James; Morris, Darrell [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Moor Row, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Angus, Mike [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cann, Gavin; Binks, Tracey [National Nuclear Laboratory Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Interim storage is an essential component of the waste management lifecycle, providing a safe, secure environment for waste packages awaiting final disposal. In order to be able to monitor and detect change or degradation of the waste packages, storage building or equipment, it is necessary to know the original condition of these components (the 'waste storage system'). This paper presents an approach to establishing the baseline for a waste-storage system, and provides guidance on the selection and implementation of potential base-lining technologies. The approach is made up of two sections; assessment of base-lining needs and definition of base-lining approach. During the assessment of base-lining needs a review of available monitoring data and store/package records should be undertaken (if the store is operational). Evolutionary processes (affecting safety functions), and their corresponding indicators, that can be measured to provide a baseline for the waste-storage system should then be identified in order for the most suitable indicators to be selected for base-lining. In defining the approach, identification of opportunities to collect data and constraints is undertaken before selecting the techniques for base-lining and developing a base-lining plan. Base-lining data may be used to establish that the state of the packages is consistent with the waste acceptance criteria for the storage facility and to support the interpretation of monitoring and inspection data collected during store operations. Opportunities and constraints are identified for different store and package types. Technologies that could potentially be used to measure baseline indicators are also reviewed. (authors)

  17. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman

    2007-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes

  18. Sampling methods and non-destructive examination techniques for large radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, T.H.; Smith, D.L.; Burgoyne, K.E.; Maxwell, D.J.; Norris, G.H.; Billington, D.M.; Pipe, R.G.; Smith, J.E.; Inman, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported on work undertaken to evaluate quality checking methods for radioactive wastes. A sampling rig was designed, fabricated and used to develop techniques for the destructive sampling of cemented simulant waste using remotely operated equipment. An engineered system for the containment of cooling water was designed and manufactured and successfully demonstrated with the drum and coring equipment mounted in both vertical and horizontal orientations. The preferred in-cell orientation was found to be with the drum and coring machinery mounted in a horizontal position. Small powdered samples can be taken from cemented homogeneous waste cores using a hollow drill/vacuum section technique with the preferred subsampling technique being to discard the outer 10 mm layer to obtain a representative sample of the cement core. Cement blends can be dissolved using fusion techniques and the resulting solutions are stable to gelling for periods in excess of one year. Although hydrochloric acid and nitric acid are promising solvents for dissolution of cement blends, the resultant solutions tend to form silicic acid gels. An estimate of the beta-emitter content of cemented waste packages can be obtained by a combination of non-destructive and destructive techniques. The errors will probably be in excess of +/-60 % at the 95 % confidence level. Real-time X-ray video-imaging techniques have been used to analyse drums of uncompressed, hand-compressed, in-drum compacted and high-force compacted (i.e. supercompacted) simulant waste. The results have confirmed the applicability of this technique for NDT of low-level waste. 8 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  19. The field performance of a 558 kWp ground mounted single-axis PV system in Pretoria, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kitessa T

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available According to a recent Green Tech Media (GTM) publication [Moskowitz, 2017], 23% of all ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed on trackers. Trackers are especially beneficial for commercial and utility scale applications, particularly...

  20. Definition of the waste package environment for a repository located in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Bradley, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The expected environmental conditions for emplaced waste packages in a salt repository are simulated in the materials testing program to evaluate performance. Synthetic brines, based on the analyses of actual brines (both intrusion and inclusion), are used for corrosion and leach testing. Elevated temperatures (to 150 0 C) and radiation fields of up to 10 3 rad/h are employed as conservative conditions to bracket expected performance and provide data for worst case scenarios. Obtaining a precise definition of the waste package environment in a salt repository and its change with time is closely tied to detailed site characterization of the candidate salt repository horizon. It is expected that field testing can augment some of the materials testing currently under way and can provide increased confidence in the predicted site-specific near-field conditions. 17 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  1. The importance of thermal loading conditions to waste package performance at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    Temperature and relative humidity are primary environmental factors affecting waste package corrosion rates for the potential repository in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Under ambient conditions, the repository environment is quite humid. If relative humidity is low enough (<70%), corrosion will be minimal. Under humid conditions, corrosion is reduced if the temperature is low (<60 C). Using the V-TOUGH code, the authors model thermo-hydrological flow to investigate the effect of repository heat on temperature and relative humidity in the repository for a wide range of thermal loads. These calculations indicate that repository heat may substantially reduce relative humidity on the waste package, over hundreds of years for low thermal loads and over tens of thousands of year for high thermal loads. Temperatures associated with a given relative humidity decrease with increasing thermal load. Thermal load distributions can be optimized to yield a more uniform reduction in relative humidity during the boiling period

  2. Specification of safety requirements for waste packages with respect to practicable quality control measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruendler, D.; Wurtinger, W.

    1987-01-01

    Waste packages for disposal in a repository in the Federal Republic of Germany have to meet safety requirements derived from site specific safety analyses. The examination of the waste packages with regard to compliance with these requirements is the main objective of quality control measures. With respect to quality control the requirements have to be specified in a way that practicable control measures can be applied. This is dealt with for the quality control of the activity inventory and the quality control of the waste form. The paper discusses the determination of the activity of hard-to-measure radionuclides and the specification of safety related requirements for the waste form and the packaging using typical examples

  3. Determination of Radioisotope Content by Measurement of Waste Package Dose Rates - 13394

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daiane Cristini B.; Gimenes Tessaro, Ana Paula; Vicente, Roberto [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute Brazil, Radioactive Waste Management Department IPEN/GRR, Sao Paulo. SP. (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this communication is to report the observed correlation between the calculated air kerma rates produced by radioactive waste drums containing untreated ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal slurries with the measured radiation field of each package. Air kerma rates at different distances from the drum surface were calculated with the activity concentrations previously determined by gamma spectrometry of waste samples and the estimated mass, volume and geometry of solid and liquid phases of each waste package. The water content of each waste drum varies widely between different packages. Results will allow determining the total activity of wastes and are intended to complete the previous steps taken to characterize the radioisotope content of wastes packages. (authors)

  4. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.

    2001-01-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  5. UKAEA's programme for the development of waste packages for deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes UKAEA ILW, the development programme underpinning the proposed disposals, the case for cement as the immobilising matrix and the waste package performance required by the Deep Repository. The paper also seeks to show that UKAEA is effectively managing its ILW liability through a well managed programme which is convincingly best value whilst meeting appropriate national and international agreed standards for safety and environmental care. (author)

  6. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package invert and backfill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Haire, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology has been proposed in which depleted uranium, in the form of oxides or silicates, is placed around the outside of the spent nuclear fuel waste packages in the geological repository. This concept may (1) reduce the potential for repository nuclear criticality events and (2) reduce long-term release of radionuclides from the repository. As a new concept, there are significant uncertainties

  7. WP-Cave - assessment of feasibility, safety and development potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    According to SKB R and D-programme 1986, alternative disposal methods will be investigated to provide a basis for selecting a site and a repository system for the Swedish spent nuclear fuel. The present report is a comparison between the WP-Cave and the reference concept KBS-3. The comparison has resulted in the following conclusions: - Both concepts are judged to be able to provide adequate safety. - A utilization of the potential of the WP-Cave requires, however, extensive development in areas where the current state of knowledge and available data are incomplete. - The higher temperatures in the WP-Cave lead to greater uncertainty as to long-term performance. Reducing this uncertainty would require many yaers of research and substantial resources. - Both repositories, including the barriers they incorporate, could be built with a normal adaption of available technology. -It is not possible to say today whether it would be simpler to find suitable sites for one design or the other. - The WP-Cave is considerably more expensive. A future research direction based on a concentrated emplacement of spent fuel along the lines of the WP-Cave is therefore judged to entail greater uncertainty as regards the possibilities of achieving acceptable safety and to require greater resources for research and development, at the same time as the costs of building the repository would be higher. The studies of the WP-Cave as an integral system should therfore be discontinued. Certain barrier designs in the WP-Cave could also be utulized in repository designs with lower temperature, for example the reduction potential of the steel canisters and the hydraulic cage's diversion of groundwater. Studies within these areas are being conducted within SKB and should continue

  8. Study of applicable methods on safety verification of disposal facilities and waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Three subjects about safety verification on the disposal of low level radioactive waste were investigated in FY. 2012. For radioactive waste disposal facilities, specs and construction techniques of covering with soil to prevent possible destruction caused by natural events (e.g. earthquake) were studied to consider verification methods for those specs. For waste packages subject to near surface pit disposal, settings of scaling factor and average radioactivity concentration (hereafter referred to as ''SF'') on container-filled and solidified waste packages generated from Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 1-5, setting of cesium residual ratio of molten solidified waste generated from Tokai and Tokai No.2 Power Stations, etc. were studied. Those results were finalized in consideration of the opinion from advisory panel, and publicly opened as JNES-EV reports. In FY 2012, five JNES reports were published and these have been used as standards of safety verification on waste packages. The verification method of radioactive wastes subject to near-surface trench disposal and intermediate depth disposal were also studied. For radioactive wastes which will be returned from overseas, determination methods of radioactive concentration, heat rate and hydrogen generation rate of CSD-C were established. Determination methods of radioactive concentration and heat rate of CSD-B were also established. These results will be referred to verification manuals. (author)

  9. A mechanistic model for leaching from low-level radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a waste leaching model to predict radionuclide releases from porous wastes in corrodible outer containers in unsaturated conditions and/or conditions of intermittent water flow is summarized in this paper. Three major processes have been conceptualized as necessarily participating in waste leaching: infiltration of water to the waste package; interaction of this water with the waste; and exit of radionuclide-laden water from the waste package. Through the exit point, the main features of the whole leaching process ware held in common. The departure occurs in two main ways: 1) the method of entrance of the radionuclides to leachant (i.e. part of the waste-water interaction phase outlined earlier); and 2) the mode of exit from waste form/waste package (i.e., the exit of radionuclide-laden water phase). The first branching point, which occurs in relation to 1), leads to either readily soluble species directly entering leachant on contact, or to other processes - mainly expected to be diffusion, dissolution or ion exchange, or some combination thereof

  10. PACCOM: A nuclear waste packaging facility cost model: Draft technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippold, D.G.; Tzemos, S.; Smith, D.J.

    1985-05-01

    PACCOM is a computerized, parametric model used to estimate the capital, operating, and decommissioning costs of a variety of nuclear waste packaging facility configurations. The model is based upon a modular waste packaging facility concept from which functional components of the overall facility have been identified and their design and costs related to various parameters such as waste type, waste throughput, and the number of operational shifts employed. The model may be used to either estimate the cost of a particular waste packaging facility configuration or to explore the cost tradeoff between plant capital and labor. That is, one may use the model to search for the particular facility sizes and associated cost which when coupled with a particular number of shifts, and thus staffing level, leads to the lowest overall total cost. The functional components which the model considers include hot cells and their supporting facilities, transportation, cask handling facilities, transuranic waste handling facilities, and administrative facilities such as warehouses, security buildings, maintenance buildings, etc. The cost of each of these functional components is related either directly or indirectly to the various independent design parameters. Staffing by shift is reported into direct and indirect support labor. These staffing levels are in turn related to the waste type, waste throughput, etc. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, K.

    2001-01-01

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified

  12. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mon

    2001-08-29

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.

  13. Preliminary selection criteria for the Yucca Mountain Project waste package container material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for construction of a geologic repository for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Nuclear Waste Management Project (NWMP) has the responsibility for design, testing, and performance analysis of the waste packages. The design is performed in an iterative manner in three sequential phases (conceptual design, advanced conceptual design, and license application design). An important input to the start of the advanced conceptual design is the selection of the material for the waste containers. The container material is referred to as the 'metal barrier' portion of the waste package, and is the responsibility of the Metal Barrier Selection and Testing task at LLNL. The selection will consist of several steps. First, preliminary, material-independent selection criteria will be established based on the performance goals for the container. Second, a variety of engineering materials will be evaluated against these criteria in a screening process to identify candidate materials. Third, information will be obtained on the performance of the candidate materials, and final selection criteria and quantitative weighting factors will be established based on the waste package design requirements. Finally, the candidate materials will be ranked against these criteria to determine whether they meet the mandated performance requirements, and to provide a comparative score to choose the material for advanced conceptual design activities. This document sets forth the preliminary container material selection criteria to be used in screening candidate materials. 5 refs

  14. Semi-empirical model to determine pure β--emitters in closed waste packages using Bremsstrahlung radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2001-01-01

    unsealed pure β - -emitting isotopes are applied. The 3 H, 35 S, 32 P and 33 P are widely used for DNA sequencing studies. Also large amount of 3 H and 14 C are used in organic compound synthesis resulting in long-lived low-level radioactive waste. The β - -particles can be detected by beta counter but it is not applicable in the case of closed waste packages, since the β - - particles loss their energy quickly and they are not capable to escape from the sealed waste package. The emitted β - -particles have continuous energy spectrum and no direct gamma radiation follow the decay. The only means of detection of these β - -particles is through the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced while the particle slows down. The cross section of the Bremsstrahlung generation process depends on the initial energy of the slowing down β - - particles and is proportional to the atomic density n and the average Z 2 of the waste matrix. The probability of this process is much lower than that of the ionisation process for beta particles but it is still high enough to produce measurable amounts of photons. We studied the 35 S and 32 P pure β - -emitter sources in sealed waste packages. The continuous nature of the Bremsstrahlung radiation prevents us using the 'full-energy photo peak area' method. Instead a Region of Interest (ROI) was defined. Unlike for the full-energy photo peak method where the detector efficiency is calculated in the function of energy, for pure β - - emitters an optimised ROI was defined in the spectrum and a special efficiency, eps*beta(E) was determined. The used geometry and the nature of the waste matrix requires time consuming efficiency calibrations of the detector system to be able to establish an efficiency - (matrix density, geometry, matrix composition, activity distribution) function. We studied experimentally the possible deviations of the eps*beta(E) function in case of non uniform activity distribution in order to be able to model the associated error

  15. EPA's high-level waste standards and waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, S.

    1985-01-01

    The seven assurance requirements EPA was considering were these: (1) Disposal systems shall not depend on active institutional controls for more than 100 years after disposal; (2) Long-term disposal system performance should be monitored for a reasonable time as a supplement to other types of protection; (3) Disposal systems shall be marked and their locations recorded in all appropriate government records; (4) Disposal systems shall be designed with several different types of barriers, both natural and engineered; (5) Sites should not be located where scarce or easily accessible resources are located; (6) Site selection should consider the relative isolation offered by potential alternatives; and (7) Wastes shall be recoverable for a reasonable time after disposal. (orig./PW)

  16. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1983-09-01

    In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), experiments on hydrothermal rock/water interaction, corrosion, thermomechanics, and geochemical modeling calculations are being conducted. All of these activities require characterization of the initial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry of the potential repository host rock. This report summarizes the characterization done on samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff (Tcfb) used for Waste Package experimental programs. 11 references, 17 figures, 3 tables

  17. Selection of barrier metals for a waste package in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-10-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is planning a repository at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site for isolation of high-level nuclear waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing designs for an engineered barrier system containing several barriers such as the waste form, a canister and/or an overpack, packing, and near field host rock. In this paper we address the selection of metal containment barriers. 13 references, 4 tables

  18. Selection of barrier metals for a waste package in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) project under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is planning a repository at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site for isolation of high-level nuclear waste. LLNL is developing designs for an engineered barrier system containing several barriers such as the waste form, a canister and/or an overpack, packing, and near field host rock. The selection of metal containment barriers is addressed. 13 references

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

    1991-05-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on the waste package environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic production of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen acids and ammonia are discussed in relation to the expected environment in a high-level waste repository that may be constructed at the Yucca Mountain site if it is found to be suitable. Both literature data and repository-relevant data are summarized for air-water vapor systems. The limiting cases of a dry air and a pure water vapor gas phase are also discussed. Design guidelines and recommendations, based solely on the potential consequence of radiation enhancement of corrosion, are given. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Monte Carlo code criticality benchmark comparisons for waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesso, H.P.; Annese, C.E.; Buck, R.M.; Pearson, J.S.; Lloyd, W.R.

    1992-07-01

    COG is a new point-wise Monte Carlo code being developed and tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It solves the Boltzmann equation for the transport of neutrons and photons. The objective of this paper is to report on COG results for criticality benchmark experiments both on a Cray mainframe and on a HP 9000 workstation. COG has been recently ported to workstations to improve its accessibility to a wider community of users. COG has some similarities to a number of other computer codes used in the shielding and criticality community. The recently introduced high performance reduced instruction set (RISC) UNIX workstations provide computational power that approach mainframes at a fraction of the cost. A version of COG is currently being developed for the Hewlett Packard 9000/730 computer with a UNIX operating system. Subsequent porting operations will move COG to SUN, DEC, and IBM workstations. In addition, a CAD system for preparation of the geometry input for COG is being developed. In July 1977, Babcock ampersand Wilcox Co. (B ampersand W) was awarded a contract to conduct a series of critical experiments that simulated close-packed storage of LWR-type fuel. These experiments provided data for benchmarking and validating calculational methods used in predicting K-effective of nuclear fuel storage in close-packed, neutron poisoned arrays. Low enriched UO2 fuel pins in water-moderated lattices in fuel storage represent a challenging criticality calculation for Monte Carlo codes particularly when the fuel pins extend out of the water. COG and KENO calculational results of these criticality benchmark experiments are presented

  2. Materials of Criticality Safety Concern in Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.L.; Day, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    10 CFR 71.55 requires in part that the fissile material package remain subcritical when considering 'the most reactive credible configuration consistent with the chemical and physical form of the material'. As waste drums and packages may contain unlimited types of materials, determination of the appropriately bounding moderator and reflector materials to ensure compliance with 71.55 requires a comprehensive analysis. Such an analysis was performed to determine the materials or elements that produce the most reactive configuration with regards to both moderation and reflection of a Pu-239 system. The study was originally performed for the TRUPACT-II shipping package and thus the historical fissile mass limit for the package, 325 g Pu-239, was used [1]. Reactivity calculations were performed with the SCALE package to numerically assess the moderation or reflection merits of the materials [2]. Additional details and results are given in SAIC-1322-001 [3]. The development of payload controls utilizing process knowledge to determine the classification of special moderator and/or reflector materials and the associated fissile mass limit is also addressed. (authors)

  3. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Final report - V. A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molesworth, T.V.; Strachan, N.R.; Findlay, D.J.S.; Wise, M.O.; Forrest, K.R.; Rogers, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research work carried out in support of the development of an integrated assay system for the quality checking of Intermediate Level Waste encapsulated in cement. Four non-destructive techniques were originally identified as being viable methods for obtaining radiometric inventory data from a cemented 500 litre ILW package. The major part of the programme was devoted to the development of two interrogation techniques; active neutron for measuring the total fissile content and active gamma for measuring the total actinide content. An electron linear accelerator was used to supply the interrogating beam for these two methods. In addition the linear accelerator beam could be used for high energy radiography. The results of this work are described and the performances and limitations of the non-destructive methods are summarised. The main engineering and operational features which influence the design of an integrated assay facility are outlined and a conceptual layout for a facility to inspect 750 ILW drums a year is described. Details of the detection methods, data processing and potential application of the assay facility are given in three associated HMIP reports. (Author)

  4. User requirements Massive Point Clouds for eSciences (WP1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, P.M.; Alkemade, I.; Kodde, M.P.; Nonhebel, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a milestone in work package 1 (WP1) of the project Massive point clouds for eSciences. In WP1 the basic functionalities needed for a new Point Cloud Spatial Database Management System are identified. This is achieved by (1) literature research, (2) discussions with the project

  5. Review of DOE Waste Package Program. Semiannual report, October 1984-March 1985. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.

    1985-12-01

    A large number of technical reports on waste package component performance were reviewed over the last year in support of the NRC's review of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Assessment reports. The intent was to assess in some detail the quantity and quality of the DOE data and their relevance to the high-level waste repository site selection process. A representative selection of the reviews is presented for the salt, basalt, and tuff repository projects. Areas for future research have been outlined. 141 refs

  6. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayal, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  7. Evaluation and compilation of DOE [Department of Energy] waste package test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Plante, E.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six month period February 1988 through July 1988. Activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center are reviewed for the period January 1988 through June 1988. A summary is given of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities. Short discussions relating to the reviewed publications are given and complete reviews and evaluations are included. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Corrosion of candidate iron-base waste package structural barrier materials in moist salt environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.

    1984-11-01

    Mild steels are considered to be strong candidates for waste package structural barrier (e.g., overpack) applications in salt repositories. Corrosion rates of these materials determined in autoclave tests utilizing a simulated intrusion brine based on Permian Basin core samples are low, generally <25 μm (1 mil) per year. When the steels are exposed to moist salts containing simulated inclusion brines, the corrosion rates are found to increase significantly. The magnesium in the inclusion brine component of the environment is believed to be responsible for the increased corrosion rates. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables

  9. Evaluation of iron-base materials for waste package containers in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Nelson, J.L.; Kuhn, W.L.; Basham, S.G.; Moak, D.A.; Pitman, S.G.

    1983-11-01

    Design studies for high-level nuclear waste packages for salt repositories have identified low-carbon steel as a candidate material for containers. Among the requirements are strength, corrosion resistance, and fabricability. The studies of the corrosion resistance and structural stability of iron-base materials (particularly low-carbon steel) are treated in this paper. The materials have been exposed in brines that are characteristic of the potential sites for salt repositories. The effects of temperature, radiation level, oxygen level and other parameters are under investigation. The initial development of corrosion models for these environments is presented with discussion of the key mechanisms under consideration. 6 references, 5 figures

  10. Effect of chloride concentration and pH on pitting corrosion of waste package container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Gordon, S.R.

    1996-12-01

    Electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization experiments were performed on several candidate waste package container materials to evaluate their susceptibility to pitting corrosion at 90 degrees C in aqueous environments relevant to the potential underground high-level nuclear waste repository. Results indicate that of all the materials tested, Alloy C-22 and Ti Grade-12 exhibited the maximum corrosion resistance, showing no pitting or observable corrosion in any environment tested. Efforts were also made to study the effect of chloride ion concentration and pH on the measured corrosion potential (Ecorr), critical pitting and protection potential values

  11. Review of DOE Waste Package Program. Semiannual report, October 1984-March 1985. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.S. (ed.)

    1985-12-01

    A large number of technical reports on waste package component performance were reviewed over the last year in support of the NRC`s review of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental Assessment reports. The intent was to assess in some detail the quantity and quality of the DOE data and their relevance to the high-level waste repository site selection process. A representative selection of the reviews is presented for the salt, basalt, and tuff repository projects. Areas for future research have been outlined. 141 refs.

  12. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: functional requirements and performance criteria for waste packages for solidified high-level waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has primary federal responsibility for the development and implementation of safe and environmentally acceptable nuclear waste disposal methods. Currently, the principal emphasis in the program is on emplacement of nuclear wastes in mined geologic repositories well beneath the earth's surface. A brief description of the mined geologic disposal system is provided. The National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program was established under DOE's predecessor, the Energy Research and Development Administration, to provide facilities for the mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The NWTS program includes both the development and the implementation of the technology necessary for designing, constructing, licensing, and operating repositories. The program does not include the management of processing radioactive wastes or of transporting the wastes to repositories. The NWTS-33 series, of which this document is a part, provides guidance for the NWTS program in the development and implementation of licensed mined geologic disposal systems for solidified high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. This document presents the functional requirements and performance criteria for waste packages for solidified high-level waste and spent fuel. A separate document to be developed, NWTS-33(4b), will present the requirements and criteria for waste packages for TRU wastes. The hierarchy and application of these requirements and criteria are discussed in Section 2.2

  13. Development of waste packages for TRU-disposal. 5. Development of cylindrical metal package for TRU wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mizubayashi, Hiroshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Owada, Hitoshi; Otsuki, Akiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Development of the TRU waste package for hulls and endpieces compression canisters, which include long-lived and low sorption nuclides like C-14 is essential and will contribute a lot to a reasonable enhancement of safety and economy of the TRU-disposal system. The cylindrical metal package made of carbon steel for canisters to enhance the efficiency of the TRU-disposal system and to economically improve their stacking conditions was developed. The package is a welded cylindrical construction with a deep drawn upper cover and a disc plate for a bottom cover. Since the welding is mainly made only for an upper cover and a bottom disc plate, this package has a better containment performance for radioactive nuclide and can reduce the cost for construction and manufacturing including its welding control. Furthermore, this package can be laid down in pile for stacking in the circular cross section disposal tunnel for the sedimentary rock, which can drastically minimize the space for disposal tunnel as mentioned previously in TRU report. This paper reports the results of the study for application of newly developed metal package into the previous TRU-disposal system and for the stacking equipment for the package. (author)

  14. Monitoring and inspection techniques for long term storage of higher activity waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, Gary

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, following recent changes in United Kingdom (UK) Government Policy, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) identified a knowledge gap in the area of long term interim storage of waste packages. A cross-industry Integrated Project Team (IPT) for Interim Storage was created with responsibility for delivering Industry Guidance on the storage of packaged Higher Activity Waste (HAW) for the current UK civil decommissioning and clean-up programmes. This included a remit to direct research and development projects via the NDA's Direct Research Portfolio (DRP) to fill the knowledge gap. The IPT for Interim Storage published Industry Guidance in 2012 which established a method to define generic package performance criteria and made recommendations on monitoring and inspection. The package performance method consists of the following steps; identification of the package safety function, identification of evolutionary processes that may affect safety function performance, determination of measurable indicators of these evolutionary processes and calibration of the indicators into package performance zones. This article provides an overview of three projects funded by the NDA's DRP that the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have completed to address monitoring and inspection needs of waste packages in interim storage. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of alternative spent fuel waste package concepts for a repository in Basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.V.B.; Nair, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    The United States government has established a program for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 requires the first nuclear waste repository to begin receiving high-level radioactive waste in 1998. One of the potentially acceptable sites currently being evaluated is the Hanford Site in the Pasco Basin in the state of Washington where the host rock is basalt. Under the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Rockwell International's Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO) has initiated the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). The BWIP must design waste packages for emplacement in the repository. As part of the BWIP waste package development program, several alternative designs were considered for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This paper describes the concepts that were evaluated, the criteria that was developed for judging their relative merits, and the methodology that was employed. The results of the evaluation show that a Pipe-In-Tunnel design, which uses a long carbon steel pipe for the containment barrier for multiple packages of consolidated spent fuel, has the highest rating. Other designs which had high ratings are also discussed

  16. Waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, S.J. Jr.; Carr, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the United States of America the selected method for disposal of radioactive waste is mined repositories located in suitable geohydrological settings. Currently four types of host rocks are under consideration: tuff, basalt, crystalline rock and salt. Development of waste package designs for incorporation in mined salt repositories is discussed. The three pertinent high-level waste forms are: spent fuel, as disassembled and close-packed fuel pins in a mild steel canister; commercial high-level waste (CHLW), as borosilicate glass in stainless-steel canisters; defence high-level waste (DHLW), as borosilicate glass in stainless-steel canisters. The canisters are production and handling items only. They have no planned long-term isolation function. Each waste form requires a different approach in package design. However, the general geometry and the materials of the three designs are identical. The selected waste package design is an overpack of low carbon steel with a welded closure. This container surrounds the waste forms. Studies to better define brine quantity and composition, radiation effects on the salt and brines, long-term corrosion behaviour of the low carbon steel, and the leaching behaviour of the spent fuel and borosilicate glass waste forms are continuing. (author)

  17. Application of geometry correction factors for low-level waste package dose measurements. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, M.C.; Parish, B.

    1995-01-01

    Plans are to determine the Cs-137 content of low-level waste packages generated in High-Level Waste by measuring the radiation level at a specified distance from the package with a hand-held radiation instrument. The measurement taken at this specified distance, either 3 or 5 feet, is called the far-field measurement. This report documents a method for adjusting the gamma exposure rate (mR/hr) reading used in dose-to-curie determinations when the far-field measurement equals the background reading. This adjustment is necessary to reduce the conservatism resulting from using a minimum detection limit exposure rate for the dose-to-curie determination for the far-field measurement position. To accomplish this adjustment, the near-field (5 cm) measurement is multiplied by a geometry correction factor to obtain an estimate of the far field exposure rate (which is below instrument sensitivity). This estimate of the far field exposure rate is used to estimate the Cs-137 curie content of the package. This report establishes the geometry correction factors for the dose-to-curie determination when the far-field gamma exposure measurement equals the background reading. This report also provides a means of demonstrating compliance to 1S Manual requirements for exposure rate readings at different locations from waste packages while specifying only two measurement positions. This demonstration of compliance is necessary to minimize the number of locations exposure rate measurements that are required, i.e., ALARA

  18. Final status of the salt repository project waste package program experimental database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, B.M.; Reimus, P.W.

    1988-03-01

    This report describes the final status of the Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Experimental Database. The data base serves as a clearinghouse for all data collected within the Waste Package Program (WPP) and its predecessor programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The database was maintained using RS/1 database management software. Documented assurance that the entries in the database were consistent with experimental records was provided by having each experimentalist inspect the entries and signify that they were in agreement with the records. The inspection and signoff were done per PNL technical procedures. Data for which it was impossible to obtain the experimentalist's inspection and signature were segregated from the rest of the database, although they could still be accessed by WPP staff. The WPPED contains two groups of subdirectories. One group contains data taken prior to the installation of quality assurance procedures at PNL. The other group of subdirectories contains data taken under the NQA-1 procedures since their installation in April 1985. As part of closeout activities in the Salt Repository Project, the WPP database has been archived onto magnetic media. The data in the database are available by request on magnetic media or in hardcopy form. 2 refs

  19. WP1 – Final project report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Scheffel, Maren; Orrego, Carola; Stieger, Lina; Hartkopf, Kathleen; Henn, Patrick; Hynes, Helen; Przibilla, Monika; Geiger, Uschi; Schroeder, Hanna; Sopka, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    This report contains the complete project reporting of the PATIENT project from October 2012 until end of March 2015. It provides a summary of all project activities and achievements that are based on the previous WP deliverables such as the project progress reports from WP1 (D1.01) and the quality

  20. Development of a method to determine the nuclide inventory in bituminized waste packages; Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur Bestimmung des Nuklidinventars in bituminierten Abfallgebinden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesalic, E.; Kortman, F.; Lierse von Gostomski, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Zentrale Technisch-Wissenschaftliche Betriebseinheit Radiochemie Muenchen (RCM)

    2014-01-15

    Until the 1980s, bitumen was used as a conditioning agent for weak to medium radioactive liquid waste. Its use can be ascribed mainly to the properties that indicated that the matrix was optimal. However, fires broke out repeatedly during the conditioning process, so that the method is meanwhile no longer permitted in Germany. There are an estimated 100 waste packages held by the public authorities in Germany that require a supplementary declaration. In contrast to the common matrices, such as for example resins or sludges, there is still no standardized technology for taking samples and subsequently determining the radio-nuclide for bitumen. Aspects, such as the thermoplastic behaviour, make determining the nuclide inventory more difficult in bituminized waste packages. The development of a standardized technology to take samples with a subsequent determination of the radio-nuclide analysis is the objective of a project funded by the BMBF. Known, new methods, specially developed for the project, are examined on inactive bitumen samples and then transferred to active samples. At first non-destructive methods are used. The resulting information forms an important basis to work out and apply destructive strategy for sampling and analysis. Since the project is on-going, this report can only address the development of the sampling process. By developing a sampling system, it will be possible to take samples from an arbitrary selected location of the package across the entire matrix level and thus gain representative analysis material. The process is currently being optimized. (orig.)

  1. Expected very-near-field thermal environments for advanced spent-fuel and defense high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickertsen, L.D.; Misplon, M.A.; Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-03-01

    The very-near-field thermal environments expected in a nuclear waste repository in a salt formation have been evaluated for the Westinghouse Form I advanced waste package concepts. The repository descriptions used to supplement the waste package designs in these analyses are realistic and take into account design constraints to assure conservatism. As a result, areal loadings are well below the acceptable values established for salt repositories. Predicted temperatures are generally well below any temperature limits which have been discussed for waste packages in a salt formation. These low temperatures result from the conservative repository designs. Investigations are also made of the sensitivity of these temperatures to areal loading, canister separation, and other design features

  2. Shielding Calculations on Waste Packages – The Limits and Possibilities of different Calculation Methods by the example of homogeneous and inhomogeneous Waste Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Mike

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For nuclear waste packages the expected dose rates and nuclide inventory are beforehand calculated. Depending on the package of the nuclear waste deterministic programs like MicroShield® provide a range of results for each type of packaging. Stochastic programs like “Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System” (MCNP® on the other hand provide reliable results for complex geometries. However this type of program requires a fully trained operator and calculations are time consuming. The problem here is to choose an appropriate program for a specific geometry. Therefore we compared the results of deterministic programs like MicroShield® and stochastic programs like MCNP®. These comparisons enable us to make a statement about the applicability of the various programs for chosen types of containers. As a conclusion we found that for thin-walled geometries deterministic programs like MicroShield® are well suited to calculate the dose rate. For cylindrical containers with inner shielding however, deterministic programs hit their limits. Furthermore we investigate the effect of an inhomogeneous material and activity distribution on the results. The calculations are still ongoing. Results will be presented in the final abstract.

  3. NAK WP-Cave project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svemar, C.

    1985-11-01

    WP-Cave is designed as an egg-shaped underground structure for intermediate storing and final disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Its height, when storing 1600 tonnes of spent fuel, is about 250 m and its diameter 110 m at mid-height. The waste storage has a compact layout and is surrounded by two engineered barriers. The innermost one is a 5 m-wide shield consisting of a mixture of bentonite clay and same which has a low hydraulic conductivity. This shield is surrounded by a so-called hydraulic cage, which initially drains the storage rock mass and, in the long-term diverts, the ground water flow past the storage. In this way an initial dry supervision period can be maintained. After sealing-off the storage and after water-filling, a stagnant chemical environment is established inside the bentonite-sand barrier preventing the disposed waste from being dissolved and from migrating to the geosphere. The programme, as outlined by the Project Board, has considered R and D questions with specific relation to the WP-Cave such as: properties of low-graded bentonite mixtures, function of the hydraulic cage, full-face boring of the storage, geomechanics of the storage and the bentonite-sand barrier, dry ventilation of the storage, temperature distributions and thermal stresses. An initial safety analysis has also been conducted. The hydraulic conductivity of low-grade bentonite mixtures has been measured in laboratory tests and found to be higher than expected. Tests of gas conductivity, for instance, confirm that only low gas pressures would build up inside the bentonite-sand barrier. The initial safety analysis indicates that a compact storage, such as that presented, would allow for the safe isolation of the spent nuclear fuel and would fulfull the radiation protection criterion of 0.1 mSv/year. With 27 refs. (Author)

  4. Study of Power Quality at the Point of Common Coupling of a Low Voltage Grid and a Distributed Generation System of 7.8 kWp in a Tropical Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Valverde Granja

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze an experimental 1000 kWh/month distributed generation system in a tropical region connected to a point of common coupling in a low voltage grid that was characterized according to NTC 5001. This photovoltaic system has 7.8 kWp and uses 30 polycrystalline silicon-panels of 260 Wp each. Its maximum energy produced was 850 kWh/month, equivalent to 72.65% of the installed capacity. Finally, there was an increase of 2% with respect to the minimum voltage value that was recorded. The voltage unbalance decreases between 3.5 and 70% and voltage harmonics in each line increased by 7% on line U1, 0.8% on U2, 3% on U3 and current harmonics have a 22% increase. Likewise, the total active and reactive power were increased by 58% and 42% respectively, and the thermography study allowed to establish a temperature increase at the point of common coupling of 7.5%. Therefore, it is expected that this paper can serve as a reference for the application of Colombian law 1715 in solar energy.

  5. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables

  6. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Use of bremsstrahlung information for the nondestructive characterization of radioactive waste packages; Nutzung von Bremsstrahlungsinformation zur zerstoerungsfreien Charakterisierung radioaktiver Abfallgebinde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrmoser, Benjamin Paul

    2016-11-10

    In order to minimize pseudo activity whilst storage of radioactive waste packages it is required to determine the nuclide inventory as precisely as possible. The in Gamma spectra contained parts of bremsstrahlung can be used to identify and quantify certain beta nuclides. For this an analytical method has been developed. This was mainly tested with beta-emitter Sr-90 and Tm-170, as well as commonly present gamma-emitters in laboratory scale and actual 200 liter waste packages. As a result, non-destructive determination of radioactive wastes can be conducted more precisely.

  8. Method to determine the radioactivity of radioactive waste packages. Basic procedure of the method used to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This document describes the procedures adopted in order to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants in Japan. The standards applied have been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan after deliberations by the Subcommittee on the Radioactivity Verification Method for Waste Packages, the Nuclear Cycle Technical Committee, and the Standards Committee. The method for determining the radioactivity of the low-level radioactive waste packages was based on procedures approved by the Nuclear Safety Commission in 1992. The scaling factor method and other methods of determining radioactivity were then developed on the basis of various investigations conducted, drawing on extensive accumulated knowledge. Moreover, the international standards applied as common guidelines for the scaling factor method were developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear Energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology. Since the application of accumulated knowledge to future radioactive waste disposal is considered to be rational and justified, such body of knowledge has been documented in a standardized form. The background to this standardization effort, the reasoning behind the determination method as applied to the measurement of radioactivity, as well as other related information, are given in the Annexes hereto. This document includes the following Annexes. Annex 1: (reference) Recorded items related to the determination of the scaling factor. Annex 2 (reference): Principles applied to the determining the radioactivity of waste packages. (author)

  9. Current status of waste package designs for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, L.B.

    1989-07-01

    Conceptual designs for waste packages containing spent fuel or high-level waste glass have been developed for use in a repository at Yucca Mountain. The basis for these designs reflects the unique nature of the expected service environment associated with disposal in welded tuff in the unsaturated zone. In addition to a set of reference designs, alternative design concepts are being considered that would contain and isolate the waste radionuclides in a more aggressive service environment. Consideration is also being given to the feasibility of a concept known as ''heat tailoring'' that employs the thermal energy released by the wasteforms to enhance and extend the performance of the containers. 5 refs., 3 figs

  10. Above and below boiling thermal loading strategies for large waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    A simplified repository thermal model was developed with the Mathcad computer code which indicates that large waste packages may be compatible with both above and below boiling repository thermal loading strategies. Minimum spent fuel decay time of at least 20 to 30 years was shown to be important for both thermal loading strategies. Constant isothermal boundary conditions are assumed at the ground surface (296 K) and 305 meters below the water table (309.7 K) with a uniform temperature change of 1.55 10 -2 K/meter. Homogeneous tuff properties are assumed: conductivity (2.1 watt/m-k); density (2.22 gm/cm 3 ); and thermal capacitance (2.17 joule/cm 3 K). Based on these properties, the tuff thermal diffusion coefficient is 9.68 x 10 -7 m 2 /sec

  11. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 1. Application of assay technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, D.J.S.; Green, T.H.; Molesworth, T.V.; Staniforth, D.; Strachan, N.R.; Rogers, J.D.; Wise, M.O.; Forrest, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report, in three volumes, covers the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd., and two major sub-contractors: Harwell Laboratory (AEA Technology) and Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd., on the development of a radioactive waste package assay facility, for cemented 500 litre intermediate level waste drums. In volume 1, the reasons for assay are considered together with the various techniques that can be used, and the information that can be obtained. The practical problems associated with the use of the various techniques in an integrated assay facility are identified, and the key parameters defined. Engineering and operational features are examined and provisional designs proposed for facilities at three throughput levels: 15,000, 750 and 30 drums per year respectively. The capital and operating costs for such facilities have been estimated. A number of recommendations are made for further work. 16 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Buckling design criteria for waste package disposal containers in mined salt repositories: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, R.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report documents analytical and experimental results from a survey of the technical literature on buckling of thick-walled cylinders under external pressure. Based upon these results, a load factor is suggested for the design of waste package containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in repositories mined in salt formations. The load factor is defined as a ratio of buckling pressure to allowable pressure. Specifically, a load factor which ranges from 1.5 for plastic buckling to 3.0 for elastic buckling is included in a set of proposed buckling design criteria for waste disposal containers. Formulas are given for buckling design under axisymmetric conditions. Guidelines are given for detailed inelastic buckling analyses which are generally required for design of disposal containers

  13. Evolution of waste-package design at the potential U.S. geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, H.; Harkins, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of the waste-package design at the potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. Because the potential repository is the first of its kind, the design of its components must be flexible and capable of evolving in response to continuing scientific study, development efforts, and changes to performance criteria. The team of scientists and engineers at the Yucca Mountain Project has utilized a systematic, scientific approach to design the potential geologic nuclear-waste repository. As a result of continuing development efforts, the design has incorporated a growing base of scientific and engineering information to ensure that regulatory and performance requirements are met. (authors)

  14. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 2: Preliminary Design Concept for the Repository and Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  15. Application of the air/water cushion technology for handling of heavy waste packages in Sweden and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Seidler, Wolf K.; Londe, Louis; Thurner, Erik; Pettersson, Stig

    2008-01-01

    The disposal of certain types of radioactive waste canisters in a deep repository involves handling and emplacement of very heavy loads. The weight of these particular canisters can be in the order of 20 to 50 metric tons. They generally have to be handled underground in openings that are not much larger than the canisters themselves as it is time consuming and expensive to excavate and backfill large openings in a repository. This therefore calls for the development of special technology that can meet the requirements for safe operation in an industrial scale in restrained operating spaces. Air/water cushion lifting systems are used world wide in the industry for moving heavy loads. However, until now the technology needed for emplacing heavy cylindrical radioactive waste packages in bored drifts (with narrow annular gaps) has not been developed or demonstrated previously. This paper describes the related R and D work carried out by ANDRA (for air cushion technology) and by SKB and Posiva (for water cushion technology) respectively, mainly within the framework of the European Commission (EC) funded Integrated Project called ESDRED (6th European Framework Programme). The background for both the air and the water cushion applications is presented. The specific characteristics of the two different emplacement concepts are also elaborated. The various phases of the Test Programmes (including the Prototype phases) are detailed and illustrated for the two lifting media. Conclusions are drawn for each system developed and evaluated. Finally, based on the R and D experience, improvements deemed necessary for an industrial application are listed. The tests performed so far have shown that the emplacement equipment developed is operating efficiently. However further tests are required to verify the availability and the reliability of the equipment over longer periods of time and to identify the modifications that would be needed for an industrial application in a nuclear

  16. Technical Work Plan For: Calculation of Waste Package and Drip Shield Response to Vibratory Ground Motion and Revision of the Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Gross

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of the work scope covered by this technical work plan (TWP) is to develop new damage abstractions for the seismic scenario class in total system performance assessment (TSPA). The new abstractions will be based on a new set of waste package and drip shield damage calculations in response to vibratory ground motion and fault displacement. The new damage calculations, which are collectively referred to as damage models in this TWP, are required to represent recent changes in waste form packaging and in the regulatory time frame. The new damage models also respond to comments from the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT) postvalidation review of the draft TSPA model regarding performance of the drip shield and to an Additional Information Need (AIN) from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

  17. Development of characterization methods applied to radioactive wastes and waste packages; Le developpement des methodes de caracterisation appliquees aux dechets et colis de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, C.; Bienvenu, Ph.; Comte, J.; Excoffier, E.; Dodi, A. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD-DEC/SA3C/LARC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Gal, O.; Gmar, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Poumarede, B.; Tola, F. [CEA Saclay (DRT/SAC-DETECS/SSTM/L2MA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Moulin, V. [CEA Grenoble (DRT/GRE-LETI/DTBS/STD), 38 (France); Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Ma, J.L.; Oriol, L.; Passard, Ch.; Perot, B.; Pettier, J.L.; Raoux, A.C.; Thierry, R. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD-DTN/SMTM/LMN), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    This document is a compilation of R and D studies carried out in the framework of the axis 3 of the December 1991 law about the conditioning and storage of high-level and long lived radioactive wastes and waste packages, and relative to the methods of characterization of these wastes. This R and D work has permitted to implement and qualify new methods (characterization of long-lived radioelements, high energy imaging..) and also to improve the existing methods by lowering detection limits and reducing uncertainties of measured data. This document is the result of the scientific production of several CEA laboratories that use complementary techniques: destructive methods and radiochemical analyses, photo-fission and active photonic interrogation, high energy imaging systems, neutron interrogation, gamma spectroscopy and active and passive imaging techniques. (J.S.)

  18. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available

  19. Feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, C.F.; McCright, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This report discussed progress made during the second year of a two-year study on the feasibility of using copper or a copper-base alloy as a container material for a waste package in a potential repository in tuff rock at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Corrosion testing in potentially corrosive irradiated environments received emphasis during the feasibility study. Results of experiments to evaluate the effect of a radiation field on the uniform corrosion rate of the copper-base materials in repository-relevant aqueous environments are given as well as results of an electrochemical study of the copper-base materials in normal and concentrated J-13 water. Results of tests on the irradiation of J-13 water and on the subsequent formation of hydrogen peroxide are given. A theoretical study was initiated to predict the long-term corrosion behavior of copper in the repository. Tests were conducted to determine whether copper would adversely affect release rates of radionuclides to the environment because of degradation of the Zircaloy cladding. A manufacturing survey to determine the feasibility of producing copper containers utilizing existing equipment and processes was completed. The cost and availability of copper was also evaluated and predicted to the year 2000. Results of this feasibility assessment are summarized

  20. Example of a quality control operation performed on a nuclear reactor waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouguier, H.; Nomine, J.S.; Vaunois, P.

    1983-01-01

    The need has emerged to secure the possibility of the spot sampling and inspection of a package, in the production line or on its arrival at the disposal center. This external inspection (or superinspection) has a threefold objective: to check the conformity of the package and of all its components with the mechanical, chemical and radiochemical specifications; to ensure, by thorough inspection, that the product is similar to the product which was characterized and qualified, and which secured ANDRA's approval of the process; and, through the detection of any variations and discrepancies, to advise the process promoter and the research laboratories, so as to improve the process, the product and the specifications. This paper describes an operation of this type conducted in 1982 by ANDRA, with the help of the CEA's laboratories and technical units, on low and medium-level waste packages produced by an industrial installation in an EDF nuclear power plant. The following are described: dismantling and sampling methods implemented, means employed, and the specific characteristics tested and the first results obtained

  1. Nuclear criticality safety analysis of a spent fuel waste package in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weren, B.H.; Capo, M.A.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-12-01

    An assessment has been performed of the criticality potential associated with the disposal of spent fuel in a tuff geology above the water table. Eleven potential configurations were defined which cover a vast range of geometries and conditions from the nominal configuration at emplacement to a hypothetical configuration thousands of years after emplacement in which the structure is gone, the fuel pellets disintegrated and the borehole flooded. Of these eleven configurations, four have been evaluated at this time. The results of this evaluation indicate that even with very conservative assumptions (4.5 w/o fresh fuel), criticality is not a problem for the nominal configuration either dry or fully flooded. In the cases where the condition of the waste package is assumed to have severely deteriorated, over long times, calculations were performed with less conservative assumptions (depleted fuel). An assessment of these calculations indicates that criticality safety could be demonstrated if the depletion of the fissile inventory during fuel irradiation is taken into account. A detailed discussion of the calculations performed is presented in this report. Also included are a description of the configurations which were considered, the analytical methods and models used, and a discussion of additional related work which should be performed. 15 references, 11 figures, 8 tables

  2. Feasibility study using hypothesis testing to demonstrate containment of radionuclides within waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to apply methods of statistical hypothesis testing to demonstrate the performance of containers of radioactive waste. The approach involves modeling the failure times of waste containers using Weibull distributions, making strong assumptions about the parameters. A specific objective is to apply methods of statistical hypothesis testing to determine the number of container tests that must be performed in order to control the probability of arriving at the wrong conclusions. An algorithm to determine the required number of containers to be tested with the acceptable number of failures is derived as a function of the distribution parameters, stated probabilities, and the desired waste containment life. Using a set of reference values for the input parameters, sample sizes of containers to be tested are calculated for demonstration purposes. These sample sizes are found to be excessively large, indicating that this hypothesis-testing framework does not provide a feasible approach for demonstrating satisfactory performance of waste packages for exceptionally long time periods

  3. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  4. W1045 environment surf drip shield and waste package outer barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1999-01-01

    The environments on the drip shield and waste package outer barrier are controlled by the compositions of the waters that contact these components. the temperature (T) of these components, and the effective relative humidity (RH) at these components. Because the composition of the waters that are expected to enter the emplacement drifts (either by seepage flow or by episodic flow) have not been specified: well J13 water was chosen as the reference water (Harrar 1990). Section 6.2 discusses the accessible RH for the temperatures of interest at the repository horizon. Section 6.3 discusses the adsorption of water on metal alloys in the absence of hygroscopic salts. Because the temperatures of the DSs and the WPOBs are higher than those of the surrounding near-field environment, the relative humidity at the DSs and the WPOBs will be lower than that of the surrounding near-field environment. This difference is a result of the water partial pressure in the drift being constant and no higher than the equilibrium water vapor pressure at the temperature of the drift wall

  5. FLOAT2 WP4: Development of Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Aarup, Bendt

    This report refers to complementary material testing to support the design and production of UHPC floaters for installation in the Wave Star Machine under FLOAT2 project. The main objective of WP4 is the characterization of mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced UHPC.......This report refers to complementary material testing to support the design and production of UHPC floaters for installation in the Wave Star Machine under FLOAT2 project. The main objective of WP4 is the characterization of mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced UHPC....

  6. Annotated bibliography for the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, K.J.; Miller, N.E.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography identifies documents that are pertinent to the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The bibliography is divided into fourteen subject categories so that anyone wishing to review the subject of leaching, for example, can turn to the leaching section and review the abstracts of reports which are concerned primarily with leaching. Abstracts are also cross referenced according to secondary subject matter so that one can get a complete list of abstracts for any of the fourteen subject categories. All documents which by their title alone appear to deal with the design of waste packages for the geologic disposal of spent fuel or high-level waste were obtained and reviewed. Only those documents which truly appear to be of interest to a waste package designer were abstracted. The documents not abstracted are listed in a separate section. There was no beginning date for consideration of a document for review. About 1100 documents were reviewed and about 450 documents were abstracted

  7. R and D applied to the non-destructive characterization of waste packages for long term storage or deep disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvache, P.; Perot, B.; Ma, J.L.; Pettier, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Dechets, DED, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Capdevila, J.M.; Huot, N. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares DDIN, 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France); Moulin, V. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique, de Technologie de l' Information LETI, DSYS, 38 (France)

    2001-07-01

    To ensure the quality and traceability of waste package management in the long term, knowledge on these packages is necessary so as to confirm their compliance to storage or disposal specifications. Research is focused on the management of the knowledge on these packages (fabrication means, materials contained,...) and on the acquisition, through measurement, of their characteristics. Within this context, many studies are underway at the CEA in the field of measurements so as to obtain non- destructive tools to access the parameters which allow the waste packages to be characterized. The two main R and D investigations concern: the nuclear measurement methods for the detection and quantification of radionuclides and of chemical elements considered as important for storage or disposal safety ; the measurement methods for the physical characteristics of the packages by high energy photon imaging, thus allowing pictures of the contents of large, high density and sometimes irradiating packages to be known. During the last five years, the research at the CEA focused on these two areas and resulted in a significant evolution in the non-destructive characterization means for long lived waste packages. (author)

  8. R and D applied to the non-destructive characterization of waste packages for long term storage or deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvache, P.; Perot, B.; Ma, J.L.; Pettier, J.L.; Capdevila, J.M.; Huot, N.; Moulin, V.

    2001-01-01

    To ensure the quality and traceability of waste package management in the long term, knowledge on these packages is necessary so as to confirm their compliance to storage or disposal specifications. Research is focused on the management of the knowledge on these packages (fabrication means, materials contained,...) and on the acquisition, through measurement, of their characteristics. Within this context, many studies are underway at the CEA in the field of measurements so as to obtain non- destructive tools to access the parameters which allow the waste packages to be characterized. The two main R and D investigations concern: the nuclear measurement methods for the detection and quantification of radionuclides and of chemical elements considered as important for storage or disposal safety ; the measurement methods for the physical characteristics of the packages by high energy photon imaging, thus allowing pictures of the contents of large, high density and sometimes irradiating packages to be known. During the last five years, the research at the CEA focused on these two areas and resulted in a significant evolution in the non-destructive characterization means for long lived waste packages. (author)

  9. Nuclear waste management technical support in the development of nuclear waste form criteria for the NRC. Task 1. Waste package overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayal, R.; Lee, B.S.; Wilke, R.J.; Swyler, K.J.; Soo, P.; Ahn, T.M.; McIntyre, N.S.; Veakis, E.

    1982-02-01

    In this report the current state of waste package development for high level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel in the US and abroad has been assessed. Specifically, reviewed are recent and on-going research on various waste forms, container materials and backfills and tentatively identified those which are likely to perform most satisfactorily in the repository environment. Radiation effects on the waste package components have been reviewed and the magnitude of these effects has been identified. Areas requiring further research have been identified. The important variables affecting radionuclide release from the waste package have been described and an evaluation of regulatory criteria for high level waste and spent fuel is presented. Finally, for spent fuel, high level, and TRU waste, components which could be used to construct a waste package having potential to meet NRC performance requirements have been described and identified.

  10. Nuclear waste management technical support in the development of nuclear waste form criteria for the NRC. Task 1. Waste package overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Lee, B.S.; Wilke, R.J.; Swyler, K.J.; Soo, P.; Ahn, T.M.; McIntyre, N.S.; Veakis, E.

    1982-02-01

    In this report the current state of waste package development for high level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel in the US and abroad has been assessed. Specifically, reviewed are recent and on-going research on various waste forms, container materials and backfills and tentatively identified those which are likely to perform most satisfactorily in the repository environment. Radiation effects on the waste package components have been reviewed and the magnitude of these effects has been identified. Areas requiring further research have been identified. The important variables affecting radionuclide release from the waste package have been described and an evaluation of regulatory criteria for high level waste and spent fuel is presented. Finally, for spent fuel, high level, and TRU waste, components which could be used to construct a waste package having potential to meet NRC performance requirements have been described and identified

  11. Level 4 Milestone (M4): M41UF033201 - Review of Radiolysis of Brines on the Surface of a Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-12

    This milestone report (M41UF033201) documents a literature review of relevant publications for gamma radiolysis occurring within a droplet of water on the outside of a waste package in a repository environment within the “

  12. Waste package transfer, emplacement and retrievability in the French deep geological repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roulet, Alain; Delort, Daniel; Herve, Jean Francois; Bosgiraud, Jean Michel; Guenin, Jean Jacques [Technical Department ANDRA (France)

    2009-06-15

    Safe, reliable and reversible handling of waste is a significant issue related to the design and safety assessment of deep geological repository in France. The first step taken was to study various waste handling solutions. ANDRA also decided to fabricate and demonstrate industrial scale handling equipment for HLW (since 2003) and for ILW-LL wastes (since 2008). We will review the main equipment developed for the transfer process in the repository, for both types of waste, and underline the benefits of developing industrial demonstrators within the framework of international cooperation agreements. Waste retrieval capability will be simultaneously examined. Two types of waste have to be handled underground in Andra's repository. The HLW disposal package for vitrified waste is a 2 ton carbon steel cylindrical canister with a diameter of 600 mm. The weight of ILW-LL concrete disposal packages range from a minimum of 6 tonnes to over 20 tonnes, and their volume from approximately 5 to 10 m3. The underground transfer to the disposal drift requires moving the disposal package within a shielded transfer cask placed on a trailer. Transfer cask design has evolved since 2005, due to optimisation studies and as a result of industrial feedback from SKB. For HLW handling equipment two design options have been studied. In the first solution (Andra's Dossier 2005), the waste package are emplaced, one at a time, in the disposal drift by a pushing robot. Successive steps in design and proto-typing have lead to improve the design of the equipment and to gain confidence. Recently a fully integrated process has been successfully demonstrated, at full scale, (in a 100 m long mock up drift) as part of the EC funded ESDRED Project. This demonstrator is now on display in Andra's Technology Centre at Saudron, near the Bure Underground Laboratory. The second disposal option which has been investigated is based on a concept of utilising an external apparatus to push a row of

  13. WP2 Annual Report 1st year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2006-01-01

    This report constitutes a contribution to the consolidated annual report covering the activities in SAFEDOR for the first year (1/2-2005 to 1/2-2006). The report deals in five separate chapters one for each of the five subprojects. The objectives of WP2 are • To develop and / or refine such advan...

  14. Examining Design Factors for Safe and Effective Hydrogen Vents for Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of a nuclear renaissance, and the possibility of large scale new build to meet both the concerns of the environmental lobby and the economic imperatives created by the political hostage taking of unreliable fossil fuel markets throughout the world, coupled with the need to resolve issues still outstanding from a previous generation of wastes create the need for a widely accepted understanding of the needs for venting waste packages which are being prepared for term storage. In the US the technologies to immobilising the legacy wastes are being developed, in the UK the NDA is gearing up to decommission a range of sites and throughout Europe facilities are being demolished and the wastes taken to term storage. In several cases, the waste containers require venting, both to allow the thermal relief of the container during climatic variation and to allow the venting of generated gases from radiolysis, decomposition and corrosion of the contents, including Hydrogen and Hydrocarbons. The paper will examine the disparate demands of the market place, and propose strategies to rationalise the specification of filter breathers so that both producers and users have a common framework from which to determine their individual venting needs. Examining the mutually exclusive demands of permeability (affecting both pressure differential and Hydrogen diffusion) and filtration efficiency, the paper will explore economic solutions in an attempt to provide a framework against which the large number of waste containers requiring venting in the future can have their vent filters designed to meet both the best possible combination of efficiency and permeability, as well as exploring the limits of knowledge of corrosion of the filter media and suggesting strategies to tackle the possibility of the filter media failing before the waste container, and the consequences of such an event. (authors)

  15. Interpretation of non destructive combined nuclear measurements for the characterization of radioactive wastes and waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoux, Anne-Cecile

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear industry produces radioactive waste and is faced with the problem of their management, especially for those which have a long radioactive decay time. In view to be able to define the best storage solution, alpha bearing solid waste are identified by different specific parameters (alpha, beta activities,... ). Then, the storage and cost optimizations are essential stakes. The quantification of these parameters can be obtained by the implementation of non destructive nuclear measurement methods generally associated with information from the manufacturing process of the waste. The works presented in this report are dedicated to two complementary aspects of the nuclear waste management issue. On the one hand, an experimental study concerning the possibilities of the prompt and delayed neutron counting with only one measurement result from neutron interrogation is presented. On the other hand, an interpretation method allowing the determination of the waste package specific parameters and their uncertainties has been developed. It is based on random trials which allow to describe the parameters as statistical distributions (Monte Carlo method). It was resulting in the realization of a software called RECITAL (information combination and solving process by random trials). This software was applied to the isotopic quantification of "2"3"5U and "2"3"9Pu from prompt and delayed signals of neutron interrogation. It was also used to demonstrate the complementarity of photofission interrogation with neutron interrogation in view to correct "2"3"8U interference on the delayed fission signal, especially when "2"3"8U contribution is similar to "2"3"5U and "2"3"9Pu ones. (author) [fr

  16. Development of waste package designs for disposal in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Three package design concepts were developed for CHLW and DHLW forms and spent fuel rods: (1) carbon steel overpack, borehole emplacement, (2) titanium clad, carbon steel reinforced overpack, borehole emplacement, and (3) carbon steel (self-shield) overpack, tunnel emplacement. For a DHLW canister with titanium clad overpack, the concept features a 9.5-cm-thick carbon steel overpack reinforcement supporting a 0.25-cm-thick titanium shell. The overall package dimensions are 84 cm diameter x 340 cm long weighing about 8.8 mtons. By contrast, a monolithic DHLW borehole package has a carbon steel overpack that is 10.4 cm thick, weighing about 9.3 mtons. The titanium clad/carbon steel reinforced borehole package is intended for remote emplacement in a vertical borehole in salt. The carbon steel overpack reinforcement provides structural integrity, primarily to resist external pressure, while the titanium overpack provides the necessary corrosion resistance to meet containment requirements. The carbon steel borehole package concept provides containment integrity for both external pressure and corrosion environments with a thicker carbon steel overpack in place of the titanium/carbon steel concept. A third concept utilizes an even greater thickness of cast steel or iron to resist external pressure and corrosion as well as reduce external shielding requirements. For example, a cast steel DHLW package would have overall dimensions of 125 cm diameter x 390 cm long, weighing 31 mtons. The purpose of this self-shield concept is to minimize handling and emplacement operations by reducing the package surface radiation dose to about 100 mrem/hr. In addition, it may serve as a shipping cask, thereby eliminating the need for a shielded hot cell at the repository for waste package assembly operations. 7 figures

  17. Radioactive waste packages stored at the Aube facility for low-intermediate activity wastes. A selective and controlled storage; Les colis de dechets radioactifs stockes au centre de stockage FMA de l'Aube. Une stockage selectif et maitrise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The waste package is the first barrier designed to protect the man and the environment from the radioactivity contained in wastes. Its design is thus particularly stringent and controlled. This brochure describes the different types of packages for low to intermediate activity wastes like those received and stored at the Aube facility, and also the system implemented by the ANDRA (the French national agency of radioactive wastes) and by waste producers to safely control each step of the design and fabrication of these packages. (J.S.)

  18. FDS3 simulations of indoor hydrocarbon fires engulfing radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, W.; Roewekamp, M.; Kunze, V.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment of a hypothetical large indoor hydrocarbon pool fire is more complex compared to outdoor fires and can be more severe for engulfed objects. In order to analyze potential thermal environments for interim storage of spent fuel casks or low-level radioactive waste packages engulfed in pool fires numerical simulations with the CFD fire code FDS3 were carried out for different storage configurations. In addition, data of indoor pool fire experiments were used to validate the model for this type of application. A series of pool fire experiments under different ventilation conditions and varied pool surface (1 m 2 - 4 m 2 ) inside a compartment of 3.6 m x 3.6 m x 5.7 m was conducted at iBMB (Institut fuer Baustoffe, Massivbau und Brandschutz) of Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany. The instrumentation included thermocouples, heatflux and pressure gauges, bi-directional flow probes and gas concentration measurements. A mock low-level waste drum equipped with outside and inside thermocouples was positioned as an additional heat sink near the fire source. Two of these experiments have recently been used for benchmarking a number of fire simulation codes within the International Collaborative Fire Model Project (ICFMP). FDS3 simulations by GRS of some of the above mentioned experiments will be presented showing the ability of the model to sufficiently well represent the fire environment in most cases. Further simulations were performed for hypothetical pool fire environments in interim storage facilities for German spent fuel transport and storage casks. The resulting temperature curves were then used for the thermomechanical analysis of the cask reaction performed by BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, see corresponding conference paper by Wieser et al.). The FDS3 pool fire simulations show that the fire environment is strongly influenced by the ventilation conditions and cooling effects depending on the number and

  19. Long-term corrosion behaviour of low-/medium-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendras, M.; Bach, F.W.; Behrens, S.; Birr, Ch.; Hassel, Th.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Storage of low- and medium-level radioactive waste requires safe packages. This means that all materials used for the manufacturing of such packages have to show a sufficient resistance especially against corrosive attacks. Since these packages are generally made from carbon steel an additional coating for corrosion protection - mainly solvent-based polymers - is necessary. However, it is not enough to consider the selection and combination of the materials. Regarding the construction and manufacturing of corrosion-resistant drums for low- and medium-level radioactive waste there also has to be paid closer attention to the joining technologies such as welding. For lifetime prediction of low-/medium-level waste packages reliable experimental data concerning the long-term corrosion behaviour of each material as well as of the components is needed. Therefore sheet metals from carbon steel were galvanized or coated with different solvent-based and water-based corrosion protection materials (epoxy as well as silicone resins). After damaging the anti-corrosion coating of some of these sheets with predefined scratches sets of these samples were stored at higher temperatures in climatic chamber, in simulated waste or aged according to standard DIN EN ISO 9227. All corrosion damages were analyzed by means of metallography (light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy of micro-sections). The quantitative influence of the corrosive attacks on the mechanical properties of the materials was examined by mechanical testing according to DIN EN 10002. Besides reduction of tensile strength drastic reduction of percentage of elongation after fracture (from 30 % to 10 %) was found. Further experiments were carried out using components or scaled-down drums joined by means of innovative welding techniques such as Cold Arc or Force Arc. The relevant welding parameters (e.g. welding current, proper volume of shielding gas or wire feed) were

  20. Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100 degree C. 52 refs., 9 figs

  1. Implementation of Work Package 7 (WP7) - a condition for achieving the CORONA project goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsakov, T.; Ilieva, M.; Miteva, R.

    2013-01-01

    Project CORONA 'Construction of a regional center for WWER competencies and nuclear technology' is a three year project co-funded by the European Commission coordinated by Kozloduy NPP and another 10 participants from eight countries. Work Package 7 (WP7) - 'Assessment and recommendations for sustainable development of regional Center for WWER nuclear technology and competence', aims to summarize and analyzing the results of the implementation of activities within the defined work packages: WP1 - Identification of training needs for all target groups; WP2 - Creating a scheme for training of nuclear scientists and researchers with the technology of WWER; WP3 - Create a schedule for training of non-nuclear specialists and subcontractors with the basics of technology WWER; WP4 - Establishing a scheme for specialized training of students with technology WWER; WP5 - Creation of a scheme for implementing and enhancing safety culture; WP6 - Creating a portal for knowledge management technology with WWER; Analysis of the results of the activity should provide conditions for creation of conditions for continued development of a regional center for obtaining and maintaining the knowledge of professionals applying WWER technology by integrating the experience of different organizations, research centers and the WWER units, in the process of creating frames for maintenance and development of this technology. By establishing the regional center will be unified schemes for qualification of personnel applying WWER technology in accordance with the standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the generally accepted criteria for education and vocational training in the European Community. Integrating the experience of different organizations NPP and research centers will enable to define schemes and programs for continuous education and training to be recognized in the EU from around the nuclear sector and the European Credit System for Vocational

  2. Considerations on the activity concentration determination method for low-level waste packages and nuclide data comparison between different countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, M.; Mueller, W.

    2000-01-01

    In low-level waste disposal, acceptable activity concentration limits are regulated for individual nuclides and groups of nuclides according to the conditions of each disposal site. Such regulated limits principally concern total alpha and beta /gamma activity as well as nuclides such as C-14, Ni-63, and Pu-238 which are long-lived and difficult to measure (hereinafter referred to as difficult-to-measure nuclides). Before waste packages are transported to the disposal site, the activities or activity concentrations of the regulated nuclides and groups of nuclides in the waste packages must be assessed and declared. A generally applicable theoretical method to determine these activities is lacking at present. Therefore, to meet this requirement, for NPP waste each country independently samples actual waste and carries out radiochemical analyses on these samples. The activity concentrations of difficult-to-measure nuclides are then determined by statistical correlation of the measured data between difficult-to-measure nuclides and Co-60 and Cs-137 which are measurable from outside the waste packages (hereinafter referred to as key nuclides). This method is called 'Scaling Factor Method'. It is widely adopted as a method for determining the activity concentrations of the limited nuclides in low-level waste packages from NPP, and it is also approved by responsible authorities in the respective country. In the past, each country independently determined scaling factors based on measurements on samples from the local NPPs. In the first part of this study, the possibility of an international scaling factor assessment using a database integrating data from different countries was studied by comparing radiochemical analysis data between Germany, Japan, and the United States. These countries have accumulated a large number of those nuclide data required to determine scaling factors. Statistical values such as correlation coefficients change with an accumulation of data. In

  3. Production controls (PC) and technical verification testing (TVT). A methodology for the control and tracking of LILW waste package conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, A.M.; Nieto, J.L.L.; Garrido, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    As part of its low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) characterisation and acceptance activities, ENRESA has set up a quality control programme that covers the different phases of radioactive waste package production and implies different levels of tracking in generation, assessment of activity and control of the documentation associated therewith. Furthermore, ENRESA has made available the mechanisms required for verification, depending on the results of periodic sampling, of the quality of the end product delivered by the waste producers. Both processes are included within the framework of two programmes of complementary activities: production controls (PC) and technical verification testing (TVT). (orig.)

  4. Nuclear energy - Waste-packages activity measurement - Part.1: high-resolution gamma spectrometry in integral mode with open geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ISO 14850:2004 describes a procedure for measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclide activity in homogeneous objects such as unconditioned waste (including process waste, dismantling waste, etc.), waste conditioned in various matrices (bitumen, hydraulic binder, thermosetting resins, etc.), notably in the form of 100 L, 200 L, 400 L or 800 L drums, and test specimens or samples, (vitrified waste), and waste packaged in a container, notably technological waste. It also specifies the calibration of the gamma spectrometry chain. The gamma energies used generally range from 0,05 MeV to 3 MeV. (authors)

  5. SKB WP-cave project. Radionuclide release from the near-field in a WP-cave repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.

    1989-04-01

    The release of radionuclides from the bentonite-sand barrier (near-field) in a WP-cave repository for high level radioactive waste has been studied. Calculations were made for two cases; a Low Flow Through Case and a High Flow Through Case. The difference between the two cases lies in the assumed hydraulic properties of the bentonite-sand barrier and the system inside the barrier. The effect on the nuclide release of solubility limitations, sorption capacity of the barriers, radiolytic fuel oxidation rate as well as the thickness of the bentonite-sand barrier, were also investigated for the Low Flow Through Case. (authors)

  6. Analysis and evaluation of a radioactive waste package retrieved from the Farallon Islands 900-meter disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Kendig, M.W.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was given a Congressional mandate to develop criteria and regulations governing the ocean disposal of all forms of waste. The EPA taken an active role both nationally and within the international nuclear regulatory community to develop the effective controls necessary to protect the health and safety of man and the marine environment. The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) first initiated feasibility studies to determine whether current technologies could be applied toward determining the fate of radioactive waste disposed of in the past. After successfully locating actual radioactive waste packages in formerly used disposal sites, in the United States, the Office of Radiation Programs developed an intensive program of site characterization studies to examine biological, chemical and physical characteristics including evaluations of the concentration and distribution of radionuclides within these sites, and has conducted a performance evaluation of past packaging techniques and materials. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed container corrosion and matrix analysis studies on the recovered radioactive waste packages. This report presents the final results of laboratory analyses performed. 17 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Analysis and evaluation of a radioactive waste package retrieved from the Farallon Islands 900-meter disposal site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, P.; Kendig, M.W.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was given a Congressional mandate to develop criteria and regulations governing the ocean disposal of all forms of waste. The EPA taken an active role both nationally and within the international nuclear regulatory community to develop the effective controls necessary to protect the health and safety of man and the marine environment. The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) first initiated feasibility studies to determine whether current technologies could be applied toward determining the fate of radioactive waste disposed of in the past. After successfully locating actual radioactive waste packages in formerly used disposal sites, in the United States, the Office of Radiation Programs developed an intensive program of site characterization studies to examine biological, chemical and physical characteristics including evaluations of the concentration and distribution of radionuclides within these sites, and has conducted a performance evaluation of past packaging techniques and materials. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed container corrosion and matrix analysis studies on the recovered radioactive waste packages. This report presents the final results of laboratory analyses performed. 17 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Combined analytical model for preformance assessment of the waste package/geologic medium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.K.; Nair, S.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    For sparsely soluble isotopes leaching rates are probably controlled by solubility limits. For a situation like this backfill provides a significant resistance to escape of nuclides from the repository. Isotope 129 I shows significant concentration level at a 10 km downstream distance. For this isotope the backfill thickness of 0.25 m used in the test case is not sufficient to reduce the concentration to an insignificant level. Materials for backfill and thickness of the backfill probably have to be chosen from the consideration of nuclides like 129 I. The three dimensional transport model used here provides a relatively more accurate estiamtes of concentration levels and discharge rates than the one dimensional model

  9. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of glass commercial high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable to the reference glass composition described in PNL-3838 and carbon steel canister described in ONWI-438. They provide preliminary numerical values for the commercial high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses and regulatory requirements become available. 13 references, 1 figure

  10. Repository environmental parameters and models/methodologies relevant to assessing the performance of high-level waste packages in basalt, tuff, and salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claiborne, H.C.; Croff, A.G.; Griess, J.C.; Smith, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    This document provides specifications for models/methodologies that could be employed in determining postclosure repository environmental parameters relevant to the performance of high-level waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at Richland, Washington, the tuff at Yucca Mountain by the Nevada Test Site, and the bedded salt in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Guidance is provided on the identify of the relevant repository environmental parameters; the models/methodologies employed to determine the parameters, and the input data base for the models/methodologies. Supporting studies included are an analysis of potential waste package failure modes leading to identification of the relevant repository environmental parameters, an evaluation of the credible range of the repository environmental parameters, and a summary of the review of existing models/methodologies currently employed in determining repository environmental parameters relevant to waste package performance. 327 refs., 26 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Repository environmental parameters and models/methodologies relevant to assessing the performance of high-level waste packages in basalt, tuff, and salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claiborne, H.C.; Croff, A.G.; Griess, J.C.; Smith, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    This document provides specifications for models/methodologies that could be employed in determining postclosure repository environmental parameters relevant to the performance of high-level waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at Richland, Washington, the tuff at Yucca Mountain by the Nevada Test Site, and the bedded salt in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Guidance is provided on the identify of the relevant repository environmental parameters; the models/methodologies employed to determine the parameters, and the input data base for the models/methodologies. Supporting studies included are an analysis of potential waste package failure modes leading to identification of the relevant repository environmental parameters, an evaluation of the credible range of the repository environmental parameters, and a summary of the review of existing models/methodologies currently employed in determining repository environmental parameters relevant to waste package performance. 327 refs., 26 figs., 19 tabs

  12. Experimental study on the properties of drum-packed, cement solidified waste package of pre and after sea dumping test of sea depth 30m and 100m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Yasuro; Abe, Hirotoshi; Hattori, Seiichi

    1976-01-01

    Japan Marine Science and Technology Center has been tackling with the development of the monitoring system to confirm the soundness of drum-packed, cement-solidified low level radioactive waste (the package) during falling and after reaching at sea bed when it is dumped into sea. The test was carried out at Sagami Bay of 30 m and 100 m sea depth using non-radioactive packages. The observation of the falling behaviour of packages in sea was carried out by taking photographs of the motion of packages with an underwater 16 mm movie camera and an underwater industrial TV (ITV), and the observation of the soundness and the area of packages scattered on sea bed was carried out with an underwater ITV and an underwater 70 mm snap camera which were set up on the frame. The proportion of cement-solidified waste was decided so that the uni-axial compressive strength of the cement-solidified waste satisfies the condition of ''The tentative guideline''. Prior to tests at sea, hydrostatic pressure test of packages are carried out on land. After that, core specimens were sampled to obtain the uniaxial compressive strength from packages and were tested. After sea dumping tests, 6 packages were recovered from sea bed, and the soundness were tested. As the results, the deformation and damage of drums and cement solidified waste packages did not occur at all. (Kako, I.)

  13. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of Westinghouse Electric Corporation's report on reference conceptual designs for a repository waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rote, D.M.; Hull, A.B.; Was, G.S.; Macdonald, D.D.; Wilde, B.E.; Russell, J.E.; Kruger, J.; Harrison, W.; Hambley, D.F.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the findings of the peer panel constituted by Argonne National Laboratory to review Region A of Westinghouse Electric Corporation's report entitled Waste Package Reference Conceptual Designs for a Repository in Salt. The panel determined that the reviewed report does not provide reasonable assurance that US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for waste packages will be met by the proposed design. It also found that it is premature to call the design a ''reference design,'' or even a ''reference conceptual design.'' This review report provides guidance for the preparation of a more acceptable design document

  14. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of Westinghouse Electric Corporation's report on reference conceptual designs for a repository waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rote, D.M.; Hull, A.B.; Was, G.S.; Macdonald, D.D.; Wilde, B.E.; Russell, J.E.; Kruger, J.; Harrison, W.; Hambley, D.F.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the findings of the peer panel constituted by Argonne National Laboratory to review Region A of Westinghouse Electric Corporation's report entitled Waste Package Reference Conceptual Designs for a Repository in Salt. The panel determined that the reviewed report does not provide reasonable assurance that US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for waste packages will be met by the proposed design. It also found that it is premature to call the design a ''reference design,'' or even a ''reference conceptual design.'' This review report provides guidance for the preparation of a more acceptable design document.

  15. Role of waste packages in the safety of a high level waste repository in a deep geological formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretheau, F.; Lewi, J.

    1990-06-01

    The safety of a radioactive waste disposal facility lays on the three following barriers placed between the radioactive materials and the biosphere: the waste package; the engineered barriers; the geological barrier. The function assigned to each of these barriers in the performance assessment is an option taken by the organization responsible for waste disposal management (ANDRA in France), which must show that: expected performances of each barrier (confinement ability, life-time, etc.) are at least equal to those required to fulfill the assigned function; radiation protection requirements are met in all situations considered as credible, whether they be the normal situation or random event situations. The French waste management strategy is based upon two types of disposal depending on the nature and activity of waste packages: - surface disposal intended for low and medium level wastes having half-lives of about 30 years or less and alpha activity less than 3.7 MBq/kg (0.1 Ci/t), for individual packages and less than 0.37 MBq/kg (0.01 Ci/t) in the average. Deep geological disposal intended for TRU and high level wastes. The conditions of acceptance of packages in a surface disposal site are subject to the two fundamental safety rules no. I.2 and III.2.e. The present paper is only dealing with deep geological disposal. For deep geological repositories, three stages are involved: stage preceding definitive disposal (intermediate storage, transportation, handling, setting up in the disposal cavities); stage subsequent to definitive sealing of the disposal cavities but prior to the end of operation of the repository; stage subsequent to closure of the repository. The role of the geological barrier has been determined as the essential part of long term radioactivity confinement, by a working group, set up by the French safety authorities. Essential technical criteria relating to the choice of a site so defined by this group, are the following: very low permeability

  16. Methodology for predicting the life of waste-package materials, and components using multifactor accelerated life tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.E.; Cote, R.W.

    1983-09-01

    Accelerated life tests are essential for estimating the service life of waste-package materials and components. A recommended methodology for generating accelerated life tests is described in this report. The objective of the methodology is to define an accelerated life test program that is scientifically and statistically defensible. The methodology is carried out using a select team of scientists and usually requires 4 to 12 man-months of effort. Specific agendas for the successive meetings of the team are included in the report for use by the team manager. The agendas include assignments for the team scientists and a different set of assignments for the team statistician. The report also includes descriptions of factorial tables, hierarchical trees, and associated mathematical models that are proposed as technical tools to guide the efforts of the design team

  17. Destructive and non-destructive tests for radioactive waste packages Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-89) No 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odoj, R.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary waste acceptance requirements quality control of radioactive waste has to be performed prior to interim storage or final disposal. The quality control can either be achieved by random tests on conditioned radioactive waste packages or by process qualification of the conditioning processes. One of the most important criteria is the activity of the radioactive waste product or packages. To get some first information on the waste package γ-spectrometric measurement is performed as non-destructive test. Besides the γ-emitting nuclides the α and β-emitting nuclides can be estimated by calculation if the waste was generated in nuclear power plants and the nuclide relations are known. If the non-destructive determination of nuclides is not sufficient or the non-radioactive content of the waste packages has to be identified sampling from the waste packages has to be performed. This can best be done by core drilling. To avoid the need of water for cooling the drill head, air cooled core drilling is investigated. As mixed wastes is not allowed for final disposal the determination of possible organic toxic materials like PCB, dioxin and furane-compounds in cemented wastes is conducted by GC-MS-investigations. For getting more knowledge in the field of process qualification concerning super compaction, instrumentation of the super compaction process is investigated and tested

  18. The FP7 collaborative project RECOSY - a comprehensive information management system for european disposal R and D (INMAN): a proposal for the next European framework program - 59397

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckau, Gunnar; ); Delos, Anne; Montoya, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The Collaborative Project Redox phenomena Controlling Systems (RECOSY) started in 2008 falls within the EURATOM program and is implemented within the 7. Framework Program. The main objective of ReCosy is the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment/Safety Case. Although redox is not a new issue, different questions are still not resolved, such as, redox processes in the long-term dissolution/ chemical transformation of the radioactive waste, waste packages and engineered barriers, and migration in the far-field, including which species are formed and their respective various retention mechanisms. In order to solve this questions, the project includes i) development of advanced analytical tools, ii) investigations of processes responsible for redox control (thermodynamically and kinetically controlled processes, surface reactions and microbial processes), iii) provision of required data on redox controlling processes, and iv) response to internal/external disturbances in disposal systems to internal/external disturbances. The work program of the project is structured along six Research and Technological Development work-packages. Specific Work-packages on knowledge management, education and training (WP7) and administrative management issues (WP8) are also included in the project. In WP1, the scientific state-of-the-art and its application to Performance Assessment/Safety Case is documented and regularly up-dated, based on the safety case of the ANDRA B2 cell. WP2 deals with the development and testing of redox determination methods using different type of electrodes

  19. Yucca Mountain engineered barrier system corrosion model (EBSCOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Kessler, J.H.; Apted, M.

    2008-01-01

    A revised engineered barrier system model has been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute to predict the time dependence of the failure of the drip shields and waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The revised model is based on new information on various corrosion processes developed by the US Department of Energy and others and for a 20-mm-thick waste package design with a double closure lid system. As with earlier versions of the corrosion model, the new EBSCOM code produces a best-estimate of the failure times of the various barriers. The model predicts that only 15% of waste packages will fail within a period of 1 million years. The times for the first corrosion failures are 40,000 years, 336,000 years, and 375,000 years for the drip shield, waste package, and combination of drip shield and the associated waste package, respectively

  20. CAMEX-4 NOAA WP-3D VIDEO V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 NOAA WP-3D Video dataset was collected during the fourth field campaign in the CAMEX series (CAMEX-4), which ran from 16 August to 25 September, 2001 and...

  1. Verification of the 2.00 WAPPA-B [Waste Package Performance Assessment-B version] code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylock, B.; Jansen, G.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-07-01

    The old version of the Waste Package Performance Assessment (WAPPA) code has been modified into a new code version, 2.00 WAPPA-B. The input files and the results for two benchmarks at repository conditions are fully documented in the appendixes of the EA reference report. The 2.00 WAPPA-B version of the code is suitable for computation of barrier failure due to uniform corrosion; however, an improved sub-version, 2.01 WAPPA-B, is recommended for general use due to minor errors found in 2.00 WAPPA-B during its verification procedures. The input files and input echoes have been modified to include behavior of both radionuclides and elements, but the 2.00 WAPPA-B version of the WAPPA code is not recommended for computation of radionuclide releases. The 2.00 WAPPA-B version computes only mass balances and the initial presence of radionuclides that can be released. Future code development in the 3.00 WAPPA-C version will include radionuclide release computations. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  2. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  3. Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-01

    In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  5. Conceptual designs for waste packages for horizontal or vertical emplacement in a repository in salt for reference in the site characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report includes the options of horizontal and vertical emplacement, the addition of a phased repository, an additional waste form (intact spent fuel), revised geotechnical data appropriate for the Deaf Smith County site, new corrosion data for the container, and new repository design data. The waste package consists of waste form and canister within a thick-walled, low-carbon steel container surrounded by packing. The container is a hollow cylinder with a flat head welded to each end. The design concepts for the waste container or vertical and horizontal emplacement are identical. This report discusses the results of analyses of aspects of the reference waste package concept needing changes because of new data and information believed applicable to the Deaf Smith County site. Included are waste package conceptual designs or (1) the reference defense high-level waste form from the Savannah River Plant; (2) intact spent fuel with our pressurized-water-reactor or nine boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 1 of repository operation; and (3) spent fuel which has been disassembled and consolidated into a segmented cylindrical canister with rods from either 12 pressurized-water-reactor or 30 boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 2. 30 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs

  6. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives

  7. Using depleted uranium to shield vitrified high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Gildea, P.D.; Bernard, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The underlying report for this paper evaluates options for using depleted uranium as shielding materials for transport systems for disposal of vitrified high-level waste (VHLW). In addition, economic analyses are presented to compare costs associated with these options to costs, associated with existing and proposed storage, transport, and diposal capabilities. A more detailed evaluation is provided elsewhere. (Yoshimura et al. 1995.)

  8. Comparison of mutagenic efficiency of decay of 32P incorporated in E.Coli WP-2 and E.Coli WP-2S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluciennik, H.

    1975-01-01

    32 P-labelled Escherichia coli WP-2 and Escherichia coli WP-2S cells were stored at -196 0 . The lethal effect induced by 32 P decay was equal in both strains. Lethal efficiency of 32 P→ 32 S transmutation in DNA amounted to 0.046. Reversion try→try + were induced with a ten times higher efficiency in UV-sensitive strain WP-2S, as compared with strain WP-2. (author)

  9. Comparison of mutagenic efficiency of decay of /sup 32/P incorporated in E. Coli WP-2 and E. Coli WP-2S cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluciennik, H [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Instytut Podstawowych Problemow Chemii

    1975-01-01

    Phosphorous-32 labelled Escherichia coli WP-2 and Escherichia coli WP-2S cells were stored at -196/sup 0/. The lethal effect induced by /sup 32/P decay was equal in both strains. Lethal efficiency of /sup 32/P..-->../sup 32/S transmutation in DNA amounted to 0.046. Reversion try..-->..try/sup +/ were induced with a ten times higher efficiency in uv-sensitive strain WP-2S, as compared with strain WP-2.

  10. Application of thermodynamics to the estimation of the biodegradation of bitumen wastes package underground stored

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.F.; Besnainou, B.

    2001-01-01

    A modelling approach to evaluate microbial activity in a geological system is adopted. It focusses upon the availability of key nutrients (C, H, O, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The model is applied to determine the possible consequences of such microbiological activity in the presence of bitumen embedded waste in a repository for low - and intermediate - level waste. Taking into account this particular environment, thermodynamic and experimental results are given in terms of gas and organic complexant production. (authors)

  11. Modelling approach to evaluate safety of LILW-SL disposal in slovenia considering different waste packaging options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perko, J.; Mallants, D.

    2007-01-01

    The long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories is usually demonstrated by means of a safety assessment which normally includes modelling of radionuclide release from a multi-barrier surface or deep repository to the geosphere and biosphere. The present quantitative evaluation performed emphasizes on contrasting disposal options under consideration in Slovenia and concerns siting, disposal concept (deep versus surface), and waste packaging. The assessment has identified a number of conditions that would lead to acceptable waste disposal solutions, while at the same time results also revealed options that would result in exceeding the radiological criteria. Results presented are the output of a collective effort of a Quintessa-led Consortium with SCK-CEN and Belgatom, in the framework of a recent PHARE project. The key objective of this work was to identify the preferred disposal concept and packaging option from a number of alternatives being considered by the Slovenian radioactive waste management agency (ARAO) for low and intermediate level short-lived waste (LILW-SL). The emphasis of the assessment was the consideration of several waste treatment and packaging options in an attempt to identify the minimum required containment characteristics which would result in safe disposal and the cost-benefit of additional safety measures. Waste streams for which alternative treatment and packaging solutions were developed and evaluated include decommissioning waste and NPP operational wastes containing drums with unconditioned ion exchange resins in overpacked tube type containers (TTCs). For the former the disposal options under consideration were either direct disposal of loose pieces grouted into a vault or use of high integrity containers. For the latter three options were foreseen. The first is overpacking of resin containing TTCs grouted into high integrity containers, the second option is complete treatment with hydration, neutralisation, and cementation of

  12. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, C A; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; Paraskevoulakos, C; Banos, A; Rennie, S; Jowsey, J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed.

  13. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Stitt

    Full Text Available Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed.

  14. Oxidation and waste-to-energy output of aluminium waste packaging during incineration: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Félix A; Román, Carlos Pérez; García-Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the oxidation behaviour and waste-to-energy output of different semi-rigid and flexible aluminium packagings when incinerated at 850°C in an air atmosphere enriched with 6% oxygen, in the laboratory setting. The physical properties of the different packagings were determined, including their metallic aluminium contents. The ash contents of their combustion products were determined according to standard BS ISO 1171:2010. The net calorific value, the required energy, and the calorific gain associated with each packaging type were determined following standard BS EN 13431:2004. Packagings with an aluminium lamina thickness of >50μm did not fully oxidise. During incineration, the weight-for-weight waste-to-energy output of the packagings with thick aluminium lamina was lower than that of packagings with thin lamina. The calorific gain depended on the degree of oxidation of the metallic aluminium, but was greater than zero for all the packagings studied. Waste aluminium may therefore be said to act as an energy source in municipal solid waste incineration systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Waste package performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.H.; Stula, R.T.; Kirstein, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been applied to several package designs. The resulting preliminary assessments were intended for use in making decisions about package development programs. A computer model called BARIER estimates the package life and subsequent rate of release of selected nuclides. The model accounts for temperature, pressure (and resulting stresses), bulk and localized corrosion, and nuclide retardation by the backfill after water intrusion into the waste form. The assessment model assumes a post-closure, flooded, geologic repository. Calculations indicated that, within the bounds of model assumptions, packages could last for several hundred years. Intact backfills of appropriate design may be capable of nuclide release delay times on the order of 10 7 yr for uranium, plutonium, and americium. 8 references, 6 figures, 9 tables

  16. Waste Package Misload Probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to calculate the probability of occurrence for fuel assembly (FA) misloads (i.e., Fa placed in the wrong location) and FA damage during FA movements. The scope of this calculation is provided by the information obtained from the Framatome ANP 2001a report. The first step in this calculation is to categorize each fuel-handling events that occurred at nuclear power plants. The different categories are based on FAs being damaged or misloaded. The next step is to determine the total number of FAs involved in the event. Using the information, a probability of occurrence will be calculated for FA misload and FA damage events. This calculation is an expansion of preliminary work performed by Framatome ANP 2001a

  17. Synthesis of knowledge on the long-term behaviour of concretes. Applications to cemented waste packages; Synthese des connaissances sur le comportement a long terme des betons. Application aux colis cimentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richet, C.; Galle, C.; Le Bescop, P.; Peycelon, H.; Bejaoui, S.; Tovena, I.; Pointeau, I.; L' Hostis, V.; Levera, P

    2004-03-01

    As stipulated in the former law of December 91 relating to 'concrete waste package', a progress report (phenomenological reference document) was first provided in 1999. The objective was to make an assessment of the knowledge acquired on the long-term behaviour of cement-based waste packages in the context of deep disposal and/or interim storage. The present document is an updated summary report. It takes into account a new knowledge assessment, considers coupled mechanisms and should contribute to the first performance studies (operational calculations). Handling and radio-nuclides (RN) confinement are the two major functional properties requested from the concrete used for the waste packages. In unsaturated environment (interim storage/disposal prior to closing), the main problem is the generation of cracks in the material. This aspect is a key parameter from the mechanical point of view (retrievability). It can have a major impact on the disposal phase (confinement). In saturated environment (disposal post-closing phase), the main concern is the chemical degradation of the waste package concrete submitted to underground waters leaching. In this context, the major thema are: the durability of the concretes under water (chemical degradation) and in unsaturated medium (corrosion of reinforcement), matter transport, RN retention, chemistry / transport / mechanical couplings. On the other hand, laboratory data on the behaviour of concretes are used to evaluate the RN source term of waste packages in function of time (concrete waste package OPerational Model, i.e. 'Concrete MOP'). The 'MOP' provides the physico-chemical description of the RN release in relationship with the waste package degradation itself. This description is based on simplified phenomenology for which only dimensioning mechanisms are taken into account. The use of Diffu-Ca code (basic module for the MOP) on the CASTEM numerical plate-form, already allows operational

  18. Synthesis of knowledge on the long-term behaviour of concretes. Applications to cemented waste packages; Synthese des connaissances sur le comportement a long terme des betons. Application aux colis cimentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richet, C; Galle, C; Le Bescop, P; Peycelon, H; Bejaoui, S; Tovena, I; Pointeau, I; L' Hostis, V; Levera, P

    2004-03-01

    As stipulated in the former law of December 91 relating to 'concrete waste package', a progress report (phenomenological reference document) was first provided in 1999. The objective was to make an assessment of the knowledge acquired on the long-term behaviour of cement-based waste packages in the context of deep disposal and/or interim storage. The present document is an updated summary report. It takes into account a new knowledge assessment, considers coupled mechanisms and should contribute to the first performance studies (operational calculations). Handling and radio-nuclides (RN) confinement are the two major functional properties requested from the concrete used for the waste packages. In unsaturated environment (interim storage/disposal prior to closing), the main problem is the generation of cracks in the material. This aspect is a key parameter from the mechanical point of view (retrievability). It can have a major impact on the disposal phase (confinement). In saturated environment (disposal post-closing phase), the main concern is the chemical degradation of the waste package concrete submitted to underground waters leaching. In this context, the major thema are: the durability of the concretes under water (chemical degradation) and in unsaturated medium (corrosion of reinforcement), matter transport, RN retention, chemistry / transport / mechanical couplings. On the other hand, laboratory data on the behaviour of concretes are used to evaluate the RN source term of waste packages in function of time (concrete waste package OPerational Model, i.e. 'Concrete MOP'). The 'MOP' provides the physico-chemical description of the RN release in relationship with the waste package degradation itself. This description is based on simplified phenomenology for which only dimensioning mechanisms are taken into account. The use of Diffu-Ca code (basic module for the MOP) on the CASTEM numerical plate-form, already allows operational predictions. (authors)

  19. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  20. Background studies in support of a feasibility assessment on the use of copper-base materials for nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Kundig, K.J.A.; Lyman, W.S.; Prager, M.; Meyers, J.R.; Servi, I.S.

    1990-06-01

    This report combines six work units performed in FY'85--86 by the Copper Development Association and the International Copper Research Association under contract with the University of California. The work includes literature surveys and state-of-the-art summaries on several considerations influencing the feasibility of the use of copper-base materials for fabricating high-level nuclear waste packages for the proposed repository in tuff rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The general conclusion from this work was that copper-base materials are viable candidates for inclusion in the materials selection process for this application. 55 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs

  1. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices

  2. HOW THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE DEVELOPED A NEW WASTE PACKAGE USING A POLYUREA COATING THAT IS SAFELY AND ECONOMICALLY ELIMINATING SIZE REDUCTION OF LARGE ITEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Kent A.; Hogue, Richard S.; Kimokeo, Margaret K.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major challenges involved in closing the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is the disposal of extremely large pieces of contaminated production equipment and building debris. Past practice has been to size reduce the equipment into pieces small enough to fit into approved, standard waste containers. Size reducing this equipment is extremely expensive, and exposes workers to high-risk tasks, including significant industrial, chemical, and radiological hazards. RFETS has developed a waste package using a Polyurea coating for shipping large contaminated objects. The cost and schedule savings have been significant

  3. Background studies in support of a feasibility assessment on the use of copper-base materials for nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Kundig, K.J.A.; Lyman, W.S.; Prager, M.; Meyers, J.R.; Servi, I.S. [CDA/INCRA Joint Advisory Group, Greenwich, CT (USA)

    1990-06-01

    This report combines six work units performed in FY`85--86 by the Copper Development Association and the International Copper Research Association under contract with the University of California. The work includes literature surveys and state-of-the-art summaries on several considerations influencing the feasibility of the use of copper-base materials for fabricating high-level nuclear waste packages for the proposed repository in tuff rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The general conclusion from this work was that copper-base materials are viable candidates for inclusion in the materials selection process for this application. 55 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. (02.2) Scoping experiments; (02.3) long-term corrosion testing and properties evaluation of candidate waste package basket material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKonynenburg, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The work described in this activity plan addresses Information Need 2.7.3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (l), which reads Determination that the design criteria in lOCFR60.130 through 60.133 and any appropriate additional design objectives pertaining to criticality control have been met. This work falls under section WBS 1.2.2.5 2 (Basket Materials) of WBS 1.2.2.5 (Waste Package Materials) in the Work Breakdown Structure of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

  5. Long-term behaviour of concrete: development of operational model to predict the evolution of its containment performance. Application to cemented waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peycelon, H.; Le Bescop, P.; Richet, C.; Adenot, F.

    2001-01-01

    In order to describe the main phenomena during different stages of cement waste packages life-time and to predict the long-term behaviour (containment performance) of concrete, coupled experiments and modelling studies are achieved. With respect to logical methodology, improvement of these studies is accomplished. Degradation of concrete in low mineralized, carbonated and sulfated water lead to an evolution of chemical characteristics (dissolution/precipitation of solid phases) and of transport properties which must be included or coupled in retention/transport modelling of radio nuclides to predict containment performance. (author)

  6. Reasoning about Grover's Quantum Search Algorithm using Probabilistic wp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, M.J.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    Grover's search algorithm is designed to be executed on a quantum mechanical computer. In this paper, the probabilistic wp-calculus is used to model and reason about Grover's algorithm. It is demonstrated that the calculus provides a rigorous programming notation for modelling this and other quantum

  7. Waste Generator Instructions: Key to Successful Implementation of the US DOE's 435.1 for Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions (LA-UR-12-24155) - 13218

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, David M.; Hayes, Timothy A.; Pope, Howard L.; Enriquez, Alejandro E.; Carson, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    In times of continuing fiscal constraints, a management and operation tool that is straightforward to implement, works as advertised, and virtually ensures compliant waste packaging should be carefully considered and employed wherever practicable. In the near future, the Department of Energy (DOE) will issue the first major update to DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This update will contain a requirement for sites that do not have a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste certification program to use two newly developed technical standards: Contact-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions and Remote-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions. The technical standards are being developed from the DOE O 435.1 Notice, Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging, approved August 2011. The packaging instructions will provide detailed information and instruction for packaging almost every conceivable type of transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at WIPP. While providing specificity, the packaging instructions leave to each site's own discretion the actual mechanics of how those Instructions will be functionally implemented at the floor level. While the Technical Standards are designed to provide precise information for compliant packaging, the density of the information in the packaging instructions necessitates a type of Rosetta Stone that translates the requirements into concise, clear, easy to use and operationally practical recipes that are waste stream and facility specific for use by both first line management and hands-on operations personnel. The Waste Generator Instructions provide the operator with step-by-step instructions that will integrate the sites' various operational requirements (e.g., health and safety limits, radiological limits or dose limits) and result in a WIPP certifiable waste and package that can be transported to and emplaced at WIPP. These little known but widely productive Waste

  8. Reports from dissemination and feed-back workshops with presentation of Volante results from WP1 and WP2, and response from local, regional, and national stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Pia; Vesterager, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Søren Bech Pilgaard

    2014-01-01

    The report constitutes an overview of the dissemination and feed-back workshops in the Volante case study countries: Netherlands, Romania, Austria, Greece and Denmark. The workshops were conducted based on the presentation of findings from WP1 and WP2 to national, regional and local stakeholders...

  9. WP6 - Application Integration, Trials and Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Neeli R.; Cetin, Bilge Kartal; Moran, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    of the Total cost of ownership (TCO) associated to RFID systems as well as to confirm the ease of implementation of ASPIRE open source software (OSS) components into current IT SME infrastructure.The different pilot trials described in this deliverable are the following: • A Logistics pilot for the packing...... industry to be setup at SENSAP S.A in Greece. • A pilot for company STAFF-Jeans SA, which focuses on two distinct yet complementary scenarios, namely logistics and retail scenarios for the apparel-textiles industry • PV Lab pilot, which is demonstration pilot that aims at showcasing the ASPIRE middleware....

  10. WP4 CASE STUDY Report: Living Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorland, Jens; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    Science Shops can be regarded as a platform for bringing together scientific analytical principles on the one hand, and the lay persons’ (with or without scientific background) knowledge about the issue on the other, thus contributing theoretically based systemization of lay knowledge or problem...... conception and lay insights on perceived problems to science. Science shops are an interesting entity to study to see what kind of long-term impacts they have implied as an initiative which has been running since the 80’ties, and how CSO’s have been empowered through the relationship with the university....

  11. [The Waste Package Project. Final report, July 1, 1995--February 27, 1996]: Volume 3, Stress study in faulted tunnel models by combined photoelastic measurements and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Nuclear Waste Package Project research at UNLV is to investigate the stresses in a model of a faulted mountain and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. An investigation was performed to develop a proper technique for analyzing the stresses in and around three adjacent scaled tunnel models, along with the stress concentration factors resulting from the existence of a fault that penetrates two of the three tunnels, at an inclined angel of 44 degrees to the horizontal plane. The results and experience gained from this investigation will be used in a future project in which a full-size repository drift and a penetrating fault will be modeled and analyzed

  12. Technical specifications for waste packages conditioned in a durable confining shell, with an hydraulic binder basis, intended to a ground disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this document is to precise the general and particular conditions for the acceptance on a ground disposal site of a low- and middle-level radioactive waste package conditioned in a durable confining shell. This specification concerns the wastes that contain beta and gamma decay radionuclides and/or long life alpha decay radionuclides in higher quantities than accepted for the protective coatings. Physico-chemical and mechanical specifications are given for the wastes, the fixing material, the confining shell and the container. Accepted limits for degassing and dose rates, surface contamination, dimensions and weight are given. The agreement is delivered by the ANDRA after the package has satisfied the different mechanical, chemical, fire, moisture and radiation resistance tests. (J.S.). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 1 glossary

  13. Low temperature resistivity plateau and non-saturating magnetoresistance in Type-II Weyl semimetal WP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, V.; Kumar, P.; Sudesh, Patnaik, S.

    2018-04-01

    We have studied the resistivity and magnetoresistance (MR) properties of the recently predicted type-II Weyl semimetal WP2. Polycrystalline WP2 is synthesized using solid state reaction and crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure with the Cmc21 spacegroup. The temperature dependent resistivity is enhanced with the application of magnetic field and a resistivity plateau is observed at low temperatures. We find a small dip in resistivity around 30K at 5T field suggesting that there might be a metal-insulator-like transition at higher magnetic fields. A non-saturating magnetoresistance is observed at low temperatures with maximum MR ˜ 94% at 2K and 6T. The value of MR decreases with the increase in temperature. We see a deviation from Kohler's power law which implies that the system comprises of two types of charge carriers.

  14. Environmental benefits of parking-integrated photovoltaics: A 222kWp experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano-Luján, Lucía; García-Valverde, Rafael; Espinosa, Nieves

    2015-01-01

    integration (in this case parking integration) have been quantified using a standard methodology for the calculation of several environmental parameters. Finally, the environmental benefits of renewable energy generation because of the savings of producing the same amount of electricity by the Spanish grid...... in the system, the energy payback time, and the energy return factor of the facility have been obtained and are 6.31TJ equivalent primary energy, 2.06 and 12.16years, respectively. The average performance ratio is 0.8 with a slight monthly variation. Additionally, the environmental benefits of the architectural......The life cycle assessment of a grid-connected, parking integrated, 222kWp cadmium telluride photovoltaic system has been performed. The system was built at the University of Murcia and has been monitored for 2.5years (sampling data every 5min). The detailed material inventory, the energy embedded...

  15. Migracja i edukacja: czy transnarodowe rodzicielstwo wpływa na osiągnięcia szkolne niemobilnych dzieci?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Walczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available W artykule została podjęta kwestia wpływu transnarodowej mobilności rodziców na osiągnięcia edukacyjne ich rezydentnych dzieci. Wyniki badań opisywanych w międzynarodowej literaturze nie są jednoznaczne, co wynika ze zróżnicowania wskaźników sukcesu edukacyjnego, specyfiki systemów edukacyjnych i struktury zmiennych niezależnych oraz pośredniczących uwzględnianych w analizach. Polskie badania opierają się niemal wyłącznie na nielosowych próbach nauczycieli i dyrektorów oraz nielicznych, regionalnych badaniach prowadzonych na próbach uczniów. W artykule wykorzystano dane zebrane w 2014 r. w ramach badania sondażowego przeprowadzonego na ogólnopolskiej losowej próbie 4169 uczniów w wieku 10–19 lat. Uzyskane wyniki wskazują na niekorzystny wpływ migracji pojedynczych rodziców (szczególnie matek w przypadku uczniów szkół podstawowych na wyniki oceniania wewnątrzszkolnego. W tej kategorii wieku wpływ jest porównywalny z dziedziczonym statusem wykształceniowym, lecz praktycznie zanika w starszych kohortach.

  16. Changing needs in a waste information management system: A disposer's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauver, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    An enhanced radioactive waste management information system (RWMIS) is currently under development to accommodate more specific reporting requirements. Radioactive waste management project (RWMP) has recently completed a draft revision of its Operational Radioactive Defense Waste Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site which identifies NTS waste acceptance criteria and revised data requirements for waste generators. Emphasis shifts to the characterization of individual waste packages. RWMP proposes that the waste generator number individual waste packages in a manner which identifies the generator, waste stream, container type, and method of treatment or stabilization. A listing of radionuclides and concentrations will be required, as well as physical and chemical data specific to each waste package. Analytical methods and techniques used for waste package characterization must be detailed by each generator in their quality assurance plan which is reviewed by DOE Nevada Operations Office

  17. TRIUMF - The Swedish data base system for radioactive waste in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogsberg, Marie; Andersson, Per-Anders

    2006-01-01

    All short lived LLW/ILW from the operation and maintenance of all Swedish Nuclear Power Plants are disposed in SFR, the Swedish final repository for radioactive operational waste. It is important to save all the information about radioactive waste that is needed now and in the future. To be secure that, we have developed a database system in Sweden called Triumf, consisting information about all the waste packages that are disposed in SFR. The waste producers register data concerning individual waste package during production. Before transport to SFR a data file with all information about the individual waste packages is transferred to Triumf. When transferred, the data are checked against accepted limitations before the waste can be loaded on the ship for transport to SFR. After disposal at SFR the deposition location in the repository is added to the database for each waste package. (author)

  18. An Epstein-Barr virus anti-apoptotic protein constitutively expressed in transformed cells and implicated in burkitt lymphomagenesis: the Wp/BHRF1 link.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma L Kelly

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two factors contribute to Burkitt lymphoma (BL pathogenesis, a chromosomal translocation leading to c-myc oncogene deregulation and infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Although the virus has B cell growth-transforming ability, this may not relate to its role in BL since many of the transforming proteins are not expressed in the tumor. Mounting evidence supports an alternative role, whereby EBV counteracts the high apoptotic sensitivity inherent to the c-myc-driven growth program. In that regard, a subset of BLs carry virus mutants in a novel form of latent infection that provides unusually strong resistance to apoptosis. Uniquely, these virus mutants use Wp (a viral promoter normally activated early in B cell transformation and express a broader-than-usual range of latent antigens. Here, using an inducible system to express the candidate antigens, we show that this marked apoptosis resistance is mediated not by one of the extended range of EBNAs seen in Wp-restricted latency but by Wp-driven expression of the viral bcl2 homologue, BHRF1, a protein usually associated with the virus lytic cycle. Interestingly, this Wp/BHRF1 connection is not confined to Wp-restricted BLs but appears integral to normal B cell transformation by EBV. We find that the BHRF1 gene expression recently reported in newly infected B cells is temporally linked to Wp activation and the presence of W/BHRF1-spliced transcripts. Furthermore, just as Wp activity is never completely eclipsed in in vitro-transformed lines, low-level BHRF1 transcripts remain detectable in these cells long-term. Most importantly, recognition by BHRF1-specific T cells confirms that such lines continue to express the protein independently of any lytic cycle entry. This work therefore provides the first evidence that BHRF1, the EBV bcl2 homologue, is constitutively expressed as a latent protein in growth-transformed cells in vitro and, in the context of Wp-restricted BL, may contribute to virus

  19. Biotrans functional and technical description. Report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tilburg, X.; Egging, R.; Londo, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels and to identify the possibilities and strategies towards large scale sustainable production, use and trading of biofuels for the transport sector in Europe, including Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC). The report supplements the two other reports in the work package: 'Biofuel and Bio-energy implementation scenarios - final report of VIEWLS WP5' (2005) and 'VIEWLS modelling and analysis, technical data for biofuel production chains' (2005). This document contains a functional and technical description of the BioTrans model, accompanied by a description of the system. Section 2 contains a conceptual and functional description of the biofuel model. Section 3 describes the optimisation method in technical terms, discussing aspects like the target function and constraints used. Finally, section 4 discusses the input and output requirements for the BioTrans system

  20. The Benefish consortium 24 month report WP6: productivity modelling of OWI's and welfare intervention measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.; Schram, E.; Noble, C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to accurately model all costs and benefits associated with welfare interventions for farmed fish it is necessary to establish how any welfare actions affect productivity. Productivity modelling within Benefish has been conducted in WP6. WP6 aimed to model relationships between welfare

  1. Study and development of a method allowing the identification of actinides inside nuclear waste packages, by active neutron or photon interrogation and delayed gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrel, F.

    2007-10-01

    An accurate estimation of the alpha-activity of a nuclear waste package is necessary to select the best mode of storage. The main purpose of this work is to develop a non-destructive active method, based on the fission process and allowing the identification of actinides ( 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu). These three elements are the main alpha emitters contained inside a package. Our technique is based on the detection of delayed gammas emitted by fission products. These latter are created by irradiation with the help of a neutron or photon beam. Performances of this method have been investigated after an Active Photon or Neutron Interrogation (INA or IPA). Three main objectives were fixed in the framework of this thesis. First, we measured many yields of photofission products to compensate the lack of data in the literature. Then, we studied experimental performances of this method to identify a given actinide ( 239 Pu in fission, 235 U in photofission) present in an irradiated mixture. Finally, we assessed the application of this technique on different mock-up packages for both types of interrogation (118 l mock-up package containing EVA in fission, 220 l mock-up package with a wall of concrete in photofission). (author)

  2. Long-term integrity of waste package final closure for HLW geological disposal, (2). Applicability of TIG welding method to overpack final closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Hidekazu; Sawa, Shuusuke; Aritomi, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Overpack, a high-level radioactive waste package for geological disposal, seals vitrified waste and in line with Japan's waste management program is required to isolate it from contact with groundwater for 1,000 years. In this study, TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding method, a typical arc welding method and widely used in various industries, was examined for its applicability to seal a carbon steel overpack lid with a thickness of 190 mm. Welding conditions and welding parameters were examined for multi-layer welding in a narrow gap for four different groove depths. Weld joint tests were conducted and weld flaws, macro- and microstructure, and mechanical properties were assessed within tentatively applied criteria for weld joints. Measurement and numerical calculation for residual stress were also conducted and the tendency of residual stress distribution was discussed. These test results were compared with the basic requirements of the welding method for overpack which were pointed out in our first report. It is assessed that the TIG welding method has the potential to provide the necessary requirements to complete the final closure of overpack with a maximum thickness of 190 mm. (author)

  3. Preliminary thermal/thermomechanical analyses of the Site Characterization Plan's Conceptual Design for a repository containing horizontally emplaced waste packages at the Deaf Smith County site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, N.Y.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents thermal/thermomechanical analyses of the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design for horizontal package emplacement at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The repository was divided into three geometric regions. Then two-dimensional finite-element models were set up to approximate the three-dimensional nature of each region. Thermal and quasistatic thermomechanical finite-element analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal/thermomechanical responses of the three regions. The exponential-time creep law was used to represent the creep behavior of salt rock. The repository design was evaluated by comparing the thermal/thermomechanical responses obtained for the three regions with interim performance constraints. The preliminary results show that all the performance constraints are met except for those of the waste package. The following factors were considered in interpreting these results: (1) the qualitative description of the analytical responses; (2) the limitations of the analyses; and (3) either the conclusions based on overall evaluation of limitations and analytical results or the conclusions based on the fact that the repository design may be evaluated only after further analyses. Furthermore, a parametric analysis was performed to estimate the effect of material parameters on the predicted thermal/thermomechanical response. 23 refs., 34 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Results on 3D interconnection from AIDA WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Hans-Günther, E-mail: hgm@hll.mpg.de

    2016-09-21

    From 2010 to 2014 the EU funded AIDA project established in one of its work packages (WP3) a network of groups working collaboratively on advanced 3D integration of electronic circuits and semiconductor sensors for applications in particle physics. The main motivation came from the severe requirements on pixel detectors for tracking and vertexing at future Particle Physics experiments at LHC, super-B factories and linear colliders. To go beyond the state-of-the-art, the main issues were studying low mass, high bandwidth applications, with radiation hardness capabilities, with low power consumption, offering complex functionality, with small pixel size and without dead regions. The interfaces and interconnects of sensors to electronic readout integrated circuits are a key challenge for new detector applications.

  5. Thermal analysis in the near field for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch on the 2nd progress report for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Wataru; Iwasa, Kengo

    1999-11-01

    For the underground facility of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the space is needed to set the engineered barrier, and the set engineered barrier and rock-mass of near field are needed to satisfy some conditions or constraints for their performance. One of the conditions above mentioned is thermal condition arising from heat outputs of vitrified waste and initial temperature at the disposal depth. Hence, it is needed that the temperature of the engineered barrier and rock mass is less degree than the constraint temperature of each other. Therefore, the design of engineered barrier and underground facility is conducted so that the temperature of the engineered barrier and rock mass is less degree than the constraint temperature of each other. One of these design is establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch. In this report, thermal analysis is conducted to establish the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch to satisfy the constraint temperature in the near field. Also, other conditions or constraints for establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch are investigated. Then, design of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch, considering these conditions or constraints, is conducted. For the near field configuration using the results of the design above mentioned, the temperature with time dependency is studied by analysis, and then the temperature variation due to the gaps, that will occur within the engineered barrier and between the engineered barrier and rock mass in setting engineered barrier in the disposal tunnel or pit, is studied. At last, the disposal depth variation is studied to satisfy the temperature constraint in the near field. (author)

  6. Three dimensional reconstruction of activity profiles in 220 liters radioactive waste packages containing super-compacted 100 liters drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Velzen, L.P.M.; Maes, J.

    2007-01-01

    The 3DRedact project's main objective is the development of a non-destructive assay (NDA) system that can replace emission computer tomography (ECT) and transmission computer tomography (TCT) for the routine characterization of decayed radioactive waste 220 liters drums. The existing fast NDA scan system has been extended with a transmission system that fulfils the requirements of fast scan measurements. The design parameters and engineering are described. As a consequence of this extension the analyze program HOLIS had to be updated, so that HOLIS can make full advantage of the transmission data generated by the analysis of a 220 liters waste drum, containing different super compacted drums. The achievements of the new HOLIS version are presented. As a first assessment, based on the presented tests results, the accuracy of the calculated coordinates of hotspots can be assessed for all coordinates ± 1 cm and for the activity of the hot-spot ± 5 %. These accuracies are within the predefined requirements e.g. coordinates uncertainty ± 2 cm and activity less than 10 %. Further, additional safety systems have been installed to improve a healthy and save working environment. (authors)

  7. Development of the NIREX generic transport safety assessment to assist in the provision of waste packaging advice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.L.; Marrison, A.R.; Sievwright, R.W.T.

    2002-01-01

    The current Nirex Mission is to provide the United Kingdom with safe, environmentally sound and publicly acceptable options for the long-term management of radioactive materials. As part of this role, Nirex has developed a phased deep geological disposal concept which is defined by six 'generic documents' that describe systems, processes and safety assessments that are not specific to any one location or geology. These generic documents give access to detailed information about the ideas and approaches that underpin the phased disposal concept, and have been published with an invitation to enter into dialogue with Nirex regarding these issues. The generic documents identify the requirements for an integrated transport system that would be necessary for the management of the intermediate-level (ILW) and low-level (LLW) wastes within Nirex's remit - the so-called reference case volume. This has involved Nirex in the development of transport hardware and associated safety reports and modelling and assessment tools for transport system logistics and system safety. Although the phased disposal concept is only one option for the long-term management of waste, the integrated transport system and associated modelling tools, is likely to be of equal relevance to other options. The safety assessment of the generic transport operation for the movement of ILW and LLW waste from waste producers' sites to a future radioactive waste disposal facility is described in one of the generic documents - the generic transport safety assessment (GTSA). The GTSA demonstrates that the transport operation is compliant with Nirex safety principles, and that the nuclear and non-nuclear risks to the public and workers from routine transport and from accidents are acceptable. This paper describes the types of risk that are calculated, and discusses the data requirements and calculation methodology. The verification and validation methodology is outlined, together with a discussion of the results

  8. Development of waste packages for the long-term confinement of C-14 in TRU waste disposal. 2. Confinement container with titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ario; Owada, Hitoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Jintoku, Takashi; Nakayama, Gen

    2008-01-01

    The long-term integrity of TRU waste package, with a titanium alloy for the outer corrosion resistance layer and carbon steel for the inner structural vessel, has been evaluated. The target confinement period is settled at 60,000 years in this study (i.e., 10 times of half-life). So the outer corrosion resistance layer with titanium (Ti-Pd alloy) is developed through focus on the high corrosion resistance of Ti alloy as a technology that has long-term confinement. In investigation about integrity of its passive film, the thickness of corrosion layer of 60,000 years is calculated by building an empirical formula between temperature and corrosion current density, considering the results of constant voltage examination in the TRU waste repository assumed environment. About crevice corrosion, its occurrence conditions is investigated in the TRU waste repository assumed environment, then, Ti.Gr-17 is selected as candidate material of the corrosion resistance layer. In investigation about SCC in Ti alloy, using the models of growth of hydride-layer, the thickness of hydride-layer after 60,000 years is estimated by the results of constant currents tests. Then, the hydride-layer of this thickness is confirmed not to generate cracks, in consideration of destructive critical hydride cracking thickness and the models of crack propagation. The knowledge that the process of generation of hydrogenated layers changes with differences in acceleration conditions (i.e., current density) is obtained. So we must confirm the adequacy of this model by the examination with natural condition. (author)

  9. Reliability of radioactive waste packages in ground repositories; Confiabilidade de embalados de rejeitos radioativos em repositorios proximos a superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Lais A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: lais@con.ufrj.br; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br; Passos, Erivaldo; Alves, Antonio Sergio [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Seguranca Nuclear]. E-mail: epassos@eletronuclear.gov.br; asergi@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    This work aims to discuss the reliability of a great amount of radioactive packages containing low and medium activity material, due to the significance of these latter in the whole safe performance of a final disposal facility (repository). The package is an engineering barrier designed to retain the radioactive material during long time periods. The discussion is based on the use of a probability distribution allowing the best representation of the failure times of the packages, since this type of information is unavailable. Here, the model uses the exponential, normal, lognormal and Weibull distributions published data and existing, related designs in order to obtain estimated values for the reliability function. The study was developed for a radioactive package system by considering the retaining capacity of the solid matrix plus the metallic container. The results indicate that these packages, as a whole, are not enough to perform the safe retaining of the radioactive material for the envisaged time period. The conclusions of the study lead to the necessary use of a system of multiple engineering barriers for the safe containing of the radioactive material. (author)

  10. Prediction of radionuclide invention for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste by considering concentration limit of waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Min Seong; Jeong, Noh Gyeon; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency(KORAD), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The result of a preliminary safety assessment that was completed by applying the radionuclide inventory calculated on the basis of available data from radioactive waste generation agencies suggested that many difficulties are to be expected with regard to disposal safety and operation. Based on the results of the preliminary safety assessment of the entire disposal system, in this paper, a unit package exceeding the safety goal is selected that occupies a large proportion of radionuclides in intermediate-level radioactive waste. We introduce restrictions on the amount of radioactivity in a way that excludes the high surface dose rate of the package. The radioactivity limit for disposal will be used as the baseline data for establishing the acceptance criteria and the disposal criteria for each disposal facility to meet the safety standards. It is necessary to draw up a comprehensive safety development plan for the Gyeongju waste disposal facility that will contribute to the construction of a Safety Case for the safety optimization of radioactive waste disposal facilities.

  11. The long-term management of information and records on radioactive waste packages in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upshall, I.R.; Wisbey, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that information associated with the creation, conditioning and packaging of radioactive waste must be maintained for a considerable period of time. During the retention period not only must the storage media be preserved, but the data must remain accessible and in a form that can be interpreted with minimum 'processing'. This will ensure, as far as practicable, that the information accurately represents the nature of the waste and its packaging, that the media employed is suitable for long-term storage and that the storage conditions provide a stable environment. Careful consideration must be given to the type and form of the retained information and the threats to its continued integrity. United Kingdom Nirex Limited (Nirex), in association with experts in records media and management, has undertaken a programme of work to consider the range of media currently available, the threats to media integrity and the implications of a general move towards 'electronic' records. The results of this study are being used to develop an information management system strategy, capable of retaining data for all future phases of radioactive waste management. (author)

  12. Numerical studies of fluid and heat flow near high-level nuclear waste packages emplaced in partially saturated fractured tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1984-11-01

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous rock. Formation parameters were chosen as representative of the potential repository horizon in the Topopah Spring Unit of the Yucca Mountain tuffs. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator ''TOUGH'' used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions for handling the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 35 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Performance and safety analysis of WP-cave concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Svemar, C.

    1989-08-01

    The report presents a performance safety, and cost analysis of the WP-cave, WPC, concept. In the performance analysis, questions specific to the WPC have been addressed which have been identified to require more detailed studies. Based on the outcome of this analysis, a safety analysis has been made which comprises of the modeling and calculation of radionuclide transport from the repository to the biosphere and the resulting dose exposure to man. The result of the safety analysis indicates that the present design of a WPC repository may give unacceptably high doses. By improving the properties of the bentonite/sand barrier such that the hydraulic conductivity is reduced, or by changing the short-lived steel canisters to more long-lived canisters, e.g. copper canisters, it is judged possible to achieve a sufficiently low level of dose exposure rates to man. The cost for a WPC repository of the studied design is significantly higher than for a KBS-3 repository considering the Swedish conditions and the Swedish amount of spent fuel. The major costs are connected to the excavation and backfilling of the bentonite/sand barrier. The potential for cost savings is high but it is not judged possible to account for savings in such a way that the WPC concept shows lower cost than the KBS-3 concept. (34 figs., 33 tabs., 29 refs.)

  14. Stable Weyl points, trivial surface states, and particle-hole compensation in WP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, E.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Michiardi, M.; Boschini, F.; Day, R. P.; Elfimov, I. S.; Denlinger, J. D.; Süss, V.; Felser, C.; Damascelli, A.

    2018-05-01

    A possible connection between extremely large magnetoresistance and the presence of Weyl points has garnered much attention in the study of topological semimetals. Exploration of these concepts in transition-metal diphosphides WP2 has been complicated by conflicting experimental reports. Here we combine angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to disentangle surface and bulk contributions to the ARPES intensity, the superposition of which has plagued the determination of the band structure in WP2. Our results show that while the hole- and electronlike Fermi surface sheets originating from surface states have different areas, the bulk-band structure of WP2 is electron-hole compensated in agreement with DFT. Furthermore, the ARPES band structure is compatible with the presence of at least four temperature-independent Weyl points, confirming the topological nature of WP2 and its stability against lattice distortions.

  15. WP5 Evaluation: D54-D55 Evaluation Results V2 (V3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rosmalen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Van Rosmalen, P. (2010, 19 May). WP5 Evaluation: D54-D55 Evaluation Results V2 (V3). Presentation at idSpace Final Review, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands. idSpace-project.

  16. The Benefish consortium 24 month report WP6: productivity modelling of OWI's and welfare intervention measures

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, O.; Schram, E.; Noble, C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to accurately model all costs and benefits associated with welfare interventions for farmed fish it is necessary to establish how any welfare actions affect productivity. Productivity modelling within Benefish has been conducted in WP6. WP6 aimed to model relationships between welfare interventions, changes in OWI’s and measures of productivity. It did so focusing only on the effects which were biological in nature: economic costs and benefits attributed to changes in productivity ar...

  17. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  18. Synthesis of Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 Composites with Adjustable Thermal Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 composites were fabricated by solid state reaction with the goal of tailoring the thermal expansion coefficient. XRD, SEM and TMA were used to investigate the composition, microstructure, and thermal expansion behavior of Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 composites with different mass ratio. Relative densities of all the resulting Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 samples were also tested by Archimedes' methods. The obtained Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 composites were comprised of orthorhombic Zr2WP2O12 and monoclinic ZrO2. As the increase of the Zr2WP2O12, the relative densities of Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 ceramic composites increased gradually. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 composites can be tailored from 4.1 × 10−6 K−1 to −3.3 × 10−6 K−1 by changing the content of Zr2WP2O12. The 2:1 Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 specimen shows close to zero thermal expansion from 25 to 700°C with an average linear thermal expansion coefficient of −0.09 × 10−6 K−1. These adjustable and near zero expansion ceramic composites will have great potential application in many fields.

  19. Synthesis of Zr2WP2O12/ZrO2 Composites with Adjustable Thermal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Sun, Weikang; Liu, Hongfei; Xie, Guanhua; Chen, Xiaobing; Zeng, Xianghua

    2017-01-01

    Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 composites were fabricated by solid state reaction with the goal of tailoring the thermal expansion coefficient. XRD, SEM and TMA were used to investigate the composition, microstructure, and thermal expansion behavior of Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 composites with different mass ratio. Relative densities of all the resulting Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 samples were also tested by Archimedes' methods. The obtained Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 composites were comprised of orthorhombic Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 and monoclinic ZrO 2 . As the increase of the Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 , the relative densities of Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 ceramic composites increased gradually. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 composites can be tailored from 4.1 × 10 -6 K -1 to -3.3 × 10 -6 K -1 by changing the content of Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 . The 2:1 Zr 2 WP 2 O 12 /ZrO 2 specimen shows close to zero thermal expansion from 25 to 700°C with an average linear thermal expansion coefficient of -0.09 × 10 -6 K -1 . These adjustable and near zero expansion ceramic composites will have great potential application in many fields.

  20. Behaviour Test with the Leaching of a Waste package; Evaluacion del Comportamiento frente a la Lixiviacion de un Bulto de Residuo Acondicionado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G R [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1999-07-01

    bibliographic data.With the whole coefficients it was made a prediction about the time involved until the total release of the radionuclides. This work is being developed by the Radioactive Waste Management Division of Cnea and it has been included in a contract with the IAEA, which also studies the changes on the mechanical resistance of the waste package,so as the release of gases from organic wastes and the container corrosion.

  1. Description of SODAR data storage. WISE project WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhorst, S.A.M.; Verhoef, J.P.; Van der Werff, P.A.; Eecen, P.J.

    2003-10-01

    The partners in the WISE project are investigating whether application of the SODAR (sonic detection and ranging) measurement technique in wind energy experimental work is feasible as a replacement for cup anemometers and wind direction sensors mounted on tall meteorological masts both from the view of accuracy and cost. In Work Package 2 (WP2) of the WISE project extensive controlled experiments with the SODAR have been performed. For example, SODAR measurements have been compared with measurements from nearby masts and different brands of SODARs have been compared. Part of the work package was the creation of a database to gather the measured SODAR data. The database was created by ECN in order to enable further analysis by the partners in the project. The database structure that has been defined by ECN is described in full detail. The database is based on SQL (structured query language), and care is taken that data that is unchanged during a measurement period is only stored once. The logic behind the structure is described and the relations between the various tables are described. Up to now the description of the database is limited to include SODAR data measured close to a meteorological mast. Power measurements from wind turbines are not yet included. However, the database can easily be extended to include these data. The data measured by means of the ECN SODAR have completely been re-processed. A new directory structure was defined which is accessible from both the Unix (Linux) and the Microsoft Windows platform. The processed and validated data have been stored in a database to make retrieval of specific data sets possible. The database is also accessible from the Windows platform. The defined format is available for the WISE project, so that the database containing data from all partners can be created

  2. East Asian winter temperature variation associated with the combined effects of AO and WP pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) teleconnection pattern on the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) over the last 56 years (1958/59-2013/2014) were investigated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (Park and Ahn, 2015). The study results revealed that the effect of the AO on winter temperature in East Asia could be changed depending on the phases of the WP pattern in the North Pacific. The negative relationship between the EAWM and the AO increased when the AO and WP were in-phase with each other. Hence, when winter negative (positive) AO was accompanied by negative (positive) WP, negative (positive) temperature anomalies were dominant across the entire East Asia region. Conversely, when the AO and WP were of-of-phase, the winter temperature anomaly in East Asia did not show distinct changes. Furthermore, from the perspective of stationary planetary waves, the zonal wavenumber-2 patterns of sea level pressure and geopotential height at 500hPa circulation strengthened when the AO and WP were in-phase but were not significant for the out-of-phase condition. It explained the possible mechanism of the combined effects of the AO and WP on the circulation related to EAWM. Reference Park, H.-J., and J.-B. Ahn (2015) Combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation and the Western Pacific pattern on East Asia winter temperature, Clim. Dyn. DOI:10.1007/s00382-015-2763-2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under grant KMIPA2015-2081.

  3. Near field and altered zone environmental report Volume I: technical bases for EBS design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, D. G., LLNL

    1997-08-01

    This report presents an updated summary of results for the waste package (WP) and engineered barrier system (EBS) evaluations, including materials testing, waste-form characterization, EBS performance assessments, and near-field environment (NFE) characterization. Materials testing, design criteria and concept development, and waste-form characterization all require an understanding of the environmental conditions that will interact with the WP and EBS. The Near-Field Environment Report (NFER) was identified in the Waste Package Plan (WPP) (Harrison- Giesler, 1991) as the formal means for transmitting and documenting this information.

  4. Waste Generator Instructions: Key to Successful Implementation of the US DOE's 435.1 for Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions (LA-UR-12-24155) - 13218

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, David M. [LANL EES-12, Carlsbad, NM, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hayes, Timothy A. [LANL EES-12, Carlsbad, NM, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pope, Howard L. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc., P.O. Box 3038, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Enriquez, Alejandro E. [LANL NCO-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Carson, Peter H. [LANL NPI-7, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In times of continuing fiscal constraints, a management and operation tool that is straightforward to implement, works as advertised, and virtually ensures compliant waste packaging should be carefully considered and employed wherever practicable. In the near future, the Department of Energy (DOE) will issue the first major update to DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This update will contain a requirement for sites that do not have a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste certification program to use two newly developed technical standards: Contact-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions and Remote-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions. The technical standards are being developed from the DOE O 435.1 Notice, Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging, approved August 2011. The packaging instructions will provide detailed information and instruction for packaging almost every conceivable type of transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at WIPP. While providing specificity, the packaging instructions leave to each site's own discretion the actual mechanics of how those Instructions will be functionally implemented at the floor level. While the Technical Standards are designed to provide precise information for compliant packaging, the density of the information in the packaging instructions necessitates a type of Rosetta Stone that translates the requirements into concise, clear, easy to use and operationally practical recipes that are waste stream and facility specific for use by both first line management and hands-on operations personnel. The Waste Generator Instructions provide the operator with step-by-step instructions that will integrate the sites' various operational requirements (e.g., health and safety limits, radiological limits or dose limits) and result in a WIPP certifiable waste and package that can be transported to and emplaced at WIPP. These little known but widely

  5. Wpływ cukrzycy na rozwój i funkcjonowanie dziecka

    OpenAIRE

    Buchnat, Marzena

    2006-01-01

    Choroba przewlekła, jaką jest cukrzyca, wpływa niekorzystnie na rozwój dziecka, powodując zmianę sposobu życia zarówno dla dziecka jak i jego rodziny. Jest źródłem wielu trudnych sytuacji, ponieważ wpływa na sposób funkcjonowania dziecka na różnych płaszczyznach. Jednak jak dalece choroba będzie zakłócać ten sposób funkcjonowania, zależy nie tylko od samej choroby, ale i od sposobu jej przyjęcia przez dziecko Cukrzyca szczególnie negatywne wpływa na kształtowanie się osobowości. Trzeba ...

  6. DESIGN OF A WELDING AND INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR WASTE STORAGE CLOSURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.B. Smartt; A.D. Watkins; D.P. Pace; R.J. Bitsoi; E.D. Larsen T.R. McJunkin; C.R. Tolle

    2005-01-01

    This work reported here was done to provide a conceptual design for a robotic welding and inspection system for the Yucca Mountain Repository waste package closure system. The welding and inspection system is intended to make the various closure welds that seal and/or structurally join the lids to the waste package vessels. The welding and inspection system will also perform surface and volumetric inspections of the various closure welds and has the means to repair closure welds, if required. The system is designed to perform these various activities remotely, without the necessity of having personnel in the closure cell

  7. Legal market abuse regulations of WpHG (law on stock trading) and the REMIT-VO in the electricity spot trading; Marktmissbrauchsrechtliche Regelungen des WpHG und der REMIT-VO im Stromspothandel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retsch, Alexander T.

    2014-07-01

    The thesis on legal market abuse regulations of WpHG (law on stock trading) and the REMIT-VO in the electricity spot trading include the discussion of the following issues: market abuse, its forms of appearance (market manipulation, insider trade, insider information), electricity spot trading, relevant legislative frame, market abuse regulations (WpHG), interdiction of market manipulation and related regulations.

  8. Progress report on first year of WP5.2. Including detailed description of planned research for WP 5.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellemers, N.; Van Dijk, E.; Terwel, B.; De Vries, G. [Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    This document contains the progress report on the first half year of the CATO-2 WP5.2 PhD project 'Framing effects in communication about CCS'. In the first few months a literature study has been conducted, both on (factors that influence) public perceptions and acceptance of CCS, and on framing. In the last two month, a first study was designed. This study consists of an experiment designed to examine how framing a company's involvement in CCS in terms of economic benefits and/or CSR of the organization affects the corporate image, trust, and perceived 'greenwashing' (deceit). Furthermore, this experiment serves to test the quality of newly developed questionnaires to measure these variables. In addition, this document contains a detailed description of the research planned for WP5.2 written by senior (CATO-2) researchers from January 2010 on. The objective of the research planned for WP5.2 is to examine whether framing of communications by an organization can improve the perceived credibility and trustworthiness of the organization and the information provided. This issue will be examined by a combination of experimental studies and a survey-type study.

  9. Contributions of the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) to the EPOS (European Plate Observing System) Implementation Phase 2015-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lauterjung, J.

    2017-12-01

    The European Plate Observing System project is currently approaching the end of year two of its four-year Implementation Phase 2015-18 (EPOS-IP). Under the Horizon 2020 Programme INFRADEV-3, the EPOS cyberinfrastructure is being established as an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) and encompasses the implementation of both the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS) for solid Earth Science and a multitude of EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). During year two, a basic set of ICS and TCS services was developed and implemented, so that in October 2017 the validation phase (year 3) of EPOS is ready to be launched. Up to now, various TCS-Elements have integrated different Service Providers (SD) that are delivering Data, Data Products, Services and Software (DDSS) to their specific scientific community. As one of the 29 awardees of the EC grant, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) plays an important role in the implementation of EPOS and its Thematic and Integrated Core Services. The presented poster will give an overview of GFZ's participation in the work of nine technical EPOS Work Packages (WP7 ICS Development, WP8 Seismology, WP11 Volcano Observations, WP12 Satellite Data, WP13 Geomagnetic Observations, WP14 Anthropogenic Hazards, WP15 Geological Information and Modelling, WP16 Multi-Scale Laboratories and WP17 Geo Energy Test Beds) as well as in four administrative EPOS Work Packages (WP2 Communication, WP3 Harmonization, WP4 Legal & Governance, and WP5 Financial).

  10. EPOS-WP16 : A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calignano, E.; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, C.J.; Willingshofer, E.; Drury, M.R.; van Kan, M.; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, F.; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; winkler, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two

  11. Flow and wakes in large wind farms: Final report for UpWind WP8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Rathmann, Ole

    This report summarises the research undertaken through the European Commission funded project UpWind Wp8:Flow. The objective of the work was to develop understanding of flow in large wind farms and to evaluate models of power losses due to wind turbine wakes focusing on complex terrain and offshore...

  12. Genetic toxicology of metal compounds: I. Induction of lambda prophage in E coli WP2/sub s/(lambda)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossman, T.G.; Molina, M.; Meyer, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    A number of metal compounds have been shown to be human carcinogens. Others, while not proven human carcinogens, are able to cause tumors in laboratory animals. Short-term bacterial assays for genotoxic effects have not been successful in predicting the carcinogenicity of metal compounds. The ability of some metal compounds to cause the induction of lambda prophage in E coli WP2/sub s/(lambda) is reported. By far the strongest inducing ability was observed with K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/. With the exception of chromate, long-term exposures in a narrow, subtoxic dose range were required in order to demonstrate phage induction. A new microtiter assay for lambda prophage induction, which incorporates these features, is described. This system also was able to detect very small amounts of organic carcinogens.

  13. Watchdog System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann; Bahnsen, Chris Holmberg; Jensen, Morten Bornø

    This deliverable is part of WP4. Overall WP4 is motivated by the need for automatic systems that can ease the task of annotating massive amounts of traffic data. Concretely this deliverable is related to WP4.2 - the watchdog system. The idea with the watchdog is to develop a system that can remov...... huge chunks of video data where no events/interactions of interest are occurring and hence let a user focus on manually annotation of only the interesting stuff....

  14. EPOS-IP WP10: services and data provision for the GNSS community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The EPOS-IP WP10 - "GNSS Data & Products" is the Working Package of the EPOS-IP project in charge of implementing the necessary services in order that the geo-sciences community can access the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures. The WP10 is formed by representatives of the participating institutions (10) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WP10 also includes members from other institutions/countries that formally are not participating in the EPOS-IP. During the EPOS-IP project, the geodetic component of EPOS (WP10) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS). The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized geodetic tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WP10 towards the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for GNSS data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. The collaboration with EUREF is also an essential component of the implementation plan.

  15. Design of a real time market for regulating power. FlexPower WP1 - Report 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, C.; Fock, F.; Togeby, M.

    2011-12-15

    The FlexPower project investigates the possibility of using broadcasted dynamic electricity prices as a simple and low cost means to activating a large number of flexible small-scale power units. The aim is to provide regulating power via an aggregated response from the numerous units on a volunteer basis. The power units could for example be electrical heating and cooling units, electrical vehicles, industrial demand and micro generation. Each power unit can have its own local controller and individual business model and objective function. The optimisation of the local controls may require forecasts of the services requested by the customer (such as heat for a house or charging power for an electrical vehicle) - in terms of quantity, timing and flexibility - and forecasts of the electricity prices. Based on international 'real-time' power market experiences, new dynamic FlexPower market mechanisms to perform regulating power are designed and tested via simulations, under laboratory conditions and in the field. A dedicated simulation tool is developed for this purpose. The FlexPower regulation can never be perfect, but is expected to be able to meet some of the present and future growing demand for regulating power. As a starting point, a 5-minute power price signal, based on the actual regulation power prices, is tested. WP1 addresses the following question: 1) How could a system with a one-way price be designed? How can the FlexPower mechanism be integrated into the present electricity market, including the market for regulating power? This report describes the FlexPower concept, and gives one suggestion as to how this new market could work. How this will affect the different stakeholders is discussed, and risks and opportunities in the new market are presented. (LN)

  16. AET III 100 kWp photovoltaic installation in Riazzino - Results of monitoring; Monitoraggio dell'impianto PV da 100 kWp AET III a Riazzino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezzonico, S.; Bura, E.

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a monitoring project that monitored the performance of the 100 kWp, grid-connected photovoltaic installation in Riazzino in southern Switzerland. The original installation, dating from 1992, was refurbished with three new inverters and new cabling. The results of a three-year monitoring project are presented and discussed. Figures are presented on the plant's power production, which illustrate the improved performance of the new inverters. Further investigations made on the power ratings of the modules and the results of infrared examination are discussed.

  17. Free-standing ternary NiWP film for efficient water oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunpeng; Zhou, Kuo; Ma, Lili; Liang, Yanqin; Yang, Xianjin; Cui, Zhenduo; Zhu, Shengli; Li, Zhaoyang

    2018-03-01

    High-efficient catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great concern in improving energy efficiency for water splitting. Here we report a high-performance OER electrocatalyst of nickel-tungsten-phosphorus (NiWP) film prepared by template method. This free-standing ternary electrocatalyst exhibits a remarkable electrocatalytic activity of OER in alkaline medium due to the synergetic effect among these elements and the good electrical conductivity. The reported NiWP composite catalyst has an overpotential of as low as 0.4 V (vs. RHE) at 30 mA cm-2, better than that of the commercial RuO2 catalyst. Moreover, a small charge transfer resistance of 4.06 Ω and a Tafel slope of 68 mV dec-1 demonstrate the outstanding catalytic activity.

  18. Efficacité des fongicides Mancozèbe 80 WP et Chlorothalonil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cinq plants ont été inoculés par isolat. Chaque plant inoculé est couvert de toile cirée noire et déposé sous abris. Efficacité des fongicides Mancozèbe 80 WP ... sans fongicide. Nc : nombre de spores comptées sur milieu avec fongicide. Germination des spores. Les spores d'une culture de 7 jours de l'isolat Cgldc3 de C.

  19. WP3 Prototype development for operational planning tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Trine; Meibom, Peter; Apfelbeck, J.

    is documented in chapter 1 and 2. The inclusion of load uncertainty and forced outages in the Scenario Tree Tool enables calculation of the demand for reserve power depending on the forecast horizon. The algorithm is given in Section 3.1. The design of a modified version of the Joint Market Model enabling...... estimation of the optimal amount of reserve power to reserve day-ahead before the actual operation hour is documented in Section 3.2. With regard to the evaluation of a power system, its ability to cope with extreme events is crucial to be investigated. Chapter 4 gives a definition of such extreme events....... Further, the methodology to identify extreme events on the basis of the existing tools is described. Within the SUPWIND consortium there has been an interest in using the Joint Market Model to model smaller parts of a power system but with more detailed representation of the transmission and distribution...

  20. Pro-apoptotic activity of new analog of anthracyclines--WP 631 in advanced ovarian cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Arkadiusz; Denel, Marta; Bukowska, Barbara; Rogalska, Aneta; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2014-03-01

    In this work we investigated the mode of cell death induced by WP 631, a novel anthracycline antibiotic, in the ovarian cancer cell line (OV-90) derived from the malignant ascites of a patient diagnosed with advanced disease. The effects were compared with those of doxorubicin (DOX), a first generation anthracycline. The ability of WP 631 to induce apoptosis and necrosis was examined by double staining with Annexin V and propidium iodide, measurements of the level of intracellular calcium ions and cytochrome c, PARP cleavage. We also investigated the possible involvement of the caspases activation, DNA degradation (comet assay) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the development of the apoptotic events and their significance for drug efficiency. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that antiproliferative capacity of WP 631 in tested cell line was a few times greater than that of DOX. Furthermore, ovarian cancer cells treated with WP 631 showed a higher mean level of basal DNA damage in comparison to DOX. In conclusion, WP 631 is able to induce caspase - dependent apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells. Obtained results suggested that WP 631 may be a candidate for further evaluation as chemotherapeutic agents for human cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. WP3 Prototype development for operational planning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristoffersen, T.; Meibom, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Apfelbeck, J.; Barth, R.; Brand, H. (IER, Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany))

    2008-04-15

    This report documents the model development carried out in work package 3 in the SUPWIND project. It was decided to focus on the estimation of the need for reserve power, and on the reservation of reserve power by TSOs. Reserve power is needed to cover deviations from the day-ahead forecasts of electricity load and wind power production, and to cover forced outages of power plants and transmission lines. Work has been carried out to include load uncertainty and forced outages in the two main components of the Wilmar Planning tool namely the Scenario Tree Tool and the Joint Market Model. This work is documented in chapter 1 and 2. The inclusion of load uncertainty and forced outages in the Scenario Tree Tool enables calculation of the demand for reserve power depending on the forecast horizon. The algorithm is given in Section 3.1. The design of a modified version of the Joint Market Model enabling estimation of the optimal amount of reserve power to reserve day-ahead before the actual operation hour is documented in Section 3.2. With regard to the evaluation of a power system, its ability to cope with extreme events is crucial to be investigated. Chapter 4 gives a definition of such extreme events. Further, the methodology to identify extreme events on the basis of the existing tools is described. Within the SUPWIND consortium there has been an interest in using the Joint Market Model to model smaller parts of a power system but with more detailed representation of the transmission and distribution grid. Chapter 5 documents this work. (author)

  2. NAK WP-cave project: Thermally induced convective motion in groundwater in the near field of the WP-cave after filling and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkirk, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    The thermal convective motion induced in groundwater due to the decay heat generated by the high-level waste in the WP-Cave has been studied by means of coupled thermo-hydraulic numerical models. The WPC concept is proposed as an alternative to the KBS-3 repository concept for construction in crystalline rock. However, in the absence of specific site fissure data, the rock mass has been modelled as a quasi-porous medium. The repository was assumed to be filled 40 years after unloading of the spent fuel. For a further 100 years the whole repository is cooled, before being backfilled and sealed off. Maximum waste temperatures and the fluid fluxes crossing the backfilled bentonite diffusion barrier were monitored to 3000 years after fuel unloading. At the same time, the effects of the hydraulic cage and of a highly permeable rock zone beneath the central storage volume on the induced fluid flows have been assessed. (orig.)

  3. Visit to the 2nd International seminar on quality control of radioactive waste packaged for removal; Juelich, 28/5-1/6 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekschoten, H.J.C.; Tanke, R.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    An account is presented of a five-day seminar on the quality control of radioactive waste contained for removal. In a number of countries a control system is raised. Such a control system can be subdivided in two large parts: -the system of rules, organization (responsibilities) and financing, -the control upon these. Because of the many kinds of radio-active waste, treatment methods and various removal possibilities and because everything has to be accounted well, a quality control system elaborated in detail may involve large costs. It has been mentioned that the costs for processing and removal could be enlarged with 20 - 30 % (BRD). During the seminar attention has been paid to national programmes, the raising of quality control systems, the quality assurance of products of treatment products and the containment of those products, certification of storage and removal sites, experiences with quality control systems, inspection of offered waste. (author)

  4. Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios. Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakker, A.; Egging, R.; Van Thuijl, E.; Van Tilburg, X.; Deurwaarder, E.P.; De Lange, T.J.; Berndes, G.; Hansson, J.

    2005-11-01

    This report is published within the framework of the European Commission-supported project 'Clear Views on Clean Fuels' or VIEWLS. The overall objectives of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuel and to identify the possibilities and strategies towards large-scale sustainable production, use and trading of biofuels for the transport sector in Europe, including Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC). This reports constitutes the outcome of the Work Package 5 (WP5) of the VIEWLS project. In WP5 the EU biofuels and bioenergy markets are modelled with the aim to conduct quantitative analyses on the production and costs of biofuels and on the resulting market structure and supply chains. In a bigger context, where possible, WP5 aims also to provide insight into larger socio-economic impacts of bioenergy trade within Europe. The objective of this research is to develop a cost efficient biofuel strategy for Europe in terms of biofuel production, cost and trade, and to assess its larger impact on bioenergy markets and trade up to 2030. Based on the biomass availability and associated costs within EU25, under different conditions, scenarios for biofuels production and cost can be constructed using quantitative modelling tools. Combining this with (cost) data on biofuel conversion technologies and transport of biomass and biofuels, the lowest cost biofuel supply chain given a certain demand predetermined by the biofuels Directive can be designed. In a broader context, this is supplemented by a design of a sustainable bioenergy supply chain in view of the fact that biomass-heat, biomass-electricity and biofuels are competing for the same biomass resources. In other words, the scarcity of bioenergy crops, as manifested through overall bioenergy demand, is an essential variable in bioenergy scenarios

  5. Flow and wakes in large wind farms. Final report for UpWind WP8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmie, R.J.; Frandsen, S.T.; Rathmann, O. (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Hansen, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark (DTU), Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Politis, E.; Prospathopoulos, J. (CRES (Greece)); Schepers, J.G. (ECN, Petten (Netherlands)); Rados, K. (NTUA, Athens (Greece)); Cabezon, D. (CENER, Sarriguren (Spain)); Schlez, W.; Neubert, A.; Heath, M. (Garrad Hassan and Partners (Germany) (United Kingdom))

    2011-02-15

    This report summarises the research undertaken through the European Commission funded project UpWind Wp8:Flow. The objective of the work was to develop understanding of flow in large wind farms and to evaluate models of power losses due to wind turbine wakes focusing on complex terrain and offshore. A crosscutting activity was to improve and compare the performance of computational fluid dynamics models with wind farm models. The report contains 6 deliverable reports and guideline to wind farm wake analysis as appendices. (Author)

  6. An analysis of the performance of a 2.6 kWp building integrated photovoltaic installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman Shaari

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of an analysis of the performance results of a 2.6 kWp Building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) installation. The building has fifty Siemens M55 photovoltaic (PV) modules integrated as part of the roof of the building, grid-interactive via an SMA inverter. Data have been compiled and a detailed analysis of its performance was done using a dedicated BIPV computer model called PVSYST2.0. It was found that the general performance of the system was at the lower end of the spectrum mainly due to inherent architectural design of the building. This came by way of shading on the modules casted by shadow: of existing roofs of the building, and adverse effects from temperature increases on the modules due to the heating regimes in the building and lack of ventilation of the modules. The problem was exacerbated by an inverter-to-PV size ratio mismatch. In addition there had been some teething problems during the earlier periods of operation. Lessons from this experience are drawn up to serve as a precautionary note in designing other BIPV installations, especially valuable for applications in tropical climate countries, like Malaysia. (Author)

  7. Genetic toxicology of metal compounds. I. Induction of lambda prophage in E coli WP2/sub s/(lambda)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossman, T.G.; Molina, M.; Meyer, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    A number of metal compounds have been shown to be human carcinogens. Others, while not proven human carcinogens, are able to cause tumors in laboratory animals. Short-term bacterial assays for genotoxic effects have not been successful in predicting the carcinogenicity of metal compounds. The authors report here the ability of some metal compounds to cause the induction of lambda prophage in E coli WP2/sub s/(lambda). By far the strongest inducing ability was observed with K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, followed by Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ > Ni(OOCCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ > CrCl/sub 2/ > NaWO/sub 4/ > Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ > KMnO/sub 4/. With the exception of chromate, long-term exposures in a narrow, subtoxic dose range were required in order to demonstrate phage induction. A new microtiter assay for lambda prophage induction, which incorporates these features, is described. This system also was able to detect very small amounts of organic carcinogens.

  8. ENETRAP III WP7. European guidance on the implementation of the requirements of the EURATOM BSS; ENETRAP III WP7. Europaeische Leitlinien zur Umsetzung der Aus- und Weiterbildungs-Anforderungen der EURATOM-Grundnormen im Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paynter, R. [EUTERP (Netherlands); Stewart, J. [PHE (United Kingdom); Schmitt-Hannig, A. [BfS (Germany); Coeck, M. [SCK-CEN (Belgium); Falcao, A. [IST (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    The Euratom BSS lays down specific requirements for the Radiation Protection Expert (RPE) and for the Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) and education and training requirements associated with these roles. A guidance document has been developed within the framework of ENETRAP III WP7 ''Guidance to support the implementation of E and T requirements for RPE and RPO as defined in the Euratom BSS''. The objective of WP7 activities is to facilitate the implementation of the new requirements for RPE and RPO in Member States and to help ensuring a consistent approach throughout the European Union.

  9. Genetic toxicology of metal compounds. II. Enhancement of ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossman, T.G.; Molina, M.

    1986-01-01

    Salts of metals which are carcinogenic, noncarcinogenic, or of unknown carcinogenicity were assayed for their abilities to modulate ultraviolet (UV)-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli WP2. In addition to the previously reported comutagenic effect of arsenite, salts of three other compounds were found to enhance UV mutagenesis. CuCl 2 , MnCl 2 (and a small effect by KMnO 4 ), and NaMoO 4 acted as comutagens in E coli WP2, which has wild-type DNA repair capability, but were much less comutagenic in the repair deficient strain WP2/sub s/ (uvrA). The survival of irradiated or unirradiated cells was not affected by these compounds. No effects on UV mutagenesis were seen for 16 other metal compounds. We suggest that the comutagenic effects might occur either via metal-induced decreases in the fidelity of repair replication or via metal-induced depurination

  10. Vegetation cover and long-term conservation of radioactive waste packages: the case study of the CSM waste disposal facility (Manche District, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit-Berghem, Yves; Lemperiere, Guy

    2012-03-01

    The CSM is the first French waste disposal facility for radioactive waste. Waste material is buried several meters deep and protected by a multi-layer cover, and equipped with a drainage system. On the surface, the plant cover is a grassland vegetation type. A scientific assessment has been carried out by the Géophen laboratory, University of Caen, in order to better characterize the plant cover (ecological groups and associated soils) and to observe its medium and long term evolution. Field assessments made on 10 plots were complemented by laboratory analyses carried out over a period of 1 year. The results indicate scenarios and alternative solutions which could arise, in order to passively ensure the long-term safety of the waste disposal system. Several proposals for a blanket solution are currently being studied and discussed, under the auspices of international research institutions in order to determine the most appropriate materials for the storage conditions. One proposal is an increased thickness of these materials associated with a geotechnical barrier since it is well adapted to the forest plants which are likely to colonize the site. The current experiments that are carried out will allow to select the best option and could provide feedback for other waste disposal facility sites already being operated in France (CSFMA waste disposal facility, Aube district) or in other countries.

  11. Legal market abuse regulations of WpHG (law on stock trading) and the REMIT-VO in the electricity spot trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retsch, Alexander T.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis on legal market abuse regulations of WpHG (law on stock trading) and the REMIT-VO in the electricity spot trading include the discussion of the following issues: market abuse, its forms of appearance (market manipulation, insider trade, insider information), electricity spot trading, relevant legislative frame, market abuse regulations (WpHG), interdiction of market manipulation and related regulations.

  12. Global helioseismology (WP4.1): From the Sun to the stars & solar analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Rafael A.

    2017-10-01

    Sun-as-a star observations put our star as a reference for stellar observations. Here, I review the activities in which the SPACEINN global seismology team (Working Package WP4.1) has worked during the past 3 years. In particular, we will explain the new deliverables available on the SPACEINN seismic+ portal. Moreover, special attention will be given to surface dynamics (rotation and magnetic fields). After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of around 300 solar-like stars and defining proper metrics for that, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogues for which we study their surface magnetic and seismic properties. This allows us to put the Sun into context compared to its siblings.

  13. Global helioseismology (WP4.1: From the Sun to the stars & solar analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Rafael A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sun-as-a star observations put our star as a reference for stellar observations. Here, I review the activities in which the SPACEINN global seismology team (Working Package WP4.1 has worked during the past 3 years. In particular, we will explain the new deliverables available on the SPACEINN seismic+ portal. Moreover, special attention will be given to surface dynamics (rotation and magnetic fields. After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of around 300 solar-like stars and defining proper metrics for that, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogues for which we study their surface magnetic and seismic properties. This allows us to put the Sun into context compared to its siblings.

  14. Endokrynny wpływ tkanki tłuszczowej na stan skóry

    OpenAIRE

    Jaśkiewicz, Jerzy; Goździalska, Anna; Lizak, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Praca recenzowana / peer-reviewed paper Komórki tkanki tłuszczowej, adipocyty, różnicują się w okresie życia płodowego z pierwotnych fi broblastów. W adipocytach gromadzone są substraty energetyczne w postaci zestryfi - kowanych kwasów tłuszczowych. W komórkach tych zachodzą aktywne procesy syntezy kwasów tłuszczowych, a także reakcji elongacji i desaturacji lipidów. Dla stabilności energetycznej ustroju znaczący wpływ ma korelacja osi insulina–glukagon z aktywnością takich enzymów, jak...

  15. KMoWP3O12, a tunnel structure of the KMo2O12-type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmoussa, A.; Leclaire, A.; Grandin, A.; Raveau, B.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium molybdotungstotriphosphate(V), KMoWP 3 O 12 , M r =603.80, orthorhombic, Pbcm, a=8.8180(6), b=9.1574(8), c=12.3836(8) A, V=1000.0(2) A 3 , Z=4, D x =4.01 Mg m -3 , λ(Mo Kα)=0.71073 A, μ=13.9 mm -1 , T=294 K, F(000)=276, R=0.035 and wR=0.042 for 2291 observed reflections. The framework is built up from MoO 6 octahedra and PO 4 tetrahedra which delimit tunnels running along b, where the K ions are located. The structure leads to the formula KMoWO(PO 4 )(P 2 O 7 ). (orig.)

  16. Integrating GRID tools to build a computing resource broker: activities of DataGrid WP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglano, C.; Barale, S.; Gaido, L.; Guarise, A.; Lusso, S.; Werbrouck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Resources on a computational Grid are geographically distributed, heterogeneous in nature, owned by different individuals or organizations with their own scheduling policies, have different access cost models with dynamically varying loads and availability conditions. This makes traditional approaches to workload management, load balancing and scheduling inappropriate. The first work package (WP1) of the EU-funded DataGrid project is addressing the issue of optimizing the distribution of jobs onto Grid resources based on a knowledge of the status and characteristics of these resources that is necessarily out-of-date (collected in a finite amount of time at a very loosely coupled site). The authors describe the DataGrid approach in integrating existing software components (from Condor, Globus, etc.) to build a Grid Resource Broker, and the early efforts to define a workable scheduling strategy

  17. Mobbing w miejscu pracy a regulacyjna rola strategii wpływu społecznego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Gamian-Wilk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Artykuł stanowi przegląd teoretyczny, dotyczący problematyki mobbinguw miejscu pracy z perspektywy przejawów wpływu społecznego. Porównanonegatywne działania, charakterystyczne dla mobbingu, do procesu manipulacji orazdo taktyk wpływu społecznego, pojawiających się w miejscu pracy. Przedstawionoźródła i czynniki ryzyka rozwoju mobbingu, które mogą ułatwiać lub dawać przyzwoleniena  stosowanie taktyk manipulacji. Wykazano, że  w  procesie mobbingu występują takie strategie wpływu społecznego, jak manipulacja w języku i procesiekomunikacji, ostracyzm czy też plotka. Dyskusji poddano regulacyjną rolę negatywnychsposobów oddziaływania i strategii wpływu dla funkcjonowania i przetrwaniagrupy i organizacji, co przyczyniać się może do utrwalania się rozwoju mobbingu.

  18. Labeling of the spent fuel waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbreth, W.G.; Chagari, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the containers used to store spent fuel in an underground repository must meet federal guidelines that call for unique labels that identify the contents and processing history. Existing standards in the nuclear power industry and relevant ASME/ANSI codes have been reviewed for possible application to the spent-fuel container labeling. An Array of labeling techniques were found that include recommendations for: fonts, word spacing, color combinations, label materials and mounting methods, placement, and content. The use of bar code, optical character recognition, and RF labels were also studied to meet the requirement that the container labels be consistent with the methods used to maintain the repository records

  19. Post emplacement environment of waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.; Oversby, V.M.; Wolery, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project to determine the changes in water chemistry due to reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with natural groundwater at temperatures up to 150 0 C. The reaction extent has been investigated as a function of rock-to-water ratio, temperature, reaction time, physical state of the samples, and geographic location of the samples within the tuff unit. Results of these experiments will be used to provide information on the water chemistry to be expected if a high-level waste repository were to be constructed in the Topopah Spring tuff. 6 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  20. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  1. Total-System Performance Assessment for the Yucca Mountain Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential site for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. Total-system performance-assessment simulations are performed to evaluate the safety of the site. Features, events, and processes have been systematically evaluated to determine which ones are significant to the safety assessment. Computer models of the disposal system have been developed within a probabilistic framework, including both engineered and natural components. Selected results are presented for three different total-system simulations, and the behavior of the disposal system is discussed. The results show that risk is dominated by igneous activity at early times, because the robust waste-package design prevents significant nominal (non-disruptive) releases for tens of thousands of years or longer. The uncertainty in the nominal performance is dominated by uncertainties related to waste-package corrosion at early times and by uncertainties in the natural system, most significantly infiltration, at late times

  2. Nuclear energy. Waste-packages activity measurement. Part. 1: high-resolution gamma spectrometry in integral mode with open geometry; ISO 14850-1: 2004. Energie nucleaire -- Mesurage de l'activite de colis de dechets. Partie 1: Spectrometrie gamma haute resolution en mode integral et geometrie ouverte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    ISO 14850:2004 describes a procedure for measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclide activity in homogeneous objects such as unconditioned waste (including process waste, dismantling waste, etc.), waste conditioned in various matrices (bitumen, hydraulic binder, thermosetting resins, etc.), notably in the form of 100 L, 200 L, 400 L or 800 L drums, and test specimens or samples, (vitrified waste), and waste packaged in a container, notably technological waste. It also specifies the calibration of the gamma spectrometry chain. The gamma energies used generally range from 0,05 MeV to 3 MeV.

  3. Nuclear energy - Waste-packages activity measurement - Part.1: high-resolution gamma spectrometry in integral mode with open geometry; ISO 14850-1:2004. Energie nucleaire - Mesurage de l'activite de colis de dechets - Partie 1: spectrometrie gamma haute resolution en mode integral et geometrie ouverte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    ISO 14850:2004 describes a procedure for measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclide activity in homogeneous objects such as unconditioned waste (including process waste, dismantling waste, etc.), waste conditioned in various matrices (bitumen, hydraulic binder, thermosetting resins, etc.), notably in the form of 100 L, 200 L, 400 L or 800 L drums, and test specimens or samples, (vitrified waste), and waste packaged in a container, notably technological waste. It also specifies the calibration of the gamma spectrometry chain. The gamma energies used generally range from 0,05 MeV to 3 MeV. (authors)

  4. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broz, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data through the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal

  5. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. E. Broz

    2008-12-22

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

  6. Monitoring system specifications: retrieval of surf from a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The task of developing specifications for a reference monitoring system determined by repository environmental conditions, retrieval operations, and federal regulatory criteria is discussed. The monitoring system specified in this report is capable of measuring (1) package position and orientation, (2) vault deformation, (3) brine accumulation, (4) spent fuel dissolution, (5) temperature, (6) nuclear radiation, and (7) package condition with sufficient accuracy to provide data input to a general risk assessment model. In order to define a monitoring system which can provide probabilistic data on radiological risk to operating personnel and the general public for a salt mine repository, the following information is required: (1) a complete design of the salt SURF repository including inventory, density and waste package design details; (2) probalistic failure rate data on containment integrity of the SURF waste package; (3) probabilistic failure rate data on the monitoring system components

  7. The German quality system for waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmerhagen, I.; Berg, H.P.; Brennecke, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)--Federal Office for Radiation protection--has to guarantee that the requirements resulting from different regulations concerning planning, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of a waste repository are fulfilled. In addition, the results of the safety assessments lead to nuclear-specific requirements on the design of the plant as well as to requirements on the radioactive waste packages intended to be disposed of. Therefore, the implementation of a quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) system is an essential task in order to ensure that the designed quality is achieved so that the necessary precaution against damage is taken. In this paper, a detailed description of QA and QC to be applied to the planned Konrad repository as well as the basic principles and the present status of the waste package QC are indicated and discussed

  8. A supramolecular photosensitizer system based on the host-guest complexation between water-soluble pillar[6]arene and methylene blue for durable photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Wen, Jia; Chao, Shuang; Liu, Jing; Yang, Ke; Pei, Yuxin; Pei, Zhichao

    2018-06-05

    A supramolecular photosensitizer system WP6-MB was synthesized based on water-soluble pillar[6]arene and the photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) via host-guest interaction. MB can complex with WP6 directly with a high complex constant without further modification. In particular, WP6-MB can reduce the dark toxicity of MB remarkably. Furthermore, it can efficiently overcome photobleaching and extend the time for singlet oxygen production of MB upon light irradiation, which is significant for durable photodynamic therapy.

  9. Hydrogen production using Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP 3-5 with hydrogen fermentation reactor effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi-Mei Lee; Kuo-Tsang Hung

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing the dark hydrogen fermentation stage effluents for photo hydrogen production using purple non-sulfur bacteria should be elucidated. In the previous experiments, Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5 was proven to efficiently produce hydrogen from the effluent of hydrogen fermentation reactors. The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained at a HRT value of 48 h when feeding a 5 fold effluent dilution from anaerobic hydrogen fermentation. Besides, hydrogen production occurred only when the NH 4 + concentration was below 17 mg-NH 4 + /l. Therefore, for successful fermentation effluent utilization, the most important things were to decrease the optimal HRT, increase the optimal substrate concentration and increase the tolerable ammonia concentration. In this study, a lab-scale serial photo-bioreactor was constructed. The reactor overall hydrogen production efficiency with synthetic wastewater exhibiting an organic acid profile identical to that of anaerobic hydrogen fermentation reactor effluent and with effluent from two anaerobic hydrogen fermentation reactors was evaluated. (authors)

  10. Thermal-hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    This chapter describes the physical processes and natural and engineered system conditions that affect thermal-hydrological (T-H) behavior in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain and how these effects are represented in mathematical and numerical models that are used to predict T-H conditions in the near field, altered zone, and engineered barrier system (EBS), and on waste package (WP) surfaces.

  11. Tent Preservation Project - Demonstration/Validation for Replacement of Aqueous Copper 8 Quinolinolate Treatment of Cotton Webbing With RO-59-WP

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bosselman, Suzanne E

    2008-01-01

    .... This report describes a demonstration/validation study of an alternative coating, RO-59-WP, as a potential additive to or replacement for Copper 8, which has been taken off the market several times...

  12. A comparison study of performance for three stand-alone PV systems used in rural electrification in Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I. M. Saleh; Kreama, N. M.; Khalat, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Rural photovoltaic electrification in Libya is a national program to electrify isolated villages, as part of this program 250 systems with a total peak power of about 300 K Wp has been put into work starting the beginning of the year 2003, the sizes of the systems are 1.8 K Wp, 1.2 K Wp, 0.75 K Wp, and 0.15 K Wp, the systems was designed to supply different family needs. All systems are equipped by a data logger to collect the system parameters. In this paper we will compare the performance of three different PV sizes through two year of work. The results showed that the systems are performing incomparable to the deigned parameters, very little power failure was reported, and there are technical and social issues has to be addressed before the installation of the PV system.(Author)

  13. Extremely high magnetoresistance and conductivity in the type-II Weyl semimetals WP2 and MoP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitesh; Sun, Yan; Xu, Nan; Manna, Kaustuv; Yao, Mengyu; Süss, Vicky; Leermakers, Inge; Young, Olga; Förster, Tobias; Schmidt, Marcus; Borrmann, Horst; Yan, Binghai; Zeitler, Uli; Shi, Ming; Felser, Claudia; Shekhar, Chandra

    2017-11-21

    The peculiar band structure of semimetals exhibiting Dirac and Weyl crossings can lead to spectacular electronic properties such as large mobilities accompanied by extremely high magnetoresistance. In particular, two closely neighboring Weyl points of the same chirality are protected from annihilation by structural distortions or defects, thereby significantly reducing the scattering probability between them. Here we present the electronic properties of the transition metal diphosphides, WP 2 and MoP 2 , which are type-II Weyl semimetals with robust Weyl points by transport, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Our single crystals of WP 2 display an extremely low residual low-temperature resistivity of 3 nΩ cm accompanied by an enormous and highly anisotropic magnetoresistance above 200 million % at 63 T and 2.5 K. We observe a large suppression of charge carrier backscattering in WP 2 from transport measurements. These properties are likely a consequence of the novel Weyl fermions expressed in this compound.

  14. Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Jain, S.; David Sevougian; Patrick D. Mattie; Kevin G. Mon; Robert J. Mackinnon

    2006-01-01

    A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model

  15. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  16. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17)

  17. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A System Simulation Model has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. This model can be used to quantify the impacts of different operating schedules, operational rules, system configurations, and equipment reliability and availability considerations on the performance of processes comprising the CRWMS and how these factors combine to determine overall system performance for the purpose of making system design decisions. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste

  18. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  19. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jaewoong; Liu, Z Lewis

    2015-04-01

    The aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of an intermediate subfamily within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily that clarified mechanisms of in situ detoxification of 2-furaldehyde and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) are common among tolerant candidate genes identified for lignocellulose-to-advanced biofuels conversion. This study presents partially purified proteins of two ORFs, YDR541C and YGL039W, and direct enzyme assay evidence against aldehyde-inhibitory compounds commonly encountered during lignocellulosic biomass fermentation processes. Each of the partially purified proteins encoded by these ORFs showed a molecular mass of approximately 38 kDa, similar to Ari1p, a protein encoded by aldehyde reductase gene. Both proteins demonstrated strong aldehyde reduction activities toward 14 aldehyde substrates, with high levels of reduction activity for Ydr541cp toward both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. While Ydr541cp was observed to have a significantly higher specific enzyme activity at 20 U/mg using co-factor NADPH, Ygl039wp displayed a NADH preference at 25 U/mg in reduction of butylaldehyde. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a characteristic catalytic triad, Ser, Tyr and Lys; a conserved catalytic motif of Tyr-X-X-X-Lys; and a cofactor-binding sequence motif, Gly-X-X-Gly-X-X-Ala, near the N-terminus that are shared by Ydr541cp, Ygl039wp, Yol151wp/GRE2 and Ari1p. Findings of aldehyde reductase genes contribute to the yeast gene annotation and aids development of the next-generation biocatalyst for advanced biofuels production. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the civilian radioactive waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a System Simulation Model which has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste