WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste simulant solutions

  1. Preparation of Simulated Waste Solutions for Solvent Extraction Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, R.A.

    2000-06-27

    Personnel will need to routinely prepare 0.5 to 10 L batches of salt solutions simulating Savannah River Site (SRS) soluble waste for solvent extraction testing. This report describes the compositions and preparation methods.

  2. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

    2010-09-27

    To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between

  3. Nuclear waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Darrel D.; Ebra, Martha A.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  4. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Danielson; SG Pitman

    2000-02-23

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy{reg_sign} C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment.

  5. Electrodriven selective transport of Cs+ using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in polymer inclusion membrane: a novel approach for cesium removal from simulated nuclear waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Goswami, Asok

    2014-11-04

    The work describes a novel and cleaner approach of electrodriven selective transport of Cs from simulated nuclear waste solutions through cellulose tri acetate (CTA)/poly vinyl chloride (PVC) based polymer inclusion membrane. The electrodriven cation transport together with the use of highly Cs+ selective hexachlorinated derivative of cobalt bis dicarbollide, allows to achieve selective separation of Cs+ from high concentration of Na+ and other fission products in nuclear waste solutions. The transport selectivity has been studied using radiotracer technique as well as atomic emission spectroscopic technique. Transport studies using CTA based membrane have been carried out from neutral solution as well as 0.4 M HNO3, while that with PVC based membrane has been carried out from 3 M HNO3. High decontamination factor for Cs+ over Na+ has been obtained in all the cases. Experiment with simulated high level waste solution shows selective transport of Cs+ from most of other fission products also. Significantly fast Cs+ transport rate along with high selectivity is an interesting feature observed in this membrane. The current efficiency for Cs+ transport has been found to be ∼100%. The promising results show the possibility of using this kind of electrodriven membrane transport methods for nuclear waste treatment.

  6. Reuse of hydroponic waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramasamy Rajesh; Cho, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Attaining sustainable agriculture is a key goal in many parts of the world. The increased environmental awareness and the ongoing attempts to execute agricultural practices that are economically feasible and environmentally safe promote the use of hydroponic cultivation. Hydroponics is a technology for growing plants in nutrient solutions with or without the use of artificial medium to provide mechanical support. Major problems for hydroponic cultivation are higher operational cost and the causing of pollution due to discharge of waste nutrient solution. The nutrient effluent released into the environment can have negative impacts on the surrounding ecosystems as well as the potential to contaminate the groundwater utilized by humans for drinking purposes. The reuse of non-recycled, nutrient-rich hydroponic waste solution for growing plants in greenhouses is the possible way to control environmental pollution. Many researchers have successfully grown several plant species in hydroponic waste solution with high yield. Hence, this review addresses the problems associated with the release of hydroponic waste solution into the environment and possible reuse of hydroponic waste solution as an alternative resource for agriculture development and to control environmental pollution.

  7. Simulation of ceramic materials relevant for nuclear waste management: Case of La1-xEuxPO4 solid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Ji, Yaqi; Li, Yan; Arinicheva, Yulia; Beridze, George; Neumeier, Stefan; Bukaemskiy, Andrey; Bosbach, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Using powerful computational resources and state-of-the-art methods of computational chemistry we contribute to the research on novel nuclear waste forms by providing atomic scale description of processes that govern the structural incorporation and the interactions of radionuclides in host materials. Here we present various results of combined computational and experimental studies on La1-xEuxPO4 monazite-type solid solution. We discuss the performance of DFT + U method with the Hubbard U parameter value derived ab initio, and the derivation of various structural, thermodynamic and radiation-damage related properties. We show a correlation between the cation displacement probabilities and the solubility data, indicating that the binding of cations is the driving factor behind both processes. The combined atomistic modeling and experimental studies result in a superior characterization of the investigated material.

  8. Simulated Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, Robert; Lingenheil, Martin; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2009-10-13

    For the enhanced conformational sampling in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we present "simulated solute tempering" (SST) which is an easy to implement variant of simulated tempering. SST extends conventional simulated tempering (CST) by key concepts of "replica exchange with solute tempering" (REST, Liu et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 13749). We have applied SST, CST, and REST to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of an alanine octapeptide in explicit water. The weight parameters required for CST and SST are determined by two different formulas whose performance is compared. For SST only one of them yields a uniform sampling of the temperature space. Compared to CST and REST, SST provides the highest exchange probabilities between neighboring rungs in the temperature ladder. Concomitantly, SST leads to the fastest diffusion of the simulation system through the temperature space, in particular, if the "even-odd" exchange scheme is employed in SST. As a result, SST exhibits the highest sampling speed of the investigated tempering methods.

  9. Thermal and physical property determination for IONSIV/256 IE-911 crystalline silicotitanate and Savannah River Site waste simulant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-08

    This document describes physical and thermophysical property determinations that were made in order to resolve questions associated with the decontamination of Savannah River Site waste streams using ion exchange on crystalline silicotitanate.

  10. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  11. CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-12-09

    Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel

  12. Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

    2012-07-10

    The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

  13. Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

    2011-09-01

    The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

  14. Processing of waste solutions from electrochemical decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlot, L.A.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Hooper, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The use of electropolishing as a decontamination technique will be effective only if we can minimize the amount of secondary waste requiring disposal and economically recycle part of the decontamination electrolyte. Consequently, a solution purification method is needed to remove the dissolved contamination and metal in the electrolyte. This report describes the selection of a purification method for a phosphoric acid electrolyte from the following possible acid reclamation processes: ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation, distillation, electrolysis, and membrane separation.

  15. Treatment for hydrazine-containing waste water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yade, N.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment for waste solutions containing hydrazine is presented. The invention attempts oxidation and decomposition of hydrazine in waste water in a simple and effective processing. The method adds activated charcoal to waste solutions containing hydrazine while maintaining a pH value higher than 8, and adding iron salts if necessary. Then, the solution is aerated.

  16. Strontium and Actinide Separations from High Level Nuclear Waste Solutions using Monosodium Titanate - Actual Waste Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs,D.T.; Walker, D.D.; Fondeur, F.F.; Norato, M.A.; Pulmano, R.L.; Fink, S.D.

    2005-11-01

    Pretreatment processes at the Savannah River Site will separate {sup 90}Sr, alpha-emitting and radionuclides (i.e., actinides) and {sup 137}Cs prior to disposal of the high-level nuclear waste. Separation of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides occurs by ion exchange/adsorption using an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). Previously reported testing with simulants indicates that the MST exhibits high selectivity for strontium and actinides in high ionic strength and strongly alkaline salt solutions. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from actual waste solutions. These tests evaluated the effects of ionic strength, mixing, elevated alpha activities, and multiple contacts of the waste with MST. Tests also provided confirmation that MST performs well at much larger laboratory scales (300-700 times larger) and exhibits little affinity for desorption of strontium and plutonium during washing.

  17. Simulation of ceramic materials relevant for nuclear waste management: Case of La{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}PO{sub 4} solid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Piotr M., E-mail: p.kowalski@fz-juelich.de; Ji, Yaqi; Li, Yan; Arinicheva, Yulia; Beridze, George; Neumeier, Stefan; Bukaemskiy, Andrey; Bosbach, Dirk

    2017-02-15

    Using powerful computational resources and state-of-the-art methods of computational chemistry we contribute to the research on novel nuclear waste forms by providing atomic scale description of processes that govern the structural incorporation and the interactions of radionuclides in host materials. Here we present various results of combined computational and experimental studies on La{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}PO{sub 4} monazite-type solid solution. We discuss the performance of DFT + U method with the Hubbard U parameter value derived ab initio, and the derivation of various structural, thermodynamic and radiation-damage related properties. We show a correlation between the cation displacement probabilities and the solubility data, indicating that the binding of cations is the driving factor behind both processes. The combined atomistic modeling and experimental studies result in a superior characterization of the investigated material.

  18. Importance of waste composition for Life Cycle Assessment of waste management solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisinella, Valentina; Götze, Ramona; Conradsen, Knut

    2017-01-01

    The composition of waste materials has fundamental influence on environmental emissions associated with waste treatment, recycling and disposal, and may play an important role also for the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of waste management solutions. However, very few assessments include effects...... tool for systematically assessing the importance of waste composition and for consciously collecting and using waste composition data within LCAs of waste management systems....... of the waste composition and waste LCAs often rely on poorly justified data from secondary sources. This study systematically quantifiesy the influence and uncertainty on LCA results associated with selection of waste composition data. Three archetypal waste management scenarios were modelled with the waste...

  19. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  20. Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

    2011-08-15

    'The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste feed delivery to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hall (2008) includes WTP acceptance criteria that describe physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be certified as acceptable before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST. The objectives of Washington River Protection Solutions' (WRPS) Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project are to understand and demonstrate the DST sampling and batch transfer performance at multiple scales using slurry simulants comprised of UDS particles and liquid (Townson 2009). The SSMD project utilizes geometrically scaled DST feed tanks to generate mixing, sampling, and transfer test data. In Phase 2 of the testing, RPP-49740, the 5-part simulant defined in RPP-48358 was used as the waste slurry simulant. The Phase 2 test data are being used to estimate the expected performance of the prototypic systems in the full-scale DSTs. As such, understanding of the how the small-scale systems as well as the simulant relate to the full-scale DSTs and actual waste is required. The focus of this report is comparison of the size and density of the 5-part SSMD simulant to that of the Hanford waste. This is accomplished by computing metrics for particle mobilization, suspension, settling, transfer line intake, and pipeline transfer from the characterization of the 5-part SSMD simulant and characterizations of the Hanford waste. In addition, the effects of the suspending fluid characteristics on the test results are considered, and a computational fluid dynamics tool useful to quantify uncertainties from simulant selections is discussed.'

  1. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-08-11

    This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  2. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-11-29

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams.

  3. Waste management outlook for mountain regions: Sources and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semernya, Larisa; Ramola, Aditi; Alfthan, Björn; Giacovelli, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    Following the release of the global waste management outlook in 2015, the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), through its International Environmental Technology Centre, is elaborating a series of region-specific and thematic waste management outlooks that provide policy recommendations and solutions based on current practices in developing and developed countries. The Waste Management Outlook for Mountain Regions is the first report in this series. Mountain regions present unique challenges to waste management; while remoteness is often associated with costly and difficult transport of waste, the potential impact of waste pollutants is higher owing to the steep terrain and rivers transporting waste downstream. The Outlook shows that waste management in mountain regions is a cross-sectoral issue of global concern that deserves immediate attention. Noting that there is no 'one solution fits all', there is a need for a more landscape-type specific and regional research on waste management, the enhancement of policy and regulatory frameworks, and increased stakeholder engagement and awareness to achieve sustainable waste management in mountain areas. This short communication provides an overview of the key findings of the Outlook and highlights aspects that need further research. These are grouped per source of waste: Mountain communities, tourism, and mining. Issues such as waste crime, plastic pollution, and the linkages between exposure to natural disasters and waste are also presented.

  4. Analysis of Discharged Gas from Incinerator using Simulated Organic Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungil; Kim, Hyunki; Heo, Jun; Kang, Dukwon [HaJI Co., Ltd., Radiation Eng. Center, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yunbok; Kwon, Youngbock [KORAD, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Korea has no experience of treatment of RI organic waste and appropriate measures for treatment of organic waste did not suggested. RI organic wastes which are occurring in KOREA are stored at the RI waste storage building of KORAD. But they can't no more receive the RI organic waste because the storage facility for RI organic waste was saturated with these organic wastes. In case of Japan, they recognized the dangerousness of long-term storage for RI organic wastes. In case of Korea, the released concentration of gaseous pollutant from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.1 of the Notification No. 2012-60 of Nuclear Safety Commission and attached table No.8 of Clean Air Conservation Act. And the dioxin from the incinerator is regulated by attached table No.3 of Persistent Organic Pollutants Control Act. This experiment was performed to examine whether the incinerator introduced from Japan is manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and to confirm the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws especially attached table No.1 of NSC using simulated organic waste solution. In this experiment, we examined whether the incinerator was manufactured suitably for municipal law regulation and confirmed the compliance about the gaseous pollutant released from incinerator with the above-mentioned laws using simulated organic waste solution. The design requirement of incinerator for RI organic waste in the municipal law regulation is proposed briefly but the requirements for more detail about the incinerator are proposed in regulation of Japan. The incinerator used in this experiment is satisfied with all clauses of the domestic as well as Japan. Multiple safety functions were installed in the incinerator such as air purge system to remove unburned inflammable gases in the furnace and earthquake detector. Also, perfect combustion of RI organic waste is achieved because the temperature in the furnace

  5. Simulation analysis of wastes gasification technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year a significant growth in the amount of wastes generated is observed. Due to this fact technologies enabling utilization of wastes are needed. One of the ways to utilizes wastes is thermal conversion. Most widely used technology for thermal conversion is gasification that enables to produce syngas that can be either combusted or directed to further synthesis to produce methanol or liquid fuels. There are several commercially available technologies that enable to gasify wastes. The first part of this study is subjected to general description of waste gasification process. Furthermore the analysis and comparison of commercially available gasification technologies is presented, including their process arrangement, limits and capabilities. Second part of the study is dedicated to the development of thermodynamic model for waste gasification. The model includes three zones of gasification reactors: drying, gasification and eventually ash melting. Modified Gibbs minimization method is used to simulate gasification process. The model is capable of predicting final gas composition as a function of temperature or equivalence ratio. Calculations are performed for a specified average wastes composition and different equivalence ratios of air to discuss its influence on the performance of gasification (temperature of the process and gas composition. Finally the model enables to calculate total energy balance of the process as well as gasification and final gas temperature.

  6. Characterisation of waste solutions to determine optimised P recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K; Ho, G E

    2001-11-01

    A number of waste solutions from processes operating in Western Australia (anaerobic digester supernatants, facultative lagoon treated piggery and abattoir waste effluents) were characterised chemically and by automated titration to determine acid-base characteristics. Titrations were over the pH range 2-12 or less. All waste solutions were excess molar ratios of NH3-N to PO4-P (5:1 up to 20:1). The amounts of acid or base reagent required for each waste solution type were in the sequence anaerobic digestor supernatant>piggery effluent>abattoir effluent. The most efficient removal of N and P of the field samples considered is from piggery effluent. The results indicate conditions for optmising the removal of N and P by precipitation (predominantly struvite) as well as the way forward in determining the full scope of N and P waste streams for which recycling by precipitation (either magnesium or calcium based salts) may be feasible.

  7. Industrial Water Waste, Problems and the Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alif Noor Anna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the long term development in Indonesia has changed agricultural sector to the industrial sector. This development can apparently harm our own people. This is due to the waste that is produced from factories. The waste from various factories seems to have different characteristics. This defference encourages us to be able to find out different of methods of managing waste so that cost can be reduced, especially in water treatment. In order that industrial development and environmental preservation can run together in balance, many institutions involved should be consider, especially in the industrial chain, the environment, and human resource, these three elements can be examined in terms of their tolerance to waste.

  8. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance...... of a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway efficiencies...... 15-40% compared with incineration), albeit at the potential expense of additional toxic emissions to soil. Society's need for the outputs from waste, i.e., energy products (electricity vs transport fuels) and resources (e.g., phosphorus), and the available waste composition were found decisive...

  9. Community Solutions for Indonesia's Waste | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-19

    Oct 19, 2010 ... People who work as garbage scavengers face risks of bacterial contamination or exposure to hazardous products. Dioxins circulate when garbage containing polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is burned in neighbourhoods that have no waste collection. A 2004 World Bank report states that Indonesia's public ...

  10. Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoc, Uyen Nguyen; Schnitzer, Hans

    2009-06-01

    Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be applied successfully with today's technical possibilities in the agro-based processing industry. First, the state-of-the-art of waste management in Southeast Asian countries will be outlined in this paper, followed by waste generation rates, sources, and composition, as well as future trends of waste. Further on, solutions for solid waste management will be reviewed in the discussions of sustainable waste management. The paper emphasizes the concept of waste prevention through utilization of all wastes as process inputs, leading to the possibility of creating an ecosystem in a loop of materials. Also, a case study, focusing on the citrus processing industry, is displayed to illustrate the application of the aggregated material input-output model in a widespread processing industry in ASEAN. The model can be shown as a closed cluster, which permits an identification of opportunities for reducing environmental impacts at the process level in the food processing industry. Throughout the discussion in this paper, the utilization of renewable energy and economic aspects are considered to adapt to environmental and economic issues and the aim of eco-efficiency. Additionally, the opportunities and constraints of waste management will be discussed.

  11. STRONTIUM-90 LIQUID CONCENTRATION SOLUBILITY CORRELATION IN THE HANFORD TANK WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOHL, T.; PLACE, D.; WITTMAN, R.

    2004-08-05

    A new correlation was developed to estimate the concentration of strontium-90 in a waste solution based on total organic carbon. This correlation replaces the strontium-90 wash factors, and when applied in the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator, significantly reduced the estimated quantity of strontium-90 in the delivered low-activity waste feed. This is thought to be a more realistic estimate of strontium-90 than using the wash-factor method.

  12. Photochemical oxidation: A solution for the mixed waste dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prellberg, J.W.; Thornton, L.M.; Cheuvront, D.A. [Vulcan Peroxidation Systems, Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Numerous technologies are available to remove organic contamination from water or wastewater. A variety of techniques also exist that are used to neutralize radioactive waste. However, few technologies can satisfactorily address the treatment of mixed organic/radioactive waste without creating unacceptable secondary waste products or resulting in extremely high treatment costs. An innovative solution to the mixed waste problem is on-site photochemical oxidation. Liquid-phase photochemical oxidation has a long- standing history of successful application to the destruction of organic compounds. By using photochemical oxidation, the organic contaminants are destroyed on-site leaving the water, with radionuclides, that can be reused or disposed of as appropriate. This technology offers advantages that include zero air emissions, no solid or liquid waste formation, and relatively low treatment cost. Discussion of the photochemical process will be described, and several case histories from recent design testing, including cost analyses for the resulting full-scale installations, will be presented as examples.

  13. Accurate simulation of protein dynamics in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M.; Sharon, R. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1988-10-01

    Simulation of the molecular dynamics of a small protein, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, was found to be more realistic when water molecules were included than when in vacuo: the time-averaged structure was much more like that observed in high-resolution x-ray studies, the amplitudes of atomic vibration in solution were smaller, and fewer incorrect hydrogen bonds were formed. The authors approach, which provides a sound basis for reliable simulation of diverse properties of biological macromolecules in solution, uses atom-centered forces and classical mechanics.

  14. Food waste in Central Europe – challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Boer Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Food waste is an important issue in the global economy. In the EU many activities aimed at this topic are carried out, however in Central Europe is still quite pristine. There is lack of reliable data on food waste quantities in this region, and not many preventive actions are taken. To improve this situation the STREFOWA (Strategies to Reduce and Manage Food Waste in Central Europe was initiated. It is an international project (Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy, Poland, founded by the Interreg Central Europe programme, running from July 2016 to June 2019. Its main purpose is to provide solutions to prevent and manage food waste throughout the entire food supply chain. The results of STREFOWA will have positive economical, social and environmental impacts.

  15. Food waste in Central Europe - challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Jan; Kobel, Przemysław; Dyjakon, Arkadiusz; Urbańska, Klaudia; Obersteiner, Gudrun; Hrad, Marlies; Schmied, Elisabeth; den Boer, Emilia

    2017-11-01

    Food waste is an important issue in the global economy. In the EU many activities aimed at this topic are carried out, however in Central Europe is still quite pristine. There is lack of reliable data on food waste quantities in this region, and not many preventive actions are taken. To improve this situation the STREFOWA (Strategies to Reduce and Manage Food Waste in Central Europe) was initiated. It is an international project (Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy, Poland), founded by the Interreg Central Europe programme, running from July 2016 to June 2019. Its main purpose is to provide solutions to prevent and manage food waste throughout the entire food supply chain. The results of STREFOWA will have positive economical, social and environmental impacts.

  16. Radioactive Waste...The Problem and Some Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Jean-Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear safety is a highly technical and controversial subject that has caused much heated debate and political concern. This article examines the problems involved in managing radioactive wastes and the techniques now used. Potential solutions are suggested and the need for international cooperation is stressed. (Author/MA)

  17. Carbon Market and Integrated Waste Solutions : a Case Study of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carbon Market and Integrated Waste Solutions : a Case Study of Indonesia. The Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) was established in 1997 with the dual purpose of helping developing countries achieve sustainable development (as defined nationally) and industrialized countries achieve compliance ...

  18. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part II: Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, and Am onto 32 absorbers from four variations of Hanford tank 101-SY simulant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. In this second part of our three-part investigation of the effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products, we measured the sorption of strontium, cesium, technetium, and americium onto 32 absorbers that offer high sorption of these elements in the absence of organic complexants. The four solutions tested were (1) a simulant for a 3:1 dilution of Hanford Tank 101-SY contents that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), (2) this simulant after gamma-irradiation to 34 Mrads, (3) the unirradiated simulant after treatment with a hydrothermal organic-destruction process, and (4) the irradiated simulant after hydrothermal processing. For each of 512 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kds) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of our 3,072 measured Kd values, the sorption of strontium and americium is significantly decreased by the organic components of the simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of cesium and technetium appears unaffected by the organic components of the simulant solutions.

  19. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-15

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ), and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  20. An eco friendly solution to the food waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, G. Reddy; Kumar, G. Madhav

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, waste disposal at workmen camp is one of the major problems being faced by many nations across the world. In the workmen colony at Chittapur, a series of kitchens were built for cooking purpose and a number of small canteens are also functioning. Considerable quantity of food waste is collected daily from these eateries and disposed at a faraway place. Food waste is highly degradable in nature, if not disposed properly it causes problems related to environmental pollution. Hence, it is very important to identify an environment friendly process rather than opt for land filling or any disposal method. We worked together to find a suitable eco-friendly solution for the food waste disposal at Chittapur site and suggested that biogas production through anaerobic digestion is a solution for the disposal and utilization of food waste for better purpose. This resulted in setting up a 500 kg per day food waste treatment biogas plant at Chittapur. This establishment is the first time in the construction industry at workmen camp in India. Anaerobic Digestion has been recognized as one of the best options that is available for treating food waste, as it generates two valuable end products, biogas and compost. Biogas is a mixture of CH4 and CO2 about (55:45). Biogas generated can be used for thermal applications such as cooking or for generating electricity. The digested slurry is a well stabilized organic manure and can be used as soil fertilizer. Plant design is to handle 500 kg of food waste /day. 27 kg LPG is obtained from 500kg of kitchen waste. The Value of 27 kg of LPG is Rs.2700/day. Daily 1000 litres of digested effluent was obtained. It is good organic manure with plant micro nutrients and macro nutrients. This can be used for growing plants and in agriculture. The value of manure per day is Rs.250/-. The annual revenue is Rs.10.62 lakhs and the annual expenditure is 1.8 lakhs. The net benefit is 8.82 lakhs. Payback period is 2.1 years. This process

  1. Women, e-waste, and technological solutions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Lucy; Magee, Amanda; Hale, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    In this paper, we argue that a crossover class of climate change solutions (which we term "technological solutions") may disproportionately and adversely impact some populations over others. We begin by situating our discussion in the wider climate discourse, particularly with regard to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Basel Convention. We then suggest that many of the most attractive technological solutions to climate change, such as solar energy and electric car batteries, will likely add to the rapidly growing stream of electronic waste ("e-waste"). This e-waste may have negative downstream effects on otherwise disenfranchised populations. We argue that e-waste burdens women unfairly and disproportionately, affecting their mortality/morbidity and fertility, as well as the development of their children. Building on this, we claim that these injustices are more accurately captured as problems of recognition rather than distribution, since women are often institutionally under-acknowledged both in the workplace and in the home. Without institutional support and representation, women and children are deprived of adequate safety equipment, health precautions, and health insurance. Finally, we return to the question of climate justice in the context of the human right to health and argue for greater inclusion and recognition of women waste workers and other disenfranchised groups in forging future climate agreements. Copyright © 2014 McAllister, Magee. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  2. Sustainable Solutions for Municipal Solid Waste Management in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Thaniya Kaosol

    2009-01-01

    General as well as the MSW management in Thailand is reviewed in this paper. Topics include the MSW generation, sources, composition, and trends. The review, then, moves to sustainable solutions for MSW management, sustainable alternative approaches with an emphasis on an integrated MSW management. Information of waste in Thailand is also given at the beginning of this paper for better understanding of later contents. It is clear that no one single method of MSW disposal can deal with all mat...

  3. Geopolymerisation of fly ashes with waste aluminium anodising etching solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundiran, M B; Nugteren, H W; Witkamp, G J

    2016-10-01

    Combined management of coal combustion fly ash and waste aluminium anodising etching solutions using geopolymerisation presents economic and environmental benefits. The possibility of using waste aluminium anodising etching solution (AES) as activator to produce fly ash geopolymers in place of the commonly used silicate solutions was explored in this study. Geopolymerisation capacities of five European fly ashes with AES and the leaching of elements from their corresponding geopolymers were studied. Conventional commercial potassium silicate activator-based geopolymers were used as a reference. The geopolymers produced were subjected to physical, mechanical and leaching tests. The leaching of elements was tested on 28 days cured and crushed geopolymers using NEN 12457-4, NEN 7375, SPLP and TCLP leaching tests. After 28 days ambient curing, the geopolymers based on the etching solution activator showed compressive strength values between 51 and 84 MPa, whereas the commercial potassium silicate based geopolymers gave compressive strength values between 89 and 115 MPa. Based on the regulatory limits currently associated with the used leaching tests, all except one of the produced geopolymers (with above threshold leaching of As and Se) passed the recommended limits. The AES-geopolymer geopolymers demonstrated excellent compressive strength, although less than geopolymers made from commercial activator. Additionally, they demonstrated low element leaching potentials and therefore can be suitable for use in construction works. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfates in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to demonstrate evaporation of a simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations, in order to predict the composition of the effluents from the EMF evaporator to aid in planning for their disposition. This document describes the results of that test using the core simulant. This simulant formulation is designated as the “core simulant”; other additives will be included for specific testing, such as volatiles for evaporation or hazardous metals for measuring leaching properties of waste forms. The results indicate that the simulant can easily be concentrated via evaporation. During that the pH adjustment step in simulant preparation, ammonium is quickly converted to ammonia, and most of the ammonia was stripped from the simulated waste and partitioned to the condensate. Additionally, it was found that after concentrating (>12x) and cooling that a small amount of LiF and Na3(SO4)F precipitate out of solution. With the exception of ammonia, analysis of the condensate indicated very low to below detectable levels of many of the constituents in the simulant, yielding very high decontamination factors (DF).

  5. Low-level tank waste simulant data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-04-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent N- Reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST) in the form of liquids, slurries, sludges, and salt cakes. The tank waste remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. This report discusses three principle topics: the need for and basis for selecting target or reference LLW simulants, tanks waste analyses and simulants that have been defined, developed, and used for the GDP and activities in support of preparing and characterizing simulants for the current LLW vitrification project. The procedures and the data that were generated to characterized the LLW vitrification simulants were reported and are presented in this report. The final section of this report addresses the applicability of the data to the current program and presents recommendations for additional data needs including characterization and simulant compositional variability studies.

  6. Community Solutions to Solid Waste Pollution. Operation Waste Watch: The New Three Rs for Elementary School. Grade 6. [Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

    This publication, the last in a series of seven for elementary schools, is an environmental education curriculum guide with a focus on waste management issues. It contains a unit of exercises selected for sixth grade students focusing on community solutions to solid waste pollution. Waste management activities included in this unit seek to…

  7. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...... potential functions. However, system-size limitations and statistical noise cause uncertainties in the functions at long range, and thus uncertainties or errors in the integrals. A number of methods such as truncation, distance shifting, long-range modeling, transforms, DCF matching, finite-size scaling...

  8. WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-03-20

    The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the

  9. Worst-Case" Simulant for INTEC Soduim-Bearing Waste Vitrification Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Jerry Dale; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is developing technologies to process the radioactive liquid sodium-bearing waste from the waste tanks at INTEC to solidify the waste into a form suitable for disposition in a National high-level waste repository currently being considered at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The requirement is for a qualified glass waste form. Therefore, vitrification is being developed using laboratory, research-scale, and pilot scale melters. While some laboratory experiments can be done with actual waste, the larger scale and most laboratory experiments must be done on non-radioactive simulant waste solutions. Some tests have previously been done on simulants of a representative waste that has been concentrated and will remain unchanged in tank WM-180 until it is vitrified. However, there is a need to develop glass compositions that will accommodate all future wastes in the tanks. Estimates of those future waste compositions have been used along with current compositions to develop a “worst-case” waste composition and a simulant preparation recipe suitable for developing a bracketing glass formulation and for characterizing the flowpath and decontamination factors of pertinent off-gas constituents in the vitrification process. The considerations include development of criteria for a worst-case composition. In developing the criteria, the species that are known to affect vitrification and glass properties were considered. Specific components that may need to be characterized in the off-gas cleanup system were considered in relation to detection limits that would need to be exceeded in order to track those components. Chemical aspects of various constituent interactions that should be taken into account when a component may need to be increased in concentration from that in the actual waste for detection in experiments were evaluated. The worst-case waste simulant composition is comprised of the highest concentration of each

  10. Using simulation to assess the opportunities of dynamic waste collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.; Bangsow, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  11. Using Simulation to Assess the Opportunities of Dynamic Waste Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.

    In this paper, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  12. An innovative simulation tool for waste to energy generation opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Abderezzak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new world energy policies encourage the use of renewable energy sources with clean technologies, and abandon progressively the fossil fuel dependence. Another energy generation trend called commonly the “Waste-to-Energy” solution, uses organic waste as a response for two major problems: energy generation and waste management. Thanks to the anaerobic digestion, the organic waste can provide a biogas composed essentially from Carbone dioxide (CO2 and Methane (CH4. This work aims essentially to help students, researchers and even decision makers to consider the importance of biogas generation. The proposed tool is the last version of our previous tool which is enhanced and completed. It presents the potential to produce biogas of any shortlisted kind of waste, including also some energy valorization ways. A technical economical data are introduced for eventual feasibility studies.

  13. Ammonia nitrogen removal from aqueous solution by local agricultural wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azreen, I.; Lija, Y.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Excess ammonia nitrogen in the waterways causes serious distortion to environment such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic organisms. Ammonia nitrogen removal from synthetic solution was investigated by using 40 local agricultural wastes as potential low cost adsorbent. Some of the adsorbent were able to remove ammonia nitrogen with adsorption capacity ranging from 0.58 mg/g to 3.58 mg/g. The highest adsorption capacity was recorded by Langsat peels with 3.58 mg/g followed by Jackfruit seeds and Moringa peels with 3.37 mg/g and 2.64 mg/g respectively. This experimental results show that the agricultural wastes can be utilized as biosorbent for ammonia nitrogen removal. The effect of initial ammonia nitrogen concentration, pH and stirring rate on the adsorption process were studied in batch experiment. The adsorption capacity reached maximum value at pH 7 with initial concentration of 500 mg/L and the removal rate decreased as stirring rate was applied.

  14. VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

  15. Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

  16. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  17. Thermal properties of simulated Hanford waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Canfield, Nathan L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rönnebro, Ewa C. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington

    2017-03-20

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the mixed hazardous wastes generated from 45 years of plutonium production. The molten glasses will be poured into stainless steel containers or canisters and subsequently quenched for storage and disposal. Such highly energy-consuming processes require precise thermal properties of materials for appropriate facility design and operations. Key thermal properties (heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity) of representative high-level and low-activity waste glasses were studied as functions of temperature in the range of 200 to 800°C (relevant to the cooling process), implementing simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermal gravimetry (DSC-TGA), Xe-flash diffusivity, pycnometry, and dilatometry. The study showed that simultaneous DSC-TGA would be a reliable method to obtain heat capacity of various glasses at the temperature of interest. Accurate thermal properties from this study were shown to provide a more realistic guideline for capacity and time constraint of heat removal process, in comparison to the design basis conservative engineering estimates. The estimates, though useful for design in the absence measured physical properties, can now be supplanted and the measured thermal properties can be used in design verification activities.

  18. 78 FR 14773 - U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit-Medical Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit--Medical Waste AGENCY: International... of medical waste. The Department of Commerce continues to develop the web-based U.S. Environmental... address, contact information, and medical waste management category of interest from the following list...

  19. 78 FR 14774 - U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit-Universal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ...: (a) Mercury Recycling Technology (b) E-Waste Recycling Technology (c) CRT Recycling Technology (d... International Trade Administration U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit--Universal Waste AGENCY: International... of universal waste. The Department of Commerce continues to develop the web-based U.S. Environmental...

  20. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage.

  1. Reaction chemistry of nitrogen species in hydrothermal systems: Simple reactions, waste simulants, and actual wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell`Orco, P.; Luan, L.; Proesmans, P.; Wilmanns, E.

    1995-02-01

    Results are presented from hydrothermal reaction systems containing organic components, nitrogen components, and an oxidant. Reaction chemistry observed in simple systems and in simple waste simulants is used to develop a model which presents global nitrogen chemistry in these reactive systems. The global reaction path suggested is then compared with results obtained for the treatment of an actual waste stream containing only C-N-0-H species.

  2. Investigation of thermolytic hydrogen generation rate of tank farm simulated and actual waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-15

    To support resolution of Potential Inadequacies in the Safety Analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm, Savannah River National Laboratory conducted research to determine the thermolytic hydrogen generation rate (HGR) with simulated and actual waste. Gas chromatography methods were developed and used with air-purged flow systems to quantify hydrogen generation from heated simulated and actual waste at rates applicable to the Tank Farm Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). Initial simulant tests with a simple salt solution plus sodium glycolate demonstrated the behavior of the test apparatus by replicating known HGR kinetics. Additional simulant tests with the simple salt solution excluding organics apart from contaminants provided measurement of the detection and quantification limits for the apparatus with respect to hydrogen generation. Testing included a measurement of HGR on actual SRS tank waste from Tank 38. A final series of measurements examined HGR for a simulant with the most common SRS Tank Farm organics at temperatures up to 140 °C. The following conclusions result from this testing.

  3. A study on reusing of electroless Ni-Cu-P waste solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Lee-Sik [Pukyong National University, Pusan(Korea)

    2001-04-30

    Reusing of electroless Ni-Cu-P waste solution was investigated in the plating time, plating rate, solution composition and deposit. Plating time of nickel-catalytic surface took longer than that of zincated-catalytic surface. Initial solution with 50% waste solution additive at batch type was possible to reusing of waste solution. Plating time of initial solution at continuous type took longer 10 times over than that of batch type. Plating time of 50% waste solution additive at continuous type took longer 3.7 times over than that of batch type. Component change of nickel-copper for electroless deposition was greatly affected by deposited inferiority and larger decreased plating rate. (author). 11 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  4. Numerical simulation of waste tyres gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janajreh, Isam; Raza, Syed Shabbar

    2015-05-01

    Gasification is a thermochemical pathway used to convert carbonaceous feedstock into syngas (CO and H2) in a deprived oxygen environment. The process can accommodate conventional feedstock such as coal, discarded waste including plastics, rubber, and mixed waste owing to the high reactor temperature (1000 °C-1600 °C). Pyrolysis is another conversion pathway, yet it is more selective to the feedstock owing to the low process temperature (350 °C-550 °C). Discarded tyres can be subjected to pyrolysis, however, the yield involves the formation of intermediate radicals additional to unconverted char. Gasification, however, owing to the higher temperature and shorter residence time, is more opted to follow quasi-equilibrium and being predictive. In this work, tyre crumbs are subjected to two levels of gasification modelling, i.e. equilibrium zero dimension and reactive multi-dimensional flow. The objective is to investigate the effect of the amount of oxidising agent on the conversion of tyre granules and syngas composition in a small 20 kW cylindrical gasifier. Initially the chemical compositions of several tyre samples are measured following the ASTM procedures for proximate and ultimate analysis as well as the heating value. The measured data are used to carry out equilibrium-based and reactive flow gasification. The result shows that both models are reasonably predictive averaging 50% gasification efficiency, the devolatilisation is less sensitive than the char conversion to the equivalence ratio as devolatilisation is always complete. In view of the high attained efficiency, it is suggested that the investigated tyre gasification system is economically viable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Computer simulation of the leaching and washing of waste in tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, G.T.

    1997-05-01

    The waste in underground storage tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102 will be used to prepare feed material for the proposed high level waste vitrification demonstration plant at Hanford. A chemical process simulation computer program called the Environment Simulation Program (ESP) was used to estimate the compositions and quantities of this waste and the products after pretreatment processing. The amount of precipitated material in Tank C-106 predicted to be dissolved by sluicing is 27 wt.%. The amount of precipitated material predicted to be dissolved by mild leaching is about 30% for the C-106 and AY-102 combined waste and about 50% for AZ-101, and 35% for AZ-102 wastes. The predicted caustic solution raw material requirements for leaching are 158 m{sup 3} for C-106 and AY-102, 60 m{sup 3} for AZ-101, and 146 m{sup 3} for AZ-102, all as 50 wt.% NAOH.

  6. Development of new solutions for fast simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Olifer, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    With the steady increase in the precision of flavour physics measurements with data from Run 2 of the LHC, the LHCb experiment requires simulated data samples of ever increasing magnitude to study the detector response in detail. However, relying on an increase of computing power available for the production of simulated samples will not suffice to achieve this goal. Therefore, multiple efforts are currently being investigated to significantly decrease the time needed to simulate an event, e.g. reducing and approximating the detector geometry based on the physics requirements or reusing parts of a simulated event in other events. The main goal of this project is to investigate and test potential methods and implement them in the LHCb simulation framework.

  7. Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Simulation Package Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, K.

    1991-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to immobilize high level liquid radioactive waste into safe, stable, and manageable solid form. The complexity and classification of the facility requires that a performance based operator training to satisfy Department of Energy orders and guidelines. A major portion of the training program will be the application and utilization of Process Simulation Packages to assist in training the Control Room Operators on the fluctionality of the process and the application of the Distribution Control System (DCS) in operating and managing the DWPF process. The packages are being developed by the DWPF Computer and Information Systems Simulation Group. This paper will describe the DWPF Process Simulation Package Life Cycle. The areas of package scope, development, validation, and configuration management will be reviewed and discussed in detail.

  8. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  10. Simulant Development for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Mixing and Waste Feed Delivery Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Tran, Diana N.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2012-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Projection manages the River Protection Project, which has the mission to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms (Certa et al. 2011). Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) is responsible for a primary objective of this mission which is to retrieve and transfer tank waste to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). A mixing and sampling program with four separate demonstrations is currently being conducted to support this objective and also to support activities in a plan for addressing safety concerns identified by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board related to the ability of the WTP to mix, sample, and transfer fast settling particles. Previous studies have documented the objectives, criteria, and selection of non-radioactive simulants for these four demonstrations. The identified simulants include Newtonian suspending liquids with densities and viscosities that span the range expected in waste feed tanks. The identified simulants also include non-Newtonian slurries with Bingham yield stress values that span a range that is expected to bound the Bingham yield stress in the feed delivery tanks. The previous studies identified candidate materials for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian suspending fluids, but did not provide specific recipes for obtaining the target properties and information was not available to evaluate the compatibility of the fluids and particles or the potential for salt precipitation at lower temperatures. The purpose of this study is to prepare small batches of simulants in advance of the demonstrations to determine specific simulant recipes, to evaluate the compatibility of the liquids and particles, and to determine if the simulants are stable for the potential range of test temperatures. The objective of the testing, which is focused primarily on the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, is to determine the composition of

  11. Sorption Potentials of Waste Tyre for Some Heavy Metals (Pb Cd in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Kanayo ASIAGWU

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the adsorption potential of activated and inactivated waste tyre powders for some heavy metals (Pb2+ and Cd2+ in their aqueous solution has been studied. The result indicated that inactivated waste tyre is a good non-conventional adsorbent for the removal of Cd from aqueous solution. A total of 93.3% of Cadmium contents was removed. The inactivated waste type proved a good adsorbent for the removal of Pb2+ 5g of 500mm activated tyre removed over 86.66% of Pb2+ from solution.

  12. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-01

    (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that

  13. SIMULANT DEVELOPMENT FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M; Russell Eibling, R; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Paul Burket, P

    2007-09-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The HLW is processed in large batches through DWPF; DWPF has recently completed processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and is currently processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The composition of metal species in SB4 is shown in Table 1 as a function of the ratio of a metal to iron. Simulants remove radioactive species and renormalize the remaining species. Supernate composition is shown in Table 2.

  14. Simulating Acid Mine Drainage Through Unsaturated Waste Rock Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molson, J. W.; Aubertin, M.; Bussiere, B.

    2004-05-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) through unsaturated waste rock piles is numerically simulated to gain insight into the governing physical and chemical processes. The simulations include unsaturated flow, oxygen diffusion, sulphide mineral oxidation, advective-dispersive transport of the oxidation products and pH-dependent geochemical reactions including mineral precipitation and dissolution. The waste pile models are considered as 2D structured porous systems under steady-state flow conditions. The simulations highlight the influence of grain size and moisture content on reaction rates and AMD. Fine-grained sulphide-bearing zones, proposed as internal capillary barriers for example, have a high specific surface area which tends to increase the local sulphide oxidation rate. On the other hand, these zones preferentially retain moisture which reduces the oxygen diffusion coefficient thereby decreasing the reaction rate. The results suggest that where these layers are not fully saturated, sulphide oxidation may continue at a high rate. A sensitivity analysis shows the effect of increasing the background quantity of buffering minerals, and the effect of moisture-dependent diffusion rates and sulphide mineral fractions. Issues related to flow instability and development of preferential flow zones are discussed. These types of simulations can be used to help design waste pile geometries and internal structures (e.g. capillary barriers) which will minimize or control discharge of acidic effluent.

  15. Tank waste remediation system simulation analysis retrieval model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fordham, R.A.

    1996-09-30

    The goal of simulation was to test tll(., consequences of assumptions. For the TWRS SIMAN Retrieval Model, l@lie specific assumptions are primarily defined with respect to waste processing arid transfer timing. The model tracks 73 chem1913ical constituents from underground waste tanks to glass; yet, the detailed (@hemistrv and complete set of unit operations of the TWRS process flow sheet are represented only at the level necessary to define the waste processing and transfer logic and to estimate the feed composition for the treatment facilities. Tlierefor(,, the model should net be regarded as a substitute for the TWRS process flow sheet. Pra(!ticallv the model functions as a dyrt(imic extension of the flow sheet model. I I The following sections present the description, assunipt@ions, architecture, arid evalua- tion of the TWRS SIMAN Retrieval Model. Section 2 describes the model in terms of an overview of the processes represented. Section 3 presents the assumptions for the simulation model. Specific assumptions 9.tt(l parameter values used in the model are provided for waste retrieval, pretreatment, low-level waste (LLNN7) immobilization, and high-level waste (HLW) immobilization functions. Section 4 describes the model in terms of its functional architec- rare to d(@fine a basis for a systematic evaluation of the model. Finally, Section 5 documents an independent test and evaluation of the niodel`s performance (i.e., the verification and validation). Additionally, Appendix A gives a complete listing of the tank inventory used. Appendix B documents the verification and validation plan that was used for the (Section 5) evaluation work. A description and listing of all the model variables is given in Appendix C along with a complete source listing.

  16. Rheological properties of kaolin and chemically simulated waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.L.

    1981-12-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory is conducting tests to determine the best operating conditions of pumps used to transfer insoluble radioactive sludges from old to new waste tanks. Because it is not feasible to conduct these tests with real or chemically simulated sludges, kaolin clay is being used as a stand-in for the solid waste. The rheology tests described herein were conducted to determine whether the properties of kaolin were sufficiently similar to those of real sludge to permit meaningful pump tests. The rheology study showed that kaolin can be substituted for real waste to accurately determine pump performance. Once adequately sheared, kaolin properties were found to remain constant. Test results determined that kaolin should not be allowed to settle more than two weeks between pump tests. Water or supernate from the waste tanks can be used to dilute sludge on an equal volume basis because they identically affect the rheological properties of sludge. It was further found that the fluid properties of kaolin and waste are insensitive to temperature.

  17. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    A byproduct of the Purex process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste, is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant on the Hanford Site. Rheological and transport properties of NCAW slurry were evaluated. First, researchers conducted lab rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The NCAW in the tank will either be retrieved as is, i.e., no change in the concentration presently in the tank, or will be slightly concentrated before retrieval. Sluicing may be required to retrieve the solids. Three concentrations of simulated NCAW were evaluated that would simulate the different retrieval options: NCAW in the concentration that is presently in the tank; a slightly concentrated NCAW, called NCAW5.5; and equal parts of NCAW settled solids and water (simulating the sluicing stage), called NCAW1:1. The physical and rheological properties of three samples of each concentration at 25 and 100/sup 0/C were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCAW and NCAW5.5 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. NCAW1:1 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C displayed properties of a yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The classical non-Newtonian models for pseudoplastic and yield-pseudoplastic fluids were used with the laboratory data to predict the full-scale pump-pipe network parameters.

  18. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SIMULATION MODELS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Ian; Kossik, Rick; Voss, Charlie

    2003-02-27

    Most waste management activities are decided upon and carried out in a public or semi-public arena, typically involving the waste management organization, one or more regulators, and often other stakeholders and members of the public. In these environments, simulation modeling can be a powerful tool in reaching a consensus on the best path forward, but only if the models that are developed are understood and accepted by all of the parties involved. These requirements for understanding and acceptance of the models constrain the appropriate software and model development procedures that are employed. This paper discusses requirements for both simulation software and for the models that are developed using the software. Requirements for the software include transparency, accessibility, flexibility, extensibility, quality assurance, ability to do discrete and/or continuous simulation, and efficiency. Requirements for the models that are developed include traceability, transparency, credibility/validity, and quality control. The paper discusses these requirements with specific reference to the requirements for performance assessment models that are used for predicting the long-term safety of waste disposal facilities, such as the proposed Yucca Mountain repository.

  19. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  20. Water hyacinth for phytoremediation of radioactive waste simulate contaminated with cesium and cobalt radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phytoremediation of radioactive wastes containing {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using water hyacinth for radioactive waste treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioaccumulation of radionuclides from radioactive waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factors affecting bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co using floating plants. - Abstract: Phytoremediation is based on the capability of plants to remove hazardous contaminants present in the environment. This study aimed to demonstrate some factors controlling the phytoremediation efficiency of live floating plant, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), towards the effluents contaminated with {sup 137}Cs and/or {sup 60}Co. Cesium has unknown vital biological role for plant while cobalt is one of the essential trace elements required for plant. The main idea of this work i.e. using undesirable species, water hyacinth, in purification of radiocontaminated aqueous solutions has been receiving much attention. The controlling factors such as radioactivity concentration, pH values, the amount of biomass and the light were studied. The uptake rate of radiocesium from the simulated waste solution is inversely proportional to the initial activity content and directly proportional to the increase in mass of plant and sunlight exposure. A spiked solution of pH Almost-Equal-To 4.9 was found to be the suitable medium for the treatment process. The uptake efficiency of {sup 137}Cs present with {sup 60}Co in mixed solution was higher than if it was present separately. On the contrary, uptake of {sup 60}Co is affected negatively by the presence of {sup 137}Cs in their mixed solution. Sunlight is the most required factor for the plant vitality and radiation resistance. The results of the present study indicated that water hyacinth may be a potential candidate plant of high concentration ratios (CR) for phytoremediation of radionuclides

  1. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  2. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste - transuranics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.; Scott, P.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    At the Hanford Plutonium and Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX), in Richland, Washington, plutonium and uranium products are recovered from irradiated fuel by a solvent extraction process. A byproduct of this process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste (CAW), is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks (DSTs) on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant located nearby. In B-Plant, the transuranic (TRU) elements in NCAW are separated from the non-TRU elements. The majority of the TRU elements in NCAW are in the solids. Therefore, the primary processing operation is to separate the NCAW solids (NCAW-TRU) from the NCAW liquid. These two waste streams will be pumped to suitable holding tanks before being further processed for permanent disposal. To ensure that the retrieval and transportation of NCAW and NCAW-TRU are successful, researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the rheological and transport properties of the slurries. This evaluation had two phases. First, researchers conducted laboratory rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW and NCAW-TRU. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. This scale-up procedure has already been successfully used to predict the critical transport properties of a slurry (Neutralized Cladding Removal Waste) with rheological properties similar to those displayed by NCAW and NCAW-TRU.

  3. Salt Effect on Osmotic Pressure of Polyelectrolyte Solutions: Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Michael Y. Carrillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present results of the hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics simulations of the osmotic pressure of salt solutions of polyelectrolytes. In our simulations, we used a coarse-grained representation of polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions. During simulation runs, we alternate Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation steps. Monte Carlo steps were used to perform small ion exchange between simulation box containing salt ions (salt reservoir and simulation box with polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions (polyelectrolyte solution. This allowed us to model Donnan equilibrium and partitioning of salt and counterions across membrane impermeable to polyelectrolyte chains. Our simulations have shown that the main contribution to the system osmotic pressure is due to salt ions and osmotically active counterions. The fraction of the condensed (osmotically inactive counterions first increases with decreases in the solution ionic strength then it saturates. The reduced value of the system osmotic coefficient is a universal function of the ratio of the concentration of osmotically active counterions and salt concentration in salt reservoir. Simulation results are in a very good agreement with osmotic pressure measurements in sodium polystyrene sulfonate, DNA, polyacrylic acid, sodium polyanetholesulfonic acid, polyvinylbenzoic acid, and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride solutions.

  4. Composition and Simulation of Tank WM-180 Sodium Bearing Waste at INTEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Jerry Dale

    2001-04-01

    The 1-million liters of sodium-bearing waste in the WM-180 tank at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center has been concentrated and will be the first to be processed, at its current composition, by vitrification to prepare the radioactive waste for disposition. The waste has been sampled and analyzed for cations, anions, and radionuclides in the liquid and in the small amount of solids that were entrained with the liquid during sampling. The analytical results have been evaluated and a non-radioactive simulant composition and preparation procedure developed and demonstrated to result in a clear solution. The evaluation and results are reported here. This simulant is suitable for performing laboratory and pilot-scale tests in order to develop the vitrification technology. The solids entrained from the tank with the liquid sample amount to 0.06% of the dissolved solids in the liquid. While their elemental and radionuclide composition was determined, qualitative characterization using x-ray diffraction was not possible. Because of the interest in the properties of solids that may be in the bottom of the WM-180 tank, for tank closure activities, thermodynamic modeling was performed of potential precipitates that may be in equilibrium with the solution. The results were used to derive a possible chemical composition of the solids.

  5. Process simulation and economic analysis of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil with membrane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhman, Yuanita Budiman; Putra, Zulfan Adi; Bilad, Muhammad Roil

    2017-10-01

    Pollution and shortage of clean energy supply are among major problems that are caused by rapid population growth. Due to this growth, waste cooking oil is one of the pollution sources. On the other hand, biodiesel appears to be one of the most promising and feasible energy sources as it emits less toxic pollutants and greenhouse gases than petroleum diesel. Thus, biodiesel production using waste cooking oil offers a two-in-one solution to cater pollution and energy issues. However, the conventional biodiesel production process using homogeneous base catalyst and stirred tank reactor is unable to produce high purity of biodiesel from waste cooking oil. It is due its sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA) content in waste cooking oil and purification difficulties. Therefore, biodiesel production using heterogeneous acid catalyst in membrane reactor is suggested. The product of this process is fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or biodiesel with glycerol as by-product. This project is aimed to study techno-economic feasibility of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil via heterogeneous acid catalyst in membrane reactor. Aspen HYSYS is used to accomplish this aim. Several cases, such as considering different residence times and the production of pharmaceutical (USP) grade glycerol, are evaluated and compared. Economic potential of these cases is calculated by considering capital expenditure, utilities cost, product and by-product sales, as well as raw material costs. Waste cooking oil, inorganic pressure-driven membrane and WAl is used as raw material, type of membrane and heterogeneous acid catalyst respectively. Based on literature data, FAME yield formulation is developed and used in the reactor simulation. Simulation results shows that economic potential increases by 30% if pharmaceutical (USP) grade glycerol is produced regardless the residence time of the reactor. In addition, there is no significant effect of residence time on the economic potential.

  6. Removal of radionuclides from partitioning waste solutions by adsorption and catalytic oxidation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Isao; Yamaguchi, Isoo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kubota, Masumitsu [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology (RIST), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Adsorption of radionuclides with inorganic ion exchangers and catalytic oxidation of a complexant were studied for the decontamination of waste solutions generated in past partitioning tests with high-level liquid waste. Granulated ferrocyanide and titanic acid were used for adsorption of Cs and Sr, respectively, from an alkaline solution resulting from direct neutralization of an acidic waste solution. Both Na and Ba inhibited adsorption of Sr but Na did not that of Cs. These exchangers adsorbed Cs and Sr at low concentration with distribution coefficients of more than 10{sup 4}ml/g from 2M Na solution of pH11. Overall decontamination factors (DFs) of Cs and total {beta} nuclides exceeded 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 3}, respectively, at the neutralization-adsorption step of actual waste solutions free from a complexant. The DF of total {alpha} nuclides was less than 10{sup 3} for a waste solution containing diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). DTPA was rapidly oxidized by nitric acid in the presence of a platinum catalyst, and radionuclides were removed as precipitates by neutralization of the resultant solution. The DF of {alpha} nuclides increased to 8x10{sup 4} by addition of the oxidation step. The DFs of Sb and Co were quite low through the adsorption step. A synthesized Ti-base exchanger (PTC) could remove Sb with the DF of more than 4x10{sup 3}. (author)

  7. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

    2000-04-04

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

  8. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be

  9. Municipal Solid Waste Management with Citizen Participation: An Alternative Solution to Waste Problems in Jakarta, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprilia, A.; Tezuka, T.; Spaargaren, G.

    2011-01-01

    The verity that ascertains waste as one of the contributors to CO2 emission leads the discourse to enter the limelight. Formulating suitable waste management scheme for developing countries such as Indonesia would require careful considerations that take into account the specific local context. This

  10. Community Solutions for Solid Waste Pollution, Level 6. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

    Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

  11. Steel corrosion resistance in model solutions and reinforced mortar containing wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the corrosion resistance of steel in alkaline model solutions and in cement-based materials (mortar). The model solutions and the mortar specimens were Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based. Further, hereby discussed is the implementation of an eco-friendly approach of waste

  12. Reduction of waste solution volume generated on electrokinetic remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the reduction of volume of metal oxides generated in cathode chamber, the optimum pH of waste electrolyte in cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. Also, the required time to reach to below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal was estimated through experiments using the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. A diagram of soil decontamination process for the removal of uranium from contaminated soil was drawn out. The optimum pH of waste electrolyte in cathode chamber for the reduction of volume of metal oxides was below 2.35. Also, when the initial uranium concentration of the soils were 7-20 Bq/g, the required times to reach to below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal were 25-40 days. A diagram of soil decontamination process for the removal of uranium from contaminated soil was drawn out.

  13. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  14. Navy Aquatic Hazardous Waste Sites: The Problem and Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    and storm drains as well as direct runoff. Disposal areas, abandoned drum sites, and waste oil tanks all con- tain potentially hazardous materials that...Narragansett Bay. Streams, shallow groundwater, storm drains , marshes, and creeks near the sites all discharge to Allen Harbor and the bay. Calf Pasture Point...Center San Diego, CA. All surface runoff, storm drains , and probably groundwater discharge to the boat channel which enters San Diego Bay. A refuse

  15. The solution of proofing pie for the waste sorting plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braila, Natalya; Kirilkina, Anna; Barinov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    The modern way of establishment of a flat roof is considered in the article. The standard project of the waste sorting plant was adapted under the conditions of the Republic of Karelia. Instead of the traditional roof with a slope from the concrete coupler, provided by the project, the option with the use of heater in the form of wedge-shaped plates was offered.

  16. Vitrification: a solution for the wastes of wastes; La vitrification: ca chauffe pour les ultimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihard, B. [Europlasma, 33 - Saint Medard en Jalles (France)

    1997-07-01

    The incineration of wastes generates other wastes (fly ashes) that concentrate a large amount of polluting substances (heavy metals, salts..). French law requires a stabilization of this kind of wastes before their storage. Today vitrification can be considered as an alternative to the stabilization and storage way, the vitrified products could be seen as an interesting material in the building industry or in road works. A few years ago the municipality of Bordeaux decided to launch a demonstration program and a REFIOM (fly ashes) vitrification unit has been operating since 1997. (A.C.)

  17. Validation of Solution Methods for Building Energy Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The most commonly applied mathematical solution techniques for building energy simulation are response function methods and finite difference methods. The accepted validation methodology in this domain has as its main elements empirical validation, analytical verification and inter-model comparison. Of these, only analytical verification tests the solution method exclusively; but the test examples used are too confined to be representative of the building energy problem. A discriminating and ...

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Perego, C; Salvalaglio, M; Parrinello, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Gran...

  19. Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, S.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-11

    The author studied liquid anion exchangers, such as Aliquat-336 nitrate, various pyridinium nitrates, and related salts, so that they may be applied toward a specific process for extracting (partitioning) and recovering {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from nuclear waste streams. Many of the waste streams are caustic and contain a variety of other ions. For this reason, the author studied waste stream simulants that are caustic and contain appropriate concentrations of selected, relevant ions. Methods of measuring the performance of the exchangers and extractant systems included contact experiments. Batch contact experiments were used to determine the forward and reverse extraction parameters as a function of temperature, contact time, phase ratio, concentration, solvent (diluent), and other physical properties. They were also used for stability and competition studies. Specifically, the author investigated the solvent extraction behavior of salts of perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}), a stable (non-radioactive) chemical surrogate for {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Results are discussed for alternate organic solvents; metalloporphyrins, ferrocenes, and N-cetyl pyridium nitrate as alternate extractant salts; electroactive polymers; and recovery of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.

  20. Water and Solute Flux Simulation Using Hydropedology Survey Data in South African Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentz, Simon; van Tol, Johan; le Roux, Pieter

    2017-04-01

    Hydropedology surveys include linking soil profile information in hillslope transects in order to define dominant subsurface flow mechanisms and pathways. This information is useful for deriving hillslope response functions, which aid storage and travel time estimates of water and solute movement in the sub-surface. In this way, the "soft" data of the hydropedological survey can be included in simple hydrological models, where detailed modelling of processes and pathways is prohibitive. Hydropedology surveys were conducted in two catchments and the information used to improve the prediction of water and solute responses. Typical hillslope response functions are then derived using a 2-D finite element model of the hydropedological features. Similar response types are mapped. These mapped response units are invoked in a simple SCS based, hydrological and solute transport model to yield water and solute fluxes at the catchment outlets. The first catchment (1.6 km2) comprises commercial forestry in a sedimentary geology of sandstone and mudstone formation while the second catchment (6.1 km2) includes mine waste impoundments in a granitic geology. In this paper, we demonstrate the method of combining hydropedological interpretation with catchment hydrology and solute transport simulation. The forested catchment, with three dominant hillslope response types, have solute response times in excess of 90 days, whereas the granitic responses occur within 10 days. The use of the hydropedological data improves the solute distribution response and storage simulation, compared to simulations without the hydropedology interpretation. The hydrological responses are similar, with and without the use of the hydropedology data, but the simulated distribution of water in the catchment is improved using the techniques demonstrated.

  1. Engineering solutions of environmental problems in organic waste handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briukhanov, A. Y.; Vasilev, E. V.; Shalavina, E. V.; Kucheruk, O. N.

    2017-10-01

    This study shows the urgent need to consider modernization of agricultural production in terms of sustainable development, which takes into account environmental implications of intensive technologies in livestock farming. Some science-based approaches are offered to address related environmental challenges. High-end technologies of organic livestock waste processing were substantiated by the feasibility study and nutrient balance calculation. The technologies were assessed on the basis of best available techniques criteria, including measures such as specific capital and operational costs associated with nutrient conservation and their delivery to the plants.

  2. Fundamental Science-Based Simulation of Nuclear Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-04

    This report presents a hierarchical multiscale modeling scheme based on two-way information exchange. To account for all essential phenomena in waste forms over geological time scales, the models have to span length scales from nanometer to kilometer and time scales from picoseconds to millenia. A single model cannot cover this wide range and a multi-scale approach that integrates a number of different at-scale models is called for. The approach outlined here involves integration of quantum mechanical calculations, classical molecular dynamics simulations, kinetic Monte Carlo and phase field methods at the mesoscale, and continuum models. The ultimate aim is to provide science-based input in the form of constitutive equations to integrated codes. The atomistic component of this scheme is demonstrated in the promising waste form xenotime. Density functional theory calculations have yielded valuable information about defect formation energies. This data can be used to develop interatomic potentials for molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage. Potentials developed in the present work show a good match for the equilibrium lattice constants, elastic constants and thermal expansion of xenotime. In novel waste forms, such as xenotime, a considerable amount of data needed to validate the models is not available. Integration of multiscale modeling with experimental work is essential to generate missing data needed to validate the modeling scheme and the individual models. Density functional theory can also be used to fill knowledge gaps. Key challenges lie in the areas of uncertainty quantification, verification and validation, which must be performed at each level of the multiscale model and across scales. The approach used to exchange information between different levels must also be rigorously validated. The outlook for multiscale modeling of wasteforms is quite promising.

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

    2011-09-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic

  4. Closed circuit recovery of copper, lead and iron from electronic waste with citrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Robinson; Lapidus, Gretchen T

    2017-02-01

    An integral closed circuit hydrometallurgical process is presented for base metal recovery from electronic waste. The leaching medium consists of a sodium citrate solution, from which base metals are retrieved by direct electrowinning, and the barren solution is recycled back to the leaching stage. This leaching-electrowinning cycle was repeated four times. The redox properties of the fresh citrate solution, as well as the leach liquors, were characterized by cyclic voltammetry to determine adequate conditions for metal reduction, as well as to limit citrate degradation. The leaching efficiency of electronic waste, employing the same solution after four complete cycles was 71, 83 and 94% for copper, iron and lead, respectively, compared to the original leach with fresh citrate solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles as a draw solute in forward osmosis membrane process for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heeman; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These wastes contain about 0.3 ∼ 0.8 wt% of boric acid. It is known that reverse osmosis (RO) membrane can eliminate boron at high pH and boron of 40 ∼ 90% can be removed by RO membrane in pH condition. RO uses hydraulic pressure to oppose, and exceed, the osmotic pressure of an aqueous feed solution containing boric acid. As an emerging technology forward osmosis (FO) has attracted growing interest in wastewater treatment and desalination because FO operates at low or no hydraulic pressures. FO is a membrane process in which water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a feed solution of lower osmotic pressure to a draw solution of higher osmotic pressure. However, the challenges of FO still lie in the fabrication of eligible FO membranes and the readily separable draw solutes of high osmotic pressures. Superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be separated from water by an external magnet field easily. If Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are coated with highly soluble organic substances, thus they can be used as a draw solute by concurrently generating high osmotic pressure and easy separation. The carboxylated polyglycerol coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized. The nanoparticles were about 50 nm in diameter and showed the good colloidal stability in aqueous solution. The osmolality and osmotic pressure were enough high to be used as a draw solute in FO. For the future work, we will investigate the performance of our magnetic draw solute in FO to remove boron in the simulated liquid waste.

  6. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  7. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  8. Probability: Actual Trials, Computer Simulations, and Mathematical Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Karen Doyle; Walton, J. Doyle

    The purpose of this teaching unit is to approach elementary probability problems in three ways. First, actual trials are performed and results are recorded. Second, a simple computer simulation of the problem provided on diskette and written for Apple IIe and IIc computers, is run several times. Finally, the mathematical solution of the problem is…

  9. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: a potential solution for the disposal of transuranic waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1996-01-01

    ... Isolation Pilot Plant Board on Radioactive Waste Management Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the c...

  10. Modelling the sulfate capacity of simulated radioactive waste borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P. A.; Vaishnav, S.; Forder, S. D.; Scrimshire, A.; Jaganathan, B.; Rohini, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Workman, P.; Vienna, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    The capacity of simulated high-level radioactive waste borosilicate glasses to incorporate sulfate has been studied as a function of glass composition. Combined Raman, 57Fe Mössbauer and literature evidence supports the attribution of coordination numbers and oxidation states of constituent cations for the purposes of modelling, and results confirm the validity of correlating sulfate incorporation in multicomponent borosilicate radioactive waste glasses with different models. A strong compositional dependency is observed and this can be described by an inverse linear relationship between incorporated sulfate (mol% SO42-) and total cation field strength index of the glass, Σ(z/a2), with a high goodness-of-fit (R2 ≈ 0.950). Similar relationships are also obtained if theoretical optical basicity, Λth (R2 ≈ 0.930) or non-bridging oxygen per tetrahedron ratio, NBO/T (R2 ≈ 0.919), are used. Results support the application of these models, and in particular Σ(z/a2), as predictive tools to aid the development of new glass compositions with enhanced sulfate capacities.

  11. Analysis of a waste-heat boiler by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongziang; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Waste-heat boilers play important roles in the continuous operation of a smelter and in the conservation of energy. However, the fluid flow and heat transfer behaviour has not been well studied, concerning the boiler performance and design. This presentation describes simulated gas flow and heat transfer of a waste-heat boiler in the Outokumpu copper flash smelting process. The governing transport equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and enthalpy were solved with a commercial CFD-code PHOENICS. The standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model and a composite-flux radiation model were used in the computations. The computational results show that the flow is strongly recirculating and distinctly three-dimensional in most part of the boiler, particularly in the radiation section. The predicted flow pattern and temperature distribution were in a good agreement with laboratory models and industrial measurements. The results provide detailed information of flow pattern, the temperature distribution and gas cooling efficiency. The CFD proved to be a useful tool in analysing the boiler operation. (author)

  12. Rapid immobilization of simulated radioactive soil waste by microwave sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Shu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Shunzhang; Yang, Huimin; Hou, Chenxi; Mao, Xueli; Chi, Fangting; Song, Mianxin; Lu, Xirui

    2017-09-05

    A rapid and efficient method is particularly necessary in the timely disposal of seriously radioactive contaminated soil. In this paper, a series of simulated radioactive soil waste containing different contents of neodymium oxide (3-25wt.%) has been successfully vitrified by microwave sintering at 1300°C for 30min. The microstructures, morphology, element distribution, density and chemical durability of as obtained vitrified forms have been analyzed. The results show that the amorphous structure, homogeneous element distribution, and regular density improvement are well kept, except slight cracks emerge on the magnified surface for the 25wt.% Nd2O3-containing sample. Moreover, all the vitrified forms exhibit excellent chemical durability, and the leaching rates of Nd are kept as ∼10-4-10-6g/(m2day) within 42days. This demonstrates a potential application of microwave sintering in radioactive contaminated soil disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbon Market and Integrated Waste Solutions : a Case Study of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Marché du carbone et solutions de gestion intégrée des déchets : étude de cas menée en Indonésie. Le Mécanisme de développement propre (MDP) prévu au Protocole de Kyoto signé en 1997 a le double objectif d'aider les pays en développement à connaître un développement durable (tel que défini.

  14. Effect of temperature on copper, iron and lead leaching from e-waste using citrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Robinson; Segura-Bailón, Brenda; Lapidus, Gretchen T

    2018-01-01

    E-waste is a potential source of large quantities of metals. The ability of citrate solutions to recover base metals from these materials has been demonstrated. In the present study, the effect of the temperature on base metal leaching capacity by the citrate solutions is determined. The material employed consisted of a mechanically prepared, gravity concentrated e-waste, with a metallic content greater than 90%. The leaching conditions were selected based on previous research performed by the authors (0.5 M sodium citrate, pH 4.5 and 20 g per liter e-waste concentrate). Leaching tests were performed at temperatures between 0° and 70 °C. The initial leaching rates for the three metals increased with temperature. However, these tapered off with time for temperatures above 30 °C, which can be associated to citrate destruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vapor Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel Exposed to Simulated High Level Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B

    2006-01-26

    A program to resolve the issues associated with potential vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion in the Type III high level waste tanks is in place. The objective of the program is to develop understanding of vapor space (VSC) and liquid/air interface (LAIC) corrosion to ensure a defensible technical basis to provide accurate corrosion evaluations with regard to vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. The results of the FY05 experiments are presented here. The experiments are an extension of the previous research on the corrosion of tank steel exposed to simple solutions to corrosion of the steel when exposed to complex high level waste simulants. The testing suggested that decanting and the consequent residual species on the tank wall is the predominant source of surface chemistry on the tank wall. The laboratory testing has shown that at the boundary conditions of the chemistry control program for solutions greater than 1M NaNO{sub 3}{sup -}. Minor and isolated pitting is possible within crevices in the vapor space of the tanks that contain stagnant dilute solution for an extended period of time, specifically when residues are left on the tank wall during decanting. Liquid/air interfacial corrosion is possible in dilute stagnant solutions, particularly with high concentrations of chloride. The experimental results indicate that Tank 50 would be most susceptible to the potential for liquid/air interfacial corrosion or vapor space corrosion, with Tank 49 and 41 following, since these tanks are nearest to the chemistry control boundary conditions. The testing continues to show that the combination of well-inhibited solutions and mill-scale sufficiently protect against pitting in the Type III tanks.

  16. Simulation of collagen solution flow in rectangular capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysela, Bohus; Skocilas, Jan; Zitny, Rudolf; Stancl, Jaromir; Houska, Milan; Landfeld, Ales

    The viscoelastic properties of foods and polymers can be evaluated from flow of the material in capillary with specified dimension and shape. The extrusion rheometer equipped by capillary with rectangular cross-section was used for determination of the rheological behaviour of water collagen solution. The measurements of the axial profiles in longitudinal direction of the total stresses at capillary wall were performed for various shear rates. The linear viscoelastic model of Oldroyd B type: White-Metzner model was used for simulation of fluid flow in OpenFOAM software package. The simulations describe the effect of relaxation time on wall total stress in convergent-divergent capillary.

  17. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  18. Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

    2004-01-23

    Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

  19. Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  20. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION FOR TRANSESTERIFICATION OF WASTE VEGETABLE OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K M Mohiuddin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides detailed information involved in the numerical simulation of transesterification of waste vegetable oil (WVO.  The main objective of this work is to perform mixing study based on large eddy simulation particle image Velocimetry (LES-PIV which resolved the turbulent scale. Reynolds stress model (RSM was subsequently used to validate the result using a multiple reference frame (MRF approach for the impeller-vessel geometry. Experimental FAME yield and liquid velocities were found to be dependent on stirrer speeds, impeller bottom distance and bulk flow pattern. Thermodynamic properties of the reaction components were incorporated as user defined function (UDF for the mixing models. FAME yield were predicted in terms of species concentration and compared fairly well with experimental condition for 1 and 2-L STR, where yield from the numerical model varied by about 18 and 23 % for 1 and 2-L STR respectively. The characteristic time scales were used to show the relevant mixing scale to describe the process.

  1. A system dynamics-based environmental performance simulation of construction waste reduction management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhikun; Yi, Guizhen; Tam, Vivian W Y; Huang, Tengyue

    2016-05-01

    A huge amount of construction waste has been generated from increasingly higher number of construction activities than in the past, which has significant negative impacts on the environment if they are not properly managed. Therefore, effective construction waste management is of primary importance for future sustainable development. Based on the theory of planned behaviors, this paper develops a system dynamic model of construction waste reduction management at the construction phase to simulate the environmental benefits of construction waste reduction management. The application of the proposed model is shown using a case study in Shenzhen, China. Vensim is applied to simulate and analyze the model. The simulation results indicate that source reduction is an effective waste reduction measure which can reduce 27.05% of the total waste generation. Sorting behaviors are a premise for improving the construction waste recycling and reuse rates which account for 15.49% of the total waste generated. The environmental benefits of source reduction outweigh those of sorting behaviors. Therefore, to achieve better environmental performance of the construction waste reduction management, attention should be paid to source reduction such as low waste technologies and on-site management performance. In the meantime, sorting behaviors encouragement such as improving stakeholders' waste awareness, refining regulations, strengthening government supervision and controlling illegal dumping should be emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

  3. SHARING AND DEPLOYING INNOVATIVE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS TO MANAGE WASTE ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crolley, R.; Thompson, M.

    2011-01-31

    There has been a need for a faster and cheaper deployment model for information technology (IT) solutions to address waste management needs at US Department of Energy (DOE) complex sites for years. Budget constraints, challenges in deploying new technologies, frequent travel, and increased job demands for existing employees have prevented IT organizations from staying abreast of new technologies or deploying them quickly. Despite such challenges, IT organizations have added significant value to waste management handling through better worker safety, tracking, characterization, and disposition at DOE complex sites. Systems developed for site-specific missions have broad applicability to waste management challenges and in many cases have been expanded to meet other waste missions. Radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning satellite (GPS)-enabled solutions have reduced the risk of radiation exposure and safety risks. New web-based and mobile applications have enabled precision characterization and control of nuclear materials. These solutions have also improved operational efficiencies and shortened schedules, reduced cost, and improved regulatory compliance. Collaboration between US Department of Energy (DOE) complex sites is improving time to delivery and cost efficiencies for waste management missions with new information technologies (IT) such as wireless computing, global positioning satellite (GPS), and radio frequency identification (RFID). Integrated solutions developed at separate DOE complex sites by new technology Centers of Excellence (CoE) have increased material control and accountability, worker safety, and environmental sustainability. CoEs offer other DOE sister sites significant cost and time savings by leveraging their technology expertise in project scoping, implementation, and ongoing operations.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C; Salvalaglio, M; Parrinello, M

    2015-04-14

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  5. Formulation Efforts for Direct Vitrification of INEEL Blend Calcine Waste Simulate: Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Reamer, I. A.

    2001-03-30

    This report documents the results of glass formulation efforts for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high level waste (HWL) calcine. Two waste compositions were used during testing. Testing started by using the Run 78 calcine composition and switched to simulated Blend calcine composition when it became available. The goal of the glass formulation efforts was to develop a frit composition that will accept higher waste loading that satisfies the glass processing and product acceptance constraints. 1. Melting temperature of 1125 ? 25?C 2. Viscosity between 2 and 10 Pa?s at the melting temperature 3. Liquidus temperature at least 100?C below the melting temperature 4. Normalized release of B, Li and Na each below 1 g/m2 (per ASTM C 1285-97) Glass formulation efforts tested several frit compositions with variable waste loadings of Run 78 calcine waste simulant. Frit 107 was selected as the primary candidate for processing since it met all process and performance criteria up to 45 mass% waste loading. When the simulated Blend calcine waste composition became available Frits 107 and 108 compositions were retested and again Frit 107 remained the primary candidate. However, both frits suffered a decrease in waste loading when switching from the Run 78 calcine to simulated Blend calcine waste composition. This was due to increase concentrations of both F and Al2O3 along with a decrease in CaO and Na2O in the simulate Blend calcine waste all of which have strong impacts on the glass properties that limit waste loading of this type of waste.

  6. MANAGEMENT OF SOLID WASTE GENERATED BY THE INTEGRATED STEELWORKS ACTIVITY AND SOLUTIONS TO REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anişoara CIOCAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of steel industry is subject to solve major problems arising from industry-nature relationship, strictly targeted on pollution control and protection of natural resources and energy. In this paper we discussed about the management of solid waste generated by an integrated steelwork located near a major urban area and the adopted solutions for the reduction of environmental impact. There are summarized technical solutions that are currently applied and were proposed some solutions that can be applied in accordance with the environmental legislations. The new solutions are proposed for integrated management of solid wastes in accordance with: the exact quantification (quantitative, qualitative and the generation sources of emissions and solid wastes; controlled storage; minimization of the wastes and its harmfulness; transformation of the wastes into valuable by-products used directly by the company in a subsequent process, or by external down-stream user.

  7. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2006-05-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop XRF analytical methods that provide the rapid turnaround time (<8 hours) requested by the WTP, while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine waste composition variations. For Phase 1a, SRNL (1) evaluated, selected, and procured an XRF instrument for WTP installation, (2) investigated three XRF sample methods for preparing the LAW sub-sample for XRF analysis, and (3) initiated scoping studies on AN-105 (Envelope A) simulant to determine the instrument's capability, limitations, and optimum operating parameters. After preliminary method development on simulants and the completion of Phase 1a activities, SRNL received approval from WTP to begin Phase 1b activities with the objective of optimizing the XRF methodology. Three XRF sample methods used for preparing the LAW sub-sample for XRF analysis were studied: direct liquid analysis, dried spot, and fused glass. The direct liquid method was selected because its major advantage is that the LAW can be analyzed directly without any sample alteration that could bias the method accuracy. It also is the fastest preparation technique--a typical XRF measurement could be completed in < 1hr after sample delivery. Except for sodium, the method detection limits (MDLs) for the most important analytes in solution, the hold point elements, were achieved by this method. The XRF detection limits are generally adequate for glass former batching and product composition reporting, but may be inadequate for some species (Hg, Cd, and Ba) important

  8. Evaluation of extractant-coated ferromagnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, M. D.

    1998-05-08

    A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible.

  9. Production of ultrafine zinc powder from wastes containing zinc by electrowinning in alkaline solution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Youcai; Li Qiang; Zhang Chenglong; Jiang Jiachao

    2013-01-01

    Production of ultrafine zinc powder from industrial wastes by electrowinning in alkaline solution was studied. Stainless steel and magnesium electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively. Morphology, size distribution and composition of the Zn particles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Laser Particle Size Analyzer, and Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. The required composition of the electrolyte for ultrafine particles was found to be 25-35 g/L Zn, 2...

  10. Test for Fauske and Associates to perform tube propagation experiments with simulated Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.D.

    1996-02-01

    This test plan, prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, provides guidance for performing tube propagation experiments on simulated Hanford tank wastes and on actual tank waste samples. Simulant compositions are defined and an experimental logic tree is provided for Fauske and Associates (FAI) to perform the experiments. From this guidance, methods and equipment for small-scale tube propagation experiments to be performed at the Hanford Site on actual tank samples will be developed. Propagation behavior of wastes will directly support the safety analysis (SARR) for the organic tanks. Tube propagation may be the definitive tool for determining the relative reactivity of the wastes contained in the Hanford tanks. FAI have performed tube propagation studies previously on simple two- and three-component surrogate mixtures. The simulant defined in this test plan more closely represents actual tank composition. Data will be used to support preparation of criteria for determining the relative safety of the organic bearing wastes.

  11. Biorefining of platinum group metals from model waste solutions into catalytically active bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Angela J; Zhu, Ju; Wood, Joe; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2018-03-01

    Bacteria can fabricate platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts cheaply, a key consideration of industrial processes and waste decontaminations. Biorecovery of PGMs from wastes is promising but PGM leachates made from metallic scraps are acidic. A two-step biosynthesis 'pre-seeds' metallic deposits onto bacterial cells benignly; chemical reduction of subsequent metal from acidic solution via the seeds makes bioscaffolded nanoparticles (NPs). Cells of Escherichia coli were seeded using Pd(II) or Pt(IV) and exposed to a mixed Pd(II)/Pt(IV) model solution under H 2 to make bimetallic catalyst. Its catalytic activity was assessed in the reduction of Cr(VI), with 2 wt% or 5 wt% preloading of Pd giving the best catalytic activity, while 1 wt% seeds gave a poorer catalyst. Use of Pt seeds gave less effective catalyst in the final bimetallic catalyst, attributed to fewer and larger initial seeds as shown by electron microscopy, which also showed a different pattern of Pd and Pt deposition. Bimetallic catalyst (using cells preloaded with 2 wt% Pd) was used in the hydrogenation of soybean oil which was enhanced by ~fourfold using the bimetallic catalyst made from a model waste solution as compared to 2 wt% Pd preloaded cells alone, with a similar selectivity to cis C18:1 product as found using a Pd-Al 2 O 3 commercial catalyst. © 2018 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić-Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  13. Simulating sanitation and waste flows and their environmental impacts in East African urban centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating Sanitation and Waste Flows and their Environmental Impacts in East African Urban Centres Abstract If improperly managed, urban waste flows can pose a significant threat to the quality of both the natural environment and public health. Just as many urban

  14. Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions from open burning of simulated military waste from forward operating bases (FOBs) were extensively characterized as an initial step in assessing potential inhalation exposure of FOB personnel and future disposal alternatives. Emissions from two different burning scenar...

  15. Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G

    2004-07-26

    Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 {mu}M) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 {mu}M) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co]{sub initial} ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup.

  16. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  17. Performance of a large-scale melter off-gas system utilizing simulated SRP DWPF waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, J L; Randall, C T

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy and the DuPont Company have begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive waste now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of the process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, two large-scale glass melter systems have been designed and operated with simulated waste. Experimental data from these operations show that process requirements will be met. 6 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris--impact on solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Viktor; Karlsson, Stefan; Grandin, Anna; Allard, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of the environment due to mining and mineral processing is an urgent problem worldwide. It is often desirable to establish a grass cover on old mine waste since it significantly decreases the production of leachates. To obtain sustainable growth, it is often necessary to improve several properties of the waste such as water-holding capacity, nutrient status, and toxicity. This can be done by addition of organic materials such as wood residues, e.g., compost. In this study, we focus on the solution chemistry of the leachates when a substrate containing historic sulfidic mine waste mixed with 30 % (volume) bark compost is overgrown by Agrostis capillaris. The pot experiments also included other growth-promoting additives (alkaline material, mycorrhiza, and metabolizable carbon) to examine whether a more sustainable growth could be obtained. Significant changes in the plant growth and in the leachates composition were observed during 8 weeks of growth. It was concluded that in this time span, the growth of A. capillaris did not affect the composition of the leachates from the pots. Instead, the composition of the leachates was determined by interactions between the bark compost and the mine waste. Best growth of A. capillaris was obtained when alkaline material and mycorrhiza or metabolizable carbon was added to the substrate.

  19. Immobilization of Rose Waste Biomass for Uptake of Pb(II from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Mahmood Ansari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz distillation waste biomass was immobilized using sodium alginate for Pb(II uptake from aqueous solutions under varied experimental conditions. The maximum Pb(II adsorption occurred at pH 5. Immobilized rose waste biomasses were modified physically and chemically to enhance Pb(II removal. The Langmuir sorption isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted well to the adsorption data of Pb(II by immobilized Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz. The adsorbed metal is recovered by treating immobilized biomass with different chemical reagents (H2SO4, HCl and H3PO4 and maximum Pb(II recovered when treated with sulphuric acid (95.67%. The presence of cometals Na, Ca(II, Al(III, Cr(III, Cr(VI, and Cu(II, reduced Pb(II adsorption on Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz waste biomass. It can be concluded from the results of the present study that rose waste can be effectively used for the uptake of Pb(II from aqueous streams.

  20. Removal of Pb (II from Aqueous Solutions Using Waste Tea Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Cheraghi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of lead in natural waters has become an important issue around the world. Lead has been identified as a highly toxic metal that can cause severe environmental and public health problems and its decontamination is of utmost importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adsorption of lead (Pb(II on waste tea leaves as a cheap purification method. Methods: In this experimental study, prepared waste tea leaves were used as adsorbent for the removal of Pb (II from aqueous solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out as batch studies at different contact time, pH, amount of adsorbent, initial metal concentration and temperature. Results: The results showed that maximum removal efficiency was observed at pH 6. Also the adsorption of Pb (II ions increased with decreasing initial metal concentration. The Langmuir isotherm model fits well with the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data and its calculated maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 166.6 mg g-1 at a temperature of 25±0.1˚C. The kinetic data obtained have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The best fitted kinetic model was found to be pseudo-second-order. Conclusion: The results suggest that tea wastes could be employed as cheap material for the removal of lead from aqueous solutions.

  1. Recovery of gold from hydrometallurgical leaching solution of electronic waste via spontaneous reduction by polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhao Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study is primarily designed to develop an environmentally-benign approach for the recovery of precious metals, especially gold, from the ever increasingly-discarded electronic wastes (e-waste. By coupling the metal reduction process with an increase in the intrinsic oxidation state of the aniline polymers, and the subsequent re-protonation and reduction of the intrinsically oxidized polymer to the protonated emeraldine (EM salt, polyaniline (PANi films and polyaniline coated cotton fibers are able to recover metallic gold from acid/halide leaching solutions of electronic wastes spontaneously and sustainably. The current technique, which does not require the use of extensive extracting reagents or external energy input, can recover as much as 90% of gold from the leaching acidic solutions. The regeneration of polyaniline after gold recovery, as confirmed by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, promises the continuous operation using the current approach. The as-recovered elemental gold can be further concentrated and purified by incineration in air.

  2. Industrial symbiosis: high purity recovery of metals from Waelz sintering waste by aqueous SO2 solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Mehmet; Pekdemir, Turgay; Colak, Sabri; Künkül, Asim

    2007-10-22

    Sintering operation in the production of Zn, Cd, and Pb by Waelz process produces a powdery waste containing mainly (about 70%) ZnO, CdO, and PbO. The waste may be referred to as Waelz sintering waste (WSW). The aim of this study is to develop a process for the separation and recovery of the metals from WSW with high purities. The process is based on the dissolution of the WSW in aqueous SO2 solution. The research reported here concentrated on the effect of some important operational parameters on dissolution process. The parameters investigated and their ranges were as follows: SO(2) gas flow rate (V); 38-590 ml/min, stirring speed (W); 100-1000 rpm, reaction temperature (T); 13-60 degrees C, reaction time (t); 1-16 min, and solid-liquid ratio (S/L); 0.1-0.5 g/ml. The results showed that the dissolution rate increased with increasing W, V, and S/L and decreasing T. The best dissolution conditions were found to be V=325 ml/min, W=600 rpm, t=6 min, T=21 degrees C, and S/L=0.1g/ml. Separation of Zn from Cd involved precipitation of ZnSO3 from a mixture solution. The best pH level for the precipitation was observed to be 6.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  4. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Riley, Brian J.

    2012-01-18

    Resolution of the nation's high-level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research-scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron-phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfate (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, Missouri University of Science and Technology, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  5. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2011-08-01

    Resolution of the nation’s high level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfates (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis as related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  6. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-21

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 (99Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are 129I, 90Sr, 137Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove 90Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for 99Tc, and zeolites for 137Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of 99Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl2 as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination

  7. A Comparative Study of Cellulose Agricultural Wastes (Almond Shell, Pistachio Shell, Walnut Shell, Tea Waste And Orange Peel) for Adsorption of Violet B Dye from Aqueous Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Saeedeh Hashemian

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of violet B azo dye from aqueous solutions was studied by different cellulose agriculturalwaste materials (almond shell (AS), pistachio shell (PS), walnut shell (WS), Tea waste (TW) and orange peel (OP)). Cellulose agricultural waste sorbents characterized by FTIR and SEM methods. The effects of different parameters such as contact time, pH, adsorbent dosage and initial dye concentration were studied.Maximum removal of dye was obtained at contact time of 90 min and pH 11.The adsorp...

  8. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airth, G.L. [Hands-on GPSS Training, Corvallis, OR (United States); Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A System Simulation Model has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. This model can be used to quantify the impacts of different operating schedules, operational rules, system configurations, and equipment reliability and availability considerations on the performance of processes comprising the CRWMS and how these factors combine to determine overall system performance for the purpose of making system design decisions. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste.

  9. Oil refinery sludge and green waste simulated windrow composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Terzakis, S; Georgaki, E; Drakopoulou, S; Sabathianakis, I; Kouzoulakis, M; Manios, T

    2009-04-01

    Oil refinery sludge (ORS) was mixed with shredded green wastes (GW) at ratios of 1:1 v/v (RI) and 1:3 v/v (RII). The mixtures, of approximately volumes of 1,020 l and 990 l respectively, were introduced in metal cubic containers of 1.0 m(3) volume, opened at the top and with small holes punctured in the bottom and the side. The containers were additionally insulated with a layer of rockwool (20 mm). The boxes were emptied, the mixtures were turned and water was added occasionally, in one to two weeks intervals, simulating a windrow composting system. Temperature, physiochemical characteristics, mineral oil and grease (MOG) concentration, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration, carbon dioxide emission, methane emission and microorganisms presence were recorded either daily or every time the mixtures were turned, for a period of 120 days. RII recorded temperatures as high as 62 degrees C, reaching 56 degrees C in Day 6 and retained temperatures above 50 degrees C for more than 40 days. RI recorded its highest temperature of 53 degrees C in Day 77. The reason why the two mixtures behaved so differently can be explained by: (i) extended co-digestion phenomena by the microorganisms decomposing the GW in RII, (ii) toxic effect of ORS in RI due to the far larger amounts used (840 kg in RI in comparison with the 460 kg in RII). After Day 36 temperature increased gradually in RI and MOG and PAHs reduction was first noted. At the end of the experiment MOG concentration in RI was 57.2 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (52.1% reduction) where in RII was 34.3 mg/kg dw (62.1% reduction). Emissions of methane and carbon dioxide support the concept of the toxic effect and the delay ignition of the decomposing process in RI. In total, CO(2) and CH(4) emissions from RI were recorded to be 30.8 kg and 18.5 g, respectively, where from RII 59.6 kg of CO(2) and 6.4 g of CH(4) were emitted. An effort was made to determine the effect of temperature alone (as an abiotic treating

  10. Phase IV testing of monosodium titanate adsorption with radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-12-08

    Testing examined the extent and rate of strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium removal from radioactive waste solutions at 4.5M and 7.5M in Na concentration by adsorption onto monosodium titanate (MST) at 0.2 g/L. Results indicate that the extents and rates of strontium, plutonium, and neptunium removal in radioactive waste solutions agree well with those previously measured using simulated waste solutions. Uranium removal in the 7.5M Na radioactive waste solution proved similar to that observed with simulated waste solutions. Uranium removal in the 4.5M Na radioactive waste solution proved lower than expected from previous simulant tests. The authors conclude that MST adsorption data obtained from simulated waste solutions provide reliable predictions for use in facility design and flowsheet modeling studies in the Salt Disposition Alternatives program.

  11. Recuperação de bromo em soluções aquosas residuais Bromine recovery from waste aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco Arnold Tavares

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory procedure was devised to recover bromine from waste alkaline aqueous solutions used in the isotopic determination of N-15. The laboratory apparatus comprises two round bottom flasks (1 and 2 L, a dropping funnel, a gas bubbler, a gas regulator and glass fittings. The waste solution is acidified with sulfuric acid forming molecular bromine that is stripped out by a flow of nitrogen gas bubbled through the solution. This gas is then bubbled through a solution of lithium hydroxide generating lithium bromide and lithium hypobromite. The efficiency of bromine recovery was estimated to be 82±2%. This resulting solution was successfully reused in the isotopic determination of N-15. The procedure can recycle most of the bromine used in the laboratory saving resources and preserving the environment. The procedure can be adapted to recover bromine of other laboratory waste streams.

  12. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate

  13. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-11-15

    Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in bioremediation of nuclear and other waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  15. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  16. Cyclic deformation-induced solute transport in tissue scaffolds with computer designed, interconnected, pore networks: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Buijs, Jorn Op; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-08-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid-structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold.

  17. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-07-18

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  18. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2002-07-01

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  19. New Engineering Solutions in Creation of Mini-BOF for Metallic Waste Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronko, S. P.; Gorbatyuk, S. M.; Oshovskaya, E. V.; Starodubtsev, B. I.

    2017-12-01

    New engineering solutions used in design of the mini melting unit capable of recycling industrial and domestic metallic waste with high content of harmful impurities are provided. High efficiency of the process technology implemented with its use is achieved due to the possibility of the heat and mass transfer intensification in the molten metal bath, controlled charge into it of large amounts of reagents in lumps and in fines, and cut-off of remaining process slag during metal tapping into the teeming ladle.

  20. Synthesis of hydroxy sodalite from coal fly ash using waste industrial brine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M; Petrik, Leslie F; Balfour, Gillian; Gitari, Wilson M; Hums, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The effect of using industrial waste brine solution instead of ultra pure water was investigated during the synthesis of zeolites using three South African coal fly ashes as Si feedstock. The high halide brine was obtained from the retentate effluent of a reverse osmosis mine water treatment plant. Synthesis conditions applied were; ageing of fly ash was at 47 ° C for 48 hours, and while the hydrothermal treatment temperature was set at 140 ° C for 48 hours. The use of brine as a solvent resulted in the formation of hydroxy sodalite zeolite although unconverted mullite and hematite from the fly ash feedstock was also found in the synthesis product.

  1. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  2. Reuse of waste beer yeast sludge for biosorptive decolorization of reactive blue 49 from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoe; Guo, Xiu

    2011-06-01

    Reactive blue 49 was removed from aqueous solution by biosorption using powder waste sludge composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the beer-brewing industry. The effect of initial pH, temperature and the biosorption thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics was investigated in this study. It was found that the biosorption capacity was at maximum at initial pH 3, that the effect of temperature on biosorption of reactive blue 49 was only slight in relation to the large biosorption capacity (25°C, 361 mg g(-1)) according as the biosorption capacity decreased only 43 mg g(-1) at the temperature increased from 25 to 50°C. The biosorption was spontaneous, exothermic in nature and the dye molecules movements decreased slightly in random at the solid/liquid interface during the biosorption of dye on biosorbents. The biosorption equilibrium data could be described by Freundich isotherm model. The biosorption rates were found to be consistent with a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The functional group interaction analysis between waste beer yeast sludge and reactive blue 49 by the aid of Fourier transform infrared (abbr. FTIR) spectroscopy indicated that amino components involved in protein participated in the biosorption process, which may be achieved by the mutual electrostatic adsorption process between the positively charged amino groups in waste beer yeast sludge with negatively charged sulfonic groups in reactive blue 49.

  3. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  4. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunsu, Cristian, E-mail: tunsu@chalmers.se; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A wet-based decontamination process for fluorescent lamp waste is proposed. • Mercury can be leached using iodine in potassium iodide solution. • The efficiency of the process increases with an increase in leachant concentration. • Selective leaching of mercury from rare earth elements is achieved. • Mercury is furthered recovered using ion exchange, reduction or solvent extraction. - Abstract: With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent’s concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I{sub 2}/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5 M I{sub 2}/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe{sub 4}BTBP showed good removal of mercury

  5. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunsu, Cristian; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-01

    With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent's concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I2/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5M I2/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe4BTBP showed good removal of mercury, with an extraction efficiency of 97.5 ± 0.7% being achieved in a single stage. Better removal of mercury was achieved in a single stage using the extractants Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 923 in kerosene, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Applying AN Integrated Route Optimization Method as a Solution to the Problem of Waste Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, A. H.; Ahamad, M. S. S.; Yusoff, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Solid waste management (SWM) is very subjective to budget control where the utmost expenses are devoted to the waste collection's travel route. The common understanding of the travel route in SWM is that shorter route is cheaper. However, in reality it is not necessarily true as the SWM compactor truck is affected by various aspects which leads to higher fuel consumption. Thus, this ongoing research introduces a solution to the problem using multiple criteria route optimization process integrated with AHP/GIS as its main analysis tools. With the criteria obtained from the idea that leads to higher fuel consumption based on road factors, road networks and human factors. The weightage of criteria is obtained from the combination of AHP with the distance of multiple shortest routes obtained from GIS. A solution of most optimum routes is achievable and comparative analysis with the currently used route by the SWM compactor truck can be compared. It is expected that the decision model will be able to solve the global and local travel route problem in MSW.

  7. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Day, Christy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  8. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  9. G189A analytical simulation of the RITE Integrated Waste Management-Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, J. V.; Clonts, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses the computer simulation of the Integrated Waste Management-Water System Using Radioisotopes for Thermal Energy (RITE) and applications of the simulation. Variations in the system temperature and flows due to particular operating conditions and variations in equipment heating loads imposed on the system were investigated with the computer program. The results were assessed from the standpoint of the computed dynamic characteristics of the system and the potential applications of the simulation to system development and vehicle integration.

  10. Waste pretreatment and interfacing system dynamic simulation model (ITHINK model) FY-96 year-end report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, R.W.

    1996-09-30

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation (ITHINK) Model (see WHC-SD-WM-DR-013) was originally created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates required to meet the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) waste vitrification milestones. The TPA milestones are satisfied by retrieving the TX tank farm (salt cake) single-shell tanks (SSTs)first and by utilizing a relatively constant retrieval rate to the year 2018 when retrieval is completed.

  11. Metals and polybrominated diphenyl ethers leaching from electronic waste in simulated landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiddee, Peeranart [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, 5095 (Australia); Wong, Ming H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (China)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: • Simulated landfill columns provided realistic results than lab based column study. • Column leachates showed significant seasonal effect on toxic substances. • Toxic substances in the landfill leachates pose environmental and health hazards. • A better management of e-waste is urgently needed. -- Abstract: Landfills established prior to the recognition of potential impacts from the leaching of heavy metals and toxic organic compounds often lack appropriate barriers and pose significant risks of contamination of groundwater. In this study, bioavailable metal(oids) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leachates from landfill columns that contained intact or broken e-waste were studied under conditions that simulate landfills in terms of waste components and methods of disposal of e-wastes, and with realistic rainfall. Fourteen elements and PBDEs were analysed in leachates over a period of 21 months. The results demonstrate that the average concentrations of Al, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and V in leachates from the column that contained broken e-waste items were significantly higher than the column without e-waste. BDE-153 was the highest average PBDEs congener in all columns but the average of ∑PBDEs levels in columns that contained intact e-waste were (3.7 ng/l) and were not significantly higher than that in the leachates from the control column.

  12. Evaluation of Gas Retention in Waste Simulants: Tall Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Powell, Michael R.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Karri, Naveen K.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Tran, Diana N.; Sande, Susan; Heldebrant, David J.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Smet, Dave; Bryan, Wesley E.; Calmus, Ronald B.

    2014-05-16

    Gas generation in Hanford’s underground waste storage tanks can lead to gas accumulation within the layer of settled solids (sludge) at the tank bottom. The gas, which typically has hydrogen as the major component together with other flammable species, is formed principally by radiation-driven chemical reactions. Accumulation of these gases within the sludge in a waste tank is undesirable and limits the amount of tank volume for waste storage. Further, accumulation of large amounts of gas in the sludge may potentially result in an unacceptable release of the accumulated gas if the sludge-layer density is reduced to less than that of the overlying sludge or that of the supernatant liquid. Rapid release of large amounts of flammable gases could endanger personnel and equipment near the tank. For this reason, a thorough understanding of the circumstances that can lead to a potentially problematic gas accumulation in sludge layers is needed. To respond to this need, the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Program (DSGREP) was commissioned to examine gas release behavior in sludges.

  13. Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrados, A; de Marco, I; Caballero, B M; López, A; Laresgoiti, M F; Torres, A

    2012-05-01

    Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Wenfang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Yingxin, E-mail: yingxinzhao@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zheng, Xinyi [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ji, Min [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Zhenya [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The main chemical components of Sakura leaves are cellulose 16.6%, hemicellulose 10.4%, lignin 18.3%, ash 11.4%, and others 43.3%. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto Sakura leaves can achieve 435.25 mg g{sup −1}, much higher than other similar agroforestry wastes. - Highlights: • Sakura leaves were prepared to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached 435.25 mg g{sup −1}. • Cr(VI) adsorption fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic model. • Isotherm models indicated Cr(VI) adsorption occurred on a monolayer surface. • The influence order of coexisting ions followed PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g{sup −1} at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of water, solution, and clay mineral-water systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    quantitatively, and nano-scopic structural and dynamic properties of interlayer aqueous solutions were obtained. Wetting of clay mineral surfaces determines the mechanical properties of clays, soils and sedimentary rocks. We investigated the wetting properties of smectite, kaolinite, pyrophyllite, brucite, etc. The wetness of these minerals is quite different with each other. The reson of these difference was demonstrated by our molecular simulations. One of our main purpose of studying clay nano-properties ais to know the fundamental nano-mechanical characteristics of clays, and to apply these properties to predict long term behavior of clay-based materials, such as engineering barriers for radioactive waste disposal. For this purpose, unified nano-micro-macro mechanical approaches should be established (Ichikawa, et al. (1999)“Unified molecular dynamics and homogenization analysis for bentonite behavior: Current results and future possibilities. Engineering Geology, 54, 21-31. Choi, et al. (2008) Transport phenomena in kaolinite clay: Molecular simulation, homogenization analysis. Int.J.Numer. Analy. Meth. Geomech., DOI:10.1002/nag.744.)

  16. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel, E-mail: teodor.chelaru@upb.ro [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest - Research Center for Aeronautics and Space, Str. Ghe Polizu, nr. 1, Bucharest, Sector 1 (Romania); Cristian, Barbu, E-mail: barbucr@mta.ro [Military Technical Academy, Romania, B-dul. George Coşbuc, nr. 81-83, Bucharest, Sector 5 (Romania); Chelaru, Adrian, E-mail: achelaru@incas.ro [INCAS -National Institute for Aerospace Research Elie Carafoli, B-dul Iuliu Maniu 220, 061126, Bucharest, Sector 6 (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital

  17. Purification of simulated waste water using green synthesized silver nanoparticles of Piliostigma thonningii aqueous leave extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, K. O.; Ihebunna, O.

    2017-12-01

    Synthesis of nanoparticles from various biological systems has been reported, but among all such systems, biosynthesis of nanoparticles from plants is considered the most suitable method. The use of plant material not only makes the process eco-friendly, but also the abundance makes it more economical. The aim of this study was to biologically synthesize silver nanoparticle using Piliostigma thonningii aqueous leaf extract and applied in the purification of laboratory stimulated waste with optimization using the different conditions of silver nanoparticle production such as time, temperature, pH, concentration of silver nitrate and volume of the aqueous extract. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectrophotometry, nanosizer, energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The time intervals for the reaction with aqueous silver nitrate solution shows an increase in the absorbance with time and became constant giving a maximum absorbance at 415 nm at 60 min of incubation. The pH of 6.5, temperature 65 °C, 1.25 mM of silver nitrate and 5 ml of plant extract was the best condition with maximum absorbance. The results from nanosizer, UV-vis and TEM suggested the biosynthesis silver nanoparticle to be spherical ranging from 50 nm to 114 nm. The EDX confirmed the elemental synthesis of silver at 2.60 keV and FTIR suggested the capping agent to be hydroxyl (OH) group with -C=C stretching vibrations. The synthesized silver nanoparticle also shows heavy metal removal activity in laboratory simulated waste water. The safety toxicity studies show no significant difference between the orally administered silver nanoparticles treated water group and control group, while the histopathological studies show well preserved hepatic architecture for the orally administered silver nanoparticle treated waste water group when compared with the control

  18. Research and demonstration results for a new "Double-Solution" technology for municipal solid waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erping, Li; Haoyun, Chen; Yanyang, Shang; Jun, Pan; Qing, Hu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the pyrolysis characteristics of six typical components in municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated through a TG-FTIR combined technique and it was concluded that the main pyrolysis process of the biomass components (including food residues, sawdust and paper) occurred at 150-600°C. The main volatiles were multi-component gas including H2O, CO2, and CO. The main pyrolysis temperatures of three artificial products (PP, PVC and leather) was ranged from 200to 500°C. The wavelength of small molecule gases (CH4, CO2 and CO) and the the chemical bonds (CO and CC) were observed in the infrared spectrum Based on the pyrolysis temperature interval and volatile constituent, a new "double-solution" process of pyrolysis and oxygen-enrichment decomposition MSW was designed. To achieve this process, a double-solution project was built for the direct treatment of MSW (10t/d). The complete setup of equipment and analysis of the byproducts has been reported in this paper to indicate the performance of this process. Energy balance and economic benefits were analysed for the process supporting. It was successfully demonstrated that the double-solution process was the environmentally friendly alternative method for MSW treatment in Chinese rural areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of steel during accelerated carbonation of solutions which simulate the pore concrete solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso, C.

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the numerous studies carried out on carbonation of the concrete, very few data have been published on the mechanism of steel depassivation and the corrosion rates involved in this type of phenomenon. Also some uncertainties remain as to the chemical composition of the pore solution of a carbonated concrete. Random behaviours related with the changes in the corrosion rate of steel during accelerated carbonation of cement mortars have suggested the need to study the process in a more simple medium which allows the isolation of the different parameters. Thus, saturated Ca(0H2 -base solutions with different additions of KOH and NaOH have been used to simulate the real pore concrete solution. In the present work, simultaneous changes in the pH value, corrosion potential and corrosion rate (measured by means of the determination of the Polarization Resistance of steel roads have been monitored during accelerated carbonation produced by a constant flux through the solution of CO2 gas and/or air.

    A pesar de los numerosos estudios realizados en torno a la carbonatación del hormigón, son muy pocos los datos publicados acerca del mecanismo de despasivación del acero y las velocidades de corrosión implicadas en el proceso de corrosión por carbonatación. Por otra parte, aún no se conoce la composición de la fase acuosa de un hormigón carbonatado. Cierta erraticidad en los cambios registrados en la velocidad de corrosión del acero durante la carbonatación acelerada de morteros de cemento, puso de manifiesto la necesidad del estudio del proceso en un sistema simplificado que permitiera considerar aisladamente cada uno de los distintos parámetros. A este fin se utilizaron como disoluciones de simulación de la fase acuosa intersticial del hormigón, disoluciones saturadas de Ca(0H2 con distintas adiciones de NaOH o KOH. En el presente trabajo, se han registrado simultáneamente los cambios en

  20. Immobilization of zinc from metallurgical waste and water solutions using geopolymerization technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolići I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymeraization technology is recognized as a promising method for immobilization of heavy metals by the stabilization or solidification process. This process involves the chemical reaction of alumino-silicate oxides with highly alkaline activator yielding the new material with amorphous or semi-amorphous structure, called geopolymer. Fly ash and blast furnace slag were mainly used as a raw material for geopolymerization process. In this paper we have investigated the possibility of immobilization of Zn from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD through geopolymerization of fly ash and possibility of Zn2+ adsorption from waste waters using fly ash based geopolymers. Efficacy of Zn immobilization from electric arc furnace dust was evaluated by TCLP test while the immobilization of Zn2+ ions from the water solution was evaluated through the removal efficiency. The results have shown that geopolymerization process may successfully be used for immobilization of Zn by stabilization of EAFD and for production of low cost adsorbent for waste water treatment.

  1. Preparation of porous carbon sphere from waste sugar solution for electric double-layer capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhi-Qiang; Cao, Jing-Pei; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Zhuang, Qi-Qi; Wang, Xing-Yong; Wei, Xian-Yong

    2017-09-01

    Waste sugar solution (WSS), which contains abundant 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, is harmful to the environment if discharged directly. For value-added utilization of the waste resource, a novel process is developed for preparation of porous carbon spheres by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of WSS followed by KOH activation. Additionally, the possible preparation mechanism of carbon spheres is proposed. The effects of hydrothermal and activation parameters on the properties of the carbon sphere are also investigated. The carbon sphere is applied to electric double-layer capacitor and its electrochemical performance is studied. These results show that the carbon sphere obtained by HTC at 180 °C for 12 h with the WSS/deionized water volume ratio of 2/3 possess the highest specific capacitance under identical activation conditions. The specific capacitance of the carbon spheres can reach 296.1 F g-1 at a current density of 40 mA g-1. Besides, excellent cycle life and good capacitance retention (89.6%) are observed at 1.5 A g-1 after 5000 cycles. This study not only provides a facile and potential method for the WSS treatment, but also achieves the high value-added recycling of WSS for the preparation of porous carbon spheres with superior electrochemical properties.

  2. Removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto orange waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Marin, A.B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Zapata, V. Meseguer [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: vzapata@um.es; Ortuno, J.F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguilar, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Saez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Llorens, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain)

    2007-01-02

    The use of orange wastes, generated in the orange juice industry, for removing cadmium from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and batch experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption capacity of the biomass. A strong dependence of the adsorption capacity on pH was observed, the capacity increasing as pH value rose. Kinetics and adsorption equilibrium were studied at different pH values (4-6). The adsorption process was quick and the equilibrium was attained within 3 h. The maximum adsorption capacity of orange waste was found to be 0.40, 0.41 and 0.43 mmol/g at pH 4-6, respectively. The kinetic data were analysed using various kinetic models - pseudo-first order equation, pseudo-second order equation, Elovich equation and intraparticle diffusion equation - and the equilibrium data were tested using four isotherm models - Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips and Redlich-Peterson. The data were fitted by non-linear regression and five error analysis methods were used to evaluate the goodness of the fit. The Elovich equation provides the greatest accuracy for the kinetic data and the Sips model the closest fit for the equilibrium data.

  3. RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.

    2012-11-08

    A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel's susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

  4. Waste Treatment of Acidic Solutions from the Dissolution of Irradiated LEU Targets for 99-Mo Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-01

    One of the missions of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program (and now the National Nuclear Security Administrations Material Management and Minimization program) is to facilitate the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets for 99Mo production. The conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU targets will require five to six times more uranium to produce an equivalent amount of 99Mo. The work discussed here addresses the technical challenges encountered in the treatment of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH)/nitric acid solutions remaining after the dissolution of LEU targets. Specifically, the focus of this work is the calcination of the uranium waste from 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. Work with our calciner system showed that high furnace temperature, a large vent tube, and a mechanical shield are beneficial for calciner operation. One- and two-step direct calcination processes were evaluated. The high-temperature one-step process led to contamination of the calciner system. The two-step direct calcination process operated stably and resulted in a relatively large amount of material in the calciner cup. Chemically assisted calcination using peroxide was rejected for further work due to the difficulty in handling the products. Chemically assisted calcination using formic acid was rejected due to unstable operation. Chemically assisted calcination using oxalic acid was recommended, although a better understanding of its chemistry is needed. Overall, this work showed that the two-step direct calcination and the in-cup oxalic acid processes are the best approaches for the treatment of the UNH/nitric acid waste solutions remaining from dissolution of LEU targets for 99Mo production.

  5. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  6. Spatial distribution of solute leaching with snowmelt and irrigation: measurements and simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, D.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Transport of a tracer and a degradable solute in a heterogeneous soil was measured in the field, and simulated with several transient and steady state infiltration rates. Leaching surfaces were used to investigate the solute leaching in space and time simultaneously. In the simulations, a random

  7. Atomistic Simulations of Dislocations in a Model BCC Multicomponent Concentrated Solid Solution Alloy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Dislocations ; Atomistic simulations; Concentrated multicomponent solid solution alloy; BCC crystal 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...This has implications for higher-scale modeling ( dislocation dynamics or crystal plasticity) of HEA alloys, relative to elemental BCC metals, which...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0302 ATOMISTIC SIMULATIONS OF DISLOCATIONS IN A MODEL BCC MULTICOMPONENT CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTION ALLOY

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  9. Recycle Waste Collection Tank (RWCT) simulant testing in the PVTD feed preparation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrigo, G.P.; Daume, J.T.; Halstead, S.D.; Myers, R.L.; Beckette, M.R.; Freeman, C.J.; Hatchell, B.K.

    1996-03-01

    (This is part of the radwaste vitrification program at Hanford.) RWCT was to routinely receive final canister decontamination sand blast frit and rinse water, Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank bottoms, and melter off-gas Submerged Bed Scrubber filter cake. In order to address the design needs of the RWCT system to meet performance levels, the PNL Vitrification Technology (PVTD) program used the Feed Preparation Test System (FPTS) to evaluate its equipment and performance for a simulant of RWCT slurry. (FPTS is an adaptation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility feed preparation system and represents the initially proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed preparation system designed by Fluor-Daniel, Inc.) The following were determined: mixing performance, pump priming, pump performance, simulant flow characterization, evaporator and condenser performance, and ammonia dispersion. The RWCT test had two runs, one with and one without tank baffles.

  10. Parametric and kinetic study of adsorptive removal of dyes from aqueous solutions using an agriculture waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, imane; el hajjaji, souad; abourouh, imane; Kitane, Said; Dahchour, Abdelmalek; El M'Rabet, Mohammadine

    2017-04-01

    Wastewater treatment is the subject of several studies through decades. Interest is continuously oriented to provide cheaper and efficient methods of treatment. Several methods of treatment exit including coagulation flocculation, filtration, precipitation, ozonation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation process. The use of these methods proved limited because of their high investment and operational cost. Adsorption can be an efficient low-cost process to remove pollutants from wastewater. This method of treatment calls for an solid adsorbent which constitutes the purification tool. Agricultural wastes have been widely exploited in this case .As we know the agricultural wastes are an important source of water pollution once discharged into the aquatic environment (river, sea ...). The valorization of such wastes and their use allows the prevention of this problem with an economic and environment benefits. In this context our study aimed testing the wastewater treatment capacity by adsorption onto holocellulose resulting from the valorization of an agriculture waste. In this study, methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) are selected as models pollutants for evaluating the holocellulose adsorbent capacity. The kinetics of adsorption is performed using UV-visible spectroscopy. In order to study the effect of the main parameters for the adsorption process and their mutual interaction, a full factorial design (type nk) has been used.23 full factorial design analysis was performed to screen the parameters affecting dye removal efficiency. Using the experimental results, a linear mathematical model representing the influence of the different parameters and their interactions was obtained. The parametric study showed that efficiency of the adsorption system (Dyes/ Holocellulose) is mainly linked to pH variation. The best yields were observed for MB at pH=10 and for MO at pH=2.The kinetic data was analyzed using different models , namely , the pseudo

  11. Treatment of an Anonymous Recipient: Solid-Waste Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Chiu; Huang, Po-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    This study developed a game simulation based on problem solving in the management of urban waste. We then investigated the factors affecting the decisions made by players. During gameplay, the players sought to guide the development of a city via management strategies involving a balance of economic growth and environmental protection. Nature…

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in a single rough fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Zhi; Zhi-fang ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) was used to simulate the solute transport in a single rough fracture. The self-affine rough fracture wall was generated with the successive random addition method. The ability of the developed LBM to simulate the solute transport was validated by Taylor dispersion. The effect of fluid velocity on the solute transport in a single rough fracture was investigated using the LBM. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) for continuous injection sources in ro...

  13. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  14. Computer simulations of alkali-acetate solutions: Accuracy of the forcefields in difference concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrand, Emma; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Friedman, Ran

    2017-11-01

    When proteins are solvated in electrolyte solutions that contain alkali ions, the ions interact mostly with carboxylates on the protein surface. Correctly accounting for alkali-carboxylate interactions is thus important for realistic simulations of proteins. Acetates are the simplest carboxylates that are amphipathic, and experimental data for alkali acetate solutions are available and can be compared with observables obtained from simulations. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of alkali acetate solutions using polarizable and non-polarizable forcefields and examined the ion-acetate interactions. In particular, activity coefficients and association constants were studied in a range of concentrations (0.03, 0.1, and 1M). In addition, quantum-mechanics (QM) based energy decomposition analysis was performed in order to estimate the contribution of polarization, electrostatics, dispersion, and QM (non-classical) effects on the cation-acetate and cation-water interactions. Simulations of Li-acetate solutions in general overestimated the binding of Li+ and acetates. In lower concentrations, the activity coefficients of alkali-acetate solutions were too high, which is suggested to be due to the simulation protocol and not the forcefields. Energy decomposition analysis suggested that improvement of the forcefield parameters to enable accurate simulations of Li-acetate solutions can be achieved but may require the use of a polarizable forcefield. Importantly, simulations with some ion parameters could not reproduce the correct ion-oxygen distances, which calls for caution in the choice of ion parameters when protein simulations are performed in electrolyte solutions.

  15. Selective separation of copper over solder alloy from waste printed circuit boards leach solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi, Maryam; Sattari, Anahita; Alamdari, Eskandar Keshavarz; Firozi, Sadegh

    2017-02-01

    The printed circuit boards (PCBs) from electronic waste are important resource, since the PCBs contain precious metals such as gold, copper, tin, silver, platinum and so forth. In addition to the economic point of view, the presence of lead turns this scrap into dangerous to environment. This study was conducted as part of the development of a novel process for selective recovery of copper over tin and lead from printed circuit boards by HBF4 leaching. In previous study, Copper with solder alloy was associated, simultaneously were leached in HBF4 solution using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant at room temperature. The objective of this study is the separation of copper from tin and lead from Fluoroborate media using CP-150 as an extractant. The influence of organic solvent's concentration, pH, temperature and A/O phase ratio was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism and the composition of the extracted species have been determined. The separation factors for these metals using this agent are reported, while efficient methods for separation of Cu (II) from other metal ions are proposed. The treatment of leach liquor for solvent extraction of copper with CP-150 revealed that 20% CP-150 in kerosene, a 30min period of contact time, and a pH of 3 were sufficient for the extraction of Cu(II) and 99.99% copper was recovered from the leached solution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Removal of Orange 16 reactive dye from aqueous solutions by waste sunflower seed shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODOR MALUTAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the use of an agro-industrial waste, i.e., sunflower seed shells, was investigated as a sorbent for the removal of Orange 16 reactive dye from aqueous environments. Batch experiments were performed as a function of pH, sorbent dose, dye concentration, temperature and contact time. The per­cent dye removal increased with increasing sorbent dose and temperature of the aqueous solution, and decreased with increasing dye concentration; the re­quired contact time was five hours. The Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin–Ra­du­shkevich and Tempkin adsorption isotherms were used to describe the equi­librium sorption data and to determine the corresponding isotherm constants. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔG, ΔH and ΔS, were also determined. These parameters indicated that the sorption of reactive dye onto sunflower seed shells was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropy-driven process. The kinetic data were evaluated by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-par­ticle diffusion kinetic models. The results of the kinetic study indicated that the sorption of Orange 16 reactive dye onto sunflower seed shells is a complex process and both chemical surface sorption and intra-particle diffusion contri­bute to the rate-limiting step. Therefore, the sunflower seed shell showed itself to be a promising cheap sorbent for the decolourization of aqueous coloured solutions or effluents.

  17. Formulation and preparation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant direct feed low activity waste Effluent Management Facility core simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  18. An adaptive nonlinear solution scheme for reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, G.S. [Scientific Software - Intercomp, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Numerical reservoir simulation involves solving large, nonlinear systems of PDE with strongly discontinuous coefficients. Because of the large demands on computer memory and CPU, most users must perform simulations on very coarse grids. The average properties of the fluids and rocks must be estimated on these grids. These coarse grid {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} properties are costly to determine, and risky to use, since their optimal values depend on the fluid flow being simulated. Thus, they must be found by trial-and-error techniques, and the more coarse the grid, the poorer the results. This paper describes a numerical reservoir simulator which accepts fine scale properties and automatically generates multiple levels of coarse grid rock and fluid properties. The fine grid properties and the coarse grid simulation results are used to estimate discretization errors with multilevel error expansions. These expansions are local, and identify areas requiring local grid refinement. These refinements are added adoptively by the simulator, and the resulting composite grid equations are solved by a nonlinear Fast Adaptive Composite (FAC) Grid method, with a damped Newton algorithm being used on each local grid. The nonsymmetric linear system of equations resulting from Newton`s method are in turn solved by a preconditioned Conjugate Gradients-like algorithm. The scheme is demonstrated by performing fine and coarse grid simulations of several multiphase reservoirs from around the world.

  19. Removal of chromium(III) from aqueous waste solution by liquid-liquid extraction in a circular microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian Hong; Li, Jun; Guo, Lei; Zhu, Xin Hua; Dai, Shuang; Li, Xing

    2017-11-01

    A new circular microchannel device has been proposed for the removal of chromium(III) from aqueous waste solution by using kerosene as a diluent and (2-ethylhexyl) 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate as an extractant. The proposed device has several advantages such as a flexible and easily adaptable design, easy maintenance, and cheap setup without the requirement of microfabrication. To study the extraction efficiency and advantages of the circular microchannel device in the removal of chromium(III), the effects of various operating conditions such as the inner diameter of the channel, the total flow velocity, the phase ratio, the initial pH of aqueous waste solution, the reaction temperature and the initial concentration of extractant on the extraction efficiency are investigated and the optimal process conditions are obtained. The results show that chromium(III) in aqueous waste solution can be effectively removed with (2-ethylhexyl) 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate in the circular microchannel. Under optimized conditions, an extraction efficiency of chromium(III) of more than 99% can be attained and the aqueous waste solution can be discharged directly, which can meet the Chinese national emission standards.

  20. Corrosion of inconel in high-temperature borosilicate glass melts containing simulant nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Yuan, Xiaoning; Brigden, Clive T.; Tao, Jun; Hyatt, Neil C.; Miekina, Michal

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Inconel 601 in the borosilicate glass (MW glass) containing 25 wt.% of simulant Magnox waste, and in ZnO, Mn2O3 and Fe2O3 modified Mg/Ca borosilicate glasses (MZMF and CZMF glasses) containing 15 wt.% of simulant POCO waste, were evaluated by dimensional changes, the formation of internal defects and changes in alloy composition near corrosion surfaces. In all three kinds of glass melts, Cr at the inconel surface forms a protective Cr2O3 scale between the metal surface and the glass, and alumina precipitates penetrate from the metal surface or formed in-situ. The corrosion depths of inconel 601 in MW waste glass melt are greater than those in the other two glass melts. In MW glass, the Cr2O3 layer between inconel and glass is fragmented because of the reaction between MgO and Cr2O3, which forms the crystal phase MgCr2O4. In MZMF and CZMF waste glasses the layers are continuous and a thin (Zn, Fe, Ni, B)-containing layer forms on the surface of the chromium oxide layer and prevents Cr2O3 from reacting with MgO or other constituents. MgCr2O4 was observed in the XRD analysis of the bulk MW waste glass after the corrosion test, and ZrSiO4 in the MZMF waste glass, and ZrSiO4 and CaMoO4 in the CZMF waste glass.

  1. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  2. Theory and computer simulation of solute effects on the surface tension of liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Smith, Paul E

    2008-07-31

    A complete description of the thermodynamics of planar mixed solute-solvent interfaces suitable for the analysis of computer simulation data is provided. The approach uses surface probability distributions to characterize the interface regions, coupled with radial distribution functions and the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions to characterize the bulk solution properties. The approach is then used to understand the relationship between changes in the surface tension, the degree of surface adsorption or depletion, and the bulk solution properties of two aqueous solute systems. The first, aqueous NaCl solutions, provides an example of a surface excluded solute. The second, aqueous methanol solutions, provides an example of a surface adsorbed solute. The numerical results support the theoretical relationships described here and provide a consistent picture of the thermodynamics of solution interfaces involving any number of components which can be applied to a wide variety of systems.

  3. Hydraulic testing of simulated DWPF waste slurries at the Georgia Iron Works Hydraulic Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.P.

    1982-12-31

    Pipeline tests of current simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste slurries were performed during August 1982 at the Georgia Iron Works Hydraulic Laboratory (GIW). Measurements of pressure gradient versus flow in 3-inch pipes and fittings were made for various concentrations of unformated sludge and formated sludge with frit. All slurries were shown to behave generally as Bingham Plastic fluids. Formated sludge/frit slurries behaved generally like unformated sludge slurries of comparable yield stress. No frit settling problems were observed. 8 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Simplified analytical model to simulate radionuclide release from radioactive waste trenches; Modelo simplificado para simulacao da liberacao de radionuclideos de repositorios de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Bernardete Lemes Vieira de

    2001-07-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, a computer code was developed to simulate the radionuclide released from waste form, transport through vadose zone and transport in the saturated zone. This paper describes the methodology used to model these process. The radionuclide released from the waste is calculated using a model based on first order kinetics and the transport through porous media was determined using semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation, considering the limiting case of unidirectional convective transport with three-dimensional dispersion in an isotropic medium. The results obtained in this work were compared with other codes, showing good agreement. (author)

  5. Analysis and simulation of radially symmetric solutions for free boundary problems with superlinear reaction term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunying Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns with the solution to a heat equation with a free boundary in n-dimensional space. By applying the energy inequality to the solutions that depend not only on the initial value but also on the dimension of space, we derive the sufficient conditions under which solutions blow up at finite time. We then explore the long-time behavior of global solutions. Results show that the solution is global and fast when initial value is small, and the solution is global but slow for suitable initial value. Numerical simulations are also given to illustrate the effect of the initial value on the free boundary.

  6. Analysis of Environmental Applicability of HDPE Geomembrane by Simulated Applicability Testing for Waste Containment Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN-YONG JEON

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic separation boxes made from recycled polymeric materials were designed to increase the waste landfill amount and develop the hydraulic performance in steep slope sides in the waste landfills. To evaluate the advantages of these geosynthetic separation boxes, index tests were conducted in order to compare the geonet composites and geosynthetic separation boxes. The tensile strength retention of the geosynthetic separation box plates exposed to UV light and leachate solutions was better than that of the geonet composites. The drainage performance of the geosynthetic separation boxes was compared with that of the geonet composites at a slope angle corresponding to a real waste landfill site. The drainage performance of the geosynthetic separation box plates was better than that of the geonet composites.

  7. Planet Patrol. An Environmental Unit on Solid Waste Solutions for Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This classroom unit was developed for use in grades 4-6 to help teach the concept of solid waste management. The teacher's guide provides an overview of the issue of solid waste disposal, a description of government, industry, and consumer roles in resolving the solid waste issue, and four lessons involving sanitary landfills, the reduction of…

  8. Phase field simulations of ice crystal growth in sugar solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, Van Der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first model ever, that describes explicitly ice crystal growth in a sugar solution during freezing. This 2-D model uses the phase field method, supplemented with realistic, and predictive theories on the thermodynamics and (diffusion) kinetics of this food system. We have to make

  9. The Preparation of Modified Industrial Waste Polyacrylonitrile for the Adsorptive Recovery of Pt(IV from Acidic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorption technique is one of the most effective methods for recovering precious metals from wastewater solutions; however, its main drawbacks of the traditional sorbents are the slow kinetics and relatively low sorption capacities. As a solution, thin sorbent fibers have been highlighted because they can lead to fast adsorption kinetics due to their high surface areas and numerous binding sites. In this sense, the applicability of an industrial waste polyacrylonitrile (PAN textile was examined to recover Pt(IV from acid solutions. In order to enrich cationic functional groups on the surface of a PAN textile, the textile was chemically modified via polyethylenmine (PEI coating. Afterwards, using PEI-coated PAN fiber, batch sorption experiments (isotherms and kinetics and column experiments were conducted to evaluate its sorption performance toward Pt(IV. It was clearly revealed in column experiments that the PEI-coated waste PAN textile (WPAN has fast kinetics and good performance for Pt(IV recovery.

  10. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  11. [Simulation on contamination forecast and control of groundwater in a certain hazardous waste landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Fei; An, Da; Jiang, Yong-Hai; Xi, Bei-Dou; Li, Ding-Long; Zhang, Jin-Bao; Yang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of site investigation and data collection of a certain hazardous waste landfill, the groundwater flow and solute transport coupled models were established by applying Visual Modflow software, which was used to conduct a numerical simulation that forecast the transport process of Cr6+ in groundwater and the effects of three control measures (ground-harden, leakage-proof barriers and drainage ditches) of contaminants transport after leachate leakage happened in impermeable layer of the landfill. The results show that the contamination plume of Cr6+ transports with groundwater flow direction, the contamination rang would reach the pool's boundary in 10 years, and the distance of contamination transport is 1 450 m. But the diffusion range of contamination plume would not be obviously expanded between 10 and 20 years. While the ground is hardened, the contamination plume would not reach the pool's boundary in 20 years. When the leakage-proof barrier is set in the bottom of water table aquifer, the concentration of Cr6+ is higher than that the leakage-proof barrier is unset, but the result is just opposite when setting the leakage-proof barrier in the bottom of underlying aquifer. The range of contamination plume is effectively controlled by setting drainage ditches that water discharge is 2 642 m3 x d(-1), which makes the monitoring wells would not be contaminated in 20 years. Moreover, combining the ground-harden with drainage ditches can get the best effect in controlling contaminants diffusion, and meanwhile, the drainage ditches' daily discharge is reduced to 1 878 m3 x d(-1). Therefore, it is suggested that the control measure combining the ground-harden with drainage ditches should apply to prevent contamination diffusion in groundwater when leachate leakage have happened in impermeable layer of the landfill.

  12. Evaluation of the Contamination Control Unit during simulated transuranic waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.N.; Freeman, A.L.; Wixom, V.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report presents the results of a field demonstration at the INEL of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a field deployable self-contained trailer mounted system to control contamination spread at the site of transuranic (TRU) handling operations. This is accomplished primarily by controlling dust spread. This demonstration was sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Technology Development Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. The CCU, housed in a mobile trailer for easy transport, supports four different contamination control systems: water misting, dust suppression application, soil fixative application, and vacuuming operations. Assessment of the CCU involved laboratory operational performance testing, operational testing and contamination control at a decommissioned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory reactor, and field testing in conjunction with a simulated TRU buried waste retrieval effort at the Cold Test Pit.

  13. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulated waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Germany were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO{sub 2}), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. the majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 microns; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. Detailed particle distribution and characterization was performed for a Hanford waste to provide input to computer modeling of particle settling in the melter.

  14. The waste management at research laboratories - problems and solutions; Gestao de rejeitos radioativos em laboratorios de pesquisa - problemas e solucoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: jcdellam@ipen.b, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2011-10-26

    The radioactive management in radioactive installations must be planned and controlled. However, in the case of research laboratories, that management is compromised due to the common use of materials and installations, the lack of trained personnel and the nonexistence of clear and objective orientations by the regulator organism. Such failures cause an increasing of generated radioactive wastes and the imprecision or nonexistence of record of radioactive substances, occasioning a financial wastage, and the cancelling of licences for use of radioactive substances. This paper discusses and proposes solutions for the problems found at radioactive waste management in research laboratories

  15. Adsorption of Reactive Blue 171 from Aqueous Solution using Low Cost Activated Carbon Prepared from Agricultural Solid Waste: Albizia amara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anitha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Reactive Blue 171 (Reactive Dye from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from Albizia amara pod shell waste as an adsorbent have been carried out. The experimental adsorption data fitted reasonably well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Kinetic parameters as a function of Initial dye concentration have been calculated and the kinetic data were substituted in Pseudo First Order, Elovich and Pseudo Second order equations. A probable explanation is offered to account for the results of kinetic study. The thermodynamic parameter enthalpy change (∆H suggests the exothermic nature of absorption of Reactive Blue 171 onto activated Albizia amara pod shell waste carbon.

  16. WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP): THE NATIONS' SOLUTION TO NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE AND DISPOSAL ISSUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Tammy Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-17

    In the southeastern portion of my home state of New Mexico lies the Chihuahauan desert, where a transuranic (TRU), underground disposal site known as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) occupies 16 square miles. Full operation status began in March 1999, the year I graduated from Los Alamos High School, in Los Alamos, NM, the birthplace of the atomic bomb and one of the nation’s main TRU waste generator sites. During the time of its development and until recently, I did not have a full grasp on the role Los Alamos was playing in regards to WIPP. WIPP is used to store and dispose of TRU waste that has been generated since the 1940s because of nuclear weapons research and testing operations that have occurred in Los Alamos, NM and at other sites throughout the United States (U.S.). TRU waste consists of items that are contaminated with artificial, man-made radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater than uranium, or are trans-uranic, on the periodic table of elements and it has longevity characteristics that may be hazardous to human health and the environment. Therefore, WIPP has underground rooms that have been carved out of 2,000 square foot thick salt formations approximately 2,150 feet underground so that the TRU waste can be isolated and disposed of. WIPP has operated safely and successfully until this year, when two unrelated events occurred in February 2014. With these events, the safety precautions and measures that have been operating at WIPP for the last 15 years are being revised and improved to ensure that other such events do not occur again.

  17. Preparation and evaporation of Hanford Waste treatment plant direct feed low activity waste effluent management facility simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-07

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream involves concentrating the condensate in a new evaporator at the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and returning it to the LAW melter. The LMOGC stream will contain components, e.g. halides and sulfates, that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in glass waste forms, and present a material corrosion concern. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components are expected to accumulate in the LMOGC stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfates in the glass and is a key objective of this program. In order to determine the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, determine the formation and distribution of key regulatoryimpacting constituents, and generate an aqueous stream that can be used in testing of the subsequent immobilization step. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of the LMOGC stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to (1) prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations, (2) demonstrate evaporation in order to predict the final composition of the effluents from the EMF

  18. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  19. Coupled Multi-physical Simulations for the Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repository Concepts: Modeling, Software Development and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, J.; Nagel, T.; Bilke, L.; Böttcher, N.; Heusermann, S.; Fischer, T.; Kumar, V.; Schäfers, A.; Shao, H.; Vogel, P.; Wang, W.; Watanabe, N.; Ziefle, G.; Kolditz, O.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the German site selection process for a high-level nuclear waste repository, different repository concepts in the geological candidate formations rock salt, clay stone and crystalline rock are being discussed. An open assessment of these concepts using numerical simulations requires physical models capturing the individual particularities of each rock type and associated geotechnical barrier concept to a comparable level of sophistication. In a joint work group of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), scientists of the UFZ are developing and implementing multiphysical process models while BGR scientists apply them to large scale analyses. The advances in simulation methods for waste repositories are incorporated into the open-source code OpenGeoSys. Here, recent application-driven progress in this context is highlighted. A robust implementation of visco-plasticity with temperature-dependent properties into a framework for the thermo-mechanical analysis of rock salt will be shown. The model enables the simulation of heat transport along with its consequences on the elastic response as well as on primary and secondary creep or the occurrence of dilatancy in the repository near field. Transverse isotropy, non-isothermal hydraulic processes and their coupling to mechanical stresses are taken into account for the analysis of repositories in clay stone. These processes are also considered in the near field analyses of engineered barrier systems, including the swelling/shrinkage of the bentonite material. The temperature-dependent saturation evolution around the heat-emitting waste container is described by different multiphase flow formulations. For all mentioned applications, we illustrate the workflow from model development and implementation, over verification and validation, to repository-scale application simulations using methods of high performance computing.

  20. Thermal-Hydrology Simulations of Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste in a Single Deep Borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of thermal-hydrology were carried out for the emplacement of spent nuclear fuel canisters and cesium and strontium capsules using the PFLOTRAN simulator. For the cesium and strontium capsules the analysis looked at disposal options such as different disposal configurations and surface aging of waste to reduce thermal effects. The simulations studied temperature and fluid flux in the vicinity of the borehole. Simulation results include temperature and vertical flux profiles around the borehole at selected depths. Of particular importance are peak temperature increases, and fluxes at the top of the disposal zone. Simulations of cesium and strontium capsule disposal predict that surface aging and/or emplacement of the waste at the top of the disposal zone reduces thermal effects and vertical fluid fluxes. Smaller waste canisters emplaced over a longer disposal zone create the smallest thermal effect and vertical fluid fluxes no matter the age of the waste or depth of emplacement.

  1. Production of ultrafine zinc powder from wastes containing zinc by electrowinning in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Youcai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production of ultrafine zinc powder from industrial wastes by electrowinning in alkaline solution was studied. Stainless steel and magnesium electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively. Morphology, size distribution and composition of the Zn particles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Laser Particle Size Analyzer, and Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. The required composition of the electrolyte for ultrafine particles was found to be 25-35 g/L Zn, 200-220 g/L NaOH and 20-40 mg/L Pb. The optimal conditions were a current density of 1000-1200 A/m² and an electrolyte temperature of 30-40 °C. The results indicated that the lead additive exerted a beneficial effect on the refining of the particles, by increasing the cathodic polarization. Through this study, ultrafine zinc powder with a size distribution of around 10 μm could be produced, and considerably high current efficiencies (97-99 % were obtained.

  2. Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solution Using Lantana camara, Forest Waste: Kinetics, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C. R.; Ramachandra Murty, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the potential of Lantana camara, a forest waste, as an adsorbent for the phenol reduction in wastewater. Batch studies were conducted with adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH to determine the influence of various experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and phenol concentration. The experimental conditions were optimized for the removal of phenol from wastewater. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of phenol were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters like the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) were also determined and they showed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data that followed Langmuir model with the monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively, for the concentration of phenol ranging from 25 to 250 mg/L. This indicates that the Lantana camara was a promising adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:27350997

  3. Removal of 226Ra and 228Ra from TENORM sludge waste using surfactants solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, M F; Hamed, Mostafa M; El Afifi, E M; Aly, H F

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using surfactants as extracting agent for the removal of radium species from TENORM sludge produced from petroleum industry is evaluated. In this investigation cationic and nonionic surfactants were used as extracting agents for the removal of radium radionuclides from the sludge waste. Two surfactants namely cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 (TX100) were investigated as the extracting agents. Different parameters affecting the removal of both (226)Ra and (228)Ra by the two surfactants as well as their admixture were studied by the batch technique. These parameters include effect of shaking time, surfactants concentration and temperature as well as the effect of surfactants admixture. It was found that, higher solution temperature improves the removal efficiency of radium species. Combined extraction of nonionic and cationic surfactants produces synergistic effect in removal both (226)Ra and (228)Ra, where the removals reached 84% and 80% for (226)Ra and (228)Ra, respectively, were obtained using surfactants admixture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solution Using Lantana camara, Forest Waste: Kinetics, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C R; Ramachandra Murty, V

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the potential of Lantana camara, a forest waste, as an adsorbent for the phenol reduction in wastewater. Batch studies were conducted with adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH to determine the influence of various experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and phenol concentration. The experimental conditions were optimized for the removal of phenol from wastewater. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of phenol were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters like the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) were also determined and they showed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic in the temperature range of 298-328 K. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data that followed Langmuir model with the monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively, for the concentration of phenol ranging from 25 to 250 mg/L. This indicates that the Lantana camara was a promising adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions.

  5. Kinetics of adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Yunus [Inonu University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)]. E-mail: yonal@inonu.edu.tr

    2006-10-11

    Adsorbent (WA11Zn5) has been prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2}. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption and DFT plus software. Adsorption of three dyes, namely, Methylene Blue (MB), Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV), onto activated carbon in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to contact time, temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of MB, MG and CV have been discussed using six kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the Elovich equation, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Bangham equation, the modified Freundlich equation. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for three dyes. The dyes uptake process was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at earlier stages (before 5 min) and by intraparticle diffusion at later stages (after 5 min). Thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G, {delta}H and {delta}S, have been calculated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient obtained at different temperatures and concentrations. The thermodynamics of dyes-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  6. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundari, Noor Anis, E-mail: nooranis@batan.go.id; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi [Sekolah Tinggi Teknologi Nuklir – Badan Tenaga Nuklir Nasional Jl. Babarsari P.O. BOX 6101 YKBB Yogyakarta 55281 Telp : (0274) 48085, 489716, Fax : (0274) 489715 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10{sup −5} Ci/m{sup 3}. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0

  8. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10-5 Ci/m3. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod's model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour-1.

  9. Numerical simulation of high-level radioactive nuclear waste glass production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Ungan, A. [Purdue Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1991-12-31

    Vitrification of radioactive waste has become an international approach for converting highly radioactive wastes into a durable solid prior to placing them in a permanent disposal repository. The technology for the process is not new. The conversion melter is a direct descendant of all electric melters used for manufacturing of some commercial glass types. Therefore, the vitrification process of radioactive wastes inherits typical problems of all electric furnaces and creates some other specific problems such as noble metal sedimentation. The noble metals and nickel sulfides in the melter are heavier than molten glass and have a low solubility. In a reducing condition, these metals amalgamate and tend to settle on the melter floor. The metal deposit resulting from this settling has a potential to short circuit the melter. The objective of this paper is to identify the typical problems that have been encountered in the waste melter operations and to address how these problems can be tackled using state-of-the-art numerical simulation techniques. It is believed that the large amount of pilot-scale melter experience throughout the world, combined with the knowledge gained from state-of-the-art computer modeling techniques would give assurance that the existing and future radioactive wastes can be effectively converted into a durable glass material and safely placed in a permanent repository.

  10. Effects of aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste in simulated hybrid bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Hac; Ma, Zeyu; Jin, Xiao; Xu, Qiyong

    2016-12-01

    Research has been conducted to investigate the effects of daily aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste settlement in simulated hybrid landfill bioreactors. Four laboratory-scale reactors were constructed and operated for about 10 months to simulate different bioreactor operations, including one anaerobic bioreactor and three hybrid bioreactors with different aeration frequencies (one, two, and four times per day). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) reduced more than 96% of the initial concentrations in all aerated bioreactors. The differences of COD and BOD5 reductions among tested aeration frequencies were relatively small. For ammonia nitrogen, the higher aeration frequency (two or four times per day) resulted in the quicker reduction. Overall, the concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn) decreased over time except Cd and Pb. The reduction of redox-sensitive metal concentrations (Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu) was greater in aerated bioreactors than in anaerobic bioreactor. Settlement of municipal solid waste (MSW) was enhanced with higher frequency of aeration events (four times per day). In recent years, hybird bioreactor landfill technology has gained a lot of attention. Appropriate aeration rate is crucial for hybrid bioreactor operation, but few studies have been done and different results were obtained. Research was conducted to investigate the effects of daily aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste settlement. Results indicated that aeration can effectively accelerate waste stabilization and remove organic carbon concentration and total nitrogen in the leachate.

  11. Open Source AV solution supporting In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Pociunas, Gintas; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    the software to meet our expectations for a portable AV system for VAD. The system would make use of “off the shelf” hardware components which are widely available and easily replaced or expanded. The developed AV software and coding is contracted to be available as Copyleft Open Source to ensure low cost...... a stable AV software that has be developed and implemented for an in situ simulation initiative. This version (1.3) is the first on released as Open Source (Copyleft) software (see QR tag). We have found that it is possible to deliver multi-camera video assisted debriefing in a mobile, in situ simulation...... environment using an AV system constructed from “off the shelf” components and Open Source software....

  12. Operation and management of Liaoning waste water treatment plants by STOAT Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yu Nan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the irregular management, the effluent water of some waste water treatment plants (WWPT of Liaoning province didn’t meet the demand of the National Discharge Standard. Meanwhile, excessive of dosage and discharge of sludge made the results of operation costs increasing and environmental pollution during the processes. The use of mathematical models for the simulationof wastewater treatment processes has gained widespread acceptance as a tool to aid the design of newworks and the optimization of existing facilities. STOAT developed by the Water Research Center is the most widely used model for simulating the WWST processes. This paper invited the STOAT as simulation model for the design and optimization of Liaoning waste water treatment plant.

  13. Utilization of fermentation waste (Corynebacterium glutamicum) for biosorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: drkvijy@chonbuk.ac.kr; Yun, Yeoung-Sang [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ysyun@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2007-03-06

    A fermentation waste, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was successfully employed as a biosorbent for Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solution. This paper initially studied the effect of pretreatment on the biosorption capacity of C. glutamicum toward RB5, using several chemical agents, such as HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, NaOH, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, CaCl{sub 2} and NaCl. Among these reagents, 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} gave the maximum enhancement of the RB5 uptake, exhibiting 195 mg/g at pH 1 with an initial RB5 concentration of 500 mg/l. The solution pH and temperature were found to affect the biosorption capacity, and the biosorption isotherms derived at different pHs and temperatures revealed that a low pH (pH 1) and high temperature (35 deg. C) favored biosorption. The biosorption isotherm was well represented using three-parameter models (Redlich-Peterson and Sips) compared to two-parameter models (Langmuir and Freundlich models). As a result, high correlation coefficients and low average percentage error values were observed for three-parameter models. A maximum RB5 uptake of 419 mg/g was obtained at pH 1 and a temperature of 35 deg. C, according to the Langmuir model. The kinetics of the biosorption process with different initial concentrations (500-2000 mg/l) was also monitored, and the data were analyzed using pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models, with the latter describing the data well. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G{sup o}, {delta}H{sup o} and {delta}S{sup o}, were calculated, indicating that the present system was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The use of a 0.1 M NaOH solution successfully desorbed almost all the dye molecules from dye-loaded C. glutamicum biomass at different solid-to-liquid ratios examined.

  14. Mechanisms of gas generation from simulated SY tank farm wastes: FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barefield, E.K.; Boatright, D.; Deshpande, A.; Doctorovich, F.; Liotta, C.L.; Neumann, H.M.; Seymore, S.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a better understanding of the mechanism of formation of flammable gases in the thermal decomposition of metal complexants such as HEDTA and sodium glycolate in simulated SY tank farm waste mixtures. This report summarizes the results of work done at the Georgia Institute of Technology in fiscal year 1995. Topics discussed are (1) long-term studies of the decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste mixtures under an argon atmosphere at 90 and 120{degrees}C, including time profiles for disappearance of HEDTA and appearance of products and the quantitative analysis of the kinetic behavior; (2) considerations of hydroxylamine as an intermediate in the production of nitrogen containing gases by HEDTA decomposition; (3) some thoughts on the revision of the global mechanism for thermal decomposition of HEDTA under argon; (4) preliminary long-term studies of the decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste under an oxygen atmosphere at 120{degrees}C; (5) estimation of the amount of NH{sub 3} in the gas phase above HEDTA reaction mixtures; and (6) further, examination of the interaction of aluminum with nitrite ion using {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy. Section 2 of this report describes the work conducted over the last three years at GIT. Section 3 contains a discussion of the kinetic behavior of HEDTA under argon; Section 4 discusses the role of hydroxylamine. Thermal decomposition of HEDTA to ED3A is the subject of Section 5, and decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste mixtures under oxygen is covered in Section 6. In Section 7 we estimate ammonia in the gas phase; the role of aluminum is discussed in Section 8.

  15. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Baradey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to recover waste thermal energy from different systems at low, medium, and high temperature applications, such as heat exchangers, waste heat recovery boiler, thermo-electric generators, and recuperators. In this paper, the focus is on waste heat recovery from air conditioners, and an efficient application of these energy resources. Integration of solar energy with heat pump technologies and major factors that affect the feasibility of heat recovery systems have been studied and reviewed as well. KEYWORDS: waste heat recovery; heat pump.

  16. Numerical Solution of Quantum Cosmological Model Simulating Boson and Fermion Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of Wheeler-De Witt equation for a quantum cosmological model simulating boson and fermion creation in the early Universe evolution is presented. This solution is based on a Wheeler-De Witt equation obtained by Krechet, Fil’chenkov, and Shikin, in the framework of quantum geometrodynamics for a Bianchi-I metric.

  17. In vitro studies evaluating leaching of mercury from mine waste calcine using simulated human body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway.

  18. Tsunami Simulators in Physical Modelling - Concept to Practical Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Ian; Allsop, William; Robinson, David; Rossetto, Tiziana; McGovern, David; Todd, David

    2017-04-01

    Whilst many researchers have conducted simple 'tsunami impact' studies, few engineering tools are available to assess the onshore impacts of tsunami, with no agreed methods available to predict loadings on coastal defences, buildings or related infrastructure. Most previous impact studies have relied upon unrealistic waveforms (solitary or dam-break waves and bores) rather than full-duration tsunami waves, or have used simplified models of nearshore and over-land flows. Over the last 10+ years, pneumatic Tsunami Simulators for the hydraulic laboratory have been developed into an exciting and versatile technology, allowing the forces of real-world tsunami to be reproduced and measured in a laboratory environment for the first time. These devices have been used to model generic elevated and N-wave tsunamis up to and over simple shorelines, and at example coastal defences and infrastructure. They have also reproduced full-duration tsunamis including Mercator 2004 and Tohoku 2011, both at 1:50 scale. Engineering scale models of these tsunamis have measured wave run-up on simple slopes, forces on idealised sea defences, pressures / forces on buildings, and scour at idealised buildings. This presentation will describe how these Tsunami Simulators work, demonstrate how they have generated tsunami waves longer than the facilities within which they operate, and will present research results from three generations of Tsunami Simulators. Highlights of direct importance to natural hazard modellers and coastal engineers include measurements of wave run-up levels, forces on single and multiple buildings and comparison with previous theoretical predictions. Multiple buildings have two malign effects. The density of buildings to flow area (blockage ratio) increases water depths and flow velocities in the 'streets'. But the increased building densities themselves also increase the cost of flow per unit area (both personal and monetary). The most recent study with the Tsunami

  19. Computer simulation of waste combustion in a moving grate furnace as a tool for process optimization and operator trainings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, G.; Kessel, L.B.M. van

    1998-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the waste combustion process in a moving grate furnace. The computer model describes the main processes occurring both in the waste layer on the grate, and in the gas phase in the furnace. The boiler section and the flue gas cleaning equipment are also

  20. Analysis of Ecodesign Implementation and Solutions for Packaging Waste System by Using System Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, Alise; Dace, Elina; Bazbauers, Gatis

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a research project which explored the packaging waste management system in Latvia. The paper focuses on identifying how the policy mechanisms can promote ecodesign implementation and material efficiency improvement and therefore reduce the rate of packaging waste accumulation in landfill. The method used for analyzing the packaging waste management policies is system dynamics modeling. The main conclusion is that the existing legislative instruments can be used to create an effective policy for ecodesign implementation but substantially higher tax rates on packaging materials and waste disposal than the existing have to be applied.

  1. Comparison of international back-end solutions for low and intermediate level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleixo, Bruna L.; Ulhoa, Barbara M.A.; Mourao, Rogerio P.; Ferreira, Vinicius V.M., E-mail: bla@ctdn.b, E-mail: mouraor@cdtn.b, E-mail: vvmf@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the fact that the use of radioactivity in different applications demands maximum attention due to its potential risks, a unique assessment of the matter is impossible to reach. When compared to other hazardous waste categories or even domestic waste, the amount of radioactive waste generated is not significant. The objective of this work is to analyze the variation associated to the amount of radioactive waste storage in many places. The results showed that this amount is increasing, a fact coherent to the growth in the last years of both the nuclear energy applications and the share of nuclear energy in the global market. (author)

  2. Simulations and experiments of self-associating telechelic polymer solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, M J; Heyes, D M [Division of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Blanchard, R-L; English, R J [Centre for Water Soluble Polymers, North East Wales Institute of Higher Education, Plas Coch Campus, Mold Road, Wrexham LL11 2AW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.heyes@surrey.ac.uk, E-mail: englishr@newi.ac.uk

    2008-08-20

    A Brownian dynamics computer simulation study of a highly coarse-grained model of telechelic associating polymers has been carried out. In a critical concentration range the model produces the so-called 'loops-to-bridges' transition, thought to exist in the experimental systems, in which the two hydrophobic groups are in different micelles, thereby forming a highly interconnected, ultimately percolating, network. The fraction of bridged polymers produced by the model correlates well with the experimental viscosity at corresponding concentrations. The distribution of micelle sizes compares favorably with the predictions of the Meng-Russell free energy theory. The mean cluster size scales well with volume occupancy according to a simple mean-field theory. The stress relaxation function is a stretched exponential at short times and not too high concentrations but develops a longer time plateau in the percolation region, both in agreement with experiment. New experimental data for the concentration dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient, viscosity, elastic modulus and relaxation time of telechelic associative polymers are presented, which show broad qualitative agreement with the simulation data.

  3. Computer simulation of disordered compounds and solid solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Pongsai, B

    2001-01-01

    simulations have also been carried out for comparison. Atomistic simulations (QLD and MCX) with full relaxation predict DELTA H sub m sub i sub x values that are less negative than those from the HF calculations in the static limit. The phase diagram is also calculated from the MCX calculations, indicating complete miscibility at temperatures as low as 200 K. In Chapter 5, both QLD and MCX methods are used to investigate the disordered metallic alloy Pd-Rh. At 300 K, vibrational contributions contribute significantly to the entropy, but not the enthalpy of mixing. The calculated consolute temperature is just above 1200 K in good agreement with experiment. In Chapter 6, we apply our new technique to the order-disorder phase transition of a complex oxygen-deficient perovskite Sr sub 2 Fe sub 2 O sub 5. The calculated order-disorder phase transition occurs between 700 and 930 K, in good agreement with experiment. Investigation of individual configurations shows the coexistence of four-, five- and six-coordinated...

  4. Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-10-27

    This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

  5. Recovery of actinides from TBP-Na/sub 2/Co/sub 3/ scrub-waste solutions: the ARALEX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.; Mason, G.W.; Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.

    1979-08-01

    A flowsheet for the recovery of actinides from TBP-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub-waste solutions has been developed, based on batch extraction data, and tested, using laboratory-scale countercurrent extraction techniques. The process, called the ARALEX process, uses 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-EHOH) to extract the TBP degradation products (HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP) from acidified Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub waste leaving the actinides in the aqueous phase. Dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acids are attached to the 2-EHOH molecules through hydrogen bonds, which also diminish the ability of the HDBP and H/sub 2/MBP to complex actinides. Thus all actinides remain in the aqueous raffinate. Dilute sodium hydroxide solutions can be used to back-extract the dibutyl and monobutyl phosphoric acid esters as their sodium salts. The 2-EHOH can then be recycled. After extraction of the acidified carbonate waste with 2-EHOH, the actinides may be readily extracted from the raffinate with DHDECMP or, in the case of tetra- and hexavalent actinides, with TBP. The ARALEX process can also be applied to other actinide waste streams which contain appreciable concentrations of polar organic compounds (e.g., detergents) that interfere with conventional actinide ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction procedures. 20 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. "Control-alt-delete": rebooting solutions for the E-waste problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Zeng, Xianlai; Chen, Mengjun; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Stevels, Ab

    2015-06-16

    A number of efforts have been launched to solve the global electronic waste (e-waste) problem. The efficiency of e-waste recycling is subject to variable national legislation, technical capacity, consumer participation, and even detoxification. E-waste management activities result in procedural irregularities and risk disparities across national boundaries. We review these variables to reveal opportunities for research and policy to reduce the risks from accumulating e-waste and ineffective recycling. Full regulation and consumer participation should be controlled and reinforced to improve local e-waste system. Aiming at standardizing best practice, we alter and identify modular recycling process and infrastructure in eco-industrial parks that will be expectantly effective in countries and regions to handle the similar e-waste stream. Toxicity can be deleted through material substitution and detoxification during the life cycle of electronics. Based on the idea of "Control-Alt-Delete", four patterns of the way forward for global e-waste recycling are proposed to meet a variety of local situations.

  8. Conceptualization and software development of a simulation environment for probalistic safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghofrani, Javad

    2016-05-26

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of complex simulation models are prominent issues, both in scientific research and education. ReSUS (Repository Simulation, Uncertainty propagation and Sensitivity analysis) is an integrated platform to perform such analysis with numerical models that simulate the THMC (Thermal Hydraulical Mechanical and Chemical) coupled processes via different programs, in particular in the context of safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. This thesis presents the idea behind the software platform ReSUS and its working mechanisms. Apart from the idea and the working mechanisms, the thesis describes applications related to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In this thesis, previous simulation tools (including the preceding version of ReSUS) are analyzed in order to provide a comprehensive view of the state of the art. In comparison to this state, a more sophisticated software tool is developed here, which provides features which are not offered by previous simulation tools. To achieve this objective, the software platform ReSUS provides a framework for handling probabilistic data uncertainties using deterministic external simulation tools, thus enhancing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. This platform performs probabilistic simulations of various models, in particular THMC coupled processes, using stand-alone deterministic simulation software tools. The complete software development process of the ReSUS Platform is discussed in this thesis. ReSUS components are developed as libraries, which are capable of being linked to other code implementations. In addition, ASCII template files are used as means for uncertainty propagation into the input files of deterministic simulation tools. The embedded input sampler and analysis tools allow for sensitivity analysis in several kinds of simulation designs. The novelty of the ReSUS platform consists in the flexibility to assign external stand-alone software

  9. Calculus Problem Solution And Simulation Using GUI Of Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaharuddin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop the project application in teaching and learning Calculus using Grapichal User Interface GUI of Matlab. The scope of the development result includes 1 PreCalculus 2 Function Limit 3 Derivative and its application and 4 Integral and its application. Every aspect of development is presented according to the standards of material competence learning achievement indicators and solutions or settlement steps on each issue presented. This project application can be used by lecturers and students in universities to improve motivation mastery of material and student learning outcomes in the Calculus course. Development of this project application is done through 4 stages called 4-D namely Define Design Development and Dissemination. Based on the data analysis the results obtained at the validation stage of expert validity level average of 3.575 which means quite valid. Then on a limited trial the average student gave a response of 92.00 which means very good. While in the first field trial the average student gave a response of 89.30 which means very good and in the second field trial the average student gave a responded of 90.15 which means very good. Besides that we also solve computational calculus problems in Edwin J. Purcell Dale Varbergs Book of Volume 1 of Edition 5 of 48 questions that are divided into 64 cases.

  10. Effective solutions for monitoring the electrostatic separation of metal and plastic granular waste from electric and electronic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senouci, Khouira; Medles, Karim; Dascalescu, Lucian

    2013-02-01

    The variability of the quantity and purity of the recovered materials is a serious drawback for the application of electrostatic separation technologies to the recycling of granular wastes. In a series of previous articles we have pointed out how capability and classic control chart concepts could be employed for better mastering the outcome of such processes. In the present work, the multiple exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart is introduced and shown to be more effective than the Hotelling T2 chart for monitoring slow varying changes in the electrostatic separation of granular mixtures originating from electric and electronic equipment waste. The operation of the industrial process was simulated by using a laboratory roll-type electrostatic separator and granular samples resulting from shredded electric cable wastes. The 25 tests carried out during the observation phase enabled the calculation of the upper and lower control limits for the two control charts considered in the present study. The 11 additional tests that simulated the monitoring phase pointed out that the MEWMA chart is more effective than Hotelling's T(2) chart in detecting slow varying changes in the outcome of a process. As the reverse is true in the case of abrupt alterations of monitored process performances, simultaneous usage of the two control charts is strongly recommended. While this study focused on a specific electrostatic separation process, using the MEWMA chart together with the well known Hotelling's T(2) chart should be applicable to the statistical control of other complex processes in the field of waste processing.

  11. Comparison of existing models to simulate anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Rodriguez-Mendez, R; Girault, R; Bihan, Y Le; Lessard, P

    2017-02-01

    Models for anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste taking inhibition into account were reviewed and, if necessary, adjusted to the ADM1 model framework in order to compare them. Experimental data from anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse waste at an organic loading rate (OLR) ranging from 0.3 to 1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1) were used to compare and evaluate models. Experimental data obtained at low OLRs were accurately modeled whatever the model thereby validating the stoichiometric parameters used and influent fractionation. However, at higher OLRs, although inhibition parameters were optimized to reduce differences between experimental and simulated data, no model was able to accurately simulate accumulation of substrates and intermediates, mainly due to the wrong simulation of pH. A simulation using pH based on experimental data showed that acetogenesis and methanogenesis were the most sensitive steps to LCFA inhibition and enabled identification of the inhibition parameters of both steps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Selection of Steady-State Process Simulation Software to Optimize Treatment of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Barnes, Charles Marshall; Lauerhass, Lance; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2001-06-01

    The process used for selecting a steady-state process simulator under conditions of high uncertainty and limited time is described. Multiple waste forms, treatment ambiguity, and the uniqueness of both the waste chemistries and alternative treatment technologies result in a large set of potential technical requirements that no commercial simulator can totally satisfy. The aim of the selection process was two-fold. First, determine the steady-state simulation software that best, albeit not completely, satisfies the requirements envelope. And second, determine if the best is good enough to justify the cost. Twelve simulators were investigated with varying degrees of scrutiny. The candidate list was narrowed to three final contenders: ASPEN Plus 10.2, PRO/II 5.11, and CHEMCAD 5.1.0. It was concluded from "road tests" that ASPEN Plus appears to satisfy the project's technical requirements the best and is worth acquiring. The final software decisions provide flexibility: they involve annual rather than multi-year licensing, and they include periodic re-assessment.

  13. Selection of Steady-State Process Simulation Software to Optimize Treatment of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, T. T.; Barnes, C. M.; Lauerhass, L.; Taylor, D. D.

    2001-06-01

    The process used for selecting a steady-state process simulator under conditions of high uncertainty and limited time is described. Multiple waste forms, treatment ambiguity, and the uniqueness of both the waste chemistries and alternative treatment technologies result in a large set of potential technical requirements that no commercial simulator can totally satisfy. The aim of the selection process was two-fold. First, determine the steady-state simulation software that best, albeit not completely, satisfies the requirements envelope. And second, determine if the best is good enough to justify the cost. Twelve simulators were investigated with varying degrees of scrutiny. The candidate list was narrowed to three final contenders: ASPEN Plus 10.2, PRO/II 5.11, and CHEMCAD 5.1.0. It was concluded from ''road tests'' that ASPEN Plus appears to satisfy the project's technical requirements the best and is worth acquiring. The final software decisions provide flexibility: they involve annual rather than multi-year licensing, and they include periodic re-assessment.

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

  15. Liquid secondary waste: Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-31

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, including Direct Feed Low Activity Waste (DFLAW) vitrification, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. The powdered salt waste form produced by the ETF will be replaced by a stabilized solidified waste form for disposal in Hanford’s Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the IDF. Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF. In 2015, three Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste simulants were developed based on existing and projected waste streams. Using these waste simulants, fourteen mixes of Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste were prepared and tested varying the waste simulant, the water-to-dry materials ratio, and the dry materials blend composition.1 In FY16, testing was performed using a simulant of the EMF process condensate blended with the caustic scrubber—from the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter—, processed through the ETF. The initial EMF-16 simulant will be based on modeling efforts performed to determine the mass balance of the ETF for the DFLAW.2 The compressive strength of all of the mixes exceeded the target of 3.4 MPa (500 psi) to meet the requirements identified as potential IDF Waste Acceptance Criteria in Table 1 of the Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan.3 The hydraulic properties of the waste forms tested (hydraulic conductivity

  16. Removal of technetium-99 from simulated Oak Ridge National Laboratory Newly-Generated Liquid Low-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.E.; Osborne, P.E.; Bunch, D.H.; Fellows, R.L.; Sellers, G.F.; Shoemaker, J.L.; Bowser, K.T. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Bostick, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We report laboratory investigations on treatment options for the removal of the radionuclide {sup 99}{Tc} (as the pertechnetate anion, {Tc}O{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from simulated Oak Ridge National Laboratory Newly Generated Liquid Low-Level Waste. The waste stimulant is alkaline (pH 12-13), containing sodium carbonate ({approximately}0.10 mot/L) and sodium hydroxide ({approximately} 0.125 mol/L), plus a modest concentration of sodium nitrate ({approximately}0.06 mol/L). Several organic resin anion exchange media were tested; Dowex{trademark} 1-X-8 and Reillex{trademark} HPQ resins were notably effective (with equilibrium distribution coefficients {approximately}2,000 mL/g, as-received basis). We also tested steel wool as a reagent to chemically reduce and sorb {sup 99}Tc. At pH values above {approximately}10, the iron surface was passivated and became ineffective as a reagent for technetium; however, as the test solution pH value was adjusted to near-neutrality (e.g., pH 8-9), the steel was noted to be more effective than the organic resins tested. In dynamic flow conditions, steel wool packed in a column was noted to continuously leak {approximately}1--3% of the amount of {sup 99}{Tc} activity in the feed solution, although no additional increase in eluent activity was noted for the duration of the testing ({approximately}1200 bed volumes of {approximately}0.11 mg/L {sup 99}{Tc} flowed at a rate equivalent to {approximately}0.5 gal/min/ft{sup 2} of column cross sectional area). Although no breakthrough was noted (other than the 1--3 % continuous ``bleed`` noted previously) during the column operation ({approximately} 2 weeks), the steel in the column was deteriorated, causing plugging and erratic flow toward the end of the testing interval.

  17. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  18. Highly water soluble nanoparticles as a draw solute in forward osmosis for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heeman; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sungchan; Seo, Bumkyoung; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    . In this study, we introduced highly water-soluble hyperbranched caroboxylated polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CPG-MNPs). It is known that the highly branched, globular architecture of PG significantly increase solubility compared to linear polymer and they are eco-friendly. The CPG-MNPs showed no aggregate of particles in water even after placing external magnet, and exhibited a high water flux in FO process. The CPG-MNPs are, therefore, potentially useful as a draw solute in FO processes. The operation of nuclear pressurized water reactors (PWRs) results in numerous radioactive waste streams which vary in radioactivity content. Most PWR stations have experienced leakages of boric acid into liquid radioactive waste systems. These wastes contain about 0.3∼0.8 wt% of boric acid. It is known that reverse osmosis (RO) membrane can eliminate boron at high pH and boron of 40∼90% can be removed by RO membrane in pH condition. RO uses hydraulic pressure to oppose, and exceed, the osmotic pressure of an aqueous feed solution containing boric acid. Forward osmosis (FO), a low energy technique based on membrane technologies, has recently garnered attention for its utility in wastewater treatment and desalination applications. In the FO process, water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a solution with a low osmotic pressure (the feed solution) to a solution with a high osmotic pressure (the draw solution). The driving force in FO processes is provided by the osmotic gradient between the two solutions. Low energy costs and low degrees of membrane fouling are two of the advantages conveyed by FO processes over other processes, such as reverse osmosis processes that rely on a hydraulic pressure driving force. However, the challenges of FO still lie in the fabrication of eligible FO membranes and the readily separable draw solutes of high osmotic pressures. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be separated from water by an external magnet field

  19. Simulation studies of the response function of a radioactive waste assay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Daniela; Sima, Octavian

    2012-01-01

    A simulation program based on GEANT 3.21 toolkit was developed to simulate the response function of ISOCART (Ortec) gamma-ray spectrometry system applied to radioactive waste drum assessment. In view of studying the effects of possible non-homogeneous radioactivity distribution in the drum, the volume of the drum was fictitiously divided into several spatial domains. The simulation program was applied repeatedly considering each time the source distributed in another domain. In this way the expected spectra in the energy range from 50 to 2000keV as well as the full energy peak and the total efficiencies were obtained for the case when the source is distributed in each domain and also for the case when the source is uniformly distributed in the entire drum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical simulation of organic waste aerobic biodegradation: a new way to correlate respiration kinetics and organic matter fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Jeremy; Tremier, Anne; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Walter, Christian; Gratteau, Laurette; Barrington, Suzelle

    2015-02-01

    Composting wastes permits the reuse of organic matter (OM) as agricultural amendments. The fate of OM during composting and the subsequent degradation of composts in soils largely depend on waste OM quality. The proposed study aimed at developing a model to predict the evolution in organic matter quality during the aerobic degradation of organic waste, based on the quantification of the various OM fractions contained in the wastes. The model was calibrated from data gathered during the monitoring of four organic wastes (two non-treated wastes and their digestates) exposed to respirometric tests. The model was successfully fitted for all four wastes and permitted to predict respiration kinetics, expressed as CO2 production rates, and the evolution of OM fractions. The calibrated model demonstrated that hydrolysis rates of OM fractions were similar for all four wastes whereas the parameters related to microbial activity (eg. growth and death rates) were specific to each substrate. These later parameters have been estimated by calibration on respirometric data, thus demonstrating that coupling analyses of OM fractions in initial wastes and respirometric tests permit the simulation of the biodegradation of various type of waste. The biodegradation model presented in this paper could thereafter be integrated in a composting model by implementing mass and heat balance equations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A dual-porosity model for simulating solute transport in oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    A model is described for simulating three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport in oil shale and associated geohydrologic units. The model treats oil shale as a dual-porosity medium by simulating flow and transport within fractures using the finite-element method. Diffusion of solute between fractures and the essentially static water of the shale matrix is simulated by including an analytical solution that acts as a source-sink term to the differential equation of solute transport. While knowledge of fracture orientation and spacing is needed to effectively use the model, it is not necessary to map the locations of individual fractures. The computer program listed in the report incorporates many of the features of previous dual-porosity models while retaining a practical approach to solving field problems. As a result the theory of solute transport is not extended in any appreciable way. The emphasis is on bringing together various aspects of solute transport theory in a manner that is particularly suited to the unusual groundwater flow and solute transport characteristics of oil shale systems. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Removal of Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Cd from electroplating wastes and synthetic solutions by vermicompost of cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, Cláudio Pereira; Pereira, Madson de Godoi; Einloft, Rosilene; Santana, Marlete Bastos; Bellato, Carlos Roberto; de Mello, Jaime Wilson Vargas

    2002-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the retention of Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Cd under laboratory conditions from synthetic solution and electroplating wastes by vermicompost. A glass column was loaded with vermicompost, and metal solutions were passed through it. Metal concentrations were then measured in the eluate in order to evaluate the amounts retained by the vermicompost. Measurements of pH, metal concentrations, moistness, organic matter and ash contents, and infrared and XRD spectroscopy were used for vermicompost characterisation. Vermicompost residues obtained from this process were used for plant nutrition in eroded soil collected from a talus near a highway. Metal retention (in g of metal/kg of vermicompost) from effluents ranged from 2 for Cr and Zn to 4 in the case of Ni. In synthetic solutions, the values for metal retention were 4 for Cd and Zn, 6 for Cu and Ni, and 9 for Cr. The results also showed that metal concentrations in the purified effluents were below the maximum values established for waste discharges into rivers by the Brazilian Environmental Standards. The relatively high available Cd concentration of the vermicompost residue resulted in plant damage. This effect was attributed to the presence of Cd in the synthetic solution passed through the vermicompost. The data obtained do not give a complete picture of using vermicompost in cultivated lands, but such values as are determined do show that it can be suitable to remove heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  3. Coal and wood fuel for electricity production: An environmentally sound solution for waste and demolition wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninks, F.W.M. [EPON, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    Waste wood from primary wood processing and demolition presents both a problem and a potential. If disposed in landfills, it consumes large volumes and decays, producing CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. As an energy source used in a coal fired power plant it reduces the consumption of fossil fuels reducing the greenhouse effect significantly. Additional advantages are a reduction of the ash volume and the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. The waste wood requires collection, storage, processing and burning. This paper describes a unique project which is carried out in the Netherlands at EPON`s Gelderland Power Plant (635 MW{sub e}) where 60 000 tonnes of waste and demolition wood will be used annually. Special emphasis is given to the processing of the powdered wood fuel. Therefore, most waste and demolition wood can be converted from an environmental liability to an environmental and economic asset. (author)

  4. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Baradey; M. N. A. Hawlader; Ahmad Faris Ismail; Meftah Hrairi

    2015-01-01

    Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to rec...

  5. Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Takashi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

  6. Gasification: An alternative solution for energy recovery and utilization of vegetable market waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narnaware, Sunil L; Srivastava, Nsl; Vahora, Samir

    2017-03-01

    Vegetables waste is generally utilized through a bioconversion process or disposed of at municipal landfills, dumping sites or dumped on open land, emitting a foul odor and causing health hazards. The presents study deals with an alternative way to utilize solid vegetable waste through a thermochemical route such as briquetting and gasification for its energy recovery and subsequent power generation. Briquettes of 50 mm diameter were produced from four different types of vegetable waste. The bulk density of briquettes produced was increased 10 to 15 times higher than the density of the dried vegetable waste in loose form. The lower heating value (LHV) of the briquettes ranged from 10.26 MJ kg -1 to 16.60 MJ kg -1 depending on the type of vegetable waste. The gasification of the briquettes was carried out in an open core downdraft gasifier, which resulted in syngas with a calorific value of 4.71 MJ Nm -3 at the gasification temperature between 889°C and 1011°C. A spark ignition, internal combustion engine was run on syngas and could generate a maximum load up to 10 kW e . The cold gas efficiency and the hot gas efficiency of the gasifier were measured at 74.11% and 79.87%, respectively. Energy recovery from the organic vegetable waste was possible through a thermochemical conversion route such as briquetting and subsequent gasification and recovery of the fuel for small-scale power generation.

  7. Data reconciliation, structure analysis and simulation of waste flows: case study Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyus, Thomas; Gleiss, Andreas; Gruber, Karl; Bauer, Gerd

    2003-04-01

    The management of complex waste flow systems requires a systematic approach for the handling of data, for obtaining a consistent picture of the system under consideration, and for simulating various policy scenarios and evaluating material control strategies. In this paper the implementation of a useful methodology is presented, which has been developed in previous works and is further enhanced for modelling, identifying, analysing and simulating material flow systems for which at most one measurement per flow is available for a single balancing period. The methodology enables the analyst to cope with missing data and uncertainty in the measurements. A data reconciliation procedure is used to minimise the uncertainty concerning flows by exploiting the redundancies created by restricting the available data to fulfil the available structural information. Statistical tests are introduced to enable the user to check the compatibility of the data with the a priori information. The origins analysis and destination analysis tools allow for a deeper insight into the system structure. Policy scenarios can be treated using the simulation tools. The waste flow system of the city of Vienna has been chosen to demonstrate step-by-step the procedure for building a reliable model and the effective application of the above mentioned methods and tools. Current and future research focuses on models balancing different interrelated quantities simultaneously and on incorporating stock accumulation and depletion behaviour.

  8. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Simulant Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-19

    Solubility testing with simulated High Level Waste tank heel solids has been conducted in order to evaluate two alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge washing efforts. Tests were conducted with non-radioactive pure phase metal reagents, binary mixtures of reagents, and a Savannah River Site PUREX heel simulant to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent and pure, dilute nitric acid toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. A focus of this testing was on minimization of oxalic acid additions during tank cleaning. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid which is the current baseline chemical cleaning reagent. In a separate study, solubility tests were conducted with radioactive tank heel simulants using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for Savannah River Site tank closure Performance Assessments. Permanganate-based cleaning methods were evaluated prior to and after oxalic acid contact.

  9. ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMS T; HAGERTY K

    2011-01-27

    To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

  10. Effective removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) industrial processing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayğılı, Hasan; Güzel, Fuat

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon (TAC) prepared under optimized conditions with ZnCl2 activation from a new precursor; tomato industrial processing waste (TW), was applied as an adsorbent to remove tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The factors (TAC dosage, initial TC concentration, contact time, ionic strength and solution temperature) affecting the adsorption process were examined at natural pH (5.7) of TAC-TC system in aqueous solution. Kinetic data was found to be best complied by the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm analysis indicated that the equilibrium data could be represented by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity was identified as 500.0mgg(-1) at 308K. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [URS, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-17

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described.

  12. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

  13. The waste isolation pilot plant. Permanent isolation of defense transuranic waste in deep geologic salt. A national solution and international model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose; Van Luik, Abraham [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Carlsbad Field Office

    2015-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is located about 42 kilometers from the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. It is an operating deep geologic repository in bedded salt 657 meters below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert. Since its opening in March of 1999, it has received about 12,000 shipments totaling about 91,000 cubic meters of defense related transuranic (TRU) wastes. Twenty-two sites have been cleaned up of their defense-legacy TRU waste. The WIPP's shipping program has an untarnished safety record and its trucks and trailers have safely traveled the equivalent of about 60 round-trips to the Moon. WIPP received, and deserved, a variety of safety accolades over its nearly 15 year working life. In February of 2014, however, two incidents resulted in a major operational suspension and reevaluation of its safety systems, processes and equipment. The first incident was an underground mining truck fire, followed nine days later by an airborne radiation release incident. Accident Investigation Board (AIB) reports on both incidents point to failures of plans, procedures and persons. The AIB recommendations for recovery from both these incidents are numerous and are being carefully implemented. One major recommendation is to no longer have different maintenance and safety requirements for nuclear handling equipment and mining equipment. Maintenance and cleanliness of mining equipment was cited as a contributing cause to the underground fire, and the idea that there can be lesser rigor in taking care of mining equipment, when it is being operated in the same underground space as the waste handling equipment, is not tenable. At some point in the future, the changes made in response to these two incidents will be seen as a valuable lesson learned on behalf of future repository programs. WIPP will once again be seen as a ''pilot'' in the nautical sense, in terms of 'showing the way' - the way to a national and international radioactive waste

  14. Polarization and charge-transfer effects in aqueous solution via ab initio QM/MM simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali

    2006-02-23

    Combined ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations coupled with the block-localized wave function energy decomposition (BLW-ED) method have been conducted to study the solvation of two prototypical ionic systems, acetate and methylammonium ions in aqueous solution. Calculations reveal that the electronic polarization between the targeted solutes and water is the primary many-body effect, whereas the charge-transfer term only makes a small fraction of the total solute-solvent interaction energy. In particular, the polarization effect is dominated by the solvent (water) polarization.

  15. Solution of AntiSeepage for Mengxi River Based on Numerical Simulation of Unsaturated Seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lessening the leakage of surface water can reduce the waste of water resources and ground water pollution. To solve the problem that Mengxi River could not store water enduringly, geology investigation, theoretical analysis, experiment research, and numerical simulation analysis were carried out. Firstly, the seepage mathematical model was established based on unsaturated seepage theory; secondly, the experimental equipment for testing hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soil was developed to obtain the curve of two-phase flow. The numerical simulation of leakage in natural conditions proves the previous inference and leakage mechanism of river. At last, the seepage control capacities of different impervious materials were compared by numerical simulations. According to the engineering actuality, the impervious material was selected. The impervious measure in this paper has been proved to be effectible by hydrogeological research today.

  16. Utilization of Sago Waste as an Adsorbent for the Removal of Cu(II Ion from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Maheswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of activated carbon (AC from sago industry waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Cu(II removal, as well as dispose of sago industry waste. The AC was prepared using sago industry waste with H2SO4 and (NH42S2O8 and physico-chemical properties of AC were investigated. The specific surface area of the activated carbon was determined and its properties studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II from aqueous solution onto AC prepared from sago industry waste has been studied under varying conditions of agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose and pH to assess the kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Adsorption equilibrium was obtained in 60min for 20 to 50mg/L of Cu(II concentrations. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models were found to provide an excellent fitting of the adsorption data. In Freundlich equilibrium isotherm, the RL values obtained were in the range of 0 to 1 (0.043 to 0.31 for Cu(II concentration of 10 to 100mg/L, which indicates favorable adsorption of Cu(II onto Sago waste carbon. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II (Qo obtained from the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm model was found to be 32.467 mg/g at pH 4 ± 0.2 for the particle size range of 125–250u. The percent removal increased with an increase in pH from 2 to 4. This adsorbent was found to be effective and economically attractive.

  17. Evaluation of calix-crown ionophores for selective separation of radio-cesium from acidic nuclear waste solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, P.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ansari, S.A. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sarkar, A. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhattacharyya, A. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: vkm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-07-07

    Extraction of Cs-137 from nitric acid was carried out using nitrobenzene solutions of calix-crowns such as calix[4]arene-bis(crown-6) (CC-A), calix[4]arene-bis(benzo crown-6) (CC-B) and calix[4]arene-bis(napthocrown-6) (CC-C). CC-C was found to be superior extractant for Cs(I) as compared to the other two calix-crown ligands used in the present study. The effect of diluent on the extraction of Cs(I) indicated the trend: nitrobenzene > dichloroethane > chloroform > decanol >> carbon tetrachloride {approx} n-hexane {approx} toluene. Subsequently, the studies were carried out with nitrobenzene solutions of the calix-crown ligands (mainly CC-C) on the effects of (a) aqueous phase acidity (b) ligand concentration, and (c) cesium concentration on Cs extraction from nitric acid media. Conditions for quantitative extraction and stripping were optimized and the extracted species conformed to {l_brace}[CsL]{sup +}.[NO{sub 3}]{sup -}.nH{sub 2}O{r_brace}. Selectivity studies were carried out using an irradiated natural U target involving tracer amount of fission products activities. Extraction of Cs(I) from a synthetic high level waste solution was also carried out. The promising results obtained in the present studies indicate possible use of the calix-crown ligand for Cs(I) recovery from the acidic high level waste.

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  19. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include methods that 1) explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) those that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of class 1, based on direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of class 1 based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of class 2 (a pore-network model or PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results with previously reported experimental observations. Experimental observations are limited to measured pore-scale velocities, so solute transport comparisons are made only among the various models. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations).

  20. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  1. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  2. Modeling and simulation of lab-scale anaerobic co-digestion of MEA waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion model No.1 (ADM1 was applied and expanded in this study to model and simulate anaerobic digestion (AD of an industrial carbon capture reclaimer MEA (monoethanolamine waste (MEAw together with easily degradable organics. The general structure of ADM1 was not changed except for introducing state variables of MEA and complex organics (CO in the waste and biochemical reactions of MEA uptake and CO hydrolysis in the model ADM1_MEAw. Experimental batch test results were used for calibrating kinetics variables. The obtained kinetics were employed in the ADM1_MEAw to simulate semi-continuously fed experimental test for 486 days at room temperature (22 +/- 2oC. The validation results show that the ADM1_MEAw was able to predict the process performance with reasonable accuracy, including process pH, biogas generation and inorganic nitrogen concentrations, for a wide range of feed scenarios. Free ammonia inhibition, was observed to be the main inhibitory effects on acetoclastic methanogenesis, leading to volatile fatty acids (VFA accumulation at high loads. Inhibition assumed to be caused by potentially toxic constituents of MEAw appears to be much less important than ammonia, suggesting that such constituents were broken down by AD.

  3. Numerical simulations of aquaculture dissolved waste transport in a coastal embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venayagamoorthy, Subhas; Fringer, Oliver; Koseff, Jeffrey; Naylor, Rosamond

    2008-11-01

    The present study focuses on understanding the transport and fate of dissolved wastes from aquaculture pens in near-coastal environments using the hydrodynamics code SUNTANS (Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier- Stokes Simulator), which employs unstructured grids to compute flows in the coastal ocean at very high resolution. Simulations of a pollutant concentration field (in time and space) as a function of the local environment (bathymetry, rotation), flow conditions (tides, wind-induced currents and wind stress), and the location of the pens were performed to study their effects on the evolution of the waste plume. The presence of the fish farm pens causes partial blockage of the flow, leading to the deceleration of the approaching flow and formation of downstream wakes. Results of both the near-field area (area within 10 to 20 pen diameters of the fish-pen site) as well as far-field behavior of the pollutant field are presented. These results highlight for the first time the importance of the wake vortex dynamics on the evolution of the near-field plume as well as the rotation of the earth on the far-field plume. The results provide an understanding of the impact of aquaculture fish-pens on coastal water quality.

  4. Environment and oxidation state of molybdenum in simulated high level nuclear waste glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R. J.; Hand, R. J.; Hyatt, N. C.; Möbus, G.

    2005-04-01

    Alkali borosilicate glasses containing between 20 and 35 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste stream with varying Li2O contents were melted under neutral (air) and reducing (nitrogen/hydrogen) conditions. XRD analysis of the as-cast glasses showed a tendency for the products to remain amorphous when melted under neutral conditions and for metallic silver to develop in the reduced melts. EXAFS analysis revealed (MoO4)2- tetrahedra in all glasses regardless of the sparge applied during melting. The glasses were heat treated to simulate an interruption to the cooling system used to prevent heat build-up in the vitrified product store. Powellite-type molybdate phases were found to develop in the heat treated samples and formed at lower waste loadings in glasses sparged with a reducing gas. A reduction in the quantity of Li2O lead to a reduction in the quantity of powellite-type molybdate phases. EDS showed the primary molybdate phase to be high in Sr and rare earth elements and TEM indicated that the presence of silver metal encouraged molybdate formation.

  5. Prediction of Solution Properties of Flexible-Chain Polymers: A Computer Simulation Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Jose Garcia; Cifre, Jose G. Hernandez; Martinez, M. Carmen Lopez

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a computational exercise at undergraduate level that demonstrates the employment of Monte Carlo simulation to study the conformational statistics of flexible polymer chains, and to predict solution properties. Three simple chain models, including excluded volume interactions, have been implemented in a public-domain computer…

  6. Supercritical Water Oxidation: A Solution for the Elimination of Back-End Organic Reprocessing Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A.; Turc, H.A.; Fournel, B. [Supercritical fluids and membranes Laboratory, CEA Valrho, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols/Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a very efficient technique for total elimination of organic wastes from reprocessing activities on the way of 'zero wastes' facilities. This technology uses the properties of supercritical water (P > 221 bars and T > 647 K) to obtain a good mixing between oxygen (the oxidant) and the organic waste. Thereby, the oxidation reaction is fast and complete. Using the SCWO process, contamination contained in organic materials like spent solvents can be confined in a closed space, like a reactor in a glovebox. A new application is tested for the treatment of solid organic wastes like ion exchange resins (IER). Experiments are made with suspensions of IER in water and isopropyl-alcohol. A nuclear version of the process with the double shell reactor has been constructed and is being tested. The aim of this work is to obtain a treatment capacity of 1 kg/h for the nuclear version with the same global set-up, concept of process and security as well as contamination management as for a 200 g/h pilot. (authors)

  7. Waste sizing solution as co-substrate for anaerobic decolourisation of textile dyeing wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, I.; Santos, dos A.B.; Spanjers, H.

    2005-01-01

    Dyeing wastewaters and residual size are textile factory waste streams that can be treated anaerobically. For successful anaerobic treatment of dyeing effluents, a co-substrate has to be added because of their low concentration of easily biodegradable compounds. Starch-based size contains easily

  8. Solutions to the problem of waste deposition at a coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Janez; Dejanovic, Boris; Tuma, Matija

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact on the environment of the combined operation of a power plant and a coal mine located in Velenje, Slovenia. The consequences of intensive deep underground mining are the sinking of the surface and the filling up of the emerging hollows with water. As far as the various consequences of coal combustion are concerned, only the harmful effects of the surface deposition of ash and slag are discussed, with the poisoning of the lake and the river water being considered the most harmful. The integrated system of waste treatment at the power plant is presented. The idea of the system is to use the waste materials such as ash, slag, gypsum, contaminated water, etc. as the building materials or to apply them in the process of improving the ash dump and the environment. The system needs to be closed as much as possible, so that the waste cannot influence the surroundings of the dump. The physical and chemical properties of the waste materials from the power plant, the results of ecological measurements and the impact of the ecological damage are presented. In addition, we present: a description of the applied methods; the activities and the technical measures; the obtained results and the difficulties; and the problems that need to be overcome in order to normalise the ecological conditions.

  9. Competitive adsorption of metals on cabbage waste from multi-metal solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Vigneswaran, S; Nguyen, T V

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed the adsorption capacity of the agro-waste 'cabbage' as a biosorbent in single, binary, ternary and quaternary sorption systems with Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions. Dried and ground powder of cabbage waste (CW) was used for the sorption of metals ions. Carboxylic, hydroxyl, and amine groups in cabbage waste were found to be the key functional groups for metal sorption. The adsorption isotherms obtained could be well fitted to both the mono- and multi-metal models. In the competitive adsorption systems, cabbage waste adsorbed larger amount of Pb(II) than the other three metals. However, the presence of the competing ions suppressed the sorption of the target metal ions. Except the case of binary system of Cd(II)-Zn(II) and Cd(II)-Cu(II), there was a linear inverse dependency between the sorption capacities and number of different types of competitive metal ions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Obtención de materias primas a partir de la logística inversa y el reciclaje de e-waste. E-waste Solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    La oportunidad de negocio de E-Waste Solutions está enfocada a la recuperación de metales básicos ferrosos, no ferrosos, metales preciosos y otros materiales que son reutilizables en la industria tecnológica para la fabricación de nuevos productos. La innovadora y avanzada tecnología del reciclaje mecánico con la que se realizará todo el proceso de recuperación de materias primas y la participación en el proceso de recolección de la población recicladora hará posible la generación de empleo f...

  11. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. THE STRUCTURE OF CONCENTRATED Li-AMMONIA SOLUTIONS AS DERIVED FROM MD SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Heinzinger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of lithium-ammonia solutions over the whole concentration range from 0.5 to 19.6 MPM at 240 K are reported. The pseudopotential theory is employed at the higher concentrations and the direct contribution to the total potential which has been derived from ab initio calculations has been supplemented by three-body terms. The resulting partial structure and radial distribution functions are compared in detail with recent X-ray and neutron diffraction studies with isotopic substitution. There is an overall good agreement between simulation and experiment. Differences are discussed. The solvation number of the lithium ion is found to be six for the dilute solution and four for the higher concentrations in analogy to the hydration of Li+ found for various aqueous solutions.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the surface tension and structure of salt solutions and clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Li, Xin; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Ågren, Hans

    2012-03-15

    Sodium halides, which are abundant in sea salt aerosols, affect the optical properties of aerosols and are active in heterogeneous reactions that cause ozone depletion and acid rain problems. Interfacial properties, including surface tension and halide anion distributions, are crucial issues in the study of the aerosols. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of water solutions and clusters containing sodium halides with the interatomic interactions described by a conventional force field. The simulations reproduce experimental observations that sodium halides increase the surface tension with respect to pure water and that iodide anions reach the outermost layer of water clusters or solutions. It is found that the van der Waals interactions have an impact on the distribution of the halide anions and that a conventional force field with optimized parameters can model the surface tension of the salt solutions with reasonable accuracy. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. PLASMA GASIFICATION – THE WASTE-to-ENERGY SOLUTION FOR THE FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsan N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma WtE is currently subject of extensive research and a number of companies across the globe are trying to develop a suitable, eco-friendly and efficient WtE technology for the future. While all of these companies are still working on concept designs or small-scale prototypes, there is one company already building large industrial scale plasma gasifiers around the globe to treat MSW, Industrial and Toxic waste all together. In 1999 in Japan, Hitachi Metals and Westinghouse Plasma Corp (“WPC” built the World’s First commercial demonstration plasma WtE plant. Hitachi Metals operated the plant for one year on municipal solid waste and obtained a certification from the Japan Waste Research Foundation (JWRF. Subsequently, Hitachi Metals leveraged this success into the two commercial plants at Mihama-Mikata and Utashinai in Japan, both having at the very core the now proven Westinghouse Plasma gasification technology. For more than 20 years, Westinghouse Plasma Corp (WPC has been leading the technology platform for converting the world’s waste into clean energy for a healthier planet. The WPC technology makes landfills obsolete and replaces Incineration as the primary process for WtE. The WPC technology already operates in three reference plants around the world and other three new commercial plants are under construction (two plants of 1000 tons/day in UK and a 650 tons/day in China, all three designed to convert municipal solid waste to electricity and district heat, in the most efficient and environmental-friendly manner.

  15. Sodium bicarbonate solution as an anti-erosive agent against simulated endogenous erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Danielle C F; Turssi, Cecilia P; Hara, Anderson T; Serra, Mônica C

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated whether sodium bicarbonate solution, applied on enamel previously exposed to a simulated intrinsic acid, can control dental erosion. Volunteers wore palatal devices containing enamel slabs, which were exposed twice daily extra-orally to hydrochloric acid (0.01 M, pH 2) for 2 min. Immediately afterwards, the palatal devices were re-inserted in the mouth and volunteers rinsed their oral cavity with a sodium bicarbonate solution or deionized water for 60 s. After the washout period, the palatal devices were refilled with a new set of specimens and participants were crossed over to receive the alternate rinse solution. The surface loss and surface microhardness (SMH) of specimens were assessed. The surface loss of eroded enamel rinsed with a sodium bicarbonate solution was significantly lower than the surface loss of eroded enamel rinsed with deionized water. There were no differences between treatments with sodium bicarbonate and deionized water for SMH measurements. Regardless of the solution used as an oral rinse, eroded enamel showed lower SMH than uneroded specimens. Rinsing with a sodium bicarbonate solution after simulated endogenous erosive challenge controlled enamel surface loss but did not alter the microhardness. (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in a single rough fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi DOU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM was used to simulate the solute transport in a single rough fracture. The self-affine rough fracture wall was generated with the successive random addition method. The ability of the developed LBM to simulate the solute transport was validated by Taylor dispersion. The effect of fluid velocity on the solute transport in a single rough fracture was investigated using the LBM. The breakthrough curves (BTCs for continuous injection sources in rough fractures were analyzed and discussed with different Reynolds numbers (Re. The results show that the rough fracture wall leads to a large fluid velocity gradient across the aperture. Consequently, there is a broad distribution of the immobile region along the rough fracture wall. This distribution of the immobile region is very sensitive to the Re and fracture geometry, and the immobile region is enlarged with the increase of Re and roughness. The concentration of the solute front in the mobile region increases with the Re. Furthermore, the Re and roughness have significant effects on BTCs, and the slow solute molecule exchange between the mobile and immobile regions results in a long breakthrough tail for the rough fracture. This study also demonstrates that the developed LBM can be effective in studying the solute transport in a rough fracture.

  17. Solution of Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-In-Cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnfeld, Daniel; Schneider, Ralf; Matyash, Konstantin; Lüskow, Karl; Bandelow, Gunnar; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Duras, Julia; Kemnitz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    For spacecrafts the concept of ion thrusters presents a very efficient method of propulsion. Optimization of thrusters is imperative, but experimental access is difficult. Plasma simulations offer means to understand the plasma physics within an ion thruster and can aid the design of new thruster concepts. In order to achieve best simulation performances, code optimizations and parallelization strategies need to be investigated. In this work the role of different solution strategies for Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the HEMP-DM3a ion thruster was studied. The direct solution method of LU decomposition is compared to a stationary iterative method, the successive over-relaxation solver. Results and runtime of solvers were compared, and an outlook on further improvements and developments is presented. This work was supported by the German Space Agency DLR through Project 50RS1510..

  18. FAST MONTE CARLO SIMULATION METHODS FOR BIOLOGICAL REACTION-DIFFUSION SYSTEMS IN SOLUTION AND ON SURFACES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rex A; Bartol, Thomas M; Kaminsky, Boris; Dittrich, Markus; Chang, Jen-Chien Jack; Baden, Scott B; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Stiles, Joel R

    2008-10-13

    Many important physiological processes operate at time and space scales far beyond those accessible to atom-realistic simulations, and yet discrete stochastic rather than continuum methods may best represent finite numbers of molecules interacting in complex cellular spaces. We describe and validate new tools and algorithms developed for a new version of the MCell simulation program (MCell3), which supports generalized Monte Carlo modeling of diffusion and chemical reaction in solution, on surfaces representing membranes, and combinations thereof. A new syntax for describing the spatial directionality of surface reactions is introduced, along with optimizations and algorithms that can substantially reduce computational costs (e.g., event scheduling, variable time and space steps). Examples for simple reactions in simple spaces are validated by comparison to analytic solutions. Thus we show how spatially realistic Monte Carlo simulations of biological systems can be far more cost-effective than often is assumed, and provide a level of accuracy and insight beyond that of continuum methods.

  19. Effect of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock on the dissolution rate of the SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeway, James J.; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, Solange; El Mendili, Yassine; Schumacher, Stéphan; Grambow, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste glass in France is expected to occur in an engineered barrier system (EBS) located in a subsurface Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock formation in the Paris Basin in northeastern France. Understanding the behavior of glass dissolution in the complex system is critical to be able to reliably model the performance of the glass in this complex environment. To simulate this multi-barrier repository scenario in the laboratory, several tests have been performed to measure glass dissolution rates of the simulated high-level nuclear waste glass, SON68, in the presence of COx claystone at 90 °C. Experiments utilized a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pump to pass simulated Bure site COx pore water through a reaction cell containing SON68 placed between two COx claystone cores for durations up to 200 days. Silicon concentrations at the outlet were similar in all experiments, even the blank experiment with only the COx claystone (∼4 mg/L at 25 °C and ∼15 mg/L at 90 °C). The steady-state pH of the effluent, measured at room temperature, was roughly 7.1 for the blank and 7.3-7.6 for the glass-containing experiments demonstrating the pH buffering capacity of the COx claystone. Dissolution rates for SON68 in the presence of the claystone were elevated compared to those obtained from flow-through experiments conducted with SON68 without claystone in silica-saturated solutions at the same temperature and similar pH values. Additionally, through surface examination of the monoliths, the side of the monolith in direct contact with the claystone was seen to have a corrosion thickness 2.5× greater than the side in contact with the bulk glass powder. Results from one experiment containing 32Si-doped SON68 also suggest that the movement of Si through the claystone is controlled by a chemically coupled transport with a Si retention factor, Kd, of 900 mL/g.

  20. User's guide for simulation of waste treatment (SWAT) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macal, C.M.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a user's guide for the Simulation of Waste Treatment (SWAT) model computer code. (A detailed description of the logic and assumptions of the model was published previously.) A flow diagram depicting the logic of the SWAT computer code is included. Several river basins or regions can be simulated in a single computer run, with each region having numerous treatment plants. Treatment plants are simulated sequentially to reduce computer storage requirements. All input to the model is in the form of cards and all output is to a line printer. The code is written in FORTRAN IV and consists of approximately 3000 statements. Using the IBM 370/195 under OS, a Gl compiler requires a region of 220K. Execution time is under two minutes for a typical run for a river basin with 23 treatment plants, with each plant having an average of one technology modification over a simulation period of 25 years. In the first section of this report a brief description of the subroutines in the model is given along with an explanation of how the subroutines function in the context of the whole program. The third section indicates formatting for input data; sample input data for a test problem are also presented. Section 4 describes the output resulting from the sample input data. A program listing appears in the appendix.

  1. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  2. Fate of selected microorganisms when introduced as cross-contamination inocula into simulated food trash compartment waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Richard; Hummerick, Mary; Richards, Jeffrey; Birmele, Michele; Roberts, Michael

    AdHocReviewCycleID-309796538 NewReviewCycle EmailSubjectPlease review this (?today?) AuthorEm Richard F. (KSC)[DYNAMAC CORP] ReviewingToolsShownOnceurn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smart One goal of Exploration Life Support solid waste processing is to stabilize wastes for storage, mitigate crew risks, and enable resource recovery. Food and crew fecal wastes contain easily biodegraded organic components that support microbial growth. Our objective is to determine a baseline for the fate of selected microbes in wastes prior to processing treatments. Challenge microbes, including human-associated pathogens, were added to unsterilized, simulated food trash solid waste containing a mixed microbial community. The fate of the microbial community and challenge microbes was determined over a 6 week time course of waste storage. Challenge microbes were selected from a list of microorganisms common to residual food or fecal wastes and included: Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger (a common mold), and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, a spore-forming bacterium previously isolated from spacecraft assembly facilities selected for its resistance to heat, uv, and desiccation. The trash model simulant contained 80% food trash (food waste and containers) and 20% hygiene wipes. Cultures of challenge microbes were grown overnight on Nutrient Agar (Difco), harvested, re-suspended in physiological saline, and diluted to achieve the desired optical density for inoculation. The six organisms were pooled and inoculated into the simulated food wastes and packaging before manual mixing. Inoculated simulated waste was stored in custom FlexfoilTM gas sampling bags (SKC, Inc.) which were then connected to a gas analysis system designed to supply fresh air to each bag to maintain O2 above 1%. Bag headspace was monitored for CO2 (PP Systems) and O2 (Maxtec). Total microbes were quantified by microscopic direct

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  4. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies for sorption of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The sorption characteristic of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves as a low cost sorbent has been studied. The effect of pH, contact time, sorbent dose, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium data were fitted into four most common isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R. The Langmuir model described the sorption isotherm best with maximum monolayer sorption capacity of 120.50 mg g−1. Four kinetic models, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich were employed to explain the sorption mechanism. The kinetics of sorption data showed that the pseudo-second-order model is the best with correlation coefficient of 0.9946. The spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process was revealed from thermodynamic investigations. The effect of some common alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were also studied which showed that the presence of these ions have no effect on the sorption of Ni (II. The results showed that waste tea leaves have the potential to be used as a low cost sorbent for the removal of Ni (II from aqueous solutions.

  5. Generalizing Source Geometry of Site Contamination by Simulating and Analyzing Analytical Solution of Three-Dimensional Solute Transport Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the uneven distribution of pollutions and blur edge of pollutant area, there will exist uncertainty of source term shape in advective-diffusion equation model of contaminant transport. How to generalize those irregular source terms and deal with those uncertainties is very critical but rarely studied in previous research. In this study, the fate and transport of contaminant from rectangular and elliptic source geometry were simulated based on a three-dimensional analytical solute transport model, and the source geometry generalization guideline was developed by comparing the migration of contaminant. The result indicated that the variation of source area size had no effect on pollution plume migration when the plume migrated as far as five times of source side length. The migration of pollution plume became slower with the increase of aquifer thickness. The contaminant concentration was decreasing with scale factor rising, and the differences among various scale factors became smaller with the distance to field increasing.

  6. Immobilization of simulated low and intermediate level waste in alkali-activated slag-fly ash-metakaolin hydroceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wjin761026@163.com [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Wang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Qin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu-xiang [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Evaluation of the suitability of ASFMH for solidifying simulated S-LILW. • The introduction of S-LILW avails forming zeolitic phases of ASFMH waste forms. • The ASFMH waste forms have low leachability and high compressive strength. - Abstract: In the current study, the alkali-activated slag-fly ash-metakaolin hydroceramic (ASFMH) waste forms for immobilizing simulated low and intermediate level waste (S-LILW) were prepared by hydrothermal process. The crystalline phase compositions, morphology, compressive strength and aqueous stability of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms were investigated. The results showed that the main crystalline phases of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms were analcime and zeolite NaP1. The changes of Si/Al molar ratio (from 1.7 to 2.2) and Ca/Al molar ratio (from 0.15 to 0.35) had little effect on the phase compositions of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms. However, the hydrothermal temperature, time as well as the content of S-LILW (from 12.5 to 37.5 wt%) had a major impact on the phase compositions. The compressive strength of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms was not less than 20 MPa when the content of S-LILW reached 37.5 wt%. In addition, the aqueous stability testing was carried out using the standard MCC-1 static leach test method; the normalized elemental leach rates of Sr and Cs were fairly constant in a low value below 5 × 10{sup −4} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} and 3 × 10{sup −4} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} after 28 days, respectively. It is indicated that ASFMH waste form could be a potential host for safely immobilizing LILW.

  7. Purification of alkaline solutions and wastes from actinides and technetium by coprecipitation with some carriers using the method of appearing reagents: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Silin, V.I.; Kareta, A.V.; Gelis, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; German, K.E.; Firsova, E.V.; Maslennikov, A.G.; Trushina, V.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-09-01

    The coprecipitation of transuranium elements (TRU) and technetium from alkaline solutions and from simulants of Hanford Site tank wastes has been studied in reducing and oxidizing conditions on uranium(IV,VI) hydroxocompounds, tetraalkylammonium perrhenate and perchlorate, and on hydroxides of Fe(III), Co(III), Mn(II), and Cr(III) using the method of appearing reagents (MAR). Coprecipitations in alkaline solution have been shown to give high decontamination factors (DF) at low content of carrier and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Uranium(IV) hydroxide in concentrations higher than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M coprecipitates Pu and Cm in any oxidation state from 0.2 to 4 M NaOH with DFs of 110 to 1000 and Np and Tc with DFs of 51 to 176. Technetium (VII) coprecipitates with (5 to 8) {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M tetrabutylammonium (TBA) perrhenate in 0.01 to 0.02 M TBA hydroxide from 0.5 to 1.5 M NaOH to give DFs of 150 to 200. Coprecipitations of Np and Pu with Co(OH){sub 3}, Fe(OH){sub 3}, Cr(OH){sub 3}, and Mn(OH){sub 2} obtained by the MAR from precursors in the range from pH 10.5 to 0.4 M NaOH give DFs from 80 to 400.

  8. Molecular Simulation Uncovers the Conformational Space of the λ Cro Dimer in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Miyashita, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The significant variation among solved structures of the λ Cro dimer suggests its flexibility. However, contacts in the crystal lattice could have stabilized a conformation which is unrepresentative of its dominant solution form. Here we report on the conformational space of the Cro dimer in solution using replica exchange molecular dynamics in explicit solvent. The simulated ensemble shows remarkable correlation with available x-ray structures. Network analysis and a free energy surface reveal the predominance of closed and semi-open dimers, with a modest barrier separating these two states. The fully open conformation lies higher in free energy, indicating that it requires stabilization by DNA or crystal contacts. Most NMR models are found to be unstable conformations in solution. Intersubunit salt bridging between Arg4 and Glu53 during simulation stabilizes closed conformations. Because a semi-open state is among the low-energy conformations sampled in simulation, we propose that Cro-DNA binding may not entail a large conformational change relative to the dominant dimer forms in solution. PMID:22098751

  9. Microbial induced lipoprotein biosurfactant from slaughterhouse lipid waste and its application to the removal of metal ions from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, K; Jain, S Chandan; Mandal, A B; Sekaran, G

    2012-09-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the production of lipoprotein biosurfactant from Pseudomonas gessardii using goat tallow, a slaughterhouse lipid waste, as the substrate and its application to the removal of metal ions from aqueous solution. The maximum bio-transformation of goat tallow into biosurfactant occurred at 48 h. The mass of the lipoprotein biosurfactant produced was 2.03 g/g of goat tallow. The biosurfactant was clearly characterized by surface tension, critical micelle concentration, emulsification index and molecular weight. The amino acid and fatty acid moieties of the biosurfactant were determined using High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Gas chromatography (GC). The thermal behavior studies were evaluated using Thermo gravimetric (TG) and Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The lipoprotein biosurfactant was loaded onto the mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) for the sequestering of metal ions from the aqueous solution. The biosurfactant exhibited a removal efficiency for metal ions from aqueous solution in the order Cr(3+)>Ca(2+)>Cu(2+)>Fe(2+). The morphological observations and functional groups of the lipoprotein biosurfactant and that of the lipoprotein biosurfactant bound metal ions were determined using scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, respectively. This is the first report on the production of lipoprotein biosurfactant by P. gessardii using goat tallow as the substrate to sequester the metal ions from the aqueous solution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-12-01

    Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 °C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ≈ 4.0-8.0 × 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ≈ 2.0-4.0 × 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

  11. SPH-based numerical simulations of flow slides in municipal solid waste landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Dai, Zili; Zhang, Weijie; Huang, Maosong

    2013-03-01

    Most municipal solid waste (MSW) is disposed of in landfills. Over the past few decades, catastrophic flow slides have occurred in MSW landfills around the world, causing substantial economic damage and occasionally resulting in human victims. It is therefore important to predict the run-out, velocity and depth of such slides in order to provide adequate mitigation and protection measures. To overcome the limitations of traditional numerical methods for modelling flow slides, a mesh-free particle method entitled smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is introduced in this paper. The Navier-Stokes equations were adopted as the governing equations and a Bingham model was adopted to analyse the relationship between material stress rates and particle motion velocity. The accuracy of the model is assessed using a series of verifications, and then flow slides that occurred in landfills located in Sarajevo and Bandung were simulated to extend its applications. The simulated results match the field data well and highlight the capability of the proposed SPH modelling method to simulate such complex phenomena as flow slides in MSW landfills.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide generation in simulated construction and demolition debris landfills: impact of waste composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kenton; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation in construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills has been associated with the biodegradation of gypsum drywall. Laboratory research was conducted to observe H2S generation when drywall was codisposed with different C&D debris constituents. Two experiments were conducted using simulated landfill columns. Experiment 1 consisted of various combinations of drywall, wood, and concrete to determine the impact of different waste constituents and combinations on H2S generation. Experiment 2 was designed to examine the effect of concrete on H2S generation and migration. The results indicate that decaying drywall, even alone, leached enough sulfate ions and organic matter for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to generate large H2S concentrations as high as 63,000 ppmv. The codisposed wastes show some effect on H2S generation. At the end of experiment 1, the wood/drywall and drywall alone columns possessed H2S concentrations > 40,000 ppmv. Conversely, H2S concentrations were < 1 ppmv in those columns containing concrete. Concrete plays a role in decreasing H2S by increasing pH out of the range for SRB growth and by reacting with H2S. This study also showed that wood lowered H2S concentrations initially by decreasing leachate pH values. Based on the results, two possible control mechanisms to mitigate H2S generation in C&D debris landfills are suggested.

  13. Comparison of organic and inorganic ion exchangers for removal of cesium and strontium from simulated and actual Hanford 241-AW-101 DSSF tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Carlson, C.D. [and others

    1996-04-01

    A number of organic and inorganic exchangers are being developed and evaluated for cesium removal from Hanford tank wastes. The exchangers of interest that are investigated in this work include powdered (IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910; referred to as IE-910) and engineered (IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911; referred to as IE-911) forms of the crystalline silico-titanate (CST) inorganic sorbent developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/Texas A and M and prepared by UOP; a phenol-formaldehyde (CS-100) resin developed by Rohm and Haas; a resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) polymer developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and produced by Boulder Scientific; an inorganic zeolite exchanger produced by UOP (IONSIV{reg_sign} TIE-96; referred to as TIE-96); an inorganic sodium titanate produced by Allied Signal/Texas A and M (NaTi); and a macrocyclic organic resin developed and produced by IBC Advanced Technologies (SuperLig{reg_sign} 644; referred to as SL-644). Several of these materials are still under development and may not be in the optimal form. The work described in this report involves the direct comparison of the ion exchange materials for the pretreatment of actual and simulated Hanford tank waste. Data on the performance of all of the exchangers with simulated and actual double shell slurry feed (DSSF) is included. The DSSF waste is a mixture of the supernate from tanks 101-AW (70%), 106-AP (20%) and 102-AP (10%). The comparative parameters include radionuclide removal efficiency under a variety of conditions and material properties (e.g., bed density and percent removable water). Cesium and strontium distribution (K{sub d}), lambda ({lambda} = K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}), and decontamination factors (DF) are compared as a function of exchanger contact duration, solution composition (Na and Cs concentration), exchanger/waste phase ratio, and multiple sequential contacts.

  14. Analytical Problems Associated with the Analysis of Metals in a Simulated Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnivant, F. M.

    2002-06-01

    Analysis of samples subject to physical and chemical interferences can greatly enhance the learning experience in instrumental analysis and environmental chemistry laboratories. This article describes a project-based experience in which students analyze simulated hazardous waste samples (carbonated beverages) for calcium by six techniques: (i) flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) using external standard calibration, (ii) FAAS using external standard calibration with a releasing agent (Sr), (iii) FAAS using standard addition, (iv) FAAS using standard addition with a releasing agent (Sr), (v) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) titration, and (vi) Ca-ion-specific electrode. Not surprisingly, students find that these different techniques yield conflicting results and their assignment is to explain their data in the format of a peer-reviewed journal article. Students report that this series of lab experiments is challenging and highly rewarding. Laboratory experiences such as this one should significantly improve the student's ability to analyze problematic samples and interpret experimental data.

  15. Correction of MHS Viscosimetric Constants upon Numerical Simulation of Temperature Induced Degradation Kinetic of Chitosan Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maria De Benedictis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mark–Houwink–Sakurada (MHS equation allows for estimation of rheological properties, if the molecular weight is known along with good understanding of the polymer conformation. The intrinsic viscosity of a polymer solution is related to the polymer molecular weight according to the MHS equation, where the value of the constants is related to the specific solvent and its concentration. However, MHS constants do not account for other characteristics of the polymeric solutions, i.e., Deacetilation Degree (DD when the solute is chitosan. In this paper, the degradation of chitosan in different acidic environments by thermal treatment is addressed. In particular, two different solutions are investigated (used as solvent acetic or hydrochloric acid with different concentrations used for the preparation of chitosan solutions. The samples were treated at different temperatures (4, 30, and 80 °C and time points (3, 6 and 24 h. Rheological, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermal Gravimetric Analyses (TGA were performed in order to assess the degradation rate of the polymer backbones. Measured values of molecular weight have been integrated in the simulation of the batch degradation of chitosan solutions for evaluating MHS coefficients to be compared with their corresponding experimental values. Evaluating the relationship between the different parameters used in the preparation of chitosan solutions (e.g., temperature, time, acid type and concentration, and their contribution to the degradation of chitosan backbone, it is important to have a mathematical frame that could account for phenomena involved in polymer degradation that go beyond the solvent-solute combination. Therefore, the goal of the present work is to propose an integration of MHS coefficients for chitosan solutions that contemplate a deacetylation degree for chitosan systems or a more

  16. Bidentate organophosphorus extractants: purification, properties and applications to removal of actinides from acidic waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.; McIsaac, L.D.

    1977-05-01

    At both Hanford and Idaho, DHDECMP (dihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamylmethylene phosphonate) continuous counter-current solvent extraction processes are being developed for removal of americium, plutonium, and, in some cases, other actinides from acidic wastes generated at these locations. Bench and, eventually, pilot and plant-scale testing and application of these processes have been substantially enhanced by the discovery of suitable chemical and physical methods of removing deleterious impurities from technical-grade DHDECMP. Flowsheet details, as well as various properties of purified DHDECMP extractants, are enumerated.

  17. Towards reinforcement solutions for urban fibre/fabric waste using bio-based biodegradable resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pramod; Hermes, Alina; Bapeer, Solaf; Luiken, Anton; Bouwhuis, Gerrit; Brinks, Ger

    2017-10-01

    The main research question is how to systematically define and characterize urban textile waste and how to effectively utilise it to produce reinforcement(s) with selected bio-based biodegradable resin(s). Several composite samples have been produced utilising predominantly natural and predominantly synthetic fibres by combining loose fibres with PLA, nonwoven fabric with PLA, woven fabric with PLA, two-layer composite & four-layer composite samples. Physio-chemical characterisations according to the established standards have been conducted. The present work is a step toward the circular economy and closing the loop in textile value chain.

  18. Plasma gasification the Waste-to-Energy solution for the future

    OpenAIRE

    Birsan, Nicolae

    2014-01-01

    Plasma WtE is currently subject of extensive research and a number of companies across the globe are trying to develop a suitable, eco-friendly and efficient WtE technology for the future. While all of these companies are still working on concept designs or small-scale prototypes, there is one company already building large industrial scale plasma gasifiers around the globe to treat MSW, Industrial and Toxic waste all together. In 1999 in Japan, Hitachi Metals and Westinghouse Plasma Corp (“W...

  19. Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-02-02

    Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

  20. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  1. Surface activity of octanoic acid in ethanol-water solutions from molecular simulation and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htet, April N; Gil, Phwey S; Lacks, Daniel J

    2015-02-28

    The surface activity of a typical surfactant, octanoic acid (OA), in ethanol-water solutions is investigated with a combined experimental and molecular simulation approach. The experiments show that OA reduces the surface tension of ethanol-water solutions at low ethanol concentration, but the effectiveness decreases with increasing ethanol concentration and vanishes for ethanol concentrations above 60%. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain free energy landscapes for OA as a function of the distance from the surface. The free energy driving force pushing OA to the surface decreases with increasing ethanol concentration, and becomes insignificant (i.e., less than kT) for ethanol concentrations above 70%. Thus, the decrease in the effectiveness of OA in reducing the surface tension at higher ethanol concentrations can be attributed to the decrease in the free energy driving force keeping OA at the surface. We expect these results to apply generally to hydrocarbon-based surfactants.

  2. Osmotic and diffusio-osmotic flow generation at high solute concentration. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we explore osmotic transport by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We first consider osmosis through a membrane and investigate the reflection coefficient of an imperfectly semi-permeable membrane, in the dilute and high concentration regimes. We then explore the diffusio-osmotic flow of a solute-solvent fluid adjacent to a solid surface, driven by a chemical potential gradient parallel to the surface. We propose a novel non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) methodology to simulate diffusio-osmosis, by imposing an external force on every particle, which properly mimics the chemical potential gradient on the solute in spite of the periodic boundary conditions. This NEMD method is validated theoretically on the basis of linear-response theory by matching the mobility with their Green-Kubo expressions. Finally, we apply the framework to more realistic systems, namely, a water-ethanol mixture in contact with a silica or a graphene surface.

  3. Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

  4. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with supporting glass formulation development and process control strategies in key technical areas, relevant to the Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and related to high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Of specific interest is the development of predictive models for crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) in HLW glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations. This report summarizes recent progress by researchers at SRNL towards developing a predicative tool for quantifying nepheline crystallization in HLW glass canisters using laboratory experiments. In this work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to obtain the temperature regions over which nucleation and growth of nepheline occur in three simulated HLW glasses - two glasses representative of WTP projections and one glass representative of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) product. The DWPF glass, which has been studied previously, was chosen as a reference composition and for comparison purposes. Complementary quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy confirmed the validity of the methodology to determine nucleation and growth behavior as a function of temperature. The nepheline crystallization growth region was determined to generally extend from ~ 500 to >850 °C, with the maximum growth rates occurring between 600 and 700 °C. For select WTP glass compositions (high Al2O3 and B2O3), the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 600 °C, with the maximum nucleation rates occurring at ~ 530 °C. For the DWPF glass composition, the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 750 °C with the maximum nucleation rate occurring at ~ 640 °C. The nepheline growth at the peak temperature, as determined by XRD, was between 35 - 75 wt.% /hour. A maximum nepheline growth rate of ~ 0.1 mm/hour at 700 °C was measured for the DWPF

  5. NWChem: a Comprehensive and Scalable Open-Source Solution for Large Scale Molecular Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiev, Marat; Bylaska, Eric J.; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Straatsma, TP; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Wang, Dunyou; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Apra, Edoardo; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2010-09-01

    The NWChem computational chemistry package offers extensive capabilities for large scale simulations of chemical and biological systems. Utilizing a common computational framework, diverse theoretical descriptions can be used to provide the best solution for a given scientific problem. Scalable parallel implementations and modular software design enables efficient utilization of current computational architectures. This paper provides an overview of NWChem focusing primarily on the core theoretical descriptions provided by the code and their parallel performance. In addition, future plans are outlined.

  6. Multiscale Molecular Simulation of Solution Processing of SMDPPEH: PCBM Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2016-08-17

    Solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells are a promising renewable energy source because of their low production cost, mechanical flexibility, and light weight relative to their pure inorganic counterparts. In this work, we developed a coarse-grained (CG) Gay-Berne ellipsoid molecular simulation model based on atomistic trajectories from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of smaller system sizes to systematically study the nanomorphology of the SMDPPEH/PCBM/solvent ternary blend during solution processing, including the blade-coating process by applying external shear to the solution. With the significantly reduced overall system degrees of freedom and computational acceleration from GPU, we were able to go well beyond the limitation of conventional all-atom molecular simulations with a system size on the order of hundreds of nanometers with mesoscale molecular detail. Our simulations indicate that, similar to polymer solar cells, the optimal blending ratio in small-molecule organic solar cells must provide the highest specific interfacial area for efficient exciton dissociation, while retaining balanced hole/electron transport pathway percolation. We also reveal that blade-coating processes have a significant impact on nanomorphology. For given donor/acceptor blending ratios, applying an external shear force can effectively promote donor/acceptor phase segregation and stacking in the SMDPPEH domains. The present study demonstrated the capability of an ellipsoid-based coarse-grained model for studying the nanomorphology evolution of small-molecule organic solar cells during solution processing/blade-coating and provided links between fabrication protocols and device nanomorphologies.

  7. Molecular properties of astaxanthin in water/ethanol solutions from computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Samanta, Susruta; Roccatano, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin (AXT) is a reference model of xanthophyll carotenoids, which is used in medicine and food industry, and has potential applications in nanotechnology. Because of its importance, there is a great interest in understanding its molecular properties and aggregation mechanism in water and mixed solvents. In this paper, we report a novel model of AXT for molecular dynamics simulation. The model is used to estimate different properties of the molecule in pure solutions and in water/ethano...

  8. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-02

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed.

  10. Finding Solutions to Different Problems Simultaneously in a Multi-molecule Simulated Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaderick P. Pabico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available – In recent years, the chemical metaphor has emerged as a computational paradigm based on the observation of different researchers that the chemical systems of living organisms possess inherent computational properties. In this metaphor, artificial molecules are considered as data or solutions, while the interactions among molecules are defined by an algorithm. In recent studies, the chemical metaphor was used as a distributed stochastic algorithm that simulates an abstract reactor to solve the traveling salesperson problem (TSP. Here, the artificial molecules represent Hamiltonian cycles, while the reactor is governed by reactions that can re-order Hamiltonian cycles. In this paper, a multi-molecule reactor (MMR-n that simulates chemical catalysis is introduced. The MMR-n solves in parallel three NP-hard computational problems namely, the optimization of the genetic parameters of a plant growth simulation model, the solution to large instances of symmetric and asymmetric TSP, and the static aircraft landing scheduling problems (ALSP. The MMR-n was shown as a computational metaphor capable of optimizing the cultivar coefficients of CERES-Rice model, and at the same time, able to find solutions to TSP and ALSP. The MMR-n as a computational paradigm has a better computational wall clock time compared to when these three problems are solved individually by a single-molecule reactor (MMR-1.

  11. Temperature and solute-transport simulation in streamflow using a Lagrangian reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program for simulating one-dimensional, unsteady temperature and solute transport in a river has been developed and documented for general use. The solution approach to the convective-diffusion equation uses a moving reference frame (Lagrangian) which greatly simplifies the mathematics of the solution procedure and dramatically reduces errors caused by numerical dispersion. The model documentation is presented as a series of four programs of increasing complexity. The conservative transport model can be used to route a single conservative substance. The simplified temperature model is used to predict water temperature in rivers when only temperature and windspeed data are available. The complete temperature model is highly accurate but requires rather complete meteorological data. Finally, the 10-parameter model can be used to route as many as 10 interacting constituents through a river reach. (USGS)

  12. An Analytical Solution by HAM for Nonlinear Simulation of Deepwater SCR Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel catenary riser (SCR is a cost-effective riser system that is widely used in deepwater offshore oilfields development. During SCR J-lay installation, the movement of pull-head must be carefully controlled to ensure riser safety. Since the SCR installation path calculation through numerical simulation software is usually time-consuming, this paper has established a mechanical model for SCR installation by making use of homotopy analysis method (HAM to simplify its analytical solution, and dimensional analysis was considered in making initial guess solution. Based on this analytical solution, a program within the framework of MATLAB was developed to predict the two-dimensional riser behavior during installation, and a sensitivity analysis for different values of the control variables was carried out. Engineers may efficiently optimize the installation path by the application of this technique.

  13. Influence of carbon steel and its corrosion productson the leaching of elements from a simulated waste glass

    OpenAIRE

    佐竹 憲治; 亀井 玄人

    2002-01-01

    The influence of carbon steel and its corrosion products on leaching of elements from simulated high level radioactive waste glass (P0798) has been investigated in batch-type experiments of up to one year at 25pm3circC under argon atmosphere (

  14. G-189A analytical simulation of the integrated waste management-water system using radioisotopes for thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, J. V.; Loscutoff, A. V.; Barker, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the RITE-Integrated Waste Management and Water Recovery System using radioisotopes for thermal energy was prepared for the NASA-Manned Space Flight Center (MSFC). The RITE system is the most advanced concept water-waste management system currently under development and has undergone extended duration testing. It has the capability of disposing of nearly all spacecraft wastes including feces and trash and of recovering water from usual waste water sources: urine, condensate, wash water, etc. All of the process heat normally used in the system is produced from low penalty radioisotope heat sources. The analytical simulation was developed with the G189A computer program. The objective of the simulation was to obtain an analytical simulation which can be used to (1) evaluate the current RITE system steady state and transient performance during normal operating conditions, and also during off normal operating conditions including failure modes; and (2) evaluate the effects of variations in component design parameters and vehicle interface parameters on system performance.

  15. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  16. Pyrolysis of Municipal Green Waste: A Modelling, Simulation and Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J. Kabir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical conversion of carbonaceous feedstock in the absence of oxygen to produce bio-fuel (bio-oil, bio-char and syn-gas. Bio-fuel production from municipal green waste (MGW through the pyrolysis process has attracted considerable attention recently in the renewable energy sector because it can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to energy security. This study analyses properties of MGW feedstock available in Rockhampton city of Central Queensland, Australia, and presents an experimental investigation of producing bio-fuel from that MGW through the pyrolysis process using a short sealed rotary furnace. It was found from the experiment that about 19.97% bio-oil, 40.83% bio-char and 29.77% syn-gas can be produced from the MGW. Then, a four-stage steady state simulation model is developed for pyrolysis process performance simulation using Aspen Plus software. In the first stage, the moisture content of the MGW feed is reduced. In the second stage, the MGW is decomposed according to its elemental constituents. In the third stage, condensate material is separated and, finally, the pyrolysis reactions are modelled using the Gibbs free energy minimisation approach. The MGW’s ultimate and proximate analysis data were used in the Aspen Plus simulation as input parameters. The model is validated with experimentally measured data. A good agreement between simulation and experimental results was found. More specifically, the variation of modelling and experimental elemental compositions of the MGW was found to be 7.3% for carbon, 15.82% for hydrogen, 7.04% for nitrogen and 5.56% for sulphur. The validated model is used to optimise the biofuel production from the MGW as a function of operating variables such as temperature, moisture content, particle size and process heat air–fuel ratio. The modelling and optimisation results are presented, analysed and discussed.

  17. Studies on sustainability of simulated constructed wetland system for treatment of urban waste: Design and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, A K; Bankoti, N S; Rai, U N

    2016-03-15

    New system configurations and wide range of treatability make constructed wetland (CW) as an eco-sustainable on-site approach of waste management. Keeping this view into consideration, a novel configured three-stage simulated CW was designed to study its performance efficiency and relative importance of plants and substrate in purification processes. Two species of submerged plant i.e., Potamogeton crispus and Hydrilla verticillata were selected for this study. After 6 months of establishment, operation and maintenance of simulated wetland, enhanced reduction in physicochemical parameters was observed, which was maximum in the planted CW. The percentage removal (%) of the pollutants in three-stage mesocosms was; conductivity (60.42%), TDS (67.27%), TSS (86.10%), BOD (87.81%), NO3-N (81.28%) and PO4-P (83.54%) at 72 h of retention time. Submerged macrophyte used in simulated wetlands showed a significant time dependent accumulation of toxic metals (p ≤ 0.05). P. crispus accumulated the highest Mn (86.36 μg g(-1) dw) in its tissue followed by Cr (54.16 μg g(-1) dw), Pb (31.56 μg g(-1) dw), Zn (28.06 μg g(-1) dw) and Cu (25.76 μg g(-1) dw), respectively. In the case of H. verticillata, it was Zn (45.29), Mn (42.64), Pb (22.62), Cu (18.09) and Cr (16.31 μg g(-1) dw). Thus, results suggest that the application of simulated CW tackles the water pollution problem more efficiently and could be exploited in small community level as alternative and cost effective tools of phytoremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer-Based Simulation in Blended Learning Curriculum for Hazardous Waste Site Worker Health and Safety Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Cheryl; Slatin, Craig; Sanborn, Wayne; Volicer, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Intended for the interest of individuals and organizations who provide adult/worker training and education, we present a discussion of a computer-based simulation training tool used as part of a hazardous waste site worker health and safety training curriculum. Our objective is to present the simulation's development, implementation, and assessment for learning utility from both trainee and trainer perspectives. The simulation is blended with other curriculum components of training courses and supports small group learning. Assessment included end-of-course trainee questionnaires and trainer focus groups to addressing simulation utility as a user-oriented learning tool. A majority of trainees reported simulation trainings as useful learning tools with numerous advantages that support a participatory, blended learning curriculum, and raise awareness of potential work site risks and hazards. Trainers reported that the simulation advanced training impact. Evaluation results indicate that the simulation successfully supports small group learning activities.

  19. SPH Simulations of Solute Transport in Flows with Steep Velocity and Concentration Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Chang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a meshless particle method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH, is adopted to solve the shallow water equations (SWEs and the advection diffusion equations (ADEs for simulating solute transport processes under 1D/2D conditions with steep gradients. A new SPH-SWEs-ADEs model is herein developed to focus on the numerical performance of solute transport in flows with steep velocity and concentration gradients, since the traditional mesh-based methods have numerical difficulties on solving such steep velocity/concentration gradient flows. The present model is validated by six benchmark study cases, including three steep concentration gradient cases and three coupled steep concentration/velocity gradient cases. The comparison between the simulated results and the exact solutions for the former three cases shows that complete mass concentration conservation in pure advection-dominated flows is preserved. The numerical oscillation in concentration and the negative concentration resulted from the discretization of the advection term of ADEs can be totally avoided. The other three cases confirm that this model can also well capture coupled steep gradients of velocities and concentrations. It is demonstrated that the presented solver is an effective and reliable tool to investigate solute transports in complex flows incorporating steep velocity gradients.

  20. Caffeine and Sugars Interact in Aqueous Solutions: A Simulation and NMR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Engström, Olof; Schnupf, Udo; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Himmel, Michael; Widmalm, Göran; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on several systems of caffeine interacting with simple sugars. These included a single caffeine molecule in a 3 molal solution of α-D-glucopyranose, at a caffeine concentration of 0.083 molal; a single caffeine in a 3 molal solution of β-D-glucopyranose, and a single caffeine molecule in a 1.08 molal solution of sucrose (table sugar). Parallel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance titration experiments were carried out on the same solutions under similar conditions. Consistent with previous thermodynamic experiments, the sugars were found to have an affinity for the caffeine molecules in both the simulations and experiments, and that the binding in these complexes occurs by face-to-face stacking of the hydrophobic triad of protons of the pyranose rings against the caffeine face, rather than by hydrogen bonding. For the disaccharide, the binding occurs via stacking of the glucose ring against the caffeine, with a lesser affinity for the fructose observed. These findings are consistent with the association being driven by hydrophobic hydration, and are similar to the previously observed binding of glucose rings to various other planar molecules, including indole, serotonin, and phenol. PMID:22897449

  1. Development of Multi-physics (Multiphase CFD + MCNP) simulation for generic solution vessel power calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-17

    The current study aims to predict the steady state power of a generic solution vessel and to develop a corresponding heat transfer coefficient correlation for a Moly99 production facility by conducting a fully coupled multi-physics simulation. A prediction of steady state power for the current application is inherently interconnected between thermal hydraulic characteristics (i.e. Multiphase computational fluid dynamics solved by ANSYS-Fluent 17.2) and the corresponding neutronic behavior (i.e. particle transport solved by MCNP6.2) in the solution vessel. Thus, the development of a coupling methodology is vital to understand the system behavior at a variety of system design and postulated operating scenarios. In this study, we report on the k-effective (keff) calculation for the baseline solution vessel configuration with a selected solution concentration using MCNP K-code modeling. The associated correlation of thermal properties (e.g. density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat) at the selected solution concentration are developed based on existing experimental measurements in the open literature. The numerical coupling methodology between multiphase CFD and MCNP is successfully demonstrated, and the detailed coupling procedure is documented. In addition, improved coupling methods capturing realistic physics in the solution vessel thermal-neutronic dynamics are proposed and tested further (i.e. dynamic height adjustment, mull-cell approach). As a key outcome of the current study, a multi-physics coupling methodology between MCFD and MCNP is demonstrated and tested for four different operating conditions. Those different operating conditions are determined based on the neutron source strength at a fixed geometry condition. The steady state powers for the generic solution vessel at various operating conditions are reported, and a generalized correlation of the heat transfer coefficient for the current application is discussed. The assessment of multi

  2. Evaluation of high-level waste vitrification feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant, FY 1994: Alternate flowsheets (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.D.; Merz, M.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Smith, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site will be pretreated to concentrate radioactive constituents and fed to the vitrification plant A flowsheet for feed preparation within the vitrification plant (based on the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) design) called for HCOOH addition during the feed preparation step to adjust rheology and glass redox conditions. However, the potential for generating H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Studies at the University of Georgia, under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL, have verified the catalytic role of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru), present in the waste, in the generation of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} generation phenomenal Because H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} may create hazardous conditions in the vessel vapor space and offgas system of a vitrification plant, reducing the H{sub 2} generation rate and the NH{sub 3} generation to the lowest possible levels consistent with desired melter feed characteristics is important. The Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 studies were conducted with simulated (non-radioactive), pre-treated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). Neutralized current acid waste is a high-level waste originating from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) plant that has been partially denitrated with sugar, neutralized with NaOH, and is presently stored in double-shell tanks. The non-radioactive simulant used for the present study includes all of the trace components found in the waste, or substitutes a chemically similar element for radioactive or very toxic species. The composition and simulant preparation steps were chosen to best simulate the chemical processing characteristics of the actual waste.

  3. THE PREFERENTIAL STRUCTURE OF Co2+ SOLVATION IN AQUEOUS AMMONIA SOLUTION DETERMINING BY MONTE CARLO SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahyorini Kusumawardani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Monte Carlo simulation was performed for Co2+ in 18.6 % aqueous ammonia solution at a temperature of 293.16 K, using ab initio pair potentials and three-body potentials for Co-H2O-H2O, Co-NH3-NH3 and Co-H2O-NH3 interactions. The first solvation shell consists average of 2.9 water and 3.2 ammonia molecules, and the second shell of 10.4 water and 11.2 ammonia molecules. The structure of the solvated ion is discussed in terms of radial distribution functions, angular distributions and coordination number.   Keywords: Molecular simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, solvation, ab initio

  4. TiO2/bone composite materials for the separation of heavy metal impurities from waste water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakroury, G.; Labib, Sh.; Abou El-Nour, F. H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure bone material obtained from cow meat, as apatite-rich material, and TiO2-bone composite materials are prepared and studied to be used for heavy metal ions separation from waste water solutions. Meat wastes are chemically and thermally treated to control their microstructure in order to prepare the composite materials that fulfill all the requirements to be used as selective membranes with high performance, stability and mechanical strength. The prepared materials are analyzed using Hg-porosimetry for surface characterization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) for elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for chemical composition investigation. Structural studies are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructural properties are studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area studies are performed using Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. XRD studies show that multiphase structures are obtained as a result of 1h sintering at 700-1200 °C for both pure bone and TiO2-bone composite materials. The factors affecting the transport of different heavy metal ions through the selected membranes are determined from permeation flux measurements. It is found that membrane pore size, membrane surface roughness and membrane surface charge are the key parameters that control the transport or rejection of heavy metal ions through the selected membranes.

  5. Adsorption of Cu(2+) and methyl orange from aqueous solutions by activated carbons of corncob-derived char wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao-Xu; Deng, Qing-Fang; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2013-12-01

    Corncob-derived char wastes (CCW) obtained from biomass conversion to syngas production through corncob steam gasification, which were often discarded, were utilized for preparation of activated carbon by calcination, and KOH and HNO3 activation treatments, on the view of environment protection and waste recycling. Their adsorption performance in the removal of heavy metal ions and dye molecules from wastewater was evaluated by using Cu(2+) and methyl orange (MO) as the model pollutant. The surface and structure characteristics of the CCW-based activated carbons (CACs) were investigated by N2 adsorption, CO2 adsorption, FT-IR, and He-TPD. The adsorption capacity varied with the activation methods of CACs and different initial solution concentrations, indicating that the adsorption behavior was influenced by not only the surface area and porosity but also the oxygen functional groups on the surface of the CACs. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed with the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models, and the adsorption kinetics was evaluated by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models.

  6. Fabrication of the novel hydrogel based on waste corn stalk for removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongzhuo; Zhu, Baodong; Cao, Bo; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-11-01

    The novel hydrogel based on waste corn stalk was synthetized by aqueous solution polymerization technique with functional monomers in the presence of organic montmorillonite (OMMT) under ultrasonic. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to research the effect of initial dye concentration, the dosage of hydrogel, stirring speed, contact time and temperature on the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) dye. The adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which confirmed that it should be a chemical process. Furthermore, we ascertained the rate controlling step by establishing the intraparticle diffusion model and the liquid film diffusion model. The adsorption and synthesis mechanisms were vividly depicted in our work as well. Structural and morphological characterizations by virtue of FTIR, FESEM, and Biomicroscope supported the relationship between the adsorption performance and material's microstructure. This research is a valuable contribution for the environmental protection, which not only converts waste corn stalks into functional materials, but improves the removal of organic dye from sewage water.

  7. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deyi; Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia

    2012-11-30

    In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm × 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F(-)/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  9. Exploration of DGVM Parameter Solution Space Using Simulated Annealing: Implications for Forecast Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J. R.; Kim, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Parameters in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are thought to be weakly constrained and can be a significant source of errors and uncertainties. DGVMs use between 5 and 26 plant functional types (PFTs) to represent the average plant life form in each simulated plot, and each PFT typically has a dozen or more parameters that define the way it uses resource and responds to the simulated growing environment. Sensitivity analysis explores how varying parameters affects the output, but does not do a full exploration of the parameter solution space. The solution space for DGVM parameter values are thought to be complex and non-linear; and multiple sets of acceptable parameters may exist. In published studies, PFT parameters are estimated from published literature, and often a parameter value is estimated from a single published value. Further, the parameters are "tuned" using somewhat arbitrary, "trial-and-error" methods. BIOMAP is a new DGVM created by fusing MAPSS biogeography model with Biome-BGC. It represents the vegetation of North America using 26 PFTs. We are using simulated annealing, a global search method, to systematically and objectively explore the solution space for the BIOMAP PFTs and system parameters important for plant water use. We defined the boundaries of the solution space by obtaining maximum and minimum values from published literature, and where those were not available, using +/-20% of current values. We used stratified random sampling to select a set of grid cells representing the vegetation of the conterminous USA. Simulated annealing algorithm is applied to the parameters for spin-up and a transient run during the historical period 1961-1990. A set of parameter values is considered acceptable if the associated simulation run produces a modern potential vegetation distribution map that is as accurate as one produced by trial-and-error calibration. We expect to confirm that the solution space is non-linear and complex, and that

  10. Adsorption Process and Mechanism of Cd(Ii and Cr(Vi Removal from Aqueous Solution by Waste Marigold Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monoj Kumar Mondal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, waste marigold flowers from Temple were used as adsorbent to remove cadmium (II and chromium (VI ions from aqueous solutions. Influences of initial heavy metal concentrations, contact time, adsorbent dose, temperature and initial pH on removal of cadmium (II and chromium (VI ions were studied under batch mode of operation. Both the adsorption process of cadmium (II and chromium (VI followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Adsorption isotherm parameters of cadmium (II and chromium (VI on dried marigold flower were determined using Langmuir and Freundlich models. Thermodynamic parameters depicted that the process was spontaneous and exothermic under experimental conditions. The maximum removal efficiency of cadmium (II was obtained as 83% at contact time 75 min and pH 5. The maximum removal efficiency of chromium (VI was found as 96% at contact time 105 min and pH 3. Dried marigold flower showed active reusability characteristics upto three consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles.

  11. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  12. Valorization of Agroindustrial Wastes as Biosorbent for the Removal of Textile Dyes from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Contreras

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to determinate the technical feasibility of using agroindustrial wastes for adsorption of dyes. The pHpzc of Brewer’s spent grains and Orange peel is 5.3 and 3.5, respectively. The equilibrium isotherms of Basic Blue 41, Reactiive Black 5, and Acid Black 1 were carried out without pHs control which ranging between 4 and 5.5. The equilibrium concentrations for both adsorbents were fitted by the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The maximum adsorption capacity measured for Basic Blue 41, Reactive Black 5, and Acid Black 1 was 32.4, 22.3, and 19.8 mg g-1 for Brewer’s spent grains; and 157, 62.6, and 45.5 for orange peel, respectively. The kinetic of process was fitted by the model of pseudo-second order. The constant rate for orange peel decreased to extend the initial concentration of dye increased, obtaining 4.08 * 10−3−0.6 * 10−3 (Basic Blue 41, 2.98 * 10−3−0.36 * 10−3 (Acid Black 1, and 3.40 * 10−3−0.46 * 10−3 g mg−1 min−1 (Reactive Black 5. The best removal efficiency was obtained in orange peel with values started from 63% to 20%. Consequently, according the results obtained there are two positive effects, the reuse of agricultural wastes and its use as low-cost adsorbent of the dyes.

  13. Peat-based organic growbags as a solution to the mineral wool waste problem

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    O. Grunert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of solid waste produced each year is one of the greatest problems associated with greenhouse horticulture in some European countries. In particular, the disposal of used growing media arising from the soil-less cultivation of vegetables in mineral wool creates serious difficulties. The non-biodegradability of these mainly inorganic substrates causes environmental concern and has prompted the search for alternative growing media such as cocos derivatives, perlite and resin foam (Fytocell®. Organic substrates in combination with biodegradable material such as plastic, rope and clippings have the advantage that re-use or recycling of the waste is easier, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than for mineral wool. However, the differing physical and chemical characteristics of the alternative substrates may affect yield significantly. Substrates based respectively on peat and peat with cocos derivatives were tested against a mineral wool control for the production of tomato in three consecutive years. Both organic substrates were placed in biodegradable plastic bags. Greenhouse experiments demonstrated that plants grown in the pure peat substrate rooted more easily than plants grown in the peat-cocos substrate or mineral wool, and that they developed less blossom-end rot in both peat substrates than in mineral wool. Due to the buffering capacity of the organic substrates, the electrical conductivity of the draining water appeared to be more stable during cultivation. The total yield of tomato fruits was similar for all substrates, and no differences between substrates could be observed in the quality of the fruits produced. On the other hand, flavour tests demonstrated that plants grown on peat substrate produced more tasty fruits under certain conditions. The results of this study show that organic growbags are promising and competitive alternatives to mineral wool.

  14. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  15. WATSFAR: numerical simulation of soil WATer and Solute fluxes using a FAst and Robust method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevoisier, David; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    To simulate the evolution of hydro- and agro-systems, numerous spatialised models are based on a multi-local approach and improvement of simulation accuracy by data-assimilation techniques are now used in many application field. The latest acquisition techniques provide a large amount of experimental data, which increase the efficiency of parameters estimation and inverse modelling approaches. In turn simulations are often run on large temporal and spatial domains which requires a large number of model runs. Eventually, despite the regular increase in computing capacities, the development of fast and robust methods describing the evolution of saturated-unsaturated soil water and solute fluxes is still a challenge. Ross (2003, Agron J; 95:1352-1361) proposed a method, solving 1D Richards' and convection-diffusion equation, that fulfil these characteristics. The method is based on a non iterative approach which reduces the numerical divergence risks and allows the use of coarser spatial and temporal discretisations, while assuring a satisfying accuracy of the results. Crevoisier et al. (2009, Adv Wat Res; 32:936-947) proposed some technical improvements and validated this method on a wider range of agro- pedo- climatic situations. In this poster, we present the simulation code WATSFAR which generalises the Ross method to other mathematical representations of soil water retention curve (i.e. standard and modified van Genuchten model) and includes a dual permeability context (preferential fluxes) for both water and solute transfers. The situations tested are those known to be the less favourable when using standard numerical methods: fine textured and extremely dry soils, intense rainfall and solute fluxes, soils near saturation, ... The results of WATSFAR have been compared with the standard finite element model Hydrus. The analysis of these comparisons highlights two main advantages for WATSFAR, i) robustness: even on fine textured soil or high water and solute

  16. Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Solutions Simulating Tannery Wastewater by Strong Acid Cation Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulten Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process in this study was conducted on removal of chromium(III in a solution simulating a typical spent chrome tanning bath by the resin having matrix of styrene-divinylbenzene-based macroporous sulphonate, Amberjet 1200Na. The column experiments were carried out with the bed volumes of the resin as 751 mL and 1016 mL for different installation systems of the laboratory-scale pilot plant. The feeding solutions in the bed volumes of 200 and 190 were used for each installation system. The regeneration behaviour of the resin was determined by using reverse regeneration procedure with the solution of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline. The regeneration kinetics of the exhausted resin was examined with a range of the solutions having different concentration series of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide. The solutions of the basic chromium sulphate were recycled for each installation system following the regeneration cycles. The chromium ions in effluent were quantitatively eluted, and satisfactory removal of chromium(III and recovery of chromium(VI were achieved.

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Freeze-Thaw Behavior of Mortar Containing Deicing Salt Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Hadi S; Farnam, Yaghoob; Bentz, Dale P; Zavattieri, Pablo D; Weiss, Jason

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional finite difference model that is developed to describe the freeze-thaw behavior of an air-entrained mortar containing deicing salt solution. A phenomenological model is used to predict the temperature and the heat flow for mortar specimens during cooling and heating. Phase transformations associated with the freezing/melting of water/ice or transition of the eutectic solution from liquid to solid are included in this phenomenological model. The lever rule is used to calculate the quantity of solution that undergoes the phase transformation, thereby simulating the energy released/absorbed during phase transformation. Undercooling and pore size effects are considered in the numerical model. To investigate the effect of pore size distribution, this distribution is considered using the Gibbs-Thomson equation in a saturated mortar specimen. For an air-entrained mortar, the impact of considering pore size (and curvature) on freezing was relatively insignificant; however the impact of pore size is much more significant during melting. The fluid inside pores smaller than 5 nm (i.e., gel pores) has a relatively small contribution in the macroscopic freeze-thaw behavior of mortar specimens within the temperature range used in this study (i.e., +24 °C to -35 °C), and can therefore be neglected for the macroscopic freeze-thaw simulations. A heat sink term is utilized to simulate the heat dissipation during phase transformations. Data from experiments performed using a low-temperature longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) on mortar specimens fully saturated with various concentration NaCl solutions or partially saturated with water is compared to the numerical results and a promising agreement is generally obtained.

  18. Dynamic simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions with screened long-range hydrodynamic interactions: algorithm and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tadashi; Chow, Edmond; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-09-28

    Hydrodynamic interactions exert a critical effect on the dynamics of macromolecules. As the concentration of macromolecules increases, by analogy to the behavior of semidilute polymer solutions or the flow in porous media, one might expect hydrodynamic screening to occur. Hydrodynamic screening would have implications both for the understanding of macromolecular dynamics as well as practical implications for the simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions, e.g., in cells. Stokesian dynamics (SD) is one of the most accurate methods for simulating the motions of N particles suspended in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number, in that it considers both far-field and near-field hydrodynamic interactions. This algorithm traditionally involves an O(N(3)) operation to compute Brownian forces at each time step, although asymptotically faster but more complex SD methods are now available. Motivated by the idea of hydrodynamic screening, the far-field part of the hydrodynamic matrix in SD may be approximated by a diagonal matrix, which is equivalent to assuming that long range hydrodynamic interactions are completely screened. This approximation allows sparse matrix methods to be used, which can reduce the apparent computational scaling to O(N). Previously there were several simulation studies using this approximation for monodisperse suspensions. Here, we employ newly designed preconditioned iterative methods for both the computation of Brownian forces and the solution of linear systems, and consider the validity of this approximation in polydisperse suspensions. We evaluate the accuracy of the diagonal approximation method using an intracellular-like suspension. The diffusivities of particles obtained with this approximation are close to those with the original method. However, this approximation underestimates intermolecular correlated motions, which is a trade-off between accuracy and computing efficiency. The new method makes it possible to perform large

  19. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C.

  20. Removal of chromium from aqueous waste solution using liquid emulsion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M A; Selim, Y T; Mohamed, K M

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents a comprehensive study in recovery of Cr (VI) from dilute HCl solution using liquid emulsion membrane (LEM). The liquid membrane is made up of Tri-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as a carrier, cyclohexane as an organic diluent, sodium hydroxide as a stripping solution and Span-80 (sorbitain monooleate) as an emulsifying agent. The selection of the extractant (TOPO) and the stripper (NaOH) was chosen on the basis of conventional liquid-liquid extraction studies. The important parameters affecting the permeation of Cr (VI) through the prepared membrane are hydrogen ion concentration in the external aqueous phase, stirring speed of mixing the two phases, type of diluents, carrier concentration, stripper concentration, membrane to feed ratio and volume fraction were systematically investigated. The effect of surfactant types and concentration on the stability of LEM were studied because of its important role in the permeation process.

  1. A novel agricultural waste adsorbent for the removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M N Mohamad; Ngah, W S Wan; Norliyana, M S; Daud, W R Wan; Rafatullah, M; Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R

    2010-10-15

    The present study explores the ability of modified soda lignin (MSL) extracted from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) in removing lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions. The effect of contact time, point zero charge (pH(pzc)) and pH of the solution, initial metal ion concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal process were investigated. Furthermore, the MSL is characterized by SEM, XRF, FT-IR and surface area analysis. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models of adsorption. The kinetic data obtained at different initial concentrations were analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The results provide strong evidence to support the hypothesis of adsorption mechanism. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimates of water and solute release from a coal waste rock dump in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, S A; Barbour, S L; Hendry, M J; Carey, S K

    2017-12-01

    Long term (1999 to 2014) flow and water quality data from a rock drain located at the base of a coal waste rock dump constructed in the Elk Valley, British Columbia was used to characterize the release of three solutes (NO 3 - , Cl - and SO 4 2- ) from the dump and obtain whole dump estimates of net percolation (NP). The concentrations of dump derived solutes in the rock drain water were diluted by snowmelt waters from the adjacent natural watershed during the spring freshet and reached a maximum concentration during the winter baseflow period. Historical peak baseflow concentrations of conservative ions (NO 3 - and Cl - ) increased until 2006/07 after which they decreased. This decrease was attributed to completion of the flushing of the first pore volume of water stored within the dump. The baseflow SO 4 2- concentrations increased proportionally with NO 3 - and Cl - to 2007, but then continued to slowly increase as NO 3 - and Cl - concentrations decreased. This was attributed to ongoing production of SO 4 2- due to oxidation of sulfide minerals within the dump. Based on partitioning of the annual volume of water discharged from the rock drain to waste rock effluent (NP) and water entering the rock drain laterally from the natural watershed, the mean NP values were estimated to be 446±50mm/a (area normalized net percolation/year) for the dump and 172±71mm/a for the natural watershed. The difference was attributed to greater rates of recharge in the dump from summer precipitation compared to the natural watershed where rainfall interception and enhanced evapotranspiration will increase water losses. These estimates included water moving through subsurface pathways. However, given the limitations in quantifying these flows the estimated NP rates for both the natural watershed and the waste rock dump are considered to be low, and could be much higher (e.g. ~450mm/a and ~800mm/a). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospection-Simulation-Revision: Approach to the Analysis of the Composition and Characteristics of Medical Waste at a Disaster Relief Site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available A large amount of medical waste is produced during disaster relief, posing a potential hazard to the habitat and the environment. A comprehensive understanding of the composition and characteristics of medical waste that requires management is one of the most basic steps in the development of a plan for medical waste management. Unfortunately, limited reliable information is available in the open literature on the characteristics of the medical waste that is generated at disaster relief sites. This paper discusses the analysis of the composition and characteristics of medical waste at a disaster relief site using the retrospection-simulation-revision method. For this study, we obtained 35 medical relief records of the Wenchuan Earthquake, Sichuan, May 2008 from a field cabin hospital. We first present a retrospective analysis of the relief medical records, and then, we simulate the medical waste generated in the affected areas. We ultimately determine the composition and characteristics of medical waste in the affected areas using untreated medical waste to revise the composition of the simulated medical waste. The results from 35 cases showed that the medical waste generated from disaster relief consists of the following: plastic (43.2%, biomass (26.3%, synthetic fiber (15.3%, rubber (6.6%, liquid (6.6%, inorganic salts (0.3% and metals (1.7%. The bulk density of medical relief waste is 249 kg/m3, and the moisture content is 44.75%. The data should be provided to assist the collection, segregation, storage, transportation, disposal and contamination control of medical waste in affected areas. In this paper, we wish to introduce this research method of restoring the medical waste generated in disaster relief to readers and researchers. In addition, we hope more disaster relief agencies will become aware of the significance of medical case recording and storing. This may be very important for the environmental evaluation of medical waste in

  4. Simulation of a waste incineration process with flue-gas cleaning and heat recovery sections using Aspen Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Silvano; Prisciandaro, Marina; Barba, Diego

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, the modeling of a dual-purpose plant for the production of electrical and thermal energy from the heat treatment of solid wastes is presented. Particularly, the process has been modeled by using the Aspen Plus Shell, with the aim of performing a study about the applicability of this software in the simulation of a solid waste incineration process, which involves complex gas-solid reactions where the solids are referred to as "non-conventional". The model is developed to analyze and quantify the expected benefits associated with refuse derived fuel (RDF) thermal utilization; thus attention is focused on the performance of the energy recovery section.

  5. NWChem: A comprehensive and scalable open-source solution for large scale molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiev, M.; Bylaska, E. J.; Govind, N.; Kowalski, K.; Straatsma, T. P.; Van Dam, H. J. J.; Wang, D.; Nieplocha, J.; Apra, E.; Windus, T. L.; de Jong, W. A.

    2010-09-01

    The latest release of NWChem delivers an open-source computational chemistry package with extensive capabilities for large scale simulations of chemical and biological systems. Utilizing a common computational framework, diverse theoretical descriptions can be used to provide the best solution for a given scientific problem. Scalable parallel implementations and modular software design enable efficient utilization of current computational architectures. This paper provides an overview of NWChem focusing primarily on the core theoretical modules provided by the code and their parallel performance. Program summaryProgram title: NWChem Catalogue identifier: AEGI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Open Source Educational Community License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 709 543 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 680 696 106 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77, C Computer: all Linux based workstations and parallel supercomputers, Windows and Apple machines Operating system: Linux, OS X, Windows Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Code is parallelized Classification: 2.1, 2.2, 3, 7.3, 7.7, 16.1, 16.2, 16.3, 16.10, 16.13 Nature of problem: Large-scale atomistic simulations of chemical and biological systems require efficient and reliable methods for ground and excited solutions of many-electron Hamiltonian, analysis of the potential energy surface, and dynamics. Solution method: Ground and excited solutions of many-electron Hamiltonian are obtained utilizing density-functional theory, many-body perturbation approach, and coupled cluster expansion. These solutions or a combination thereof with classical descriptions are then used to analyze potential energy surface and perform dynamical simulations. Additional comments: Full

  6. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  7. Real-time Solution via Dynamic Simulation for the Six Degree of Freedom Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lizong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide a new way for dynamic simulation experiments, a real-time solution for the six degree of freedom platform was developed. The mathematical model of an improved Six-DOF Stewart platform was used to study positive solutions and inverse solutions. According to the parameters of different platforms, different function signals were selected to generate motion control data by using Visual C++ programming. Motion control card was embedded into industrial computer, data was sent automatically to the control card by the program when the platform ran. The output of the control card was analog voltage, and it was amplified to send to the proportional valve, then the flows of six hydraulic cylinders were controlled by the six proportional valves. So a closed-loop control CNC system was formed. The expected action could be realized by the platform. Experiments have proved that the method is simple, efficient and easy to operate. It can not only accompany the implementation moving of relevant actions in the 3D movie theater, but also provide the signal source for the road spectrum of simulated driving test of the automobile.

  8. Investigation of the salting out of methane from aqueous electrolyte solutions using computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, H; Galindo, A; Sanz, E; Vega, C

    2007-08-02

    We calculate the excess chemical potential of methane in aqueous electrolyte solutions of NaCl using Monte Carlo computer simulations. In a recent work [Docherty et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 074510], we presented a new potential model for methane in water which is capable of describing accurately the excess chemical potential of methane in pure water over a range of temperatures, a quantity that can be related to the solubility and which is commonly used to study the hydrophobic effect. Here, we use the same potential model for the water-methane interactions and investigate the effect of added salt on the chemical potential of methane in the solution. The methane molecules are modeled as single Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction sites, and the water molecules are modeled with the TIP4P/2005 model. A correcting factor of chi = 1.07 for the energetic Berthelot (geometric) combining rule of the methane-water interaction is also used, which mimics the polarization of methane in water. We consider NaCl as the salt and treat the ions with the Smith and Dang model (i.e., as charged LJ interaction sites). Ion-water, ion-ion, and ion-methane interactions are treated using Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules. In addition, the Coulombic potential is used to model charge-charge interactions which are calculated using the Ewald sum. We have carried out isobaric-isothermal (NpT) simulations to determine the equilibrium densities of the solutions. The simulation data is in excellent agreement with experimental densities of aqueous NaCl solutions of different concentration. Hydration numbers are also obtained and found to be in agreement with reported data. Canonical (NVT) simulations at the averaged densities are then performed using the Widom test-particle insertion method to obtain the excess chemical potential of methane in the saline solutions. An increase in the chemical potential of methane, corresponding to a salting out effect, is observed when salt is added to the solution

  9. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM AN AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY PRETREATED WASTE TEA FUNGAL BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mamisahebei , Gh. R. Jahed Khaniki, A. Torabian, S. Nasseri, K. Naddafi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination in water poses a serious threat on human health. The tea fungus known as Kombucha is a waste produced during black tea fermentation. The objective of this study was to examine the main aspect of a possible strategy for the removal of arsenates employing tea fungal biomass. The pretreatment of biomass with FeCl3 was found to improve the biosorption efficiency. Arsenics uptake was found to be rapid for all concentrations and reached to 79% of equilibrium capacity of biosorption in 20 min and reached equilibrium in 90 min. The pseudo second-order and first-order models described the biosorption kinetics of As (V with good correlation coefficient (R2>0.93 and better than the other equations. The data obtained from the experiment of biosorption isotherm were analyzed using the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The equation described the isotherm of As (V biosorption with relatively high correlation coefficient (R2>0.93. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum uptake capacities (qm of tea fungal biomass for As (V were obtained 3.9810-3 mmol/gr. The effect of Na+, K+, Mg+2 and Ca+2 on equilibrium capacities of As was not significant. The variation of sorption efficiency with pH showed that optimum biosorption takes place in the pH ranges of 6 to 8. Promising results were obtained in laboratory experiments and effective As (V removals were observed.

  10. SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM WASTE RUBBER PRODUCTS BY MODIFYING THE ROAD BINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Beliaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The article considers the problem of waste rubber industry through their recycling, compelling stakeholders to keep stocks of valuable raw rubber and improve our environment. The questions of the processes of thermal devulcanization of rubber crumb rubber products, and then use the resulting material (reclaimed rubber crumb as a modifier to improve the quality of road binder. The effect of technological parameters devulcanisation thermal (temperature and exposure time on the degree of devulcanization of crumb rubber. The question of the choice of environmentally friendly agents and emollients devulcanisation to speed the process flow. Researches modifications road binder Reclaimed rubber crumbs obtained under different conditions. The degree of influence of the content of reclaimed rubber crumb on the physico-mechanical properties of road binder bitumen BND 60/90. Studies have shown that the physical and mechanical properties of modified bitumen conform to standards of rubber bitumen binders in accordance with the recommendations of the firm "BITREK": introduction regeneration rata crumb rubber binder in the road leads to an increase in the softening temperature and the appearance of elasticity in the binder compared to the original bitumen and the values of penetration and elongation are within acceptable limits. Thus, the use of recycled materials, reduces the cost of producing a binder for pavement compared to peers.

  11. Uptake of Pb(II ion From Aqueous Solution Using Silk Cotton Hull Carbon: An Agricultural Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shanmugavalli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon prepared from silk cotton hull (SCH was used for the adsorptive removal of Pb(II ion from aqueous solution. The raw material used for the preparation of activated carbon is the waste of agricultural product; the production of this carbon is expected to be economically feasible. Parameters such as agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and Particle size were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 80 min for 10, 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 50mg of carbon per mL of solution. Adsorption parameters were determined using both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption efficiency reached 100% for 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 120, 140 and 150mg of carbon. Pb(II ion removal increased as the pH increased from 2 to 5 and remains constant up to pH 10. Desorption studies were also carried out with dilute hydrochloric acid to know the mechanism of adsorption. Quantitative desorption of Pb(II ion from carbon indicates that adsorption of metal ion is by ion-exchange. Efficiency of the adsorption of SCH was also studied with Pb containing industrial wastewater by varying pH and carbon concentration.

  12. Removal of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by seafood processing waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S M; Davis, A P

    2001-02-01

    Dried waste slurry generated in seafood processing factories has been shown to be an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from dilute solutions. Characterization of the sludge surface with scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalyzer were carried out to evaluate the components on the sludge surface that are related to the adsorption of metal ions. Aluminum and calcium, as well as organic carbon are distributed on the surface of sludge. Alkalimetric titration was used to characterize the surface acidity of the sludge sample. The surface acidity constants, pKa1s and pKa2s, were 5.80 and 9.55, respectively. Batch as well as dynamic adsorption studies were conducted with 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-3) M Cu(II) and Cd(II). A surface complexation model with the diffuse layer model successfully predicted Cu(II) and Cd(II) removals in single metal solutions. Predictions of sorption in binary-adsorbate systems based on single-adsorbate data fits represented competitive sorption data reasonably well over a wide range of conditions. The breakthrough capacity found from column studies was different for each metal ion and the data reflect the order of metal affinity for the adsorbent material very well.

  13. Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

  14. Simulation of municipal solid waste degradation in aerobic and anaerobic bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Bhagwan Shamrao; C, Agnes Anto; Singh, Devendra Narain

    2017-03-01

    Municipal solid waste generation is huge in growing cities of developing nations such as India, owing to the rapid industrial and population growth. In addition to various methods for treatment and disposal of municipal solid waste (landfills, composting, bio-methanation, incineration and pyrolysis), aerobic/anaerobic bioreactor landfills are gaining popularity for economical and effective disposal of municipal solid waste. However, efficiency of municipal solid waste bioreactor landfills primarily depends on the municipal solid waste decomposition rate, which can be accelerated through monitoring moisture content and temperature by using the frequency domain reflectometry probe and thermocouples, respectively. The present study demonstrates that these landfill physical properties of the heterogeneous municipal solid waste mass can be monitored using these instruments, which facilitates proper scheduling of the leachate recirculation for accelerating the decomposition rate of municipal solid waste.

  15. Removing actinides using a chromatographic resin from High Activity Waste Solutions containing metallic impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pialot, H

    2004-07-01

    At the Plutonium Recycling Facility of CEA Valduc, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers more than 99,9 %, the trace amounts of actinides as americium remaining in the effluent require additional processing to reduce alpha activity under the maximum allowed for surface disposal. A new process has been developed to remove actinides from these effluents with a TRUspec resin. A pilot composed of an electrochemical reactor followed by a TRUSPEC column has been designed into a glove box. Laboratory scale studies and first results on the pilot have confirmed the interesting bibliography concerning this process. The reduction of iron is effective with a yield of 98-99% and no significant retention of metallic impurities has been observed during fixing time. Moreover, Pr and Ce used as surrogates for Pu and Am are totally recovered in the elution phases. Further work will be done to validate the previous results and to qualify the overall process with active solutions.

  16. Fruit waste adsorbent for ammonia nitrogen removal from synthetic solution: Isotherms and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrim, AY; Lija, Y.; Ricky, L. N. S.; Azreen, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, four types of watermelon rind (WR) adsorbents; fresh WR, modified WR with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) were used as a potential low-cost adsorbent to remove NH3-N from solution. The adsorption data were fitted with the adsorption isotherm and kinetic models to predict the mechanisms and kinetic characteristics of the adsorption process. The equilibrium data agreed well with Langmuir isotherm model with highest correlation (R2=1.00). As for kinetic modelling, the adsorption process follows pseudo-second order for all four types of adsorbents which has R2 value of 1.0 and calculated adsorption capacity, Qe of 1.2148mg/g. The calculated Qe for pseudo-second order has the smallest difference with the experimental Qe and thus suggest that this adsorption process is mainly governed by chemical process involving cations sharing or exchange between WR adsorbent and NH3-N in the solution.

  17. Thermodynamic study of the adsorption of chromium ions from aqueous solution on waste corn cobs material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Fonseca-Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of a study obtaining activated carbon from corn cobs and determining its use as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr3+ from aqueous solutions. The finely ground precursor was subjected to pyrolysis at 600 and 900 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and chemical activation with H2O2 and HNO3. The effects of pyrolysis conditions and activation method on the physicochemical properties of the materials obtained were tested. The samples were characterised chemically and texturally. Were obtained microporous activated carbons of well-developed surface area varying from 337 to 1213 m2/g and exhibited differences acid-base character of the surface. The results obtained shows that a suitable good option of the activation procedure for corncobs permits the production of economic adsorbents with high sorption capacity for Cr3+ from aqueous solutions. A detailed study of immersion calorimetry was performed with carbons prepared from corn cobs to establish possible relationships with these materials between the enthalpies of immersion and textural and chemical parameters.

  18. Tracer simulation study of potential solute movement in Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Cummings, T. Ray

    1972-01-01

    A tracer study was conducted in Port Royal Sound to simulate the movement and ultimate pattern of concentration of a solute continuously injected into the flow. A total of 750 pounds of Rhodamine WT dye was injected by boat during a period of 24.8 hours in a line across the Colleton River. During the following 43 days, samples of water were taken at selected points in the sound, and the concentration of dye in the samples was determined by fluorometric analysis. The data obtained in the field study were used with theoretical models to compute the ultimate pattern of concentration of nonconservative and conservative solutes for a hypothetical continuous injection at the site on the Colleton River.

  19. Electric conductivity in electrolyte solution under external electromagnetic field by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, LiJun; Huang, KaMa

    2010-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NMD) simulations are performed to investigate the effects of an external electromagnetic (E/M) field on NaCl electrolyte solutions at different temperatures using the SPC/E model. The electromagnetic wave propagates in the z-axis direction with a frequency of 2.45 GHz, and the intensity of the E/M field is 3 x 10(4) V/m. The results indicate that as the concentration of the electrolyte solution increased, the diffusion coefficient and the ionic mobility gradually decreased, but the electric conductivity gradually increased. In addition, all three of them will be increased when the temperature is increased. But their value will be reduced when the electromagnetic field is applied.

  20. VM-based infrastructure for simulating different cluster and storage solutions in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    KUTOUSKI, M; The ATLAS collaboration; PETROSYAN, A; KADOCHNIKOV, I; BELOV, S; KORENKOV, V

    2012-01-01

    The current ATLAS Tier3 infrastructure consists of a variety of sites of different sizes and with a mix of local resource management systems (LRMS) and mass storage system (MSS) implementations. The Tier3 monitoring suite, having been developed in order to satisfy the needs of Tier3 site administrators and to aggregate Tier3 monitoring information on the global VO level, needs to be validated for various combinations of LRMS and MSS solutions along with the corresponding Ganglia and/or Nagios plugins. For this purpose the Testbed infrastructure, which allows simulation of various computational cluster and storage solutions, had been set up at JINR (Dubna). This infrastructure provides the ability to run testbeds with various LRMS and MSS implementations, and with the capability to quickly redeploy particular testbeds or their components. Performance of specific components is not a critical issue for development and validation, whereas easy management and deployment are crucial. Therefore virtual machines were...

  1. Simulating Monovalent and Divalent Ions in Aqueous Solution Using a Drude Polarizable Force Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haibo; Whitfield, Troy W.; Harder, Edward; Lamoureux, Guillaume; Vorobyov, Igor; Anisimov, Victor M.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Roux, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    An accurate representation of ion solvation in aqueous solution is critical for meaningful computer simulations of a broad range of physical and biological processes. Polarizable models based on classical Drude oscillators are introduced and parametrized for a large set of monoatomic ions including cations of the alkali metals (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+ and Cs+) and alkaline earth elements (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) along with Zn2+ and halide anions (F−, Cl−, Br− and I−). The models are parameterized, in conjunction with the polarizable SWM4-NDP water model [Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006)], to be consistent with a wide assortment of experimentally measured aqueous bulk thermodynamic properties and the energetics of small ion-water clusters. Structural and dynamic properties of the resulting ion models in aqueous solutions at infinite dilution are presented. PMID:20300554

  2. Simulation of unsteady flow and solute transport in a tidal river network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical method for water flow and solute transport in a tidal river network is presented. The tidal river network is defined as a system of open channels of rivers with junctions and cross sections. As an example, the Pearl River in China is represented by a network of 104 channels, 62 nodes, and a total of 330 cross sections with 11 boundary section for one of the applications. The simulations are performed with a supercomputer for seven scenarios of water flow and/or solute transport in the Pearl River, China, with different hydrological and weather conditions. Comparisons with available data are shown. The intention of this study is to summarize previous works and to provide a useful tool for water environmental management in a tidal river network, particularly for the Pearl River, China.

  3. Reusable Object-Oriented Solutions for Numerical Simulation of PDEs in a High Performance Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented platforms developed for the numerical solution of PDEs must combine flexibility and reusability, in order to ease the integration of new functionalities and algorithms. While designing similar frameworks, a built-in support for high performance should be provided and enforced transparently, especially in parallel simulations. The paper presents solutions developed to effectively tackle these and other more specific problems (data handling and storage, implementation of physical models and numerical methods that have arisen in the development of COOLFluiD, an environment for PDE solvers. Particular attention is devoted to describe a data storage facility, highly suitable for both serial and parallel computing, and to discuss the application of two design patterns, Perspective and Method-Command-Strategy, that support extensibility and run-time flexibility in the implementation of physical models and generic numerical algorithms respectively.

  4. ABSINTH: a new continuum solvation model for simulations of polypeptides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitalis, Andreas; Pappu, Rohit V

    2009-04-15

    A new implicit solvation model for use in Monte Carlo simulations of polypeptides is introduced. The model is termed ABSINTH for self-Assembly of Biomolecules Studied by an Implicit, Novel, and Tunable Hamiltonian. It is designed primarily for simulating conformational equilibria and oligomerization reactions of intrinsically disordered proteins in aqueous solutions. The paradigm for ABSINTH is conceptually similar to the EEF1 model of Lazaridis and Karplus (Proteins 1999, 35, 133). In ABSINTH, the transfer of a polypeptide solute from the gas phase into a continuum solvent is the sum of a direct mean field interaction (DMFI), and a term to model the screening of polar interactions. Polypeptide solutes are decomposed into a set of distinct solvation groups. The DMFI is a sum of contributions from each of the solvation groups, which are analogs of model compounds. Continuum-mediated screening of electrostatic interactions is achieved using a framework similar to the one used for the DMFI. Promising results are shown for a set of test cases. These include the calculation of NMR coupling constants for short peptides, the assessment of the thermal stability of two small proteins, reversible folding of both an alpha-helix and a beta-hairpin forming peptide, and the polymeric properties of intrinsically disordered polyglutamine peptides of varying lengths. The tests reveal that the computational expense for simulations with the ABSINTH implicit solvation model increase by a factor that is in the range of 2.5-5.0 with respect to gas-phase calculations. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Parallel shooting methods for finding steady state solutions to engine simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Parallel single- and multiple shooting methods were tested for finding periodic steady state solutions to a Stirling engine model. The model was used to illustrate features of the methods and possibilities for optimisations. Performance was measured using simulation of an experimental data set...... as test case. A parallel speedup factor of 23 on 33 processors was achieved with multiple shooting. But fast transients at the beginnings of sub intervals caused significant overhead for the multiple shooting methods and limited the best speedup to 3.8 relative to the fastest sequential method: Single...... shooting with reduced dimension of the boundary value problem....

  6. Ammonia and carbon dioxide regeneration from multicomponent solutions: II - Simulation and analysis of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jotanović Milovan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the simulation of the technological process of NH3 and CO2 regeneration from the multicomponent solution NH3-CO2-NaCl-NH4Cl, based on a developed mathematical model of the process. All the parameters of the technological process were obtained from the simulation, and they represent the mass flow rates as well as the physical and chemical properties (pressure, temperature,.. of all the flows shown on the process flowsheet. The calculation of numerous variations of the process also enabled the analysis and establishment for a relation between the crucial process variables and the steam and liquid phase supply. These relations are important for the absorption-desorption process of synthesis, operating process analysis and process control.

  7. Amphiphilic lipids in solution: a simulational study of lipid bilayer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Gai, Lili; Maerzke, Katie A.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; McCabe, Clare M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-03-01

    Amphiphilic molecules consisting of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail groups self-assemble into a wide variety of structures, such as bilayers (membranes), micelles, or vesicles (liposomes) when mixed with a suitable solvent. The understanding of this lipid self-assembly is essential for industrial, biological, or medical applications, but computer simulations are generally challenging due to the complex structure of the energy landscape. We show results for the lipid bilayer formation process obtained by newly developed parallel Wang-Landau Monte Carlo and statistical temperature molecular dynamics simulations. By applying those methods to a generic coarse-grained model for amphiphilic molecules in solution, we were able to obtain the thermodynamical data over the whole relevant temperature and energy range and to unravel the membrane formation process including all structural sub-transitions between different fluid and gel-phase bilayers. Research supported by NSF

  8. Effects of heat recovery for district heating on waste incineration health impact: a simulation study in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordioli, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone; De Leo, Giulio A

    2013-02-01

    The construction of waste incinerators in populated areas always causes substantial public concern. Since the heat from waste combustion can be recovered to power district heating networks and allows for the switch-off of domestic boilers in urbanized areas, predictive models for health assessment should also take into account the potential benefits of abating an important source of diffuse emission. In this work, we simulated the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants from a waste incinerator under construction in Parma (Italy) into different environmental compartments and estimated the potential health effect of both criteria- (PM(10)) and micro-pollutants (PCDD/F, PAH, Cd, Hg). We analyzed two emission scenarios, one considering only the new incinerator, and the other accounting for the potential decrease in pollutant concentrations due to the activation of a district heating network. We estimated the effect of uncertainty in parameter estimation on health risk through Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, we analyzed the robustness of health risk to alternative assumptions on: a) the geographical origins of the potentially contaminated food, and b) the dietary habits of the exposed population. Our analysis showed that under the specific set of assumptions and emission scenarios explored in the present work: (i) the proposed waste incinerator plant appears to cause negligible harm to the resident population; (ii) despite the net increase in PM(10) mass balance, ground-level concentration of fine particulate matter may be curbed by the activation of an extensive district heating system powered through waste combustion heat recovery and the concurrent switch-off of domestic/industrial heating boilers. In addition, our study showed that the health risk caused by waste incineration emissions is sensitive to assumptions about the typical diet of the resident population, and the geographical origins of food production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic Aspects of Leaching Zinc from Waste Galvanizing Zinc by Using Hydrochloric Acid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sminčáková, Emília; Trpčevská, Jarmila; Pirošková, Jana

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the results of acid leaching of flux skimmings coming from two plants are presented. Sample A contained two phases, Zn(OH)Cl and NH4Cl. In sample B, the presence of three phases, Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O, (NH4)2(ZnCl4) and ZnCl2(NH3)2, was proved. The aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and distilled water was used as the leaching medium. The effects of the leaching time, temperature and concentration of the leaching medium on the zinc extraction were investigated. The apparent activation energy, E a = 4.61 kJ mol-1, and apparent reaction order n = 0.18 for sample A, and the values E a = 6.28 kJ mol-1 and n = 0.33 for sample B were experimentally determined. Zinc leaching in acid medium is a diffusion-controlled process.

  10. Optimized simulation of vortex jet mill in waste rubber grinding technology by LNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuemei

    2015-07-01

    Frozen rubber powder has excellent qualities and application value, and it can be achieved from waste rubber after being crushed at low temperature used liquefied natural gas (LNG) as cryogen. Vortex jet mill was the key equipment to further crush the rubber particles which the pressure-air was jet into in the basic LNG technological process. After confirming the structure and size of the jet nozzle, the Height (H) between the nozzle and the bottom of the mill, the incident angle α and the initial size of the rubber particles were changed then the continuous phase and the track of single particle were optimized in order to gain more excellent crushing effect. The results showed: the jetting gas were spiral rising in the mill and the speed of it was reduced, so the particle was graded by the gas. The impact and collision could reduce the particle diameter and crush them but the result was influenced by the initial size of the particle. The size of the original rubber particles must not be more than 110μm. The simulation was helpful and leading for the experiment.

  11. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  12. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O' Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-06-15

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

  13. Simulation of the plume emitted by a municipal waste incinerator located in the Madeira island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, M.; Ribeiro, C.; Pereira, M.; Borrego, C. [Campus Univ., AVEIRO (Portugal). IDAD - Inst. of Environment and Development

    2004-07-01

    The study of meteorological circulations in small islands has been quite limited with the majority of the research published concerning the analysis of the eolic potential for energy production. Other researchers focused on the description of the dispersion of gases emitted by volcanic activity. In this paper, a mesoscale meteorological and dispersion model was applied to simulate the behaviour of the plume of a municipal waste incinerator (MSW) that was constructed in the southern slope of the Madeira island at an altitude of 1380 m. Madeira is a Portuguese island located in the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 32 40'N and 16 52'W with a clear east-west development. The island is relatively small (60 x 20 km{sup 2}) but is characterized by very complex orography with maximum peaks reaching 1800 m. The fact that the orography has the same east-west development creates a very strong distinction between the northern and the southern slopes. The northern slope is strongly exposed to the prevalent synoptic flows and the southern slope is much warmer, quiet and where the majority of the population lives. The climate is very mild with small thermal amplitudes and maximum temperatures between 18 to 28 C. Sea temperature during summer rises to 22-23 C. (orig.)

  14. Corrosion protection performance of corrosion inhibitors and epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in a simulated concrete pore water solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We used a simulated concrete pore water solution to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of concrete corrosion-inhibiting admixtures and epoxy-coated reinforcing bars (ECR). We evaluated three commercial corrosion inhibitors, ECR from three ...

  15. Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of Cu(II) and Cr(III) removal from aqueous solutions using rose waste biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iftikhar, Abdur Rauf [Industrial Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040 (Pakistan); Bhatti, Haq Nawaz [Industrial Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040 (Pakistan)], E-mail: hnbhatti2005@yahoo.com; Hanif, Muhammad Asif [Industrial Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040 (Pakistan); Rose Laboratory, Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040 (Pakistan); Nadeem, Razyia [Industrial Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040 (Pakistan)

    2009-01-30

    Distillation waste of rose petals was used to remove Cu(II) and Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. The results demonstrated the dependency of metal sorption on pH, sorbent dose, sorbent size, initial bulk concentration, time and temperature. A dosage of 1 g/L of rose waste biomass was found to be effective for maximum uptake of Cu(II) and Cr(III). Optimum sorption temperature and pH for Cu(II) and Cr(III) were 303 {+-} 1 K and 5, respectively. The Freundlich regression model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model were resulted in high correlation coefficients and described well the sorption of Cu(II) and Cr(III) on rose waste biomass. At equilibrium q{sub max} (mg/g) of Cu(II) and Cr(III) was 55.79 and 67.34, respectively. The free energy change ({delta}G{sup o}) for Cu(II) and Cr(III) sorption process was found to be -0.829 kJ/mol and -1.85 kJ/mol, respectively, which indicates the spontaneous nature of sorption process. Other thermodynamic parameters such as entropy change ({delta}S{sup o}), enthalpy ({delta}H{sup o})and activation energy ({delta}E) were found to be 0.604 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, -186.95 kJ/mol and 68.53 kJ/mol, respectively for Cu(II) and 0.397 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, -119.79 kJ/mol and 114.45 kJ/mol, respectively for Cr(III). The main novelty of this work was the determination of shortest possible sorption time for Cu(II) and Cr(III) in comparison to earlier studies. Almost over 98% of Cu(II) and Cr(III) were removed in only first 20 min at an initial concentration of 100 mg/L.

  16. Simulation of the organic-waste processing in plasma with allowance for kinetics of thermochemical transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerle, V. E.; Ustimenko, A. B.

    2017-07-01

    Kinetic calculations of the plasma processing/utilization process of organic waste in air and steam ambient were carried out. It is shown that, during the time of waste residence in the plasma reactor, 0.7 and 1.2 s, at the exit from the reactor there forms a high-calorific fuel gas with a combustion heat of 3540 and 5070 kcal/kg, respectively. In this process, 1 kg of waste yields 1.16 kg of fuel gas at air gasification of waste and 0.87 kg of pure synthesis gas at steam gasification. The energy efficiency of the waste gasification process, defined by the ratio between the calorific value of the resultant fuel gas and the initial calorific value of the waste amounts to 91 % in air plasma and 98 % in steam plasma. A comparison between the results of kinetic and thermodynamic calculations has revealed their good agreement.

  17. PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E

    2005-03-31

    The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).

  18. Heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions using engineered magnetic biochars derived from waste marine macro-algal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun-Bi; Poo, Kyung-Min; Chang, Jae-Soo; Chae, Kyu-Jung

    2018-02-15

    Despite the excellent sorption ability of biochar for heavy metals, it is difficult to separate and reuse after adsorption when applied to wastewater treatment process. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed an engineered magnetic biochar by pyrolyzing waste marine macro-algae as a feedstock, and we doped iron oxide particles (e.g., magnetite, maghemite) to impart magnetism. The physicochemical characteristics and adsorption properties of the biochar were evaluated. When compared to conventional pinewood sawdust biochar, the waste marine algae-based magnetic biochar exhibited a greater potential to remove heavy metals despite having a lower surface area (0.97m(2)/g for kelp magnetic biochar and 63.33m(2)/g for hijikia magnetic biochar). Although magnetic biochar could be effectively separated from the solution, however, the magnetization of the biochar partially reduced its heavy metal adsorption efficiency due to the biochar's surface pores becoming plugged with iron oxide particles. Therefore, it is vital to determine the optimum amount of iron doping that maximizes the biochar's separation without sacrificing its heavy metal adsorption efficiency. The optimum concentration of the iron loading solution for the magnetic biochar was determined to be 0.025-0.05mol/L. The magnetic biochar's heavy metal adsorption capability is considerably higher than that of other types of biochar reported previously. Further, it demonstrated a high selectivity for copper, showing two-fold greater removal (69.37mg/g for kelp magnetic biochar and 63.52mg/g for hijikia magnetic biochar) than zinc and cadmium. This high heavy metal removal performance can likely be attributed to the abundant presence of various oxygen-containing functional groups (COOH and OH) on the magnetic biochar, which serve as potential adsorption sites for heavy metals. The unique features of its high heavy metal removal performance and easy separation suggest that the magnetic algae biochar can potentially

  19. Potential Malaysia agricultural waste materials for the biosorption of cadmium(II) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foo, L.P.Y.; Tee, C.Z.; Raimy, N.R.; Hassell, D.G.; Lee, L.Y. [University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-15

    Biosorption of cadmium(II) ions (Cd{sup 2+}) onto Ananas comosus (AC) peel, Parkia speciosa (PS) pods and Psidium guajava (PG) peel were investigated in this study. Batch sorption experiments were performed by investigating the effect of initial pH. It was found that Cd{sup 2+} uptake was highly dependent on the initial pH and Cd{sup 2+} removal efficiency was highest for PG peel, followed by AC peel and PS pods. Biosorption experiments were carried out using different initial Cd{sup 2+} concentration and the experimental data obtained was fitted to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data was found to best fit the Langmuir isotherm, and adsorption capacities of 18.21 mg/g (AC peel), 25.64 mg/g (PS pods) and 39.68 mg/g (PG peel) were obtained. Comparison with published adsorption capacities for other low-cost biosorbents indicates that PS pods and PG peel have potential as low-cost biosorbent materials for the removal of Cd{sup 2+} from aqueous solution. (orig.)

  20. Relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution under pressure: Combining molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrini, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Hinsen, K. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calligari, P. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bellissent-Funel, M.-C. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kneller, G.R. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2008-04-18

    This paper presents a study of the influence of non-denaturing hydrostatic pressure on the relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution, which combines molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. We compare results obtained at ambient pressure and at 3 kbar. Experiments have been performed at pD 4.6 and at a protein concentration of 60 mg/ml. For both pressures we checked the monodispersity of the protein solution by small angle neutron scattering. To interpret the simulation results and the experimental data, we adopt the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model for the internal relaxation dynamics of the protein. On the experimental side, global protein motions are accounted for by the model of free translational diffusion, neglecting the much slower rotational diffusion. We find that the protein dynamics in the observed time window from about 1 to 100 ps is slowed down under pressure, while its fractal characteristics is preserved, and that the amplitudes of the motions are reduced by about 20%. The slowing down of the relaxation is reduced with increasing q-values, where more localized motions are seen.

  1. Coarse-grained simulations of poly(propylene imine) dendrimers in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeijers, A. F.; Markvoort, A. J.; Pieterse, K.; Hilbers, P. A. J.

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers in concentrated solutions has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations containing up to a thousand PPI dendrimers of generation 4 or 5 in explicit water. To deal with large system sizes and time scales required to study the solutions over a wide range of dendrimer concentrations, a previously published coarse-grained model was applied. Simulation results on the radius of gyration, structure factor, intermolecular spacing, dendrimer interpenetration, and water penetration are compared with available experimental data, providing a clear concentration dependent molecular picture of PPI dendrimers. It is shown that with increasing concentration the dendrimer volume diminishes accompanied by a reduction of internalized water, ultimately resulting in solvent filled cavities between stacked dendrimers. Concurrently dendrimer interpenetration increases only slightly, leaving each dendrimer a separate entity also at high concentrations. Moreover, we compare apparent structure factors, as calculated in experimental studies relying on the decoupling approximation and the constant atomic form factor assumption, with directly computed structure factors. We demonstrate that these already diverge at rather low concentrations, not because of small changes in form factor, but rather because the decoupling approximation fails as monomer positions of separate dendrimers become correlated at concentrations well below the overlap concentration.

  2. Pareto Optimal Solutions for Network Defense Strategy Selection Simulator in Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Pareto optimization in Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning (MORL leads to better learning results for network defense games. This is particularly useful for network security agents, who must often balance several goals when choosing what action to take in defense of a network. If the defender knows his preferred reward distribution, the advantages of Pareto optimization can be retained by using a scalarization algorithm prior to the implementation of the MORL. In this paper, we simulate a network defense scenario by creating a multi-objective zero-sum game and using Pareto optimization and MORL to determine optimal solutions and compare those solutions to different scalarization approaches. We build a Pareto Defense Strategy Selection Simulator (PDSSS system for assisting network administrators on decision-making, specifically, on defense strategy selection, and the experiment results show that the Satisficing Trade-Off Method (STOM scalarization approach performs better than linear scalarization or GUESS method. The results of this paper can aid network security agents attempting to find an optimal defense policy for network security games.

  3. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hong, E-mail: luohong@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Su, Huaizhi [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098,China (China); Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang [Institute of Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083,China (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  4. Thermodynamics of Associated Electrolytes in Water: Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Sulfate Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvail, Magali; Villard, Arnaud; Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Dufrêche, Jean-François

    2015-08-27

    A polarizable force field for the sulfate anion SO4(2–) has been developed and extended from nonpolarizable force fields in order to reproduce its structural and thermodynamics properties in aqueous solution. Two force fields with different atomic partial charges on S and O have been tested and used with molecular dynamics with explicit polarization. The results obtained with our developed force field are in good agreement with the experimental hydration properties of the sulfate anion. In addition to molecular dynamics simulations of the sulfate anion in aqueous solution, potentials of mean force of sulfate electrolytes have been calculated via umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations, i.e., MgSO4, EuSO4(+), and UO2SO4. These potentials allow for calculating pair association constants directly comparable to the experimental ones. In the case of monoatomic cations such as Mg(2+) and Eu(3+), the association constants calculated are in very good agreement with the experimental values, i.e., pKcalc = 2.21 (vs 2.21 experimentally) and 3.86 (vs 3.56–3.78 experimentally) for MgSO4 and EuSO4(+), respectively. In the case of purely molecular electrolyte (UO2SO4), the association constant calculated (pKcalc = 1.58–2.07) is in agreement with the range of values available in the literature (pKexp = 1.17–3.14).

  5. Simulating Retention in Gas-Liquid Chromatography: Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WICK,COLLIN D.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; SIEPMANN, J. ILJA; SCHURE,MARK R.

    2000-07-12

    Accurate predictions of retention times, retention indices, and partition constants are a long sought-after goal for theoretical studies in chromatography. Although advances in computational chemistry have improved the understanding of molecular interactions, little attention has been focused on chromatography, let alone calculations of retention properties. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal Gibbs ensemble were used to investigate the partitioning of benzene, toluene, and the three xylene isomers between a squalane liquid phase and a helium vapor phase. The united-atom representation of the TraPPE (Transferable Potentials for Phase Equilibria) force field was used for all solutes and squalane. The Gibbs free energies of transfer and Kovats retention indices of the solutes were calculated directly from the partition constants (which were averaged over several independent simulations). While the calculated Kovats indices of benzene and toluene at T = 403 K are significantly higher than their experimental counterparts, much better agreement is found for the xylene isomers at T = 365 K.

  6. Effect of different extracting solutions on the electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated wood waste Part I. - Behaviour of Cu and Cr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, E.; Ribeiro, A. B.; Mateus, E.

    2004-01-01

    Removal of Cu and Cr from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste under batch electrodialytic conditions was studied. The effect of different types of extracting solutions, such as deionised water or aqueous solutions of NaCl, formic acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA, on the magnitude...... for solubilising (re-mobilisation) of Cu but were less efficient for Cr removal (less than 20% removal). Overall, the results obtained show the important role of the proper selection of the type and composition of the extracting solution for the success of subsequent electrodialytic removal of Cu and Cr from CCA...

  7. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Swapan, E-mail: swapan2009sajal@gmail.com; Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr., E-mail: bidyut53@yahoo.co.in

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  8. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Linares, Universidad de Jaén, 23700 Linares, Jaén (Spain); Adroher-Benítez, Irene [Grupo de Física de Fluidos y Biocoloides, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated.

  9. The use of the virtual reality Helmet Samsung gear VR as interaction interface of a radioactive waste repository simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Julio A. dos; Mól, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. Do E., E-mail: julio_andrade11@hotmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive waste is all material resulting from human activity that contains elements that emit radiation that can generate risks to health and the environment. In this sense, they are very toxic also for those who perform the storage of radioactive waste in nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the virtual reality (VR) has been destined to the most diverse purposes, like simulations for educational systems, for military purposes as for diverse training. VR can be considered as the junction of three basic principles: immersion, interaction and involvement. Bases on these principles of VR, this work aimed to develop a simulator of a repository of nuclear tailings, for mobile computing, whose interaction interface will be through the Samsung Gear VR helmet. The simulator of the nuclear waste repository was developed in the unity 3D tool and the elements that make up the scenario in the 3D MAX program. In this work we tried to put virtual reality under scrutiny in conjunction with Gear VR, to help in the sensation of immersion, as well as, the possibility of interaction with joysticks. The purpose was to provide greater insight into the operating environment. (author)

  10. E-waste: a problem or an opportunity? Review of issues, challenges and solutions in Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herat, Sunil; Agamuthu, P

    2012-11-01

    Safe management of electronic and electrical waste (e-waste/WEEE) is becoming a major problem for many countries around the world. In particular, developing countries face a number of issues with the generation, transboundary movement and management of e-waste. It is estimated that the world generates around 20-50 million tonnes of e-waste annually, most of it from Asian countries. Improper handling of e-waste can cause harm to the environment and human health because of its toxic components. Several countries around the world are now struggling to deal with this emerging threat. Although the current emphasis is on end-of-life management of e-waste activities, such as reuse, servicing, remanufacturing, recycling and disposal, upstream reduction of e-waste generation through green design and cleaner production is gaining much attention. Environmentally sound management (ESM) of e-waste in developing countries is absent or very limited. Transboundary movement of e-waste is a major issue throughout the region. Dealing with the informal recycling sector is a complex social and environmental issue. There are significant numbers of such challenges faced by these countries in achieving ESM of e-waste. This article aims to present a review of challenges and issues faced by Asian countries in managing their e-waste in a sustainable way.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic hexacyanoferrate (II) polymeric nanocomposite for separation of cesium from radioactive waste solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheha, Reda R

    2012-12-15

    Nanocrystalline potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate loaded on nanoscale magnetite substrate was successfully synthesized for significantly enhanced removal of cesium from low-level radioactive wastes. A description was given for preparation and properties of these precursors. The physicochemical properties of these nanocomposites were determined using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Data clarified that supporting potassium zinc hexacyanoferrates on iron ferrite nanoparticles increased their thermal stability. Further, Fourier transform infrared spectra confirmed that the nanocomposites were well coordinated and incorporated in the polymer matrix. The average particle sizes, of these nanoparticles, determined by SEM had a good agreement with XRD results. Based on characterization data, the prepared zinc hexacyanoferrates were proposed to have a zeolitic rhombohedral structure with cavities can host alkali metal ions and water molecules. The magnetic analysis showed a super-paramagnetic behavior. Batch technique was applied to evaluate the influences of initial pH value, contact time, and competing cations on the efficiency of cesium removal. The sorption process was fast initially, and maximum separation was attained within 2h of contact. Cesium exchange was independent from pH value and deviate from ideal exchange phenomena. In neutral solutions, Cs(+) was retained through exchange with K(+); however, in acidic solution, phase transformation was proposed. Sorption capacity of these materials attained values amounted 1965 mg g(-1). The synthesized nanocomposites exhibited different affinities toward Cs(I), Co(II), and Eu(III) elements and showed a good ability to separate them from each other. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution-limited time stepping method and numerical simulation of single-element rocket engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Chenzhou

    The focus of the research is to gain a better understanding of the mixing and combustion of propellants in a confined single element rocket engine combustor. The approach taken is to use the unsteady computational simulations of both liquid and gaseous oxygen reacting with gaseous hydrogen to study the effects of transient processes, recirculation regions and density variations under supercritical conditions. The physics of combustion involve intimate coupling between fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics and intense energy release and take place over an exceptionally wide range of scales. In the face of these monumental challenges, it remains the engineer's task to find acceptable simulation approach and reliable CFD algorithm for combustion simulations. To provide the computational robustness to allow detailed analyses of such complex problems, we start by investigating a method for enhancing the reliability of implicit computational algorithms and decreasing their sensitivity to initial conditions without adversely impacting their efficiency. Efficient convergence is maintained by specifying a large global CFL number while reliability is improved by limiting the local CFL number such that the solution change in any cell is less than a specified tolerance. The magnitude of the solution change is estimated from the calculated residual in a manner that requires negligible computational time. The method precludes unphysical excursions in Newton-like iterations in highly non-linear regions where Jacobians are changing rapidly as well as non-physical results during the computation. The method is tested against a series of problems to identify its characteristics and to verify the approach. The results reveal a substantial improvement in convergence reliability of implicit CFD applications that enables computations starting from simple initial conditions. The method is applied in the unsteady combustion simulations and allows long time running of the code without user

  13. Adsorption of HMF from water/DMSO solutions onto hydrophobic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ruichang; León, Marta; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), DMSO, and water from binary and ternary mixtures in hydrophobic silicalite-1 and dealuminated Y (DAY) zeolites at ambient conditions was studied by experiments and molecular modeling. HMF and DMSO adsorption isotherms were measured and compared to those calculated using a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and expanded ensemble (GCMC-EE) simulations. A method based on GCMC-EE simulations for dilute solutions combined with the Redlich-Kister (RK) expansion (GCMC-EE-RK) is introduced to calculate the isotherms over a wide range of concentrations. The simulations, using literature force fields, are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In HMF/water binary mixtures, large-pore hydrophobic zeolites are much more effective for HMF adsorption but less selective because large pores allow water adsorption because of H2 O-HMF attraction. In ternary HMF/DMSO/water mixtures, HMF loading decreases with increasing DMSO fraction, rendering the separation of HMF from water/DMSO mixtures by adsorption difficult. The ratio of the energetic interaction in the zeolite to the solvation free energy is a key factor in controlling separation from liquid mixtures. Overall, our findings could have an impact on the separation and catalytic conversion of HMF and the rational design of nanoporous adsorbents for liquid-phase separations in biomass processing. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Application of conventional molecular dynamics simulation in evaluating the stability of apomyoglobin in urea solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Lazim, Raudah

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we had exploited the advancement in computer technology to determine the stability of four apomyoglobin variants namely wild type, E109A, E109G and G65A/G73A by conducting conventional molecular dynamics simulations in explicit urea solution. Variations in RMSD, native contacts and solvent accessible surface area of the apomyoglobin variants during the simulation were calculated to probe the effect of mutation on the overall conformation of the protein. Subsequently, the mechanism leading to the destabilization of the apoMb variants was studied through the calculation of correlation matrix, principal component analyses, hydrogen bond analyses and RMSF. The results obtained here correlate well with the study conducted by Baldwin and Luo which showed improved stability of apomyoglobin with E109A mutation and contrariwise for E109G and G65A/G73A mutation. These positive observations showcase the feasibility of exploiting MD simulation in determining protein stability prior to protein expression.

  15. Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste (LSW) grout formulation and waste form qualification tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate new formulations for preparing a grout waste form with high-sulfate secondary waste simulants and the release of key constituents from these grout monoliths. Specific objectives of the LSW grout formulation and waste form qualification tests described in this report focused on five activities: 1.preparing new formulations for the LSW grout waste form with high-sulfate LSW simulants and solid characterization of the cured LSW grout waste form; 2.conducting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1313 leach test (EPA 2012) on the grout prepared with the new formulations, which solidify sulfate-rich Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) off-gas condensate secondary waste simulant, using deionized water (DIW); 3.conducting the EPA Method 1315 leach tests (EPA 2013) on the grout monoliths made with the new dry blend formulations and three LSW simulants (242-A evaporator condensate, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) leachate, and WTP off-gas condensate) using two leachants, DIW and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water (VZPW); 4.estimating the 99Tc desorption Kd (distribution coefficient) values for 99Tc transport in oxidizing conditions to support the IDF performance assessment (PA); 5.estimating the solubility of 99Tc(IV)-bearing solid phases for 99Tc transport in reducing conditions to support the IDF PA.

  16. Textile dyes removal from aqueous solution using Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste as adsorbent and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Cid, A A; Velázquez-Ugalde, I; Herrera-González, A M; García-Serrano, J

    2013-11-30

    For this research, three different adsorbents, one untreated and two chemically activated, were prepared from Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste. By the construction of adsorption isotherms, its adsorption capabilities and the viability of its use in the removal of textile basic and direct type dyes were determined. It was found that the adsorbent with the most adsorption capacity for basic dyes was the one activated with NaClO, and, for direct dyes, it was the one activated with NaOH. Langmuir and Freundlich equations isotherms were applied for the analysis of the experimental data. It was found that the Freundlich model best described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption capacity was improved when the pH of the dye solution had an acid value. The specific surface area of the adsorbents was calculated by means of methylene blue adsorption at 298 K to stay within a range between 348 and 643 m(2) g(-1). The FTIR spectroscopic characterization technique, the SEM, the point of zero charge, and the elemental analysis show the chemical and physical characteristics of the studied adsorbents, which confirm the adsorption results obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction and Removal of Five Cationic Dyes from Aqueous Solution Using Magnetite Nanoparticle Loaded Platanusorientalis Waste Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Madrakian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on synthesis of a magnetic adsorbent for wastewater treatment purposes. In this regard, platanus orientalis waste leaves were chosen as a cheap material for preparing the magnetic adsorbent by loading magnetite nanoparticles on it. The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. Then, it was used for magnetic solid phase extraction and removal of five cationic dyes including methyl violet (MV, methylene blue (MB, malachite green (MG, crystal violet (CV, and neutral red (NR from aqueous solution as a model application. Different important factors affecting the adsorption process were optimized, and the results showed that under the optimized conditions (pH 10 for CV, MV, MB, and MG; pH 6 for NR; adsorbent dosage, 20 mg; agitation time, 25 min efficient removal of the investigated dyes (adsorption capacities between of 89-133 mg g-1 is achievable using the synthesized adsorbent. Furthermore, the reusability experiments showed that the adsorbent could be reused at least ten cycles without any significant loss in its sorption behavior.

  18. Numerical simulations of waste forms from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel; Numerische Simulationen von Abfallgebinden aus der Wiederaufarbeitung von Kernbrennstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    The usage of fissile material for nuclear fuel causes that alongside radioactive wastes are produced. These waste materials are created during all handling or usage operations within the nuclear fuel cycle. The main source of radiotoxicity is produced during the usage of nuclear fuel within the reactor. Energy is released by neutron induced fission reactions in heavy isotopes. Parts of the created fission products have large radiotoxicities. Due to neutron capture within the nuclear fuel the radiotoxicity is furthermore increased. These waste streams from the nuclear fuel cycle must be stored in a safe way to prevent any contamination of the biosphere and any harm to the civilization or the environment. The waste packages must be treated and conditioned for the final disposal. These created packages are subject to an independent product control to ensure there acceptability for transport, interim and final storage. The independent product control is a significant component of an effective waste management system. The aim of this work is the development of a software system used for the assessment of radioactive waste packages. The software shall permit the auditor to perform scenario analysis to forecast the product properties of a certain waste stream and therefore optimize the needed inspection scope in preparation of a new campaign. The software is designed as a modular library this permits the most flexible use of the software components and a high reusability of written analysis software. The software system is used for coupling of established and well-known simulation programs used for nuclear systems. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations and burn-up calculations are automatically imported and prepared for user interaction. The usage of simulation programs cause different challenges to the computing infrastructure. The scenario analyses need a large number of parameter variations which are bound to the computing time. For this reason additional to the

  19. Quantifying the hydrophobic effect. 1. A computer simulation-molecular-thermodynamic model for the self-assembly of hydrophobic and amphiphilic solutes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Brian C; Goldsipe, Arthur; Beers, Kenneth J; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-02-08

    Surfactant micellization and micellar solubilization in aqueous solution can be modeled using a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theoretical approach; however, the implementation of MT theory requires an accurate identification of the portions of solutes (surfactants and solubilizates) that are hydrated and unhydrated in the micellar state. For simple solutes, such identification is comparatively straightforward using simple rules of thumb or group-contribution methods, but for more complex solutes, the hydration states in the micellar environment are unclear. Recently, a hybrid method was reported by these authors in which hydrated and unhydrated states are identified by atomistic simulation, with the resulting information being used to make MT predictions of micellization and micellar solubilization behavior. Although this hybrid method improves the accuracy of the MT approach for complex solutes with a minimum of computational expense, the limitation remains that individual atoms are modeled as being in only one of two states-head or tail-whereas in reality, there is a continuous spectrum of hydration states between these two limits. In the case of hydrophobic or amphiphilic solutes possessing more complex chemical structures, a new modeling approach is needed to (i) obtain quantitative information about changes in hydration that occur upon aggregate formation, (ii) quantify the hydrophobic driving force for self-assembly, and (iii) make predictions of micellization and micellar solubilization behavior. This article is the first in a series of articles introducing a new computer simulation-molecular thermodynamic (CS-MT) model that accomplishes objectives (i)-(iii) and enables prediction of micellization and micellar solubilization behaviors, which are infeasible to model directly using atomistic simulation. In this article (article 1 of the series), the CS-MT model is introduced and implemented to model simple oil aggregates of various shapes and sizes, and its

  20. Structurally functional changes in the microbiota of nutrient solution with addition of liquid human wastes, used for growing plants in a closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirranen, L. S.; Borodina, E. V.; Markov, A. A.

    The investigations have proved the dependence of microbial community of nutrient solution development upon the specific conditions of a closed human life-support ecological system: the time of using permanent solution, introduction of additives into the nutrient medium and system gas exchange closure. For the first time, liquid human wastes were introduced into the nutrient solution to increase the mass exchange closure. Correlation analysis revealed the direct dependence between the time of liquid native human excretions introduction into the nutrient solution and the development of organisms participating in nitrogen transformation and growth of microflora potentially dangerous for humans and plants. With the help of correlation analysis it has been determined that particularly close connection exists between the duration of introduction of liquid human wastes and bacteria Escherichia coli, denitrificators, ammonificators and urobacteria. The correlation coefficient for these microbial groups was: r = 0,78. The investigations showed that by the end of experiment the microbial community of nutrient solution fulfilled the role of native urine destructor successfully. Thus, introduction of human native excretions (at 70% substitution of nitrate nitrogen with urine nitrogen) into the nutrient solution used for growing wheat monoculture in a closed ecosystem is possible.

  1. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Wallace, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 m in diameter) was found to produce several problems with astronaut s suits and helmets, mechanical seals and equipment, and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent of the lunar module from the lunar surface to rendezvous with the command module, much of the major portions of the contaminating soil and dust began to float, irritating the astronaut s eyes and being inhaled into their lungs. Our goal has been to understand some of the properties of lunar dust that could lead to possible hazards for humans. Due to the lack of an atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. In order to understand the possible toxic effects of the reactive dust, it is necessary to reactivate the dust, as samples returned during the Apollo missions were exposed to the atmosphere of the Earth. We have used grinding and UV exposure to mimic some of the processes occurring on the Moon. The level of activation has been monitored using two methods: fluorescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). These techniques allow the monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in solution. We have found that grinding of lunar dust produces 2-3 times the concentration of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and 10 times that of quartz. Exposure

  2. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  3. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997.

  4. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Xi, Fengming; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO(2)e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kg ce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical simulation on vapor absorption by wavy lithium bromide aqueous solution films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Shoushi; Ma, Xuehu; Chen, Hongxia; Lan, Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Numerical simulation has been made on heat and mass transfer of vapor absorption by wavy lithium bromide aqueous solution films. The velocity fields and interface positions are obtained by VOF model. Solitary waves are generated by periodically disturbed inflow boundary. Based on these, the temperature and concentration fields are obtained with a stationary interface shape. The effect of solitary waves on the heat and mass transfer across the film is investigated. It is shown that due to the mixing of circulation and stretch of large film thickness, the gradient of concentration and absorption rate decrease for solitary wave region. The region of capillary waves shows a significant amount of absorption enhancement. The percentage of absorption for the different regions is quantified.

  6. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonal, Digby D.; Marx, Brian M.; Ahn, Sejin; Ruiz, Julio de; Soundararajan, Balaji; Smith, Morgan; Coulson, Wendy

    2005-06-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO3, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair.

  7. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  8. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-02-06

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  9. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of the electrokinetic flow of an aqueous electrolyte solution in nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Electrokinetic flows of an aqueous NaCl solution in nanochannels with negatively charged surfaces are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The four transport coefficients that characterise the response to weak electric and pressure fields, namely the coefficients for the electrical current in response to the electric field ($M^{jj}$) and the pressure field ($M^{jm}$), and those for the mass flow in response to the same fields ($M^{mj}$ and $M^{mm}$), are obtained in the linear regime using a Green-Kubo approach. Nonequilibrium simulations with explicit external fields are also carried out, and the current and mass flows are directly obtained. The two methods exhibit good agreement even for large external field strengths, and Onsager's reciprocal relation ($M^{jm} = M^{mj}$) is numerically confirmed in both approaches. The influence of the surface charge density on the flow is also considered. The values of the trans- port coefficients are found to be smaller for larger surface charge density, be...

  11. Molecular Properties of Astaxanthin in Water/Ethanol Solutions from Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Samanta, Susruta; Roccatano, Danilo

    2016-09-08

    Astaxanthin (AXT) is a reference model of xanthophyll carotenoids, which is used in medicine and food industry, and has potential applications in nanotechnology. Because of its importance, there is a great interest in understanding its molecular properties and aggregation mechanism in water and mixed solvents. In this paper, we report a novel model of AXT for molecular dynamics simulation. The model is used to estimate different properties of the molecule in pure solutions and in water/ethanol mixtures. The calculated diffusion coefficients of AXT in pure water and ethanol are (3.22 ± 0.01) × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) and (2.7 ± 0.4) × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), respectively. Our simulations also show that the content of water plays a clear effect on the morphology of the AXT aggregation in water/ethanol mixture. In up to 75% (v/v) water concentration, a loosely connected network of dimers and trimers and two-dimensional array structures are observed. At higher water concentrations, AXT molecules form more compact three-dimensional structures that are preferentially solvated by the ethanol molecules. The ethanol preferential binding and the formation of a well connected hydrogen bonding network on these AXT clusters, suggest that such preferential solvation can play an important role in controlling the aggregate structure.

  12. Tank SY-102 waste retrieval assessment: Rheological measurements and pump jet mixing simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.; Recknagle, K.P. [and others

    1996-09-01

    Wastes stored in Hanford Tank 241-SY-102 are planned to be retrieved from that tank and transferred to 200 East Area through the new pipeline Replacement Cross Site Transfer System (RCSTS). Because the planned transfer of this waste will use the RCSTS, the slurry that results from the mobilization and retrieval operations must meet the applicable waste acceptance criteria for this system. This report describes results of the second phase (the detailed assessment) of the SY-102 waste retrieval study, which is a part of the efforts to establish a technical basis for mobilization of the slurry, waste retrieval, and slurry transport. Hanford Tank 241-SY-102 is located in the SY Tank Farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area. It was built in 1977 to serve as a feed tank for 242-S Evaporator/Crystallizer, receiving supernatant liquid from S, SX, T, and U tank farms. Since 1981, the primary sources of waste have been from 200 West Area facilities, e.g., T-Plant decontamination operations, Plutonium Finishing Plant operations, and the 222-S Laboratory. It is the only active-service double-shell tank (DST) in the 200 West Area and is used as the staging tank for cross-site transfers to 200 East Area DSTs. The tank currently stores approximately 470 kL (125 kgal) of sludge wastes from a variety of sources including the Plutonium Finishing Plant, T-Plant, and the 222-S Laboratory. In addition to the sludge, approximately twice this amount (about 930 kL) of dilute, noncomplexed waste forms a supernatant liquid layer above the sludge.

  13. Passivation of duplex stainless steel in solutions simulating chloride-contaminated concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenouti, H.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies published to date on the corrosion behaviour of stainless reinforcing steel are based on austenitic steel. The market presence of corrugated duplex steel is growing, however. The present study compared passivity in 2205 type duplex and 304 type austenitic stainless steel. Polarization tests in chloride-containing Ca(OH2 solutions confirmed the exceptional performance of duplex steels. X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS showed that the passive layer generated on duplex stainless steel in media simulating concrete pore solutions had a higher Cr content than the layer formed on steel in contact with the air. The XPS results also revealed that in duplex steel the form adopted by the passive layer Fe oxides was Fe3O4 in the solutions simulating concrete, rather than Fe2O3, as in duplex steel exposed to air. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS can be used to monitor the transformations taking place in the passive layer and analyze the factors involved.La mayoría de los estudios publicados hasta el momento sobre el comportamiento frente a la corrosión de armaduras de acero inoxidable se basan en aceros austeníticos. Sin embargo, la presencia en el mercado de aceros corrugados dúplex es cada vez más importante. En este trabajo se analiza la pasividad de un acero inoxidable dúplex tipo 2205 en comparación con la de un inoxidable austenítico tipo 304. Los ensayos de polarización en disoluciones de Ca(OH2 con cloruros confirman el excepcional comportamiento de los aceros dúplex. La espectroscopía fotoelectrónica de rayos X (XPS informa de que la capa pasiva generada en aceros inoxidables dúplex en medios que simulan la disolución de los poros del hormigón posee mayor contenido en óxidos de Cr que la formada en aire. También se puede deducir de los resultados de XPS que los óxidos de Fe de la capa pasiva de los aceros dúplex se encuentran en forma de Fe3O4 en las disoluciones que simulan el hormigón en vez de en

  14. Mass transfer simulation of nanofiltration membranes for electrolyte solutions through generalized Maxwell-Stefan approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshyargar, Vahid; Fadaei, Farzad; Ashrafizadeh, Seyed Nezameddin [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed for simulation of ion transport through nanofiltration membranes. The model is based on the Maxwell-Stefan approach and takes into account steric, Donnan, and dielectric effects in the transport of mono and divalent ions. Theoretical ion rejection for multi-electrolyte mixtures was obtained by numerically solving the 'hindered transport' based on the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equation for the flux of ions. A computer simulation has been developed to predict the transport in the range of nanofiltration, a numerical procedure developed linearization and discretization form of the governing equations, and the finite volume method was employed for the numerical solution of equations. The developed numerical method is capable of solving equations for multicomponent systems of n species no matter to what extent the system shows stiffness. The model findings were compared and verified with the experimental data from literature for two systems of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+NaCl and MgCl{sub 2}+NaCl. Comparison showed great agreement for different concentrations. As such, the model is capable of predicting the rejection of different ions at various concentrations. The advantage of such a model is saving costs as a result of minimizing the number of required experiments, while it is closer to a realistic situation since the adsorption of ions has been taken into account. Using this model, the flux of permeates and rejections of multi-component liquid feeds can be calculated as a function of membrane properties. This simulation tool attempts to fill in the gap in methods used for predicting nanofiltration and optimization of the performance of charged nanofilters through generalized Maxwell-Stefan (GMS) approach. The application of the current model may weaken the latter gap, which has arisen due to the complexity of the fundamentals of ion transport processes via this approach, and may further facilitate the industrial

  15. Comparison of simulation and experimental results for a model aqueous tert-butanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, S. D.; Patey, G. N.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the behavior of aqueous tert-butanol (TBA) solutions for a range of temperatures, using the CHARMM generalized force field (CGenFF) to model TBA and the TIP4P/2005 or TIP4P-Ew water model. Simulation results for the density, isothermal compressibility, constant pressure heat capacity, and self-diffusion coefficients are in good accord with experimental measurements. Agreement with the experiment is particularly good at low TBA concentration, where experiments have revealed anomalies in a number of thermodynamic properties. Importantly, the CGenFF model does not exhibit liquid-liquid demixing at temperatures between 290 and 320 K (for systems of 32 000 molecules), in contrast with the situation for several other common TBA models [R. Gupta and G. N. Patey, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034509 (2012)]. However, whereas real water and TBA are miscible at all temperatures where the liquid is stable, we observe some evidence of demixing at 340 K and above. To evaluate the structural properties at low concentrations, we compare with both neutron scattering and recent spectroscopic measurements. This reveals that while the CGenFF model is a definite improvement over other models that have been considered, the TBA molecules still exhibit a tendency to associate at low concentrations that is somewhat stronger than that indicated by experiments. Finally, we discuss the range and decay times of the long-range correlations, providing an indication of the system size and simulation times that are necessary in order to obtain reliable results for certain properties.

  16. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topics / Enhanced safety and operation excellence and decommissioning experience and Waste management solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salnikova, Tatiana [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Schaffrath, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Summary report on the Key Topics ''Enhanced Safety and Operation Excellence'' and ''Decommissioning Experience and Waste Management Solutions'' of the 47{sup th} Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2016) held in Hamburg, 10 to 12 May 2016. Other Sessions of AMNT 2016 have been and will be covered in further issues of atw.

  17. Simulation of blast furnace operation during the substitution of coke and pulverized coal with granulated waste plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Tihomir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using the waste plastic as reducing agent in blast furnace for obtaining pig iron is in focus for the past couple year. The simulation of blast furnace process in BFC software has been performed in order to analyze the coke and coals saving, CO2 emission and determining the economic benefits. Three different batches were made for comparative analysis, depending on the batch composition and input of batch components into the blast furnace: case 1 (C1, case 2 (C2 and case 3 (C3. The base case, C1 contains sinter (bulk material which is needed for obtaining 1 tone of pig iron, quartz which provides slag alkalinity and coke as reducing and energy agent. C2 has the same components as C1, but contains pulverized coal instead one part of coke and C3 contains granulated waste plastic instead coke in an approximately the same amount as pulverized coal. The substitution of coke with pulverized coal and waste plastic is 18.6 % and 25.2 %, respectively. The economic, productivity and ecologic aspects have been analyzed. The consumption of each tone of waste plastic in blast furnace saves 360 $, which is 18 times more than its price, bearing in mind that the market price of coke is 380 $/t % and waste plastic 20 $/t. Regarding the specific productivity, it decreases from 2.13 for C1 to 1.87 for C3. From an environmental aspect there are two main benefits: reduction of CO2 emission and impossibility of dioxin formation. The CO2 emission was 20.18, 19.46 and 17.21 for C1, C2 and C3, respectively.

  18. Development of advanced electrochemical emission spectroscopy for monitoring corrosion in simulated DOE liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    'Objective of this project is to develop and use Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy (EES) and other electrochemical techniques as in situ tools for exploring corrosion mechanisms of iron and carbon steel in highly alkaline solutions and for continuously monitoring corrosion on structural materials in DOE liquid waste storage system. In particular, the author will explore the fundamental aspects of the passive behavior of pure iron since breakdown of passivity leads to localized corrosion. This report summarizes work after 1 year of a 3 year project.'

  19. Electrostatic polarization effects and hydrophobic hydration in ethanol-water solutions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-22

    Nonadditive electrostatic force fields based on the charge equilibration formalism coupled with long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the microscopic structural aspects of hydrophobic hydration in ethanol-water solutions. Employing a combination of polarizable ethanol and water force fields (developed independently), we find that solution properties are satisfactorily reproduced across the ethanol mole fraction range between 0.1 and 0.9. Solution densities are predicted within 3.6% of experimental measurements, while excess mixing enthalpies are overestimated as in earlier studies. The solvation free energy of ethanol in infinite dilution is determined via thermodynamic integration to be 5.70 +/- 0.23 kcal/mol, overestimating the free energetics of solvation relative to experiment (5.01 kcal/mol). Bulk solution dielectric constants and diffusion constants reproduce experimental trends and are in reasonable agreement across the ethanol concentration range studied. Because of explicit accounting of induction effects, ethanol and water exhibit varying molecular dipole moment distributions with concentration. The polarizable ethanol model, possessing higher condensed-phase polarizability relative to the TIP4P-FQ water model (4.54 A(3) versus 1.1 A(3), respectively), displays greater variation upon perturbation by the electric field of water. With regard to hydrophobic hydration, the current force fields indicate positive hydrogen bonding excess for water in the dilute ethanol concentration range, consistent with previous theoretical and experimental studies. Strikingly, we find that there are both positive and negative hydrogen bond excess contributions within the first hydration shell of both the ethanol hydroxyl oxygen and ethylene carbon atoms. The larger positive contributions dominate the overall hydrogen bonding patterns to yield overall net positive excesses. Moreover, we do not find evidence of excess hydrogen bonding vicinal to

  20. Technetium partitioning for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System: anion exchange studies for partitioning technetium from synthetic DSSF and DSS simulants and actual Hanford wastes (101-SY and 103-SY) using Rellex-HPQ resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Norman C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Radzinski, Susan D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ball, Jason R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ashley, Kenneth R. [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Cobb, Steven L [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Cutrell, Brent [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Adams, J Michael [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Johnson, Coy [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Whitener, Glenn D [Macalester College, St Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-15

    This combined annual report fufills the FY95 milestones for the TWRS technetium partitioning programs "Column Ion Exchange Test for Technetium Removal from synthetic DSSF Waste" and "Column Ion Exchange Test for Technetium Removal from Actual DSSF Waste." The report describes batch and column experiments on the sorption of technetium from DSSF-7, DSSF-5, DSS, 101-SY and 103-SY simulants by Reillex-HPQ anion exchange resin and other resins.

  1. Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottom-Waste Streams Formulation and Waste Form Qualification Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A.; Um, Wooyong; Russell, Renee L.

    2017-08-02

    This report describes the results from grout formulation and cementitious waste form qualification testing performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). These results are part of a screening test that investigates three grout formulations proposed for wide-range treatment of different waste stream compositions expected for the Hanford Effluent Management Facility (EMF) evaporator bottom waste. This work supports the technical development need for alternative disposition paths for the EMF evaporator bottom wastes and future direct feed low-activity waste (DFLAW) operations at the Hanford Site. High-priority activities included simulant production, grout formulation, and cementitious waste form qualification testing. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY 2017 and future waste form development efforts. The provided results and data should be used by (1) cementitious waste form scientists to further the understanding of cementitious leach behavior of contaminants of concern (COCs), (2) decision makers interested in off-site waste form disposal, and (3) the U.S. Department of Energy, their Hanford Site contractors and stakeholders as they assess the IDF PA program at the Hanford Site. The results reported help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a cementitious waste form for the EMF evaporator bottom waste, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form risk estimates.

  2. Quantum dynamical simulation of non-adiabatic proton transfers in aqueous solution methodology, molecular models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Billeter, S R

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the methodology of quantum dynamical (QD) simulation of proton transfers in aqueous solutions, its implementation in the simulation program QDGROMOS and its application to protonated water and aqueous solutions of acetic acid. QDGROMOS is based on the GROMOS96 molecular dynamics (MD) program package. Many of the solutions to partial problems such as the representation of the quantum state, the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, the forces from the quantum subsystem, the time-ordering of the propagations and the correlations between the subsystems, are complementary. In chapter 1, various numerical propagation algorithms for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation under the influence of a constant Hamilton operator are compared against each other, mainly in one dimension. A Chebysheff series expansion and the expansion in terms of eigenstates of the Hamilton operator were found to be most stable. Chapter 2 describes the theory, the methods and the algorithms of Q...

  3. Chemical interaction between a simulated nuclear waste glass and different backfill materials under a thermal gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, C. [CEA-Saclay-DCC/DESD/SESD/Laboratory for Migration and Solid Geochemistry, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Toulhoat, P.; Goffe, B. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratory for Geology, URA-1316 du CNRS 24, rue Lhomand, 75231 Paris (France)

    1998-08-01

    The initial stage of a HLW disposal will be dominated by a strong thermal gradient that will exist between the hot canister and the 'cold' geological medium. In the case of hot wastes (MOX, direct disposal of used spent fuel, short interim storage), nuclear glass can begin to dissolve in groundwater and to interact with other materials in the presence of a thermal gradient. Moreover, it has already been demonstrated that thermal gradients strongly influence the hydrothermal corrosion of nuclear glass by creating large elemental segregation and subsequent mass transport processes. The aim of this article is to experimentally test whether the presence of a simulated engineered clay barrier affects these mass transport processes. In parallel, experiments were performed with different clays of various Si/Al ratios (smectite, kaolinite and allophane) as Si and Al are often invoked as possible rate limiting species for nuclear glass aging. A simulated nuclear glass was disposed between two layers of various clays, enclosed in a sealed gold tube filled with deionised water. The gold tube was put in a cold-seal vessel and submitted to a thermal field under high temperatures (300-200C, 140 bars, 100 days). High temperatures were used in order to enhance transformation kinetics as mass transport is supposed to be independent of the temperature. At the end of the experiments, the newly formed phases along the tube as well as the mineralogical transformations of the reactants were studied by integrated in-situ analyses (SEM, TEM, EDS and XRD). Precise descriptions of the mineralogical transformations are presented. The major result is a systematic re-crystallization of the initial clay under the influence of the leached elements from the glass (in particular Si and alkalies). The nuclear glass aging is strongly affected by the composition of the surrounding clay and consumes Al from the clay. The aluminous-rich medium seems to limit the glass corrosion and the

  4. Comparative potential of black tea leaves waste to granular activated carbon in adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ifelebuegu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption properties and mechanics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds; 17 β-estradiol, 17 α – ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A on locally available black tea leaves waste and granular activated carbon were investigated. The results obtained indicated that the kinetics of adsorption were pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature dependent with equilibrium being reached at 20 to 40 minutes for tea leaves waste and 40 to 60 minutes for granular activated compound. Maximum adsorption capacities of 3.46, 2.44 and 18.35 mg/g were achieved for tea leaves waste compared to granular activated compound capacities of 4.01, 2.97 and 16.26 mg/g for 17 β- estradiol, 17 α-ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A respectively. Tea leaves waste adsorption followed pseudo-first order kinetics while granular activated compound fitted better to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The experimental isotherm data for both tea leaves waste and granular activated compound showed a good fit to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models with the Langmuir model showing the best fit. The thermodynamic and kinetic data for the adsorption indicated that the adsorption process for tea leaves waste was predominantly by physical adsorption while the granular activated compound adsorption was more chemical in nature. The results have demonstrated the potential of waste tea leaves for the adsorptive removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from water.

  5. Media-fill simulation tests in manual and robotic aseptic preparation of injection solutions in syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Irene; Federici, Matteo; Kaiser, Vanessa; Thiesen, Judith

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contamination rate of media-fill products either prepared automated with a robotic system (APOTECAchemo™) or prepared manually at cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom environment and by experienced operators. Media fills were completed by microbiological environmental control in the critical zones and used to validate the cleaning and disinfection procedures of the robotic system. The aseptic preparation of patient individual ready-to-use injection solutions was simulated by using double concentrated tryptic soy broth as growth medium, water for injection and plastic syringes as primary packaging materials. Media fills were either prepared automated (500 units) in the robot or manually (500 units) in cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom over a period of 18 working days. The test solutions were incubated at room temperature (22℃) over 4 weeks. Products were visually inspected for turbidity after a 2-week and 4-week period. Following incubation, growth promotion tests were performed with Staphylococcus epidermidis. During the media-fill procedures, passive air monitoring was performed with settle plates and surface monitoring with contact plates on predefined locations as well as fingerprints. The plates got incubated for 5-7 days at room temperature, followed by 2-3 days at 30-35℃ and the colony forming units (cfu) counted after both periods. The robot was cleaned and disinfected according to the established standard operating procedure on two working days prior to the media-fill session, while on six other working days only six critical components were sanitized at the end of the media-fill sessions. Every day UV irradiation was operated for 4 h after finishing work. None of the 1000 media-fill products prepared in the two different settings showed turbidity after the incubation period thereby indicating no contamination with microorganisms. All products remained uniform, clear, and light

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of a simulated organic fraction of municipal solid wastes and fats of animal and vegetable origin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Anna

    2005-01-01

    The potential of mesophilic anaerobic digestion for the treatment of fats of different origin through co-digestion with the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) has been evaluated. Co-digestion process was conducted in a pilot plant working in semi-continuous regime in the mesophilic range (37◦ C) and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 17 days. During the start-up period the digester was fed with increasing quantities of a simulated OFMSW (diluted dry pet food). When the des...

  7. Simulation of blast furnace operation during the substitution of coke and pulverized coal with granulated waste plastic

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačević Tihomir M.; Kamberović Željko J.; Korać Marija S.; Anđić Zoran M.; Vasić Aleksandar V.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of using the waste plastic as reducing agent in blast furnace for obtaining pig iron is in focus for the past couple year. The simulation of blast furnace process in BFC software has been performed in order to analyze the coke and coals saving, CO2 emission and determining the economic benefits. Three different batches were made for comparative analysis, depending on the batch composition and input of batch components into the blast furnace: case 1 (C1), case 2 (C2) and case 3...

  8. Reactive solute transport in streams. 2. Simulation of a pH modification experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We present an application of an equilibrium-based solute transport model to a pH-modification experiment conducted on the Snake River, an acidic, metal-rich stream located in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. During the experiment, instream pH decreased from 4.2 to 3.2, causing a marked increase in dissolved iron concentrations. Model application requires specification of several parameters that are estimated using tracer techniques, mass balance calculations, and geochemical data. Two basic questions are addressed through model application: (1) What are the processes responsible for the observed increase in dissolved iron concentrations? (2) Can the identified processes be represented within the equilibrium-based transport model? Simulation results indicate that the increase in iron was due to the dissolution of hydrous iron oxides and the photoreduction of ferric iron. Dissolution from the streambed is represented by considering a trace compartment consisting of freshly precipitated hydrous iron oxide and an abundant compartment consisting of aged precipitates that are less soluble. Spatial variability in the solubility of hydrous iron oxide is attributed to heterogeneity in the streambed sediments, temperature effects, and/or variability in the effects of photoreduction. Solubility products estimated via simulation fall within a narrow range (pK(sp) from 40.2 to 40.8) relative to the 6 order of magnitude variation reported for laboratory experiments (pK(sp) from 37.3 to 43.3). Results also support the use of an equilibrium-based transport model as the predominate features of the iron and p H profiles are reproduced. The model provides a valuable tool for quantifying the nature and extent of pH- dependent processes within the context of hydrologic transport.

  9. Electron beam simulation from gun to collector: Towards a complete solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertzig, R., E-mail: robert.mertzig@cern.ch; Shornikov, A., E-mail: robert.mertzig@cern.ch; Wenander, F. [CERN, Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Beebe, E.; Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An electron-beam simulation technique for high-resolution complete EBIS/T modelling is presented. The technique was benchmarked on the high compression HEC{sup 2} test-stand with an electron beam current, current density and energy of 10 A, 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and 49.2 keV, and on the immersed electron beam at REXEBIS for electron beam characteristics of 0.4 A, 200 A/cm{sup 2} and 4.5 keV. In both Brillouin-like and immersed beams the electron-beam radius varies from several millimeters at the gun, through some hundreds of micrometers in the ionization region to a few centimeters at the collector over a total length of several meters. We report on our approach for finding optimal meshing parameters, based on the local beam properties such as magnetic field-strength, electron energy and beam radius. This approach combined with dividing the problem domain into sub-domains, and subsequent splicing of the local solutions allowed us to simulate the beam propagation in EBISes from the gun to the collector using a conventional PC in about 24–36 h. Brillouin-like electron beams propagated through the complete EBIS were used to analyze the beam behavior within the collector region. We checked whether elastically reflected paraxial electrons from a Brillouin-like beam will escape from the collector region and add to the loss current. We have also studied the power deposition profiles as function of applied potentials using two electrode geometries for a Brillouin-like beam including the effects of backscattered electrons.

  10. Solvent controlled ion association in structured copolymers: Molecular dynamics simulations in dilute solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Dipak; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-09-01

    Tailoring the nature of individual segments within ion containing block co-polymers is one critical design tool to achieve desired properties. The local structure including the size and distribution of the ionic blocks, as well as the long range correlations, are crucial for their transport ability. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations on the effects of varying the concentrations of the ionizable groups on the conformations of pentablock ionomer that consist of a center block of ionic sulfonated styrene tethered to polyethylene and terminated by a bulky substituted styrene in dilute solutions. Sulfonation fractions f (0 ≤ f ≤ 0.55), spanning the range from ionomer to polyelectrolytes, were studied. Results for the equilibrium conformation of the chains in water and a 1:1 mixture of cyclohexane and heptane are compared to that in implicit poor solvents with dielectric constants ɛ = 1.0 and 77.73. In water, the pentablock collapses with the sulfonated groups on the outer surface. As f increases, the ionic, center block increasingly segregates from the hydrophobic regions. In the 1:1 mixture of cyclohexane and heptane, the flexible blocks swell, while the center ionic block collapses for f > 0. For f = 0, all blocks swell. In both implicit poor solvents, the pentablock collapses into a nearly spherical shape for all f. The sodium counterions disperse widely throughout the simulation cell for both water and ɛ = 77.73, whereas for ɛ = 1.0 and mixture of cyclohexane and heptane, the counterions largely condense onto the collapsed pentablock.

  11. Simulation analysis and ternary diagram of municipal solid waste pyrolysis and gasification based on the equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Na; Zhang, Awen; Zhang, Qiang; He, Guansong; Cui, Wenqian; Chen, Guanyi; Song, Chengcai

    2017-07-01

    A self-sustained municipal solid waste (MSW) pyrolysis-gasification process with self-produced syngas as heat source was proposed and an equilibrium model was established to predict the syngas reuse rate considering variable MSW components. Simulation results indicated that for constant moisture (ash) content, with the increase of ash (moisture) content, syngas reuse rate gradually increased, and reached the maximum 100% when ash (moisture) content was 73.9% (60.4%). Novel ternary diagrams with moisture, ash and combustible as axes were proposed to predict the adaptability of the self-sustained process and syngas reuse rate for waste. For wastes of given components, its position in the ternary diagram can be determined and the syngas reuse rate can be obtained, which will provide guidance for system design. Assuming that the MSW was composed of 100% combustible content, ternary diagram shows that there was a minimum limiting value of 43.8% for the syngas reuse rate in the process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Developing a holistic strategy for integrated waste management within municipal planning: challenges, policies, solutions and perspectives for Hellenic municipalities in the zero-waste, low-cost direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotos, G; Karagiannidis, A; Zampetoglou, S; Malamakis, A; Antonopoulos, I-S; Kontogianni, S; Tchobanoglous, G

    2009-05-01

    The present position paper addresses contemporary waste management options, weaknesses and opportunities faced by Hellenic local authorities. It focuses on state-of-the-art, tested as well as innovative, environmental management tools on a municipal scale and identifies a range of different collaboration schemes between local authorities and related service providers. Currently, a policy implementation gap is still experienced among Hellenic local authorities; it appears that administration at the local level is inadequate to manage and implement many of the general policies proposed; identify, collect, monitor and assess relevant data; and safeguard efficient and effective implementation of MSWM practices in the framework of integrated environmental management as well. This shortfall is partly due to the decentralisation of waste management issues to local authorities without a parallel substantial budgetary and capacity support, thus resulting in local activity remaining often disoriented and isolated from national strategies, therefore yielding significant planning and implementation problems and delays against pressing issues at hand as well as loss or poor use of available funds. This paper develops a systemic approach for MSWM at both the household and the non-household level, summarizes state-of-the-art available tools and compiles a set of guidelines for developing waste management master plans at the municipal level. It aims to provide a framework in the MSWM field for municipalities in Greece as well as other countries facing similar problems under often comparable socioeconomic settings.

  13. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow and solute dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-07-31

    In the present work fluid flow and solute transport through porous media are described by solving the governing equations at the pore scale with finite-volume discretization. Instead of solving the simplified Stokes equation (very often employed in this context) the full Navier-Stokes equation is used here. The realistic three-dimensional porous medium is created in this work by packing together, with standard ballistic physics, irregular and polydisperse objects. Emphasis is placed on numerical issues related to mesh generation and spatial discretization, which play an important role in determining the final accuracy of the finite-volume scheme and are often overlooked. The simulations performed are then analyzed in terms of velocity distributions and dispersion rates in a wider range of operating conditions, when compared with other works carried out by solving the Stokes equation. Results show that dispersion within the analyzed porous medium is adequately described by classical power laws obtained by analytic homogenization. Eventually the validity of Fickian diffusion to treat dispersion in porous media is also assessed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  14. Mathematical simulation of lithium bromide solution laminar falling film evaporation in vertical tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengming; Wang, Yang; Hu, Huili; Yang, Ying

    2010-06-01

    For utilization of the residual heat of flue gas to drive the absorption chillers, a lithium-bromide falling film in vertical tube type generator is presented. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the heat and mass coupled problem of laminar falling film evaporation in vertical tube. In the model, the factor of mass transfer was taken into account in heat transfer performance calculation. The temperature and concentration fields were calculated. Some tests were conducted for the factors such as Re number, heating flux, the inlet concentration and operating pressure which can affect the heat and mass transfer performance in laminar falling film evaporation. The heat transfer performance is enhanced with the increasing of heat flux. An increasing inlet concentration can weaken the heat transfer performance. The operating pressure hardly affects on heat and mass transfer. The bigger inlet Re number means weaker heat transfer effects and stronger mass transfer. The mass transfer obviously restrains the heat transfer in the falling film solution. The relation between dimensionless heat transfer coefficient and the inlet Re number is obtained.

  15. An Integrated Simulation Model for Dynamically Exploring the Optimal Solution to Mitigating Water Scarcity and Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An integrated optimization simulation model has been developed based on an input-output approach to mitigate water pollution and water scarcity through embedding environmental economic policies and applicable technologies into a complex environ-economic system to obtain an optimal set of policies and technologies that promotes the maximization of the regional economy under the constraints of water pollutant discharge and water availability. An empirical study is undertaken with the Source Region of Liao River as the target area to verify the performance of the model. The relationships between the water environment and socio-economic systems are presented by clarifying the trends in economic development, water pollutant discharge and water supply and demand during a time horizon from 2011 to 2020. The endogenously-formed optimal set of policies and industrial restructuring simultaneously facilitate the reduction of water pollutant discharge and water consumption and increase the water supply. The extent of the mitigation of water pollution and water scarcity via applied policies and technologies promoted by the subsidies provided by the government are specified, and the mechanism of the policy application and subsidization distribution is explained. This model has applicability for other regions in terms of giving an optimal solution via comprehensive assessment of all of the proposed sustainability-related policies with sufficient data accessibility to achieve regional sustainable development.

  16. Chemical library screening using a SPR-based inhibition in solution assay: simulations and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choulier, Laurence; Nominé, Yves; Zeder-Lutz, Gabrielle; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Didier, Bruno; Jung, Marie-Louise; Altschuh, Danièle

    2013-09-17

    We have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based inhibition in solution assay (ISA) to search for inhibitors of the medium affinity (KD = 0.8 μM) interaction between an E6-derived peptide (E6peptide) immobilized on the sensor and a PDZ domain (MAGI-1 PDZ1) in the mobile phase. DZ domains are widespread protein-protein interaction modules that recognize the C-terminus of various partners. Simulations indicated that relatively low compound concentrations (10 μM) and limited peptide densities (Rmax Library® (1120 compounds), identified 36 compounds that inhibited the interaction by more than 5%. Concentration-dependent ISA, carried out on a subset of 19 potential inhibitors, indicated that 13 of these indeed affected the interaction between MAGI-1 PDZ1 and the E6peptide. No effect was observed for 84 compounds randomly chosen among noninhibitors. One of the four best inhibitors was a peptide binder, and three were PDZ binders with KD in the 10-50 μM range. We propose that a medium (μM) affinity between the target and surface-bound partner is optimal for SPR-based ISA screening.

  17. Phase separation kinetics in compressible polymer solutions: computer simulation of the early stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virnau, Peter; Müller, Marcus; González MacDowell, Luis; Binder, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for solutions of polymers in supercritical fluids is introduced and applied to the system of hexadecane and carbon dioxide as a representative example. Fitting parameters of the model to the gas-liquid critical point properties of the pure systems, and allowing for a suitably chosen parameter that describes the deviation from the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rule, we model the liquid-gas and fluid-fluid unmixing transitions of this system over a wide range of temperatures and pressures in reasonable agreement with experiment. Interfaces between the polymer-rich phase and the gas can be studied at temperatures both above and below the end point of the triple line where liquid and vapour carbon dioxide and a polymer-rich phase coexist. In the first case interfacial adsorption of fluid carbon dioxide can be demonstrated. Our model can also be used to simulate quenches from the one-phase to the two-phase region. A short animation and a series of snapshots help to visualize the early stages of bubble nucleation and spinodal decomposition. Furthermore we discuss deviations from classical nucleation theory for small nuclei.

  18. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CO, POHC, AND PIC EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements conducted on full-scale hazardous waste incinerators have occasionally shown a relationship between carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and emissions of toxic organic compounds. In this study, four mixtures of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons were diluted in commercial...

  19. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  20. Laboratory simulations of the mixed solvent extraction recovery of dominate polymers in electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Bo; Lv, Xu-Dong; Yang, Wan-Dong; Ni, Hong-Gang

    2017-11-01

    The recovery of four dominant plastics from electronic waste (e-waste) using mixed solvent extraction was studied. The target plastics included polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), and styrene acrylonitrile (SAN). The extraction procedure for multi-polymers at room temperature yielded PC, PS, ABS, and SAN in acceptable recovery rates (64%, 86%, 127%, and 143%, respectively, where recovery rate is defined as the mass ratio of the recovered plastic to the added standard polymer). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to verify the recovered plastics' purity using a similarity analysis. The similarities ranged from 0.98 to 0.99. Another similar process, which was denoted as an alternative method for plastic recovery, was examined as well. Nonetheless, the FTIR results showed degradation may occur over time. Additionally, the recovery cost estimation model of our method was established. The recovery cost estimation indicated that a certain range of proportion of plastics in e-waste, especially with a higher proportion of PC and PS, can achieve a lower cost than virgin polymer product. It also reduced 99.6%, 30.7% and 75.8% of energy consumptions and CO2 emissions during the recovery of PC, PS and ABS, and reduced the amount of plastic waste disposal via landfill or incineration and associated environmental impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterizing the biotransformation of sulfur-containing wastes in simulated landfill reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Sun, Mei; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-07-01

    Landfills that accept municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. may also accept a number of sulfur-containing wastes including residues from coal or MSW combustion, and construction and demolition (C&D) waste. Under anaerobic conditions that dominate landfills, microbially mediated processes can convert sulfate to hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The presence of H2S in landfill gas is problematic for several reasons including its low odor threshold, human toxicity, and corrosive nature. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a laboratory-scale reactor method to measure the H2S production potential of a range of sulfur-containing wastes. The H2S production potential was measured in 8-L reactors that were filled with a mixture of the target waste, newsprint as a source of organic carbon required for microbial sulfate reduction, and leachate from decomposed residential MSW as an inoculum. Reactors were operated with and without N2 sparging through the reactors, which was designed to reduce H2S accumulation and toxicity. Both H2S and CH4 yields were consistently higher in reactors that were sparged with N2 although the magnitude of the effect varied. The laboratory-measured first order decay rate constants for H2S and CH4 production were used to estimate constants that were applicable in landfills. The estimated constants ranged from 0.11yr(-1) for C&D fines to 0.38yr(-1) for a mixed fly ash and bottom ash from MSW combustion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface analysis of localized corrosion of austenitic 316L and duplex 2205 stainless steels in simulated body solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter Manfred; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Jenko, M.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) studies of localized corrosion of duplex 2205 stainless steel (DSS 2205) and austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L in two model solutions, including artificial saliva (AS) and a simulated

  3. The calculation of chemical potential of organic solutes in dense liquid phases by using expanded ensemble Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jaeeon

    2009-08-21

    In this work, the chemical potentials of organic compounds in dense liquid phases are calculated by using expanded ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. To make insertion of a solute molecule efficiently, Lennard-Jones size parameters and bond lengths are varied with coupling parameter. A robust adaptive scheme is proposed in order to determine biasing weights during the simulation, which enhances the efficiency and applicability of the expanded ensemble method. Using the proposed simulation technique, chemical potentials of organic molecules in dense liquid phases are obtained from a single run of simulation. The excess chemical potentials of several hydrocarbon molecules including n-alkanes, benzene, toluene, and ethanol in aqueous phases at infinite dilution as well as in their pure liquid phases are calculated at 298 K and 1 atm, and simulation results are compared with experimental data.

  4. Potentiality of Eisenia fetida to degrade disposable paper cups-an ecofriendly solution to solid waste pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Karthika; Ganesan, Seethadevi; Muthunarayanan, Vasanthy; Vivek, Swabna; Sugumar, Susila; Munusamy, Vivekanadhan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to subject the post-consumer waste, namely paper cups for vermicomposting along with cow dung in three different ratios for a period of 90-140 days employing Eisenia fetida. The post-consumer wastes are a menace in many developing countries including India. This waste was provided as feed for earthworms and was converted to vermicompost. Vermicompost prepared with paper cup waste was analyzed for their physicochemical properties. Based on the physicochemical properties, it was evident that the best manure is obtained from type A (paper cup/cow dung in the ratio 1:1) than type B (paper cup/cow dung in the ratio 1.5:0.5) and type C (paper cup/cow dung in the ratio 0.5:1.5). The results showed that earthworms accelerated the rate of mineralization and converted the wastes into compost with needed elements which could support the growth of crop plants. The predominant bacterial strains in the vermicompost were characterized biochemically as well as by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. The bacterial strains like Bacillus anthracis (KM289159), Bacillus endophyticus (KM289167), Bacillus funiculus (KM289165), Virigibacillius chiquenigi (KM289163), Bacillus thuringiensis (KM289164), Bacillus cereus (KM289160), Bacillus toyonensis (KM289161), Acinetobacter baumanni (KM289162), and Lactobacillus pantheries (KM289166) were isolated and identified from the final compost. The total protein content of E. fetida involved in vermicomposting was extracted, and the banding pattern was analyzed. During final stages of vermicomposting, it was observed that the earthworm did not act on the plastic material coated inside the paper cups and stagnated it around the rim of the tub. Further, the degradation of paper cup waste was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Hence, vermicomposting was found to be an effective technology for the conversion of the paper cup waste material into a nutrient-rich manure, a value

  5. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  6. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Keil, F. J.; Smirnova, I.

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  7. Process performance of the pilot-scale in situ vitrification of a simulated waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.G.; Koegler, S.S.; Bates, S.O.

    1988-06-01

    Process feasibility studies have been successfully performed on three developmental scales to determine the potential for applying in situ vitrification to intermediate-level (low-level) waste placed in seepage pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the laboratory, testing was performed in crucibles containing a mixture of 50% ORNL soil and 50% limestone. In an engineering-scale test at Pacific Northwest Laboratory a /1/12/-scale simulation of an ORNL waste trench was constructed and vitrified, resulting in a waste product containing soil and limestone concentrations of 68 wt % and 32 wt %, respectively. In the pilot-scale test a /3/8/-scale simulation of the same trench was constructed and vitrified at ORNL, resulting in soil and limestone concentrations of 80% and 20%, respectively, in the waste product. Results of the three scales of testing indicate that the ORNL intermediate-level (low-level) waste sites can be successfully processed by in situ vitrification; the waste form will retain significant quantities of the cesium and strontium. Because cesium-137 and strontium-90 are the major components of the radionuclide inventory in the ORNL seepage pits and trenches, final field process decontamination factors (i.e., losses to the off-gas system relative to the waste inventory) of 1.0 E + 4 are desired to minimize activity buildup in the off-gas system. 17 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of packed-bed and fluidized-bed cell technology for the destruction and removal of contaminants in alkaline waste solutions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bockris, J.O.M.; Kim, Jinseong [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Surface Electrochemistry Laboratory

    1995-12-31

    Disposing of the large quantity of nuclear waste that has been produced within the DOE complex is an area of active research and development. Electrochemical processes have been reported for the treatment of alkaline wastes including the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of metals such as Tc and Ru. Electrolytic recovery of metals from dilute solution has been reported using conventional porous electrodes such as felt electrode and reticulated electrode, but use of such electrodes is limited. The pores of such electrodes become blocked as a consequence of metal deposition. If an attempt is made to regenerate these electrodes by dissolution of the deposited metals, oxygen evolution on the matrix competes with dissolution of metals deposited within the pores. On the other hand, the use of three dimensional packed-bed and fluidized-bed electrodes having large surface area per unit volume would offer an improvement on felt or reticulated system because of the greater ease of regeneration.

  9. Development of thermal conditioning technology for alpha-contaminated wastes: a study on leaching characteristics and long-term safety assessment of simulated waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yong Chil [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoo, Jong Ik; Choi, Yong Cheol [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Radioactive wastes sh